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Sample records for neurons coding action

  1. Code-specific learning rules improve action selection by populations of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Johannes; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Population coding is widely regarded as a key mechanism for achieving reliable behavioral decisions. We previously introduced reinforcement learning for population-based decision making by spiking neurons. Here we generalize population reinforcement learning to spike-based plasticity rules that take account of the postsynaptic neural code. We consider spike/no-spike, spike count and spike latency codes. The multi-valued and continuous-valued features in the postsynaptic code allow for a generalization of binary decision making to multi-valued decision making and continuous-valued action selection. We show that code-specific learning rules speed up learning both for the discrete classification and the continuous regression tasks. The suggested learning rules also speed up with increasing population size as opposed to standard reinforcement learning rules. Continuous action selection is further shown to explain realistic learning speeds in the Morris water maze. Finally, we introduce the concept of action perturbation as opposed to the classical weight- or node-perturbation as an exploration mechanism underlying reinforcement learning. Exploration in the action space greatly increases the speed of learning as compared to exploration in the neuron or weight space. PMID:24875790

  2. Neuronal codes for the inhibitory control of impulsive actions in the rat infralimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Ohmura, Yu; Izumi, Takeshi; Matsushima, Toshiya; Amita, Hidetoshi; Yamaguchi, Taku; Yoshida, Takayuki; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Poor impulse control is a debilitating condition observed in various psychiatric disorders and could be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. The rat infralimbic cortex (IL), located in the ventral portion of the medial prefrontal cortex, has been implicated in impulse control. To elucidate the neurophysiological basis of impulse control, we recorded single unit activity in the IL of a rat performing a 3-choiceserial reaction time task (3-CSRTT) and 2-choice task (2-CT), which are animal models for impulsivity. The inactivation of IL neuronal activity with an injection of muscimol (0.1 μg /side) disrupted impulse control in the 3-CSRTT. More than 60% (38/56) of isolated IL units were linked to impulse control, while approximately 30% of all units were linked to attentional function in the 3-CSRTT. To avoid confounding motor-related units with the impulse control-related units, we further conducted the 2-CT in which the animals' motor activities were restricted during recording window. More than 30% (14/44) of recorded IL units were linked to impulse control in the 2-CT. Several types of impulse control-related units were identified. Only 16% of all units were compatible with the results of the muscimol experiment, which showed a transient decline in the firing rate immediately before the release of behavioral inhibition. This is the first study to elucidate the neurophysiological basis of impulse control in the IL and to propose that IL neurons control impulsive actions in a more complex manner than previously considered. PMID:26341319

  3. The neuronal code(s) of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Heck, Detlef H; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Jaeger, Dieter; Khodakhah, Kamran; Person, Abigail L

    2013-11-01

    Understanding how neurons encode information in sequences of action potentials is of fundamental importance to neuroscience. The cerebellum is widely recognized for its involvement in the coordination of movements, which requires muscle activation patterns to be controlled with millisecond precision. Understanding how cerebellar neurons accomplish such high temporal precision is critical to understanding cerebellar function. Inhibitory Purkinje cells, the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex, and their postsynaptic target neurons in the cerebellar nuclei, fire action potentials at high, sustained frequencies, suggesting spike rate modulation as a possible code. Yet, millisecond precise spatiotemporal spike activity patterns in Purkinje cells and inferior olivary neurons have also been observed. These results and ongoing studies suggest that the neuronal code used by cerebellar neurons may span a wide time scale from millisecond precision to slow rate modulations, likely depending on the behavioral context. PMID:24198351

  4. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brea, Johanni; Gaál, Alexisz Tamás; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron’s firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ). PMID:27341100

  5. The Mirror Neuron System and Action Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buccino, Giovanni; Binkofski, Ferdinand; Riggio, Lucia

    2004-01-01

    Mirror neurons, first described in the rostral part of monkey ventral premotor cortex (area F5), discharge both when the animal performs a goal-directed hand action and when it observes another individual performing the same or a similar action. More recently, in the same area mirror neurons responding to the observation of mouth actions have been…

  6. The neuronal code for number.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Humans and non-human primates share an elemental quantification system that resides in a dedicated neural network in the parietal and frontal lobes. In this cortical network, 'number neurons' encode the number of elements in a set, its cardinality or numerosity, irrespective of stimulus appearance across sensory motor systems, and from both spatial and temporal presentation arrays. After numbers have been extracted from sensory input, they need to be processed to support goal-directed behaviour. Studying number neurons provides insights into how information is maintained in working memory and transformed in tasks that require rule-based decisions. Beyond an understanding of how cardinal numbers are encoded, number processing provides a window into the neuronal mechanisms of high-level brain functions. PMID:27150407

  7. Spike Code Flow in Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime; Kamimura, Takuya; Yagi, Yasushi; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We observed spike trains produced by one-shot electrical stimulation with 8 × 8 multielectrodes in cultured neuronal networks. Each electrode accepted spikes from several neurons. We extracted the short codes from spike trains and obtained a code spectrum with a nominal time accuracy of 1%. We then constructed code flow maps as movies of the electrode array to observe the code flow of "1101" and "1011," which are typical pseudorandom sequence such as that we often encountered in a literature and our experiments. They seemed to flow from one electrode to the neighboring one and maintained their shape to some extent. To quantify the flow, we calculated the "maximum cross-correlations" among neighboring electrodes, to find the direction of maximum flow of the codes with lengths less than 8. Normalized maximum cross-correlations were almost constant irrespective of code. Furthermore, if the spike trains were shuffled in interval orders or in electrodes, they became significantly small. Thus, the analysis suggested that local codes of approximately constant shape propagated and conveyed information across the network. Hence, the codes can serve as visible and trackable marks of propagating spike waves as well as evaluating information flow in the neuronal network. PMID:27217825

  8. Spike Code Flow in Cultured Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime; Kamimura, Takuya; Yagi, Yasushi; Mizuno-Matsumoto, Yuko; Chen, Yen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We observed spike trains produced by one-shot electrical stimulation with 8 × 8 multielectrodes in cultured neuronal networks. Each electrode accepted spikes from several neurons. We extracted the short codes from spike trains and obtained a code spectrum with a nominal time accuracy of 1%. We then constructed code flow maps as movies of the electrode array to observe the code flow of “1101” and “1011,” which are typical pseudorandom sequence such as that we often encountered in a literature and our experiments. They seemed to flow from one electrode to the neighboring one and maintained their shape to some extent. To quantify the flow, we calculated the “maximum cross-correlations” among neighboring electrodes, to find the direction of maximum flow of the codes with lengths less than 8. Normalized maximum cross-correlations were almost constant irrespective of code. Furthermore, if the spike trains were shuffled in interval orders or in electrodes, they became significantly small. Thus, the analysis suggested that local codes of approximately constant shape propagated and conveyed information across the network. Hence, the codes can serve as visible and trackable marks of propagating spike waves as well as evaluating information flow in the neuronal network. PMID:27217825

  9. Nonspatial Sequence Coding in CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Timothy A.; Salz, Daniel M.; McKenzie, Sam

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical to the memory for sequences of events, a defining feature of episodic memory. However, the fundamental neuronal mechanisms underlying this capacity remain elusive. While considerable research indicates hippocampal neurons can represent sequences of locations, direct evidence of coding for the memory of sequential relationships among nonspatial events remains lacking. To address this important issue, we recorded neural activity in CA1 as rats performed a hippocampus-dependent sequence-memory task. Briefly, the task involves the presentation of repeated sequences of odors at a single port and requires rats to identify each item as “in sequence” or “out of sequence”. We report that, while the animals' location and behavior remained constant, hippocampal activity differed depending on the temporal context of items—in this case, whether they were presented in or out of sequence. Some neurons showed this effect across items or sequence positions (general sequence cells), while others exhibited selectivity for specific conjunctions of item and sequence position information (conjunctive sequence cells) or for specific probe types (probe-specific sequence cells). We also found that the temporal context of individual trials could be accurately decoded from the activity of neuronal ensembles, that sequence coding at the single-cell and ensemble level was linked to sequence memory performance, and that slow-gamma oscillations (20–40 Hz) were more strongly modulated by temporal context and performance than theta oscillations (4–12 Hz). These findings provide compelling evidence that sequence coding extends beyond the domain of spatial trajectories and is thus a fundamental function of the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to remember the order of life events depends on the hippocampus, but the underlying neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by recording neural activity in hippocampal

  10. Correlation of action potentials in adjacent neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Pekker, M.

    2015-12-01

    A possible mechanism for the synchronization of action potential propagation along a bundle of neurons (ephaptic coupling) is considered. It is shown that this mechanism is similar to the salutatory conduction of the action potential between the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons. The proposed model allows us to estimate the scale of the correlation, i.e., the distance between neurons in the nervous tissue, wherein their synchronization becomes possible. The possibility for experimental verification of the proposed model of synchronization is discussed.

  11. High-Fidelity Coding with Correlated Neurons

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Rava Azeredo; Berry, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive correlations in the activity of neurons are widely observed in the brain. Previous studies have shown these correlations to be detrimental to the fidelity of population codes, or at best marginally favorable compared to independent codes. Here, we show that positive correlations can enhance coding performance by astronomical factors. Specifically, the probability of discrimination error can be suppressed by many orders of magnitude. Likewise, the number of stimuli encoded—the capacity—can be enhanced more than tenfold. These effects do not necessitate unrealistic correlation values, and can occur for populations with a few tens of neurons. We further show that both effects benefit from heterogeneity commonly seen in population activity. Error suppression and capacity enhancement rest upon a pattern of correlation. Tuning of one or several effective parameters can yield a limit of perfect coding: the corresponding pattern of positive correlation leads to a ‘lock-in’ of response probabilities that eliminates variability in the subspace relevant for stimulus discrimination. We discuss the nature of this pattern and we suggest experimental tests to identify it. PMID:25412463

  12. Context-dependent coding in single neurons.

    PubMed

    Mease, Rebecca A; Lee, SangWook; Moritz, Anna T; Powers, Randall K; Binder, Marc D; Fairhall, Adrienne L

    2014-12-01

    The linear-nonlinear cascade model (LN model) has proven very useful in representing a neural system's encoding properties, but has proven less successful in reproducing the firing patterns of individual neurons whose behavior is strongly dependent on prior firing history. While the cell's behavior can still usefully be considered as feature detection acting on a fluctuating input, some of the coding capacity of the cell is taken up by the increased firing rate due to a constant "driving" direct current (DC) stimulus. Furthermore, both the DC input and the post-spike refractory period generate regular firing, reducing the spike-timing entropy available for encoding time-varying fluctuations. In this paper, we address these issues, focusing on the example of motoneurons in which an afterhyperpolarization (AHP) current plays a dominant role regularizing firing behavior. We explore the accuracy and generalizability of several alternative models for single neurons under changes in DC and variance of the stimulus input. We use a motoneuron simulation to compare coding models in neurons with and without the AHP current. Finally, we quantify the tradeoff between instantaneously encoding information about fluctuations and about the DC. PMID:24990803

  13. A memristive spiking neuron with firing rate coding

    PubMed Central

    Ignatov, Marina; Ziegler, Martin; Hansen, Mirko; Petraru, Adrian; Kohlstedt, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Perception, decisions, and sensations are all encoded into trains of action potentials in the brain. The relation between stimulus strength and all-or-nothing spiking of neurons is widely believed to be the basis of this coding. This initiated the development of spiking neuron models; one of today's most powerful conceptual tool for the analysis and emulation of neural dynamics. The success of electronic circuit models and their physical realization within silicon field-effect transistor circuits lead to elegant technical approaches. Recently, the spectrum of electronic devices for neural computing has been extended by memristive devices, mainly used to emulate static synaptic functionality. Their capabilities for emulations of neural activity were recently demonstrated using a memristive neuristor circuit, while a memristive neuron circuit has so far been elusive. Here, a spiking neuron model is experimentally realized in a compact circuit comprising memristive and memcapacitive devices based on the strongly correlated electron material vanadium dioxide (VO2) and on the chemical electromigration cell Ag/TiO2−x/Al. The circuit can emulate dynamical spiking patterns in response to an external stimulus including adaptation, which is at the heart of firing rate coding as first observed by E.D. Adrian in 1926. PMID:26539074

  14. Astrocytic Actions on Extrasynaptic Neuronal Currents

    PubMed Central

    Pál, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, knowledge about astrocytic functions has significantly increased. It was demonstrated that astrocytes are not passive elements of the central nervous system (CNS), but active partners of neurons. There is a growing body of knowledge about the calcium excitability of astrocytes, the actions of different gliotransmitters and their release mechanisms, as well as the participation of astrocytes in the regulation of synaptic functions and their contribution to synaptic plasticity. However, astrocytic functions are even more complex than being a partner of the “tripartite synapse,” as they can influence extrasynaptic neuronal currents either by releasing substances or regulating ambient neurotransmitter levels. Several types of currents or changes of membrane potential with different kinetics and via different mechanisms can be elicited by astrocytic activity. Astrocyte-dependent phasic or tonic, inward or outward currents were described in several brain areas. Such currents, together with the synaptic actions of astrocytes, can contribute to neuromodulatory mechanisms, neurosensory and -secretory processes, cortical oscillatory activity, memory, and learning or overall neuronal excitability. This mini-review is an attempt to give a brief summary of astrocyte-dependent extrasynaptic neuronal currents and their possible functional significance. PMID:26696832

  15. Multiplexed coding by cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sungho; Negrello, Mario; Junker, Marc; Smilgin, Aleksandra; Thier, Peter; De Schutter, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje cells (PC), the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex, encode sensorimotor information, but how they do it remains a matter of debate. Here we show that PCs use a multiplexed spike code. Synchrony/spike time and firing rate encode different information in behaving monkeys during saccadic eye motion tasks. Using the local field potential (LFP) as a probe of local network activity, we found that infrequent pause spikes, which initiated or terminated intermittent pauses in simple spike trains, provide a temporally reliable signal for eye motion onset, with strong phase-coupling to the β/γ band LFP. Concurrently, regularly firing, non-pause spikes were weakly correlated with the LFP, but were crucial to linear encoding of eye movement kinematics by firing rate. Therefore, PC spike trains can simultaneously convey information necessary to achieve precision in both timing and continuous control of motion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13810.001 PMID:27458803

  16. Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Use Time and Rate Coding to Transmit Purkinje Neuron Pauses.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Shyam Kumar; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei convey the final output of the cerebellum to their targets in various parts of the brain. Within the cerebellum their direct upstream connections originate from inhibitory Purkinje neurons. Purkinje neurons have a complex firing pattern of regular spikes interrupted by intermittent pauses of variable length. How can the cerebellar nucleus process this complex input pattern? In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. Pause beginning synchronization produced a unique effect on nuclei neuron firing, while the effect of pause ending and pause overlapping synchronization could not be distinguished from each other. Pause beginning synchronization produced better time-locking of nuclear neurons for short length pauses. We also characterize the effect of pause length and spike jitter on the nuclear neuron firing. Additionally, we find that the rate of rebound responses in nuclear neurons after a synchronous pause is controlled by the firing rate of Purkinje neurons preceding it. PMID:26630202

  17. Simple models for reading neuronal population codes.

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H S; Sompolinsky, H

    1993-01-01

    In many neural systems, sensory information is distributed throughout a population of neurons. We study simple neural network models for extracting this information. The inputs to the networks are the stochastic responses of a population of sensory neurons tuned to directional stimuli. The performance of each network model in psychophysical tasks is compared with that of the optimal maximum likelihood procedure. As a model of direction estimation in two dimensions, we consider a linear network that computes a population vector. Its performance depends on the width of the population tuning curves and is maximal for width, which increases with the level of background activity. Although for narrowly tuned neurons the performance of the population vector is significantly inferior to that of maximum likelihood estimation, the difference between the two is small when the tuning is broad. For direction discrimination, we consider two models: a perceptron with fully adaptive weights and a network made by adding an adaptive second layer to the population vector network. We calculate the error rates of these networks after exhaustive training to a particular direction. By testing on the full range of possible directions, the extent of transfer of training to novel stimuli can be calculated. It is found that for threshold linear networks the transfer of perceptual learning is nonmonotonic. Although performance deteriorates away from the training stimulus, it peaks again at an intermediate angle. This nonmonotonicity provides an important psychophysical test of these models. PMID:8248166

  18. Synchronized action of synaptically coupled chaotic model neurons.

    PubMed

    Abarbanel, H D; Huerta, R; Rabinovich, M I; Rulkov, N F; Rowat, P F; Selverston, A I

    1996-11-15

    Experimental observations of the intracellular recorded electrical activity in individual neurons show that the temporal behavior is often chaotic. We discuss both our own observations on a cell from the stomatogastric central pattern generator of lobster and earlier observations in other cells. In this paper we work with models with chaotic neurons, building on models by Hindmarsh and Rose for bursting, spiking activity in neurons. The key feature of these simplified models of neurons is the presence of coupled slow and fast subsystems. We analyze the model neurons using the same tools employed in the analysis of our experimental data. We couple two model neurons both electrotonically and electrochemically in inhibitory and excitatory fashions. In each of these cases, we demonstrate that the model neurons can synchronize in phase and out of phase depending on the strength of the coupling. For normal synaptic coupling, we have a time delay between the action of one neuron and the response of the other. We also analyze how the synchronization depends on this delay. A rich spectrum of synchronized behaviors is possible for electrically coupled neurons and for inhibitory coupling between neurons. In synchronous neurons one typically sees chaotic motion of the coupled neurons. Excitatory coupling produces essentially periodic voltage trajectories, which are also synchronized. We display and discuss these synchronized behaviors using two "distance" measures of the synchronization. PMID:8888609

  19. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence. PMID:27239189

  20. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a “signature” of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence. PMID:27239189

  1. Correlated neuronal discharges that increase coding efficiency during perceptual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Romo, Ranulfo; Hernández, Adrián; Zainos, Antonio; Salinas, Emilio

    2003-05-22

    During a sensory discrimination task, the responses of multiple sensory neurons must be combined to generate a choice. The optimal combination of responses is determined both by their dependence on the sensory stimulus and by their cofluctuations across trials-that is, the noise correlations. Positively correlated noise is considered deleterious, because it limits the coding accuracy of populations of similarly tuned neurons. However, positively correlated fluctuations between differently tuned neurons actually increase coding accuracy, because they allow the common noise to be subtracted without signal loss. This is demonstrated with data recorded from the secondary somatosensory cortex of monkeys performing a vibrotactile discrimination task. The results indicate that positive correlations are not always harmful and may be exploited by cortical networks to enhance the neural representation of features to be discriminated. PMID:12765615

  2. Cracking Taste Codes by Tapping into Sensory Neuron Impulse Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marion E.; Lundy, Robert F.; Contreras, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Insights into the biological basis for mammalian taste quality coding began with electrophysiological recordings from “taste” nerves and this technique continues to produce essential information today. Chorda tympani (geniculate ganglion) neurons, which are particularly involved in taste quality discrimination, are specialists or generalists. Specialists respond to stimuli characterized by a single taste quality as defined by behavioral cross-generalization in conditioned taste tests. Generalists respond to electrolytes that elicit multiple aversive qualities. Na+-salt (N) specialists in rodents and sweet-stimulus (S) specialists in multiple orders of mammals are well-characterized. Specialists are associated with species’ nutritional needs and their activation is known to be malleable by internal physiological conditions and contaminated external caloric sources. S specialists, associated with the heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptor: T1R, and N specialists, associated with the epithelial sodium channel: ENaC, are consistent with labeled line coding from taste bud to afferent neuron. Yet, S-specialist neurons and behavior are less specific thanT1R2-3 in encompassing glutamate and E generalist neurons are much less specific than a candidate, PDK TRP channel, sour receptor in encompassing salts and bitter stimuli. Specialist labeled lines for nutrients and generalist patterns for aversive electrolytes may be transmitting taste information to the brain side by side. However, specific roles of generalists in taste quality coding may be resolved by selecting stimuli and stimulus levels found in natural situations. T2Rs, participating in reflexes via the glossopharynygeal nerve, became highly diversified in mammalian phylogenesis as they evolved to deal with dangerous substances within specific environmental niches. Establishing the information afferent neurons traffic to the brain about natural taste stimuli imbedded in dynamic complex mixtures will

  3. Extra-coding RNAs regulate neuronal DNA methylation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Savell, Katherine E; Gallus, Nancy V N; Simon, Rhiana C; Brown, Jordan A; Revanna, Jasmin S; Osborn, Mary Katherine; Song, Esther Y; O'Malley, John J; Stackhouse, Christian T; Norvil, Allison; Gowher, Humaira; Sweatt, J David; Day, Jeremy J

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are essential regulators of the function and information storage capacity of neurons. DNA methylation is highly dynamic in the developing and adult brain, and is actively regulated by neuronal activity and behavioural experiences. However, it is presently unclear how methylation status at individual genes is targeted for modification. Here, we report that extra-coding RNAs (ecRNAs) interact with DNA methyltransferases and regulate neuronal DNA methylation. Expression of ecRNA species is associated with gene promoter hypomethylation, is altered by neuronal activity, and is overrepresented at genes involved in neuronal function. Knockdown of the Fos ecRNA locus results in gene hypermethylation and mRNA silencing, and hippocampal expression of Fos ecRNA is required for long-term fear memory formation in rats. These results suggest that ecRNAs are fundamental regulators of DNA methylation patterns in neuronal systems, and reveal a promising avenue for therapeutic targeting in neuropsychiatric disease states. PMID:27384705

  4. Extra-coding RNAs regulate neuronal DNA methylation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Savell, Katherine E.; Gallus, Nancy V. N.; Simon, Rhiana C.; Brown, Jordan A.; Revanna, Jasmin S.; Osborn, Mary Katherine; Song, Esther Y.; O'Malley, John J.; Stackhouse, Christian T.; Norvil, Allison; Gowher, Humaira; Sweatt, J. David; Day, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are essential regulators of the function and information storage capacity of neurons. DNA methylation is highly dynamic in the developing and adult brain, and is actively regulated by neuronal activity and behavioural experiences. However, it is presently unclear how methylation status at individual genes is targeted for modification. Here, we report that extra-coding RNAs (ecRNAs) interact with DNA methyltransferases and regulate neuronal DNA methylation. Expression of ecRNA species is associated with gene promoter hypomethylation, is altered by neuronal activity, and is overrepresented at genes involved in neuronal function. Knockdown of the Fos ecRNA locus results in gene hypermethylation and mRNA silencing, and hippocampal expression of Fos ecRNA is required for long-term fear memory formation in rats. These results suggest that ecRNAs are fundamental regulators of DNA methylation patterns in neuronal systems, and reveal a promising avenue for therapeutic targeting in neuropsychiatric disease states. PMID:27384705

  5. Neuronal code for extended time in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mankin, Emily A.; Sparks, Fraser T.; Slayyeh, Begum; Sutherland, Robert J.; Leutgeb, Stefan; Leutgeb, Jill K.

    2012-01-01

    The time when an event occurs can become part of autobiographical memories. In brain structures that support such memories, a neural code should exist that represents when or how long ago events occurred. Here we describe a neuronal coding mechanism in hippocampus that can be used to represent the recency of an experience over intervals of hours to days. When the same event is repeated after such time periods, the activity patterns of hippocampal CA1 cell populations progressively differ with increasing temporal distances. Coding for space and context is nonetheless preserved. Compared with CA1, the firing patterns of hippocampal CA3 cell populations are highly reproducible, irrespective of the time interval, and thus provide a stable memory code over time. Therefore, the neuronal activity patterns in CA1 but not CA3 include a code that can be used to distinguish between time intervals on an extended scale, consistent with behavioral studies showing that the CA1 area is selectively required for temporal coding over such periods. PMID:23132944

  6. Energy coding in neural network with inhibitory neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyin; Wang, Rubin; Fang, Ruiyan

    2015-04-01

    This paper aimed at assessing and comparing the effects of the inhibitory neurons in the neural network on the neural energy distribution, and the network activities in the absence of the inhibitory neurons to understand the nature of neural energy distribution and neural energy coding. Stimulus, synchronous oscillation has significant difference between neural networks with and without inhibitory neurons, and this difference can be quantitatively evaluated by the characteristic energy distribution. In addition, the synchronous oscillation difference of the neural activity can be quantitatively described by change of the energy distribution if the network parameters are gradually adjusted. Compared with traditional method of correlation coefficient analysis, the quantitative indicators based on nervous energy distribution characteristics are more effective in reflecting the dynamic features of the neural network activities. Meanwhile, this neural coding method from a global perspective of neural activity effectively avoids the current defects of neural encoding and decoding theory and enormous difficulties encountered. Our studies have shown that neural energy coding is a new coding theory with high efficiency and great potential. PMID:25806094

  7. Stimulus Coding and Synchrony in Stochastic Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieniak, Jakub

    A stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire neuron model was implemented in this study to simulate the spiking activity of the electrosensory "P-unit" receptor neurons of the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In the context of sensory coding, these cells have been previously shown to respond in experiment to natural random narrowband signals with either a linear or nonlinear coding scheme, depending on the intrinsic firing rate of the cell in the absence of external stimulation. It was hypothesised in this study that this duality is due to the relation of the stimulus to the neuron's excitation threshold. This hypothesis was validated with the model by lowering the threshold of the neuron or increasing its intrinsic noise, or randomness, either of which made the relation between firing rate and input strength more linear. Furthermore, synchronous P-unit firing to a common input also plays a role in decoding the stimulus at deeper levels of the neural pathways. Synchronisation and desynchronisation between multiple model responses for different types of natural communication signals were shown to agree with experimental observations. A novel result of resonance-induced synchrony enhancement of P-units to certain communication frequencies was also found.

  8. Identifying Temporal Codes in Spontaneously Active Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, Alexander B.; Russell, David F.; Rowe, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    The manner in which information is encoded in neural signals is a major issue in Neuroscience. A common distinction is between rate codes, where information in neural responses is encoded as the number of spikes within a specified time frame (encoding window), and temporal codes, where the position of spikes within the encoding window carries some or all of the information about the stimulus. One test for the existence of a temporal code in neural responses is to add artificial time jitter to each spike in the response, and then assess whether or not information in the response has been degraded. If so, temporal encoding might be inferred, on the assumption that the jitter is small enough to alter the position, but not the number, of spikes within the encoding window. Here, the effects of artificial jitter on various spike train and information metrics were derived analytically, and this theory was validated using data from afferent neurons of the turtle vestibular and paddlefish electrosensory systems, and from model neurons. We demonstrate that the jitter procedure will degrade information content even when coding is known to be entirely by rate. For this and additional reasons, we conclude that the jitter procedure by itself is not sufficient to establish the presence of a temporal code. PMID:22087303

  9. A neuronal learning rule for sub-millisecond temporal coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstner, Wulfram; Kempter, Richard; van Hemmen, J. Leo; Wagner, Hermann

    1996-09-01

    A PARADOX that exists in auditory and electrosensory neural systems1,2 is that they encode behaviourally relevant signals in the range of a few microseconds with neurons that are at least one order of magnitude slower. The importance of temporal coding in neural information processing is not clear yet3-8. A central question is whether neuronal firing can be more precise than the time constants of the neuronal processes involved9. Here we address this problem using the auditory system of the barn owl as an example. We present a modelling study based on computer simulations of a neuron in the laminar nucleus. Three observations explain the paradox. First, spiking of an 'integrate-and-fire' neuron driven by excitatory postsynaptic potentials with a width at half-maximum height of 250 μs, has an accuracy of 25 μs if the presynaptic signals arrive coherently. Second, the necessary degree of coherence in the signal arrival times can be attained during ontogenetic development by virtue of an unsupervised hebbian learning rule. Learning selects connections with matching delays from a broad distribution of axons with random delays. Third, the learning rule also selects the correct delays from two independent groups of inputs, for example, from the left and right ear.

  10. Thyroid hormone action: astrocyte-neuron communication.

    PubMed

    Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) action is exerted mainly through regulation of gene expression by binding of T3 to the nuclear receptors. T4 plays an important role as a source of intracellular T3 in the central nervous system via the action of the type 2 deiodinase (D2), expressed in the astrocytes. A model of T3 availability to neural cells has been proposed and validated. The model contemplates that brain T3 has a double origin: a fraction is available directly from the circulation, and another is produced locally from T4 in the astrocytes by D2. The fetal brain depends almost entirely on the T3 generated locally. The contribution of systemic T3 increases subsequently during development to account for approximately 50% of total brain T3 in the late postnatal and adult stages. In this article, we review the experimental data in support of this model, and how the factors affecting T3 availability in the brain, such as deiodinases and transporters, play a decisive role in modulating local TH action during development. PMID:24910631

  11. Thyroid Hormone Action: Astrocyte–Neuron Communication

    PubMed Central

    Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) action is exerted mainly through regulation of gene expression by binding of T3 to the nuclear receptors. T4 plays an important role as a source of intracellular T3 in the central nervous system via the action of the type 2 deiodinase (D2), expressed in the astrocytes. A model of T3 availability to neural cells has been proposed and validated. The model contemplates that brain T3 has a double origin: a fraction is available directly from the circulation, and another is produced locally from T4 in the astrocytes by D2. The fetal brain depends almost entirely on the T3 generated locally. The contribution of systemic T3 increases subsequently during development to account for approximately 50% of total brain T3 in the late postnatal and adult stages. In this article, we review the experimental data in support of this model, and how the factors affecting T3 availability in the brain, such as deiodinases and transporters, play a decisive role in modulating local TH action during development. PMID:24910631

  12. Neural Coding of Cooperative vs. Affective Human Interactions: 150 ms to Code the Action's Purpose

    PubMed Central

    Proverbio, Alice Mado; Riva, Federica; Paganelli, Laura; Cappa, Stefano F.; Canessa, Nicola; Perani, Daniela; Zani, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The timing and neural processing of the understanding of social interactions was investigated by presenting scenes in which 2 people performed cooperative or affective actions. While the role of the human mirror neuron system (MNS) in understanding actions and intentions is widely accepted, little is known about the time course within which these aspects of visual information are automatically extracted. Event-Related Potentials were recorded in 35 university students perceiving 260 pictures of cooperative (e.g., 2 people dragging a box) or affective (e.g., 2 people smiling and holding hands) interactions. The action's goal was automatically discriminated at about 150–170 ms, as reflected by occipito/temporal N170 response. The swLORETA inverse solution revealed the strongest sources in the right posterior cingulate cortex (CC) for affective actions and in the right pSTS for cooperative actions. It was found a right hemispheric asymmetry that involved the fusiform gyrus (BA37), the posterior CC, and the medial frontal gyrus (BA10/11) for the processing of affective interactions, particularly in the 155–175 ms time window. In a later time window (200–250 ms) the processing of cooperative interactions activated the left post-central gyrus (BA3), the left parahippocampal gyrus, the left superior frontal gyrus (BA10), as well as the right premotor cortex (BA6). Women showed a greater response discriminative of the action's goal compared to men at P300 and anterior negativity level (220–500 ms). These findings might be related to a greater responsiveness of the female vs. male MNS. In addition, the discriminative effect was bilateral in women and was smaller and left-sided in men. Evidence was provided that perceptually similar social interactions are discriminated on the basis of the agents' intentions quite early in neural processing, differentially activating regions devoted to face/body/action coding, the limbic system and the MNS. PMID:21760948

  13. The Mirror Neuron System: Grasping Others' Actions from Birth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lepage, Jean-Francois; Theoret, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    In the adult human brain, the presence of a system matching the observation and the execution of actions is well established. This mechanism is thought to rely primarily on the contribution of so-called "mirror neurons", cells that are active when a specific gesture is executed as well as when it is seen or heard. Despite the wealth of evidence…

  14. Coding movement direction by burst firing in electrosensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Khosravi-Hashemi, Navid; Fortune, Eric S; Chacron, Maurice J

    2011-10-01

    Directional selectivity, in which neurons respond strongly to an object moving in a given direction ("preferred") but respond weakly or not at all to an object moving in the opposite direction ("null"), is a critical computation achieved in brain circuits. Previous measures of direction selectivity have compared the numbers of action potentials elicited by each direction of movement, but most sensory neurons display patterning, such as bursting, in their spike trains. To examine the contribution of patterned responses to direction selectivity, we recorded from midbrain neurons in weakly electric fish and found that most neurons responded with a combination of both bursts and isolated spikes to moving object stimuli. In these neurons, we separated bursts and isolated spikes using an interspike interval (ISI) threshold. The directional bias of bursts was significantly higher than that of either the full spike train or the isolated spike train. To examine the encoding and decoding of bursts, we built biologically plausible models that examine 1) the upstream mechanisms that generate these spiking patterns and 2) downstream decoders of bursts. Our model of upstream mechanisms uses an interaction between afferent input and subthreshold calcium channels to give rise to burst firing that occurs preferentially for one direction of movement. We tested this model in vivo by application of calcium antagonists, which reduced burst firing and eliminated the differences in direction selectivity between bursts, isolated spikes, and the full spike train. Our model of downstream decoders used strong synaptic facilitation to achieve qualitatively similar results to those obtained using the ISI threshold criterion. This model shows that direction selective information carried by bursts can be decoded by downstream neurons using biophysically plausible mechanisms. PMID:21775723

  15. The adrenergic-neurone blocking action of some coumaran compounds

    PubMed Central

    Fielden, R.; Roe, A. M.; Willey, G. L.

    1964-01-01

    Ethyldimethyl(7-methylcoumaran-3-yl)ammonium iodide (SK&F 90,109) and its guanidine analogue [N-(7-methylcoumaran-3-yl)guanidine nitrate] (SK&F 90,238) abolish the effects of adrenergic nerve stimulation in cats, as do xylocholine and bretylium. SK&F 90,109 has slight sympathomimetic actions; these are less marked than in SK&F 90,238. Large doses of SK&F 90,109 have an action, dependent on local noradrenaline stores, that delays the appearance of adrenergic-neurone blockade in conscious cats. Responses to adrenaline are, in general, enhanced by each drug, but SK&F 90,238 transiently antagonizes tachycardia induced by adrenaline and isoprenaline. Both drugs inhibit the release of noradrenaline from the spleen during splenic nerve stimulation, but the release of catechol amines from the adrenal glands, in response to electrical or chemical stimulation, is unimpaired. In contrast to the prolonged adrenergic-neurone blocking action, any inhibition of the effects of cholinergic nerve stimulation is transient. Large intravenous doses produce neuromuscular blockade. The compounds have a slight central depressant action. In contrast to reserpine and guanethidine the noradrenaline content of rat hearts is not appreciably lowered 24 hr after a single dose of either drug. Unlike xylocholine they are not local anaesthetics. Related compounds also block the effects of adrenergic-nerve stimulation. The possible modes of action of these drugs are discussed. PMID:14256809

  16. Analyses of rapid estrogen actions on rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kow, Lee-Ming; Pataky, Stefan; Dupré, Christophe; Phan, Anna; Martin-Alguacil, Nieves; Pfaff, Donald W

    2016-07-01

    Rapid estrogen actions are widely diverse across many cell types. We conducted a series of electrophysiological studies on single rat hypothalamic neurons and found that estradiol (E2) could rapidly and independently potentiate neuronal excitation/depolarizations induced by histamine (HA) and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA). Now, the present whole-cell patch study was designed to determine whether E2 potentiates HA and NMDA depolarizations - mediated by distinctly different types of receptors - by the same or by different mechanisms. For this, the actions of HA, NMDA, as well as E2, were investigated first using various ion channel blockers and then by analyzing and comparing their channel activating characteristics. Results indicate that: first, both HA and NMDA depolarize neurons by inhibiting K(+) currents. Second, E2 potentiates both HA and NMDA depolarizations by enhancing the inhibition of K(+) currents, an inhibition caused by the two transmitters. Third, E2 employs the very same mechanism, the enhancement of K(+) current inhibition, thus to rapidly potentiate HA and NMDA depolarizations. These data are of behavioral importance, since the rapid E2 potentiation of depolarization synergizes with nuclear genomic actions of E2 to facilitate lordosis behavior, the primary female-typical reproductive behavior. PMID:27017919

  17. Action-space coding in social contexts.

    PubMed

    Ciardo, Francesca; Lugli, Luisa; Nicoletti, Roberto; Rubichi, Sandro; Iani, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    In two behavioural experiments we tested whether performing a spatial task along with another agent changes space representation by rendering some reference frames more/less salient than others. To this end, we used a Simon task in which stimuli were presented in four horizontal locations thus allowing for spatial coding according to multiple frames of reference. In Experiment 1 participants performed a go/no-go Simon task along another agent, each being in charge of one response. In Experiment 2 they performed a two-choice Simon task along another agent, each being in charge of two responses. Results showed that when participants were in charge of only one response, stimulus position was coded only with reference to the centre of the screen hence suggesting that the co-actor's response, or the position of the co-actor, was represented and used as a reference for spatial coding. Differently, when participants were in charge of two responses, no effect of the social context emerged and spatial coding relied on multiple frames of reference, similarly to when the Simon task is performed individually. These findings provide insights on the influence played by the interaction between the social context (i.e. the presence of others) and task features on individual performance. PMID:26940396

  18. Action-space coding in social contexts

    PubMed Central

    Ciardo, Francesca; Lugli, Luisa; Nicoletti, Roberto; Rubichi, Sandro; Iani, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    In two behavioural experiments we tested whether performing a spatial task along with another agent changes space representation by rendering some reference frames more/less salient than others. To this end, we used a Simon task in which stimuli were presented in four horizontal locations thus allowing for spatial coding according to multiple frames of reference. In Experiment 1 participants performed a go/no-go Simon task along another agent, each being in charge of one response. In Experiment 2 they performed a two-choice Simon task along another agent, each being in charge of two responses. Results showed that when participants were in charge of only one response, stimulus position was coded only with reference to the centre of the screen hence suggesting that the co-actor’s response, or the position of the co-actor, was represented and used as a reference for spatial coding. Differently, when participants were in charge of two responses, no effect of the social context emerged and spatial coding relied on multiple frames of reference, similarly to when the Simon task is performed individually. These findings provide insights on the influence played by the interaction between the social context (i.e. the presence of others) and task features on individual performance. PMID:26940396

  19. Temporal coding of odor mixtures in an olfactory receptor neuron

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Ying; Martelli, Carlotta; Emonet, Thierry; Carlson, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Most natural odors are mixtures and often elicit percepts distinct from those elicited by their constituents. This emergence of a unique odor quality has long been attributed to central processing. Here we show that sophisticated integration of olfactory information begins in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in Drosophila. Odor mixtures are encoded in the temporal dynamics as well as in the magnitudes of ORN responses. ORNs can respond to an inhibitory odorant with different durations depending on the level of background excitation. ORNs respond to mixtures with distinctive temporal dynamics that reflect the physicochemical properties of the constituent odorants. The insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), which attenuates odor responses of multiple ORNs, differs from an ORN-specific inhibitor in its effects on temporal dynamics. Our analysis reveals a means by which integration of information from odor mixtures begins in ORNs and provides insight into the contribution of inhibitory stimuli to sensory coding. PMID:21383179

  20. Economic risk coding by single neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Martin; Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Risk is a ubiquitous feature of the environment for all organisms. Very few things in life are achieved with absolute certainty. Therefore, it is essential that organisms process risky information efficiently to promote adaptive behaviour and enhance survival. Here we outline a clear definition of economic risk derived from economic theory and focus on two experiments in which we have shown subpopulations of single neurons in the orbitofrontal cortex of rhesus macaques that code either economic risk per se or an error-related risk signal, namely a risk prediction error. These biological risk signals are essential for processing and updating risky information in the environment to contribute to efficient decision making and adaptive behaviour. PMID:24954027

  1. Olfactory receptor neuron responses coding for rapid odour sampling

    PubMed Central

    Ghatpande, Ambarish S; Reisert, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vertebrate olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) are stimulated in a rhythmic manner in vivo, driven by delivery of odorants to the nasal cavity carried by the inhaled air, making olfaction a sense where animals can control the frequency of stimulus delivery. How ORNs encode repeated stimulation at resting, low breathing frequencies and at increased sniffing frequencies is not known, nor is it known if the olfactory transduction cascade is accurate and fast enough to follow high frequency stimulation. We investigated mouse olfactory responses to stimulus frequencies mimicking odorant exposure during low (2 Hz) and high (5 Hz) frequency sniffing. ORNs reliably follow low frequency stimulations with high fidelity by generating bursts of action potentials at each stimulation at intermediate odorant concentrations, but fail to do so at high odorant concentrations. Higher stimulus frequencies across all odorant concentrations reduced the likelihood of action potential generation, increased the latency of response, and decreased the reliability of encoding the onset of stimulation. Thus an increase in stimulus frequency degrades and at high odorant concentrations entirely prevents action potential generation in individual ORNs, causing reduced signalling to the olfactory bulb. These results demonstrate that ORNs do not simply relay timing and concentration of an odorous stimulus, but also process and modulate the stimulus in a frequency-dependent manner which is controlled by the chosen sniffing rate. PMID:21486768

  2. Position and locality constrained soft coding for human action recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Liu, Yu; Xiao, Wenhua; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Maojun

    2013-10-01

    Although the traditional bag-of-words model has shown promising results for human action recognition, in the feature coding phase, the ambiguous features from different body parts are still difficult to distinguish. Furthermore, it also suffers from serious representation error. We propose an innovative coding strategy called position and locality constrained soft coding (PLSC) to overcome these limitations. PLSC uses the feature position in a human oriented region of interest (ROI) to distinguish the ambiguous features. We first construct a subdictionary for each feature by selecting the bases from their spatial neighbor in human ROI. Then, a modified soft coding with locality constraint is adopted to alleviate the quantization error and preserve the manifold structure of features. This novel coding algorithm increases both the representation accuracy and discriminative power with low computational cost. The human action recognition experimental results on KTH, Weizmann, and UCF sports datasets show that PLSC can achieve a better performance than previous competing feature coding methods.

  3. User's manual to the ACTION computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    The form and interpretation of input and output data are defined. The Analysis of Crash Transients in Inelastic and Geometrically Nonlinear structures program (ACTION) performs nonlinear transient response analysis of structures subjected to time varying loads, allowing for nonlinear, time independent material properties and large geometry changes.

  4. Rapid Direct Action of Estradiol in GnRH Neurons: Findings and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kenealy, Brian P.; Terasawa, E.

    2011-01-01

    Estradiol plays a pivotal role in the control of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal function and female reproduction. While positive and negative feedback actions of estradiol that enhance and suppress release of GnRH and LH are primarily mediated through estrogen receptor alpha located in interneurons, a series of recent studies in our laboratory indicate that rapid excitatory actions of estradiol also directly modify GnRH neuronal activity. We observed this phenomenon in cultured primate GnRH neurons, but similar rapid direct actions of estradiol are also described in cultured GnRH neurons and green fluorescent protein-labeled GnRH neurons of mice. Importantly, rapid direct action of estradiol in GnRH neurons is mediated through membrane or membrane associated receptors, such as GPR30, STX-sensitive receptors, and ERβ. In this review, possible implications of this rapid estradiol action in GnRH neurons are discussed. PMID:22654841

  5. Onset Dynamics of Action Potentials in Rat Neocortical Neurons and Identified Snail Neurons: Quantification of the Difference

    PubMed Central

    Volgushev, Maxim; Malyshev, Aleksey; Balaban, Pavel; Chistiakova, Marina; Volgushev, Stanislav; Wolf, Fred

    2008-01-01

    The generation of action potentials (APs) is a key process in the operation of nerve cells and the communication between neurons. Action potentials in mammalian central neurons are characterized by an exceptionally fast onset dynamics, which differs from the typically slow and gradual onset dynamics seen in identified snail neurons. Here we describe a novel method of analysis which provides a quantitative measure of the onset dynamics of action potentials. This method captures the difference between the fast, step-like onset of APs in rat neocortical neurons and the gradual, exponential-like AP onset in identified snail neurons. The quantitative measure of the AP onset dynamics, provided by the method, allows us to perform quantitative analyses of factors influencing the dynamics. PMID:18398478

  6. Leptin modulates nutrient reward via inhibitory galanin action on orexin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Laque, Amanda; Yu, Sangho; Qualls-Creekmore, Emily; Gettys, Sarah; Schwartzenburg, Candice; Bui, Kelly; Rhodes, Christopher; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Morrison, Christopher D.; Richards, Brenda K.; Münzberg, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Objective Leptin modulates food reward via central leptin receptor (LepRb) expressing neurons. Food reward requires stimulation of midbrain dopamine neurons and is modulated by central leptin action, but the exact central mechanisms remain unclear. Stimulatory and inhibitory leptin actions on dopamine neurons have been reported, e.g. by indirect actions on orexin neurons or via direct innervation of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. Methods We showed earlier that LepRb neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LHA) co-express the inhibitory acting neuropeptide galanin (GAL-LepRb neurons). We studied the involvement of GAL-LepRb neurons to regulate nutrient reward in mice with selective LepRb deletion from galanin neurons (GAL-LepRbKO mice). Results We found that the rewarding value and preference for sucrose over fat was increased in GAL-LepRbKO mice compared to controls. LHA GAL-LepRb neurons innervate orexin neurons, but not the VTA. Further, expression of galanin and its receptor GalR1 are decreased in the LHA of GAL-LepRbKO mice, resulting in increased activation of orexin neurons. Conclusion We suggest galanin as an important mediator of leptin action to modulate nutrient reward by inhibiting orexin neurons. PMID:26500842

  7. Dipole characterization of single neurons from their extracellular action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial variation of the extracellular action potentials (EAP) of a single neuron contains information about the size and location of the dominant current source of its action potential generator, which is typically in the vicinity of the soma. Using this dependence in reverse in a three-component realistic probe + brain + source model, we solved the inverse problem of characterizing the equivalent current source of an isolated neuron from the EAP data sampled by an extracellular probe at multiple independent recording locations. We used a dipole for the model source because there is extensive evidence it accurately captures the spatial roll-off of the EAP amplitude, and because, as we show, dipole localization, beyond a minimum cell-probe distance, is a more accurate alternative to approaches based on monopole source models. Dipole characterization is separable into a linear dipole moment optimization where the dipole location is fixed, and a second, nonlinear, global optimization of the source location. We solved the linear optimization on a discrete grid via the lead fields of the probe, which can be calculated for any realistic probe + brain model by the finite element method. The global source location was optimized by means of Tikhonov regularization that jointly minimizes model error and dipole size. The particular strategy chosen reflects the fact that the dipole model is used in the near field, in contrast to the typical prior applications of dipole models to EKG and EEG source analysis. We applied dipole localization to data collected with stepped tetrodes whose detailed geometry was measured via scanning electron microscopy. The optimal dipole could account for 96% of the power in the spatial variation of the EAP amplitude. Among various model error contributions to the residual, we address especially the error in probe geometry, and the extent to which it biases estimates of dipole parameters. This dipole characterization method can be applied to

  8. Neurochemical codes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons activated by glucoprivation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lindsay M; Kumar, Natasha N; Lonergan, Tina; Goodchild, Ann K

    2013-08-15

    Glucoprivation or hypoglycemia induces a range of counterregulatory responses, including glucose mobilization, reduced glucose utilization, and de novo glucose synthesis. These responses are mediated in part by the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical codes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) activated by glucoprivation, induced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG). SPN controlling the adrenal glands and celiac ganglia, which ultimately can innervate the liver and pancreas, were targeted together with the superior cervical ganglia (control). 23.9% ± 1.3% of SPN in the T4-T11 region contained c-Fos immunoreactivity following 2DG; 70.3% ± 1.8% of SPN innervating the adrenal glands and 37.4% ± 3% of SPN innervating celiac ganglia were activated. 14.8% ± 3.5% of SPN (C8-T3) innervating superior cervical ganglia were activated. In the C8-T3 region 55% ± 10% of SPN activated contained PPCART, with only 12% ± 3% expressing PPE mRNA, whereas, in the T4-T11 region, 78% ± 4% contained PPE, with only 6.0% ± 0.6% expressing PPCART mRNA. Thus CART is not involved in glucose mobilization. Two chemically distinct populations of SPN (PPE⁺ 57.4% ± 5%, PPE⁻ ∼40%) were identified to regulate adrenaline release in response to glucoprivation. Multiple chemically distinct SPN populations innervating a specific target could suggest their graded recruitment. The two distinct populations of SPN (PPE⁺ 67.6% ± 9%, PPE⁻ ∼30%) projecting to celiac ganglia activated by glucoprivation could direct pancreatic and hepatic or other counterregulatory responses. Nearly all SPN that expressed PPE mRNA and projected to the adrenal glands or celiac ganglia were activated, suggesting a role for the inhibitory peptide enkephalin in responses evoked by glucoprivation. PMID:23348748

  9. Energy-efficient population coding constrains network size of a neuronal array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lianchun; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    We consider the open issue of how the energy efficiency of the neural information transmission process, in a general neuronal array, constrains the network size, and how well this network size ensures the reliable transmission of neural information in a noisy environment. By direct mathematical analysis, we have obtained general solutions proving that there exists an optimal number of neurons in the network, where the average coding energy cost (defined as energy consumption divided by mutual information) per neuron passes through a global minimum for both subthreshold and superthreshold signals. With increases in background noise intensity, the optimal neuronal number decreases for subthreshold signals and increases for suprathreshold signals. The existence of an optimal number of neurons in an array network reveals a general rule for population coding that states that the neuronal number should be large enough to ensure reliable information transmission that is robust to the noisy environment but small enough to minimize energy cost.

  10. Energy-efficient population coding constrains network size of a neuronal array system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lianchun; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    We consider the open issue of how the energy efficiency of the neural information transmission process, in a general neuronal array, constrains the network size, and how well this network size ensures the reliable transmission of neural information in a noisy environment. By direct mathematical analysis, we have obtained general solutions proving that there exists an optimal number of neurons in the network, where the average coding energy cost (defined as energy consumption divided by mutual information) per neuron passes through a global minimum for both subthreshold and superthreshold signals. With increases in background noise intensity, the optimal neuronal number decreases for subthreshold signals and increases for suprathreshold signals. The existence of an optimal number of neurons in an array network reveals a general rule for population coding that states that the neuronal number should be large enough to ensure reliable information transmission that is robust to the noisy environment but small enough to minimize energy cost. PMID:26781354

  11. Energy-efficient population coding constrains network size of a neuronal array system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lianchun; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    We consider the open issue of how the energy efficiency of the neural information transmission process, in a general neuronal array, constrains the network size, and how well this network size ensures the reliable transmission of neural information in a noisy environment. By direct mathematical analysis, we have obtained general solutions proving that there exists an optimal number of neurons in the network, where the average coding energy cost (defined as energy consumption divided by mutual information) per neuron passes through a global minimum for both subthreshold and superthreshold signals. With increases in background noise intensity, the optimal neuronal number decreases for subthreshold signals and increases for suprathreshold signals. The existence of an optimal number of neurons in an array network reveals a general rule for population coding that states that the neuronal number should be large enough to ensure reliable information transmission that is robust to the noisy environment but small enough to minimize energy cost. PMID:26781354

  12. Interpersonal predictive coding, not action perception, is impaired in autism

    PubMed Central

    von der Lühe, T.; Manera, V.; Barisic, I.; Becchio, C.; Vogeley, K.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine interpersonal predictive coding in individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA). Healthy and HFA participants observed point-light displays of two agents (A and B) performing separate actions. In the ‘communicative’ condition, the action performed by agent B responded to a communicative gesture performed by agent A. In the ‘individual’ condition, agent A's communicative action was substituted by a non-communicative action. Using a simultaneous masking-detection task, we demonstrate that observing agent A's communicative gesture enhanced visual discrimination of agent B for healthy controls, but not for participants with HFA. These results were not explained by differences in attentional factors as measured via eye-tracking, or by differences in the recognition of the point-light actions employed. Our findings, therefore, suggest that individuals with HFA are impaired in the use of social information to predict others' actions and provide behavioural evidence that such deficits could be closely related to impairments of predictive coding. PMID:27069050

  13. Geometric constraints on neuronal connectivity facilitate a concise synaptic adhesive code

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; Baruch, Leehod; Shapiro, Ehud; Segal, Eran

    2008-01-01

    The nervous system contains trillions of neurons, each forming thousands of synaptic connections. It has been suggested that this complex connectivity is determined by a synaptic “adhesive code,” where connections are dictated by a variable set of cell surface proteins, combinations of which form neuronal addresses. The estimated number of neuronal addresses is orders of magnitude smaller than the number of neurons. Here, we show that the limited number of addresses dictates constraints on the possible neuronal network topologies. We show that to encode arbitrary networks, in which each neuron can potentially connect to any other neuron, the number of neuronal addresses needed scales linearly with network size. In contrast, the number of addresses needed to encode the wiring of geometric networks grows only as the square root of network size. The more efficient encoding in geometric networks is achieved through the reutilization of the same addresses in physically independent portions of the network. We also find that ordered geometric networks, in which the same connectivity patterns are iterated throughout the network, further reduce the required number of addresses. We demonstrate our findings using simulated networks and the C. elegans neuronal network. Geometric neuronal connectivity with recurring connectivity patterns have been suggested to confer an evolutionary advantage by saving biochemical resources on the one hand and reutilizing functionally efficient neuronal circuits. Our study suggests an additional advantage of these prominent topological features—the facilitation of the ability to genetically encode neuronal networks given constraints on the number of addresses. PMID:18583478

  14. Cracking the code of neuronal apoptosis and survival

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, S

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal apoptosis and survival are tightly controlled processes that regulate cell fate during the development of the central nervous system and its homeostasis throughout adulthood. A new study in primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons identified common transcriptional cascades during rescue from apoptosis by insulin-like growth factor-1 (Igf1) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (Pacap), thus suggesting the existence of a high degree of conservation of cell survival pathways. PMID:26539910

  15. Cracking the code of neuronal apoptosis and survival.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, S

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal apoptosis and survival are tightly controlled processes that regulate cell fate during the development of the central nervous system and its homeostasis throughout adulthood. A new study in primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons identified common transcriptional cascades during rescue from apoptosis by insulin-like growth factor-1 (Igf1) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (Pacap), thus suggesting the existence of a high degree of conservation of cell survival pathways. PMID:26539910

  16. Direct action of low doses of radiation of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Peimer, S.I.; Dudkin, A.O.; Sverdlov, A.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors experiment with new technology of surviving mammalian brain sections for the detection of the direct action of ionizing radiation on the functioning neurons of mammals. The authors selected the rat hippocampus as the object of investigation. Sections of the hippocampus were prepared according to standard procedure, 0.3 mm thick, and incubated for several hours under the following conditions: temperature 35.5/sup 0/C, rate of perfusion 2-3 ml/min, rate of delivery of a mixture of oxygen (95%), and carbon monoxide (5%), in the perfusion solution 35 ml/min. Composition of solution (mM): NaCl 124, KCl 5, CACl/sub 2/ 2.4, MgSO/sub 4/ 1.3, NaHCO/sub 3/ 26, glucose 10; pH 7.4. In an individual series of experiments, calcium was not added to the solution, but an excess of magnesium ions was introduced up to 2.6 mM. Extracellular takeoffs were performed with glass microelectrodes. For irradiation, the authors used sources of x-rays and gamma radiation. In the 5-DI x-ray apparatus, the working voltage and current on the tube were 50 quanta and 8 mA, respectively; there were no filters. Gamma irradiation was performed using ampuls with the radionuclide cesium-137 (IGI-C-3 type), which can be delivered on a holder directly to the section for 1 min.

  17. Stimulus features coded by single neurons of a macaque body category selective patch

    PubMed Central

    Popivanov, Ivo D.; Schyns, Philippe G.; Vogels, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Body category-selective regions of the primate temporal cortex respond to images of bodies, but it is unclear which fragments of such images drive single neurons’ responses in these regions. Here we applied the Bubbles technique to the responses of single macaque middle superior temporal sulcus (midSTS) body patch neurons to reveal the image fragments the neurons respond to. We found that local image fragments such as extremities (limbs), curved boundaries, and parts of the torso drove the large majority of neurons. Bubbles revealed the whole body in only a few neurons. Neurons coded the features in a manner that was tolerant to translation and scale changes. Most image fragments were excitatory but for a few neurons both inhibitory and excitatory fragments (opponent coding) were present in the same image. The fragments we reveal here in the body patch with Bubbles differ from those suggested in previous studies of face-selective neurons in face patches. Together, our data indicate that the majority of body patch neurons respond to local image fragments that occur frequently, but not exclusively, in bodies, with a coding that is tolerant to translation and scale. Overall, the data suggest that the body category selectivity of the midSTS body patch depends more on the feature statistics of bodies (e.g., extensions occur more frequently in bodies) than on semantics (bodies as an abstract category). PMID:27071095

  18. Joint action changes valence-based action coding in an implicit attitude task.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Anna; Liepelt, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that co-acting with another person induces a problem to discriminate between one's own and the other's actions which can be resolved by emphasizing action features that discriminate best between both persons' actions in a given task context. Mostly, overt action features like the spatial position of responses have been suggested as discriminating action features. In the present study, we tested whether non-externally perceivable, covert action features can be used for resolving the action discrimination problem during joint action. Therefore, we compared task performance between a joint and an individual version of the Go/Nogo Association Task, a task requiring the association of a valence to the response. We found a larger implicit attitude effect in the joint than in the individual setting for person-related (self and other, Experiment 1) as well as for non-person-related attitude objects (fruit and insect, Experiment 2) suggesting that the weight of valence information is increased in the internal coding of responses when valence discriminates between both responses. In contrast, we found a smaller implicit attitude effect in a person present setting than an individual setting (Experiment 3) indicating that the enhanced implicit attitude effect observed in the joint settings of Experiments 1 and 2 is not due to social facilitation. Our results suggest that action discrimination during joint action can rely on covert action features. The results are in line with the referential coding account, and specify the kind of action features that are represented when sharing a task with another person. PMID:26215432

  19. Molecular codes for neuronal individuality and cell assembly in the brain.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    The brain contains an enormous, but finite, number of neurons. The ability of this limited number of neurons to produce nearly limitless neural information over a lifetime is typically explained by combinatorial explosion; that is, by the exponential amplification of each neuron's contribution through its incorporation into "cell assemblies" and neural networks. In development, each neuron expresses diverse cellular recognition molecules that permit the formation of the appropriate neural cell assemblies to elicit various brain functions. The mechanism for generating neuronal assemblies and networks must involve molecular codes that give neurons individuality and allow them to recognize one another and join appropriate networks. The extensive molecular diversity of cell-surface proteins on neurons is likely to contribute to their individual identities. The clustered protocadherins (Pcdh) is a large subfamily within the diverse cadherin superfamily. The clustered Pcdh genes are encoded in tandem by three gene clusters, and are present in all known vertebrate genomes. The set of clustered Pcdh genes is expressed in a random and combinatorial manner in each neuron. In addition, cis-tetramers composed of heteromultimeric clustered Pcdh isoforms represent selective binding units for cell-cell interactions. Here I present the mathematical probabilities for neuronal individuality based on the random and combinatorial expression of clustered Pcdh isoforms and their formation of cis-tetramers in each neuron. Notably, clustered Pcdh gene products are known to play crucial roles in correct axonal projections, synaptic formation, and neuronal survival. Their molecular and biological features induce a hypothesis that the diverse clustered Pcdh molecules provide the molecular code by which neuronal individuality and cell assembly permit the combinatorial explosion of networks that supports enormous processing capability and plasticity of the brain. PMID:22518100

  20. Modulation of spike coding by subthreshold extracellular electric fields and neuronal morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xile; Li, Bingjie; Lu, Meili; Yi, Guosheng; Wang, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    We use a two-compartment model, which includes soma and dendrite, to explore how extracellular subthreshold sinusoidal electric fields (EFs) influence the spike coding of an active neuron. By changing the intensity and the frequency of subthreshold EFs, we find that subthreshold EFs indeed affect neuronal coding remarkably within several stimulus frequency windows where the field effects on spike timing are stronger than that on spiking rate. The field effects are maximized at several harmonics of the intrinsic spiking frequency of an active neuron. Our findings implicate the potential resonance mechanism underlying subthreshold field effects. We also discuss how neuronal morphologic properties constrain subthreshold EF effects on spike timing. The morphologic properties are represented by two parameters, gc and p, where gc is the internal conductance between soma and dendrite and geometric factor p characterizes the proportion of area occupied by soma. We find that the contribution to field effects from the variation of p is stronger than that from gc, which suggests that neuronal geometric features play a crucial role in subthreshold field effects. Theoretically, these insights into how subthreshold sinusoidal EFs modulate ongoing neuron behaviors could contribute to uncovering the relevant mechanism of subthreshold sinusoidal EFs effects on neuronal coding. Furthermore, they are useful in rationally designing noninvasive brain stimulation strategies and developing electromagnetic stimulus techniques.

  1. Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using NV-diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Matthew; Barry, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Glenn, David; Walsworth, Ron

    2016-05-01

    A key challenge for neuroscience is noninvasive, label-free sensing of action potential dynamics in whole organisms with single-neuron resolution. Here, we report a new approach to this problem: using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond to measure the time-dependent magnetic fields produced by single-neuron action potentials. We demonstrate our method using excised single neurons from two invertebrate species, marine worm and squid; and then by single-neuron action potential magnetic sensing exterior to whole, live, opaque marine worms for extended periods with no adverse effect. The results lay the groundwork for real-time, noninvasive 3D magnetic mapping of functional mammalian neuronal networks.

  2. Properties of Neurons in External Globus Pallidus Can Support Optimal Action Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bogacz, Rafal; Martin Moraud, Eduardo; Abdi, Azzedine; Magill, Peter J.; Baufreton, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The external globus pallidus (GPe) is a key nucleus within basal ganglia circuits that are thought to be involved in action selection. A class of computational models assumes that, during action selection, the basal ganglia compute for all actions available in a given context the probabilities that they should be selected. These models suggest that a network of GPe and subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons computes the normalization term in Bayes’ equation. In order to perform such computation, the GPe needs to send feedback to the STN equal to a particular function of the activity of STN neurons. However, the complex form of this function makes it unlikely that individual GPe neurons, or even a single GPe cell type, could compute it. Here, we demonstrate how this function could be computed within a network containing two types of GABAergic GPe projection neuron, so-called ‘prototypic’ and ‘arkypallidal’ neurons, that have different response properties in vivo and distinct connections. We compare our model predictions with the experimentally-reported connectivity and input-output functions (f-I curves) of the two populations of GPe neurons. We show that, together, these dichotomous cell types fulfil the requirements necessary to compute the function needed for optimal action selection. We conclude that, by virtue of their distinct response properties and connectivities, a network of arkypallidal and prototypic GPe neurons comprises a neural substrate capable of supporting the computation of the posterior probabilities of actions. PMID:27389780

  3. Properties of Neurons in External Globus Pallidus Can Support Optimal Action Selection.

    PubMed

    Bogacz, Rafal; Martin Moraud, Eduardo; Abdi, Azzedine; Magill, Peter J; Baufreton, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    The external globus pallidus (GPe) is a key nucleus within basal ganglia circuits that are thought to be involved in action selection. A class of computational models assumes that, during action selection, the basal ganglia compute for all actions available in a given context the probabilities that they should be selected. These models suggest that a network of GPe and subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons computes the normalization term in Bayes' equation. In order to perform such computation, the GPe needs to send feedback to the STN equal to a particular function of the activity of STN neurons. However, the complex form of this function makes it unlikely that individual GPe neurons, or even a single GPe cell type, could compute it. Here, we demonstrate how this function could be computed within a network containing two types of GABAergic GPe projection neuron, so-called 'prototypic' and 'arkypallidal' neurons, that have different response properties in vivo and distinct connections. We compare our model predictions with the experimentally-reported connectivity and input-output functions (f-I curves) of the two populations of GPe neurons. We show that, together, these dichotomous cell types fulfil the requirements necessary to compute the function needed for optimal action selection. We conclude that, by virtue of their distinct response properties and connectivities, a network of arkypallidal and prototypic GPe neurons comprises a neural substrate capable of supporting the computation of the posterior probabilities of actions. PMID:27389780

  4. Extending the mirror neuron system model, I. Audible actions and invisible grasps.

    PubMed

    Bonaiuto, James; Rosta, Edina; Arbib, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The paper introduces mirror neuron system II (MNS2), a new version of the MNS model (Oztop and Arbib in Biol Cybern 87 (2):116-140, 2002) of action recognition learning by mirror neurons of the macaque brain. The new model uses a recurrent architecture that is biologically more plausible than that of the original model. Moreover, MNS2 extends the capacity of the model to address data on audio-visual mirror neurons and on the response of mirror neurons when the target object was recently visible but is currently hidden. PMID:17028884

  5. Hebbian learning and predictive mirror neurons for actions, sensations and emotions

    PubMed Central

    Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Spike-timing-dependent plasticity is considered the neurophysiological basis of Hebbian learning and has been shown to be sensitive to both contingency and contiguity between pre- and postsynaptic activity. Here, we will examine how applying this Hebbian learning rule to a system of interconnected neurons in the presence of direct or indirect re-afference (e.g. seeing/hearing one's own actions) predicts the emergence of mirror neurons with predictive properties. In this framework, we analyse how mirror neurons become a dynamic system that performs active inferences about the actions of others and allows joint actions despite sensorimotor delays. We explore how this system performs a projection of the self onto others, with egocentric biases to contribute to mind-reading. Finally, we argue that Hebbian learning predicts mirror-like neurons for sensations and emotions and review evidence for the presence of such vicarious activations outside the motor system. PMID:24778372

  6. Multimodal stimulus coding by a gustatory sensory neuron in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    van Giesen, Lena; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Delasoie-Baranek, Sophie; Colombo, Martino; Renaud, Philippe; Bruggmann, Rémy; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-01-01

    Accurate perception of taste information is crucial for animal survival. In adult Drosophila, gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) perceive chemical stimuli of one specific gustatory modality associated with a stereotyped behavioural response, such as aversion or attraction. We show that GRNs of Drosophila larvae employ a surprisingly different mode of gustatory information coding. Using a novel method for calcium imaging in the larval gustatory system, we identify a multimodal GRN that responds to chemicals of different taste modalities with opposing valence, such as sweet sucrose and bitter denatonium, reliant on different sensory receptors. This multimodal neuron is essential for bitter compound avoidance, and its artificial activation is sufficient to mediate aversion. However, the neuron is also essential for the integration of taste blends. Our findings support a model for taste coding in larvae, in which distinct receptor proteins mediate different responses within the same, multimodal GRN. PMID:26864722

  7. Multimodal stimulus coding by a gustatory sensory neuron in Drosophila larvae

    PubMed Central

    van Giesen, Lena; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Delasoie-Baranek, Sophie; Colombo, Martino; Renaud, Philippe; Bruggmann, Rémy; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan D. T.; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate perception of taste information is crucial for animal survival. In adult Drosophila, gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs) perceive chemical stimuli of one specific gustatory modality associated with a stereotyped behavioural response, such as aversion or attraction. We show that GRNs of Drosophila larvae employ a surprisingly different mode of gustatory information coding. Using a novel method for calcium imaging in the larval gustatory system, we identify a multimodal GRN that responds to chemicals of different taste modalities with opposing valence, such as sweet sucrose and bitter denatonium, reliant on different sensory receptors. This multimodal neuron is essential for bitter compound avoidance, and its artificial activation is sufficient to mediate aversion. However, the neuron is also essential for the integration of taste blends. Our findings support a model for taste coding in larvae, in which distinct receptor proteins mediate different responses within the same, multimodal GRN. PMID:26864722

  8. Incorporating spike-rate adaptation into a rate code in mathematical and biological neurons.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Bridget N; Flagg, Lucas Q; Faggin, Eric; Birmingham, John T

    2016-06-01

    For a slowly varying stimulus, the simplest relationship between a neuron's input and output is a rate code, in which the spike rate is a unique function of the stimulus at that instant. In the case of spike-rate adaptation, there is no unique relationship between input and output, because the spike rate at any time depends both on the instantaneous stimulus and on prior spiking (the "history"). To improve the decoding of spike trains produced by neurons that show spike-rate adaptation, we developed a simple scheme that incorporates "history" into a rate code. We utilized this rate-history code successfully to decode spike trains produced by 1) mathematical models of a neuron in which the mechanism for adaptation (IAHP) is specified, and 2) the gastropyloric receptor (GPR2), a stretch-sensitive neuron in the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis, that exhibits long-lasting adaptation of unknown origin. Moreover, when we modified the spike rate either mathematically in a model system or by applying neuromodulatory agents to the experimental system, we found that changes in the rate-history code could be related to the biophysical mechanisms responsible for altering the spiking. PMID:26888106

  9. Self-images in the video monitor coded by monkey intraparietal neurons.

    PubMed

    Iriki, A; Tanaka, M; Obayashi, S; Iwamura, Y

    2001-06-01

    When playing a video game, or using a teleoperator system, we feel our self-image projected into the video monitor as a part of or an extension of ourselves. Here we show that such a self image is coded by bimodal (somatosensory and visual) neurons in the monkey intraparietal cortex, which have visual receptive fields (RFs) encompassing their somatosensory RFs. We earlier showed these neurons to code the schema of the hand which can be altered in accordance with psychological modification of the body image; that is, when the monkey used a rake as a tool to extend its reach, the visual RFs of these neurons elongated along the axis of the tool, as if the monkey's self image extended to the end of the tool. In the present experiment, we trained monkeys to recognize their image in a video monitor (despite the earlier general belief that monkeys are not capable of doing so), and demonstrated that the visual RF of these bimodal neurons was now projected onto the video screen so as to code the image of the hand as an extension of the self. Further, the coding of the imaged hand could intentionally be altered to match the image artificially modified in the monitor. PMID:11377755

  10. Action-outcome relationships are represented differently by medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex neurons during action execution.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nicholas W; Wood, Jesse; Moghaddam, Bita

    2015-12-01

    Internal representations of action-outcome relationships are necessary for flexible adaptation of motivated behavior in dynamic environments. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in flexible planning and execution of goal-directed actions, but little is known about how information about action-outcome relationships is represented across functionally distinct regions of PFC. Here, we observe distinct patterns of action-evoked single unit activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) during a task in which the relationship between outcomes and actions was independently manipulated. The mPFC encoded changes in the number of actions required to earn a reward, but not fluctuations in outcome magnitude. In contrast, OFC neurons decreased firing rates as outcome magnitude was increased, but were insensitive to changes in action requirement. A subset of OFC neurons also tracked outcome availability. Pre-outcome anticipatory activity in both mPFC and OFC was altered when reward expectation was reduced, but did not differ with outcome magnitude. These data provide novel evidence that PFC regions encode distinct information about the relationship between actions and impending outcomes during action execution. PMID:26467523

  11. Additivity of Pyrethroid Actions on Sodium Influx in Cortical Neurons in Cerebrocortical Neurons in Primary Culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Although previous work has tested the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo, this has not been assessed directly at the primary molecular ...

  12. Specification of individual adult motor neuron morphologies by combinatorial transcription factor codes

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, Jonathan; Venkatasubramanian, Lalanti; Baek, Myungin; Peterson, Meredith; Aghayeva, Ulkar; Mann, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How the highly stereotyped morphologies of individual neurons are genetically specified is not well understood. We identify six transcription factors (TFs) expressed in a combinatorial manner in seven post-mitotic adult leg motor neurons (MNs) that are derived from a single neuroblast in Drosophila. Unlike TFs expressed in mitotically active neuroblasts, these TFs do not regulate each other's expression. Removing the activity of a single TF resulted in specific morphological defects, including muscle targeting and dendritic arborization, and in a highly specific walking defect in adult flies. In contrast, when the expression of multiple TFs was modified nearly complete transformations in MN morphologies were generated. These results show that the morphological characteristics of a single neuron are dictated by a combinatorial code of morphology TFs (mTFs). mTFs function at a previously unidentified regulatory tier downstream of factors acting in the NB, but independently of factors that act in terminally differentiated neurons. PMID:25959734

  13. Widespread Differential Expression of Coding Region and 3' UTR Sequences in Neurons and Other Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Arif; Duarte, Terence; Kumar, Saranya; Hynes, Mary A

    2015-12-16

    Mature messenger RNAs (mRNAs) consist of coding sequence (CDS) and 5' and 3' UTRs, typically expected to show similar abundance within a given neuron. Examining mRNA from defined neurons, we unexpectedly show extremely common unbalanced expression of cognate 3' UTR and CDS sequences; many genes show high 3' UTR relative to CDS, others show high CDS to 3' UTR. In situ hybridization (19 of 19 genes) shows a broad range of 3' UTR-to-CDS expression ratios across neurons and tissues. Ratios may be spatially graded or change with developmental age but are consistent across animals. Further, for two genes examined, a 3' UTR-to-CDS ratio above a particular threshold in any given neuron correlated with reduced or undetectable protein expression. Our findings raise questions about the role of isolated 3' UTR sequences in regulation of protein expression and highlight the importance of separately examining 3' UTR and CDS sequences in gene expression analyses. PMID:26687222

  14. Stochastic Nonlinear Evolutional Model of the Large-Scaled Neuronal Population and Dynamic Neural Coding Subject to Stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Rubin; Yu Wei

    2005-08-25

    In this paper, we investigate how the population of neuronal oscillators deals with information and the dynamic evolution of neural coding when the external stimulation acts on it. Numerically computing method is used to describe the evolution process of neural coding in three-dimensioned space. The numerical result proves that only the suitable stimulation can change the coupling structure and plasticity of neurons.

  15. EquiFACS: The Equine Facial Action Coding System

    PubMed Central

    Wathan, Jen; Burrows, Anne M.; Waller, Bridget M.; McComb, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies of horses have investigated their facial expressions in specific contexts, e.g. pain, until now there has been no methodology available that documents all the possible facial movements of the horse and provides a way to record all potential facial configurations. This is essential for an objective description of horse facial expressions across a range of contexts that reflect different emotional states. Facial Action Coding Systems (FACS) provide a systematic methodology of identifying and coding facial expressions on the basis of underlying facial musculature and muscle movement. FACS are anatomically based and document all possible facial movements rather than a configuration of movements associated with a particular situation. Consequently, FACS can be applied as a tool for a wide range of research questions. We developed FACS for the domestic horse (Equus caballus) through anatomical investigation of the underlying musculature and subsequent analysis of naturally occurring behaviour captured on high quality video. Discrete facial movements were identified and described in terms of the underlying muscle contractions, in correspondence with previous FACS systems. The reliability of others to be able to learn this system (EquiFACS) and consistently code behavioural sequences was high—and this included people with no previous experience of horses. A wide range of facial movements were identified, including many that are also seen in primates and other domestic animals (dogs and cats). EquiFACS provides a method that can now be used to document the facial movements associated with different social contexts and thus to address questions relevant to understanding social cognition and comparative psychology, as well as informing current veterinary and animal welfare practices. PMID:26244573

  16. EquiFACS: The Equine Facial Action Coding System.

    PubMed

    Wathan, Jen; Burrows, Anne M; Waller, Bridget M; McComb, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies of horses have investigated their facial expressions in specific contexts, e.g. pain, until now there has been no methodology available that documents all the possible facial movements of the horse and provides a way to record all potential facial configurations. This is essential for an objective description of horse facial expressions across a range of contexts that reflect different emotional states. Facial Action Coding Systems (FACS) provide a systematic methodology of identifying and coding facial expressions on the basis of underlying facial musculature and muscle movement. FACS are anatomically based and document all possible facial movements rather than a configuration of movements associated with a particular situation. Consequently, FACS can be applied as a tool for a wide range of research questions. We developed FACS for the domestic horse (Equus caballus) through anatomical investigation of the underlying musculature and subsequent analysis of naturally occurring behaviour captured on high quality video. Discrete facial movements were identified and described in terms of the underlying muscle contractions, in correspondence with previous FACS systems. The reliability of others to be able to learn this system (EquiFACS) and consistently code behavioural sequences was high--and this included people with no previous experience of horses. A wide range of facial movements were identified, including many that are also seen in primates and other domestic animals (dogs and cats). EquiFACS provides a method that can now be used to document the facial movements associated with different social contexts and thus to address questions relevant to understanding social cognition and comparative psychology, as well as informing current veterinary and animal welfare practices. PMID:26244573

  17. The anthropomorphic brain: the mirror neuron system responds to human and robotic actions.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, V; Rizzolatti, G; Wicker, B; Keysers, C

    2007-05-01

    In humans and monkeys the mirror neuron system transforms seen actions into our inner representation of these actions. Here we asked if this system responds also if we see an industrial robot perform similar actions. We localised the motor areas involved in the execution of hand actions, presented the same subjects blocks of movies of humans or robots perform a variety of actions. The mirror system was activated strongly by the sight of both human and robotic actions, with no significant differences between these two agents. Finally we observed that seeing a robot perform a single action repeatedly within a block failed to activate the mirror system. This latter finding suggests that previous studies may have failed to find mirror activations to robotic actions because of the repetitiveness of the presented actions. Our findings suggest that the mirror neuron system could contribute to the understanding of a wider range of actions than previously assumed, and that the goal of an action might be more important for mirror activations than the way in which the action is performed. PMID:17395490

  18. Visual coding with a population of direction-selective neurons.

    PubMed

    Fiscella, Michele; Franke, Felix; Farrow, Karl; Müller, Jan; Roska, Botond; da Silveira, Rava Azeredo; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The brain decodes the visual scene from the action potentials of ∼20 retinal ganglion cell types. Among the retinal ganglion cells, direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) encode motion direction. Several studies have focused on the encoding or decoding of motion direction by recording multiunit activity, mainly in the visual cortex. In this study, we simultaneously recorded from all four types of ON-OFF DSGCs of the rabbit retina using a microelectronics-based high-density microelectrode array (HDMEA) and decoded their concerted activity using probabilistic and linear decoders. Furthermore, we investigated how the modification of stimulus parameters (velocity, size, angle of moving object) and the use of different tuning curve fits influenced decoding precision. Finally, we simulated ON-OFF DSGC activity, based on real data, in order to understand how tuning curve widths and the angular distribution of the cells' preferred directions influence decoding performance. We found that probabilistic decoding strategies outperformed, on average, linear methods and that decoding precision was robust to changes in stimulus parameters such as velocity. The removal of noise correlations among cells, by random shuffling trials, caused a drop in decoding precision. Moreover, we found that tuning curves are broad in order to minimize large errors at the expense of a higher average error, and that the retinal direction-selective system would not substantially benefit, on average, from having more than four types of ON-OFF DSGCs or from a perfect alignment of the cells' preferred directions. PMID:26289471

  19. Synaptic action of R beta neurons on phrenic motoneurons studied with spike-triggered averaging.

    PubMed

    Lipski, J; Kubin, L; Jodkowski, J

    1983-12-12

    The functional role of dorsal medullary inspiratory neurons with excitatory input from lung stretch receptors (R beta neurons) is a matter of controversy. The present study, performed on chloralose-anesthetized and paralyzed cats, ventilated mainly with a phrenic-controlled servorespirator, deals with the spinal projection of these neurons, a property which suggests their involvement in the efferent part of the medullary respiratory complex. Out of 37 inspiratory neurons which could be excited antidromically following microstimulation within the contralateral C6 phrenic nucleus (latency 2.0 ms +/- 0.4, S.D.), 17 were classified by the 'no-inflation' test as R beta. Intracellular recording of synaptic potentials from phrenic motoneurons using the 'spike-triggered averaging' technique were made. In 10 phrenic motoneurons, the averaging revealed individual EPSPs (peak amplitude 150 +/- 110 microV, rise time 0.5 +/- 0.2 ms) time-locked to action potentials of 5 out of 7 R beta neurons tested. Cross-correlation of the R beta neurons firing with the activity of C5 and C6 phrenic rootlets indicated a divergence of excitatory action within the phrenic nucleus. For comparison, in 3 phrenic motoneurons individual EPSPs were recorded when the activity of 3 R alpha cells was used to trigger the averaging. It is concluded that at least some R beta neurons, similarly to R alpha neurons, project to the contralateral phrenic nucleus and can make monosynaptic excitatory connections with phrenic motoneurons. The finding that individual EPSPs were similar when averaging was triggered by the activity of either R beta or R alpha neurons provides new evidence for our earlier hypothesis that bulbospinal inspiratory neurons of the solitary tract nucleus may be subdivided into two categories only on a quantitative basis. PMID:6661613

  20. NEURONAL ACTION ON THE DEVELOPING BLOOD VESSEL PATTERN

    PubMed Central

    James, Jennifer M.; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke

    2011-01-01

    The nervous system relies on a highly specialized network of blood vessels for development and neuronal survival. Recent evidence suggests that both the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS) employ multiple mechanisms to shape the vascular tree to meet its specific metabolic demands, such as promoting nerve-artery alignment in the PNS or the development the blood brain barrier in the CNS. In this article we discuss how the nervous system directly influences blood vessel patterning resulting in neuro-vascular congruence that is maintained throughout development and in the adult. PMID:21978864

  1. Head direction is coded more strongly than movement direction in a population of entorhinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Raudies, Florian; Brandon, Mark P; Chapman, G William; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2015-09-24

    The spatial firing pattern of entorhinal grid cells may be important for navigation. Many different computational models of grid cell firing use path integration based on movement direction and the associated movement speed to drive grid cells. However, the response of neurons to movement direction has rarely been tested, in contrast to multiple studies showing responses of neurons to head direction. Here, we analyzed the difference between head direction and movement direction during rat movement and analyzed cells recorded from entorhinal cortex for their tuning to movement direction. During foraging behavior, movement direction differs significantly from head direction. The analysis of neuron responses shows that only 5 out of 758 medial entorhinal cells show significant coding for both movement direction and head direction when evaluating periods of rat behavior with speeds above 10 cm/s and ±30° angular difference between movement and head direction. None of the cells coded movement direction alone. In contrast, 21 cells in this population coded only head direction during behavioral epochs with these constraints, indicating much stronger coding of head direction in this population. This suggests that the movement direction signal required by most grid cell models may arise from other brain structures than the medial entorhinal cortex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory. PMID:25451111

  2. Metabolic Interplay between Astrocytes and Neurons Regulates Endocannabinoid Action

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Blankman, Jacqueline L.; Zhong, Peng; Liu, Xiaojie; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Joslyn, Christopher M.; Liu, Qing-Song; Tomarchio, Aaron J.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Selley, Dana E.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is a retrograde lipid messenger that modulates synaptic function, neurophysiology, and behavior. 2-AG signaling is terminated by enzymatic hydrolysis—a reaction that is principally performed by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). MAGL is broadly expressed throughout the nervous system, and the contributions of different brain cell types to regulating 2-AG activity have remained unclear. Here, we genetically dissect the cellular anatomy of MAGL-mediated 2-AG metabolism in the brain and show that neurons and astrocytes coordinately regulate 2-AG content and endocannabinoid-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity and behavior. We also find that astrocytic MAGL is mainly responsible for converting 2-AG to neuroinflammatory prostaglandins via a mechanism that may involve transcellular shuttling of lipid substrates. Astrocytic-neuronal interplay thus provides distributed oversight of 2-AG metabolism and function, and, through doing so, protects the nervous system from excessive CB1 receptor activation and promotes endocannabinoid crosstalk with other lipid transmitter systems. PMID:26212325

  3. Cellular Mechanisms of Action of Drug Abuse on Olfactory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Heinbockel, Thomas; Wang, Ze-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol) are the active ingredient of marijuana (cannabis) which is the most commonly abused illicit drug in the USA. In addition to being known and used as recreational drugs, cannabinoids are produced endogenously by neurons in the brain (endocannabinoids) and serve as important signaling molecules in the nervous system and the rest of the body. Cannabinoids have been implicated in bodily processes both in health and disease. Recent pharmacological and physiological experiments have described novel aspects of classic brain signaling mechanisms or revealed unknown mechanisms of cellular communication involving the endocannabinoid system. While several forms of signaling have been described for endocannabinoids, the most distinguishing feature of endocannabinoids is their ability to act as retrograde messengers in neural circuits. Neurons in the main olfactory bulb express high levels of cannabinoid receptors. Here, we describe the cellular mechanisms and function of this novel brain signaling system in regulating neural activity at synapses in olfactory circuits. Results from basic research have the potential to provide the groundwork for translating the neurobiology of drug abuse to the realm of the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of addiction, specifically marijuana substance use disorder. PMID:26703658

  4. Adhesion to Carbon Nanotube Conductive Scaffolds Forces Action-Potential Appearance in Immature Rat Spinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies. PMID:23951361

  5. Somatic spikes regulate dendritic signaling in small neurons in the absence of backpropagating action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Myoga, Michael H.; Beierlein, Michael; Regehr, Wade G.

    2010-01-01

    Somatic spiking is known to regulate dendritic signaling and associative synaptic plasticity in many types of large neurons, but it is unclear whether somatic action potentials play similar roles in small neurons. Here we ask whether somatic action potentials can also influence dendritic signaling in an electrically compact neuron, the cerebellar stellate cell (SC). Experiments were conducted in rat brain slices using a combination of imaging and electrophysiology. We find that somatic action potentials elevate dendritic calcium levels in SCs. There was little attenuation of calcium signals with distance from the soma in SCs from P17-19 rats, which had dendrites that averaged 60 µm in length and in short SC dendrites from P30-33 rats. Somatic action potentials evoke dendritic calcium increases that are not affected by blocking dendritic sodium channels. This indicates that dendritic signals in SCs do not rely on dendritic sodium channels, which differs from many types of large neurons where dendritic sodium channels and backpropagating action potentials allow somatic spikes to control dendritic calcium signaling. Despite the lack of active backpropagating action potentials, we find that trains of somatic action potentials elevate dendritic calcium sufficiently to release endocannabinoids and retrogradely suppress parallel fiber to SC synapses in P17-19 rats. Prolonged SC firing at physiologically realistic frequencies produces retrograde suppression when combined with low-level group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation. Somatic spiking also interacts with synaptic stimulation to promote associative plasticity. These findings indicate that in small neurons the passive spread of potential within dendrites can allow somatic spiking to regulate dendritic calcium signaling and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19535592

  6. Regulation of neuronal-glial fate specification by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yan; Sun, Shaiqi; Lu, Ming; Xia, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation is becoming a promising and attractive cell-based treatment modality for repairing the damaged central nervous system. One of the limitations of this approach is that the proportion of functional cells differentiated from stem cells still remains at a low level. In recent years, novel long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are being discovered at a growing pace, suggesting that this class of molecules may act as novel regulators in neuronal-glial fate specification. In this review, we first describe the general features of lncRNAs that are more likely to be relevant to reveal their function. By this, we aim to point out the specific roles of a number of lncRNAs whose function has been described during neuronal and glial cell differentiation. There is no doubt that investigation of the lncRNAs will open a new window in studying neuronal-glial fate specification. PMID:26943605

  7. A biologically plausible mechanism for neuronal coding organized by the phase of alpha oscillations.

    PubMed

    Gips, Bart; van der Eerden, Jan P J M; Jensen, Ole

    2016-08-01

    The visual system receives a wealth of sensory information of which only little is relevant for behaviour. We present a mechanism in which alpha oscillations serve to prioritize different components of visual information. By way of simulated neuronal networks, we show that inhibitory modulation in the alpha range (~ 10 Hz) can serve to temporally segment the visual information to prevent information overload. Coupled excitatory and inhibitory neurons generate a gamma rhythm in which information is segmented and sorted according to excitability in each alpha cycle. Further details are coded by distributed neuronal firing patterns within each gamma cycle. The network model produces coupling between alpha phase and gamma (40-100 Hz) amplitude in the simulated local field potential similar to that observed experimentally in human and animal recordings. PMID:27320148

  8. Neural coding of nociceptive stimuli-from rat spinal neurones to human perception.

    PubMed

    Sikandar, Shafaq; Ronga, Irene; Iannetti, Gian Domenico; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2013-08-01

    Translational studies are key to furthering our understanding of nociceptive signalling and bridging the gaps between molecules and pathways to the patients. This requires use of appropriate preclinical models that accurately depict outcome measures used in humans. Whereas behavioural animal studies classically involve reports related to nociceptive thresholds of, for example, withdrawal, electrophysiological recordings of spinal neurones that receive convergent input from primary afferents permits investigation of suprathreshold events and exploration of the full-range coding of different stimuli. We explored the central processing of nociceptive inputs in a novel parallel investigation between rats and humans. Using radiant laser pulses, we first compared the electrophysiological responses of deep wide dynamic range and superficial nociceptive-specific neurones in the rat dorsal horn with human psychophysics and cortical responses. Secondly, we explored the effects of spatial summation using laser pulses of identical energy and different size. We observed 3 main findings. Firstly, both rodent and human data confirmed that neodymium-yttrium aluminium perovskite laser stimulation is a nociceptive-selective stimulus that never activates Aβ afferents. Secondly, graded laser stimulation elicited similarly graded electrophysiological and behavioural responses in both species. Thirdly, there was a significant degree of spatial summation of laser nociceptive input. The remarkable similarity in rodent and human coding indicates that responses of rat dorsal horn neurones can translate to human nociceptive processing. These findings suggest that recordings of spinal neuronal activity elicited by laser stimuli could be a valuable predictive measure of human pain perception. PMID:23719576

  9. Regulatory consequences of neuronal ELAV-like protein binding to coding and non-coding RNAs in human brain.

    PubMed

    Scheckel, Claudia; Drapeau, Elodie; Frias, Maria A; Park, Christopher Y; Fak, John; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Kou, Yan; Haroutunian, Vahram; Ma'ayan, Avi; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Darnell, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal ELAV-like (nELAVL) RNA binding proteins have been linked to numerous neurological disorders. We performed crosslinking-immunoprecipitation and RNAseq on human brain, and identified nELAVL binding sites on 8681 transcripts. Using knockout mice and RNAi in human neuroblastoma cells, we showed that nELAVL intronic and 3' UTR binding regulates human RNA splicing and abundance. We validated hundreds of nELAVL targets among which were important neuronal and disease-associated transcripts, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) transcripts. We therefore investigated RNA regulation in AD brain, and observed differential splicing of 150 transcripts, which in some cases correlated with differential nELAVL binding. Unexpectedly, the most significant change of nELAVL binding was evident on non-coding Y RNAs. nELAVL/Y RNA complexes were specifically remodeled in AD and after acute UV stress in neuroblastoma cells. We propose that the increased nELAVL/Y RNA association during stress may lead to nELAVL sequestration, redistribution of nELAVL target binding, and altered neuronal RNA splicing. PMID:26894958

  10. Regulatory consequences of neuronal ELAV-like protein binding to coding and non-coding RNAs in human brain

    PubMed Central

    Scheckel, Claudia; Drapeau, Elodie; Frias, Maria A; Park, Christopher Y; Fak, John; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Kou, Yan; Haroutunian, Vahram; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal ELAV-like (nELAVL) RNA binding proteins have been linked to numerous neurological disorders. We performed crosslinking-immunoprecipitation and RNAseq on human brain, and identified nELAVL binding sites on 8681 transcripts. Using knockout mice and RNAi in human neuroblastoma cells, we showed that nELAVL intronic and 3' UTR binding regulates human RNA splicing and abundance. We validated hundreds of nELAVL targets among which were important neuronal and disease-associated transcripts, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) transcripts. We therefore investigated RNA regulation in AD brain, and observed differential splicing of 150 transcripts, which in some cases correlated with differential nELAVL binding. Unexpectedly, the most significant change of nELAVL binding was evident on non-coding Y RNAs. nELAVL/Y RNA complexes were specifically remodeled in AD and after acute UV stress in neuroblastoma cells. We propose that the increased nELAVL/Y RNA association during stress may lead to nELAVL sequestration, redistribution of nELAVL target binding, and altered neuronal RNA splicing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10421.001 PMID:26894958

  11. Temporally diverse firing patterns in olfactory receptor neurons underlie spatiotemporal neural codes for odors

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Baranidharan; Joseph, Joby; Tang, Jeff; Stopfer, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Odorants are represented as spatiotemporal patterns of spikes in neurons of the antennal lobe (AL, insects) and olfactory bulb (OB, vertebrates). These response patterns have been thought to arise primarily from interactions within the AL/OB, an idea supported, in part, by the assumption that olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) respond to odorants with simple firing patterns. However, activating the AL directly with simple pulses of current evoked responses in AL neurons that were much less diverse, complex, and enduring than responses elicited by odorants. Similarly, models of the AL driven by simplistic inputs generated relatively simple output. How then are dynamic neural codes for odors generated? Consistent with recent results from several other species, our recordings from locust ORNs showed a great diversity of temporal structure. Further, we found that, viewed as a population, many response features of ORNs were remarkably similar to those observed within the AL. Using a set of computational models constrained by our electrophysiological recordings, we found that the temporal heterogeneity of responses of ORNs critically underlies the generation of spatiotemporal odor codes in the AL. A test then performed in vivo confirmed that, given temporally homogeneous input, the AL cannot create diverse spatiotemporal patterns on its own; however, given temporally heterogeneous input, the AL generated realistic firing patterns. Finally, given the temporally structured input provided by ORNs, we clarified several separate, additional contributions of the AL to olfactory information processing. Thus, our results demonstrate the origin and subsequent reformatting of spatiotemporal neural codes for odors. PMID:20147528

  12. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs. PMID:27510732

  13. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs. PMID:27510732

  14. [Hardware Implementation of Numerical Simulation Function of Hodgkin-Huxley Model Neurons Action Potential Based on Field Programmable Gate Array].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Mai; Hu, Yanwen; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Pan, Qiangqiang

    2015-12-01

    Neuron is the basic unit of the biological neural system. The Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model is one of the most realistic neuron models on the electrophysiological characteristic description of neuron. Hardware implementation of neuron could provide new research ideas to clinical treatment of spinal cord injury, bionics and artificial intelligence. Based on the HH model neuron and the DSP Builder technology, in the present study, a single HH model neuron hardware implementation was completed in Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The neuron implemented in FPGA was stimulated by different types of current, the action potential response characteristics were analyzed, and the correlation coefficient between numerical simulation result and hardware implementation result were calculated. The results showed that neuronal action potential response of FPGA was highly consistent with numerical simulation result. This work lays the foundation for hardware implementation of neural network. PMID:27079105

  15. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced changes in the chemical coding of extrinsic sensory neurons supplying the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Rytel, L; Calka, J

    2016-03-23

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a popular drug that is commonly used to treat fever and inflammation, but which can also negativity affect the mucosal layer of the stomach, although knowledge concerning its influence on gastric innervation is very scarce. Thus, the aim of the present study was to study the influence of prolonged acetylsalicylic acid supplementation on the extrinsic primary sensory neurons supplying the porcine stomach prepyloric region. Fast Blue (FB) was injected into the above-mentioned region of the stomach. Acetylsalicylic acid was then given orally to the experimental gilts from the seventh day after FB injection to the 27th day of the experiment. After euthanasia, the nodose ganglia (NG) and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were collected. Sections of these ganglia were processed for routine double-labelling immunofluorescence technique for substance P (SP), calcitonine gene related peptide (CGRP), galanin (GAL), neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Under physiological conditions within the nodose ganglia, the percentage of the FB-labeled neurons immunoreactive to particular substances ranged between 17.9±2.7% (VIP-like immunoreactive (LI) neurons in the right NG) and 60.4±1.7% (SP-LI cells within the left NG). Acetylsalicylic acid supplementation caused a considerable increase in the expression of all active substances studied within both left and right NG and the percentage of neurons positive to particular substances fluctuated from 47.2±3.6% (GAL-LI neurons in the right NG) to 67.2±2.0% (cells immunoreactive to SP in the left NG). All studied substances were also observed in DRG neurons supplying the prepyloric region of the stomach, but the number of immunoreactive neurons was too small to conduct a statistical analysis. The obtained results show that ASA may influence chemical coding of the sensory neurons supplying the porcine stomach, but the exact mechanisms of this action still remain

  16. Direct inhibition of arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons: a potential mechanism for the orexigenic actions of dynorphin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobing; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2013-01-01

    Dynorphin, an endogenous ligand of kappa (κ) opioid receptors, has multiple roles in the brain, and plays a positive role in energy balance and food intake. However, the mechanism for this is unclear. With immunocytochemistry, we find that axonal dynorphin immunoreactivity in the arcuate nucleus is strong, and that a large number of dynorphin-immunoreactive boutons terminate on or near anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cells. Here we provide evidence from whole-cell patch-clamp recording that dynorphin-A (Dyn-A) directly and dose-dependently inhibits arcuate nucleus POMC neurons. Dyn-A inhibition was eliminated by the κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-BNI, but not by the μ receptor antagonist CTAP. The inhibitory effect was mimicked by the κ2 receptor agonist GR89696, but not by the κ1 receptor agonist U69593. No presynaptic effect of κ2 agonists was found. These results suggest that Dyn-A inhibits POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor. In whole-cell voltage clamp, Dyn-A opened G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK)-like channels on POMC neurons. Dynorphin attenuated glutamate and GABA neurotransmission to POMC neurons. In contrast to the strong inhibition of POMC neurons by Dyn-A, we found a weaker direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons mediated by both κ1 and κ2 receptors. Taken together, these results indicate a direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor and GIRK channels. A number of orexigenic hypothalamic neurons release dynorphin along with other neuropeptides. The inhibition of anorexigenic POMC neurons may be one mechanism underlying the orexigenic actions of dynorphin. PMID:23318874

  17. Neuritin produces antidepressant actions and blocks the neuronal and behavioral deficits caused by chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hyeon; Banasr, Mounira; Choi, Miyeon; Chae, Seung Yeon; Licznerski, Pawel; Lee, Boyoung; Voleti, Bhavya; Li, Nanxin; Lepack, Ashley; Fournier, Neil M.; Lee, Ka Rim; Lee, In Young; Kim, Juhyun; Kim, Joung-Hun; Kim, Yong Ho; Jung, Sung Jun; Duman, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    Decreased neuronal dendrite branching and plasticity of the hippocampus, a limbic structure implicated in mood disorders, is thought to contribute to the symptoms of depression. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect, as well as the actions of antidepressant treatment, remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that hippocampal expression of neuritin, an activity-dependent gene that regulates neuronal plasticity, is decreased by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) and that antidepressant treatment reverses this effect. We also show that viral-mediated expression of neuritin in the hippocampus produces antidepressant actions and prevents the atrophy of dendrites and spines, as well as depressive and anxiety behaviors caused by CUS. Conversely, neuritin knockdown produces depressive-like behaviors, similar to CUS exposure. The ability of neuritin to increase neuroplasticity is confirmed in models of learning and memory. Our results reveal a unique action of neuritin in models of stress and depression, and demonstrate a role for neuroplasticity in antidepressant treatment response and related behaviors. PMID:22733766

  18. New Neurons in Aging Brains: Molecular Control by Small Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Marijn; Buijink, M. Renate; Lucassen, Paul J.; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. It is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG), in the hippocampus. With age, the function of the hippocampus and particularly the DG is impaired. For instance, adult neurogenesis is decreased with aging, in both proliferating and differentiation of newborn cells, while in parallel an age-associated decline in cognitive performance is often seen. Surprisingly, the synaptogenic potential of adult-born neurons is only marginally influenced by aging. Therefore, although proliferation, differentiation, and synaptogenesis of adult-born new neurons in the DG are closely related to each other, they are differentially affected by aging. In this review we discuss the crucial roles of a novel class of recently discovered modulators of gene expression, the small non-coding RNAs, in the regulation of adult neurogenesis. Multiple small non-coding RNAs are differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In particular a subgroup of the small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs, fine-tune the progression of adult neurogenesis. This makes small non-coding RNAs appealing candidates to orchestrate the functional alterations in adult neurogenesis and cognition associated with aging. Finally, we summarize observations that link changes in circulating levels of steroid hormones with alterations in adult neurogenesis, cognitive decline, and vulnerability to psychopathology in advanced age, and discuss a potential interplay between steroid hormone receptors and microRNAs in cognitive decline in aging individuals. PMID:22363255

  19. Identification of long non-coding RNAs involved in neuronal development and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    D'haene, Eva; Jacobs, Eva Z; Volders, Pieter-Jan; De Meyer, Tim; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Recently, exome sequencing led to the identification of causal mutations in 16-31% of patients with intellectual disability (ID), leaving the underlying cause for many patients unidentified. In this context, the noncoding part of the human genome remains largely unexplored. For many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) a crucial role in neurodevelopment and hence the human brain is anticipated. Here we aimed at identifying lncRNAs associated with neuronal development and ID. Therefore, we applied an integrated genomics approach, harnessing several public epigenetic datasets. We found that the presence of neuron-specific H3K4me3 confers the highest specificity for genes involved in neurodevelopment and ID. Based on the presence of this feature and GWAS hits for CNS disorders, we identified 53 candidate lncRNA genes. Extensive expression profiling on human brain samples and other tissues, followed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis indicates that at least 24 of these lncRNAs are indeed implicated in processes such as synaptic transmission, nervous system development and neurogenesis. The bidirectional or antisense overlapping orientation relative to multiple coding genes involved in neuronal processes supports these results. In conclusion, we identified several lncRNA genes putatively involved in neurodevelopment and CNS disorders, providing a resource for functional studies. PMID:27319317

  20. Identification of long non-coding RNAs involved in neuronal development and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    D’haene, Eva; Jacobs, Eva Z.; Volders, Pieter-Jan; De Meyer, Tim; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Recently, exome sequencing led to the identification of causal mutations in 16–31% of patients with intellectual disability (ID), leaving the underlying cause for many patients unidentified. In this context, the noncoding part of the human genome remains largely unexplored. For many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) a crucial role in neurodevelopment and hence the human brain is anticipated. Here we aimed at identifying lncRNAs associated with neuronal development and ID. Therefore, we applied an integrated genomics approach, harnessing several public epigenetic datasets. We found that the presence of neuron-specific H3K4me3 confers the highest specificity for genes involved in neurodevelopment and ID. Based on the presence of this feature and GWAS hits for CNS disorders, we identified 53 candidate lncRNA genes. Extensive expression profiling on human brain samples and other tissues, followed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis indicates that at least 24 of these lncRNAs are indeed implicated in processes such as synaptic transmission, nervous system development and neurogenesis. The bidirectional or antisense overlapping orientation relative to multiple coding genes involved in neuronal processes supports these results. In conclusion, we identified several lncRNA genes putatively involved in neurodevelopment and CNS disorders, providing a resource for functional studies. PMID:27319317

  1. Efficient Olfactory Coding in the Pheromone Receptor Neuron of a Moth

    PubMed Central

    Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr; Rospars, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The concept of coding efficiency holds that sensory neurons are adapted, through both evolutionary and developmental processes, to the statistical characteristics of their natural stimulus. Encouraged by the successful invocation of this principle to predict how neurons encode natural auditory and visual stimuli, we attempted its application to olfactory neurons. The pheromone receptor neuron of the male moth Antheraea polyphemus, for which quantitative properties of both the natural stimulus and the reception processes are available, was selected. We predicted several characteristics that the pheromone plume should possess under the hypothesis that the receptors perform optimally, i.e., transfer as much information on the stimulus per unit time as possible. Our results demonstrate that the statistical characteristics of the predicted stimulus, e.g., the probability distribution function of the stimulus concentration, the spectral density function of the stimulation course, and the intermittency, are in good agreement with those measured experimentally in the field. These results should stimulate further quantitative studies on the evolutionary adaptation of olfactory nervous systems to odorant plumes and on the plume characteristics that are most informative for the ‘sniffer’. Both aspects are relevant to the design of olfactory sensors for odour-tracking robots. PMID:18437217

  2. Long Non-coding RNA in Neurons: New Players in Early Response to BDNF Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Aliperti, Vincenza; Donizetti, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin family member that is highly expressed and widely distributed in the brain. BDNF is critical for neural survival and plasticity both during development and in adulthood, and dysfunction in its signaling may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Deep understanding of the BDNF-activated molecular cascade may thus help to find new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. One interesting direction is related to the early phase of BDNF-dependent gene expression regulation, which is responsible for the activation of selective gene programs that lead to stable functional and structural remodeling of neurons. Immediate-early coding genes activated by BDNF are under investigation, but the involvement of the non-coding RNAs is largely unexplored, especially the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNAs are emerging as key regulators that can orchestrate different aspects of nervous system development, homeostasis, and plasticity, making them attractive candidate markers and therapeutic targets for brain diseases. We used microarray technology to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs in the immediate response phase of BDNF stimulation in a neuronal cell model. Our observations on the putative functional role of lncRNAs provide clues to their involvement as master regulators of gene expression cascade triggered by BDNF. PMID:26973456

  3. Parallel coding of first- and second-order stimulus attributes by midbrain electrosensory neurons.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, Patrick; Vonderschen, Katrin; Fortune, Eric S; Chacron, Maurice J

    2012-04-18

    Natural stimuli often have time-varying first-order (i.e., mean) and second-order (i.e., variance) attributes that each carry critical information for perception and can vary independently over orders of magnitude. Experiments have shown that sensory systems continuously adapt their responses based on changes in each of these attributes. This adaptation creates ambiguity in the neural code as multiple stimuli may elicit the same neural response. While parallel processing of first- and second-order attributes by separate neural pathways is sufficient to remove this ambiguity, the existence of such pathways and the neural circuits that mediate their emergence have not been uncovered to date. We recorded the responses of midbrain electrosensory neurons in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus to stimuli with first- and second-order attributes that varied independently in time. We found three distinct groups of midbrain neurons: the first group responded to both first- and second-order attributes, the second group responded selectively to first-order attributes, and the last group responded selectively to second-order attributes. In contrast, all afferent hindbrain neurons responded to both first- and second-order attributes. Using computational analyses, we show how inputs from a heterogeneous population of ON- and OFF-type afferent neurons are combined to give rise to response selectivity to either first- or second-order stimulus attributes in midbrain neurons. Our study thus uncovers, for the first time, generic and widely applicable mechanisms by which parallel processing of first- and second-order stimulus attributes emerges in the brain. PMID:22514313

  4. Actions of motor neurons and leg muscles in jumping by planthopper insects (hemiptera, issidae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Bräunig, Peter

    2010-04-15

    To understand the catapult mechanism that propels jumping in a planthopper insect, the innervation and action of key muscles were analyzed. The large trochanteral depressor muscle, M133b,c, is innervated by two motor neurons and by two dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, all with axons in N3C. A smaller depressor muscle, M133a, is innervated by two neurons, one with a large-diameter cell body, a large, blind-ending dendrite, and a giant ovoid, axon measuring 50 microm by 30 microm in nerve N5A. The trochanteral levator muscles (M132) and (M131) are innervated by N4 and N3B, respectively. The actions of these muscles in a restrained jump were divisible into a three-phase pattern. First, both hind legs were moved into a cocked position by high-frequency bursts of spikes in the levator muscles lasting about 0.5 seconds. Second, and once both legs were cocked, M133b,c received a long continuous sequence of motor spikes, but the two levators spiked only sporadically. The spikes in the two motor neurons to M133b,c on one side were closely coupled to each other and to the spikes on the other side. If one hind leg was cocked then the spikes only occurred in motor neurons to that side. The final phase was the jump movement itself, which occurred when the depressor spikes ceased and which lasted 1 ms. Muscles 133b,c activated synchronously on both sides, are responsible for generating the power, and M133a and its giant neuron may play a role in triggering the release of a jump. PMID:20151364

  5. Computational and Electronic Analog Implementation of the Hodgkin-Huxley Model of Action Potentials in Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter; Link, Justin

    2012-02-01

    Alan Loyd Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley's mathematical model of action potential initiation and propagation in neurons is one of the greatest hallmarks of biophysics. Two techniques for implementing the Hodgkin-Huxley model were explored: computational and electronic analog. Computational modeling was done using NEURON 7.1. NEURON is a free, robust, and relatively user friendly simulation environment that enables quantitatively accurate computational modeling of neurons and neural networks. An analog electronic circuit was built using field-effect transistors (FETs) to simulate the non-linear, voltage-dependent (sodium and potassium) conductances that are responsible for membrane excitability. While the electronic analog qualitatively reproduces many of the key features of the action potential including overall shape, inactivation period, and propagation, it was difficult to quantitatively reproduce the Hodgkin-Huxley model. In addition, while the relative cost to build circuits equivalent to small membrane patches is minimal (˜50), implementation of larger cells or networks would prove uneconomical. Still, both techniques are viable avenues toward introducing interdisciplinary research into either a computational or electronics lab setting at the undergraduate level.

  6. Peripheral Hot Spots for Local Ca2+ Release after Single Action Potentials in Sympathetic Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cseresnyés, Zoltán; Schneider, Martin F.

    2004-01-01

    Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contributes to Ca2+ transients in frog sympathetic ganglion neurons. Here we use video-rate confocal fluo-4 fluorescence imaging to show that single action potentials reproducibly trigger rapidly rising Ca2+ transients at 1–3 local hot spots within the peripheral ER-rich layer in intact neurons in fresh ganglia and in the majority (74%) of cultured neurons. Hot spots were located near the nucleus or the axon hillock region. Other regions exhibited either slower and smaller signals or no response. Ca2+ signals spread into the cell at constant velocity across the ER in nonnuclear regions, indicating active propagation, but spread with a (time)1/2 dependence within the nucleus, consistent with diffusion. 26% of cultured cells exhibited uniform Ca2+ signals around the periphery, but hot spots were produced by loading the cytosol with EGTA or by bathing such cells in low-Ca2+ Ringer's solution. Peripheral hot spots for Ca2+ release within the perinuclear and axon hillock regions provide a mechanism for preferential initiation of nuclear and axonal Ca2+ signals by single action potentials in sympathetic ganglion neurons. PMID:14695260

  7. Nitric Oxide Exerts Basal and Insulin-Dependent Anorexigenic Actions in POMC Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wellhauser, Leigh; Chalmers, Jennifer A; Belsham, Denise D

    2016-04-01

    The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus represents a key center for the control of appetite and feeding through the regulation of 2 key neuronal populations, notably agouti-related peptide/neuropeptide Y and proopimelanocortin (POMC)/cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript neurons. Altered regulation of these neuronal networks, in particular the dysfunction of POMC neurons upon high-fat consumption, is a major pathogenic mechanism involved in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Efforts are underway to preserve the integrity or enhance the functionality of POMC neurons in order to prevent or treat these metabolic diseases. Here, we report for the first time that the nitric oxide (NO(-)) donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) mediates anorexigenic actions in both hypothalamic tissue and hypothalamic-derived cell models by mediating the up-regulation of POMC levels. SNP increased POMC mRNA in a dose-dependent manner and enhanced α-melanocortin-secreting hormone production and secretion in mHypoA-POMC/GFP-2 cells. SNP also enhanced insulin-driven POMC expression likely by inhibiting the deacetylase activity of sirtuin 1. Furthermore, SNP enhanced insulin-dependent POMC expression, likely by reducing the transcriptional repression of Foxo1 on the POMC gene. Prolonged SNP exposure prevented the development of insulin resistance. Taken together, the NO(-) donor SNP enhances the anorexigenic potential of POMC neurons by promoting its transcriptional expression independent and in cooperation with insulin. Thus, increasing cellular NO(-) levels represents a hormone-independent method of promoting anorexigenic output from the existing POMC neuronal populations and may be advantageous in the fight against these prevalent disorders. PMID:26930171

  8. Effects of some heavy metals on the action potentials of an identified Helix pomatia photosensitive neuron.

    PubMed

    Kartelija, Gordana; Radenović, Lidija; Todorović, Natasa; Nedeljković, Miodrag

    2005-06-01

    In the photosensitive MB neuron in the left parietal ganglion of Helix pomatia, the onset of light prolongs significantly (by about 40%) the duration of the action potential. The broadening of the action potential after the onset of light was found to be due to its calcium component and could not be induced after blocking Ca(2+) channels by Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) and in absence of Ca(2+) in medium. The blocking effect of both compounds was reversible. It was found that CdCl(2) exhibited a more intense blocking effect than PbCl(2). PMID:16154952

  9. Long non-coding RNA-dependent transcriptional regulation in neuronal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brian S.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the mammalian transcriptome has revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may make up a large fraction of cellular transcripts. Recent years have seen a surge of studies aimed at functionally characterizing the role of lncRNAs in development and disease. In this review, we discuss new findings implicating lncRNAs in controlling development of the central nervous system (CNS). The evolution of the higher vertebrate brain has been accompanied by an increase in the levels and complexities of lncRNAs expressed within the developing nervous system. Although a limited number of CNS-expressed lncRNAs are now known to modulate the activity of proteins important for neuronal differentiation, the function of the vast majority of neuronal-expressed lncRNAs is still unknown. Topics of intense current interest include the mechanism by which CNS-expressed lncRNAs might function in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation during neuronal development, and how gain and loss of function of individual lncRNAs contribute to neurological diseases. PMID:24936207

  10. Different mRNAs code for dopa decarboxylase in tissues of neuronal and nonneuronal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, M.; Coge, F.; Gros, F.; Thibault, J. )

    1991-03-15

    A cDNA clone for dopa decarboxylase has been isolated from a rat pheochromocytoma cDNA library and the cDNA sequence has been determined. It corresponds to an mRNA of 2094 nucleotides. The length of the mRNA was measured by primer-extension of rat pheochromocytoma RNA and the 5{prime} end of the sequence of the mRNA was confirmed by the PCR. A probe spanning the translation initiation site of the mRNA was used to hybridize with mRNAs from various organs of the rat. S1 nuclease digestion of the mRNAs annealed with this probe revealed two classes of mRNAs. The comparison of the cDNA sequence and published sequences for rat liver, human pheochromocytoma, and Droxophila dopa decarboxylase supported the conclusion that two mRNAs are produced: one is specific for tissue of neuronal origin and the other is specific for tissues of nonneuronal (mesodermal or endodermal) origin. The neuronal mRNA contains a 5{prime} untranslated sequence that is highly conserved between human and rat pheochromocytoma including a GA stretch. The coding sequence and the 3{prime} untranslated sequence of mRNAs from rat liver and pheochromocytoma are identical. The rat mRNA differs only in the 5{prime} untranslated region. Thus a unique gene codes for dopa decarboxylase and this gene gives rise to at least two transcripts presumably in response to different signals during development.

  11. Developmental changes in the inward current of the action potential of Rohon-Beard neurones

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, Paola I.; Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    1977-01-01

    1. Rohon-Beard cells in the spinal cord of Xenopus tadpoles have been studied in animals from early neural tube to free-swimming larval stages. The onset and further development of electrical excitability of these neurones has been investigated in different ionic environments, to determine the ionic species carrying the inward current of the action potential. 2. The cells appear inexcitable at early stages (Nieuwkoop & Faber stages 18-20) and do not give action potentials to depolarizing current pulses. 3. The action potential is first recorded at stage 20. (A) The inward current is carried by Ca2+ at stages 20-25, since it is blocked by mm quantitites of La3+, Co2+ or Mn2+ and is unaffected by removal of Na+ or the addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX). (B) The action potential is an elevated plateau of long duration (mean 190 msec at stages 20-22). The duration decreases exponentially with repetitive stimulation. (C) The specific Ca2+ conductance (gCa) at the onset of the plateau of the action potential is 2·6 × 10-4 mho/cm2. Calculations show that a single action potential raises [Ca2+]1 by more than 100-fold. 4. At later times (stages 25-40), the inward current of the action potential is carried by both Na+ and Ca2+: the action potential has two components, an initial spike which is blocked by removal of Na+ or addition of TTX, followed by a plateau which is blocked by La3+, Co2+ or Mn2+. 5. Finally (stages 40-51), the inward current is primarily carried by Na+, since the action potential is blocked only by removal of Na+ or addition of TTX, and the overshoot agrees with the prediction of the Nernst equation for a Na-selective membrane. When the outward current channel is blocked and cells exposed to Na-free solutions, 67% of cells at the latest stages studied were incapable of producing action potentials in which the inward current is carried by divalent cations. 6. The duration of the action potential decreases from a maximum of about 1000 msec to about 1 msec

  12. Spatially regularized and locality-constrained linear coding for human action recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Gai, Wen; Guo, Shouchun; Liu, Yu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Maojun

    2014-05-01

    To reduce quantization error, preserve the manifold of local features, distinguish the ambiguous features, and model the spatial configuration of features for Bag-of-Features (BoF) model-based human action recognition, a novel feature coding method called spatially regularized and locality-constrained linear coding (SLLC) is proposed. The spatial regularization and locality constraint are involved in the feature coding phase to model the spatial configuration of features and preserve their nonlinear manifold. The action recognition experimental results on benchmark datasets show that SLLC achieves better performance than the state-of-the-art feature coding methods such as soft vector quantization, sparse coding, and locality-constrained linear coding.

  13. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  14. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2016-01-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca2+ entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca2+ buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca2+-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca2+ elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377724

  15. Plasticity-driven individualization of olfactory coding in mushroom body output neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hige, Toshihide; Aso, Yoshinori; Rubin, Gerald M.; Turner, Glenn C.

    2015-01-01

    Although all sensory circuits ascend to higher brain areas where stimuli are represented in sparse, stimulus-specific activity patterns, relatively little is known about sensory coding on the descending side of neural circuits, as a network converges. In insects, mushroom bodies (MBs) have been an important model system for studying sparse coding in the olfactory system1–3, where this format is important for accurate memory formation4–6. In Drosophila, it has recently been shown that the 2000 Kenyon cells (KCs) of the MB converge onto a population of only 35 MB output neurons (MBONs), that fall into 22 anatomically distinct cell types7,8. Here we provide the first comprehensive view of olfactory representations at the fourth layer of the circuit, where we find a clear transition in the principles of sensory coding. We show that MBON tuning curves are highly correlated with one another. This is in sharp contrast to the process of progressive decorrelation of tuning in the earlier layers of the circuit2,9. Instead, at the population level, odor representations are reformatted so that positive and negative correlations arise between representations of different odors. At the single-cell level, we show that uniquely identifiable MBONs display profoundly different tuning across different animals, but tuning of the same neuron across the two hemispheres of an individual fly was nearly identical. Thus, individualized coordination of tuning arises at this level of the olfactory circuit. Furthermore, we find that this individualization is an active process that requires a learning-related gene, rutabaga. Ultimately, neural circuits have to flexibly map highly stimulus-specific information in sparse layers onto a limited number of different motor outputs. The reformatting of sensory representations we observe here may mark the beginning of this sensory-motor transition in the olfactory system. PMID:26416731

  16. Plasticity-driven individualization of olfactory coding in mushroom body output neurons.

    PubMed

    Hige, Toshihide; Aso, Yoshinori; Rubin, Gerald M; Turner, Glenn C

    2015-10-01

    Although all sensory circuits ascend to higher brain areas where stimuli are represented in sparse, stimulus-specific activity patterns, relatively little is known about sensory coding on the descending side of neural circuits, as a network converges. In insects, mushroom bodies have been an important model system for studying sparse coding in the olfactory system, where this format is important for accurate memory formation. In Drosophila, it has recently been shown that the 2,000 Kenyon cells of the mushroom body converge onto a population of only 34 mushroom body output neurons (MBONs), which fall into 21 anatomically distinct cell types. Here we provide the first, to our knowledge, comprehensive view of olfactory representations at the fourth layer of the circuit, where we find a clear transition in the principles of sensory coding. We show that MBON tuning curves are highly correlated with one another. This is in sharp contrast to the process of progressive decorrelation of tuning in the earlier layers of the circuit. Instead, at the population level, odour representations are reformatted so that positive and negative correlations arise between representations of different odours. At the single-cell level, we show that uniquely identifiable MBONs display profoundly different tuning across different animals, but that tuning of the same neuron across the two hemispheres of an individual fly was nearly identical. Thus, individualized coordination of tuning arises at this level of the olfactory circuit. Furthermore, we find that this individualization is an active process that requires a learning-related gene, rutabaga. Ultimately, neural circuits have to flexibly map highly stimulus-specific information in sparse layers onto a limited number of different motor outputs. The reformatting of sensory representations we observe here may mark the beginning of this sensory-motor transition in the olfactory system. PMID:26416731

  17. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  18. Noise Enhances Action Potential Generation in Mouse Sensory Neurons via Stochastic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Irene; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Renzi, Massimiliano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Musarò, Antonio; Salvetti, Marco; Limatola, Cristina; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Noise can enhance perception of tactile and proprioceptive stimuli by stochastic resonance processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this general phenomenon remain to be characterized. Here we studied how externally applied noise influences action potential firing in mouse primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia, modelling a basic process in sensory perception. Since noisy mechanical stimuli may cause stochastic fluctuations in receptor potential, we examined the effects of sub-threshold depolarizing current steps with superimposed random fluctuations. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings in cultured neurons of mouse dorsal root ganglia. Noise was added either before and during the step, or during the depolarizing step only, to focus onto the specific effects of external noise on action potential generation. In both cases, step + noise stimuli triggered significantly more action potentials than steps alone. The normalized power norm had a clear peak at intermediate noise levels, demonstrating that the phenomenon is driven by stochastic resonance. Spikes evoked in step + noise trials occur earlier and show faster rise time as compared to the occasional ones elicited by steps alone. These data suggest that external noise enhances, via stochastic resonance, the recruitment of transient voltage-gated Na channels, responsible for action potential firing in response to rapid step-wise depolarizing currents. PMID:27525414

  19. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for control of behavioral state.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, U

    2010-12-15

    Cholinergic neurons of the pontine laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) play a critical role in regulation of behavioral state. Therefore, elucidation of mechanisms that control their activity is vital for understanding of how switching between wakefulness, sleep and anesthetic states is effectuated. In vivo studies suggest that GABAergic mechanisms within the pons play a critical role in behavioral state switching. However, the postsynaptic, electrophysiological actions of GABA on LDT neurons, as well as the identity of GABA receptors present in the LDT mediating these actions is virtually unexplored. Therefore, we studied the actions of GABA agonists and antagonists on cholinergic LDT cells by performing patch clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. Under conditions where detection of Cl(-) -mediated events was optimized, GABA induced gabazine (GZ)-sensitive inward currents in the majority of LDT neurons. Post-synaptic location of GABA(A) receptors was demonstrated by persistence of muscimol-induced inward currents in TTX and low Ca(2+) solutions. THIP, a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist with a preference for δ-subunit containing GABA(A) receptors, induced inward currents, suggesting the existence of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors. LDT cells also possess GABA(B) receptors as baclofen-activated a TTX- and low Ca(2+)-resistant outward current that was attenuated by the GABA(B) antagonists CGP 55845 and saclofen. The tertiapin sensitivity of baclofen-induced outward currents suggests that a G(IRK) mediated this effect. Further, outward currents were never additive with those induced by application of carbachol, suggesting that they were mediated by activation of GABA(B) receptors linked to the same G(IRK) activated in these cells by muscarinic receptor stimulation. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibited Ca(2+) increases induced by a depolarizing voltage step shown previously to activate VOCCs in cholinergic LDT neurons. Baclofen-mediated reductions in depolarization

  20. Dopaminergic modulation of axonal potassium channels and action potential waveform in pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Mingyu; Tian, Cuiping; Yang, Mingpo; Wang, Yonghong; Shu, Yousheng

    2013-07-01

    Voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels play critical roles in shaping neuronal signals. KV channels distributed in the perisomatic regions and thick dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons have been extensively studied. However, the properties and regulation of KV channels distributed in the thin axons remain unknown. In this study, by performing somatic and axonal patch-clamp recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons of prefrontal cortical slices, we showed that the rapidly inactivating A-currents mediated the transient K(+) currents evoked by action potential (AP) waveform command (KAP) at the soma, whereas the rapidly activating but slowly inactivating KV1-mediated D-currents dominated the KAP at the axon. In addition, activation of D1-like receptors for dopamine decreased the axonal K(+) currents, as a result of an increase in the activity of cAMP-PKA pathway. In contrast, activation of D2-like receptors showed an opposite effect on the axonal K(+) currents. Further experiments demonstrated that functional D1-like receptors were expressed at the main axon trunk and their activation could broaden the waveforms of axonal APs. Together, these results show that axonal KV channels were subjected to dopamine modulation, and this modulation could regulate the waveforms of propagating APs at the axon, suggesting an important role of dopaminergic modulation of axonal KV channels in regulating neuronal signalling. PMID:23568892

  1. Electrophysiological properties of rat spinal dorsal horn neurones in vitro: calcium-dependent action potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Murase, K; Randić, M

    1983-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties of dorsal horn neurones have been investigated in the immature rat in vitro spinal cord slice preparation. 2. Intracellular recordings from dorsal horn neurones show that direct or orthodromic stimulation generates action potentials followed by a brief after-hyperpolarization. Synaptic potentials were elicited by the activation of primary afferent fibres in the dorsal root. 3. Input resistance for dorsal horn neurones ranged from 48 to 267 M omega, and the membrane time constant was in the range of 4-19 ms. 4. In response to strong depolarizing currents dorsal horn neurones perfused with TTX and TEA frequently exhibit a slow regenerative depolarizing potential followed by a slow after-hyperpolarization. The depolarizing potential probably results from an influx of Ca. It is blocked by low concentration Ca, Co or Mn, and enhanced by high levels of extracellular Ca. 5. There is, in addition, a low-threshold Ca-dependent response which is activated at membrane potentials more negative than -65 mV and has a maximum rate of rise at the polarization level of about -80 mV. 6. The addition of Ba or TEA to the perfusing medium provided support for the Ca-dependence of the low- and high-threshold responses, and the lack of fast inactivation of the high-threshold Ca potential. Images Plate 1 PMID:6306228

  2. Action potential energy efficiency varies among neuron types in vertebrates and invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Stemmler, Martin; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2010-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs) places high demands on the energetic resources of neural tissue. Each AP forces ATP-driven ion pumps to work harder to restore the ionic concentration gradients, thus consuming more energy. Here, we ask whether the ionic currents underlying the AP can be predicted theoretically from the principle of minimum energy consumption. A long-held supposition that APs are energetically wasteful, based on theoretical analysis of the squid giant axon AP, has recently been overturned by studies that measured the currents contributing to the AP in several mammalian neurons. In the single compartment models studied here, AP energy consumption varies greatly among vertebrate and invertebrate neurons, with several mammalian neuron models using close to the capacitive minimum of energy needed. Strikingly, energy consumption can increase by more than ten-fold simply by changing the overlap of the Na(+) and K(+) currents during the AP without changing the APs shape. As a consequence, the height and width of the AP are poor predictors of energy consumption. In the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the squid axon, optimizing the kinetics or number of Na(+) and K(+) channels can whittle down the number of ATP molecules needed for each AP by a factor of four. In contrast to the squid AP, the temporal profile of the currents underlying APs of some mammalian neurons are nearly perfectly matched to the optimized properties of ionic conductances so as to minimize the ATP cost. PMID:20617202

  3. Spatial dynamics of action potentials estimated by dendritic Ca(2+) signals in insect projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiroto; Mitani, Ruriko

    2015-11-13

    The spatial dynamics of action potentials, including their propagation and the location of spike initiation zone (SIZ), are crucial for the computation of a single neuron. Compared with mammalian central neurons, the spike dynamics of invertebrate neurons remain relatively unknown. Thus, we examined the spike dynamics based on single spike-induced Ca(2+) signals in the dendrites of cricket mechanosensory projection neurons, known as giant interneurons (GIs). The Ca(2+) transients induced by a synaptically evoked single spike were larger than those induced by an antidromic spike, whereas subthreshold synaptic potentials caused no elevation of Ca(2+). These results indicate that synaptic activity enhances the dendritic Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Stimulation of the presynaptic sensory afferents ipsilateral to the recording site evoked a dendritic spike with higher amplitude than contralateral stimulation, thereby suggesting that alteration of the spike waveform resulted in synaptic enhancement of the dendritic Ca(2+) transients. The SIZ estimated from the spatial distribution of the difference in the Ca(2+) amplitude was distributed throughout the right and left dendritic branches across the primary neurite connecting them in GIs. PMID:26456645

  4. Alcohol action on a neuronal membrane receptor: evidence for a direct interaction with the receptor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Peoples, R W; Weight, F F

    1994-01-01

    For almost a century, alcohols have been thought to produce their effects by actions on the membrane lipids of central nervous system neurons--the well known "lipid theory" of alcohol action. The rationale for this theory is the correlation of potency with oil/water or membrane/buffer partition coefficient. Although a number of recent studies have shown that alcohols can affect the function of certain neuronal neurotransmitter receptors, there is no evidence that the alcohols interact directly with these membrane proteins. In the present study, we report that inhibition of a neuronal neurotransmitter receptor, an ATP-gated ion channel, by a series of alcohols exhibits a distinct cutoff effect. For alcohols with a molecular volume of < or = 42.2 ml/mol, potency for inhibiting ATP-activated current was correlated with lipid solubility (order of potency: 1-propanol = trifluoroethanol > monochloroethanol > ethanol > methanol). However, despite increased lipid solubility, alcohols with a molecular volume of > or = 46.1 ml/mol (1-butanol, 1-pentanol, trichloroethanol, and dichloroethanol) were without effect on the ATP-activated current. The results suggest that alcohols inhibit the function of this neurotransmitter receptor by interacting with a small hydrophobic pocket on the receptor protein. PMID:8058780

  5. In vivo neuronal action potential recordings via three-dimensional microscale needle-electrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Fujishiro, Akifumi; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Kawashima, Takahiro; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Very fine needle-electrode arrays potentially offer both low invasiveness and high spatial resolution of electrophysiological neuronal recordings in vivo. Herein we report the penetrating and recording capabilities of silicon-growth-based three-dimensional microscale-diameter needle-electrodes arrays. The fabricated needles exhibit a circular-cone shape with a 3-μm-diameter tip and a 210-μm length. Due to the microscale diameter, our silicon needles are more flexible than other microfabricated silicon needles with larger diameters. Coating the microscale-needle-tip with platinum black results in an impedance of ~600 kΩ in saline with output/input signal amplitude ratios of more than 90% at 40 Hz–10 kHz. The needles can penetrate into the whisker barrel area of a rat's cerebral cortex, and the action potentials recorded from some neurons exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~300 μVpp. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo neuronal action potential recordings with a microscale needle-electrode array fabricated using silicon growth technology. PMID:24785307

  6. In vivo neuronal action potential recordings via three-dimensional microscale needle-electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishiro, Akifumi; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Kawashima, Takahiro; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2014-05-01

    Very fine needle-electrode arrays potentially offer both low invasiveness and high spatial resolution of electrophysiological neuronal recordings in vivo. Herein we report the penetrating and recording capabilities of silicon-growth-based three-dimensional microscale-diameter needle-electrodes arrays. The fabricated needles exhibit a circular-cone shape with a 3-μm-diameter tip and a 210-μm length. Due to the microscale diameter, our silicon needles are more flexible than other microfabricated silicon needles with larger diameters. Coating the microscale-needle-tip with platinum black results in an impedance of ~600 kΩ in saline with output/input signal amplitude ratios of more than 90% at 40 Hz-10 kHz. The needles can penetrate into the whisker barrel area of a rat's cerebral cortex, and the action potentials recorded from some neurons exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~300 μVpp. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo neuronal action potential recordings with a microscale needle-electrode array fabricated using silicon growth technology.

  7. In vivo neuronal action potential recordings via three-dimensional microscale needle-electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Fujishiro, Akifumi; Kaneko, Hidekazu; Kawashima, Takahiro; Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Very fine needle-electrode arrays potentially offer both low invasiveness and high spatial resolution of electrophysiological neuronal recordings in vivo. Herein we report the penetrating and recording capabilities of silicon-growth-based three-dimensional microscale-diameter needle-electrodes arrays. The fabricated needles exhibit a circular-cone shape with a 3-μm-diameter tip and a 210-μm length. Due to the microscale diameter, our silicon needles are more flexible than other microfabricated silicon needles with larger diameters. Coating the microscale-needle-tip with platinum black results in an impedance of ~600 kΩ in saline with output/input signal amplitude ratios of more than 90% at 40 Hz-10 kHz. The needles can penetrate into the whisker barrel area of a rat's cerebral cortex, and the action potentials recorded from some neurons exhibit peak-to-peak amplitudes of ~300 μVpp. These results demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo neuronal action potential recordings with a microscale needle-electrode array fabricated using silicon growth technology. PMID:24785307

  8. Supporting data for characterization of non-coding RNAs associated with the Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prameet; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Peter Wong, Tsun-Hon; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs and microRNAs control gene expression to determine central nervous system development and function. Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) is a cell adhesion molecule that plays an important role in neurite outgrowth during neuronal development and its precise expression is crucial for correct brain development. The data described here is related to the research article titled "A long non-coding RNA, BC048612 and a microRNA, miR-203 coordinate the gene expression of Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) adhesion protein" [1]. This data article contains detailed bioinformatics analysis of genetic signatures at the Negr1 gene locus retrieved from the UCSC genome browser. This approach could be adopted to identify putative regulatory non-coding RNAs in other tissues and diseases. PMID:26977442

  9. A common neuronal code for perceptual processes in visual cortex? Comparing choice and attentional correlates in V5/MT.

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Kristine

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, sensory neuroscience has moved from describing response properties to external stimuli in cerebral cortex to establishing connections between neuronal activity and sensory perception. The seminal studies by Newsome, Movshon and colleagues in the awake behaving macaque firmly link single cells in extrastriate area V5/MT and perception of motion. A decade later, extrastriate visual cortex appears awash with neuronal correlates for many different perceptual tasks. Examples are attentional signals, choice signals for ambiguous images, correlates for binocular rivalry, stereo and shape perception, and so on. These diverse paradigms are aimed at elucidating the neuronal code for perceptual processes, but it has been little studied how they directly compare or even interact. In this paper, I explore to what degree the measured neuronal signals in V5/MT for choice and attentional paradigms might reflect a common neuronal mechanism for visual perception. PMID:15306408

  10. Trichloroethanol alters action potentials in a subgroup of primary sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Marco; Hempelmann, Gunter; Scholz, Andreas

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the effects of 2,2,2-trichloroethanol (TCE), the active metabolite of chloral hydrate, on large-conductance calcium-activated K+ channels (BKCa channels) of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones. In outside-out patches, 2 and 5 mM TCE increased the open probability of BKCa channels to 1.7-fold and 2.8-fold of control, respectively. In 50% of the cells investigated (group A) the action potential (AP) was shortened reversibly by TCE by 20% and the whole-cell outward-current was increased by 44%. Both effects could be antagonized by iberiotoxin. In a second group of neurone (group B), TCE prolonged the AP duration. The effects of TCE in group A, which was 20-fold more potent than ethanol on BKCa channels and AP might contribute to the described analgesic effect of chloral hydrate. PMID:11997700

  11. Additivity of Pyrethroid Actions on Sodium Influx in Cerebrocortical Neurons in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Shafer, Timothy J.; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gennings, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pyrethroid insecticides bind to voltage-gated sodium channels and modify their gating kinetics, thereby disrupting neuronal function. Although previous work has tested the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo, this has not been assessed directly at the primary molecular target using a functional measure. Objectives: We investigated the potency and efficacy of 11 structurally diverse food-use pyrethroids to evoke sodium (Na+) influx in neurons and tested the hypothesis of dose additivity for a mixture of these same 11 compounds. Methods: We determined pyrethroid-induced increases in Na+ influx in primary cultures of cerebrocortical neurons using the Na+-sensitive dye sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI). Concentration-dependent responses for 11 pyrethroids were determined, and the response to dilutions of a mixture of all 11 compounds at an equimolar mixing ratio was assessed. Additivity was tested assuming a dose-additive model. Results: Seven pyrethroids produced concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ influx. The rank order of potency was deltamethrin > S-bioallethrin > β-cyfluthrin > λ-cyhalothrin > esfenvalerate > tefluthrin > fenpropathrin. Cypermethrin and bifenthrin produced modest increases in Na+ influx, whereas permethrin and resmethrin were inactive. When all 11 pyrethroids were present at an equimolar mixing ratio, their actions on Na+ influx were consistent with a dose-additive model. Conclusions: These data provide in vitro relative potency and efficacy measurements for 7 pyrethroid compounds in intact mammalian neurons. Despite differences in individual compound potencies, we found the action of a mixture of all 11 pyrethroids to be additive when we used an appropriate statistical model. These results are consistent with a previous report of the additivity of pyrethroids in vivo. PMID:21665567

  12. Autocrine action of BDNF on dendrite development of adult-born hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Chang, Xingya; She, Liang; Xu, Duo; Huang, Wei; Poo, Mu-ming

    2015-06-01

    Dendrite development of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus is critical for their incorporation into existing hippocampal circuits, but the cellular mechanisms regulating their dendrite development remains largely unclear. In this study, we examined the function of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is expressed in adult-born GCs, in regulating their dendrite morphogenesis. Using retrovirus-mediated gene transfection, we found that deletion and overexpression of BDNF in adult-born GCs resulted in the reduction and elevation of dendrite growth, respectively. This effect was mainly due to the autocrine rather than paracrine action of BDNF, because deletion of BDNF only in the newborn GCs resulted in dendrite abnormality of these neurons to a similar extent as that observed in conditional knockout (cKO) mice with BDNF deleted in the entire forebrain. Furthermore, selective expression of BDNF in adult-born GCs in BDNF cKO mice fully restored normal dendrite development. The BDNF autocrine action was also required for the development of normal density of spines and normal percentage of spines containing the postsynaptic marker PSD-95, suggesting autocrine BDNF regulation of synaptogenesis. Furthermore, increased dendrite growth of adult-born GCs caused by voluntary exercise was abolished by BDNF deletion specifically in these neurons and elevated dendrite growth due to BDNF overexpression in these neurons was prevented by reducing neuronal activity with coexpression of inward rectifier potassium channels, consistent with activity-dependent autocrine BDNF secretion. Therefore, BDNF expressed in adult-born GCs plays a critical role in dendrite development by acting as an autocrine factor. PMID:26041908

  13. Optical recording of action potentials in mammalian neurons using a microbial rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Kralj, Joel M.; Douglass, Adam D.; Hochbaum, Daniel R.; Maclaurin, Dougal; Cohen, Adam E.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable optical detection of single action potentials in mammalian neurons has been one of the longest-standing challenges in neuroscience. Here we achieve this goal by using the endogenous fluorescence of a microbial rhodopsin protein, Archaerhodopsin 3 (Arch) from Halorubrum sodomense, expressed in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This genetically encoded voltage indicator exhibited an approximately 10-fold improvement in sensitivity and speed over existing protein-based voltage indicators, with a roughly linear two-fold increase in brightness between −150 mV and +150 mV and a sub-millisecond response time. Arch detected single electrically triggered action potentials with an optical signal-to-noise ratio > 10. The mutant Arch(D95N) lacked endogenous proton pumping and showed 50% greater sensitivity than wild-type, but had a slower response (41 ms). Nonetheless, Arch(D95N) also resolved individual action potentials. Microbial rhodopsin-based voltage indicators promise to enable optical interrogation of complex neural circuits, and electrophysiology in systems for which electrode-based techniques are challenging. PMID:22120467

  14. Synaptic diversity enables temporal coding of coincident multi-sensory inputs in single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chabrol, François P.; Arenz, Alexander; Wiechert, Martin T.; Margrie, Troy W.; DiGregorio, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the brain to rapidly process information from multiple pathways is critical for reliable execution of complex sensory-motor behaviors, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying a neuronal representation of multimodal stimuli are poorly understood. Here we explored the possibility that the physiological diversity of mossy fiber (MF) to granule cell (GC) synapses within the mouse vestibulocerebellum may contribute to the processing of coincident multisensory information at the level of individual GCs. We found that the strength and short-term dynamics of individual MF-GC synapses can act as biophysical signatures for primary vestibular, secondary vestibular and visual input pathways. The majority of GCs receive inputs from different modalities, which when co-activated, produced enhanced GC firing rates and distinct first spike latencies. Thus, pathway-specific synaptic response properties permit temporal coding of correlated multisensory input by single GCs, thereby enriching sensory representation and facilitating pattern separation. PMID:25821914

  15. A General Odorant Background Affects the Coding of Pheromone Stimulus Intermittency in Specialist Olfactory Receptor Neurones

    PubMed Central

    Rouyar, Angela; Party, Virginie; Prešern, Janez; Blejec, Andrej; Renou, Michel

    2011-01-01

    In nature the aerial trace of pheromone used by male moths to find a female appears as a train of discontinuous pulses separated by gaps among a complex odorant background constituted of plant volatiles. We investigated the effect of such background odor on behavior and coding of temporal parameters of pheromone pulse trains in the pheromone olfactory receptor neurons of Spodoptera littoralis. Effects of linalool background were tested by measuring walking behavior towards a source of pheromone. While velocity and orientation index did drop when linalool was turned on, both parameters recovered back to pre-background values after 40 s with linalool still present. Photo-ionization detector was used to characterize pulse delivery by our stimulator. The photo-ionization detector signal reached 71% of maximum amplitude at 50 ms pulses and followed the stimulus period at repetition rates up to 10 pulses/s. However, at high pulse rates the concentration of the odorant did not return to base level during inter-pulse intervals. Linalool decreased the intensity and shortened the response of receptor neurons to pulses. High contrast (>10 dB) in firing rate between pulses and inter-pulse intervals was observed for 1 and 4 pulses/s, both with and without background. Significantly more neurons followed the 4 pulses/s pattern when delivered over linalool; at the same time the information content was preserved almost to the control values. Rapid recovery of behavior shows that change of perceived intensity is more important than absolute stimulus intensity. While decreasing the response intensity, background odor preserved the temporal parameters of the specific signal. PMID:22028879

  16. A coding-independent function of an alternative Ube3a transcript during neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Valluy, Jeremy; Bicker, Silvia; Aksoy-Aksel, Ayla; Lackinger, Martin; Sumer, Simon; Fiore, Roberto; Wüst, Tatjana; Seffer, Dominik; Metge, Franziska; Dieterich, Christoph; Wöhr, Markus; Schwarting, Rainer; Schratt, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Ube3a is an important regulator of activity-dependent synapse development and plasticity. Ube3a mutations cause Angelman syndrome and have been associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the biological significance of alternative Ube3a transcripts generated in mammalian neurons remains unknown. We report here that Ube3a1 RNA, a transcript that encodes a truncated Ube3a protein lacking catalytic activity, prevents exuberant dendrite growth and promotes spine maturation in rat hippocampal neurons. Surprisingly, Ube3a1 RNA function was independent of its coding sequence but instead required a unique 3' untranslated region and an intact microRNA pathway. Ube3a1 RNA knockdown increased activity of the plasticity-regulating miR-134, suggesting that Ube3a1 RNA acts as a dendritic competing endogenous RNA. Accordingly, the dendrite-growth-promoting effect of Ube3a1 RNA knockdown in vivo is abolished in mice lacking miR-134. Taken together, our results define a noncoding function of an alternative Ube3a transcript in dendritic protein synthesis, with potential implications for Angelman syndrome and ASD. PMID:25867122

  17. Vibrotactile discrimination in the rat whisker system is based on neuronal coding of instantaneous kinematic cues.

    PubMed

    Waiblinger, Christian; Brugger, Dominik; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2015-04-01

    Which physical parameter of vibrissa deflections is extracted by the rodent tactile system for discrimination? Particularly, it remains unclear whether perception has access to instantaneous kinematic parameters (i.e., the details of the trajectory) or relies on temporally integration of the movement trajectory such as frequency (e.g., spectral information) and intensity (e.g., mean speed). Here, we use a novel detection of change paradigm in head-fixed rats, which presents pulsatile vibrissa stimuli in seamless sequence for discrimination. This procedure ensures that processes of decision making can directly tap into sensory signals (no memory functions involved). We find that discrimination performance based on instantaneous kinematic cues far exceeds the ones provided by frequency and intensity. Neuronal modeling based on barrel cortex single units shows that small populations of sensitive neurons provide a transient signal that optimally fits the characteristic of the subject's perception. The present study is the first to show that perceptual read-out is superior in situations allowing the subject to base perception on detailed trajectory cues, that is, instantaneous kinematic variables. A possible impact of this finding on tactile systems of other species is suggested by evidence for instantaneous coding also in primates. PMID:24169940

  18. Postsynaptic mechanisms underlying the excitatory action of histamine on medial vestibular nucleus neurons in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Yu, Lei; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Peng, Shi-Yu; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Anti-histaminergic drugs have been widely used in the clinical treatment of vestibular disorders and most studies concentrate on their presynaptic actions. The present study investigated the postsynaptic effect of histamine on medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons and the underlying mechanisms. Experimental Approach Histamine-induced postsynaptic actions on MVN neurons and the corresponding receptor and ionic mechanisms were detected by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings on rat brain slices. The distribution of postsynaptic histamine H1, H2 and H4 receptors was mapped by double and single immunostaining. Furthermore, the expression of mRNAs for H1, H2 and H4 receptors and for subtypes of Na+–Ca2+ exchangers (NCXs) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels was assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Key Results A marked postsynaptic excitatory effect, co-mediated by histamine H1 and H2 receptors, was involved in the histamine-induced depolarization of MVN neurons. Postsynaptic H1 and H2 rather than H4 receptors were co-localized in the same MVN neurons. NCXs contributed to the inward current mediated by H1 receptors, whereas HCN channels were responsible for excitation induced by activation of H2 receptors. Moreover, NCX1 and NCX3 rather than NCX2, and HCN1 rather than HCN2-4 mRNAs, were abundantly expressed in MVN. Conclusion and Implications NCXs coupled to H1 receptors and HCN channels linked to H2 receptors co-mediate the strong postsynaptic excitatory action of histamine on MVN neurons. These results highlight an active role of postsynaptic mechanisms in the modulation by central histaminergic systems of vestibular functions and suggest potential targets for clinical treatment of vestibular disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23713466

  19. Modulation in the mirror neuron system when action prediction is not satisfied.

    PubMed

    Plata Bello, Julio; Modroño, Cristián; Marcano, Francisco; González-Mora, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    The ability to understand competitive games is closely connected to the mirror neuron system (MNS). This network is activated not only when an action is performed, but also when it is observed. Apart from allowing the understanding of actions performed by others, the MNS has been implicated in predicting subsequent actions. However, the results concerning the modulation of this network by the final outcome of these predictions are contradictory. These contradictions may be related to the use of complex experimental conditions. The aim of this research is to identify changes in the activity of the MNS when the predictions are or are not satisfied in a simple intransitive action-based game. An event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study was conducted. It consisted of the observation of videos with two actors playing the well-known rock-paper-scissors game. The participants were asked to predict the response of the second actor when the first actor performed one of the three possible actions. In some videos (congruents) the prediction was satisfied, but in the rest of the videos (incongruents) the prediction was not satisfied. When the result was shown, higher activity in the MNS was observed in the congruent videos than in the incongruent ones. Therefore, the observation of a simple manual game leads to a significant activation of the MNS, and this activity seems to be modulated by the final outcome of a prediction, and when predictions are satisfied the activity is higher. PMID:25722245

  20. Hearing in action; auditory properties of neurons in the red nucleus of alert primates

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Jonathan M.; Mylius, Judith; Scheich, Henning; Brosch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The response of neurons in the Red Nucleus pars magnocellularis (RNm) to both tone bursts and electrical stimulation were observed in three cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis), in a series of studies primarily designed to characterize the influence of the dopaminergic ventral midbrain on auditory processing. Compared to its role in motor behavior, little is known about the sensory response properties of neurons in the red nucleus (RN); particularly those concerning the auditory modality. Sites in the RN were recognized by observing electrically evoked body movements characteristic for this deep brain structure. In this study we applied brief monopolar electrical stimulation to 118 deep brain sites at a maximum intensity of 200 μA, thus evoking minimal body movements. Auditory sensitivity of RN neurons was analyzed more thoroughly at 15 sites, with the majority exhibiting broad tuning curves and phase locking up to 1.03 kHz. Since the RN appears to receive inputs from a very early stage of the ascending auditory system, our results suggest that sounds can modify the motor control exerted by this brain nucleus. At selected locations, we also tested for the presence of functional connections between the RN and the auditory cortex by inserting additional microelectrodes into the auditory cortex and investigating how action potentials and local field potentials (LFPs) were affected by electrical stimulation of the RN. PMID:24860417

  1. A novel analysis of excitatory currents during an action potential from suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A new application of the action potential (AP) voltage-clamp technique is described based on computational analysis. An experimentally recorded AP is digitized. The resulting Vi vs. ti data set is applied to mathematical models of the ionic conductances underlying excitability for the cell from which the AP was recorded to test model validity. The method is illustrated for APs from suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons and the underlying tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, INa, and the Ca2+ current, ICa. Voltage-step recordings have been made for both components from SCN neurons (Jackson et al. 2004). The combination of voltage-step and AP clamp results provides richer constraints for mathematical models of voltage-gated ionic conductances than either set of results alone, in particular the voltage-step results. For SCN neurons the long-term goal of this work is a realistic mathematical model of the SCN AP in which the equations for INa and ICa obtained from this analysis will be a part. Moreover, the method described in this report is general. It can be applied to any excitable cell. PMID:24047903

  2. Resibufogenin and Cinobufagin Activate Central Neurons through an Ouabain-Like Action

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Jun; Sun, Liqin; Heinbockel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Cinobufagin and resibufogenin are two major effective bufadienolides of Chan su (toad venom), which is a Chinese medicine obtained from the skin venom gland of toads and is used as a cardiotonic and central nervous system (CNS) respiratory agent, an analgesic and anesthetic, and as a remedy for ulcers. Many clinical cases showed that Chan su has severe side-effects on the CNS, causing shortness of breath, breathlessness, seizure, coma and cardiac arrhythmia. We used whole-cell recordings from brain slices to determine the effects of bufadienolides on excitability of a principal neuron in main olfactory bulb (MOB), mitral cells (MCs), and the cellular mechanism underlying the excitation. At higher concentrations, cinobufagin and resibufogenin induced irreversible over-excitation of MCs indicating a toxic effect. At lower concentrations, they concentration-dependently increased spontaneous firing rate, depolarized the membrane potential of MCs, and elicited inward currents. The excitatory effects were due to a direct action on MCs rather than an indirect phasic action. Bufadienolides and ouabain had similar effects on firing of MCs which suggested that bufadienolides activated neuron through a ouabain-like effect, most likely by inhibiting Na+/K+-ATPase. The direct action of bufadienolide on brain Na+ channels was tested by recordings from stably Nav1.2-transfected cells. Bufadienolides failed to make significant changes of the main properties of Nav1.2 channels in current amplitude, current-voltage (I-V) relationships, activation and inactivation. Our results suggest that inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase may be involved in both the pharmacological and toxic effects of bufadienolide-evoked CNS excitation. PMID:25420080

  3. The tactile motion aftereffect suggests an intensive code for speed in neurons sensitive to both speed and direction of motion.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, S; Birznieks, I; Vickery, R M; Holcombe, A O; Seizova-Cajic, T

    2016-03-01

    Neurophysiological studies in primates have found that direction-sensitive neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) generally increase their response rate with increasing speed of object motion across the skin and show little evidence of speed tuning. We employed psychophysics to determine whether human perception of motion direction could be explained by features of such neurons and whether evidence can be found for a speed-tuned process. After adaptation to motion across the skin, a subsequently presented dynamic test stimulus yields an impression of motion in the opposite direction. We measured the strength of this tactile motion aftereffect (tMAE) induced with different combinations of adapting and test speeds. Distal-to-proximal or proximal-to-distal adapting motion was applied to participants' index fingers using a tactile array, after which participants reported the perceived direction of a bidirectional test stimulus. An intensive code for speed, like that observed in SI neurons, predicts greater adaptation (and a stronger tMAE) the faster the adapting speed, regardless of the test speed. In contrast, speed tuning of direction-sensitive neurons predicts the greatest tMAE when the adapting and test stimuli have matching speeds. We found that the strength of the tMAE increased monotonically with adapting speed, regardless of the test speed, showing no evidence of speed tuning. Our data are consistent with neurophysiological findings that suggest an intensive code for speed along the motion processing pathways comprising neurons sensitive both to speed and direction of motion. PMID:26823511

  4. ETHANOL ACTION ON DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN THE VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA: INTERACTION WITH INTRINSIC ION CHANNELS AND NEUROTRANSMITTER INPUTS

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Hitoshi; Morrisett, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    The dopaminergic system originating in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) has been extensively studied over the past decades as a critical neural substrate involved in the development of alcoholism and addiction to other drugs of abuse. Accumulating evidence indicates that ethanol modulates the functional output of this system by directly affecting the firing activity of VTA dopamine neurons, whereas withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure leads to a reduction in the functional output of these neurons. This chapter will provide an update on the mechanistic investigations of the acute ethanol action on dopamine neuron activity and the neuroadaptations/plasticities in the VTA produced by previous ethanol experience. PMID:20813245

  5. Consequences of Converting Graded to Action Potentials upon Neural Information Coding and Energy Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Laughlin, Simon Barry; Niven, Jeremy Edward

    2014-01-01

    Information is encoded in neural circuits using both graded and action potentials, converting between them within single neurons and successive processing layers. This conversion is accompanied by information loss and a drop in energy efficiency. We investigate the biophysical causes of this loss of information and efficiency by comparing spiking neuron models, containing stochastic voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels, with generator potential and graded potential models lacking voltage-gated Na+ channels. We identify three causes of information loss in the generator potential that are the by-product of action potential generation: (1) the voltage-gated Na+ channels necessary for action potential generation increase intrinsic noise and (2) introduce non-linearities, and (3) the finite duration of the action potential creates a ‘footprint’ in the generator potential that obscures incoming signals. These three processes reduce information rates by ∼50% in generator potentials, to ∼3 times that of spike trains. Both generator potentials and graded potentials consume almost an order of magnitude less energy per second than spike trains. Because of the lower information rates of generator potentials they are substantially less energy efficient than graded potentials. However, both are an order of magnitude more efficient than spike trains due to the higher energy costs and low information content of spikes, emphasizing that there is a two-fold cost of converting analogue to digital; information loss and cost inflation. PMID:24465197

  6. Consequences of converting graded to action potentials upon neural information coding and energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Laughlin, Simon Barry; Niven, Jeremy Edward

    2014-01-01

    Information is encoded in neural circuits using both graded and action potentials, converting between them within single neurons and successive processing layers. This conversion is accompanied by information loss and a drop in energy efficiency. We investigate the biophysical causes of this loss of information and efficiency by comparing spiking neuron models, containing stochastic voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) channels, with generator potential and graded potential models lacking voltage-gated Na(+) channels. We identify three causes of information loss in the generator potential that are the by-product of action potential generation: (1) the voltage-gated Na(+) channels necessary for action potential generation increase intrinsic noise and (2) introduce non-linearities, and (3) the finite duration of the action potential creates a 'footprint' in the generator potential that obscures incoming signals. These three processes reduce information rates by ∼50% in generator potentials, to ∼3 times that of spike trains. Both generator potentials and graded potentials consume almost an order of magnitude less energy per second than spike trains. Because of the lower information rates of generator potentials they are substantially less energy efficient than graded potentials. However, both are an order of magnitude more efficient than spike trains due to the higher energy costs and low information content of spikes, emphasizing that there is a two-fold cost of converting analogue to digital; information loss and cost inflation. PMID:24465197

  7. Asymmetry of Neuronal Combinatorial Codes Arises from Minimizing Synaptic Weight Change.

    PubMed

    Leibold, Christian; Monsalve-Mercado, Mauro M

    2016-08-01

    Synaptic change is a costly resource, particularly for brain structures that have a high demand of synaptic plasticity. For example, building memories of object positions requires efficient use of plasticity resources since objects can easily change their location in space and yet we can memorize object locations. But how should a neural circuit ideally be set up to integrate two input streams (object location and identity) in case the overall synaptic changes should be minimized during ongoing learning? This letter provides a theoretical framework on how the two input pathways should ideally be specified. Generally the model predicts that the information-rich pathway should be plastic and encoded sparsely, whereas the pathway conveying less information should be encoded densely and undergo learning only if a neuronal representation of a novel object has to be established. As an example, we consider hippocampal area CA1, which combines place and object information. The model thereby provides a normative account of hippocampal rate remapping, that is, modulations of place field activity by changes of local cues. It may as well be applicable to other brain areas (such as neocortical layer V) that learn combinatorial codes from multiple input streams. PMID:27348595

  8. Multi-Scale Locality-Constrained Spatiotemporal Coding for Local Feature Based Human Action Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Wei; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Maojun

    2013-01-01

    We propose a Multiscale Locality-Constrained Spatiotemporal Coding (MLSC) method to improve the traditional bag of features (BoF) algorithm which ignores the spatiotemporal relationship of local features for human action recognition in video. To model this spatiotemporal relationship, MLSC involves the spatiotemporal position of local feature into feature coding processing. It projects local features into a sub space-time-volume (sub-STV) and encodes them with a locality-constrained linear coding. A group of sub-STV features obtained from one video with MLSC and max-pooling are used to classify this video. In classification stage, the Locality-Constrained Group Sparse Representation (LGSR) is adopted to utilize the intrinsic group information of these sub-STV features. The experimental results on KTH, Weizmann, and UCF sports datasets show that our method achieves better performance than the competing local spatiotemporal feature-based human action recognition methods. PMID:24194681

  9. Recording Single Neurons' Action Potentials from Freely Moving Pigeons Across Three Stages of Learning

    PubMed Central

    Güntürkün, Onur

    2014-01-01

    While the subject of learning has attracted immense interest from both behavioral and neural scientists, only relatively few investigators have observed single-neuron activity while animals are acquiring an operantly conditioned response, or when that response is extinguished. But even in these cases, observation periods usually encompass only a single stage of learning, i.e. acquisition or extinction, but not both (exceptions include protocols employing reversal learning; see Bingman et al.1 for an example). However, acquisition and extinction entail different learning mechanisms and are therefore expected to be accompanied by different types and/or loci of neural plasticity. Accordingly, we developed a behavioral paradigm which institutes three stages of learning in a single behavioral session and which is well suited for the simultaneous recording of single neurons' action potentials. Animals are trained on a single-interval forced choice task which requires mapping each of two possible choice responses to the presentation of different novel visual stimuli (acquisition). After having reached a predefined performance criterion, one of the two choice responses is no longer reinforced (extinction). Following a certain decrement in performance level, correct responses are reinforced again (reacquisition). By using a new set of stimuli in every session, animals can undergo the acquisition-extinction-reacquisition process repeatedly. Because all three stages of learning occur in a single behavioral session, the paradigm is ideal for the simultaneous observation of the spiking output of multiple single neurons. We use pigeons as model systems, but the task can easily be adapted to any other species capable of conditioned discrimination learning. PMID:24961391

  10. Non-coding RNA interact to regulate neuronal development and function

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Bharat R.; Choudhary, Ashwani; Sarangdhar, Mayuresh A.; Venkatesh, K. V.; Gadgil, Chetan J.; Pillai, Beena

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is one of the most complex biological systems, and the cognitive abilities have greatly expanded compared to invertebrates without much expansion in the number of protein coding genes. This suggests that gene regulation plays a very important role in the development and function of nervous system, by acting at multiple levels such as transcription and translation. In this article we discuss the regulatory roles of three classes of non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNAs)—microRNAs (miRNAs), piwi-interacting RNA (piRNAs) and long-non-coding RNA (lncRNA), in the process of neurogenesis and nervous function including control of synaptic plasticity and potential roles in neurodegenerative diseases. miRNAs are involved in diverse processes including neurogenesis where they channelize the cellular physiology toward neuronal differentiation. miRNAs can also indirectly influence neurogenesis by regulating the proliferation and self renewal of neural stem cells and are dysregulated in several neurodegenerative diseases. miRNAs are also known to regulate synaptic plasticity and are usually found to be co-expressed with their targets. The dynamics of gene regulation is thus dependent on the local architecture of the gene regulatory network (GRN) around the miRNA and its targets. piRNAs had been classically known to regulate transposons in the germ cells. However, piRNAs have been, recently, found to be expressed in the brain and possibly function by imparting epigenetic changes by DNA methylation. piRNAs are known to be maternally inherited and we assume that they may play a role in early development. We also explore the possible function of piRNAs in regulating the expansion of transposons in the brain. Brain is known to express several lncRNA but functional roles in brain development are attributed to a few lncRNA while functions of most of the them remain unknown. We review the roles of some known lncRNA and explore the other possible functions of lnc

  11. Multifocal fluorescence microscope for fast optical recordings of neuronal action potentials.

    PubMed

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B; Hardy, Nicholas F; Buonomano, Dean V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera's native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca(2+) transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca(2+) sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  12. The Anorectic Effect of CNTF Does Not Require Action in Leptin-Responsive Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Stefater, M. A.; MacLennan, A. J.; Lee, N.; Patterson, C. M.; Haller, A.; Sorrell, J.; Myers, M.; Woods, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Leptin resistance is a feature of obesity that poses a significant therapeutic challenge. Any treatment that is effective to reduce body weight in obese patients must overcome or circumvent leptin resistance, which promotes the maintenance of excess body fat in obese individuals. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is unique in its ability to reduce food intake and body weight in obese, leptin-resistant humans and rodents. Although attempts to use CNTF as an obesity therapy failed due to the development of neutralizing antibodies to the drug, efforts to understand mechanisms for CNTF's anorectic effects provide an opportunity to develop new drugs for leptin-resistant individuals. CNTF and leptin share several structural, anatomic, and signaling properties, but it is not understood whether or how the two cytokines might interact to affect energy balance. Here, we conditionally deleted the CNTF receptor (CNTFR) subunit, CNTFRα, in cells expressing leptin receptors. We found that CNTFR signaling in leptin-responsive neurons is not required for endogenous maintenance of energy balance and is not required for the anorectic response to exogenous administration of a CNTF agonist. These results indicate that despite anatomical overlap for CNTF and leptin action, CNTF appears to act within a distinct neuronal population to elicit its potent anorectic effect. PMID:22518062

  13. Regulation of Action Potential Waveforms by Axonal GABAA Receptors in Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Zhao, Yuan; Yang, Mingpo; Zeng, Shaoqun; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-01-01

    GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb) of the main axon trunk of layer –5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs) and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors. PMID:24971996

  14. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27181061

  15. Multifocal Fluorescence Microscope for Fast Optical Recordings of Neuronal Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shtrahman, Matthew; Aharoni, Daniel B.; Hardy, Nicholas F.; Buonomano, Dean V.; Arisaka, Katsushi; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, optical sensors for tracking neural activity have been developed and offer great utility. However, developing microscopy techniques that have several kHz bandwidth necessary to reliably capture optically reported action potentials (APs) at multiple locations in parallel remains a significant challenge. To our knowledge, we describe a novel microscope optimized to measure spatially distributed optical signals with submillisecond and near diffraction-limit resolution. Our design uses a spatial light modulator to generate patterned illumination to simultaneously excite multiple user-defined targets. A galvanometer driven mirror in the emission path streaks the fluorescence emanating from each excitation point during the camera exposure, using unused camera pixels to capture time varying fluorescence at rates that are ∼1000 times faster than the camera’s native frame rate. We demonstrate that this approach is capable of recording Ca2+ transients resulting from APs in neurons labeled with the Ca2+ sensor Oregon Green Bapta-1 (OGB-1), and can localize the timing of these events with millisecond resolution. Furthermore, optically reported APs can be detected with the voltage sensitive dye DiO-DPA in multiple locations within a neuron with a signal/noise ratio up to ∼40, resolving delays in arrival time along dendrites. Thus, the microscope provides a powerful tool for photometric measurements of dynamics requiring submillisecond sampling at multiple locations. PMID:25650920

  16. Mushroom body output neurons encode valence and guide memory-based action selection in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yoshinori; Sitaraman, Divya; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Kaun, Karla R; Vogt, Katrin; Belliart-Guérin, Ghislain; Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Robie, Alice A; Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Schnaitmann, Christopher; Rowell, William J; Johnston, Rebecca M; Ngo, Teri-T B; Chen, Nan; Korff, Wyatt; Nitabach, Michael N; Heberlein, Ulrike; Preat, Thomas; Branson, Kristin M; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Rubin, Gerald M

    2014-01-01

    Animals discriminate stimuli, learn their predictive value and use this knowledge to modify their behavior. In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) plays a key role in these processes. Sensory stimuli are sparsely represented by ∼2000 Kenyon cells, which converge onto 34 output neurons (MBONs) of 21 types. We studied the role of MBONs in several associative learning tasks and in sleep regulation, revealing the extent to which information flow is segregated into distinct channels and suggesting possible roles for the multi-layered MBON network. We also show that optogenetic activation of MBONs can, depending on cell type, induce repulsion or attraction in flies. The behavioral effects of MBON perturbation are combinatorial, suggesting that the MBON ensemble collectively represents valence. We propose that local, stimulus-specific dopaminergic modulation selectively alters the balance within the MBON network for those stimuli. Our results suggest that valence encoded by the MBON ensemble biases memory-based action selection. PMID:25535794

  17. Immature hippocampal neuronal networks do not develop tolerance to the excitatory actions of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Rafael; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2006-10-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) damages the hippocampus, a brain region that is involved in learning and memory processes. The mechanisms responsible for this effect of EtOH are not fully understood. We recently demonstrated that acute EtOH exposure potently stimulates oscillatory activity driven by the excitatory actions of GABA in the CA3 region of the neonatal rat hippocampus. This activity can be recorded during the growth spurt period as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). Here, we characterized the effects of prolonged EtOH exposure on GDPs. In the first study, we prepared hippocampal coronal slices from neonatal rats and exposed these to control artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) or ACSF plus 50 mM EtOH for 3-4 h. We then performed whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings from CA3 pyramidal neurons, which revealed that tolerance to the GDP stimulating effects of EtOH did not occur after continuous exposure. In the second study, we exposed neonatal rats to air or air plus 1.9 g/dl EtOH in vapor chambers for 4h/day for 1 or 3 days (neonatal peak blood EtOH concentration = 40-45 mM). We then performed slice electrophysiological studies 24 h after the end of EtOH exposure and found that there was no statistically significant difference in the acute effect of 50 mM EtOH on GDP frequency in samples from neonates exposed to air or air plus EtOH. These findings indicate that EtOH persistently stimulates network-driven oscillatory activity in the developing hippocampus. We propose that the lack of adaptive response to continuous EtOH exposure could make immature neuronal networks particularly vulnerable to the actions of this agent. PMID:17307647

  18. Rapid Sensitization of Physiological, Neuronal, and Locomotor Effects of Nicotine: Critical Role of Peripheral Drug Actions

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Magalie; Tang, Jeremy S.; Woods, Amina S.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated exposure to nicotine and other psychostimulant drugs produces persistent increases in their psychomotor and physiological effects (sensitization), a phenomenon related to the drugs' reinforcing properties and abuse potential. Here we examined the role of peripheral actions of nicotine in nicotine-induced sensitization of centrally mediated physiological parameters (brain, muscle, and skin temperatures), cortical and VTA EEG, neck EMG activity, and locomotion in freely moving rats. Repeated injections of intravenous nicotine (30 μg/kg) induced sensitization of the drug's effects on all these measures. In contrast, repeated injections of the peripherally acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (nicotinePM, 30 μg/kg, i.v.) resulted in habituation (tolerance) of the same physiological, neuronal, and behavioral measures. However, after repeated nicotine exposure, acute nicotinePM injections induced nicotine-like physiological responses: powerful cortical and VTA EEG desynchronization, EMG activation, a large brain temperature increase, but weaker hyperlocomotion. Additionally, both the acute locomotor response to nicotine and nicotine-induced locomotor sensitization were attenuated by blockade of peripheral nicotinic receptors by hexamethonium (3 mg/kg, i.v.). These data suggest that the peripheral actions of nicotine, which precede its direct central actions, serve as a conditioned interoceptive cue capable of eliciting nicotine-like physiological and neural responses after repeated nicotine exposure. Thus, by providing a neural signal to the CNS that is repeatedly paired with the direct central effects of nicotine, the drug's peripheral actions play a critical role in the development of nicotine-induced physiological, neural, and behavioral sensitization. PMID:23761889

  19. The synergistic inhibitory actions of oxcarbazepine on voltage-gated sodium and potassium currents in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells and model neurons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Wei; Huang, Chao-Ching; Lin, Ming-Wei; Tsai, Jing-Jane; Wu, Sheng-Nan

    2008-08-01

    Oxcarbazepine (OXC), one of the newer anti-epileptic drugs, has been demonstrating its efficacy on wide-spectrum neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the ionic mechanism of OXC actions in neurons remains incompletely understood. With the aid of patch-clamp technology, we first investigated the effects of OXC on ion currents in NG108-15 neuronal cells differentiated with cyclic AMP. We found OXC (0.3-30 microm) caused a reversible reduction in the amplitude of voltage-gated Na+ current (INa). The IC50 value required for the inhibition of INa by OXC was 3.1 microm. OXC (3 microm) could shift the steady-state inactivation of INa to a more negative membrane potential by approximately -9 mV with no effect on the slope of the inactivation curve, and produce a significant prolongation in the recovery of INa inactivation. Additionally, OXC was effective in suppressing persistent INa (INa(P)) elicited by long ramp pulses. The blockade of INa by OXC does not simply reduce current magnitude, but alters current kinetics. Moreover, OXC could suppress the amplitude of delayed rectifier K+ current (IK(DR)), with no effect on M-type K+ current (IK(M)). In current-clamp configuration, OXC could reduce the amplitude of action potentials and prolong action-potential duration. Furthermore, the simulations, based on hippocampal pyramidal neurons (Pinsky-Rinzel model) and a network of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, were analysed to investigate the effect of OXC on action potentials. Taken together, our results suggest that the synergistic blocking effects on INa and IK(DR) may contribute to the underlying mechanisms through which OXC affects neuronal function in vivo. PMID:18184444

  20. Emotional Actions Are Coded via Two Mechanisms: With and without Identity Representation

    PubMed Central

    Wincenciak, Joanna; Ingham, Jennie; Jellema, Tjeerd; Barraclough, Nick E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate perception of an individual's identity and emotion derived from their actions and behavior is essential for successful social functioning. Here we determined the role of identity in the representation of emotional whole-body actions using visual adaptation paradigms. Participants adapted to actors performing different whole-body actions in a happy and sad fashion. Following adaptation subsequent neutral actions appeared to convey the opposite emotion. We demonstrate two different emotional action aftereffects showing distinctive adaptation characteristics. For one short-lived aftereffect, adaptation to the emotion expressed by an individual resulted in biases in the perception of the expression of emotion by other individuals, indicating an identity-independent representation of emotional actions. A second, longer lasting, aftereffect was observed where adaptation to the emotion expressed by an individual resulted in longer-term biases in the perception of the expressions of emotion only by the same individual; this indicated an additional identity-dependent representation of emotional actions. Together, the presence of these two aftereffects indicates the existence of two mechanisms for coding emotional actions, only one of which takes into account the actor's identity. The results that we observe might parallel processing of emotion from face and voice. PMID:27242606

  1. Emotional Actions Are Coded via Two Mechanisms: With and without Identity Representation.

    PubMed

    Wincenciak, Joanna; Ingham, Jennie; Jellema, Tjeerd; Barraclough, Nick E

    2016-01-01

    Accurate perception of an individual's identity and emotion derived from their actions and behavior is essential for successful social functioning. Here we determined the role of identity in the representation of emotional whole-body actions using visual adaptation paradigms. Participants adapted to actors performing different whole-body actions in a happy and sad fashion. Following adaptation subsequent neutral actions appeared to convey the opposite emotion. We demonstrate two different emotional action aftereffects showing distinctive adaptation characteristics. For one short-lived aftereffect, adaptation to the emotion expressed by an individual resulted in biases in the perception of the expression of emotion by other individuals, indicating an identity-independent representation of emotional actions. A second, longer lasting, aftereffect was observed where adaptation to the emotion expressed by an individual resulted in longer-term biases in the perception of the expressions of emotion only by the same individual; this indicated an additional identity-dependent representation of emotional actions. Together, the presence of these two aftereffects indicates the existence of two mechanisms for coding emotional actions, only one of which takes into account the actor's identity. The results that we observe might parallel processing of emotion from face and voice. PMID:27242606

  2. Central action of FGF19 reduces hypothalamic AGRP/NPY neuron activity and improves glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Marcelin, Geneviève; Jo, Young-Hwan; Li, Xiaosong; Schwartz, Gary J; Zhang, Ying; Dun, Nae J; Lyu, Rong-Ming; Blouet, Clémence; Chang, Jaw K; Chua, Streamson

    2014-02-01

    Tight control of glucose excursions has been a long-standing goal of treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in order to ameliorate the morbidity and mortality associated with hyperglycemia. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 19 is a hormone-like enterokine released postprandially that emerged as a potential therapeutic agent for metabolic disorders, including diabetes and obesity. Remarkably, FGF19 treatment has hypoglycemic actions that remain potent in models of genetic and acquired insulin resistance. Here, we provided evidence that the central nervous system responds to FGF19 administered in the periphery. Then, in two mouse models of insulin resistance, leptin-deficiency and high-fat diet feeding, third intra-cerebro-ventricular infusions of FGF19 improved glycemic status, reduced insulin resistance and potentiated insulin signaling in the periphery. In addition, our study highlights a new mechanism of central FGF19 action, involving the suppression of AGRP/NPY neuronal activity. Overall, our work unveils novel regulatory pathways induced by FGF19 that will be useful in the design of novel strategies to control diabetes in obesity. PMID:24567901

  3. The antiallodynic action of pregabalin may depend on the suppression of spinal neuronal hyperexcitability in rats with spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Cai, Jie; Guo, Xiang-Yang; Meng, Xiu-Li; Xing, Guo-Gang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregabalin (PGB) is a novel antiepileptic drug and is also used as a first-line medication for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, the mechanisms of its analgesic effects remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the antiallodynic action of PGB in rats with neuropathic pain. METHODS: In a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spared nerve injury, mechanical allodynia, as a behavioural sign of neuropathic pain, was assessed by measuring 50% paw withdrawal threshold with von Frey filaments. Activities of dorsal horn wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons were examined by extracellular electrophysiological recording in vivo. RESULTS: Spinal administration of PGB exerted a significant antiallodynic effect and a prominent inhibitory effect on the hypersensitivity of dorsal horn WDR neurons in rats with spared nerve injury. CONCLUSION: The antiallodynic action of PGB is likely dependent on the suppression of WDR neuron hyperexcitability in rats with neuropathic pain. PMID:24851240

  4. Agrp neurons mediate Sirt1’s action on the melanocortin system and energy balance: roles for Sirt1 in neuronal firing and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Antunes, Catiele; Geliang, Gan; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Borok, Erzsebet; Nie, Yongzhan; Xu, Allison W.; Souza, Diogo O.; Gao, Qian; Diano, Sabrina; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2010-01-01

    Sirt1 has been associated with various effects of calorie restriction, including an increase in lifespan. Here we show in mice that a central regulatory component in energy metabolism, the hypothalamic melanocortin system, is affected by Sirt1, which promotes the activity and connectivity of this system resulting in negative energy balance. In adult mice, the pharmacological inhibition of brain Sirt1 activity decreased the inhibitory tone on the anorexigenic POMC neurons, as measured by the number of synaptic inputs to these neurons. When a Sirt1 inhibitor (EX-527) was injected either peripherally (i.p., 10mg/kg) or directly into the brain (i.c.v., 1.5 nmol/mouse), it decreased both food intake during the dark cycle and ghrelin-induced food intake. This effect on feeding is mediated by upstream melanocortin receptors, because the MC4R antagonist, SHU9119, reversed Sirt1’s effect on food intake. This action of Sirt1 required an appropriate shift in the mitochondrial redox state: in the absence of such an adaptation enabled by the mitochondrial protein, UCP2, Sirt1-induced cellular and behavioral responses were impaired. The selective knockout of Sirt1 in hypothalamic Agrp neurons through the use of Cre-Lox technology decreased electric responses of Agrp neurons to ghrelin and decreased food intake, leading to decreased lean mass, fat mass and body weight. The present data indicate that Sirt1 has a central mode of action by acting on the NPY/Agrp neurons to affect body metabolism. PMID:20810901

  5. Marked diversity in the action of growth factors on N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Prehn, J H

    1996-06-13

    Neuronal degeneration was induced in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by a 20-min exposure to the glutamatergic agonist, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 100 microM), and the neuroprotective activity of a set growth factors and cytokines was compared. During the early stages of degeneration, NMDA induced changes that were characteristic of neuronal necrosis, including swelling and darkening of the neuronal soma and swelling of neurites, leading to the formation of beaded varicosities ('blebs'). These changes were followed by nuclear pyknosis, formation of double-stranded DNA breaks and loss of membrane integrity. Only transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1; 1-10 ng/ml) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha; 30 ng/ml) protected the hippocampal neurons against NMDA neurotoxicity after short-term (60 min) pre-treatments. Interleukin-1 beta (10-100 ng/ml) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2; 50 ng/ml) were clearly effective when administered 24 h prior to the NMDA exposure, but not when given 60 min before the insult. Interestingly, the protective effect of interleukin-1 beta was significantly reduced in the presence of a neutralizing antibody to TGF-beta. Of note, short-term pre-treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; 5-50 ng/ml) significantly potentiated NMDA-induced neurodegeneration. These experiments demonstrate marked diversity in the actions of growth factors on NMDA-induced neuronal degeneration. PMID:8813618

  6. On-Chip Multichannel Action Potential Recording System for Electrical Measurement of Single Neurites of Neuronal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ikurou; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2007-11-01

    We have developed a multielectrode array recording system for single-neurite-firing measurement using an artificially constructed neuronal network on a chip, which has a 10 μm diameter array with electrodes spaced at 50 μm, for noninvasive 64-channel 100 kHz multirecording and the stimulation of a plurality of neurites extending from a single neuron. To improve the signal/noise ratio, the ground plane was set on the multi-electrode-array plane and platinum black was set on each of the 10 μm electrodes. Using this system, we performed a multisite recording of neurites of a single neuron of a rat hippocampal network in cases of both spontaneous firing and evoked responses to electrical stimulations, and estimated the velocity of action potential propagation among neurites of a single neuron from six recording sites. This demonstrated the potential use of our low-noise chip and our high-speed measurement system for the analysis of neuronal network activities at the single-neuron level.

  7. Ventral Pallidum Neurons Encode Incentive Value and Promote Cue-Elicited Instrumental Actions.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jocelyn M; Ambroggi, Frederic; Janak, Patricia H; Fields, Howard L

    2016-06-15

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is posited to contribute to reward seeking by conveying upstream signals from the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Yet, very little is known about how VP neuron responses contribute to behavioral responses to incentive cues. Here, we recorded activity of VP neurons in a cue-driven reward-seeking task previously shown to require neural activity in the NAc. We find that VP neurons encode both learned cue value and subsequent reward seeking and that activity in VP neurons is required for robust cue-elicited reward seeking. Surprisingly, the onset of VP neuron responses occurs at a shorter latency than cue-elicited responses in NAc neurons. This suggests that this VP encoding is not a passive response to signals generated in the NAc and that VP neurons integrate sensory and motivation-related information received directly from other mesocorticolimbic inputs. PMID:27238868

  8. Two primate-specific small non-protein-coding RNAs in transgenic mice: neuronal expression, subcellular localization and binding partners

    PubMed Central

    Khanam, Tasneem; Rozhdestvensky, Timofey S.; Bundman, Marsha; Galiveti, Chenna R.; Handel, Sergej; Sukonina, Valentina; Jordan, Ursula; Brosius, Jürgen; Skryabin, Boris V.

    2007-01-01

    In a rare occasion a single chromosomal locus was targeted twice by independent Alu-related retroposon insertions, and in both cases supported neuronal expression of the respective inserted genes encoding small non-protein coding RNAs (npcRNAs): BC200 RNA in anthropoid primates and G22 RNA in the Lorisoidea branch of prosimians. To avoid primate experimentation, we generated transgenic mice to study neuronal expression and protein binding partners for BC200 and G22 npcRNAs. The BC200 gene, with sufficient upstream flanking sequences, is expressed in transgenic mouse brain areas comparable to those in human brain, and G22 gene, with upstream flanks, has a similar expression pattern. However, when all upstream regions of the G22 gene were removed, expression was completely abolished, despite the presence of intact internal RNA polymerase III promoter elements. Transgenic BC200 RNA is transported into neuronal dendrites as it is in human brain. G22 RNA, almost twice as large as BC200 RNA, has a similar subcellular localization. Both transgenically expressed npcRNAs formed RNP complexes with poly(A) binding protein and the heterodimer SRP9/14, as does BC200 RNA in human. These observations strongly support the possibility that the independently exapted npcRNAs have similar functions, perhaps in translational regulation of dendritic protein biosynthesis in neurons of the respective primates. PMID:17175535

  9. Mushroom body output neurons encode valence and guide memory-based action selection in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aso, Yoshinori; Sitaraman, Divya; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Kaun, Karla R; Vogt, Katrin; Belliart-Guérin, Ghislain; Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Robie, Alice A; Yamagata, Nobuhiro; Schnaitmann, Christopher; Rowell, William J; Johnston, Rebecca M; Ngo, Teri-T B; Chen, Nan; Korff, Wyatt; Nitabach, Michael N; Heberlein, Ulrike; Preat, Thomas; Branson, Kristin M; Tanimoto, Hiromu; Rubin, Gerald M

    2014-01-01

    Animals discriminate stimuli, learn their predictive value and use this knowledge to modify their behavior. In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) plays a key role in these processes. Sensory stimuli are sparsely represented by ∼2000 Kenyon cells, which converge onto 34 output neurons (MBONs) of 21 types. We studied the role of MBONs in several associative learning tasks and in sleep regulation, revealing the extent to which information flow is segregated into distinct channels and suggesting possible roles for the multi-layered MBON network. We also show that optogenetic activation of MBONs can, depending on cell type, induce repulsion or attraction in flies. The behavioral effects of MBON perturbation are combinatorial, suggesting that the MBON ensemble collectively represents valence. We propose that local, stimulus-specific dopaminergic modulation selectively alters the balance within the MBON network for those stimuli. Our results suggest that valence encoded by the MBON ensemble biases memory-based action selection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04580.001 PMID:25535794

  10. Is automatic imitation based on goal coding or movement coding? A comparison of goal-directed and goal-less actions.

    PubMed

    Chiavarino, Claudia; Bugiani, Stefano; Grandi, Elisa; Colle, Livia

    2013-01-01

    A key issue for research on automatic imitation is whether it occurs primarily at the level of movements, that is, by automatically activating a representation of the movement/effector involved in the execution of the observed action, or at the level of goals, that is, by triggering a representation of the action goal, irrespective of how the motor act is physically instantiated. The present study presents two experiments aimed at investigating the contribution of movement coding and goal coding to automatic imitation, by assessing participants' performance in a spatial compatibility task where the observed stimuli were goal-directed and goal-less actions, which have been demonstrated to elicit, respectively, goal and movement coding. We found a significant automatic imitation effect both when the stimuli were goal-less actions and when they were actions directed toward a goal. However, the effect was stronger for the goal-less actions, even after controlling for saliency effects. These results suggest that goal coding contributes to automatic imitation, but to a lesser degree compared to movement coding. The implications of these results for theory and research on automatic imitation are discussed. PMID:23422654

  11. Involvement of G Protein-Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30) in Rapid Action of Estrogen in Primate LHRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Sekoni D.; Keen, Kim L.; Baumann, David I.; Filardo, Edward J.; Terasawa, Ei

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that 17β-estradiol (E2) induces an increase in firing activity of primate LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) neurons. The present study investigates whether E2 alters LHRH release as well as the pattern of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) oscillations and whether G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) plays a role in mediating the rapid E2 action in primate LHRH neurons. Results are summarized: 1) E2, the nuclear membrane-impermeable estrogen, estrogen-dendrimer conjugate, and the plasma membrane-impermeable estrogen, E2-BSA conjugate, all stimulated LHRH release within 10 min of exposure; 2) whereas the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, did not block the E2-induced LHRH release, E2 application to cells treated with pertussis toxin failed to induce LHRH release; 3) GPR30 mRNA was expressed in olfactory placode cultures, and GPR30 protein was expressed in a subset of LHRH neurons; 4) pertussis toxin treatment blocked the E2-induced increase in [Ca2+]i oscillations; 5) knockdown of GPR30 in primate LHRH neurons by transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for GPR30 completely abrogated the E2-induced changes in [Ca2+]i oscillations, whereas transfection with control siRNA did not; 6) the estrogen-dendrimer conjugate-induced increase in [Ca2+]i oscillations also did not occur in LHRH neurons transfected with GPR30 siRNA; and 7) G1, a GPR30 agonist, resulted in changes in [Ca2+]i oscillations, similar to those observed with E2. Collectively, E2 induces a rapid excitatory effect on primate LHRH neurons, and this rapid action of E2 appears to be mediated, in part, through GPR30. PMID:19131510

  12. Two-dimensional spatiotemporal coding of linear acceleration in vestibular nuclei neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelaki, D. E.; Bush, G. A.; Perachio, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    Response properties of vertical (VC) and horizontal (HC) canal/otolith-convergent vestibular nuclei neurons were studied in decerebrate rats during stimulation with sinusoidal linear accelerations (0.2-1.4 Hz) along different directions in the head horizontal plane. A novel characteristic of the majority of tested neurons was the nonzero response often elicited during stimulation along the "null" direction (i.e., the direction perpendicular to the maximum sensitivity vector, Smax). The tuning ratio (Smin gain/Smax gain), a measure of the two-dimensional spatial sensitivity, depended on stimulus frequency. For most vestibular nuclei neurons, the tuning ratio was small at the lowest stimulus frequencies and progressively increased with frequency. Specifically, HC neurons were characterized by a flat Smax gain and an approximately 10-fold increase of Smin gain per frequency decade. Thus, these neurons encode linear acceleration when stimulated along their maximum sensitivity direction, and the rate of change of linear acceleration (jerk) when stimulated along their minimum sensitivity direction. While the Smax vectors were distributed throughout the horizontal plane, the Smin vectors were concentrated mainly ipsilaterally with respect to head acceleration and clustered around the naso-occipital head axis. The properties of VC neurons were distinctly different from those of HC cells. The majority of VC cells showed decreasing Smax gains and small, relatively flat, Smin gains as a function of frequency. The Smax vectors were distributed ipsilaterally relative to the induced (apparent) head tilt. In type I anterior or posterior VC neurons, Smax vectors were clustered around the projection of the respective ipsilateral canal plane onto the horizontal head plane. These distinct spatial and temporal properties of HC and VC neurons during linear acceleration are compatible with the spatiotemporal organization of the horizontal and the vertical/torsional ocular responses

  13. Protective Actions of 17β-Estradiol and Progesterone on Oxidative Neuronal Injury Induced by Organometallic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Takemoto, Takuya; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones synthesized in and secreted from peripheral endocrine glands pass through the blood-brain barrier and play a role in the central nervous system. In addition, the brain possesses an inherent endocrine system and synthesizes steroid hormones known as neurosteroids. Increasing evidence shows that neuroactive steroids protect the central nervous system from various harmful stimuli. Reports show that the neuroprotective actions of steroid hormones attenuate oxidative stress. In this review, we summarize the antioxidative effects of neuroactive steroids, especially 17β-estradiol and progesterone, on neuronal injury in the central nervous system under various pathological conditions, and then describe our recent findings concerning the neuroprotective actions of 17β-estradiol and progesterone on oxidative neuronal injury induced by organometallic compounds, tributyltin, and methylmercury. PMID:25815107

  14. Diarrhetic effect of okadaic acid could be related with its neuronal action: Changes in neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Louzao, M Carmen; Fernández, Diego A; Abal, Paula; Fraga, Maria; Vilariño, Natalia; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2015-09-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and dinophysistoxins (DTXs) are a group of marine toxins that cause diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans and animals. These compounds are produced by dinoflagellates of the Prorocentrum and Dinophysis genera and can accumulate in filter-feeding bivalves, posing a serious health risk for shellfish consumers. The enteric nervous system (ENS) plays a crucial role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, neuropeptides produced by ENS affects the epithelial barrier functions. In the present work we used a two-compartment human coculture model containing the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line and polarized colonic epithelial monolayers (Caco-2) to study the OA intestinal permeability. First, we have determined OA cytotoxicity and we have found that OA reduces the viability of SH-SY5Y in a dose-dependent way, even though DTX1 is 4 to 5 times more potent than OA. Besides DTX1 is 15 to 18 orders of magnitude more potent than OA in decreasing transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of caco-2 cells without inducing cytotoxicity. Permeability assays indicate that OA cross the monolayer and modulates the neuropeptide Y (NPY) secretion by neuroblastoma cells. This NPY also affects the permeability of OA. This offers a novel approach to establish the influence of OA neuronal action on their diarrheic effects through a cross talk between ENS and intestine via OA induced NPY secretion. Therefore, the OA mechanisms of toxicity that were long attributed only to the inhibition of protein phosphatases, would require a reevaluation. PMID:26086426

  15. Pattern Separation, Pattern Completion, and New Neuronal Codes within a Continuous CA3 Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leutgeb, Stefan; Leutgeb, Jill K.

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampal CA3 subregion is critical for rapidly encoding new memories, which suggests that neuronal computations are implemented in its circuitry that cannot be performed elsewhere in the hippocampus or in the neocortex. Recording studies show that CA3 cells are bound to a large degree to a spatial coordinate system, while CA1 cells can…

  16. Positive, But Not Negative Feedback Actions of Estradiol in Adult Female Mice Require Estrogen Receptor α in Kisspeptin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Sharon L.; Acosta-Martínez, Maricedes; DeJoseph, Mary R.; Wolfe, Andrew; Radovick, Sally; Boehm, Ulrich; Urban, Janice H.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons express estrogen receptor α (ERα) and exert control over GnRH/LH secretion in female rodents. It has been proposed that estradiol (E2) activation of ERα in kisspeptin neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) suppresses GnRH/LH secretion (negative feedback), whereas E2 activation of ERα in kisspeptin neurons in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) mediates the release of preovulatory GnRH/LH surges (positive feedback). To test these hypotheses, we generated mice bearing kisspeptin cell–specific deletion of ERα (KERαKO) and treated them with E2 regimens that evoke either negative or positive feedback actions on GnRH/LH secretion. Using negative feedback regimens, as expected, E2 effectively suppressed LH levels in ovariectomized (OVX) wild-type (WT) mice to the levels seen in ovary-intact mice. Surprisingly, however, despite the fact that E2 regulation of Kiss1 mRNA expression was abrogated in both the ARC and AVPV of KERαKO mice, E2 also effectively decreased LH levels in OVX KERαKO mice to the levels seen in ovary-intact mice. Conversely, using a positive feedback regimen, E2 stimulated LH surges in WT mice, but had no effect in KERαKO mice. These experiments clearly demonstrate that ERα in kisspeptin neurons is required for the positive, but not negative feedback actions of E2 on GnRH/LH secretion in adult female mice. It remains to be determined whether the failure of KERαKO mice to exhibit GnRH/LH surges reflects the role of ERα in the development of kisspeptin neurons, in the active signaling processes leading to the release of GnRH/LH surges, or both. PMID:25545386

  17. Ability of primary auditory cortical neurons to detect amplitude modulation with rate and temporal codes: neurometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffrey S.; Yin, Pingbo; O'Connor, Kevin N.

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is a common feature of natural sounds, and its detection is biologically important. Even though most sounds are not fully modulated, the majority of physiological studies have focused on fully modulated (100% modulation depth) sounds. We presented AM noise at a range of modulation depths to awake macaque monkeys while recording from neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1). The ability of neurons to detect partial AM with rate and temporal codes was assessed with signal detection methods. On average, single-cell synchrony was as or more sensitive than spike count in modulation detection. Cells are less sensitive to modulation depth if tested away from their best modulation frequency, particularly for temporal measures. Mean neural modulation detection thresholds in A1 are not as sensitive as behavioral thresholds, but with phase locking the most sensitive neurons are more sensitive, suggesting that for temporal measures the lower-envelope principle cannot account for thresholds. Three methods of preanalysis pooling of spike trains (multiunit, similar to convergence from a cortical column; within cell, similar to convergence of cells with matched response properties; across cell, similar to indiscriminate convergence of cells) all result in an increase in neural sensitivity to modulation depth for both temporal and rate codes. For the across-cell method, pooling of a few dozen cells can result in detection thresholds that approximate those of the behaving animal. With synchrony measures, indiscriminate pooling results in sensitive detection of modulation frequencies between 20 and 60 Hz, suggesting that differences in AM response phase are minor in A1. PMID:22422997

  18. Decoupling kinematics and mechanics reveals coding properties of trigeminal ganglion neurons in the rat vibrissal system

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Nicholas E; Schroeder, Christopher L; Hobbs, Jennifer A; Yang, Anne ET; Huet, Lucie A; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra JZ

    2016-01-01

    Tactile information available to the rat vibrissal system begins as external forces that cause whisker deformations, which in turn excite mechanoreceptors in the follicle. Despite the fundamental mechanical origin of tactile information, primary sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (Vg) have often been described as encoding the kinematics (geometry) of object contact. Here we aimed to determine the extent to which Vg neurons encode the kinematics vs. mechanics of contact. We used models of whisker bending to quantify mechanical signals (forces and moments) at the whisker base while simultaneously monitoring whisker kinematics and recording single Vg units in both anesthetized rats and awake, body restrained rats. We employed a novel manual stimulation technique to deflect whiskers in a way that decouples kinematics from mechanics, and used Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) to show that Vg neurons more directly encode mechanical signals when the whisker is deflected in this decoupled stimulus space. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13969.001 PMID:27348221

  19. Retroviral induction of GSK-3β expression blocks the stimulatory action of physical exercise on the maturation of newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Martín, María; Teixeira, Catia M; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Soya, Hideaki; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) is a key process for certain types of hippocampal-dependent learning. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accompanied by memory deficits related to alterations in AHN. Given that the increased activity of GSK-3β has been related to alterations in the population of hippocampal granule neurons in AD patients, we designed a novel methodology by which to induce selective GSK-3β overexpression exclusively in newborn granule neurons. To this end, we injected an rtTA-IRES-EGFP-expressing retrovirus into the hippocampus of tTO-GSK-3β mice. Using this novel retroviral strategy, we found that GSK-3β caused a cell-autonomous impairment of the morphological and synaptic maturation of newborn neurons. In addition, we examined whether GSK-3β overexpression in newborn neurons limits the effects of physical activity. While physical exercise increased the number of dendritic spines, the percentage of mushroom spines, and the head diameter of the same in tet-OFF cells, these effects were not triggered in tet-ON cells. This observation suggests that GSK-3β blocks the stimulatory actions of exercise. Given that the activity of GSK-3β is increased in the brains of individuals with AD, these data may be relevant for non-pharmacological therapies for AD. PMID:27010990

  20. Branch specific and spike-order specific action potential invasion in basal, oblique, and apical dendrites of cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Singh, Mandakini B.; Sterjanaj, Enas V.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In neocortical pyramidal neurons, action potentials (APs) propagate from the axon into the dendritic tree to influence distal synapses. Traditionally, AP backpropagation was studied in the thick apical trunk. Here, we used the principles of optical imaging developed by Cohen to investigate AP invasion into thin dendritic branches (basal, oblique, and tuft) of prefrontal cortical L5 pyramidal neurons. Multisite optical recordings from neighboring dendrites revealed a clear dichotomy between two seemingly equal dendritic branches belonging to the same cell (“sister branches”). We documented the variable efficacy of AP invasion in basal and oblique branches by revealing their AP voltage waveforms. Using fast multisite calcium imaging, we found that trains of APs are filtered differently between two apical tuft branches. Although one dendritic branch passes all spikes in an AP train, another branch belonging to the same neuron, same cortical layer, and same path distance from the cell body, experiences only one spike. Our data indicate that the vast differences in dendritic voltage and calcium transients, detected in dendrites of pyramidal neurons, arise from a nonuniform distribution of A-type K+ conductance, an aggregate number of branch points in the path of the AP propagation and minute differences in dendritic diameter. PMID:26157997

  1. Internalization and proteolytic action of botulinum toxins in CNS neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Verderio, C; Coco, S; Rossetto, O; Montecucco, C; Matteoli, M

    1999-07-01

    Tetanus and botulinum toxins bind and are internalized at the neuromuscular junction. Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) enter the cytosol at the motor nerve terminal; tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) proceeds retroaxonally inside the motor axon to reach the spinal cord inhibitory interneurons. Although the major target of BoNTs is the peripheral cholinergic terminals, CNS neurons are susceptible to intoxication as well. We investigated the route of entry and the proteolytic activity of BoNT/B and BoNT/F in cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes. We show that, differently from TeNT, which enters hippocampal neurons via the process of synaptic vesicle (SV) recycling, BoNTs are internalized and cleave the substrate synaptobrevin/VAMP2 via a process independent of synaptic activity. Labeling of living neurons with Texas Red-conjugated BoNTs and fluoresceinated dextran revealed that these toxins enter hippocampal neurons via endocytic processes not mediated by SV recycling. Botulinum toxins also exploit endocytosis to enter cultured astrocytes, where they partially cleave cellubrevin, a ubiquitous synaptobrevin/VAMP isoform. These results indicate that, in spite of their closely related protein structure, TeNT and BoNTs use different routes to penetrate hippocampal neurons. These findings bear important implications for the identification of the protein receptors of clostridial toxins. PMID:10386990

  2. Causative role of left aIPS in coding shared goals during human–avatar complementary joint actions

    PubMed Central

    Sacheli, Lucia M.; Candidi, Matteo; Era, Vanessa; Aglioti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    Successful motor interactions require agents to anticipate what a partner is doing in order to predictively adjust their own movements. Although the neural underpinnings of the ability to predict others' action goals have been well explored during passive action observation, no study has yet clarified any critical neural substrate supporting interpersonal coordination during active, non-imitative (complementary) interactions. Here, we combine non-invasive inhibitory brain stimulation (continuous Theta Burst Stimulation) with a novel human–avatar interaction task to investigate a causal role for higher-order motor cortical regions in supporting the ability to predict and adapt to others' actions. We demonstrate that inhibition of left anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS), but not ventral premotor cortex, selectively impaired individuals' performance during complementary interactions. Thus, in addition to coding observed and executed action goals, aIPS is crucial in coding ‘shared goals', that is, integrating predictions about one's and others' complementary actions. PMID:26154706

  3. Action Potentials Initiate in the Axon Initial Segment and Propagate Through Axon Collaterals Reliably in Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Foust, Amanda; Popovic, Marko; Zecevic, Dejan; McCormick, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Purkinje neurons are the output cells of the cerebellar cortex and generate spikes in two distinct modes, known as simple and complex spikes. Revealing the point of origin of these action potentials, and how they conduct into local axon collaterals, is important for understanding local and distal neuronal processing and communication. By utilizing a recent improvement in voltage sensitive dye imaging technique that provided exceptional spatial and temporal resolution, we were able to resolve the region of spike initiation as well as follow spike propagation into axon collaterals for each action potential initiated on single trials. All fast action potentials, for both simple and complex spikes, whether occurring spontaneously or in response to a somatic current pulse or synaptic input, initiated in the axon initial segment. At discharge frequencies of less than approximately 250 Hz, spikes propagated faithfully through the axon and axon collaterals, in a saltatory manner. Propagation failures were only observed for very high frequencies or for the spikelets associated with complex spikes. These results demonstrate that the axon initial segment is a critical decision point in Purkinje cell processing and that the properties of axon branch points are adjusted to maintain faithful transmission. PMID:20484631

  4. The energy cost of action potential propagation in dopamine neurons: clues to susceptibility in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Pissadaki, Eleftheria K.; Bolam, J. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) are uniquely sensitive to degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) and its models. Although a variety of molecular characteristics have been proposed to underlie this sensitivity, one possible contributory factor is their massive, unmyelinated axonal arbor that is orders of magnitude larger than other neuronal types. We suggest that this puts them under such a high energy demand that any stressor that perturbs energy production leads to energy demand exceeding supply and subsequent cell death. One prediction of this hypothesis is that those dopamine neurons that are selectively vulnerable in PD will have a higher energy cost than those that are less vulnerable. We show here, through the use of a biology-based computational model of the axons of individual dopamine neurons, that the energy cost of axon potential propagation and recovery of the membrane potential increases with the size and complexity of the axonal arbor according to a power law. Thus SNc dopamine neurons, particularly in humans, whose axons we estimate to give rise to more than 1 million synapses and have a total length exceeding 4 m, are at a distinct disadvantage with respect to energy balance which may be a factor in their selective vulnerability in PD. PMID:23515615

  5. Cannabinoid receptor-independent actions of the aminoalkylindole WIN 55,212-2 on trigeminal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J; Patwardhan, Amol; Akopian, Armen N; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Flores, Christopher M

    2004-01-01

    The prototypical aminoalkylindole cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2) has been shown to produce antihyperalgesia through a peripheral mechanism of action. However, it is not known whether WIN-2 exerts this action directly via cannabinoid receptors located on primary afferents or if other, perhaps indirect or noncannabinoid, mechanisms are involved. To address this question, we have examined the specific actions of WIN-2 on trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons in vitro by quantifying its ability to modulate the evoked secretion of the proinflammatory neuropeptide CGRP as well as the inflammatory mediator-induced generation of cAMP. WIN-2 evoked CGRP release from TG neurons in vitro (EC50=26 μM) in a concentration- and calcium-dependent manner, which was mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor-inactive enantiomer WIN 55,212-3 (WIN-3). Moreover, WIN-2-evoked CGRP release was attenuated by the nonselective cation channel blocker ruthenium red but not by the vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine, suggesting that, unlike certain endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids, WIN-2 is not a TRPV1 agonist but rather acts at an as yet unidentified cation channel. The inhibitory effects of WIN-2 on TG neurons were also examined. WIN-2 neither inhibited capsaicin-evoked CGRP release nor did it inhibit forskolin-, isoproteranol- or prostaglandin E2-stimulated cAMP accumulation. On the other hand, WIN-2 significantly inhibited (EC50=1.7 μM) 50 mM K+-evoked CGRP release by approximately 70%. WIN-2 inhibition of 50 mM K+-evoked CGRP release was not reversed by antagonists of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor, but was mimicked in magnitude and potency (EC50=2.7 μM) by its cannabinoid-inactive enantiomer WIN-3. These findings indicate that WIN-2 exerts both excitatory and inhibitory effects on TG neurons, neither of which appear to be mediated by CB1, CB2 or TRPV1 receptors, but by a novel calcium-dependent mechanism. The ramifications of these results are discussed in relation

  6. [Pain assessment using the Facial Action Coding System. A systematic review].

    PubMed

    Rojo, Rosa; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; López-Valverde, Antonio

    2015-10-21

    Self-reporting is the most widely used pain measurement tool, although it may not be useful in patients with loss or deficit in communication skills. The aim of this paper was to undertake a systematic review of the literature of pain assessment through the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). The initial search found 4,335 references and, within the restriction «FACS», these were reduced to 40 (after exclusion of duplicates). Finally, only 26 articles meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Methodological quality was assessed using the GRADE system. Most patients were adults and elderly health conditions, or cognitive deficits and/or chronic pain. Our conclusion is that FACS is a reliable and objective tool in the detection and quantification of pain in all patients. PMID:25433779

  7. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  8. Visual Stimuli Evoked Action Potentials Trigger Rapidly Propagating Dendritic Calcium Transients in the Frog Optic Tectum Layer 6 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Svirskis, Gytis; Baranauskas, Gytis; Svirskiene, Natasa; Tkatch, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The superior colliculus in mammals or the optic tectum in amphibians is a major visual information processing center responsible for generation of orientating responses such as saccades in monkeys or prey catching avoidance behavior in frogs. The conserved structure function of the superior colliculus the optic tectum across distant species such as frogs, birds monkeys permits to draw rather general conclusions after studying a single species. We chose the frog optic tectum because we are able to perform whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings fluorescence imaging of tectal neurons while they respond to a visual stimulus. In the optic tectum of amphibians most visual information is processed by pear-shaped neurons possessing long dendritic branches, which receive the majority of synapses originating from the retinal ganglion cells. Since the first step of the retinal input integration is performed on these dendrites, it is important to know whether this integration is enhanced by active dendritic properties. We demonstrate that rapid calcium transients coinciding with the visual stimulus evoked action potentials in the somatic recordings can be readily detected up to the fine branches of these dendrites. These transients were blocked by calcium channel blockers nifedipine CdCl2 indicating that calcium entered dendrites via voltage-activated L-type calcium channels. The high speed of calcium transient propagation, >300 μm in <10 ms, is consistent with the notion that action potentials, actively propagating along dendrites, open voltage-gated L-type calcium channels causing rapid calcium concentration transients in the dendrites. We conclude that such activation by somatic action potentials of the dendritic voltage gated calcium channels in the close vicinity to the synapses formed by axons of the retinal ganglion cells may facilitate visual information processing in the principal neurons of the frog optic tectum. PMID:26414356

  9. 4-bromopropofol decreases action potential generation in spinal neurons by inducing a glycine receptor‐mediated tonic conductance

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, V S; Grasshoff, C; Mirakaj, V; O'Neill, P M; Berry, N G; Leuwer, M; Antkowiak, B

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Impaired function of spinal strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors gives rise to chronic pain states and movement disorders. Therefore, increased activity of glycine receptors should help to treat such disorders. Although compounds targeting glycine receptors with a high selectivity are lacking, halogenated analogues of propofol have recently been considered as potential candidates. Therefore we asked whether 4-bromopropofol attenuated the excitability of spinal neurons by promoting glycine receptor-dependent inhibition. Experimental Approach The actions of sub-anaesthetic concentrations of propofol and 4-bromopropofol were investigated in spinal tissue cultures prepared from mice. Drug-induced alterations in action potential firing were monitored by extracellular multi-unit recordings. The effects on GABAA and glycine receptor-mediated inhibition were quantified by whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings. Key Results Low concentrations of 4-bromopropofol (50 nM) reduced action potential activity of ventral horn neurons by about 30%, compared with sham-treated slices. This effect was completely abolished by strychnine (1 μM). In voltage-clamped neurons, 4-bromopropofol activated glycine receptors, generating a tonic current of 65 ± 10 pA, while GABAA- and glycine receptor-mediated synaptic transmission remained unaffected. Conclusions and Implications The highest glycine levels in the CNS are found in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, a region mediating pain-induced motor reflexes and participating in the control of muscle tone. 4-Bromopropofol may serve as a starting point for the development of non-sedative, non-addictive, muscle relaxants and analgesics to be used to treat low back pain. PMID:25131750

  10. fMRI Adaptation between Action Observation and Action Execution Reveals Cortical Areas with Mirror Neuron Properties in Human BA 44/45

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Stephan; Schillinger, Frieder L.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Schultz, Johannes; Uludag, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Mirror neurons (MNs) are considered to be the supporting neural mechanism for action understanding. MNs have been identified in monkey’s area F5. The identification of MNs in the human homolog of monkeys’ area F5 Broadmann Area 44/45 (BA 44/45) has been proven methodologically difficult. Cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) adaptation studies supporting the existence of MNs restricted their analysis to a priori candidate regions, whereas studies that failed to find evidence used non-object-directed (NDA) actions. We tackled these limitations by using object-directed actions (ODAs) differing only in terms of their object directedness in combination with a cross-modal adaptation paradigm and a whole-brain analysis. Additionally, we tested voxels’ blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response patterns for several properties previously reported as typical MN response properties. Our results revealed 52 voxels in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG; particularly BA 44/45), which respond to both motor and visual stimulation and exhibit cross-modal adaptation between the execution and observation of the same action. These results demonstrate that part of human IFG, specifically BA 44/45, has BOLD response characteristics very similar to monkey’s area F5. PMID:26973496

  11. The Body Action Coding System II: muscle activations during the perception and expression of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Huis In ‘t Veld, Elisabeth M. J.; van Boxtel, Geert J. M.; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Research into the expression and perception of emotions has mostly focused on facial expressions. Recently, body postures have become increasingly important in research, but knowledge on muscle activity during the perception or expression of emotion is lacking. The current study continues the development of a Body Action Coding System (BACS), which was initiated in a previous study, and described the involvement of muscles in the neck, shoulders and arms during expression of fear and anger. The current study expands the BACS by assessing the activity patterns of three additional muscles. Surface electromyography of muscles in the neck (upper trapezius descendens), forearms (extensor carpi ulnaris), lower back (erector spinae longissimus) and calves (peroneus longus) were measured during active expression and passive viewing of fearful and angry body expressions. The muscles in the forearm were strongly active for anger expression and to a lesser extent for fear expression. In contrast, muscles in the calves were recruited slightly more for fearful expressions. It was also found that muscles automatically responded to the perception of emotion, without any overt movement. The observer's forearms responded to the perception of fear, while the muscles used for leaning backwards were activated when faced with an angry adversary. Lastly, the calf responded immediately when a fearful person was seen, but responded slower to anger. There is increasing interest in developing systems that are able to create or recognize emotional body language for the development of avatars, robots, and online environments. To that end, multiple coding systems have been developed that can either interpret or create bodily expressions based on static postures, motion capture data or videos. However, the BACS is the first coding system based on muscle activity. PMID:25294993

  12. Object visibility alters the relative contribution of ventral visual stream and mirror neuron system to goal anticipation during action observation.

    PubMed

    Thioux, Marc; Keysers, Christian

    2015-01-15

    We used fMRI to study the effect of hiding the target of a grasping action on the cerebral activity of an observer whose task was to anticipate the size of the object being grasped. Activity in the putative mirror neuron system (pMNS) was higher when the target was concealed from the view of the observer and anticipating the size of the object being grasped requested paying attention to the hand kinematics. In contrast, activity in ventral visual areas outside the pMNS increased when the target was fully visible, and the performance improved in this condition. A repetition suppression analysis demonstrated that in full view, the size of the object being grasped by the actor was encoded in the ventral visual stream. Dynamic causal modeling showed that monitoring a grasping action increased the coupling between the parietal and ventral premotor nodes of the pMNS. The modulation of the functional connectivity between these nodes was correlated with the subject's capability to detect the size of hidden objects. In full view, synaptic activity increased within the ventral visual stream, and the connectivity with the pMNS was diminished. The re-enactment of observed actions in the pMNS is crucial when interpreting others' actions requires paying attention to the body kinematics. However, when the context permits, visual-spatial information processing may complement pMNS computations for improved action anticipation accuracy. PMID:25462688

  13. Object visibility alters the relative contribution of ventral visual stream and mirror neuron system to goal anticipation during action observation

    PubMed Central

    Thioux, Marc; Keysers, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We used fMRI to study the effect of hiding the target of a grasping action on the cerebral activity of an observer whose task was to anticipate the size of the object being grasped. Activity in the putative mirror neuron system (pMNS) was higher when the target was concealed from the view of the observer and anticipating the size of the object being grasped requested paying attention to the hand kinematics. In contrast, activity in ventral visual areas outside the pMNS increased when the target was fully visible, and the performance improved in this condition. A repetition suppression analysis demonstrated that in full view, the size of the object being grasped by the actor was encoded in the ventral visual stream. Dynamic causal modelling showed that monitoring a grasping action increased the coupling between the parietal and ventral premotor nodes of the pMNS. The modulation of the functional connectivity between these nodes was correlated with the subject’s capability to detect the size of hidden objects. In full view, synaptic activity increased within the ventral visual stream, and the connectivity with the pMNS was diminished. The re-enactment of observed actions in the pMNS is crucial when interpreting others’ actions requires paying attention to the body kinematics. However, when the context permits, visual-spatial information processing may complement pMNS computations for improved action anticipation accuracy. PMID:25462688

  14. Automated Facial Action Coding System for Dynamic Analysis of Facial Expressions in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Jihun; Kohler, Christian G.; Gur, Ruben C.; Verma, Ragini

    2011-01-01

    Facial expression is widely used to evaluate emotional impairment in neuropsychiatric disorders. Ekman and Friesen’s Facial Action Coding System (FACS) encodes movements of individual facial muscles from distinct momentary changes in facial appearance. Unlike facial expression ratings based on categorization of expressions into prototypical emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, fear, disgust, etc.), FACS can encode ambiguous and subtle expressions, and therefore is potentially more suitable for analyzing the small differences in facial affect. However, FACS rating requires extensive training, and is time consuming and subjective thus prone to bias. To overcome these limitations, we developed an automated FACS based on advanced computer science technology. The system automatically tracks faces in a video, extracts geometric and texture features, and produces temporal profiles of each facial muscle movement. These profiles are quantified to compute frequencies of single and combined Action Units (AUs) in videos, which can facilitate statistical study of large populations in disorders affecting facial expression. We derived quantitative measures of flat and inappropriate facial affect automatically from temporal AU profiles. Applicability of the automated FACS was illustrated in a pilot study, by applying it to data of videos from eight schizophrenia patients and controls. We created temporal AU profiles that provided rich information on the dynamics of facial muscle movements for each subject. The quantitative measures of flatness and inappropriateness showed clear differences between patients and the controls, highlighting their potential in automatic and objective quantification of symptom severity. PMID:21741407

  15. In-mold patterning and actionable axo-somatic compartmentalization for on-chip neuron culture.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ayako; Vignes, Maéva; Bureau, Cécile; Mamane, Alexandre; Venzac, Bastien; Descroix, Stéphanie; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Villard, Catherine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel; Malaquin, Laurent

    2016-05-24

    Oriented neuronal networks with controlled connectivity are required for many applications ranging from studies of neurodegeneration to neuronal computation. To build such networks in vitro, an efficient, directed and long lasting guidance of axons toward their target is a pre-requisite. The best guidance achieved so far, however, relies on confining axons in enclosed microchannels, making them poorly accessible for further investigation. Here we describe a method providing accessible and highly regular arrays of axons, emanating from somas positioned in distinct compartments. This method combines the use of a novel removable partition, allowing soma positioning outside of the axon guidance patterns, and in-mold patterning (iMP), a hybrid method combining chemical and mechanical cell positioning clues applied here for the first time to neurons. The axon guidance efficiency of iMP is compared to that of conventional patterning methods, e.g. micro-contact printing (chemical constraints by a poly-l-lysine motif) and micro-grooves (physical constraints by homogeneously coated microstructures), using guiding tracks of different widths and spacing. We show that iMP provides a gain of 10 to 100 in axon confinement efficiency on the tracks, yielding mm-long, highly regular, and fully accessible on-chip axon arrays. iMP also allows well-defined axon guidance from small populations of several neurons confined at predefined positions in μm-sized wells. iMP will thus open new routes for the construction of complex and accurately controlled neuronal networks. PMID:27170212

  16. Actions of arginine polyamine on voltage and ligand-activated whole cell currents recorded from cultured neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R. H.; Sweeney, M. I.; Kobrinsky, E. M.; Pearson, H. A.; Timms, G. H.; Pullar, I. A.; Wedley, S.; Dolphin, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    1. Toxins from invertebrates have proved useful tools for investigation of the properties of ion channels. In this study we describe the actions of arginine polyamine which is believed to be a close analogue of FTX, a polyamine isolated from the American funnel web spider, Agelenopsis aperta. 2. Voltage-activated Ca2+ currents and Ca(2+)-dependent Cl- currents recorded from rat cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones were reversibly inhibited by arginine polyamine (AP; 0.001 to 100 microM). Low voltage-activated T-type Ca2+ currents were significantly more sensitive to AP than high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents. The IC50 values for the actions of AP on low and high voltage-activated Ca2+ currents were 10 nM and 3 microM respectively. AP was equally effective in inhibiting high voltage-activated currents carried by Ba2+, Sr2+ or Ca2+. However, AP-induced inhibition of Ca2+ currents was attenuated by increasing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration from 2 mM to 10 mM. 3. The actions of AP on a Ca(2+)-independent K+ current were more complex, 1 microM AP enhanced this current but 10 microM AP had a dual action, initially enhancing but then inhibiting the K+ current. 4. gamma-Aminobutyric acid-activated Cl- currents were also reversibly inhibited by 1 to 10 microM AP. In contrast N-methyl-D-aspartate currents recorded from rat cultured cerebellar neurones were greatly enhanced by 10 microM AP. 5. We conclude that at a concentration of 10 nM, AP is a selective inhibitor of low threshold T-type voltage-activated Ca2+ currents.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1380382

  17. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase dependent inhibition as a broad basis for opponent coding in Mammalian olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth A; Ache, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling has been implicated in mediating inhibitory odorant input to mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). To better understand the breadth of such inhibition in odor coding, we screened a panel of odorants representing different chemical classes, as well as odorants known to occur in a natural odor object (tomato), for their ability to rapidly activate PI3K-dependent inhibitory signaling. Odorants were screened on dissociated native rat ORNs before and after pre-incubation with the PI3K-isoform specific blockers AS252424 and TGX221. Many different odorants increased their excitatory strength for particular ORNs following PI3K blockade in a manner consistent with activating PI3K-dependent inhibitory signaling in those cells. The PI3K-dependent inhibitory odorants overlapped with conventional excitatory odorants, but did not share the same bias, indicating partial partitioning of the odor space. Finding that PI3K-dependent inhibition can be activated by a wide range of otherwise conventional excitatory odorants strongly implies PI3K-dependent inhibition provides a broad basis for opponent coding in mammalian ORNs. PMID:23585911

  18. The spatio-temporal characteristics of action potential initiation in layer 5 pyramidal neurons: a voltage imaging study.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Marko A; Foust, Amanda J; McCormick, David A; Zecevic, Dejan

    2011-09-01

    The spatial pattern of Na(+) channel clustering in the axon initial segment (AIS) plays a critical role in tuning neuronal computations, and changes in Na(+) channel distribution have been shown to mediate novel forms of neuronal plasticity in the axon. However, immunocytochemical data on channel distribution may not directly predict spatio-temporal characteristics of action potential initiation, and prior electrophysiological measures are either indirect (extracellular) or lack sufficient spatial resolution (intracellular) to directly characterize the spike trigger zone (TZ). We took advantage of a critical methodological improvement in the high sensitivity membrane potential imaging (V(m) imaging) technique to directly determine the location and length of the spike TZ as defined in functional terms. The results show that in mature axons of mouse cortical layer 5 pyramidal cells, action potentials initiate in a region ∼20 μm in length centred between 20 and 40 μm from the soma. From this region, the AP depolarizing wave invades initial nodes of Ranvier within a fraction of a millisecond and propagates in a saltatory fashion into axonal collaterals without failure at all physiologically relevant frequencies. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to the saltatory conduction in mature axons, AP propagation is non-saltatory (monotonic) in immature axons prior to myelination. PMID:21669974

  19. Agonist action of taurine on glycine receptors in rat supraoptic magnocellular neurones: possible role in osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Deleuze, C; Pantaloni, A; Desarménien, M G; Moos, F

    1997-08-01

    1. To evaluate the implication of taurine in the physiology of supraoptic neurones, we (i) investigated the agonist properties of taurine on glycine and GABAA receptors of supraoptic magnocellular neurones acutely dissociated from adult rats, using whole-cell voltage clamp, (ii) studied the effects of taurine and strychnine in vivo by extracellular recordings of supraoptic vasopressin neurones in anaesthetized rats, and (iii) measured the osmolarity-dependent release of endogenous taurine from isolated supraoptic nuclei by HPLC. 2. GABA, glycine and taurine evoked rapidly activating currents that all reversed close to the equilibrium potential for Cl-, indicating activation of Cl(-)-selective channels. Glycine-activated currents were reversibly blocked by strychnine (IC50 of 35 nM with 100 microM glycine), but were unaffected by the GABAA antagonist gabazine (1-3 microM). GABA-activated currents were reversibly antagonized by 3 microM gabazine, but not by strychnine (up to 1 microM). 3. Responses to 1 mM taurine were blocked by strychnine but not by gabazine and showed no additivity with glycine-induced currents, indicating selective activation of glycine receptors. Responses to 10 mM taurine were partially antagonized by gabazine, the residual current being blocked by strychnine. Thus, taurine is also a weak agonist of GABAA receptors. 4. In the presence of gabazine, taurine activated glycine receptors with an EC50 of 406 microM. Taurine activated at most 70% of maximal glycine currents, suggesting that it is a partial agonist of glycine receptors. 5. In vivo, locally applied strychnine (300 nM) increased and taurine (1 mM) decreased the basal electrical activity of vasopressin neurones in normally hydrated rats. The effect of strychnine was markedly more pronounced in water-loaded rats. 6. Taurine, which is concentrated in supraoptic glial cells, could be released from isolated supraoptic nuclei upon hyposmotic stimulation. Decreases in osmolarity of 15 and 30

  20. Protective action of erythropoietin on neuronal damage induced by activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Wenker, Shirley D; Chamorro, María E; Vittori, Daniela C; Nesse, Alcira B

    2013-04-01

    Inflammation is a physiological defense response, but may also represent a potential pathological process in neurological diseases. In this regard, microglia have a crucial role in either progression or amelioration of degenerative neuronal damage. Because of the role of hypoxia in pro-inflammatory mechanisms in the nervous system, and the potential anti-inflammatory protective effect of erythropoietin (Epo), we focused our investigation on the role of this factor on activation of microglia and neuroprotection. Activation of microglial cells (EOC-2) was achieved by chemical hypoxia induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2 ) and characterized by increased levels of nitrite, tumor necrosis factor-α and reactive oxygen species production, as well as up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Under these conditions, cell proliferation data and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining demonstrated a mitogenic effect of chemical hypoxia. Even though pre-treatment with Epo did not prevent nitrite production, inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression or tumor necrosis factor-α secretion, it prevented the oxidative stress induced by CoCl2 as well as cell proliferation. Neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y) cultured in the presence of conditioned medium from activated EOC-2 cells or macrophages (RAW 264.7) developed significant apoptosis, an effect that was abolished by Epo via Epo/Epo receptor activation. The results show that even though Epo did not exert a direct anti-inflammatory effect on microglia activation, it did increase the resistance of neurons to subsequent damage from pro-inflammatory agents. In addition to its anti-apoptotic ability, the Epo antioxidant effect may have an indirect influence on neuronal survival by modulation of the pro-inflammatory environment. PMID:23384249

  1. Cl− uptake promoting depolarizing GABA actions in immature rat neocortical neurones is mediated by NKCC1

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Junko; Okabe, Akihito; Toyoda, Hiroki; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2004-01-01

    GABA is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature brain, but during early postnatal development the elevated [Cl−]i in immature neocortical neurones causes GABAA receptor activation to be depolarizing. The molecular mechanisms underlying this intracellular Cl− accumulation remain controversial. Therefore, the GABA reversal potential (EGABA) or [Cl−]i in early postnatal rat neocortical neurones was measured by the gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp method, and the relative expression levels of the cation−Cl− cotransporter mRNAs (in the same cells) were examined by semiquantitative single-cell multiplex RT-PCR to look for statistical correlations with [Cl−]i. The mRNA expression levels were positively (the Cl− accumulating Na+,K+−2Cl− cotransporter NKCC1) or negatively (the Cl− extruding K+−Cl− cotransporter KCC2) correlated with [Cl−]i. NKCC1 mRNA expression was high in early postnatal days, but decreased during postnatal development, whereas KCC2 mRNA expression displayed the opposite pattern. [Cl−]i and NKCC1 mRNA expression were each higher in cortical plate (CP) neurones than in the presumably older layer V/VI pyramidal neurones in a given slice. The pharmacological effects of bumetanide on EGABA were consistent with the different expression levels of NKCC1 mRNA. These data suggest that NKCC1 may play a pivotal role in the generation of GABA-mediated depolarization in immature CP cells, while KCC2 promotes the later maturation of GABAergic inhibition in the rat neocortex. PMID:15090604

  2. Two cold-sensitive neurons within one sensillum code for different parameters of the thermal environment in the ant Camponotus rufipes.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Manuel; Kleineidam, Christoph J

    2015-01-01

    Ants show high sensitivity when responding to minute temperature changes and are able to track preferred temperatures with amazing precision. As social insects, they have to detect and cope with thermal fluctuations not only for their individual benefit but also for the developmental benefit of the colony and its brood. In this study we investigate the sensory basis for the fine-tuned, temperature guided behaviors found in ants, specifically what information about their thermal environment they can assess. We describe the dose-response curves of two cold-sensitive neurons, associated with the sensillum coelocapitulum on the antenna of the carpenter ant Camponotus rufipes.One cold-sensitive neuron codes for temperature changes, thus functioning as a thermal flux-detector. Neurons of such type continuously provide the ant with information about temperature transients (TT-neuron). The TT-neurons are able to resolve a relative change of 37% in stimulus intensity (ΔT) and antennal scanning of the thermal environment may aid the ant's ability to use temperature differences for orientation.The second cold-sensitive neuron in the S. coelocapitulum responds to temperature only within a narrow temperature range. A temperature difference of 1.6°C can be resolved by this neuron type. Since the working range matches the preferred temperature range for brood care of Camponotus rufipes, we hypothesize that this temperature sensor can function as a thermal switch to trigger brood care behavior, based on absolute (steady state) temperature. PMID:26388753

  3. Two cold-sensitive neurons within one sensillum code for different parameters of the thermal environment in the ant Camponotus rufipes

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Manuel; Kleineidam, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    Ants show high sensitivity when responding to minute temperature changes and are able to track preferred temperatures with amazing precision. As social insects, they have to detect and cope with thermal fluctuations not only for their individual benefit but also for the developmental benefit of the colony and its brood. In this study we investigate the sensory basis for the fine-tuned, temperature guided behaviors found in ants, specifically what information about their thermal environment they can assess. We describe the dose-response curves of two cold-sensitive neurons, associated with the sensillum coelocapitulum on the antenna of the carpenter ant Camponotus rufipes.One cold-sensitive neuron codes for temperature changes, thus functioning as a thermal flux-detector. Neurons of such type continuously provide the ant with information about temperature transients (TT-neuron). The TT-neurons are able to resolve a relative change of 37% in stimulus intensity (ΔT) and antennal scanning of the thermal environment may aid the ant’s ability to use temperature differences for orientation.The second cold-sensitive neuron in the S. coelocapitulum responds to temperature only within a narrow temperature range. A temperature difference of 1.6°C can be resolved by this neuron type. Since the working range matches the preferred temperature range for brood care of Camponotus rufipes, we hypothesize that this temperature sensor can function as a thermal switch to trigger brood care behavior, based on absolute (steady state) temperature. PMID:26388753

  4. Age-related decline in multiple unit action potentials of cerebral cortex correlates with the number of lipofuscin-containing neurons.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D; Singh, R

    1996-08-01

    The present study examined whether there is any obvious correlation between the density of lipofuscin-containing neurons and the spontaneous neuronal action potentials (Multiple Unit Activity, MUA) in the parietal cortex of the aging rat brain. The results showed that MUA counts were decreased with age while the number of lipofuscin-containing neurons was increased. The cortex with the highest percentage of lipofuscin-containing neurons had the lowest MUA counts while the cortex with the lowest percentage of lipofuscin-containing neurons had the highest MUA counts. The inverse correlation between MUA and lipofuscin-containing neuron number was also evident when the population of the lipofuscin-containing neurons was pharmacologically altered in vivo by the administration of anti-lipofuscin drug centrophenoxine. The inverse relationship between MUA and the lipofuscin-containing neuron numbers is consistent with: (i) the correlations of MUA with age-related changes in lipid peroxidation and biochemically measured lipofuscin concentration, and (ii) the oxidative stress-induced impairments of neuronal electrophysiology. PMID:8979484

  5. Action potentials of embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurones in Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed Central

    Baccaglini, P I

    1978-01-01

    1. Several classes of action potentials can be distinguished in dorsal root ganglion cells, studied by intracellular recording techniques in Xenopus laevis tadpoles 4.5--51 days old. The ionic basis of the action potential was investigated by changing the ionic environment of the cells and applying various blocking agents. 2. The Ca2+-dependent action potential is a plateau of relatively long duration (mean 8.7 msec). It is unaffected by removal of Na+ but blocked by mM quantities of Co2+. It is present only in small cells. 3. Ca2+/Na+-dependent action potentials. Type I is a spike followed by a plateau or hump of different durations (mean 8.1 msec). The spike is selectively blocked by removal of Na+, leaving the plateau which is in turn blocked by Co2+. It is present in cells of small and intermediate size. Type II is a spike of short duration (mean 2.0 msec) with only an inflection on the falling phase. The spike is blocked by removal of Na+ and no other components can be elicited. The inflection is blocked by Co2+. It is present in cells of all sizes. Type III is similar to type I but is seen only in solutions in which the outward current is blocked. It was observed only very infrequently. 4. Na+-dependent action potentials. Type I a is a short duration spike (mean 1.1 msec). It is abolished by removal of Na+ or addition of tetrodotoxin (TTX), but largely unaffected by Co2+ or La3+. It is present in cells of all sizes. When the outward current channels are blocked and cells exposed to Na+-free solutions, all cells are capable of producing an action potential in which the inward current is carried by divalent cations. Type I b is a spike with a smooth, more slowly falling phase. It has the same pharmacological properties as type I a action potential and is present in cells of small size. 5. Na+-dependent action potentials. Type II is a spike with an inflection on the falling phase (mean duration 3.4 msec). It is prolonged by Co2+ and La3+. Removal of Na

  6. Anion-selective channelrhodopsin expressed in neuronal cell culture and in vivo in murine brain: Light-induced inhibition of generation of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, D A; Malyshev, A Yu; Salozhin, S V; Nekrasova, O V; Petrovskaya, L E; Roshchin, M V; Borodinova, A A; Feldman, T B; Balaban, P M; Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovsky, M A

    2015-01-01

    Anionic channelrhodopsin slow ChloC was expressed in the culture of nerve cells and in vivo in mouse brain. We demonstrated ability of slow ChloC to suppress effectively the activity of the neuron in response to the illumination with the visible light. It has been shown for a first time that slow ChloC works equally efficiently in both neuronal culture and in the whole brain being expressed in vivo. Thus, slow ChloC could be considered as an effective optogenetic tool capable in response to light stimulation to inhibit the generation of action potentials in the neuron. PMID:26728740

  7. Physiological approaches to understanding molecular actions on dorsolateral prefrontal cortical neurons underlying higher cognitive processing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2015-11-18

    Revealing how molecular mechanisms influence higher brain circuits in primates will be essential for understanding how genetic insults lead to increased risk of cognitive disorders. Traditionally, modulatory influences on higher cortical circuits have been examined using lesion techniques, where a brain region is depleted of a particular transmitter to determine how its loss impacts cognitive function. For example, depletion of catecholamines or acetylcholine from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex produces striking deficits in working memory abilities. More directed techniques have utilized direct infusions of drug into a specific cortical site to try to circumvent compensatory changes that are common following transmitter depletion. The effects of drug on neuronal firing patterns are often studied using iontophoresis, where a minute amount of drug is moved into the brain using a tiny electrical current, thus minimizing the fluid flow that generally disrupts neuronal recordings. All of these approaches can be compared to systemic drug administration, which remains a key arena for the development of effective therapeutics for human cognitive disorders. Most recently, viral techniques are being developed to be able to manipulate proteins for which there is no developed pharmacology, and to allow optogenetic manipulations in primate cortex. As the association cortices greatly expand in brain evolution, research in nonhuman primates is particularly important for understanding the modulatory regulation of our highest order cognitive operations. PMID:26646567

  8. Physiological approaches to understanding molecular actions on dorsolateral prefrontal cortical neurons underlying higher cognitive processing

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Min; ARNSTEN, Amy F.T.

    2015-01-01

    Revealing how molecular mechanisms influence higher brain circuits in primates will be essential for understanding how genetic insults lead to increased risk of cognitive disorders. Traditionally, modulatory influences on higher cortical circuits have been examined using lesion techniques, where a brain region is depleted of a particular transmitter to determine how its loss impacts cognitive function. For example, depletion of catecholamines or acetylcholine from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex produces striking deficits in working memory abilities. More directed techniques have utilized direct infusions of drug into a specific cortical site to try to circumvent compensatory changes that are common following transmitter depletion. The effects of drug on neuronal firing patterns are often studied using iontophoresis, where a minute amount of drug is moved into the brain using a tiny electrical current, thus minimizing the fluid flow that generally disrupts neuronal recordings. All of these approaches can be compared to systemic drug administration, which remains a key arena for the development of effective therapeutics for human cognitive disorders. Most recently, viral techniques are being developed to be able to manipulate proteins for which there is no developed pharmacology, and to allow optogenetic manipulations in primate cortex. As the association cortices greatly expand in brain evolution, research in nonhuman primates is particularly important for understanding the modulatory regulation of our highest order cognitive operations. PMID:26646567

  9. Neuronal ensembles sufficient for recovery sleep and the sedative actions of α2 adrenergic agonists

    PubMed Central

    Güntan, İlke; Moro, Alessandro; Steinberg, Eleonora A.; Ye, Zhiwen; Zecharia, Anna Y.; Yu, Xiao; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Brickley, Stephen G.; Yustos, Raquel; Pillidge, Zoe E.; Harding, Edward C.; Wisden, William; Franks, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Do sedatives engage natural sleep pathways? It is usually assumed that anesthetic-induced sedation and loss-of-righting-reflex (LORR) arise by influencing the same circuitry to lesser or greater extents. For the α2 adrenergic receptor agonist dexmedetomidine, we find that sedation and LORR are in fact distinct states, requiring different brain areas, the preoptic hypothalamic area and locus coeruleus (LC) respectively. Selective knockdown of α2A adrenergic receptors from the LC abolished dexmedetomidine-induced LORR, but not sedation. Instead, we found that dexmedetomidine-induced sedation resembles the deep recovery sleep that follows sleep deprivation. We used TetTag-pharmacogenetics in mice to functionally mark neurons activated in the preoptic hypothalamus during dexmedetomidine-induced sedation or recovery sleep. The neuronal ensembles could then be selectively reactivated. In both cases NREM sleep, with the accompanying drop in body temperature, was recapitulated. Thus α2 adrenergic receptor-induced sedation and recovery sleep share hypothalamic circuitry sufficient for producing these behavioral states. PMID:25706476

  10. Blockade of sensory neuron action potentials by a static magnetic field in the 10 mT range

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, M.J.; Holcomb, R.R.; Wamil, A.W.; Pickett, J.D.; Cavopol, A.V.

    1995-05-01

    To characterize the inhibitory effect of a static magnetic field, action potentials (AP) were elicited by intracellular application of 1 ms depolarizing current pulses of constant amplitude to the somata of adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons in monolayer dissociated cell culture. During the control period, < 5% of stimuli failed to elicit AP. During exposure to an {approximately}11 mT static magnetic field at the cell position produced by an array of four permanent center-charged neodymium magnets of alternating polarity (MAG-4A), 66% of stimuli failed to elicit AP. The number of failures was maximal after about 200--250 s in the field and returned gradually to baseline over 400--600 s. A direct or indirect effect on the conformation of AP generating sodium channels could account for these results because (1) failure was preceded often by reduction of maximal rate of rise, an indirect measure of sodium current; (2) recovery was significantly prolonged in more than one-half of neurons that were not stimulated during exposure to the MAG-4A field; and (3) resting membrane potential, input resistance, and chronaxie were unaffected by the field. The effect was diminished or prevented by moving the MAG-4A array along the X or Z axis away from the neuron under study and by increasing the distance between magnets in the XY plane. Reduction of AP firing during exposure to the {approximately}0.1 mT field produced by a MAG-4A array of micromagnets was about the same as that produced by a MAG-4A array of the large magnets above. The {approximately}28 mT field produced at cell position by two magnets of alternating polarity and the {approximately}88 mT field produced by a single magnet had no significant effect on AP firing. These findings suggest that field strength alone cannot account for AP blockade.

  11. Cytotoxic actions of FTY720, a novel immunosuppressant, on thymocytes and brain neurons dissociated from the rat.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Y; Chikahisa, L; Kanemaru, K; Nakata, M; Noguchi, S; Nagano, T; Okazaki, E; Hirata, A

    1998-04-01

    Effects of FTY720 (2-amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol HCl), a novel immunosuppressant, were examined on neurons and thymocytes respectively dissociated from rat brains and thymus glands using a flow cytometer to see if FTY720 exerts cytotoxic actions not only on spleen cells as previously reported but also on the other cells. FTY720 at a concentration of 10 microM deteriorated almost all of the thymocytes, while it was not the case for brain neurons. FTY720 increased the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) of thymocytes in both the presence and absence of external Ca2+, although the [Ca2+]i increased by FTY720 in the presence of external Ca2+ was much greater than that in the absence of external Ca2+. Thus, FTY720 may increase the membrane permeability of Ca2+ and release Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores in thymocytes. Furthermore, the number of thymocytes stained with ethidium, a dye impermeant to intact membranes, time-dependently increased after drug application. Therefore, FTY720 at concentrations of 3 - 10 microM non-specifically increases the membrane permeability of thymocytes, resulting in necrotic cell death, although FTY720 at micromolar concentrations was reported to induce apoptosis of spleen cells. PMID:9623716

  12. Knockout of Slo2.2 enhances itch, abolishes KNa current, and increases action potential firing frequency in DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Espinosa, Pedro L; Wu, Jianping; Yang, Chengtao; Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Zhou, Huifang; Liang, Hongwu; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Two mammalian genes, Kcnt1 and Kcnt2, encode pore-forming subunits of Na+-dependent K+ (KNa) channels. Progress in understanding KNa channels has been hampered by the absence of specific tools and methods for rigorous KNa identification in native cells. Here, we report the genetic disruption of both Kcnt1 and Kcnt2, confirm the loss of Slo2.2 and Slo2.1 protein, respectively, in KO animals, and define tissues enriched in Slo2 expression. Noting the prevalence of Slo2.2 in dorsal root ganglion, we find that KO of Slo2.2, but not Slo2.1, results in enhanced itch and pain responses. In dissociated small diameter DRG neurons, KO of Slo2.2, but not Slo2.1, abolishes KNa current. Utilizing isolectin B4+ neurons, the absence of KNa current results in an increase in action potential (AP) firing and a decrease in AP threshold. Activation of KNa acts as a brake to initiation of the first depolarization-elicited AP with no discernible effect on afterhyperpolarizations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10013.001 PMID:26559620

  13. Measuring the quality of neuronal identification in ensemble recordings

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Lytton, William W.; Olypher, Andrey V.; Fenton, André A.

    2011-01-01

    Technological advances in electrode construction and digital signal processing now allow recording simultaneous extracellular action potential discharges from many single neurons, with the potential to revolutionize understanding of the neural codes for sensory, motor and cognitive variables. Such studies have revealed the importance of ensemble neural codes, encoding information in the dynamic relationships amongst the action potential spike trains of multiple single neurons. Although the success of this research depends on the accurate classification of extracellular action potentials to individual neurons, there are no widely used quantitative methods for assessing the quality of the classifications. Here we describe information theoretic measures of action potential waveform isolation applicable to any dataset, that have an intuitive, universal interpretation, and that are not dependent on the methods or choice of parameters for single unit isolation, and that have been validated using a dataset of simultaneous intra- and extracellular neuronal recordings from Sprague-Dawley rats. PMID:22072690

  14. Ultrastructural development of Rohon-Beard neurons: loss of intramitochondrial granules parallels loss of calcium action potentials.

    PubMed

    Lamborghini, J E; Revenaugh, M; Spitzer, N C

    1979-02-15

    We have examined the ultrastructure of the cell body of a vertebrate spinal neuron, the Rohon-Beard cell of Xenopus laevis, at four stages during its development (Nieuwkoop and Faber stages: 22, 29/30, 37/38 and 42). At this time it has attained its electrical excitability and the action potential mechanism in the cell body is maturing through a sequence of stages in which the inward current is carried by Ca++ (stages 20-25), later by Ca++ and Na+ (stages 25-40), and finally by Na+ (stages 40-51) (Spitzer and Baccaglini, '76; Baccaglini and Spitzer, '77). There is a change in the abundance and distribution of the organelles in the perikaryon during this period, characteristic of other developing neurons. Mitochondria and Golgi apparatus become localized progressively more in the interior of the cells, and rough endoplasmic reticulum progressively more to the periphery where it often appears in orderly tiers parallel to the plasma membrane. The mitochondria contain dense intramitochondrial granules which are known in other cells to contain concentrations of divalent cations. The number of granules declines over the course of the developmental period studied. The presence of the intramitochondrial granules was examined quantitatively because electrophysiological data indicate that the amount of Ca++ entering the cells in early stages should raise the internal Ca++ concentration by several orders of magnitude, and that Ca++ is rapidly sequestered (Baccaglini and Spitzer, '77). A minimum of 200 mitochondrial profiles from at least four Rohon-Beard cells were scored for the presence of dense intramitochondrial granules at each stage studied. In stage 22 Rohon-Beard cells 75 +/- 5% (mean +/- SD, n = 4) of the mitochondrial profiles scored contained granules; in stage 29/30, 56 +/- 10% (n = 7); in stage 37/38, 3 +/- 3% (n = 5); and in stage 42, 0.5 +/- 0.25% (n = 4). Therefore, dense intramitochondrial granules, an indication of calcium accumulation in mitochondria

  15. Neuronal interactions between mentalising and action systems during indirect request processing.

    PubMed

    van Ackeren, Markus J; Smaragdi, Areti; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann

    2016-09-01

    Human communication relies on the ability to process linguistic structure and to map words and utterances onto our environment. Furthermore, as what we communicate is often not directly encoded in our language (e.g. in the case of irony, jokes or indirect requests), we need to extract additional cues to infer the beliefs and desires of our conversational partners. Although the functional interplay between language and the ability to mentalise has been discussed in theoretical accounts in the past, the neurobiological underpinnings of these dynamics are currently not well understood. Here, we address this issue using functional imaging (fMRI). Participants listened to question-reply dialogues. In these dialogues, a reply is interpreted as a direct reply, an indirect reply or a request for action, depending on the question. We show that inferring meaning from indirect replies engages parts of the mentalising network (mPFC) while requests for action also activate the cortical motor system (IPL). Subsequent connectivity analysis using Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM) revealed that this pattern of activation is best explained by an increase in effective connectivity from the mentalising network (mPFC) to the action system (IPL). These results are an important step towards a more integrative understanding of the neurobiological basis of indirect speech processing. PMID:27131039

  16. Prefrontal Neurons Encode Actions and Outcomes in Conjunction with Spatial Location in Rats Performing a Dynamic Delayed Non-Match to Position Task

    PubMed Central

    Wormwood, Benjamin A.; Miller, Rikki L. A.; Gibson, Brett M.; Mair, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    To respond adaptively to change organisms must utilize information about recent events and environmental context to select actions that are likely to produce favorable outcomes. We developed a dynamic delayed nonmatching to position task to study the influence of spatial context on event-related activity of medial prefrontal cortex neurons during reinforcement-guided decision-making. We found neurons with responses related to preparation, movement, lever press responses, reinforcement, and memory delays. Combined event-related and video tracking analyses revealed variability in spatial tuning of neurons with similar event-related activity. While all correlated neurons exhibited spatial tuning broadly consistent with relevant task events, for instance reinforcement-related activity concentrated in locations where reinforcement was delivered, some had elevated activity in more specific locations, for instance reinforcement-related activity in one of several locations where reinforcement was delivered. Timing analyses revealed a limited set of distinct response types with activity time-locked to critical behavioral events that represent the temporal organization of dDNMTP trials. Our results suggest that reinforcement-guided decision-making emerges from discrete populations of medial prefrontal neurons that encode information related to planned or ongoing movements and actions and anticipated or actual action-outcomes in conjunction with information about spatial context. PMID:26848579

  17. Prefrontal Neurons Encode Actions and Outcomes in Conjunction with Spatial Location in Rats Performing a Dynamic Delayed Non-Match to Position Task.

    PubMed

    Onos, Kristen D; Francoeur, Miranda J; Wormwood, Benjamin A; Miller, Rikki L A; Gibson, Brett M; Mair, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    To respond adaptively to change organisms must utilize information about recent events and environmental context to select actions that are likely to produce favorable outcomes. We developed a dynamic delayed nonmatching to position task to study the influence of spatial context on event-related activity of medial prefrontal cortex neurons during reinforcement-guided decision-making. We found neurons with responses related to preparation, movement, lever press responses, reinforcement, and memory delays. Combined event-related and video tracking analyses revealed variability in spatial tuning of neurons with similar event-related activity. While all correlated neurons exhibited spatial tuning broadly consistent with relevant task events, for instance reinforcement-related activity concentrated in locations where reinforcement was delivered, some had elevated activity in more specific locations, for instance reinforcement-related activity in one of several locations where reinforcement was delivered. Timing analyses revealed a limited set of distinct response types with activity time-locked to critical behavioral events that represent the temporal organization of dDNMTP trials. Our results suggest that reinforcement-guided decision-making emerges from discrete populations of medial prefrontal neurons that encode information related to planned or ongoing movements and actions and anticipated or actual action-outcomes in conjunction with information about spatial context. PMID:26848579

  18. Amniotic Fluid or Its Fatty Acids Produce Actions Similar to Diazepam on Lateral Septal Neurons Firing Rate

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-García, Ana G.; Vásquez-Hernández, Diana Idania

    2013-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid (AF) contains eight fatty acids (FATs), and both produce anxiolytic-like effects in adult rats and appetitive responses in human newborns. The medial amygdala and lateral septal nucleus function are related to social behavior, but the action of AF or its FATs in this circuit is known. We obtained 267 single-unit extracellular recordings in Wistar rats treated with vehicle (1 mL, s.c.; n = 12), human AF (1 mL, s.c.; n = 12), a FAT mixture (1 mL, s.c.; n = 13), diazepam (1 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 11), and fluoxetine (1 mg/kg, p.o.; n = 12). Compared with the vehicle group, the spontaneous septal firing rate in the AF, FAT mixture, and diazepam groups was the lowest and in the fluoxetine group the highest. Cumulative peristimulus histograms indicated that the significant change in septal firing occurred only in the AF and FAT mixture groups and exclusively in those neurons that increased their firing rate during amygdala stimulation. We conclude that human AF and its FATs produce actions comparable to anxiolytic drugs and are able to modify the responsivity of a circuit involved in social behavior, suggesting facilitation of social recognition processes by maternal-fetal fluids. PMID:23864826

  19. Blockade of striatal neurone responses to morphine by aminophylline: evidence for adenosine mediation of opiate action.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, M. N.; Stone, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    1 The responses of cortical and striatal neurones to morphine and adenosine applied iontophoretically have been studied in the male rat. 2 The majority of cells (57%) within the corpus striatum were profoundly inhibited, and a smaller proportion (18%) excited by morphine. Adenosine depressed the firing rate of 30/44 cells in the striatum, excitation never being observed. In contrast, the responses of cortical cells to morphine were typically weak and required longer ejection pulses to effect comparable changes in firing rate. 3 Aminophylline applied iontophoretically, as an anion, proved able to antagonize reversibly both morphine and adenosine in parallel. 4 On a number of cells, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was used as a control depressant but aminophylline did not appear to reduce these responses. 5 The responses to morphine (both inhibitory and excitatory) were not easily antagonized by naloxone. Typically, excitatory reponses were easier to antagonize than the inhibitory ones. 6 It is concluded that a consequence of the interaction of morphine with its receptors may be the release of adenosine which subsequently produces the inhibition observed with morphine. PMID:7378652

  20. Neuronal Rap1 Regulates Energy Balance, Glucose Homeostasis, and Leptin Actions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kentaro; Xu, Pingwen; Cordonier, Elizabeth L; Chen, Siyu S; Ng, Amy; Xu, Yong; Morozov, Alexei; Fukuda, Makoto

    2016-09-13

    The CNS contributes to obesity and metabolic disease; however, the underlying neurobiological pathways remain to be fully established. Here, we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is expressed in multiple hypothalamic nuclei that control whole-body metabolism and is activated in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Genetic ablation of CNS Rap1 protects mice from dietary obesity, glucose imbalance, and insulin resistance in the periphery and from HFD-induced neuropathological changes in the hypothalamus, including diminished cellular leptin sensitivity and increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of CNS Rap1 signaling normalizes hypothalamic ER stress and inflammation, improves cellular leptin sensitivity, and reduces body weight in mice with dietary obesity. We also demonstrate that Rap1 mediates leptin resistance via interplay with ER stress. Thus, neuronal Rap1 critically regulates leptin sensitivity and mediates HFD-induced obesity and hypothalamic pathology and may represent a potential therapeutic target for obesity treatment. PMID:27626668

  1. Flash memory: photochemical imprinting of neuronal action potentials onto a microbial rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Veena; Brinks, Daan; Maclaurin, Dougal; Hochbaum, Daniel; Kralj, Joel; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-02-12

    We developed a technique, "flash memory", to record a photochemical imprint of the activity state--firing or not firing--of a neuron at a user-selected moment in time. The key element is an engineered microbial rhodopsin protein with three states. Two nonfluorescent states, D1 and D2, exist in a voltage-dependent equilibrium. A stable fluorescent state, F, is reached by a photochemical conversion from D2. When exposed to light of a wavelength λ(write), population transfers from D2 to F, at a rate determined by the D1 ⇌ D2 equilibrium. The population of F maintains a record of membrane voltage which persists in the dark. Illumination at a later time at a wavelength λ(read) excites fluorescence of F, probing this record. An optional third flash at a wavelength λ(reset) converts F back to D2, for a subsequent write-read cycle. The flash memory method offers the promise to decouple the recording of neural activity from its readout. In principle, the technique may enable one to generate snapshots of neural activity in a large volume of neural tissue, e.g., a complete mouse brain, by circumventing the challenge of imaging a large volume with simultaneous high spatial and high temporal resolution. The proof-of-principle flash memory sensors presented here will need improvements in sensitivity, speed, brightness, and membrane trafficking before this goal can be realized. PMID:24428326

  2. Flash Memory: Photochemical Imprinting of Neuronal Action Potentials onto a Microbial Rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We developed a technique, “flash memory”, to record a photochemical imprint of the activity state—firing or not firing—of a neuron at a user-selected moment in time. The key element is an engineered microbial rhodopsin protein with three states. Two nonfluorescent states, D1 and D2, exist in a voltage-dependent equilibrium. A stable fluorescent state, F, is reached by a photochemical conversion from D2. When exposed to light of a wavelength λwrite, population transfers from D2 to F, at a rate determined by the D1 ⇌ D2 equilibrium. The population of F maintains a record of membrane voltage which persists in the dark. Illumination at a later time at a wavelength λread excites fluorescence of F, probing this record. An optional third flash at a wavelength λreset converts F back to D2, for a subsequent write–read cycle. The flash memory method offers the promise to decouple the recording of neural activity from its readout. In principle, the technique may enable one to generate snapshots of neural activity in a large volume of neural tissue, e.g., a complete mouse brain, by circumventing the challenge of imaging a large volume with simultaneous high spatial and high temporal resolution. The proof-of-principle flash memory sensors presented here will need improvements in sensitivity, speed, brightness, and membrane trafficking before this goal can be realized. PMID:24428326

  3. Neuronal adaptation involves rapid expansion of the action potential initiation site.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ricardo S; Henneberger, Christian; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Anders, Stefanie; Jensen, Thomas P; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation is the key to information-processing in the brain. Although APs are normally initiated in the axonal initial segment, developmental adaptation or prolonged network activity may alter the initiation site geometry thus affecting cell excitability. Here we find that hippocampal dentate granule cells adapt their spiking threshold to the kinetics of the ongoing dendrosomatic excitatory input by expanding the AP-initiation area away from the soma while also decelerating local axonal spikes. Dual-patch soma-axon recordings combined with axonal Na(+) and Ca(2+) imaging and biophysical modelling show that the underlying mechanism involves distance-dependent inactivation of axonal Na(+) channels due to somatic depolarization propagating into the axon. Thus, the ensuing changes in the AP-initiation zone and local AP propagation could provide activity-dependent control of cell excitability and spiking on a relatively rapid timescale. PMID:24851940

  4. Neuronal adaptation involves rapid expansion of the action potential initiation site

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ricardo S.; Henneberger, Christian; Padmashri, Ragunathan; Anders, Stefanie; Jensen, Thomas P.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation is the key to information-processing in the brain. Although APs are normally initiated in the axonal initial segment, developmental adaptation or prolonged network activity may alter the initiation site geometry thus affecting cell excitability. Here we find that hippocampal dentate granule cells adapt their spiking threshold to the kinetics of the ongoing dendrosomatic excitatory input by expanding the AP-initiation area away from the soma while also decelerating local axonal spikes. Dual-patch soma–axon recordings combined with axonal Na+ and Ca2+ imaging and biophysical modelling show that the underlying mechanism involves distance-dependent inactivation of axonal Na+ channels due to somatic depolarization propagating into the axon. Thus, the ensuing changes in the AP-initiation zone and local AP propagation could provide activity-dependent control of cell excitability and spiking on a relatively rapid timescale. PMID:24851940

  5. Neuronal and immunological basis of action of antidepressants in chronic pain - clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Mika, Joanna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Rojewska, Ewelina; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The current knowledge of the pharmacological actions of the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) has slowly evolved through their over 40-year history. Chronic pain represents one of the most important public health problems, and antidepressants are an essential part of the therapeutic strategy in addition to classical analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in chronic pain conditions; namely, headaches, low back pain, fibromyalgia, cancer pain and especially neuropathic pain. TCAs are traditionally the main type of depression medication used to treat chronic pain. Recently, new antidepressants were introduced into clinical use, with a significant reduction in side effects and equivalent efficacy on mood disorders. These new drugs that are effective for chronic pain belong to the tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs) group (amoxapine, maprotiline), the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) group (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and the atypical antidepressants group (bupropion, trazodone, mirtazapine, nefazodone). In this review, we present the available publications on TCAs (amitriptyline, doxepin, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline), TeCAs (amoxapine, maprotiline), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (citalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine), SNRIs (duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and atypical antidepressants (bupropion) for the treatment of neuropathic pain. We also review analgesics acting as both opioid receptor agonists and also acting as aminergic reuptake inhibitors. Existing data are insufficient to conclude which of these new classes of antidepressants has the best clinical profile and will be the most effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain; in addition, a lower incidence of side effects should be considered. Increased experimental and translational research is a key for further improvement of the treatment of chronic pain with antidepressants. However

  6. Novel description of ionic currents recorded with the action potential clamp technique: application to excitatory currents in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The traditional method of recording ionic currents in neurons has been with voltage-clamp steps. Other waveforms such as action potentials (APs) can be used. The AP clamp method reveals contributions of ionic currents that underlie excitability during an AP (Bean BP. Nat Rev Neurosci 8: 451–465, 2007). A novel usage of the method is described in this report. An experimental recording of an AP from the literature is digitized and applied computationally to models of ionic currents. These results are compared with experimental AP-clamp recordings for model verification or, if need be, alterations to the model. The method is applied to the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium ion current, INa, and the calcium ion current, ICa, from suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons (Jackson AC, Yao GL, Bean BP. J Neurosci 24: 7985–7998, 2004). The latter group reported voltage-step and AP-clamp results for both components. A model of INa is constructed from their voltage-step results. The AP clamp computational methodology applied to that model compares favorably with experiment, other than a modest discrepancy close to the peak of the AP that has not yet been resolved. A model of ICa was constructed from both voltage-step and AP-clamp results of this component. The model employs the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for the current-voltage relation rather than the traditional linear dependence of this aspect of the model on the Ca2+ driving force. The long-term goal of this work is a mathematical model of the SCN AP. The method is general. It can be applied to any excitable cell. PMID:26041831

  7. Assessing the Electrode-Neuron Interface with the Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potential, Electrode Position, and Behavioral Thresholds.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Lindsay; Scheperle, Rachel; Bierer, Julie Arenberg

    2016-06-01

    Variability in speech perception scores among cochlear implant listeners may largely reflect the variable efficacy of implant electrodes to convey stimulus information to the auditory nerve. In the present study, three metrics were applied to assess the quality of the electrode-neuron interface of individual cochlear implant channels: the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP), the estimation of electrode position using computerized tomography (CT), and behavioral thresholds using focused stimulation. The primary motivation of this approach is to evaluate the ECAP as a site-specific measure of the electrode-neuron interface in the context of two peripheral factors that likely contribute to degraded perception: large electrode-to-modiolus distance and reduced neural density. Ten unilaterally implanted adults with Advanced Bionics HiRes90k devices participated. ECAPs were elicited with monopolar stimulation within a forward-masking paradigm to construct channel interaction functions (CIF), behavioral thresholds were obtained with quadrupolar (sQP) stimulation, and data from imaging provided estimates of electrode-to-modiolus distance and scalar location (scala tympani (ST), intermediate, or scala vestibuli (SV)) for each electrode. The width of the ECAP CIF was positively correlated with electrode-to-modiolus distance; both of these measures were also influenced by scalar position. The ECAP peak amplitude was negatively correlated with behavioral thresholds. Moreover, subjects with low behavioral thresholds and large ECAP amplitudes, averaged across electrodes, tended to have higher speech perception scores. These results suggest a potential clinical role for the ECAP in the objective assessment of individual cochlear implant channels, with the potential to improve speech perception outcomes. PMID:26926152

  8. Inhalational anaesthetics and n-alcohols share a site of action in the neuronal Shaw2 Kv channel

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharji, Aditya; Klett, Nathan; Go, Ramon Christopher V; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Neuronal ion channels are key targets of general anaesthetics and alcohol, and binding of these drugs to pre-existing and relatively specific sites is thought to alter channel gating. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this action are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the neuronal Shaw2 voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel to ask whether the inhalational anaesthetic halothane and n-alcohols share a binding site near the activation gate of the channel. Experimental approach: Focusing on activation gate mutations that affect channel modulation by n-alcohols, we investigated n-alcohol-sensitive and n-alcohol-resistant Kv channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes to probe the functional modulation by externally applied halothane using two-electrode voltage clamping and a gas-tight perfusion system. Key results: Shaw2 Kv channels are reversibly inhibited by halothane in a dose-dependent and saturable manner (K0.5= 400 µM; nH= 1.2). Also, discrete mutations in the channel's S4S5 linker are sufficient to reduce or confer inhibition by halothane (Shaw2-T330L and Kv3.4-G371I/T378A respectively). Furthermore, a point mutation in the S6 segment of Shaw2 (P410A) converted the halothane-induced inhibition into halothane-induced potentiation. Lastly, the inhibition resulting from the co-application of n-butanol and halothane is consistent with the presence of overlapping binding sites for these drugs and weak binding cooperativity. Conclusions and implications: These observations strongly support a molecular model of a general anaesthetic binding site in the Shaw2 Kv channel. This site may involve the amphiphilic interface between the S4S5 linker and the S6 segment, which plays a pivotal role in Kv channel activation. PMID:20136839

  9. Intravenous Cocaine Induces Rapid, Transient Excitation of Striatal Neurons via its Action on Peripheral Neural Elements: Single-cell, Iontophoretic Study in Awake and Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.; Brown, Paul Leon

    2007-01-01

    Cocaine’s (COC) direct interaction with the dopamine (DA) transporter is usually considered the most important action underlying the psychomotor stimulant and reinforcing effects of this drug. However, some physiological, behavioral and psycho-emotional effects of COC are very rapid and brief and they remain intact during DA receptor blockade, suggesting possible involvement of peripheral non-DA neural mechanisms. To assess this issue, single-unit recording with microiontophoresis was used to examine changes in impulse activity of dorsal and ventral striatal neurons to intravenous (iv) COC (0.25–0.5 mg/kg) in the same rats under two conditions: awake with dopamine (DA) receptor blockade and anesthetized with urethane. In the awake preparation ~70% striatal neurons showed rapid and transient (latency ~ 6 s, duration ~15 s) COC-induced excitations. These effects were stronger in ventral than dorsal striatum. During anesthesia, these phasic effects were fully blocked and COC slowly decreased neuronal discharge rate. COC-methiodide (COC-M), a derivative that cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, also caused phasic excitations in the awake, but not anesthetized condition. In contrast to regular COC, COC-M had no tonic effect on discharge rate in either preparation. Most striatal neurons that were phasically excited by both COC forms also showed short-latency excitations during tail-touch and tail-pinch in the awake preparation, an effect strongly attenuated during anesthesia. Finally, most striatal neurons that in awake conditions were phasically excited by somato-sensory stimuli and COC salts were also excited by iontophoretic glutamate (GLU). Although striatal neurons were sensitive to GLU in both preparations, the response magnitude at the same GLU current was higher in awake than anesthetized conditions. These data suggest that in awake animals iv COC, like somato-sensory stimuli, transiently excites striatal neurons via its action on peripheral neural elements

  10. Common Coding of Observation and Execution of Action in 9-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Matthew R.; Bertenthal, Bennett I.

    2006-01-01

    Do 9-month-old infants motorically simulate actions they perceive others perform? Two experiments tested whether action observation, like overt reaching, is sufficient to elicit the Piagetian A-not-B error. Infants recovered a toy hidden at location A or observed an experimenter recover the toy. After the toy was hidden at location B, infants in…

  11. Linear coding of complex sound spectra by discharge rate in neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) and its inputs

    PubMed Central

    Koka, Kanthaiah; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The interaural level difference (ILD) cue to sound location is first encoded in the lateral superior olive (LSO). ILD sensitivity results because the LSO receives excitatory input from the ipsilateral cochlear nucleus and inhibitory input indirectly from the contralateral cochlear nucleus via glycinergic neurons of the ipsilateral medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). It is hypothesized that in order for LSO neurons to encode ILDs, the sound spectra at both ears must be accurately encoded via spike rate by their afferents. This spectral-coding hypothesis has not been directly tested in MNTB, likely because MNTB neurons have been mostly described and studied recently in regards to their abilities to encode temporal aspects of sounds, not spectral. Here, we test the hypothesis that MNTB neurons and their inputs from the cochlear nucleus and auditory nerve code sound spectra via discharge rate. The Random Spectral Shape (RSS) method was used to estimate how the levels of 100-ms duration spectrally stationary stimuli were weighted, both linearly and non-linearly, across a wide band of frequencies. In general, MNTB neurons, and their globular bushy cell inputs, were found to be well-modeled by a linear weighting of spectra demonstrating that the pathways through the MNTB can accurately encode sound spectra including those resulting from the acoustical cues to sound location provided by head-related directional transfer functions (DTFs). Together with the anatomical and biophysical specializations for timing in the MNTB-LSO complex, these mechanisms may allow ILDs to be computed for complex stimuli with rapid spectrotemporally-modulated envelopes such as speech and animal vocalizations and moving sound sources. PMID:25565971

  12. Excitability and Burst Generation of AVPV Kisspeptin Neurons Are Regulated by the Estrous Cycle Via Multiple Conductances Modulated by Estradiol Action123

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The preovulatory secretory surge of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is crucial for fertility and is regulated by a switch of estradiol feedback action from negative to positive. GnRH neurons likely receive estradiol feedback signals via ERα-expressing afferents. Kisspeptin neurons in anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) are thought to be critical for estradiol-positive feedback induction of the GnRH surge. We examined the electrophysiological properties of GFP-identified AVPV kisspeptin neurons in brain slices from mice on the afternoon of diestrus (negative feedback) and proestrus (positive feedback, time of surge). Extracellular recordings revealed increased firing frequency and action potential bursts on proestrus versus diestrus. Whole-cell recordings were used to study the intrinsic mechanisms of bursting. Upon depolarization, AVPV kisspeptin neurons exhibited tonic firing or depolarization-induced bursts (DIB). Both tonic and DIB cells exhibited bursts induced by rebound from hyperpolarization. DIB occurred similarly on both cycle stages, but rebound bursts were observed more often on proestrus. DIB and rebound bursts were both sensitive to Ni2+, suggesting that T-type Ca2+ currents (ITs) are involved. IT current density was greater on proestrus versus diestrus. In addition to IT, persistent sodium current (INaP) facilitated rebound bursting. On diestrus, 4-aminopyridine-sensitive potassium currents contributed to reduced rebound bursts in both tonic and DIB cells. Manipulation of specific sex steroids suggests that estradiol induces the changes that enhance AVPV kisspeptin neuron excitability on proestrus. These observations indicate cycle-driven changes in circulating estradiol increased overall action potential generation and burst firing in AVPV kisspeptin neurons on proestrus versus diestrus by regulating multiple intrinsic currents. PMID:27280155

  13. Underlying mechanism of regulatory actions of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, on neuronal potassium channels and firing: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Huang, C W; Hung, T Y; Liao, Y K; Hsu, M C; Wu, S N

    2013-06-01

    Diclofenac (DIC), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is known to exert anti-nociceptive and anti-convulsant actions; however, its effects on ion currents, in neurons remain debatable. We aimed to investigate (1) potential effects of diclofenac on membrane potential and potassium currents in differentiated NSC-34 neuronal cells and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with whole-cell patch-clamp technology, and (2) firing of action potentials (APs), using a simulation model from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons based on diclofenac's effects on potassium currents. In the NSC-34 cells, diclofenac exerted an inhibitory effect on delayed-rectifier K⁺ current (I(KDR)) with an IC₅₀ value of 73 μM. Diclofenac not merely inhibited the I(KDR) amplitude in response to membrane depolarization, but also accelerated the process of current inactivation. The inhibition by diclofenac of IK(DR) was not reversed by subsequent application of either naloxone. Importantly, diclofenac (300 μM) increased the amplitude of M-type K⁺ current (I)(KM)), while flupirtine (10 μM) or meclofenamic acid (10 μM) enhanced it effectively. Consistently, diclofenac (100 μM) increased the amplitude of I(KM) and diminished the I(KDR) amplitude, with a shortening of inactivation time constant in DRG neurons. Furthermore, by using the simulation modeling, we demonstrated the potential electrophysiological mechanisms underlying changes in AP firing caused by diclofenac. During the exposure to diclofenac, the actions on both I(KM) and I(KDR) could be potential mechanism through which it influences the excitability of fast-spiking neurons. Caution needs to be made in attributing the effects of diclofenac primarily to those produced by the activation of I(KM). PMID:23959723

  14. The involvement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in antiepileptic action of alpha-asarone on pentylenetetrazol molding rats.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Zhu, Wenting; Liu, Jing; Yin, Jian; Qin, Wei; Jiang, Changbin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to research the role of nitric oxide (NO) as a mediator of alpha (α)-asarone effect at the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptiform discharge in rat. α-Asarone that was injected intraperitoneally twenty minutes before PTZ injection suppressed the clonic discharge effectively and the significant actions lasted for 30 min with no change of clonic amplitude. Administration of α-asarone did not influence interictal discharge. Four kinds of NO regulators were administered, including non-selective NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG) and NO substrate, L-arginine (ARG) and their influence on the actions of α-asarone were studied, and all of the regulators were administered fifteen minutes before α-asarone injection. L-NAME and 7-NI reversed the anticlonic activity of α-asarone, and a significant increase of clonic activity was induced by L-NAME later in L-NAME +.α-asarone + PTZ group. There were no significant differences between AG + α-asarone + PTZ and α-asarone + PTZ group. L-ARG played a dual role in this study. It aggravated clonic discharge in the early stage but relieved interictal discharge in the late stage compared with PTZ group alone, and the beneficial effect of α-asarone was also reversed. All the above results suggest that nNOS/NO pathway mediates the anticonvulsant effect of α-asarone, and NO played a biphasic role in PTZ modeling process, while iNOS was unrelated to the inhibition effect of α-asarone on PTZ induced epileptiform activity. PMID:25227079

  15. Rapid Signaling Actions of Environmental Estrogens in Developing Granule Cell Neurons Are Mediated by Estrogen Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoa H.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) constitute a diverse group of man-made chemicals and natural compounds derived from plants and microbial metabolism. Estrogen-like actions are mediated via the nuclear hormone receptor activity of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ and rapid regulation of intracellular signaling cascades. Previous study defined cerebellar granule cell neurons as estrogen responsive and that granule cell precursor viability was developmentally sensitive to estrogens. In this study experiments using Western blot analysis and pharmacological approaches have characterized the receptor and signaling modes of action of selective and nonselective estrogen ligands in developing cerebellar granule cells. Estrogen treatments were found to briefly increase ERK1/2-phosphorylation and then cause prolonged depression of ERK1/2 activity. The sensitivity of granule cell precursors to estrogen-induced cell death was found to require the integrated activation of membrane and intracellular ER signaling pathways. The sensitivity of granule cells to selective and nonselective ER agonists and a variety of estrogenic and nonestrogenic EDCs was also examined. The ERβ selective agonist DPN, but not the ERα selective agonist 4,4′,4′-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol or other ERα-specific ligands, stimulated cell death. Only EDCs with selective or nonselective ERβ activities like daidzein, equol, diethylstilbestrol, and bisphenol A were observed to induce E2-like neurotoxicity supporting the conclusion that estrogen sensitivity in granule cells is mediated via ERβ. The presented results also demonstrate the utility of estrogen sensitive developing granule cells as an in vitro assay for elucidating rapid estrogen-signaling mechanisms and to detect EDCs that act at ERβ to rapidly regulate intracellular signaling. PMID:20926581

  16. A survey of the effective factors in students' adherence to university dress code policy, using the theory of reasoned action

    PubMed Central

    KAVEH, MOHAMMAD HOSSEIN; MORADI, LEILA; HESAMPOUR, MARYAM; HASAN ZADEH, JAFAR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recognizing the determinants of behavior plays a major role in identification and application of effective strategies for encouraging individuals to follow the intended pattern of behavior. The present study aimed to analyze the university students’ behaviors regarding the amenability to dress code, using the theory of reasoned action (TRA). Methods In this cross sectional study, 472 students were selected through multi-stage random sampling. The data were collected using a researcher-made questionnaire whose validity was confirmed by specialists. Besides, its reliability was confirmed by conducting a pilot study revealing Cronbach’s alpha coefficients of 0.93 for attitude, 0.83 for subjective norms, 0.94 for behavioral intention and 0.77 for behavior. The data were entered into the SPSS statistical software and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics (Mann-Whitney, correlation and regression analysis). Results Based on the students’ self-reports, conformity of clothes to the university’s dress code was below the expected level in 28.87% of the female students and 28.55% of the male ones. The mean scores of attitude, subjective norms, and behavioral intention to comply with dress code policy were 28.78±10.08, 28.51±8.25 and 11.12±3.84, respectively. The students of different colleges were different from each other concerning TRA constructs. Yet, subjective norms played a more critical role in explaining the variance of dress code behavior among the students. Conclusion Theory of reasoned action explained the students’ dress code behaviors relatively well. The study results suggest paying attention to appropriate approaches in educational, cultural activities, including promotion of student-teacher communication. PMID:26269790

  17. From muscles synergies and individual goals to interpersonal synergies and shared goals: Mirror neurons and interpersonal action hierarchies. Comment on "Grasping synergies: A motor-control approach to the mirror neuron mechanism" by D'Ausilio et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candidi, Matteo; Sacheli, Lucia Maria; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2015-03-01

    D'Ausilio et al. [28] must be praised for bringing attention to the important question of how human Mirror Neurons (MNs) may contribute to action perception, prediction and understanding [1] and for linking their role with the granularity of the motor system as conceptualized in the domain of action control theories. Although we think that the Authors are right in saying that the granularity of the motor system constrains the granularity of the MN system, we speculate that the contribution of MNs to action perception, prediction and understanding is also constrained by the connections between MNs and other cortical and subcortical regions, and by the identity of MNs, i.e. whether they are interneurons or pyramidal cells [2]. In other words, the functional contribution of MS depends on whether they are connected to sensory, emotional and cognitive networks for the service of action perception, prediction and understanding.

  18. Adaptive coding of orofacial and speech actions in motor and somatosensory spaces with and without overt motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Sato, Marc; Vilain, Coriandre; Lamalle, Laurent; Grabski, Krystyna

    2015-02-01

    Studies of speech motor control suggest that articulatory and phonemic goals are defined in multidimensional motor, somatosensory, and auditory spaces. To test whether motor simulation might rely on sensory-motor coding common with those for motor execution, we used a repetition suppression (RS) paradigm while measuring neural activity with sparse sampling fMRI during repeated overt and covert orofacial and speech actions. RS refers to the phenomenon that repeated stimuli or motor acts lead to decreased activity in specific neural populations and are associated with enhanced adaptive learning related to the repeated stimulus attributes. Common suppressed neural responses were observed in motor and posterior parietal regions in the achievement of both repeated overt and covert orofacial and speech actions, including the left premotor cortex and inferior frontal gyrus, the superior parietal cortex and adjacent intraprietal sulcus, and the left IC and the SMA. Interestingly, reduced activity of the auditory cortex was observed during overt but not covert speech production, a finding likely reflecting a motor rather an auditory imagery strategy by the participants. By providing evidence for adaptive changes in premotor and associative somatosensory brain areas, the observed RS suggests online state coding of both orofacial and speech actions in somatosensory and motor spaces with and without motor behavior and sensory feedback. PMID:25203272

  19. MaqFACS (Macaque Facial Action Coding System) can be used to document facial movements in Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus)

    PubMed Central

    Julle-Danière, Églantine; Whitehouse, Jamie; Joly, Marine; Gass, Carolin; Burrows, Anne M.; Waller, Bridget M.

    2015-01-01

    Human and non-human primates exhibit facial movements or displays to communicate with one another. The evolution of form and function of those displays could be better understood through multispecies comparisons. Anatomically based coding systems (Facial Action Coding Systems: FACS) are developed to enable such comparisons because they are standardized and systematic and aid identification of homologous expressions underpinned by similar muscle contractions. To date, FACS has been developed for humans, and subsequently modified for chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, orangutans, hylobatids, dogs, and cats. Here, we wanted to test whether the MaqFACS system developed in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could be used to code facial movements in Barbary macaques (M. sylvanus), a species phylogenetically close to the rhesus macaques. The findings show that the facial movement capacity of Barbary macaques can be reliably coded using the MaqFACS. We found differences in use and form of some movements, most likely due to specializations in the communicative repertoire of each species, rather than morphological differences. PMID:26401458

  20. Augmentation of Cav1 channel current and action potential duration after uptake of S100A1 in sympathetic ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Wright, Nathan T.; Contreras, Minerva; Weber, David J.

    2009-01-01

    S100A1, a 21-kDa dimeric Ca2+-binding protein of the EF-hand type, is expressed in cardiomyocytes and is an important regulator of heart function. During ischemia, cardiomyocytes secrete S100A1 to the extracellular space. Although the effects of extracellular S100A1 have been documented in cardiomyocytes, it is unclear whether S100A1 exerts modulatory effects on other tissues in proximity with cardiac cells. Therefore, we sought to investigate the effects of exogenous S100A1 on Ca2+ signals and electrical properties of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. Immunostaining and Western blot assays indicated no endogenous S100A1 in SCG neurons. Cultured SCG neurons took up S100A1 when it was present in the extracellular medium. Inside the cell exogenous S100A1 localized in a punctate pattern throughout the cytoplasm but was excluded from the nuclei. S100A1 partially colocalized with markers for both receptor- and non-receptor-mediated endocytosis, indicating that in SCG neurons multiple endocytotic pathways are involved in S100A1 internalization. In compartmentalized SCG cultures, axonal projections were capable of uptake and transport of S100A1 toward the neuronal somas. Exogenous S100A1 applied either extra- or intracellularly enhanced Cav1 channel currents in a PKA-dependent manner, prolonged action potentials, and amplified action potential-induced Ca2+ transients. NMR chemical shift perturbation of Ca2+-S100A1 in the presence of a peptide from the regulatory subunit of PKA verifies that S100A1 directly interacts with PKA, and that this interaction likely occurs in the hydrophobic binding pocket of Ca2+-S100A1. Our results suggest the hypothesis that in sympathetic neurons exogenous S100A1 may lead to an increase of sympathetic output. PMID:19657060

  1. Differential actions of orexin receptors in brainstem cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons revealed by receptor knockouts: implications for orexinergic signaling in arousal and narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmeier, Kristi A.; Tyler, Christopher J.; Kalogiannis, Mike; Ishibashi, Masaru; Kristensen, Morten P.; Gumenchuk, Iryna; Chemelli, Richard M.; Kisanuki, Yaz Y.; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Leonard, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Orexin neuropeptides influence multiple homeostatic functions and play an essential role in the expression of normal sleep-wake behavior. While their two known receptors (OX1 and OX2) are targets for novel pharmacotherapeutics, the actions mediated by each receptor remain largely unexplored. Using brain slices from mice constitutively lacking either receptor, we used whole-cell and Ca2+ imaging methods to delineate the cellular actions of each receptor within cholinergic [laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT)] and monoaminergic [dorsal raphe (DR) and locus coeruleus (LC)] brainstem nuclei—where orexins promote arousal and suppress REM sleep. In slices from OX−/−2 mice, orexin-A (300 nM) elicited wild-type responses in LDT, DR, and LC neurons consisting of a depolarizing current and augmented voltage-dependent Ca2+ transients. In slices from OX−/−1 mice, the depolarizing current was absent in LDT and LC neurons and was attenuated in DR neurons, although Ca2+-transients were still augmented. Since orexin-A produced neither of these actions in slices lacking both receptors, our findings suggest that orexin-mediated depolarization is mediated by both receptors in DR, but is exclusively mediated by OX1 in LDT and LC neurons, even though OX2 is present and OX2 mRNA appears elevated in brainstems from OX−/−1 mice. Considering published behavioral data, these findings support a model in which orexin-mediated excitation of mesopontine cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons contributes little to stabilizing spontaneous waking and sleep bouts, but functions in context-dependent arousal and helps restrict muscle atonia to REM sleep. The augmented Ca2+ transients produced by both receptors appeared mediated by influx via L-type Ca2+ channels, which is often linked to transcriptional signaling. This could provide an adaptive signal to compensate for receptor loss or prolonged antagonism and may contribute to the reduced severity of narcolepsy in single receptor

  2. THE TWO-LEVEL THEORY OF VERB MEANING: AN APPROACH TO INTEGRATING THE SEMANTICS OF ACTION WITH THE MIRROR NEURON SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Kemmerer, David; Castillo, Javier Gonzalez

    2010-01-01

    Verbs have two separate levels of meaning. One level reflects the uniqueness of every verb and is called the “root.” The other level consists of a more austere representation that is shared by all the verbs in a given class and is called the “event structure template.” We explore the following hypotheses about how, with specific reference to the motor features of action verbs, these two distinct levels of semantic representation might correspond to two distinct levels of the mirror neuron system. Hypothesis 1: Root-level motor features of verb meaning are partially subserved by somatotopically mapped mirror neurons in the left primary motor and/or premotor cortices. Hypothesis 2: Template-level motor features of verb meaning are partially subserved by representationally more schematic mirror neurons in Brodmann area 44 of the left inferior frontal gyrus. Evidence has been accumulating in support of the general neuroanatomical claims made by these two hypotheses—namely, that each level of verb meaning is associated with the designated cortical areas. However, as yet no studies have satisfied all the criteria necessary to support the more specific neurobiological claims made by the two hypotheses—namely, that each level of verb meaning is associated with mirror neurons in the pertinent brain regions. This would require demonstrating that within those regions the same neuronal populations are engaged during (a) the linguistic processing of particular motor features of verb meaning, (b) the execution of actions with the corresponding motor features, and (c) the observation of actions with the corresponding motor features. PMID:18996582

  3. Distribution and Chemical Coding of Corticotropin Releasing Factor-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Guinea-Pig Enteric Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Xiyu; Wang, Guo-Du; Fang, Xiucai; Gao, Xiang; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D.

    2008-01-01

    Immunofluorescence was used to study immunoreactivity (IR) for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in the guinea-pig enteric nervous system. CRF-IR was expressed in both the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of all regions of the large and small intestine and the myenteric plexus of the stomach. CRF-IR-nerve fibers were present in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, in the circular muscle coat and surrounding submucosal arterioles. Most of the CRF-IR fibers persisted in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses after 7 days in organotypic culture. CRF-IR was not co-expressed with tyrosine hydroxylase-IR or calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR fibers. The proportions of CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus increased progressively from the stomach (0.6%) to the distal colon (2.8%). Most of the CRF-IR myenteric neurons (95%) had uniaxonal morphology; the remainder had Dogiel type II multipolar morphology. CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus of the ileum expressed IR for choline acetyltransferase (56.9%), substance P (55.0%), and nitric oxide synthase (37.9%). CRF-IR never co-localized with IR for calbindin, calretinin, neuropeptide Y, serotonin or somatostatin in the myenteric plexus. CRF-IR cell bodies were more abundant in the submucosal plexus (29.9-38.0%) than in the myenteric plexus. All CRF-IR neurons in submucosal ganglia expressed vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR and were likely to be secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. CRF-IR neurons did not express IR for the CRF1 receptor. CRF1-IR was expressed in neuronal neighbors of those with CRF-IR. Collective evidence suggests that VIPergic secretomotor neurons might provide synaptic input to neighboring cholinergic neurons. PMID:16304680

  4. Exploring action potential initiation in neurons exposed to DC electric fields through dynamical analysis of conductance-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Han, Chun-Xiao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Jin, Qi-Tao

    2014-05-01

    Noninvasive direct current (DC) electric stimulation of central nervous system is today a promising therapeutic option to alleviate the symptoms of a number of neurological disorders. Despite widespread use of this noninvasive brain modulation technique, a generalizable explanation of its biophysical basis has not been described which seriously restricts its application and development. This paper investigated the dynamical behaviors of Hodgkin's three classes of neurons exposed to DC electric field based on a conductance-based neuron model. With phase plane and bifurcation analysis, the different responses of each class of neuron to the same stimulation are shown to derive from distinct spike initiating dynamics. Under the effects of negative DC electric field, class 1 neuron generates repetitive spike through a saddle-node on invariant circle (SNIC) bifurcation, while it ceases this repetitive behavior through a Hopf bifurcation; Class 2 neuron generates repetitive spike through a Hopf bifurcation, meanwhile it ceases this repetitive behavior also by a Hopf bifurcation; Class 3 neuron can generate single spike through a quasi-separatrix-crossing (QSC) at first, then it generates repetitive spike through a Hopf bifurcation, while it ceases this repetitive behavior through a SNIC bifurcation. Furthermore, three classes of neurons' spiking frequency f-electric field E (f-E) curves all have parabolic shape. Our results highlight the effects of external DC electric field on neuronal activity from the biophysical modeling point of view. It can contribute to the application and development of noninvasive DC brain modulation technique.

  5. Interneuronal Transfer and Distal Action of Tetanus Toxin and Botulinum Neurotoxins A and D in Central Neurons.

    PubMed

    Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Vevea, Jason D; Brittain, Joel M; Figueroa-Bernier, Annette; Tepp, William H; Johnson, Eric A; Yeh, Felix L; Chapman, Edwin R

    2016-08-16

    Recent reports suggest that botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) A, which is widely used clinically to inhibit neurotransmission, can spread within networks of neurons to have distal effects, but this remains controversial. Moreover, it is not known whether other members of this toxin family are transferred between neurons. Here, we investigate the potential distal effects of BoNT/A, BoNT/D, and tetanus toxin (TeNT), using central neurons grown in microfluidic devices. Toxins acted upon the neurons that mediated initial entry, but all three toxins were also taken up, via an alternative pathway, into non-acidified organelles that mediated retrograde transport to the somato-dendritic compartment. Toxins were then released into the media, where they entered and exerted their effects upon upstream neurons. These findings directly demonstrate that these agents undergo transcytosis and interneuronal transfer in an active form, resulting in long-distance effects. PMID:27498860

  6. 26 CFR 301.7433-2 - Civil cause of action for violation of section 362 or 524 of the Bankruptcy Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Civil cause of action for violation of section 362 or 524 of the Bankruptcy Code. 301.7433-2 Section 301.7433-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by...

  7. NUCRAC: a code for the estimation of adversary-action consequences in the nuclear power fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, D.C.; Ritzman, R.L.; Roberts, J.A.; Sachs, E.S.

    1986-02-01

    A program sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and designed to estimate the potential consequences of adversary actions in the nuclear power fuel cycle has been completed. So that the results of this consequence analysis would be comparable to that of the reactor Safety Study (RSS), the methodology described in the RSS and implemented in the Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences (CRAC) code served as the baseline for consequence evaluation in this study. Four portions of the RSS methodology were modified for use in this study: the atmospheric dispersion model, the inhalation dose factors, the criterion for early mortality from lung dose, and the model for chronic pathways to man. Implementation of these modifications to the CRAC code resulted in the preparation and application of a revised code termed NUCRAC. These modifications are described in detail. Detailed instructions for the operation of NUCRAC are presented in the form of a user-manual. Inputs and outputs for an example calculation are also presented.

  8. Ethanol directly depresses AMPA and NMDA glutamate currents in spinal cord motor neurons independent of actions on GABAA or glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, M Y; Rampil, I J; Kendig, J J

    1999-07-01

    Ethanol is a general anesthetic agent as defined by abolition of movement in response to noxious stimulation. This anesthetic endpoint is due to spinal anesthetic actions. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that ethanol acts directly on motor neurons to inhibit excitatory synaptic transmission at glutamate receptors. Whole cell recordings were made in visually identified motor neurons in spinal cord slices from 14- to 23-day-old rats. Currents were evoked by stimulating a dorsal root fragment or by brief pulses of glutamate. Ethanol at general anesthetic concentrations (50-200 mM) depressed both responses. Ethanol also depressed glutamate-evoked responses in the presence of tetrodotoxin (300 nM), showing that its actions are postsynaptic. Block of inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acidA and glycine receptors by bicuculline (50 microM) and strychnine (5 microM), respectively, did not significantly reduce the effects of ethanol on glutamate currents. Ethanol also depressed glutamate-evoked currents when the inhibitory receptors were blocked and either D, L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (40 microM) or 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione disodium (10 microM) were applied to block N-methyl-D-aspartate or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate receptors, respectively. The results show that ethanol exerts direct depressant effects on both alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate currents in motor neurons. Enhancement of gamma-aminobutyric acidA and glycine inhibition is not required for this effect. Direct depression of glutamatergic excitatory transmission by a postsynaptic action on motor neurons thus may contribute to general anesthesia as defined by immobility in response to a noxious stimulus. PMID:10381800

  9. Auditory Distance Coding in Rabbit Midbrain Neurons and Human Perception: Monaural Amplitude Modulation Depth as a Cue

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Carney, Laurel H.; Bishop, Brian B.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying sound source distance localization are not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that a novel mechanism can create monaural distance sensitivity: a combination of auditory midbrain neurons' sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) depth and distance-dependent loss of AM in reverberation. We used virtual auditory space (VAS) methods for sounds at various distances in anechoic and reverberant environments. Stimulus level was constant across distance. With increasing modulation depth, some rabbit inferior colliculus neurons increased firing rates whereas others decreased. These neurons exhibited monotonic relationships between firing rates and distance for monaurally presented noise when two conditions were met: (1) the sound had AM, and (2) the environment was reverberant. The firing rates as a function of distance remained approximately constant without AM in either environment and, in an anechoic condition, even with AM. We corroborated this finding by reproducing the distance sensitivity using a neural model. We also conducted a human psychophysical study using similar methods. Normal-hearing listeners reported perceived distance in response to monaural 1 octave 4 kHz noise source sounds presented at distances of 35–200 cm. We found parallels between the rabbit neural and human responses. In both, sound distance could be discriminated only if the monaural sound in reverberation had AM. These observations support the hypothesis. When other cues are available (e.g., in binaural hearing), how much the auditory system actually uses the AM as a distance cue remains to be determined. PMID:25834060

  10. Auditory distance coding in rabbit midbrain neurons and human perception: monaural amplitude modulation depth as a cue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duck O; Zahorik, Pavel; Carney, Laurel H; Bishop, Brian B; Kuwada, Shigeyuki

    2015-04-01

    Mechanisms underlying sound source distance localization are not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that a novel mechanism can create monaural distance sensitivity: a combination of auditory midbrain neurons' sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) depth and distance-dependent loss of AM in reverberation. We used virtual auditory space (VAS) methods for sounds at various distances in anechoic and reverberant environments. Stimulus level was constant across distance. With increasing modulation depth, some rabbit inferior colliculus neurons increased firing rates whereas others decreased. These neurons exhibited monotonic relationships between firing rates and distance for monaurally presented noise when two conditions were met: (1) the sound had AM, and (2) the environment was reverberant. The firing rates as a function of distance remained approximately constant without AM in either environment and, in an anechoic condition, even with AM. We corroborated this finding by reproducing the distance sensitivity using a neural model. We also conducted a human psychophysical study using similar methods. Normal-hearing listeners reported perceived distance in response to monaural 1 octave 4 kHz noise source sounds presented at distances of 35-200 cm. We found parallels between the rabbit neural and human responses. In both, sound distance could be discriminated only if the monaural sound in reverberation had AM. These observations support the hypothesis. When other cues are available (e.g., in binaural hearing), how much the auditory system actually uses the AM as a distance cue remains to be determined. PMID:25834060

  11. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the voltage-dependent potassium currents underlying spike repolarization in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Studying mouse substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons both in brain slice and after acute dissociation, we found that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 channels both make major contributions to the depolarization-activated potassium current. Inhibiting Kv2 or BK channels had very different effects on spike shape and evoked firing. Inhibiting Kv2 channels increased spike width and decreased the afterhyperpolarization, as expected for loss of an action potential-activated potassium conductance. BK inhibition also increased spike width but paradoxically increased the afterhyperpolarization. Kv2 channel inhibition steeply increased the slope of the frequency–current (f–I) relationship, whereas BK channel inhibition had little effect on the f–I slope or decreased it, sometimes resulting in slowed firing. Action potential clamp experiments showed that both BK and Kv2 current flow during spike repolarization but with very different kinetics, with Kv2 current activating later and deactivating more slowly. Further experiments revealed that inhibiting either BK or Kv2 alone leads to recruitment of additional current through the other channel type during the action potential as a consequence of changes in spike shape. Enhancement of slowly deactivating Kv2 current can account for the increased afterhyperpolarization produced by BK inhibition and likely underlies the very different effects on the f–I relationship. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This work shows that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 voltage-activated potassium channels both regulate action potentials in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra

  12. A-272651, a nonpeptidic blocker of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, modulates bladder smooth muscle contractility and neuronal action potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, C-C; Turner, S C; Zhang, X-F; Milicic, I; Parihar, A; Jinkerson, T; Wilkins, J; Buckner, S A; Gopalakrishnan, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BKCa, KCa1.1) links membrane excitability with intracellular Ca2+ signaling and plays important roles in smooth muscle contraction, neuronal firing, and neuroendocrine secretion. This study reports the characterization of a novel BKCa channel blocker, 2,4-dimethoxy-N-naphthalen-2-yl-benzamide (A-272651). Experimental Approach: 86Rb+ efflux in HEK-293 cells expressing BKCa was measured. Effects of A-272651 on BKCa α- and BKCa αβ1-mediated currents were evaluated by patch-clamp. Effects on contractility were assessed using low-frequency electrical field stimulated pig detrusor and spontaneously contracting guinea pig detrusor. Effects of A-272651 on neuronal activity were determined in rat small diameter dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Key Results: A-272651 (10 μM) inhibited 86Rb+ efflux evoked by NS-1608 in HEK-293 cells expressing BKCa currents. A-272651 concentration-dependently inhibited BKCa currents with IC50 values of 4.59 μM (Hill coefficient 1.04, measured at +40 mV), and 2.82 μM (Hill coefficient 0.89), respectively, for BKCa α and BKCa αβ1-mediated currents. Like iberiotoxin, A-272651 enhanced field stimulated twitch responses in pig detrusor and spontaneous contractions in guinea pig detrusor with EC50 values of 4.05±0.05 and 37.95±0.12 μM, respectively. In capsaicin-sensitive DRG neurons, application of A-272651 increased action potential firing and prolonged action potential duration. Conclusions and Implications: These data demonstrate that A-272651 modulates smooth muscle contractility and neuronal firing properties. Unlike previously reported peptide BKCa blockers, A-272651 represents one of the first small molecule BKCa channel blockers that could serve as a useful tool for further characterization of BKCa channels in physiological and pathological states. PMID:17519951

  13. Activation of neurotensin receptor 1 facilitates neuronal excitability and spatial learning and memory in the entorhinal cortex: beneficial actions in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhaoyang; Cilz, Nicholas I; Kurada, Lalitha; Hu, Binqi; Yang, Chuanxiu; Wada, Etsuko; Combs, Colin K; Porter, James E; Lesage, Florian; Lei, Saobo

    2014-05-14

    Neurotensin (NT) is a tridecapeptide distributed in the CNS, including the entorhinal cortex (EC), a structure that is crucial for learning and memory and undergoes the earliest pathological alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whereas NT has been implicated in modulating cognition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which NT modifies cognitive processes and the potential therapeutic roles of NT in AD have not been determined. Here we examined the effects of NT on neuronal excitability and spatial learning in the EC, which expresses high density of NT receptors. Brief application of NT induced persistent increases in action potential firing frequency, which could last for at least 1 h. NT-induced facilitation of neuronal excitability was mediated by downregulation of TREK-2 K(+) channels and required the functions of NTS1, phospholipase C, and protein kinase C. Microinjection of NT or NTS1 agonist, PD149163, into the EC increased spatial learning as assessed by the Barnes Maze Test. Activation of NTS1 receptors also induced persistent increases in action potential firing frequency and significantly improved the memory status in APP/PS1 mice, an animal model of AD. Our study identifies a cellular substrate underlying learning and memory and suggests that NTS1 agonists may exert beneficial actions in an animal model of AD. PMID:24828655

  14. Activation of Neurotensin Receptor 1 Facilitates Neuronal Excitability and Spatial Learning and Memory in the Entorhinal Cortex: Beneficial Actions in an Alzheimer's Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhaoyang; Cilz, Nicholas I.; Kurada, Lalitha; Hu, Binqi; Yang, Chuanxiu; Wada, Etsuko; Combs, Colin K.; Porter, James E.; Lesage, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a tridecapeptide distributed in the CNS, including the entorhinal cortex (EC), a structure that is crucial for learning and memory and undergoes the earliest pathological alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whereas NT has been implicated in modulating cognition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which NT modifies cognitive processes and the potential therapeutic roles of NT in AD have not been determined. Here we examined the effects of NT on neuronal excitability and spatial learning in the EC, which expresses high density of NT receptors. Brief application of NT induced persistent increases in action potential firing frequency, which could last for at least 1 h. NT-induced facilitation of neuronal excitability was mediated by downregulation of TREK-2 K+ channels and required the functions of NTS1, phospholipase C, and protein kinase C. Microinjection of NT or NTS1 agonist, PD149163, into the EC increased spatial learning as assessed by the Barnes Maze Test. Activation of NTS1 receptors also induced persistent increases in action potential firing frequency and significantly improved the memory status in APP/PS1 mice, an animal model of AD. Our study identifies a cellular substrate underlying learning and memory and suggests that NTS1 agonists may exert beneficial actions in an animal model of AD. PMID:24828655

  15. WNK1-regulated inhibitory phosphorylation of the KCC2 cotransporter maintains the depolarizing action of GABA in immature neurons.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Perrine; Kahle, Kristopher T; Zhang, Jinwei; Hertz, Nicholas; Pisella, Lucie I; Buhler, Emmanuelle; Schaller, Fabienne; Duan, JingJing; Khanna, Arjun R; Bishop, Paul N; Shokat, Kevan M; Medina, Igor

    2015-06-30

    Activation of Cl(-)-permeable γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors elicits synaptic inhibition in mature neurons but excitation in immature neurons. This developmental "switch" in the GABA function depends on a postnatal decrease in intraneuronal Cl(-) concentration mediated by KCC2, a Cl(-)-extruding K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter. We showed that the serine-threonine kinase WNK1 [with no lysine (K)] forms a physical complex with KCC2 in the developing mouse brain. Dominant-negative mutation, genetic depletion, or chemical inhibition of WNK1 in immature neurons triggered a hyperpolarizing shift in GABA activity by enhancing KCC2-mediated Cl(-) extrusion. This increase in KCC2 activity resulted from reduced inhibitory phosphorylation of KCC2 at two C-terminal threonines, Thr(906) and Thr(1007). Phosphorylation of both Thr(906) and Thr(1007) was increased in immature versus mature neurons. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanism regulating Cl(-) homeostasis in immature neurons, and suggest that WNK1-regulated changes in KCC2 phosphorylation contribute to the developmental excitatory-to-inhibitory GABA sequence. PMID:26126716

  16. Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure Enhances the Excitability and Synaptic Plasticity of Lateral Orbitofrontal Cortex Neurons and Induces a Tolerance to the Acute Inhibitory Actions of Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Lopez, Marcelo F; Mulholland, Patrick J; Woodward, John J

    2016-03-01

    Alcoholism is associated with changes in brain reward and control systems, including the prefrontal cortex. In prefrontal areas, the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) has been suggested to have an important role in the development of alcohol-abuse disorders and studies from this laboratory demonstrate that OFC-mediated behaviors are impaired in alcohol-dependent animals. However, it is not known whether chronic alcohol (ethanol) exposure alters the fundamental properties of OFC neurons. In this study, mice were exposed to repeated cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure to induce dependence and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine the effects of CIE treatment on lateral OFC (lOFC) neuron excitability, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. Repeated cycles of CIE exposure and withdrawal enhanced current-evoked action potential (AP) spiking and this was accompanied by a reduction in the after-hyperpolarization and a decrease in the functional activity of SK channels. CIE mice also showed an increase in the AMPA/NMDA ratio, and this was associated with an increase in GluA1/GluA2 AMPA receptor expression and a decrease in GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. Following CIE treatment, lOFC neurons displayed a persistent long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission following a spike-timing-dependent protocol. Lastly, CIE treatment diminished the inhibitory effect of acute ethanol on AP spiking of lOFC neurons and reduced expression of the GlyT1 transporter. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol leads to enhanced intrinsic excitability and glutamatergic synaptic signaling of lOFC neurons. These alterations may contribute to the impairment of OFC-dependent behaviors in alcohol-dependent individuals. PMID:26286839

  17. Electrophysiological studies in cultured mouse CNS neurones of the actions of an agonist and an inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M. S.; Lambert, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The action of agents which bind with the benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor has been investigated by use of intracellular recordings from dissociated mouse neurones grown in tissue culture. The agents tested were midazolam (an agonist at the BZ receptor) and methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM-an inverse agonist at the BZ receptor). These were applied to the neurone under study by one of the following methods: iontophoresis; pressure application of known concentrations from blunt pipettes; directly in the perfusing medium. On only very few occasions did midazolam or DMCM have a direct effect on the membrane potential (EM) or conductance (GM) of the impaled neurone. For the neurones where direct effects were present, there was no consistent pattern of response. Neither substance affected the threshold for action potential generation. The effect of midazolam and DMCM on responses evoked by iontophoretic application of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was also investigated. Three parameters were used to quantify GABA responses: the depolarization (VGABA); the increase in GM (gGABA) measured with constant current pulses; using voltage clamp, the GABA current (IGABA). The GABA response should be quantified by a parameter which is linearly related to the number of GABA-operated channels which are conducting at any instant. VGABA does not fulfil this criterion. gGABA is an appropriate parameter, but is difficult to determine for large responses where the membrane is nearly short circuited. IGABA measured during voltage clamp fulfils this criterion. Midazolam (greater than 10(-6) M) reliably potentiated GABA responses with a parallel shift to the left of the dose-response curve. This is in agreement with biochemical studies where BZs increase the affinity of the GABA receptor for its ligand. The effect of DMCM on GABA responses was more variable. In the majority of cases GABA responses were reduced by DMCM. The threshold dose for this depression was

  18. Neuronal cholesterol metabolism increases dendritic outgrowth and synaptic markers via a concerted action of GGTase-I and Trk.

    PubMed

    Moutinho, Miguel; Nunes, Maria João; Correia, Jorge C; Gama, Maria João; Castro-Caldas, Margarida; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Björkhem, Ingemar; Ruas, Jorge L; Rodrigues, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol 24-hydroxylase (CYP46A1) is responsible for brain cholesterol elimination and therefore plays a crucial role in the control of brain cholesterol homeostasis. Altered CYP46A1 expression has been associated with several neurodegenerative diseases and changes in cognition. Since CYP46A1 activates small guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins (sGTPases), we hypothesized that CYP46A1 might be affecting neuronal development and function by activating tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors and promoting geranylgeranyl transferase-I (GGTase-I) prenylation activity. Our results show that CYP46A1 triggers an increase in neuronal dendritic outgrowth and dendritic protrusion density, and elicits an increase of synaptic proteins in the crude synaptosomal fraction. Strikingly, all of these effects are abolished by pharmacological inhibition of GGTase-I activity. Furthermore, CYP46A1 increases Trk phosphorylation, its interaction with GGTase-I, and the activity of GGTase-I, which is crucial for the enhanced dendritic outgrowth. Cholesterol supplementation studies indicate that cholesterol reduction by CYP46A1 is the necessary trigger for these effects. These results were confirmed in vivo, with a significant increase of p-Trk, pre- and postsynaptic proteins, Rac1, and decreased cholesterol levels, in crude synaptosomal fractions prepared from CYP46A1 transgenic mouse cortex. This work describes the molecular mechanisms by which neuronal cholesterol metabolism effectively modulates neuronal outgrowth and synaptic markers. PMID:27491694

  19. Inhibitory action of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone on the signaling pathways induced by kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7.

    PubMed

    Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Soga, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Bentley, George E; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) acts as a negative regulator of reproduction by acting on gonadotropes and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Despite its functional significance, the molecular mechanism of GnIH action in the target cells has not been fully elucidated. To expand our previous study on GnIH actions in gonadotropes, we investigated the potential signal transduction pathway that conveys the inhibitory action of GnIH in GnRH neurons by using the GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7. We examined whether GnIH inhibits the action of kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), positive regulators of GnRH neurons. Although GnIH significantly suppressed the stimulatory effect of kisspeptin on GnRH release in hypothalamic culture, GnIH had no inhibitory effect on kisspeptin stimulation of serum response element and nuclear factor of activated T-cell response element activities and ERK phosphorylation, indicating that GnIH may not directly inhibit kisspeptin signaling in GnRH neurons. On the contrary, GnIH effectively eliminated the stimulatory effect of VIP on p38 and ERK phosphorylation, c-Fos mRNA expression, and GnRH release. The use of pharmacological modulators strongly demonstrated the specific inhibitory action of GnIH on the adenylate cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway, suggesting a common inhibitory mechanism of GnIH action in GnRH neurons and gonadotropes.-Son, Y. L., Ubuka, T., Soga, T., Yamamoto, K., Bentley, G. E., Tsutsui, K. Inhibitory action of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone on the signaling pathways induced by kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7. PMID:26929433

  20. Speech Coding in the Brain: Representation of Vowel Formants by Midbrain Neurons Tuned to Sound Fluctuations(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Carney, Laurel H; Li, Tianhao; McDonough, Joyce M

    2015-01-01

    Current models for neural coding of vowels are typically based on linear descriptions of the auditory periphery, and fail at high sound levels and in background noise. These models rely on either auditory nerve discharge rates or phase locking to temporal fine structure. However, both discharge rates and phase locking saturate at moderate to high sound levels, and phase locking is degraded in the CNS at middle to high frequencies. The fact that speech intelligibility is robust over a wide range of sound levels is problematic for codes that deteriorate as the sound level increases. Additionally, a successful neural code must function for speech in background noise at levels that are tolerated by listeners. The model presented here resolves these problems, and incorporates several key response properties of the nonlinear auditory periphery, including saturation, synchrony capture, and phase locking to both fine structure and envelope temporal features. The model also includes the properties of the auditory midbrain, where discharge rates are tuned to amplitude fluctuation rates. The nonlinear peripheral response features create contrasts in the amplitudes of low-frequency neural rate fluctuations across the population. These patterns of fluctuations result in a response profile in the midbrain that encodes vowel formants over a wide range of levels and in background noise. The hypothesized code is supported by electrophysiological recordings from the inferior colliculus of awake rabbits. This model provides information for understanding the structure of cross-linguistic vowel spaces, and suggests strategies for automatic formant detection and speech enhancement for listeners with hearing loss. PMID:26464993

  1. Speech Coding in the Brain: Representation of Vowel Formants by Midbrain Neurons Tuned to Sound Fluctuations1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianhao; McDonough, Joyce M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current models for neural coding of vowels are typically based on linear descriptions of the auditory periphery, and fail at high sound levels and in background noise. These models rely on either auditory nerve discharge rates or phase locking to temporal fine structure. However, both discharge rates and phase locking saturate at moderate to high sound levels, and phase locking is degraded in the CNS at middle to high frequencies. The fact that speech intelligibility is robust over a wide range of sound levels is problematic for codes that deteriorate as the sound level increases. Additionally, a successful neural code must function for speech in background noise at levels that are tolerated by listeners. The model presented here resolves these problems, and incorporates several key response properties of the nonlinear auditory periphery, including saturation, synchrony capture, and phase locking to both fine structure and envelope temporal features. The model also includes the properties of the auditory midbrain, where discharge rates are tuned to amplitude fluctuation rates. The nonlinear peripheral response features create contrasts in the amplitudes of low-frequency neural rate fluctuations across the population. These patterns of fluctuations result in a response profile in the midbrain that encodes vowel formants over a wide range of levels and in background noise. The hypothesized code is supported by electrophysiological recordings from the inferior colliculus of awake rabbits. This model provides information for understanding the structure of cross-linguistic vowel spaces, and suggests strategies for automatic formant detection and speech enhancement for listeners with hearing loss. PMID:26464993

  2. Direct Actions of Kisspeptins on GnRH Neurons Permit Attainment of Fertility but are Insufficient to Fully Preserve Gonadotropic Axis Activity

    PubMed Central

    León, Silvia; Barroso, Alexia; Vázquez, María J.; García-Galiano, David; Manfredi-Lozano, María; Ruiz-Pino, Francisco; Heras, Violeta; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Roa, Juan; Schutz, Günther; Kirilov, Milen; Gaytan, Francisco; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins, ligands of the receptor, Gpr54, are potent stimulators of puberty and fertility. Yet, whether direct kisspeptin actions on GnRH neurons are sufficient for the whole repertoire of their reproductive effects remains debatable. To dissect out direct vs. indirect effects of kisspeptins on GnRH neurons in vivo, we report herein the detailed reproductive/gonadotropic characterization of a Gpr54 null mouse line with selective re-introduction of Gpr54 expression only in GnRH cells (Gpr54−/−Tg; rescued). Despite preserved fertility, adult rescued mice displayed abnormalities in gonadal microstructure, with signs of precocious ageing in females and elevated LH levels with normal-to-low testosterone secretion in males. Gpr54−/−Tg rescued mice showed also altered gonadotropin responses to negative feedback withdrawal, while luteinizing hormone responses to various gonadotropic regulators were variably affected, with partially blunted relative (but not absolute) responses to kisspeptin-10, NMDA and the agonist of tachykinin receptors, NK2R. Our data confirm that direct effects of kisspeptins on GnRH cells are sufficient to attain fertility. Yet, such direct actions appear to be insufficient to completely preserve proper functionality of gonadotropic axis, suggesting a role of kisspeptin signaling outside GnRH cells. PMID:26755241

  3. Direct Actions of Kisspeptins on GnRH Neurons Permit Attainment of Fertility but are Insufficient to Fully Preserve Gonadotropic Axis Activity.

    PubMed

    León, Silvia; Barroso, Alexia; Vázquez, María J; García-Galiano, David; Manfredi-Lozano, María; Ruiz-Pino, Francisco; Heras, Violeta; Romero-Ruiz, Antonio; Roa, Juan; Schutz, Günther; Kirilov, Milen; Gaytan, Francisco; Pinilla, Leonor; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptins, ligands of the receptor, Gpr54, are potent stimulators of puberty and fertility. Yet, whether direct kisspeptin actions on GnRH neurons are sufficient for the whole repertoire of their reproductive effects remains debatable. To dissect out direct vs. indirect effects of kisspeptins on GnRH neurons in vivo, we report herein the detailed reproductive/gonadotropic characterization of a Gpr54 null mouse line with selective re-introduction of Gpr54 expression only in GnRH cells (Gpr54(-/-)Tg; rescued). Despite preserved fertility, adult rescued mice displayed abnormalities in gonadal microstructure, with signs of precocious ageing in females and elevated LH levels with normal-to-low testosterone secretion in males. Gpr54(-/-)Tg rescued mice showed also altered gonadotropin responses to negative feedback withdrawal, while luteinizing hormone responses to various gonadotropic regulators were variably affected, with partially blunted relative (but not absolute) responses to kisspeptin-10, NMDA and the agonist of tachykinin receptors, NK2R. Our data confirm that direct effects of kisspeptins on GnRH cells are sufficient to attain fertility. Yet, such direct actions appear to be insufficient to completely preserve proper functionality of gonadotropic axis, suggesting a role of kisspeptin signaling outside GnRH cells. PMID:26755241

  4. Differential regulation of action potential- and metabotropic glutamate receptor-induced Ca2+ signals by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guohong; Bernier, Brian E; Harnett, Mark T; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2007-04-25

    Ca2+ signals associated with action potentials (APs) and metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation exert distinct influences on neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. However, it is not clear how these two types of Ca2+ signals are differentially regulated by neurotransmitter inputs in a single neuron. We investigated this issue in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral midbrain using brain slices. Intracellular Ca2+ was assessed by measuring Ca2+-sensitive K+ currents or imaging the fluorescence of Ca2+ indicator dyes. Tonic activation of metabotropic neurotransmitter receptors (mGluRs, alpha1 adrenergic receptors, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors), attained by superfusion of agonists or weak, sustained (approximately 1 s) synaptic stimulation, augmented AP-induced Ca2+ transients. In contrast, Ca2+ signals elicited by strong, transient (50-200 ms) activation of mGluRs with aspartate iontophoresis were suppressed by superfusion of agonists. These opposing effects on Ca2+ signals were both mediated by an increase in intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) levels, because they were blocked by heparin, an IP3 receptor antagonist, and reproduced by photolytic application of IP3. Evoking APs repetitively at low frequency (2 Hz) caused inactivation of IP3 receptors and abolished IP3 facilitation of single AP-induced Ca2+ signals, whereas facilitation of Ca2+ signals triggered by bursts of APs (five at 20 Hz) was attenuated by less than half. We further obtained evidence suggesting that the psychostimulant amphetamine may augment burst-induced Ca2+ signals via both depression of basal firing and production of IP3. We propose that intracellular IP3 tone provides a mechanism to selectively amplify burst-induced Ca2+ signals in dopaminergic neurons. PMID:17460090

  5. The neuroprotective action of pyrroloquinoline quinone against glutamate-induced apoptosis in hippocampal neurons is mediated through the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qi; Shen Mi; Ding Mei; Shen Dingding; Ding Fei

    2011-04-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a cofactor in several enzyme-catalyzed redox reactions, possesses a potential capability of scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibiting cell apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the effects of PQQ on glutamate-induced cell death in primary cultured hippocampal neurons and the possible underlying mechanisms. We found that glutamate-induced apoptosis in cultured hippocampal neurons was significantly attenuated by the ensuing PQQ treatment, which also inhibited the glutamate-induced increase in Ca2+ influx, caspase-3 activity, and ROS production, and reversed the glutamate-induced decrease in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. The examination of signaling pathways revealed that PQQ treatment activated the phosphorylation of Akt and suppressed the glutamate-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK). And inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt cascade by LY294002 and wortmannin significantly blocked the protective effects of PQQ, and alleviated the increase in Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Taken together, our results indicated that PQQ could protect primary cultured hippocampal neurons against glutamate-induced cell damage by scavenging ROS, reducing Ca2+ influx, and caspase-3 activity, and suggested that PQQ-activated PI3K/Akt signaling might be responsible for its neuroprotective action through modulation of glutamate-induced imbalance between Bcl-2 and Bax. - Research Highlights: >PQQ attenuated glutamate-induced cell apoptosis of cultured hippocampal neurons. >PQQ inhibited glutamate-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx and caspase-3 activity. >PQQ reduced glutamate-induced increase in ROS production. >PQQ affected phosphorylation of Akt and JNK signalings after glutamate injury. >PI3K/Akt was required for neuroprotection of PQQ by modulating Bcl-2/Bax ratio.

  6. Action selection in a possible model of striatal medium spiny neuron dysfunction: behavioral and EEG data in a patient with benign hereditary chorea.

    PubMed

    Beste, Christian; Saft, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Chaining or cascading of different actions and responses is necessary to accomplish a goal. Yet, little is known about the functional neuroanatomical-electrophysiological mechanisms mediating these processes. Computational models suggest that medium spiny neurons (MSNs) play an important role in action cascading, but this assumption has hardly been tested relating neuroanatomical and electrophysiological parameters in a human model of circumscribed MSN dysfunction. As a possible human model of circumscribed MSN dysfunction, we investigate benign hereditary chorea in a case-control study applying bootstrap statistics. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a stop-change paradigm, where we apply mathematical constraints to describe the degree of how task goals are activated with more or less overlap during action cascading. We record event-related potentials and analyze neural synchronization processes. The results show that MSN dysfunctions lead to deficits in action cascading processes only when two response options seek simultaneous access to response selection resources. Attentional selection processes are not affected, but processes reflecting the transition between stimulus evaluation and responding are affected. The results underline computational models of MSN functioning and show that dysfunction in these networks leads to a more parallel and hence inefficient response selection. PMID:24135770

  7. GRP78 clustering at the cell surface of neurons transduces the action of exogenous alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Bellani, S; Mescola, A; Ronzitti, G; Tsushima, H; Tilve, S; Canale, C; Valtorta, F; Chieregatti, E

    2014-12-01

    Mutation or multiplication of the alpha-synuclein (Syn)-encoding gene is frequent cause of early onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent evidences point to the pathogenic role of excess Syn also in sporadic PD. Syn is a cytosolic protein, which has been shown to be released from neurons. Here we provide evidence that extracellular Syn induces an increase in surface-exposed glucose-related protein of 78 kDa (GRP78), which becomes clustered in microdomains of the neuronal plasma membrane. Upon interacting with Syn, GRP78 activates a signaling cascade leading to cofilin 1 inactivation and stabilization of microfilaments, thus affecting morphology and dynamics of actin cytoskeleton in cultured neurons. Downregulation of GRP78 abolishes the activity of exogenous Syn, indicating that it is the primary target of Syn. Inactivation of cofilin 1 and stabilization of actin cytoskeleton are present also in fibroblasts derived from genetic PD patients, which show a dramatic increase in stress fibers. Similar changes are displayed by control cells incubated with the medium of PD fibroblasts, only when Syn is present. The accumulation of Syn in the extracellular milieu, its interaction with the plasma membrane and Syn-driven clustering of GRP78 appear, therefore, responsible for the dysregulation of actin turnover, leading to early deficits in synaptic function that precede neurodegeneration. PMID:25124556

  8. ANTI-APOPTOTIC ACTIONS OF VASOPRESSIN IN H32 NEURONS INVOLVE MAP KINASE TRANSACTIVATION AND BAD PHOSPHORYLATION

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Volpi, Simona; Aguilera, Greti

    2008-01-01

    Vasopressin (VP) secreted within the brain modulates neuronal function acting as a neurotransmitter. Based on the observation that VP prevented serum deprivation-induced cell death in the neuronal cell line, H32, which expresses endogenous V1 receptors, we tested the hypothesis that VP has anti-apoptotic properties. Flow cytometry experiments showed that 10nM VP prevented serum deprivation-induced cell death and annexin V binding. Serum deprivation increased caspase-3 activity in a time and serum concentration dependent manner, and VP prevented these effects through interaction with receptors of V1 subtype. The signaling pathways mediating the anti-apoptotic effect of VP involve mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), Ca2+/calmodulin dependent kinase (CaMK) and protein kinase C (PKC). Western blot analyses revealed time-dependent decreases of Bad phosphorylation and increases in cytosolic levels of cytochrome c following serum deprivation, effects which were prevented by 10nM VP. These data demonstrate that activation of endogenous V1 VP receptors prevents serum deprivation-induced apoptosis, through phosphorylation-inactivation of the pro-apoptotic protein, Bad, and consequent decreases in cytosolic cytochome c and caspase-3 activation. The data suggest that VP has anti-apoptotic activity in neurons and that VP may act as a neuroprotective agent in the brain. PMID:18402937

  9. Action Research of a Color-Coded, Onset-Rime Decoding Intervention: Examining the Effects with First Grade Students Identified as at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Candace A.; Rafferty, Lisa A.; Camizzi, Mariya A.; Max, Caroline A.; Van Blargan, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Many students who struggle to obtain the alphabetic principle are at risk for being identified as having a reading disability and would benefit from additional explicit phonics instruction as a remedial measure. In this action research case study, the research team conducted two experiments to investigate the effects of a color-coded, onset-rime,…

  10. A long non-coding RNA, BC048612 and a microRNA, miR-203 coordinate the gene expression of neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prameet; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Wong, Peter T-H; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-04-01

    The regulatory roles for non-coding RNAs, the long non-coding RNAs and microRNAs, are emerging as crucial determinants of central nervous system development and function. Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) is a cell adhesion molecule that has been shown to play an important role in neurite outgrowth during neuronal development. Precise expression of the Negr1 gene is crucial for proper brain development and is dysregulated during brain injury. Hence, we attempted to elucidate the non-coding RNAs that control Negr1 gene expression. A long non-coding RNA, BC048612, transcribed from the bidirectional GC-rich Negr1 gene promoter was found to influence Negr1 mRNA expression. In vitro knockdown of the long non-coding RNA resulted in significant down-regulation of Negr1 mRNA expression, NEGR1 protein levels and neurite length whereas over-expression enhanced Negr1 mRNA expression, NEGR1 protein levels and increased neurite length. Meanwhile, another non-coding RNA, microRNA-203, was found to target the 3' untranslated region of the Negr1 mRNA. Inhibition of microRNA-203 led to increased expression of Negr1 mRNA, elevated NEGR1 protein levels and increased neurite length. Conversely, microRNA-203 over-expression decreased the level of Negr1 mRNA, NEGR1 protein and neurite length. Neither microRNA-203 nor the long non-coding RNA, BC048612 could influence each other's expression. Hence, the long non-coding RNA, BC048612, and microRNA-203 were determined to be positive and negative regulators of Negr1 gene expression respectively. These processes have a direct effect on NEGR1 protein levels and neurite length, thus highlighting the importance of the regulatory non-coding RNAs in modulating Negr1 gene expression for precise neuronal development. PMID:26723899

  11. A Mouse Model of Visual Perceptual Learning Reveals Alterations in Neuronal Coding and Dendritic Spine Density in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Xian; Hu, Xu; Li, Yue; Lou, Shihao; Ma, Xiao; An, Xu; Liu, Hui; Peng, Jing; Ma, Danyi; Zhou, Yifeng; Yang, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    Visual perceptual learning (VPL) can improve spatial vision in normally sighted and visually impaired individuals. Although previous studies of humans and large animals have explored the neural basis of VPL, elucidation of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remains a challenge. Owing to the advantages of molecular genetic and optogenetic manipulations, the mouse is a promising model for providing a mechanistic understanding of VPL. Here, we thoroughly evaluated the effects and properties of VPL on spatial vision in C57BL/6J mice using a two-alternative, forced-choice visual water task. Briefly, the mice underwent prolonged training at near the individual threshold of contrast or spatial frequency (SF) for pattern discrimination or visual detection for 35 consecutive days. Following training, the contrast-threshold trained mice showed an 87% improvement in contrast sensitivity (CS) and a 55% gain in visual acuity (VA). Similarly, the SF-threshold trained mice exhibited comparable and long-lasting improvements in VA and significant gains in CS over a wide range of SFs. Furthermore, learning largely transferred across eyes and stimulus orientations. Interestingly, learning could transfer from a pattern discrimination task to a visual detection task, but not vice versa. We validated that this VPL fully restored VA in adult amblyopic mice and old mice. Taken together, these data indicate that mice, as a species, exhibit reliable VPL. Intrinsic signal optical imaging revealed that mice with perceptual training had higher cut-off SFs in primary visual cortex (V1) than those without perceptual training. Moreover, perceptual training induced an increase in the dendritic spine density in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of V1. These results indicated functional and structural alterations in V1 during VPL. Overall, our VPL mouse model will provide a platform for investigating the neurobiological basis of VPL. PMID:27014004

  12. Action-Effect Codes in and before the Central Bottleneck: Evidence from the Psychological Refractory Period Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paelecke, Marko; Kunde, Wilfried

    2007-01-01

    Voluntary motor actions aim at and are thus governed by predictable action effects. Therefore, representations of an action's effects normally must become activated prior to the action itself. In 5 psychological refractory period experiments the authors investigated whether the activation of such effect representations coincides with the response…

  13. Utilizing induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to understand the actions of estrogens in human neurons.

    PubMed

    Shum, Carole; Macedo, Sara C; Warre-Cornish, Katherine; Cocks, Graham; Price, Jack; Srivastava, Deepak P

    2015-08-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and Cognition". Over recent years tremendous progress has been made towards understanding the molecular and cellular mechanism by which estrogens exert enhancing effects on cognition, and how they act as a neuroprotective or neurotrophic agent in disease. Currently, much of this work has been carried out in animal models with only a limited number of studies using native human tissue or cells. Recent advances in stem cell technology now make it possible to reprogram somatic cells from humans into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which can subsequently be differentiated into neurons of specific lineages. Importantly, the reprogramming of cells allows for the generation of iPSCs that retain the genetic "makeup" of the donor. Therefore, it is possible to generate iPSC-derived neurons from patients diagnosed with specific diseases, that harbor the complex genetic background associated with the disorder. Here, we review the iPSC technology and how it's currently being used to model neural development and neurological diseases. Furthermore, we explore whether this cellular system could be used to understand the role of estrogens in human neurons, and present preliminary data in support of this. We further suggest that the use of iPSC technology offers a novel system to not only further understand estrogens' effects in human cells, but also to investigate the mechanism by which estrogens are beneficial in disease. Developing a greater understanding of these mechanisms in native human cells will also aid in the development of safer and more effective estrogen-based therapeutics. PMID:26143621

  14. Utilizing induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to understand the actions of estrogens in human neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Carole; Macedo, Sara C.; Warre-Cornish, Katherine; Cocks, Graham; Price, Jack; Srivastava, Deepak P.

    2015-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue “Estradiol and Cognition”. Over recent years tremendous progress has been made towards understanding the molecular and cellular mechanism by which estrogens exert enhancing effects on cognition, and how they act as a neuroprotective or neurotrophic agent in disease. Currently, much of this work has been carried out in animal models with only a limited number of studies using native human tissue or cells. Recent advances in stem cell technology now make it possible to reprogram somatic cells from humans into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which can subsequently be differentiated into neurons of specific lineages. Importantly, the reprogramming of cells allows for the generation of iPSCs that retain the genetic “makeup” of the donor. Therefore, it is possible to generate iPSC-derived neurons from patients diagnosed with specific diseases, that harbor the complex genetic background associated with the disorder. Here, we review the iPSC technology and how it's currently being used to model neural development and neurological diseases. Furthermore, we explore whether this cellular system could be used to understand the role of estrogens in human neurons, and present preliminary data in support of this. We further suggest that the use of iPSC technology offers a novel system to not only further understand estrogens' effects in human cells, but also to investigate the mechanism by which estrogens are beneficial in disease. Developing a greater understanding of these mechanisms in native human cells will also aid in the development of safer and more effective estrogen-based therapeutics. PMID:26143621

  15. Tonic Inhibition of Accumbal Spiny Neurons by Extrasynaptic α4βδ GABAA Receptors Modulates the Actions of Psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Edward P.; Macpherson, Tom; Swinny, Jerome D.; Dixon, Claire I.; Herd, Murray B.; Belelli, Delia; Stephens, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), synaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) mediate phasic inhibition of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and influence behavioral responses to cocaine. We demonstrate that both dopamine D1- and D2-receptor-expressing MSNs (D-MSNs) additionally harbor extrasynaptic GABAARs incorporating α4, β, and δ subunits that mediate tonic inhibition, thereby influencing neuronal excitability. Both the selective δ-GABAAR agonist THIP and DS2, a selective positive allosteric modulator, greatly increased the tonic current of all MSNs from wild-type (WT), but not from δ−/− or α4−/− mice. Coupling dopamine and tonic inhibition, the acute activation of D1 receptors (by a selective agonist or indirectly by amphetamine) greatly enhanced tonic inhibition in D1-MSNs but not D2-MSNs. In contrast, prolonged D2 receptor activation modestly reduced the tonic conductance of D2-MSNs. Behaviorally, WT and constitutive α4−/− mice did not differ in their expression of cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP). Importantly, however, mice with the α4 deletion specific to D1-expressing neurons (α4D1−/−) showed increased CPP. Furthermore, THIP administered systemically or directly into the NAc of WT, but not α4−/− or α4D1−/− mice, blocked cocaine enhancement of CPP. In comparison, α4D2−/− mice exhibited normal CPP, but no cocaine enhancement. In conclusion, dopamine modulation of GABAergic tonic inhibition of D1- and D2-MSNs provides an intrinsic mechanism to differentially affect their excitability in response to psychostimulants and thereby influence their ability to potentiate conditioned reward. Therefore, α4βδ GABAARs may represent a viable target for the development of novel therapeutics to better understand and influence addictive behaviors. PMID:24431441

  16. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15–20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent long-term potentiation (t-LTP) to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10–20 min) to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values) in sucrose prepared slices. These results suggest that dopamine signaling is involved in regulating the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:22065958

  17. Postnatal maturation of rat hypothalamoneurohypophysial neurons: evidence for a developmental decrease in calcium entry during action potentials.

    PubMed

    Widmer, H; Amerdeil, H; Fontanaud, P; Desarménien, M G

    1997-01-01

    Action potentials and voltage-gated currents were studied in acutely dissociated neurosecretory cells from the rat supraoptic nucleus during the first three postnatal weeks (PW1-PW3), a period corresponding to the final establishment of neuroendocrine relationships. Action potential duration (at half maximum) decreased from 2.7 to 1.8 ms; this was attributable to a decrease in decay time. Application of cadmium (250 microM) reduced the decay time by 43% at PW1 and 21% at PW3, indicating that the contribution of calcium currents to action potentials decreased during postnatal development. The density of high-voltage-activated calcium currents increased from 4.4 to 10.1 pA/pF at postnatal days 1-5 and 11-14, respectively. The conductance density of sustained potassium current, measured at +20 mV, increased from 0.35 (PW1) to 0.53 (PW3) nS/pF. The time to half-maximal amplitude did not change. Conductance density and time- and voltage-dependent inactivation of the transient potassium current were stable from birth. At PW1, the density and time constant of decay (measured at 0 mV) were 0.29 nS/pF (n = 12) and 17.9 ms (n = 10), respectively. Voltage-dependent properties and density (1.1 nS/pF) of the sodium current did not change postnatally. During PW1, fitting the mean activation data with a Boltzmann function gave a half-activation potential of -25 mV. A double Boltzman equation was necessary to adequately fit the inactivation data, suggesting the presence of two populations of sodium channels. One population accounted for approximately 14% of the channels, with a half-inactivation potential of -86 mV; the remaining population showed a half-inactivation potential of -51 mV. A mathematical model, based on Hodgkin-Huxley equations, was used to assess the respective contributions of individual currents to the action potential. When the densities of calcium and sustained potassium currents were changed from immature to mature values, the decay time of the action

  18. Designer Self-Assemble Peptides Maximize the Therapeutic Benefits of Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for Alzheimer's Disease via Enhancing Neuron Differentiation and Paracrine Action.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guo-hong; Shao, Shui-jin; Yang, Jia-jun; Liu, Jian-ren; Guo, Hai-dong

    2016-03-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include the presence of extracellular amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the form of amyloid plaques and neuronal loss. Neural stem cell (NSC) is being scrutinized as a promising cell replacement therapy for various neurodegenerative diseases. However, the unfavorable niche at the site of degenerative disease is hostile to the survival and differentiation of transplanted cells. Here, we undertook in vitro and in vivo works to examine whether a designer self-assemble peptide (DSP), which contains one functional domain Tyr-Ile-Gly-Ser-Arg (YIGSR) derived from laminin, promotes the survival and neuronal differentiation of NSC and behavioral improvement. We found that DSP could undergo spontaneous assembly into well-ordered nanofibers, and it not only facilitated the cell viability in normal culture condition, but also decreased the number of apoptotic cells induced by Aβ in vitro. NSC seeded in DSP showed much more neuronal differentiation than that seeded in self-assemble peptide (SP) or alone. In the AD model, NSC transplantation in DSP-treated AD rats demonstrated much more obvious cognitive rescue with restoration of learning/memory function compared with NSC transplantation in SP, NSC alone, or DSP alone treated ones. Interestingly, DSP enhanced the survival and neuronal differentiation of transplanted NSC. Apoptosis levels in the CA1 region and Aβ level in the hippocampus were significantly decreased in the group of NSC transplantation in DSP. Moreover, synaptic function, indicated by the expression of pre-synaptic protein synapsin-1, was restored and the secretion of anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic factors were increased, such as IL-10, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), while the expression of pro-inflammatory factors were decreased, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data firstly unveiled that the biomaterial DSP can

  19. Circular RNAs: Novel Regulators of Neuronal Development.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Daniëlle; Verheijen, Bert M; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are highly stable, circularized long non-coding RNAs. circRNAs are conserved across species and appear to be specifically enriched in the nervous system. Recent studies show that many circRNAs are expressed in a tissue- and developmental-stage-specific manner, reveal a striking regulation of circRNAs during neuronal development, and detect their presence at synaptic sites. The exact functions of circRNAs remain poorly understood, but evidence from analysis of some circRNA molecules suggests that they could substantially contribute to the regulation of gene expression, particularly in architecturally complex and polarized cells such as neurons. Emerging evidence also indicates that circRNAs are involved in the development and progression of various neurological disorders. In this review, we summarize the molecular characteristics of circRNAs and discuss their proposed functions and mechanism-of-action in developing neurons. PMID:27616979

  20. Circular RNAs: Novel Regulators of Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    van Rossum, Daniëlle; Verheijen, Bert M.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are highly stable, circularized long non-coding RNAs. circRNAs are conserved across species and appear to be specifically enriched in the nervous system. Recent studies show that many circRNAs are expressed in a tissue- and developmental-stage-specific manner, reveal a striking regulation of circRNAs during neuronal development, and detect their presence at synaptic sites. The exact functions of circRNAs remain poorly understood, but evidence from analysis of some circRNA molecules suggests that they could substantially contribute to the regulation of gene expression, particularly in architecturally complex and polarized cells such as neurons. Emerging evidence also indicates that circRNAs are involved in the development and progression of various neurological disorders. In this review, we summarize the molecular characteristics of circRNAs and discuss their proposed functions and mechanism-of-action in developing neurons. PMID:27616979

  1. The involvement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the anti-epileptic action of curcumin on pentylenetetrazol-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenting; Su, Jing; Liu, Jing; Jiang, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, it was investigated whether a NO signaling pathway is involved in the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin on pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindled rats. PTZ-kindled rats received different doses of curcumin that were administered intraperitoneally for 24 days. Either a non-selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)), a selective inhibitor of neuronal NOS (7-Nitroindazole (7-NI)), a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (aminoguanidine (AG)), or a NO precursor (L-arginine (L-ARG)) was administered chronically to evaluate the role of NO in curcumin's anti-seizure effect. A chronic administration of curcumin (200 mg/kg) was most effective for decreasing the mean frequency of epileptiform discharge. Furthermore, a pretreatment with L-NAME or 7-NI augmented the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin. In contrast, AG failed to significantly alter the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin. A pretreatment with L-ARG temporally reversed the anti-epileptic effect of curcumin in the early stage, but in the late stage, it potentiated curcumin's anti-epileptic effect. These findings suggest that the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway may be involved in the anti-epileptic properties of curcumin, and that the role of nNOS (and not iNOS) is prominent in this neuroprotective feature. PMID:26406082

  2. Bisphenol A is released from polycarbonate drinking bottles and mimics the neurotoxic actions of estrogen in developing cerebellar neurons

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoa H.; Carlson, Emily M.; Chua, Jason P.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    The impact of endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) exposure on human health is receiving increasingly focused attention. The prototypical EDC bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic high-production chemical used primarily as a monomer for production of polycarbonate and epoxy resins. It is now well established that there is ubiquitous human exposure to BPA. In the general population exposure to BPA occurs mainly by consumption of contaminated foods and beverages that have contacted epoxy resins or polycarbonate plastics. To test the hypothesis that bioactive BPA was released from polycarbonate bottles used for consumption of water and other beverages, we evaluated whether BPA migrated into water stored in new or used high-quality polycarbonate bottles used by consumers. Using a sensitive and quantitative competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, BPA was found to migrate from polycarbonate water bottles at rates ranging from 0.20 to 0.79 ng per hour. At room temperature the migration of BPA was independent of whether or not the bottle had been previously used. Exposure to boiling water (100°C) increased the rate of BPA migration by up to 55-fold. The estrogenic bioactivity of the BPA-like immunoreactivity released into the water samples was confirmed using an in vitro assay of rapid estrogen-signaling and neurotoxicity in developing cerebellar neurons. The amounts of BPA found to migrate from polycarbonate drinking bottles should be considered as a contributing source to the total “EDC-burden” to which some individuals are exposed. PMID:18155859

  3. Temporal Uncertainty and Temporal Estimation Errors Affect Insular Activity and the Frontostriatal Indirect Pathway during Action Update: A Predictive Coding Study

    PubMed Central

    Limongi, Roberto; Pérez, Francisco J.; Modroño, Cristián; González-Mora, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Action update, substituting a prepotent behavior with a new action, allows the organism to counteract surprising environmental demands. However, action update fails when the organism is uncertain about when to release the substituting behavior, when it faces temporal uncertainty. Predictive coding states that accurate perception demands minimization of precise prediction errors. Activity of the right anterior insula (rAI) is associated with temporal uncertainty. Therefore, we hypothesize that temporal uncertainty during action update would cause the AI to decrease the sensitivity to ascending prediction errors. Moreover, action update requires response inhibition which recruits the frontostriatal indirect pathway associated with motor control. Therefore, we also hypothesize that temporal estimation errors modulate frontostriatal connections. To test these hypotheses, we collected fMRI data when participants performed an action-update paradigm within the context of temporal estimation. We fit dynamic causal models to the imaging data. Competing models comprised the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG), right supramarginal gyrus (rSMG), rAI, right presupplementary motor area (rPreSMA), and the right striatum (rSTR). The winning model showed that temporal uncertainty drove activity into the rAI and decreased insular sensitivity to ascending prediction errors, as shown by weak connectivity strength of rSMG→rAI connections. Moreover, temporal estimation errors weakened rPreSMA→rSTR connections and also modulated rAI→rSTR connections, causing the disruption of action update. Results provide information about the neurophysiological implementation of the so-called horse-race model of action control. We suggest that, contrary to what might be believed, unsuccessful action update could be a homeostatic process that represents a Bayes optimal encoding of uncertainty. PMID:27445737

  4. Temporal Uncertainty and Temporal Estimation Errors Affect Insular Activity and the Frontostriatal Indirect Pathway during Action Update: A Predictive Coding Study.

    PubMed

    Limongi, Roberto; Pérez, Francisco J; Modroño, Cristián; González-Mora, José L

    2016-01-01

    Action update, substituting a prepotent behavior with a new action, allows the organism to counteract surprising environmental demands. However, action update fails when the organism is uncertain about when to release the substituting behavior, when it faces temporal uncertainty. Predictive coding states that accurate perception demands minimization of precise prediction errors. Activity of the right anterior insula (rAI) is associated with temporal uncertainty. Therefore, we hypothesize that temporal uncertainty during action update would cause the AI to decrease the sensitivity to ascending prediction errors. Moreover, action update requires response inhibition which recruits the frontostriatal indirect pathway associated with motor control. Therefore, we also hypothesize that temporal estimation errors modulate frontostriatal connections. To test these hypotheses, we collected fMRI data when participants performed an action-update paradigm within the context of temporal estimation. We fit dynamic causal models to the imaging data. Competing models comprised the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG), right supramarginal gyrus (rSMG), rAI, right presupplementary motor area (rPreSMA), and the right striatum (rSTR). The winning model showed that temporal uncertainty drove activity into the rAI and decreased insular sensitivity to ascending prediction errors, as shown by weak connectivity strength of rSMG→rAI connections. Moreover, temporal estimation errors weakened rPreSMA→rSTR connections and also modulated rAI→rSTR connections, causing the disruption of action update. Results provide information about the neurophysiological implementation of the so-called horse-race model of action control. We suggest that, contrary to what might be believed, unsuccessful action update could be a homeostatic process that represents a Bayes optimal encoding of uncertainty. PMID:27445737

  5. Neuronal Reward and Decision Signals: From Theories to Data.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-07-01

    Rewards are crucial objects that induce learning, approach behavior, choices, and emotions. Whereas emotions are difficult to investigate in animals, the learning function is mediated by neuronal reward prediction error signals which implement basic constructs of reinforcement learning theory. These signals are found in dopamine neurons, which emit a global reward signal to striatum and frontal cortex, and in specific neurons in striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex projecting to select neuronal populations. The approach and choice functions involve subjective value, which is objectively assessed by behavioral choices eliciting internal, subjective reward preferences. Utility is the formal mathematical characterization of subjective value and a prime decision variable in economic choice theory. It is coded as utility prediction error by phasic dopamine responses. Utility can incorporate various influences, including risk, delay, effort, and social interaction. Appropriate for formal decision mechanisms, rewards are coded as object value, action value, difference value, and chosen value by specific neurons. Although all reward, reinforcement, and decision variables are theoretical constructs, their neuronal signals constitute measurable physical implementations and as such confirm the validity of these concepts. The neuronal reward signals provide guidance for behavior while constraining the free will to act. PMID:26109341

  6. Neuronal Reward and Decision Signals: From Theories to Data

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Rewards are crucial objects that induce learning, approach behavior, choices, and emotions. Whereas emotions are difficult to investigate in animals, the learning function is mediated by neuronal reward prediction error signals which implement basic constructs of reinforcement learning theory. These signals are found in dopamine neurons, which emit a global reward signal to striatum and frontal cortex, and in specific neurons in striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex projecting to select neuronal populations. The approach and choice functions involve subjective value, which is objectively assessed by behavioral choices eliciting internal, subjective reward preferences. Utility is the formal mathematical characterization of subjective value and a prime decision variable in economic choice theory. It is coded as utility prediction error by phasic dopamine responses. Utility can incorporate various influences, including risk, delay, effort, and social interaction. Appropriate for formal decision mechanisms, rewards are coded as object value, action value, difference value, and chosen value by specific neurons. Although all reward, reinforcement, and decision variables are theoretical constructs, their neuronal signals constitute measurable physical implementations and as such confirm the validity of these concepts. The neuronal reward signals provide guidance for behavior while constraining the free will to act. PMID:26109341

  7. Uplink Coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, Fabrizio; Hamkins, Jon; Dolinar, Sam; Andrews, Ken; Divsalar, Dariush

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews uplink coding. The purpose and goals of the briefing are (1) Show a plan for using uplink coding and describe benefits (2) Define possible solutions and their applicability to different types of uplink, including emergency uplink (3) Concur with our conclusions so we can embark on a plan to use proposed uplink system (4) Identify the need for the development of appropriate technology and infusion in the DSN (5) Gain advocacy to implement uplink coding in flight projects Action Item EMB04-1-14 -- Show a plan for using uplink coding, including showing where it is useful or not (include discussion of emergency uplink coding).

  8. The Student Actions Coding Sheet (SACS): An Instrument for Illuminating the Shifts toward Student-Centered Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Ibrahim; Campbell, Todd; Abd-Hamid, Nor Hashidah

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the development of an instrument to investigate the extent to which student-centered actions are occurring in science classrooms. The instrument was developed through the following five stages: (1) student action identification, (2) use of both national and international content experts to establish content validity, (3)…

  9. A minimum-error, energy-constrained neural code is an instantaneous-rate code.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erik C; Jones, Douglas L; Ratnam, Rama

    2016-04-01

    Sensory neurons code information about stimuli in their sequence of action potentials (spikes). Intuitively, the spikes should represent stimuli with high fidelity. However, generating and propagating spikes is a metabolically expensive process. It is therefore likely that neural codes have been selected to balance energy expenditure against encoding error. Our recently proposed optimal, energy-constrained neural coder (Jones et al. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, 9, 61 2015) postulates that neurons time spikes to minimize the trade-off between stimulus reconstruction error and expended energy by adjusting the spike threshold using a simple dynamic threshold. Here, we show that this proposed coding scheme is related to existing coding schemes, such as rate and temporal codes. We derive an instantaneous rate coder and show that the spike-rate depends on the signal and its derivative. In the limit of high spike rates the spike train maximizes fidelity given an energy constraint (average spike-rate), and the predicted interspike intervals are identical to those generated by our existing optimal coding neuron. The instantaneous rate coder is shown to closely match the spike-rates recorded from P-type primary afferents in weakly electric fish. In particular, the coder is a predictor of the peristimulus time histogram (PSTH). When tested against in vitro cortical pyramidal neuron recordings, the instantaneous spike-rate approximates DC step inputs, matching both the average spike-rate and the time-to-first-spike (a simple temporal code). Overall, the instantaneous rate coder relates optimal, energy-constrained encoding to the concepts of rate-coding and temporal-coding, suggesting a possible unifying principle of neural encoding of sensory signals. PMID:26922680

  10. Inhibition of recombinant N-type and native high voltage-gated neuronal Ca{sup 2+} channels by AdGABA: Mechanism of action studies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Sandoval, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Zoidis, Grigoris; Felix, Ricardo

    2011-02-01

    High-voltage activated Ca{sup 2+} (Ca{sub V}) channels play a key role in the regulation of numerous physiological events by causing transient changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. These channels consist of a pore-forming Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} protein and three auxiliary subunits (Ca{sub V}{beta}, Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and Ca{sub V}{gamma}). Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} is an important component of Ca{sub V} channels in many tissues and of great interest as a drug target. It is well known that anticonvulsant agent gabapentin (GBP) binds to Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and reduces Ca{sup 2+} currents by modulating the expression and/or function of the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} subunit. Recently, we showed that an adamantane derivative of GABA, AdGABA, has also inhibitory effects on Ca{sub V} channels. However, the importance of the interaction of AdGABA with the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} subunit has not been conclusively demonstrated and the mechanism of action of the drug has yet to be elucidated. Here, we describe studies on the mechanism of action of AdGABA. Using a combined approach of patch-clamp recordings and molecular biology we show that AdGABA inhibits Ca{sup 2+} currents acting on Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} only when applied chronically, both in a heterologous expression system and in dorsal root-ganglion neurons. AdGABA seems to require uptake and be acting intracellularly given that its effects are prevented by an inhibitor of the L-amino acid transport system. Interestingly, a mutation in the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} that abolishes GBP binding did not affect AdGABA actions, revealing that its mechanism of action is similar but not identical to that of GBP. These results indicate that AdGABA is an important Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} ligand that regulates Ca{sub V} channels.

  11. Synaptic excitation and inhibition resulting from direct action of acetylcholine on two types of chemoreceptors on individual amphibian parasympathetic neurones

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, H. Criss; Kuffler, Stephen W.; Stickgold, Robert; Yoshikami, Doju

    1977-01-01

    1. Synaptic transmission was studied in visually identified parasympathetic ganglion cells that modulate the heart beat of the mudpuppy Necturus maculosus). 2. The brief pulse of acetylcholine (ACh) released from terminals of the vagus nerve after each impulse can produce two distinct post-synaptic responses in individual principal cells of the ganglion: (i) within a milli-second of release, ACh generates a rapid and strong excitatory post-synaptic potential (e.p.s.p.) that normally initiates a post-synaptic impulse; (ii) this excitation is usually followed by a slow hyperpolarizing inhibitory post-synaptic potential (i.p.s.p.) that lasts for several seconds. The magnitude and time course of the i.p.s.p. depends on the frequency and number of vagal stimuli. When the hydrolysis of ACh is inhibited by prostigmine, a train of nerve stimuli may be followed by an i.p.s.p. lasting half a minute or longer. 3. The rapid e.p.s.p. and slow i.p.s.p. result from the direct action of ACh on two different types of chemoreceptors in the post-synaptic membrane of the principal cell. The e.p.s.p. can be preferentially blocked by the nicotinic antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (5 × 10-7 M), while the i.p.s.p. is selectively blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine (5 × 10-9 M). 4. Potentials resembling nerve-evoked e.p.s.p.s and i.p.s.p.s can be produced by iontophoretic release of ACh from micropipettes onto the post-synaptic membrane. Application of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol generates exclusively inhibitory responses. 5. The reversal potential for the i.p.s.p. is about -105 mV, which is approximately the equilibrium potential for potassium (EK). When the external K+ concentration is altered, the reversal potential for inhibition is shifted to the new value of EK as expected from the Nernst equation. Changes in the external Na+ and Cl- concentrations have no appreciable effect on the reversal potential. Thus, the i.p.s.p. is the result of a conductance increase for

  12. The Effect of Formal Policies and Informal Social Learning on Perceptions of Corporate Ethics: Actions Speak Louder than Codes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronzon, Shirit

    2002-01-01

    Discusses unethical business conduct and corporate crime, focusing on workers who bend rules to achieve satisfactory performance and organizational goals. Describes research that investigated how two cues in an organizational setting, one legal (codes of conduct) and one social (company responses to ethical transgressions), affect how individuals…

  13. Feedback Codes and Action Plans: Building the Capacity of First-Year Students to Apply Feedback to a Scientific Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Fiona L.; Yucel, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback can build self-assessment skills in students so that they become more competent and confident to identify and self-correct weaknesses in their work. In this study, we trialled a feedback code as part of an integrated programme of formative and summative assessment tasks, which provided feedback to first-year students on their…

  14. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Dan; Segall, Ken

    2010-07-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These “Josephson junction neurons” reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, large interconnected networks of Josephson junction neurons would operate fully in parallel. They would be orders of magnitude faster than both traditional computer simulations and biological neural networks. Josephson junction neurons provide a new tool for exploring long-term large-scale dynamics for networks of neurons.

  15. MicroRNAs: regulators of neuronal fate

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Alfred X; Crabtree, Gerald R; Yoo, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian neural development has been traditionally studied in the context of evolutionarily conserved signaling pathways and neurogenic transcription factors. Recent studies suggest that microRNAs, a group of highly conserved non-coding regulatory small RNAs also play essential roles in neural development and neuronal function. A part of their action in the developing nervous system is to regulate subunit compositions of BAF complexes (ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes), which appear to have dedicated functions during neural development. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of a set of brain-enriched microRNAs, miR-9/9* and miR-124 that promote the assembly of neuron-specific BAF complexes, convert the nonneuronal fate of human dermal fibroblasts towards post-mitotic neurons, thereby revealing a previously unappreciated instructive role of these microRNAs. In addition to these global effects, accumulating evidence indicate that many microRNAs could also function locally, such as at the growth cone or at synapses modulating synaptic activity and neuronal connectivity. Here we discuss some of the recent findings about microRNAs’ activity in regulating various developmental stages of neurons. PMID:23374323

  16. fMRI Adaptation Reveals Mirror Neurons in Human Inferior Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Trevor T.-J.; Cunnington, Ross; Williams, Mark A.; Kanwisher, Nancy; Mattingley, Jason B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Mirror neurons, as originally described in the macaque, have two defining properties [1] and [2]: They respond specifically to a particular action (e.g., bringing an object to the mouth), and they produce their action-specific responses independent of whether the monkey executes the action or passively observes a conspecific performing the same action. In humans, action observation and action execution engage a network of frontal, parietal, and temporal areas. However, it is unclear whether these responses reflect the activity of a single population that represents both observed and executed actions in a common neural code or the activity of distinct but overlapping populations of exclusively perceptual and motor neurons [3]. Here, we used fMRI adaptation to show that the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL) responds independently to specific actions regardless of whether they are observed or executed. Specifically, responses in the right IPL were attenuated when participants observed a recently executed action relative to one that had not previously been performed. This adaptation across action and perception demonstrates that the right IPL responds selectively to the motoric and perceptual representations of actions and is the first evidence for a neural response in humans that shows both defining properties of mirror neurons. PMID:18948009

  17. A Cross-species Comparison of Facial Morphology and Movement in Humans and Chimpanzees Using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS)

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Bridget M.; Parr, Lisa A.; Smith Pasqualini, Marcia C.; Bard, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    A comparative perspective has remained central to the study of human facial expressions since Darwin’s [(1872/1998). The expression of the emotions in man and animals (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press] insightful observations on the presence and significance of cross-species continuities and species-unique phenomena. However, cross-species comparisons are often difficult to draw due to methodological limitations. We report the application of a common methodology, the Facial Action Coding System (FACS) to examine facial movement across two species of hominoids, namely humans and chimpanzees. FACS [Ekman & Friesen (1978). Facial action coding system. CA: Consulting Psychology Press] has been employed to identify the repertoire of human facial movements. We demonstrate that FACS can be applied to other species, but highlight that any modifications must be based on both underlying anatomy and detailed observational analysis of movements. Here we describe the ChimpFACS and use it to compare the repertoire of facial movement in chimpanzees and humans. While the underlying mimetic musculature shows minimal differences, important differences in facial morphology impact upon the identification and detection of related surface appearance changes across these two species. PMID:21188285

  18. Tonic synaptic inhibition modulates neuronal output pattern and spatiotemporal synaptic integration.

    PubMed

    Häusser, M; Clark, B A

    1997-09-01

    Irregular firing patterns are observed in most central neurons in vivo, but their origin is controversial. Here, we show that two types of inhibitory neurons in the cerebellar cortex fire spontaneously and regularly in the absence of synaptic input but generate an irregular firing pattern in the presence of tonic synaptic inhibition. Paired recordings between synaptically connected neurons revealed that single action potentials in inhibitory interneurons cause highly variable delays in action potential firing in their postsynaptic cells. Activity in single and multiple inhibitory interneurons also significantly reduces postsynaptic membrane time constant and input resistance. These findings suggest that the time window for synaptic integration is a dynamic variable modulated by the level of tonic inhibition, and that rate coding and temporal coding strategies may be used in parallel in the same cell type. PMID:9331356

  19. Roles of specific Kv channel types in repolarization of the action potential in genetically identified subclasses of pyramidal neurons in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Dhruba; Guan, Dongxu; Foehring, Robert C

    2016-05-01

    The action potential (AP) is a fundamental feature of excitable cells that serves as the basis for long-distance signaling in the nervous system. There is considerable diversity in the appearance of APs and the underlying repolarization mechanisms in different neuronal types (reviewed in Bean BP. Nat Rev Neurosci 8: 451-465, 2007), including among pyramidal cell subtypes. In the present work, we used specific pharmacological blockers to test for contributions of Kv1, Kv2, or Kv4 channels to repolarization of single APs in two genetically defined subpopulations of pyramidal cells in layer 5 of mouse somatosensory cortex (etv1 and glt) as well as pyramidal cells from layer 2/3. These three subtypes differ in AP properties (Groh A, Meyer HS, Schmidt EF, Heintz N, Sakmann B, Krieger P. Cereb Cortex 20: 826-836, 2010; Guan D, Armstrong WE, Foehring RC. J Neurophysiol 113: 2014-2032, 2015) as well as laminar position, morphology, and projection targets. We asked what the roles of Kv1, Kv2, and Kv4 channels are in AP repolarization and whether the underlying mechanisms are pyramidal cell subtype dependent. We found that Kv4 channels are critically involved in repolarizing neocortical pyramidal cells. There are also pyramidal cell subtype-specific differences in the role for Kv1 channels. Only Kv4 channels were involved in repolarizing the narrow APs of glt cells. In contrast, in etv1 cells and layer 2/3 cells, the broader APs are partially repolarized by Kv1 channels in addition to Kv4 channels. Consistent with their activation in the subthreshold range, Kv1 channels also regulate AP voltage threshold in all pyramidal cell subtypes. PMID:26864770

  20. Imitation and Action Understanding in Autistic Spectrum Disorders: How Valid Is the Hypothesis of a Deficit in the Mirror Neuron System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Antonia F. de C.; Brindley, Rachel M.; Frith, Uta

    2007-01-01

    The motor mirror neuron system supports imitation and goal understanding in typical adults. Recently, it has been proposed that a deficit in this mirror neuron system might contribute to poor imitation performance in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and might be a cause of poor social abilities in these children. We aimed to test…

  1. Vestibular Neuronitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  2. Botulinum Toxin Type A Induces Changes in the Chemical Coding of Substance P-Immunoreactive Dorsal Root Ganglia Sensory Neurons Supplying the Porcine Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bossowska, Agnieszka; Lepiarczyk, Ewa; Mazur, Urszula; Janikiewicz, Paweł; Markiewicz, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is a potent neurotoxin which blocks acetylcholine release from nerve terminals, and therefore leads to cessation of somatic motor and/or parasympathetic transmission. Recently it has been found that BTX also interferes with sensory transmission, thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the neurochemical characterization of substance P-immunoreactive (SP-IR) bladder-projecting sensory neurons (BPSN) after the toxin treatment. Investigated neurons were visualized with retrograde tracing method and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labelling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), galanin (GAL), calbindin (CB), and somatostatin (SOM). In the control group (n = 6), 45% of the total population of BPSN were SP-IR. Nearly half of these neurons co-expressed PACAP or CGRP (45% and 35%, respectively), while co-localization of SP with GAL, nNOS, SOM or CB was found less frequently (3.7%, 1.8%, 1.2%, and 0.7%, respectively). In BTX-treated pigs (n = 6), toxin-injections caused a decrease in the number of SP-IR cells containing CGRP, SOM or CB (16.2%, 0.5%, and 0%, respectively) and a distinct increase in these nerve cells immunopositive to GAL (27.2%). The present study demonstrates that BTX significantly modifies the chemical phenotypes of SP-IR BPSN. PMID:26580655

  3. Botulinum toxin type A induces changes in the chemical coding of substance P-immunoreactive dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bossowska, Agnieszka; Lepiarczyk, Ewa; Mazur, Urszula; Janikiewicz, Paweł; Markiewicz, Włodzimierz

    2015-11-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is a potent neurotoxin which blocks acetylcholine release from nerve terminals, and therefore leads to cessation of somatic motor and/or parasympathetic transmission. Recently it has been found that BTX also interferes with sensory transmission, thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the neurochemical characterization of substance P-immunoreactive (SP-IR) bladder-projecting sensory neurons (BPSN) after the toxin treatment. Investigated neurons were visualized with retrograde tracing method and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labelling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), galanin (GAL), calbindin (CB), and somatostatin (SOM). In the control group (n = 6), 45% of the total population of BPSN were SP-IR. Nearly half of these neurons co-expressed PACAP or CGRP (45% and 35%, respectively), while co-localization of SP with GAL, nNOS, SOM or CB was found less frequently (3.7%, 1.8%, 1.2%, and 0.7%, respectively). In BTX-treated pigs (n = 6), toxin-injections caused a decrease in the number of SP-IR cells containing CGRP, SOM or CB (16.2%, 0.5%, and 0%, respectively) and a distinct increase in these nerve cells immunopositive to GAL (27.2%). The present study demonstrates that BTX significantly modifies the chemical phenotypes of SP-IR BPSN. PMID:26580655

  4. The thing that should not be: predictive coding and the uncanny valley in perceiving human and humanoid robot actions.

    PubMed

    Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Chaminade, Thierry; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Driver, Jon; Frith, Chris

    2012-04-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) repetition suppression, we explored the selectivity of the human action perception system (APS), which consists of temporal, parietal and frontal areas, for the appearance and/or motion of the perceived agent. Participants watched body movements of a human (biological appearance and movement), a robot (mechanical appearance and movement) or an android (biological appearance, mechanical movement). With the exception of extrastriate body area, which showed more suppression for human like appearance, the APS was not selective for appearance or motion per se. Instead, distinctive responses were found to the mismatch between appearance and motion: whereas suppression effects for the human and robot were similar to each other, they were stronger for the android, notably in bilateral anterior intraparietal sulcus, a key node in the APS. These results could reflect increased prediction error as the brain negotiates an agent that appears human, but does not move biologically, and help explain the 'uncanny valley' phenomenon. PMID:21515639

  5. Evolutionary Action Score of TP53 Coding Variants (EAp53) is Predictive of Platinum Response in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdullah A.; Neskey, David M.; Katsonis, Panagiotis; Patel, Ameeta A.; Ward, Alexandra M.; Hsu, Teng-Kuei; Hicks, Stephanie C.; McDonald, Thomas O.; Ow, Thomas J.; Alves, Marcus Ortega; Pickering, Curtis R.; Skinner, Heath D.; Zhao, Mei; Sturgis, Eric M.; Kies, Merrill S.; El-Naggar, Adel; Perrone, Federica; Licitra, Lisa; Bossi, Paolo; Kimmel, Marek; Frederick, Mitchell J.; Lichtarge, Olivier; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    TP53 is the most frequently altered gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with mutations occurring in over two third of cases, however, the predictive response of these mutations to cisplatin based therapy remains elusive. In the current study, we evaluate the ability of the Evolutionary Action score of TP53 coding variants (EAp53) to predict the impact of TP53 mutations on response to chemotherapy. The EAp53 approach clearly identifies a subset of high risk TP53 mutations associated with decreased sensitivity to cisplatin both in vitro and in vivo in pre-clinical models of HNSCC. Furthermore, EAp53 can predict response to treatment and more importantly a survival benefit for a subset of head and neck cancer patients treated with platinum based therapy. Prospective evaluation of this novel scoring system should enable more precise treatment selection for patients with HNSCC. PMID:25691460

  6. The thing that should not be: predictive coding and the uncanny valley in perceiving human and humanoid robot actions

    PubMed Central

    Chaminade, Thierry; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Driver, Jon; Frith, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) repetition suppression, we explored the selectivity of the human action perception system (APS), which consists of temporal, parietal and frontal areas, for the appearance and/or motion of the perceived agent. Participants watched body movements of a human (biological appearance and movement), a robot (mechanical appearance and movement) or an android (biological appearance, mechanical movement). With the exception of extrastriate body area, which showed more suppression for human like appearance, the APS was not selective for appearance or motion per se. Instead, distinctive responses were found to the mismatch between appearance and motion: whereas suppression effects for the human and robot were similar to each other, they were stronger for the android, notably in bilateral anterior intraparietal sulcus, a key node in the APS. These results could reflect increased prediction error as the brain negotiates an agent that appears human, but does not move biologically, and help explain the ‘uncanny valley’ phenomenon. PMID:21515639

  7. Impairment of cingulothalamic learning-related neuronal coding in rabbits exposed to cocaine in utero: general and sex-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C L; Freeman, J H; Holt, W; Gabriel, M

    1999-02-01

    Neuronal activity was recorded in the cingulate cortex and the limbic thalamus in Dutch-belted rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) exposed to cocaine (8 mg/kg/day i.v.) or saline in utero during acquisition and reversal learning of a discriminative avoidance response. Anterior cingulate cortical excitatory training-induced activity (TIA) was attenuated in cocaine-exposed female rabbits during acquisition and reversal learning, but only during reversal learning in male rabbits. Posterior cingulate cortical excitatory TIA was lessened in cocaine-exposed rabbits during acquisition, whereas discrimination between the positive and negative cues was enhanced. Neuronal firing was attenuated in the anterior ventral thalamus in cocaine-exposed rabbits during acquisition and reversal learning. Behavioral learning was normal in cocaine-exposed rabbits. Other data suggest that rabbits exposed to cocaine in utero exhibit a learning deficit when trained with nonsalient cues. PMID:10197907

  8. Origin of basal activity in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian odorant receptors form a large, diverse group of G protein–coupled receptors that determine the sensitivity and response profile of olfactory receptor neurons. But little is known if odorant receptors control basal and also stimulus-induced cellular properties of olfactory receptor neurons other than ligand specificity. This study demonstrates that different odorant receptors have varying degrees of basal activity, which drives concomitant receptor current fluctuations and basal action potential firing. This basal activity can be suppressed by odorants functioning as inverse agonists. Furthermore, odorant-stimulated olfactory receptor neurons expressing different odorant receptors can have strikingly different response patterns in the later phases of prolonged stimulation. Thus, the influence of odorant receptor choice on response characteristics is much more complex than previously thought, which has important consequences on odor coding and odor information transfer to the brain. PMID:20974772

  9. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 mediates the electrophysiological and toxic actions of the cycad derivative beta-N-Methylamino-L-alanine on substantia nigra pars compacta DAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cucchiaroni, Maria Letizia; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bernardi, Giorgio; Molinari, Marco; Guatteo, Ezia; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2010-04-14

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-Parkinson dementia complex (ALS-PDC) is a neurodegenerative disease with ALS, parkinsonism, and Alzheimer's symptoms that is prevalent in the Guam population. beta-N-Methylamino alanine (BMAA) has been proposed as the toxic agent damaging several neuronal types in ALS-PDC, including substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic (SNpc DAergic) neurons. BMAA is a mixed glutamate receptor agonist, but the specific pathways activated in DAergic neurons are not yet known. We combined electrophysiology, microfluorometry, and confocal microscopy analysis to monitor membrane potential/current, cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) changes, cytochrome-c (cyt-c) immunoreactivity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by BMAA. Rapid toxin applications caused reversible membrane depolarization/inward current and increase of firing rate and [Ca(2+)](i) in DAergic neurons. The inward current (I(BMAA)) was mainly mediated by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), coupled to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and to a lesser extent, AMPA receptors. Indeed, mGluR1 (CPCCOEt) and TRP channels (SKF 96365; Ruthenium Red) antagonists reduced I(BMAA), and a small component of I(BMAA) was reduced by the AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX. Calcium accumulation was mediated by mGluR1 but not by AMPA receptors. Application of a low concentration of NMDA potentiated the BMAA-mediated calcium increase. Prolonged exposure to BMAA caused significant modifications of membrane properties, calcium overload, cell shrinkage, massive cyt-c release into the cytosol and ROS production. In SNpc GABAergic neurons, BMAA activated only AMPA receptors. Our study identifies the mGluR1-activated mechanism induced by BMAA that may cause the neuronal degeneration and parkinsonian symptoms seen in ALS-PDC. Moreover, environmental exposure to BMAA might possibly also contribute to idiopathic PD. PMID:20392940

  10. Distinct Developmental Origins Manifest in the Specialized Encoding of Movement by Adult Neurons of the External Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Paul D.; Larvin, Joseph T.; Duffell, James M.; Garas, Farid N.; Doig, Natalie M.; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Duguid, Ian C.; Bogacz, Rafal; Butt, Simon J.B.; Magill, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional codes initiated during brain development are ultimately realized in adulthood as distinct cell types performing specialized roles in behavior. Focusing on the mouse external globus pallidus (GPe), we demonstrate that the potential contributions of two GABAergic GPe cell types to voluntary action are fated from early life to be distinct. Prototypic GPe neurons derive from the medial ganglionic eminence of the embryonic subpallium and express the transcription factor Nkx2-1. These neurons fire at high rates during alert rest, and encode movements through heterogeneous firing rate changes, with many neurons decreasing their activity. In contrast, arkypallidal GPe neurons originate from lateral/caudal ganglionic eminences, express the transcription factor FoxP2, fire at low rates during rest, and encode movements with robust increases in firing. We conclude that developmental diversity positions prototypic and arkypallidal neurons to fulfil distinct roles in behavior via their disparate regulation of GABA release onto different basal ganglia targets. PMID:25843402

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans dnj-14, the orthologue of the DNAJC5 gene mutated in adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, provides a new platform for neuroprotective drug screening and identifies a SIR-2.1-independent action of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Sudhanva S; Johnson, James R; McCue, Hannah V; Chen, Xi; Edmonds, Matthew J; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Graham, Margaret E; Jenn, Robert C; Barclay, Jeff W; Burgoyne, Robert D; Morgan, Alan

    2014-11-15

    Adult onset neuronal lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is a human neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction and premature death. Recently, the mutations that cause ANCL were mapped to the DNAJC5 gene, which encodes cysteine string protein alpha. We show here that mutating dnj-14, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of DNAJC5, results in shortened lifespan and a small impairment of locomotion and neurotransmission. Mutant dnj-14 worms also exhibited age-dependent neurodegeneration of sensory neurons, which was preceded by severe progressive chemosensory defects. A focussed chemical screen revealed that resveratrol could ameliorate dnj-14 mutant phenotypes, an effect mimicked by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram. In contrast to other worm neurodegeneration models, activation of the Sirtuin, SIR-2.1, was not required, as sir-2.1; dnj-14 double mutants showed full lifespan rescue by resveratrol. The Sirtuin-independent neuroprotective action of resveratrol revealed here suggests potential therapeutic applications for ANCL and possibly other human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24947438

  12. Primary cortical representation of sounds by the coordination of action-potential timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decharms, R. Christopher; Merzenich, Michael M.

    1996-06-01

    CORTICAL population coding could in principle rely on either the mean rate of neuronal action potentials, or the relative timing of action potentials, or both. When a single sensory stimulus drives many neurons to fire at elevated rates, the spikes of these neurons become tightly synchronized1,2, which could be involved in 'binding' together individual firing-rate feature representations into a unified object percept3. Here we demonstrate that the relative timing of cortical action potentials can signal stimulus features themselves, a function even more basic than feature grouping. Populations of neurons in the primary auditory cortex can coordinate the relative timing of their action potentials such that spikes occur closer together in time during continuous stimuli. In this way cortical neurons can signal stimuli even when their firing rates do not change. Population coding based on relative spike timing can systematically signal stimulus features, it is topographically mapped, and it follows the stimulus time course even where mean firing rate does not.

  13. Comparison of facial expression in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia using the Facial Action Coding System: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bersani, Giuseppe; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Valeriani, Giuseppe; Robiony, Maddalena; Anastasia, Annalisa; Colletti, Chiara; Liberati, Damien; Capra, Enrico; Quartini, Adele; Polli, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Research shows that impairment in the expression and recognition of emotion exists in multiple psychiatric disorders. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the way that patients with schizophrenia and those with obsessive-compulsive disorder experience and display emotions in relation to specific emotional stimuli using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS). Methods Thirty individuals participated in the study, comprising 10 patients with schizophrenia, 10 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 10 healthy controls. All participants underwent clinical sessions to evaluate their symptoms and watched emotion-eliciting video clips while facial activity was videotaped. Congruent/incongruent feeling of emotions and facial expression in reaction to emotions were evaluated. Results Patients with schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder presented similarly incongruent emotive feelings and facial expressions (significantly worse than healthy participants). Correlations between the severity of psychopathological condition (in particular the severity of affective flattening) and impairment in recognition and expression of emotions were found. Discussion Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia seem to present a similarly relevant impairment in both experiencing and displaying of emotions; this impairment may be seen as a chronic consequence of the same neurodevelopmental origin of the two diseases. Mimic expression could be seen as a behavioral indicator of affective flattening. The FACS could be used as an objective way to evaluate clinical evolution in patients. PMID:23269872

  14. Serial correlation in neural spike trains: Experimental evidence, stochastic modeling, and single neuron variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Strube-Bloss, Martin F.; Nawrot, Martin P.

    2009-02-01

    The activity of spiking neurons is frequently described by renewal point process models that assume the statistical independence and identical distribution of the intervals between action potentials. However, the assumption of independent intervals must be questioned for many different types of neurons. We review experimental studies that reported the feature of a negative serial correlation of neighboring intervals, commonly observed in neurons in the sensory periphery as well as in central neurons, notably in the mammalian cortex. In our experiments we observed the same short-lived negative serial dependence of intervals in the spontaneous activity of mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee. To model serial interval correlations of arbitrary lags, we suggest a family of autoregressive point processes. Its marginal interval distribution is described by the generalized gamma model, which includes as special cases the log-normal and gamma distributions, which have been widely used to characterize regular spiking neurons. In numeric simulations we investigated how serial correlation affects the variance of the neural spike count. We show that the experimentally confirmed negative correlation reduces single-neuron variability, as quantified by the Fano factor, by up to 50%, which favors the transmission of a rate code. We argue that the feature of a negative serial correlation is likely to be common to the class of spike-frequency-adapting neurons and that it might have been largely overlooked in extracellular single-unit recordings due to spike sorting errors.

  15. Serial correlation in neural spike trains: experimental evidence, stochastic modeling, and single neuron variability.

    PubMed

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Strube-Bloss, Martin F; Nawrot, Martin P

    2009-02-01

    The activity of spiking neurons is frequently described by renewal point process models that assume the statistical independence and identical distribution of the intervals between action potentials. However, the assumption of independent intervals must be questioned for many different types of neurons. We review experimental studies that reported the feature of a negative serial correlation of neighboring intervals, commonly observed in neurons in the sensory periphery as well as in central neurons, notably in the mammalian cortex. In our experiments we observed the same short-lived negative serial dependence of intervals in the spontaneous activity of mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee. To model serial interval correlations of arbitrary lags, we suggest a family of autoregressive point processes. Its marginal interval distribution is described by the generalized gamma model, which includes as special cases the log-normal and gamma distributions, which have been widely used to characterize regular spiking neurons. In numeric simulations we investigated how serial correlation affects the variance of the neural spike count. We show that the experimentally confirmed negative correlation reduces single-neuron variability, as quantified by the Fano factor, by up to 50%, which favors the transmission of a rate code. We argue that the feature of a negative serial correlation is likely to be common to the class of spike-frequency-adapting neurons and that it might have been largely overlooked in extracellular single-unit recordings due to spike sorting errors. PMID:19391776

  16. Direct innervation and modulation of orexin neurons by lateral hypothalamic LepRb neurons

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Gwendolyn W.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Myers, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    Leptin, the adipose-derived hormonal signal of body energy stores, acts via the leptin receptor (LepRb) on neurons in multiple brain regions. We previously identified LepRb neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), which are distinct from neighboring leptin-regulated melanin concentrating hormone (MCH)- or orexin (OX)-expressing cells. Neither the direct synaptic targets of LHA LepRb neurons nor their potential role in the regulation of other LHA neurons have been determined, however. We thus generated several adenoviral and transgenic systems in which cre recombinase promotes the expression of the tracer, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and utilized these in combination with LepRbcre mice to determine the neuronal targets of LHA LepRb neurons. This analysis revealed that, while some LHA LepRb neurons project to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), LHA LepRb neurons also densely innervate the LHA where they directly synapse with OX, but not MCH, neurons. Indeed, few other LepRb neurons in the brain project to the OX-containing region of the mouse LHA, and direct leptin action via LHA LepRb neurons regulates gene expression in OX neurons. These findings thus reveal a major role for LHA leptin action in the modulation of OX neurons, suggesting the importance of LHA LepRb neurons in the regulation of OX signaling that is crucial to leptin action and metabolic control. PMID:20739548

  17. Information theory of adaptation in neurons, behavior, and mood

    PubMed Central

    Sharpee, Tatyana O.; Calhoun, Adam J.; Chalasani, Sreekanth H.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to make accurate predictions of future stimuli and consequences of one’s actions are crucial for the survival and appropriate decision-making. These predictions are constantly being made at different levels of the nervous system. This is evidenced by adaptation to stimulus parameters in sensory coding, and in learning of an up-to-date model of the environment at the behavioral level. This review will discuss recent findings that actions of neurons and animals are selected based on detailed stimulus history in such a way as to maximize information for achieving the task at hand. Information maximization dictates not only how sensory coding should adapt to various statistical aspects of stimuli, but also that reward function should adapt to match the predictive information from past to future. PMID:24709600

  18. Self-other relations in social development and autism: multiple roles for mirror neurons and other brain bases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Justin H G

    2008-04-01

    Mirror neuron system dysfunction may underlie a self-other matching impairment, which has previously been suggested to account for autism. Embodied Cognition Theory, which proposes that action provides a foundation for cognition has lent further credence to these ideas. The hypotheses of a self-other matching deficit and impaired mirror neuron function in autism have now been well supported by studies employing a range of methodologies. However, underlying mechanisms require further exploration to explain how mirror neurons may be involved in attentional and mentalizing processes. Impairments in self-other matching and mirror neuron function are not necessarily inextricably linked and it seems possible that different sub-populations of mirror neurons, located in several regions, contribute differentially to social cognitive functions. It is hypothesized that mirror neuron coding for action-direction may be required for developing attentional sensitivity to self-directed actions, and consequently for person-oriented, stimulus-driven attention. Mirror neuron networks may vary for different types of social learning such as "automatic" imitation and imitation learning. Imitation learning may be more reliant on self-other comparison processes (based on mirror neurons) that identify differences as well as similarities between actions. Differential connectivity with the amygdala-orbitofrontal system may also be important. This could have implications for developing "theory of mind," with intentional self-other comparison being relevant to meta-representational abilities, and "automatic" imitation being more relevant to empathy. While it seems clear that autism is associated with impaired development of embodied aspects of cognition, the ways that mirror neurons contribute to these brain-behavior links are likely to be complex. PMID:19360654

  19. Neural coding of gustatory information in the thalamus of Macaca mulatta.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, T C; Hamilton, R B; Norgren, R

    1989-01-01

    1. Extracellular action potentials were recorded from single neurons in the parvicellular division of the ventroposteromedial (VPMpc) nucleus of the thalamus of restrained, but alert, Old World monkeys during gustatory, tactile, and thermal stimulation of the oral cavity. In contrast to previous reports in anesthetized or paralyzed rats, the spontaneous activity of these neurons was brisk and their evoked responses robust. 2. Each of 50 taste-responsive neurons was tested with 1.0 M sucrose, 0.1 M NaCl, 0.003 M HCl, and 0.001 M QHCl before other concentrations of the same stimuli were used. Sucrose, which was effective in 80% of the neurons tested, evoked the largest responses of the 4 standard gustatory stimuli (16.1 spikes/s). The average response to NaCl, an effective stimulus for 44% of the neurons in the sample, was 7.5 spikes/s. HCl and QHCl, which few neurons responded to, typically evoked smaller responses. 3. Most of the neurons tested showed monotonic intensity-response (I-R) functions. The power functions showed about the same degree of compression (range = 0.39-0.53), which has been described previously for brain stem neurons in anesthetized rodents. Only 9.1% of the responses were inhibitory, and there was no tendency for these responses to be associated with either specific neurons or stimuli. These data suggest that quality coding of gustatory information in the thalamus is not radically different from that seen among lower-order neurons in other species. 4. Through the use of hierarchical cluster analysis, it was possible to divide the neuron sample into 2 groups, one of which consisted of sucrose-best neurons that had an average entropy value of 0.56. The neurons in the other group, though more heterogeneous, showed either primary or side-band sensitivity to NaCl. The average breadth of responsiveness of the 50 thalamic neurons as described by the entropy coefficient was 0.73. 5. In addition to gustatory neurons, tactile (n = 15), thermal (n = 1

  20. Interplay between low threshold voltage-gated K(+) channels and synaptic inhibition in neurons of the chicken nucleus laminaris along its frequency axis.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, William R; Liu, Yu-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Quan; Lu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Central auditory neurons that localize sound in horizontal space have specialized intrinsic and synaptic cellular mechanisms to tightly control the threshold and timing for action potential generation. However, the critical interplay between intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and extrinsic synaptic conductances in determining neuronal output are not well understood. In chicken, neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) encode sound location using interaural time difference (ITD) as a cue. Along the tonotopic axis of NL, there exist robust differences among low, middle, and high frequency (LF, MF, and HF, respectively) neurons in a variety of neuronal properties such as low threshold voltage-gated K(+) (LTK) channels and depolarizing inhibition. This establishes NL as an ideal model to examine the interactions between LTK currents and synaptic inhibition across the tonotopic axis. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings prepared from chicken embryos (E17-E18), we found that LTK currents were larger in MF and HF neurons than in LF neurons. Kinetic analysis revealed that LTK currents in MF neurons activated at lower voltages than in LF and HF neurons, whereas the inactivation of the currents was similar across the tonotopic axis. Surprisingly, blockade of LTK currents using dendrotoxin-I (DTX) tended to broaden the duration and increase the amplitude of the depolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in NL neurons without dependence on coding frequency regions. Analyses of the effects of DTX on inhibitory postsynaptic currents led us to interpret this unexpected observation as a result of primarily postsynaptic effects of LTK currents on MF and HF neurons, and combined presynaptic and postsynaptic effects in LF neurons. Furthermore, DTX transferred subthreshold IPSPs to spikes. Taken together, the results suggest a critical role for LTK currents in regulating inhibitory synaptic strength in ITD-coding neurons at various frequencies. PMID:24904297

  1. Characteristics of fast-spiking neurons in the striatum of behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Inokawa, Hitoshi; Hori, Yukiko; Pan, Xiaochuan; Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Kae; Samejima, Kazuyuki; Shidara, Munetaka; Kimura, Minoru; Sakagami, Masamichi; Minamimoto, Takafumi

    2016-04-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are the fundamental constituents of neural circuits that organize network outputs. The striatum as part of the basal ganglia is involved in reward-directed behaviors. However, the role of the inhibitory interneurons in this process remains unclear, especially in behaving monkeys. We recorded the striatal single neuron activity while monkeys performed reward-directed hand or eye movements. Presumed parvalbumin-containing GABAergic interneurons (fast-spiking neurons, FSNs) were identified based on narrow spike shapes in three independent experiments, though they were a small population (4.2%, 42/997). We found that FSNs are characterized by high-frequency and less-bursty discharges, which are distinct from the basic firing properties of the presumed projection neurons (phasically active neurons, PANs). Besides, the encoded information regarding actions and outcomes was similar between FSNs and PANs in terms of proportion of neurons, but the discharge selectivity was higher in PANs than that of FSNs. The coding of actions and outcomes in FSNs and PANs was consistently observed under various behavioral contexts in distinct parts of the striatum (caudate nucleus, putamen, and anterior striatum). Our results suggest that FSNs may enhance the discharge selectivity of postsynaptic output neurons (PANs) in encoding crucial variables for a reward-directed behavior. PMID:26477717

  2. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26081570

  3. Why Neurons Have Thousands of Synapses, a Theory of Sequence Memory in Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jeff; Ahmad, Subutai

    2016-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons represent the majority of excitatory neurons in the neocortex. Each pyramidal neuron receives input from thousands of excitatory synapses that are segregated onto dendritic branches. The dendrites themselves are segregated into apical, basal, and proximal integration zones, which have different properties. It is a mystery how pyramidal neurons integrate the input from thousands of synapses, what role the different dendrites play in this integration, and what kind of network behavior this enables in cortical tissue. It has been previously proposed that non-linear properties of dendrites enable cortical neurons to recognize multiple independent patterns. In this paper we extend this idea in multiple ways. First we show that a neuron with several thousand synapses segregated on active dendrites can recognize hundreds of independent patterns of cellular activity even in the presence of large amounts of noise and pattern variation. We then propose a neuron model where patterns detected on proximal dendrites lead to action potentials, defining the classic receptive field of the neuron, and patterns detected on basal and apical dendrites act as predictions by slightly depolarizing the neuron without generating an action potential. By this mechanism, a neuron can predict its activation in hundreds of independent contexts. We then present a network model based on neurons with these properties that learns time-based sequences. The network relies on fast local inhibition to preferentially activate neurons that are slightly depolarized. Through simulation we show that the network scales well and operates robustly over a wide range of parameters as long as the network uses a sparse distributed code of cellular activations. We contrast the properties of the new network model with several other neural network models to illustrate the relative capabilities of each. We conclude that pyramidal neurons with thousands of synapses, active dendrites, and multiple

  4. Inhibition of trigeminal neurones after intravenous administration of naratriptan through an action at 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT1B/1D) receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goadsby, Peter J; Knight, Yolande

    1997-01-01

    The observation that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is effective in treating acute attacks of migraine when administered intravenously resulted in a research effort that led to the discovery of the 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist sumatriptan. Clinical experience has shown sumatriptan to be an effective treatment with some limitations, such as relatively poor bioavailability, which naratriptan was developed to address. Increasing bioavailability has been achieved with greater lipophilicity and thus the potential for greater activity in the central nervous system. In this study the increased access to central sites has been exploited in an attempt to characterize the pharmacology of those central receptors with the newer tools available. Trigeminovascular activation was examined in the model of superior sagittal sinus stimulation. Cats were anaesthetized with α-chloralose (60 mg kg−1, intraperitoneal), paralyzed (gallamine 6 mg kg−1, intravenously) and ventilated. The superior sagittal sinus was accessed and isolated for electrical stimulation (250 μs pulses, 0.3 Hz, 100 V) by a mid-line circular craniotomy. The region of the dorsal surface of C2 spinal cord was exposed by a laminectomy and an electrode placed for recording evoked activity from sinus stimulation. Stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus resulted in activation of cells in the dorsal horn of C2. Cells fired with a probability of 0.69±0.1 at a latency of 9.2±0.2 ms. Intravenous (i.v.) administration of naratriptan at clinically relevant doses (30 and 100 μg kg−1), inhibited neuronal activity in trigeminal neurones of the C2 dorsal horn, reducing probability of firing without affecting latency. The effect of naratriptan could be reversed by administration of the selective 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.). These data establish that naratriptan acts on central trigeminal neurones since sagittal sinus stimulation activates axons within the tentorial

  5. Habit Learning by Naive Macaques Is Marked by Response Sharpening of Striatal Neurons Representing the Cost and Outcome of Acquired Action Sequences.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Theresa M; Amemori, Ken-ichi; Graybiel, Ann M

    2015-08-19

    Over a century of scientific work has focused on defining the factors motivating behavioral learning. Observations in animals and humans trained on a wide range of tasks support reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms as accounting for the learning. Still unknown, however, are the signals that drive learning in naive, untrained subjects. Here, we capitalized on a sequential saccade task in which macaque monkeys acquired repetitive scanning sequences without instruction. We found that spike activity in the caudate nucleus after each trial corresponded to an integrated cost-benefit signal that was highly correlated with the degree of naturalistic untutored learning by the monkeys. Across learning, neurons encoding both cost and outcome gradually acquired increasingly sharp phasic trial-end responses that paralleled the development of the habit-like, repetitive saccade sequences. Our findings demonstrate an integrated cost-benefit signal by which RL and its neural correlates could drive naturalistic behaviors in freely behaving primates. PMID:26291166

  6. Differences in the emergent coding properties of cortical and striatal ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L.; Hyman, J.M.; Lindsay, A.J.; Phillips, A.G.; Seamans, J.K.

    2016-01-01

    The function of a given brain region is often defined by the coding properties of its individual neurons, yet how this information is combined at the ensemble level is an equally important consideration. In the present study, multiple neurons from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the dorsal striatum (DS) were recorded simultaneously as rats performed different sequences of the same three actions. Sequence and lever decoding was remarkably similar on a per-neuron basis in the two regions. At the ensemble level, sequence-specific representations in the DS appeared synchronously but transiently along with the representation of lever location, while these two streams of information appeared independently and asynchronously in the ACC. As a result the ACC achieved superior ensemble decoding accuracy overall. Thus, the manner in which information was combined across neurons in an ensemble determined the functional separation of the ACC and DS on this task. PMID:24974796

  7. Blockade by ifenprodil of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones: comparison with N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist actions.

    PubMed Central

    Church, J; Fletcher, E J; Baxter, K; MacDonald, J F

    1994-01-01

    1. The block by ifenprodil of voltage-activated Ca2+ channels was investigated in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by 50 mM K+ (high-[K+]o) in Fura-2-loaded rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones in culture and on currents carried by Ba2+ ions (IBa) through Ca2+ channels in mouse cultured hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp. The effects of ifenprodil on voltage-activated Ca2+ channels were compared with its antagonist actions on N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA) evoked responses in the same neuronal preparations. 2. Rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by transient exposure to high-[K+]o in our preparation of rat cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones are mediated predominantly by Ca2+ flux through nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels, with smaller contributions from nifedipine-resistant, omega-conotoxin GVIA-sensitive Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ channels sensitive to crude funnel-web spider venom (Church et al., 1994). Ifenprodil (0.1-200 microM) reversibly attenuated high-[K+]o-evoked rises in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 17 +/- 3 microM, compared with an IC50 value of 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM for the reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by 20 microM NMDA. Tested in the presence of nifedipine 10 microM, ifenprodil (1-50 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the dihydropyridine-resistant high-[K+]o-evoked rise in [Ca2+]i with an IC50 value of 13 +/- 4 microM. The results suggest that ifenprodil blocks Ca2+ flux through multiple subtypes of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. 3. Application of the polyamine, spermine (0.25-5 mM), produced a concentration-dependent reduction of rises in [Ca2+]i evoked by high-[K+]o.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7834201

  8. A fish on the hunt, observed neuron by neuron

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    This three-dimensional microscopy image reveals an output neuron of the optic tectum lighting up in response to visual information from the retina. The scientists used this state-of-the-art imaging technology to learn how neurons in the optic tectum take visual information and convert it into an output that drives action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/10/29/zebrafish-vision/

  9. Hyperexcitability and reduced low threshold potassium currents in auditory neurons of mice lacking the channel subunit Kv1.1

    PubMed Central

    Brew, Helen M; Hallows, Janice L; Tempel, Bruce L

    2003-01-01

    A low voltage-activated potassium current, IKL, is found in auditory neuron types that have low excitability and precisely preserve the temporal pattern of activity present in their presynaptic inputs. The gene Kcnal codes for Kv1.1 potassium channel subunits, which combine in expression systems to produce channel tetramers with properties similar to those of IKL, including sensitivity to dendrotoxin (DTX). Kv1.1 is strongly expressed in neurons with IKL, including auditory neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). We therefore decided to investigate how the absence of Kv1.1 affected channel properties and function in MNTB neurons from mice lacking Kcnal. We used the whole cell version of the patch clamp technique to record from MNTB neurons in brainstem slices from Kcnal-null (−/−) mice and their wild-type (+/+) and heterozygous (+/−) littermates. There was an IKL in voltage-clamped −/− MNTB neurons, but it was about half the amplitude of the IKL in +/+ neurons, with otherwise similar properties. Consistent with this, −/− MNTB neurons were more excitable than their +/+ counterparts; they fired more than twice as many action potentials (APs) during current steps, and the threshold current amplitude required to generate an AP was roughly halved. +/− MNTB neurons had excitability and IKL amplitudes identical to the +/+ neurons. The IKL remaining in −/− neurons was blocked by DTX, suggesting the underlying channels contained subunits Kv1.2 and/or Kv1.6 (also DTX-sensitive). DTX increased excitability further in the already hyperexcitable −/− MNTB neurons, suggesting that −/−IKL limited excitability despite its reduced amplitude in the absence of Kv1.1 subunits. PMID:12611922

  10. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Results Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. Conclusion This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties

  11. [Ambient modulation of neuronal excitability].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Zhang

    2016-08-25

    Although the modulation of synaptic activity plays an important role in the modulation of neuronal excitability, the significance of the ambient modulation (AM) of neuronal excitability should be emphasized. The AM refers to the alterations of membrane potential of neuron resulted from distinct neural activities, such as the tonic inhibition and excitation through activation of extra-synaptic receptors, the paracrine actions of nearby neural and non-neural cells, endocrinal actions of blood borne hormones and other active chemical substances. The AM of neuronal excitability may have important bearings on distinct brain functions, such as the regulation and switching of cortical states, the appearance of chaotic and vague feelings, which are usually the characteristic features in many mental and neural disorders. PMID:27546499

  12. Exploring neural code in natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemenman, Ilya

    2010-03-01

    Neurons communicate by means of stereotyped pulses, called action potentials or spikes, and a central issue in systems neuroscience is to understand this neural coding. We study how sensory information is encoded in sequences of spikes, using motion detection in the blowfly as a model system. To emphasize the importance of the environment, and specifically the statistics of its dynamics, on shaping the animal's response, we perform experiments in an environment maximally similar to the natural one. This results in a number of unexpected, striking observations about the structure of the neural code in this system, typically unseen in simpler, more traditional experimental setups. First, the timing of spikes is important with a precision roughly two orders of magnitude greater than the temporal dynamics of the stimulus, which is behaviorally controlled in the natural settings. Second, the fly goes a long way to utilize the redundancy in the stimulus in order to optimize the neural code and encode efficiently more refined features than would be possible otherwise, providing sufficient information about the stimulus in time for behavioral decision making. This implies that the neural code, even in low-level vision, may be significantly context (that is, environment and behavior) dependent. The presentation is based on: I Nemenman, GD Lewen, W Bialek, RR de Ruyter van Steveninck. Neural Coding of Natural Stimuli: Information at Sub-Millisecond Resolution. PLoS Comput Biol 4 (3): e1000025, 2008.

  13. Activation of mirror-neuron system by erotic video clips predicts degree of induced erection: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Mouras, H; Stoléru, S; Moulier, V; Pélégrini-Issac, M; Rouxel, R; Grandjean, B; Glutron, D; Bittoun, J

    2008-09-01

    Although visually-induced erection is a common occurrence in human male behaviour, the cerebral underpinnings of this response are not well-known. We hypothesized that the magnitude of induced erection would be linearly correlated with the activation of the mirror-neuron system in response to sexually explicit films. When presented with sexual video clips, eight out of ten healthy subjects had an erectile response demonstrated through volumetric penile plethysmography. The level of activation of the left frontal operculum and of the inferior parietal lobules, areas which contain mirror neurons, predicted the magnitude of the erectile response. These results suggest that the response of the mirror-neuron system may not only code for the motor correlates of observed actions, but also for autonomic correlates of these actions. PMID:18598769

  14. Neuronal arithmetic

    PubMed Central

    Silver, R. Angus

    2016-01-01

    The vast computational power of the brain has traditionally been viewed as arising from the complex connectivity of neural networks, in which an individual neuron acts as a simple linear summation and thresholding device. However, recent studies show that individual neurons utilize a wealth of nonlinear mechanisms to transform synaptic input into output firing. These mechanisms can arise from synaptic plasticity, synaptic noise, and somatic and dendritic conductances. This tool kit of nonlinear mechanisms confers considerable computational power on both morphologically simple and more complex neurons, enabling them to perform a range of arithmetic operations on signals encoded in a variety of different ways. PMID:20531421

  15. Experience-dependent specialization of receptive field surround for selective coding of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Pecka, Michael; Han, Yunyun; Sader, Elie; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D

    2014-10-22

    At eye opening, neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are selective for stimulus features, but circuits continue to refine in an experience-dependent manner for some weeks thereafter. How these changes contribute to the coding of visual features embedded in complex natural scenes remains unknown. Here we show that normal visual experience after eye opening is required for V1 neurons to develop a sensitivity for the statistical structure of natural stimuli extending beyond the boundaries of their receptive fields (RFs), which leads to improvements in coding efficiency for full-field natural scenes (increased selectivity and information rate). These improvements are mediated by an experience-dependent increase in the effectiveness of natural surround stimuli to hyperpolarize the membrane potential specifically during RF-stimulus epochs triggering action potentials. We suggest that neural circuits underlying surround modulation are shaped by the statistical structure of visual input, which leads to more selective coding of features in natural scenes. PMID:25263755

  16. 26 CFR 301.7433-2 - Civil cause of action for violation of section 362 or 524 of the Bankruptcy Code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue Code. (b) Actual, direct economic damages—(1) Definition. See § 301.7433-1(b)(1). (2... damages in controversy, and meets the requirements of section 7430(c)(4)(A)(ii) (relating to net worth...

  17. Norepinephrine Modulates Coding of Complex Vocalizations in the Songbird Auditory Cortex Independent of Local Neuroestrogen Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Maaya Z; Jeon, Sung David; Cowell, Rosemary A; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-06-24

    The catecholamine norepinephrine plays a significant role in auditory processing. Most studies to date have examined the effects of norepinephrine on the neuronal response to relatively simple stimuli, such as tones and calls. It is less clear how norepinephrine shapes the detection of complex syntactical sounds, as well as the coding properties of sensory neurons. Songbirds provide an opportunity to understand how auditory neurons encode complex, learned vocalizations, and the potential role of norepinephrine in modulating the neuronal computations for acoustic communication. Here, we infused norepinephrine into the zebra finch auditory cortex and performed extracellular recordings to study the modulation of song representations in single neurons. Consistent with its proposed role in enhancing signal detection, norepinephrine decreased spontaneous activity and firing during stimuli, yet it significantly enhanced the auditory signal-to-noise ratio. These effects were all mimicked by clonidine, an α-2 receptor agonist. Moreover, a pattern classifier analysis indicated that norepinephrine enhanced the ability of single neurons to accurately encode complex auditory stimuli. Because neuroestrogens are also known to enhance auditory processing in the songbird brain, we tested the hypothesis that norepinephrine actions depend on local estrogen synthesis. Neither norepinephrine nor adrenergic receptor antagonist infusion into the auditory cortex had detectable effects on local estradiol levels. Moreover, pretreatment with fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, did not block norepinephrine's neuromodulatory effects. Together, these findings indicate that norepinephrine enhances signal detection and information encoding for complex auditory stimuli by suppressing spontaneous "noise" activity and that these actions are independent of local neuroestrogen synthesis. PMID:26109659

  18. Mirror neuron system: basic findings and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Iacoboni, Marco; Mazziotta, John C

    2007-09-01

    In primates, ventral premotor and rostral inferior parietal neurons fire during the execution of hand and mouth actions. Some cells (called mirror neurons) also fire when hand and mouth actions are just observed. Mirror neurons provide a simple neural mechanism for understanding the actions of others. In humans, posterior inferior frontal and rostral inferior parietal areas have mirror properties. These human areas are relevant to imitative learning and social behavior. Indeed, the socially isolating condition of autism is associated with a deficit in mirror neuron areas. Strategies inspired by mirror neuron research recently have been used in the treatment of autism and in motor rehabilitation after stroke. PMID:17721988

  19. Novel action of apolipoprotein E (ApoE): ApoE isoform specifically inhibits lipid-particle-mediated cholesterol release from neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jian-Sheng; Morita, Shin-ya; Kobayashi, Mariko; Handa, Tetsurou; Fujita, Shinobu C; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko; Michikawa, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Background Since the majority of apolipoprotein E (apoE) existing in the cerebrospinal fluid is associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL), one should focus on the role of the apoE-HDL complex rather than on that of free apoE in cholesterol metabolism in the central nervous system. However, the apoE-isoform-specific effect of apoE-HDL on cholesterol transport remains unclarified. Results Here we show that apoE3-HDL induced a marked cholesterol release from neurons, while apoE4-HDL induced little. To elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we used a complex of lipid emulsion (EM) with recombinant apoE3 or apoE4 (apoE-EM) at various apoE concentrations. When a small number of apoE molecules were associated with EM, apoE3- and apoE4-EM, induced a marked cholesterol release to a level similar to that induced by EM alone. However, when apoE at given concentrations was incubated with EM, apoE3-EM induced a marked cholesterol release, while apoE4-EM induced little. Under these conditions, a greater number of apoE4 molecules were associated with EM than apoE3 molecules. When an increasing number of apoE molecules were associated with EM, both apoE3-EM and apoE4-EM induced little cholesterol release. Preincubation with β-mercaptoethanol increased the number of apoE3 molecules associated with EM similar to that of apoE4 molecules, indicating that the presence (apoE3) or absence (apoE4) of intermolecular disulfide bond formation is responsible for the association of a greater number of apoE4 molecules to EM than apoE3 molecules. Conclusion These results suggest that although apoE and a lipid particle are lipid acceptors, when apoE and a lipid particle form a complex, apoE on the particle surface inhibits the lipid particle-mediated cholesterol release from cells in an apoE-concentration-dependent manner. PMID:17504523

  20. Long non-coding RNA C2dat1 regulates CaMKIIδ expression to promote neuronal survival through the NF-κB signaling pathway following cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Deng, F; Xing, Z; Wu, Z; Cen, B; Xu, S; Zhao, Z; Nepomuceno, R; Bhuiyan, M I H; Sun, D; Wang, Q J; Ji, A

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated a significant role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in diverse biological processes. However, their functions in cerebral ischemia remain largely unknown. Through an lncRNA array analysis in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), we have identified CAMK2D-associated transcript 1 (C2dat1) as a novel I/R-induced lncRNA that regulated the expression of CaMKIIδ in murine models of focal cerebral ischemia. C2dat1 mRNA was upregulated in a time-dependent manner in mouse cortical penumbra after focal ischemic brain injury, which was accompanied by increased expression of CaMKIIδ at transcript and protein levels. The expression patterns of C2dat1 and CAMK2D were confirmed in mouse Neuro-2a cells in response to in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation, OGD/R). Knockdown of C2dat1 resulted in a significant blockade of CaMKIIδ expression, and potentiated OGD/R-induced cell death. Mechanistically, reduced CaMKIIδ expression upon silencing C2dat1 inhibited OGD/R-induced activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Further analysis showed that the downregulation of IKKα and IKKβ expression and phosphorylation, and subsequent inhibition of IκBα degradation accounted for the inhibition of the NF-κB signaling activity caused by silencing C2dat1. In summary, we discovered a novel I/R-induced lncRNA C2dat1 that modulates the expression of CaMKIIδ to impact neuronal survival, and may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of ischemic brain injury. PMID:27031970

  1. Long non-coding RNA C2dat1 regulates CaMKIIδ expression to promote neuronal survival through the NF-κB signaling pathway following cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Deng, F; Xing, Z; Wu, Z; Cen, B; Xu, S; Zhao, Z; Nepomuceno, R; Bhuiyan, M I H; Sun, D; Wang, Q J; Ji, A

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated a significant role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in diverse biological processes. However, their functions in cerebral ischemia remain largely unknown. Through an lncRNA array analysis in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), we have identified CAMK2D-associated transcript 1 (C2dat1) as a novel I/R-induced lncRNA that regulated the expression of CaMKIIδ in murine models of focal cerebral ischemia. C2dat1 mRNA was upregulated in a time-dependent manner in mouse cortical penumbra after focal ischemic brain injury, which was accompanied by increased expression of CaMKIIδ at transcript and protein levels. The expression patterns of C2dat1 and CAMK2D were confirmed in mouse Neuro-2a cells in response to in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation, OGD/R). Knockdown of C2dat1 resulted in a significant blockade of CaMKIIδ expression, and potentiated OGD/R-induced cell death. Mechanistically, reduced CaMKIIδ expression upon silencing C2dat1 inhibited OGD/R-induced activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Further analysis showed that the downregulation of IKKα and IKKβ expression and phosphorylation, and subsequent inhibition of IκBα degradation accounted for the inhibition of the NF-κB signaling activity caused by silencing C2dat1. In summary, we discovered a novel I/R-induced lncRNA C2dat1 that modulates the expression of CaMKIIδ to impact neuronal survival, and may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of ischemic brain injury. PMID:27031970

  2. Neuron Model with Simplified Memristive Ionic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegab, Almoatazbellah M.; Salem, Noha M.; Radwan, Ahmed G.; Chua, Leon

    2015-06-01

    A simplified neuron model is introduced to mimic the action potential generated by the famous Hodgkin-Huxley equations by using the genetic optimization algorithm. Comparison with different neuron models is investigated, and it is confirmed that the sodium and potassium channels in our simplified neuron model are made out of memristors. In addition, the channel equations in the simplified model may be adjusted to introduce a simplified memristor model that is in accordance with the theoretical conditions of the memristive systems.

  3. Role of miR-211 in Neuronal Differentiation and Viability: Implications to Pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chunying; Wu, Qi; Ye, Xiaoyang; Luo, Hongxue; Yan, Dongdong; Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Haili; Diao, Yarui; Zhang, Wei; Wan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related irreversible neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular β Amyloid(Aβ) deposition, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss. The dysfunction of neurogenesis and increased degeneration of neurons contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. We now report that miR-211-5p, a small non-coding RNA, can impair neurite differentiation by directly targeting NUAK1, decrease neuronal viability and accelerate the progression of Aβ-induced pathologies. In this study, we observed that during embryonic development, the expression levels of miR-211-5p were down-regulated in the normal cerebral cortexes of mice. However, in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic adult mice, it was up-regulated from 9 months of age compared to that of the age-matched wild type mice. Studies in primary cortical neuron cultures demonstrated that miR-211-5p can inhibit neurite growth and branching via NUAK1 repression and decrease mature neuron viability. The impairments were more obvious under the action of Aβ. Our data showed that miR-211-5p could inhibit cortical neuron differentiation and survival, which may contribute to the synaptic failure, neuronal loss and cognitive dysfunction in AD. PMID:27458373

  4. Dopamine neurons control striatal cholinergic neurons via regionally heterogeneous dopamine and glutamate signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chuhma, Nao; Mingote, Susana; Moore, Holly; Rayport, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Midbrain dopamine neurons fire in bursts conveying salient information. Bursts are associated with pauses in tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons. While the reciprocal balance of dopamine and acetylcholine in the striatum is well known, how dopamine neurons control cholinergic neurons has not been elucidated. Here we show that dopamine neurons make direct fast dopaminergic and glutamatergic connections with cholinergic interneurons, with regional heterogeneity. Dopamine neurons drive a burst-pause firing sequence in cholinergic interneurons in the medial shell of the nucleus accumbens, mixed actions in the accumbens core, and a pause in the dorsal striatum. This heterogeneity is due mainly to regional variation in dopamine-neuron glutamate cotransmission. A single dose of amphetamine attenuates dopamine neuron connections to cholinergic interneurons with dose-dependent regional specificity. Overall, the present data indicate that dopamine neurons control striatal circuit function via discrete, plastic connections with cholinergic interneurons. PMID:24559678

  5. Structural coding versus free-energy predictive coding.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    Focusing on visual perceptual organization, this article contrasts the free-energy (FE) version of predictive coding (a recent Bayesian approach) to structural coding (a long-standing representational approach). Both use free-energy minimization as metaphor for processing in the brain, but their formal elaborations of this metaphor are fundamentally different. FE predictive coding formalizes it by minimization of prediction errors, whereas structural coding formalizes it by minimization of the descriptive complexity of predictions. Here, both sides are evaluated. A conclusion regarding competence is that FE predictive coding uses a powerful modeling technique, but that structural coding has more explanatory power. A conclusion regarding performance is that FE predictive coding-though more detailed in its account of neurophysiological data-provides a less compelling cognitive architecture than that of structural coding, which, for instance, supplies formal support for the computationally powerful role it attributes to neuronal synchronization. PMID:26407895

  6. Reliability of neuronal information conveyed by unreliable neuristor-based leaky integrate-and-fire neurons: a model study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2015-01-01

    We conducted simulations on the neuronal behavior of neuristor-based leaky integrate-and-fire (NLIF) neurons. The phase-plane analysis on the NLIF neuron highlights its spiking dynamics – determined by two nullclines conditional on the variables on the plane. Particular emphasis was placed on the operational noise arising from the variability of the threshold switching behavior in the neuron on each switching event. As a consequence, we found that the NLIF neuron exhibits a Poisson-like noise in spiking, delimiting the reliability of the information conveyed by individual NLIF neurons. To highlight neuronal information coding at a higher level, a population of noisy NLIF neurons was analyzed in regard to probability of successful information decoding given the Poisson-like noise of each neuron. The result demonstrates highly probable success in decoding in spite of large variability – due to the variability of the threshold switching behavior – of individual neurons. PMID:25966658

  7. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Information Page Condensed from Motor Neuron Diseases ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Motor Neuron Diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  8. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... called upper motor neurons ) are transmitted to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord (called lower motor neurons ) and from them to particular muscles. Upper motor neurons direct the lower motor neurons ...

  9. Analysis of Five Gene Sets in Chimpanzees Suggests Decoupling between the Action of Selection on Protein-Coding and on Noncoding Elements

    PubMed Central

    Santpere, Gabriel; Carnero-Montoro, Elena; Petit, Natalia; Serra, François; Hvilsom, Christina; Rambla, Jordi; Heredia-Genestar, Jose Maria; Halligan, Daniel L.; Dopazo, Hernan; Navarro, Arcadi; Bosch, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We set out to investigate potential differences and similarities between the selective forces acting upon the coding and noncoding regions of five different sets of genes defined according to functional and evolutionary criteria: 1) two reference gene sets presenting accelerated and slow rates of protein evolution (the Complement and Actin pathways); 2) a set of genes with evidence of accelerated evolution in at least one of their introns; and 3) two gene sets related to neurological function (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases). To that effect, we combine human–chimpanzee divergence patterns with polymorphism data obtained from target resequencing 20 central chimpanzees, our closest relatives with largest long-term effective population size. By using the distribution of fitness effect-alpha extension of the McDonald–Kreitman test, we reproduce inferences of rates of evolution previously based only on divergence data on both coding and intronic sequences and also obtain inferences for other classes of genomic elements (untranslated regions, promoters, and conserved noncoding sequences). Our results suggest that 1) the distribution of fitness effect-alpha method successfully helps distinguishing different scenarios of accelerated divergence (adaptation or relaxed selective constraints) and 2) the adaptive history of coding and noncoding sequences within the gene sets analyzed is decoupled. PMID:25977458

  10. Analysis of Five Gene Sets in Chimpanzees Suggests Decoupling between the Action of Selection on Protein-Coding and on Noncoding Elements.

    PubMed

    Santpere, Gabriel; Carnero-Montoro, Elena; Petit, Natalia; Serra, François; Hvilsom, Christina; Rambla, Jordi; Heredia-Genestar, Jose Maria; Halligan, Daniel L; Dopazo, Hernan; Navarro, Arcadi; Bosch, Elena

    2015-06-01

    We set out to investigate potential differences and similarities between the selective forces acting upon the coding and noncoding regions of five different sets of genes defined according to functional and evolutionary criteria: 1) two reference gene sets presenting accelerated and slow rates of protein evolution (the Complement and Actin pathways); 2) a set of genes with evidence of accelerated evolution in at least one of their introns; and 3) two gene sets related to neurological function (Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases). To that effect, we combine human-chimpanzee divergence patterns with polymorphism data obtained from target resequencing 20 central chimpanzees, our closest relatives with largest long-term effective population size. By using the distribution of fitness effect-alpha extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, we reproduce inferences of rates of evolution previously based only on divergence data on both coding and intronic sequences and also obtain inferences for other classes of genomic elements (untranslated regions, promoters, and conserved noncoding sequences). Our results suggest that 1) the distribution of fitness effect-alpha method successfully helps distinguishing different scenarios of accelerated divergence (adaptation or relaxed selective constraints) and 2) the adaptive history of coding and noncoding sequences within the gene sets analyzed is decoupled. PMID:25977458

  11. Dopamine reward prediction error coding

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards—an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware. PMID:27069377

  12. Cue to action processing in motor cortex populations

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The primary motor cortex (MI) commands motor output after kinematics are planned from goals, thought to occur in a larger premotor network. However, there is a growing body of evidence that MI is involved in processes beyond action generation, and neuronal subpopulations may perform computations related to cue-to-action processing. From multielectrode array recordings in awake behaving Macaca mulatta monkeys, our results suggest that early MI ensemble activity during goal-directed reaches is driven by target information when cues are closely linked in time to action. Single-neuron activity spanned cue presentation to movement, with the earliest responses temporally aligned to cue and the later responses better aligned to arm movements. Population decoding revealed that MI's coding of cue direction evolved temporally, likely going from cue to action generation. We confirmed that a portion of MI activity is related to visual target processing by showing changes in MI activity related to the extinguishing of a continuously pursued visual target. These findings support a view that MI is an integral part of a cue-to-action network for immediate responses to environmental stimuli. PMID:24174650

  13. Refractoriness enhances temporal coding by auditory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Avissar, Michael; Wittig, John H; Saunders, James C; Parsons, Thomas D

    2013-05-01

    A universal property of spiking neurons is refractoriness, a transient decrease in discharge probability immediately following an action potential (spike). The refractory period lasts only one to a few milliseconds, but has the potential to affect temporal coding of acoustic stimuli by auditory neurons, which are capable of submillisecond spike-time precision. Here this possibility was investigated systematically by recording spike times from chicken auditory nerve fibers in vivo while stimulating with repeated pure tones at characteristic frequency. Refractory periods were tightly distributed, with a mean of 1.58 ms. A statistical model was developed to recapitulate each fiber's responses and then used to predict the effect of removing the refractory period on a cell-by-cell basis for two largely independent facets of temporal coding: faithful entrainment of interspike intervals to the stimulus frequency and precise synchronization of spike times to the stimulus phase. The ratio of the refractory period to the stimulus period predicted the impact of refractoriness on entrainment and synchronization. For ratios less than ∼0.9, refractoriness enhanced entrainment and this enhancement was often accompanied by an increase in spike-time precision. At higher ratios, little or no change in entrainment or synchronization was observed. Given the tight distribution of refractory periods, the ability of refractoriness to improve temporal coding is restricted to neurons responding to low-frequency stimuli. Enhanced encoding of low frequencies likely affects sound localization and pitch perception in the auditory system, as well as perception in nonauditory sensory modalities, because all spiking neurons exhibit refractoriness. PMID:23637161

  14. Clinical coding. Code breakers.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, Steve

    2005-02-24

    --The advent of payment by results has seen the role of the clinical coder pushed to the fore in England. --Examinations for a clinical coding qualification began in 1999. In 2004, approximately 200 people took the qualification. --Trusts are attracting people to the role by offering training from scratch or through modern apprenticeships. PMID:15768716

  15. A new work mechanism on neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rubin; Tsuda, Ichiro; Zhang, Zhikang

    2015-05-01

    By re-examining the neuronal activity energy model, we show the inadequacies in the current understanding of the energy consumption associated with neuron activity. Specifically, we show computationally that a neuron first absorbs and then consumes energy during firing action potential, and this result cannot be produced from any current neuron models or biological neural networks. Based on this finding, we provide an explanation for the observation that when neurons are excited in the brain, blood flow increases significantly while the incremental oxygen consumption is very small. We can also explain why external stimulation and perception emergence are synchronized. We also show that negative energy presence in neurons at the sub-threshold state is an essential reason that leads to blood flow incremental response time in the brain rather than neural excitation to delay. PMID:25640576

  16. PYRETHROID MODULATION OF SPONTANEOUS NEURONAL EXCITABILITY AND NEUROTRANSMISSION IN HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS IN CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides have potent actions on voltage-gated sodium channels, inhibiting inactivation and increasing channel open times. These are thought to underlie, at least in part, the clinical symptoms of pyrethroid intoxication. However, disruption of neuronal activity at ...

  17. 77 FR 12865 - Enforcement Actions Summary

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Government Printing Office's Web page at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Enforcement Actions Summary AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA)...

  18. 78 FR 11216 - Enforcement Actions Summary

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... Government Printing Office's web page at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration Enforcement Actions Summary AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: The Transportation Security Administration (TSA)...

  19. Correlations and Neuronal Population Information.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Adam; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pouget, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Brain function involves the activity of neuronal populations. Much recent effort has been devoted to measuring the activity of neuronal populations in different parts of the brain under various experimental conditions. Population activity patterns contain rich structure, yet many studies have focused on measuring pairwise relationships between members of a larger population-termed noise correlations. Here we review recent progress in understanding how these correlations affect population information, how information should be quantified, and what mechanisms may give rise to correlations. As population coding theory has improved, it has made clear that some forms of correlation are more important for information than others. We argue that this is a critical lesson for those interested in neuronal population responses more generally: Descriptions of population responses should be motivated by and linked to well-specified function. Within this context, we offer suggestions of where current theoretical frameworks fall short. PMID:27145916

  20. Functions of the mirror neuron system: implications for neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Buccino, Giovanni; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L

    2006-03-01

    Mirror neurons discharge during the execution of hand object-directed actions and during the observation of the same actions performed by other individuals. These neurons were first identified in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and later on in the inferior parietal lobule of monkey brain, thus constituting the mirror neuron system. More recently, mirror neurons for mouth object-directed actions have also been found in the monkey. Several pieces of experimental data demonstrate that a mirror neuron system devoted to hand, mouth, and foot actions is also present in humans. In the present paper we review the experimental evidence on the role of the mirror neuron system in action understanding, imitation learning of novel complex actions, and internal rehearsal (motor imagery) of actions. On the basis of features of the mirror neuron system and its role in action understanding and imitation, we discuss the possible use of action observation and imitation as an approach for systematic training in the rehabilitation of patients with motor impairment of the upper limb after stroke. PMID:16633020

  1. Modeling Neuronal Response to Simultaneous and Sequential Multi-Site Synaptic Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, David; Mekhail, Simon Peter; Go, Mary Ann; Daria, Vincent R.

    The flow of information in the brain theorizes that each neuron in a network receives synaptic inputs and sends off its processed signals to neighboring neurons. Here, we model these synaptic inputs to understand how each neuron processes these inputs and transmits neurotransmitters to neighboring neurons. We use the NEURON simulation package to stimulate a neuron at multiple synaptic locations along its dendritic tree. Accumulation of multiple synaptic inputs causes changes in the neuron's membrane potential leading to firing of an action potential. Our simulations show that simultaneous synaptic stimulation approaches firing of an action potential at lesser inputs compared to sequential stimulation at multiple sites distributed along several dendritic branches.

  2. Computational Model of Primary Visual Cortex Combining Visual Attention for Action Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shu, Na; Gao, Zhiyong; Chen, Xiangan; Liu, Haihua

    2015-01-01

    Humans can easily understand other people's actions through visual systems, while computers cannot. Therefore, a new bio-inspired computational model is proposed in this paper aiming for automatic action recognition. The model focuses on dynamic properties of neurons and neural networks in the primary visual cortex (V1), and simulates the procedure of information processing in V1, which consists of visual perception, visual attention and representation of human action. In our model, a family of the three-dimensional spatial-temporal correlative Gabor filters is used to model the dynamic properties of the classical receptive field of V1 simple cell tuned to different speeds and orientations in time for detection of spatiotemporal information from video sequences. Based on the inhibitory effect of stimuli outside the classical receptive field caused by lateral connections of spiking neuron networks in V1, we propose surround suppressive operator to further process spatiotemporal information. Visual attention model based on perceptual grouping is integrated into our model to filter and group different regions. Moreover, in order to represent the human action, we consider the characteristic of the neural code: mean motion map based on analysis of spike trains generated by spiking neurons. The experimental evaluation on some publicly available action datasets and comparison with the state-of-the-art approaches demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed model. PMID:26132270

  3. Computational Model of Primary Visual Cortex Combining Visual Attention for Action Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Na; Gao, Zhiyong; Chen, Xiangan; Liu, Haihua

    2015-01-01

    Humans can easily understand other people’s actions through visual systems, while computers cannot. Therefore, a new bio-inspired computational model is proposed in this paper aiming for automatic action recognition. The model focuses on dynamic properties of neurons and neural networks in the primary visual cortex (V1), and simulates the procedure of information processing in V1, which consists of visual perception, visual attention and representation of human action. In our model, a family of the three-dimensional spatial-temporal correlative Gabor filters is used to model the dynamic properties of the classical receptive field of V1 simple cell tuned to different speeds and orientations in time for detection of spatiotemporal information from video sequences. Based on the inhibitory effect of stimuli outside the classical receptive field caused by lateral connections of spiking neuron networks in V1, we propose surround suppressive operator to further process spatiotemporal information. Visual attention model based on perceptual grouping is integrated into our model to filter and group different regions. Moreover, in order to represent the human action, we consider the characteristic of the neural code: mean motion map based on analysis of spike trains generated by spiking neurons. The experimental evaluation on some publicly available action datasets and comparison with the state-of-the-art approaches demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed model. PMID:26132270

  4. Sudden synchrony leaps accompanied by frequency multiplications in neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Guberman, Shoshana; Kalmanovich, Alexander; Marmari, Hagar; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    A classical view of neural coding relies on temporal firing synchrony among functional groups of neurons, however, the underlying mechanism remains an enigma. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism where time-lags among neuronal spiking leap from several tens of milliseconds to nearly zero-lag synchrony. It also allows sudden leaps out of synchrony, hence forming short epochs of synchrony. Our results are based on an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on circuits of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro and are corroborated by simulations of neuronal populations. The underlying biological mechanisms are the unavoidable increase of the neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulations and temporal or spatial summation required to generate evoked spikes. These sudden leaps in and out of synchrony may be accompanied by multiplications of the neuronal firing frequency, hence offering reliable information-bearing indicators which may bridge between the two principal neuronal coding paradigms. PMID:24198764

  5. A New Framework for Cortico-Striatal Plasticity: Behavioural Theory Meets In Vitro Data at the Reinforcement-Action Interface

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, Kevin N.

    2015-01-01

    Operant learning requires that reinforcement signals interact with action representations at a suitable neural interface. Much evidence suggests that this occurs when phasic dopamine, acting as a reinforcement prediction error, gates plasticity at cortico-striatal synapses, and thereby changes the future likelihood of selecting the action(s) coded by striatal neurons. But this hypothesis faces serious challenges. First, cortico-striatal plasticity is inexplicably complex, depending on spike timing, dopamine level, and dopamine receptor type. Second, there is a credit assignment problem—action selection signals occur long before the consequent dopamine reinforcement signal. Third, the two types of striatal output neuron have apparently opposite effects on action selection. Whether these factors rule out the interface hypothesis and how they interact to produce reinforcement learning is unknown. We present a computational framework that addresses these challenges. We first predict the expected activity changes over an operant task for both types of action-coding striatal neuron, and show they co-operate to promote action selection in learning and compete to promote action suppression in extinction. Separately, we derive a complete model of dopamine and spike-timing dependent cortico-striatal plasticity from in vitro data. We then show this model produces the predicted activity changes necessary for learning and extinction in an operant task, a remarkable convergence of a bottom-up data-driven plasticity model with the top-down behavioural requirements of learning theory. Moreover, we show the complex dependencies of cortico-striatal plasticity are not only sufficient but necessary for learning and extinction. Validating the model, we show it can account for behavioural data describing extinction, renewal, and reacquisition, and replicate in vitro experimental data on cortico-striatal plasticity. By bridging the levels between the single synapse and behaviour, our

  6. A Hebbian learning rule gives rise to mirror neurons and links them to control theoretic inverse models

    PubMed Central

    Hanuschkin, A.; Ganguli, S.; Hahnloser, R. H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Mirror neurons are neurons whose responses to the observation of a motor act resemble responses measured during production of that act. Computationally, mirror neurons have been viewed as evidence for the existence of internal inverse models. Such models, rooted within control theory, map-desired sensory targets onto the motor commands required to generate those targets. To jointly explore both the formation of mirrored responses and their functional contribution to inverse models, we develop a correlation-based theory of interactions between a sensory and a motor area. We show that a simple eligibility-weighted Hebbian learning rule, operating within a sensorimotor loop during motor explorations and stabilized by heterosynaptic competition, naturally gives rise to mirror neurons as well as control theoretic inverse models encoded in the synaptic weights from sensory to motor neurons. Crucially, we find that the correlational structure or stereotypy of the neural code underlying motor explorations determines the nature of the learned inverse model: random motor codes lead to causal inverses that map sensory activity patterns to their motor causes; such inverses are maximally useful, by allowing the imitation of arbitrary sensory target sequences. By contrast, stereotyped motor codes lead to less useful predictive inverses that map sensory activity to future motor actions. Our theory generalizes previous work on inverse models by showing that such models can be learned in a simple Hebbian framework without the need for error signals or backpropagation, and it makes new conceptual connections between the causal nature of inverse models, the statistical structure of motor variability, and the time-lag between sensory and motor responses of mirror neurons. Applied to bird song learning, our theory can account for puzzling aspects of the song system, including necessity of sensorimotor gating and selectivity of auditory responses to bird's own song (BOS) stimuli. PMID

  7. Heterogeneity and Convergence of Olfactory First-Order Neurons Account for the High Speed and Sensitivity of Second-Order Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Grémiaux, Alexandre; Jarriault, David; Chaffiol, Antoine; Monsempes, Christelle; Deisig, Nina; Anton, Sylvia; Lucas, Philippe; Martinez, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    In the olfactory system of male moths, a specialized subset of neurons detects and processes the main component of the sex pheromone emitted by females. It is composed of several thousand first-order olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), all expressing the same pheromone receptor, that contact synaptically a few tens of second-order projection neurons (PNs) within a single restricted brain area. The functional simplicity of this system makes it a favorable model for studying the factors that contribute to its exquisite sensitivity and speed. Sensory information—primarily the identity and intensity of the stimulus—is encoded as the firing rate of the action potentials, and possibly as the latency of the neuron response. We found that over all their dynamic range, PNs respond with a shorter latency and a higher firing rate than most ORNs. Modelling showed that the increased sensitivity of PNs can be explained by the ORN-to-PN convergent architecture alone, whereas their faster response also requires cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the ORN population. So, far from being detrimental to signal detection, the ORN heterogeneity is exploited by PNs, and results in two different schemes of population coding based either on the response of a few extreme neurons (latency) or on the average response of many (firing rate). Moreover, ORN-to-PN transformations are linear for latency and nonlinear for firing rate, suggesting that latency could be involved in concentration-invariant coding of the pheromone blend and that sensitivity at low concentrations is achieved at the expense of precise encoding at high concentrations. PMID:25474026

  8. The WLC principle for action-oriented perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Fortuna, Luigi; Lombardo, Davide; Patané, Luca; Velarde, Manuel G.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper a new methodology for action-oriented perception will be introduced. It is based on a previous method that used Turing Patterns in CNNs for the arousal of "perceptual states" as representation of the environmental condition. The emerging patterns were associated to codes which gave rise to learnable actions on a moving robot. Recently the new paradigm of Winnerless Competition (WLC) was taken into consideration to represent a suitable, bioinspired and efficient method to generate sequences of neural activations, strictly related to the spatial-temporal activity of input sensors. This fascinating property was recently peculiarly measured in the olfactory system, in particular in groups of neurons belonging to the insects' Antennal Lobe and to the mammalians' Olfactory Bulb. Taking inspiration from these experimental results and from the analytical model of the WLC, a cellular nonlinear model generating sequences of cell activation, representing the input pattern at the sensory level, will be used in an action-oriented perception framework. In fact simulation results showed the potentiality of the WLC approach to design dynamic networks for discrimination and classification, with a potentially huge memory capacity. In the present manuscript the WLC principle, implemented in a network of FitzHugh Nagumo neurons will be used within the whole framework for action-oriented perception, and the results will be applied to a roving robot.

  9. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K; Douglas, Pamela K; Friston, Karl J

    2016-03-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics--based on approximate Bayesian inference--has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception. PMID:26953636

  10. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K.; Douglas, Pamela K.; Friston, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics—based on approximate Bayesian inference—has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception. PMID:26953636

  11. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na+ and K+ currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism. PMID:26074810

  12. Modelling the acquisition of goal-directed behaviors by populations of neurons.

    PubMed

    Guigon, E; Burnod, Y

    1995-03-01

    Recent neurophysiological studies have revealed the patterns of neuronal activity during the acquisition of goal-directed behaviors, both in single cells, and in large populations of neurons. We propose a model which helps three sets of experimental results in the monkey to be understood: (1) activity of single cells vary greatly and only population activities are causally related to behavior. The model shows how a population of stochastic neurons, whose behaviors vary widely, can learn a skilled conditioned movement with only local activity-dependent synaptic changes. (2) typical changes in neuronal activity occur when the rules governing the behavior are changed, i.e. when the relationship between cues and actions to reach a goal changes over time. There are two types of neuronal patterns during changes in reward contingency: a monotonic increasing pattern and a non-monotonic pattern which follows the change in the way the reward is obtained. Units in the model display these two types of change, which correspond to synaptic modifications related to the encoding of the behavioral significance of sensory and motor events. (3) These two patterns of neuronal activity define two populations whose anatomical distributions in the frontal lobe overlap with a gradient organized in the rostro-caudal direction. The model consists of two artificial neural networks, defined by the same set of equations, but which differ in the values of two parameters (P and Q). P defines the adaptive properties of processing units and Q describes the coding of information. The model suggests that a balance in the relative strengths of these parameters distributed along a rostro-caudal gradient can explain the distribution of neuronal types in the frontal lobe of the monkey. PMID:7622407

  13. Action Experience, More than Observation, Influences Mu Rhythm Desynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Erin N.; Yoo, Kathryn H.; Vanderwert, Ross E.; Ferrari, Pier F.; Woodward, Amanda L.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of mirror neurons in premotor and parietal areas of the macaque monkey, the idea that action and perception may share the same neural code has been of central interest in social, developmental, and cognitive neurosciences. A fundamental question concerns how a putative human mirror neuron system may be tuned to the motor experiences of the individual. The current study tested the hypothesis that prior motor experience modulated the sensorimotor mu and beta rhythms. Specifically, we hypothesized that these sensorimotor rhythms would be more desynchronized after active motor experience compared to passive observation experience. To test our hypothesis, we collected EEG from adult participants during the observation of a relatively novel action: an experimenter used a claw-like tool to pick up a toy. Prior to EEG collection, we trained one group of adults to perform this action with the tool (performers). A second group comprised trained video coders, who only had experience observing the action (observers). Both the performers and the observers had no prior motor and visual experience with the action. A third group of novices was also tested. Performers exhibited the greatest mu rhythm desynchronization in the 8–13 Hz band, particularly in the right hemisphere compared to observers and novices. This study is the first to contrast active tool-use experience and observation experience in the mu rhythm and to show modulation with relatively shorter amounts of experience than prior mirror neuron expertise studies. These findings are discussed with respect to its broader implication as a neural signature for a mechanism of early social learning. PMID:24663967

  14. Robust Nonlinear Neural Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qianli; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Most interesting natural sensory stimuli are encoded in the brain in a form that can only be decoded nonlinearly. But despite being a core function of the brain, nonlinear population codes are rarely studied and poorly understood. Interestingly, the few existing models of nonlinear codes are inconsistent with known architectural features of the brain. In particular, these codes have information content that scales with the size of the cortical population, even if that violates the data processing inequality by exceeding the amount of information entering the sensory system. Here we provide a valid theory of nonlinear population codes by generalizing recent work on information-limiting correlations in linear population codes. Although these generalized, nonlinear information-limiting correlations bound the performance of any decoder, they also make decoding more robust to suboptimal computation, allowing many suboptimal decoders to achieve nearly the same efficiency as an optimal decoder. Although these correlations are extremely difficult to measure directly, particularly for nonlinear codes, we provide a simple, practical test by which one can use choice-related activity in small populations of neurons to determine whether decoding is suboptimal or optimal and limited by correlated noise. We conclude by describing an example computation in the vestibular system where this theory applies. QY and XP was supported by a grant from the McNair foundation.

  15. Two-photon imaging of spatially extended neuronal network dynamics with high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Kyle P.; Eng, Alfred; White, John A.; Mertz, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple two-photon fluorescence imaging strategy, called targeted path scanning (TPS), to monitor the dynamics of spatially extended neuronal networks with high spatiotemporal resolution. Our strategy combines the advantages of mirror-based scanning, minimized dead time, ease of implementation, and compatibility with high-resolution low-magnification objectives. To demonstrate the performance of TPS, we monitor the calcium dynamics distributed across an entire juvenile rat hippocampus (>1.5mm), at scan rates of 100Hz, with single cell resolution and single action potential sensitivity. Our strategy for fast, efficient two-photon microscopy over spatially extended regions provides a particularly attractive solution for monitoring neuronal population activity in thick tissue, without sacrificing the signal to noise ratio or high spatial resolution associated with standard two-photon microscopy. Finally, we provide the code to make our technique generally available. PMID:18539336

  16. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically-identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found striking homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we could describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal. PMID:26854803

  17. Complementary processing of haptic information by slowly and rapidly adapting neurons in the trigeminothalamic pathway. Electrophysiology, mathematical modeling and simulations of vibrissae-related neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Torets, Carlos; Panetsos, Fivos

    2013-01-01

    Tonic (slowly adapting) and phasic (rapidly adapting) primary afferents convey complementary aspects of haptic information to the central nervous system: object location and texture the former, shape the latter. Tonic and phasic neural responses are also recorded in all relay stations of the somatosensory pathway, yet it is unknown their role in both, information processing and information transmission to the cortex: we don't know if tonic and phasic neurons process complementary aspects of haptic information and/or if these two types constitute two separate channels that convey complementary aspects of tactile information to the cortex. Here we propose to elucidate these two questions in the fast trigeminal pathway of the rat (PrV-VPM: principal trigeminal nucleus-ventroposteromedial thalamic nucleus). We analyze early and global behavior, latencies and stability of the responses of individual cells in PrV and medial lemniscus under 1–40 Hz stimulation of the whiskers in control and decorticated animals and we use stochastic spiking models and extensive simulations. Our results strongly suggest that in the first relay station of the somatosensory system (PrV): (1) tonic and phasic neurons process complementary aspects of whisker-related tactile information (2) tonic and phasic responses are not originated from two different types of neurons (3) the two responses are generated by the differential action of the somatosensory cortex on a unique type of PrV cell (4) tonic and phasic neurons do not belong to two different channels for the transmission of tactile information to the thalamus (5) trigeminothalamic transmission is exclusively performed by tonically firing neurons and (6) all aspects of haptic information are coded into low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass filtering profiles of tonically firing neurons. Our results are important for both, basic research on neural circuits and information processing, and development of sensory neuroprostheses. PMID:23761732

  18. Sparse Spectrotemporal Coding of Sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, David J.; König, Peter; Körding, Konrad P.

    2003-12-01

    Recent studies of biological auditory processing have revealed that sophisticated spectrotemporal analyses are performed by central auditory systems of various animals. The analysis is typically well matched with the statistics of relevant natural sounds, suggesting that it produces an optimal representation of the animal's acoustic biotope. We address this topic using simulated neurons that learn an optimal representation of a speech corpus. As input, the neurons receive a spectrographic representation of sound produced by a peripheral auditory model. The output representation is deemed optimal when the responses of the neurons are maximally sparse. Following optimization, the simulated neurons are similar to real neurons in many respects. Most notably, a given neuron only analyzes the input over a localized region of time and frequency. In addition, multiple subregions either excite or inhibit the neuron, together producing selectivity to spectral and temporal modulation patterns. This suggests that the brain's solution is particularly well suited for coding natural sound; therefore, it may prove useful in the design of new computational methods for processing speech.

  19. A COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF MOTOR NEURON DEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Le Masson, Gwendal; Przedborski, Serge; Abbott, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY To explore the link between bioenergetics and motor neuron degeneration, we used a computational model in which detailed morphology and ion conductance are paired with intracellular ATP production and consumption. We found that reduced ATP availability increases the metabolic cost of a single action potential and disrupts K+/Na+ homeostasis, resulting in a chronic depolarization. The magnitude of the ATP shortage at which this ionic instability occurs depends on the morphology and intrinsic conductance characteristic of the neuron. If ATP shortage is confined to the distal part of the axon, the ensuing local ionic instability eventually spreads to the whole neuron and involves fasciculation-like spiking events. A shortage of ATP also causes a rise in intracellular calcium. Our modeling work supports the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction can account for salient features of the paralytic disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including motor neuron hyperexcitability, fasciculation, and differential vulnerability of motor neuron subpopulations. PMID:25088365

  20. Bistable behaviour in a neocortical neurone model.

    PubMed

    Delord, B; Klaassen, A J; Burnod, Y; Costalat, R; Guigon, E

    1997-03-01

    Intracellular recordings have shown that neocortical pyramidal neurones have an intrinsic capacity for regenerative firing. The cellular mechanism of this firing was investigated by computer simulations of a model neurone endowed with standard action potential and persistent sodium (gNaP) conductances. The firing mode of the neurone was determined as a function of leakage and NaP maximal conductances (gl and gNaP). The neurone had two stable states of activity (bistable) over wide range of gl and gNaP, one at the resting potential and the other in a regenerative firing mode, that could be triggered by a transient input. This model points to a cellular mechanism that may contribute to the generation and maintenance of long-lasting sustained neuronal discharges in the cerebral cortex. PMID:9141084

  1. Neuron's function revealed

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    There's a new way to explore biologys secrets. With a flash of light, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley zeroed in on the type of neural cell that controls swimming in larval zebrafish. Using innovative light-activated proteins and gene expression techniques, the scientists zapped several zebrafish with a pulse of light, and initiated a swimming action in a subset of fish that was traced back to the type of neuron that drives the side-to-side motion of their tail fins. The technique behind this needle-in-haystack search for the neural roots of a specific behavior could become a powerful way to learn how any biological system works. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/09/16/light-activated-protein/

  2. Speech coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersho, Allen

    1990-05-01

    Recent advances in algorithms and techniques for speech coding now permit high quality voice reproduction at remarkably low bit rates. The advent of powerful single-ship signal processors has made it cost effective to implement these new and sophisticated speech coding algorithms for many important applications in voice communication and storage. Some of the main ideas underlying the algorithms of major interest today are reviewed. The concept of removing redundancy by linear prediction is reviewed, first in the context of predictive quantization or DPCM. Then linear predictive coding, adaptive predictive coding, and vector quantization are discussed. The concepts of excitation coding via analysis-by-synthesis, vector sum excitation codebooks, and adaptive postfiltering are explained. The main idea of vector excitation coding (VXC) or code excited linear prediction (CELP) are presented. Finally low-delay VXC coding and phonetic segmentation for VXC are described.

  3. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bardy, Cedric; van den Hurk, Mark; Eames, Tameji; Marchand, Cynthia; Hernandez, Ruben V; Kellogg, Mariko; Gorris, Mark; Galet, Ben; Palomares, Vanessa; Brown, Joshua; Bang, Anne G; Mertens, Jerome; Böhnke, Lena; Boyer, Leah; Simon, Suzanne; Gage, Fred H

    2015-05-19

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely used to culture neurons. We found that classic basal media, as well as serum, impair action potential generation and synaptic communication. To overcome this problem, we designed a new neuronal medium (BrainPhys basal + serum-free supplements) in which we adjusted the concentrations of inorganic salts, neuroactive amino acids, and energetic substrates. We then tested that this medium adequately supports neuronal activity and survival of human neurons in culture. Long-term exposure to this physiological medium also improved the proportion of neurons that were synaptically active. The medium was designed to culture human neurons but also proved adequate for rodent neurons. The improvement in BrainPhys basal medium to support neurophysiological activity is an important step toward reducing the gap between brain physiological conditions in vivo and neuronal models in vitro. PMID:25870293

  4. Using Mu Rhythm Desynchronization to Measure Mirror Neuron Activity in Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nystrom, Par; Ljunghammar, Therese; Rosander, Kerstin; von Hofsten, Claes

    2011-01-01

    The Mirror Neuron System hypothesis stating that observed actions are projected onto the observer's own action system assigns an important role to development, because only actions mastered by the observer can be mirrored. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether there is evidence of a functioning mirror neuron system (MNS) in…

  5. Response of Morris-Lecar neurons to various stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hengtong; Wang, Longfei; Yu, Lianchun; Chen, Yong

    2011-02-01

    We studied the responses of three classes of Morris-Lecar neurons to sinusoidal inputs and synaptic pulselike stimuli with deterministic and random interspike intervals (ISIs). It was found that the responses of the output frequency of class 1 and 2 neurons showed similar evolution properties by varying input amplitudes and frequencies, whereas class 3 neuron exhibited substantially different properties. Specifically, class 1 and 2 neurons display complicated phase locking (p : q, p>q, denoting output action potentials per input spikes) in low-frequency sinusoidal input area when the input amplitude is above their threshold, but a class 3 neuron does not fire action potentials in this area even if the amplitude is much higher. In the case of the deterministic ISI synaptic injection, all the three classes of neurons oscillate spikes with an arbitrary small frequency. When increasing the input frequency (both sinusoidal and deterministic ISI synaptic inputs), all neurons display 1 : 1 phase locking, whereas the response frequency decreases even fall to zero in the high-frequency input area. When the random ISI synaptic pulselike stimuli are injected into the neurons, one can clearly see the low-pass filter behaviors from the return map. The output ISI distribution depends on the mean ISI of input train as well as the ISI variation. Such different responses of three classes of neurons result from their distinct dynamical mechanisms of action potential initiation. It was suggested that the intrinsic dynamical cellular properties are very important to neuron information processing.

  6. Comparison of speech recognition with different speech coding strategies (SPEAK, CIS, and ACE) and their relationship to telemetric measures of compound action potentials in the nucleus CI 24M cochlear implant system.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, J; Hohl, S; Stürzebecher, E; Pfennigdorff, T; Gstöettner, W

    2001-01-01

    Speech understanding and subjective preference for three different speech coding strategies (spectral peak coding [SPEAK], continuous interleaved sampling [CIS], and advanced combination encoders [ACE]) were investigated in 11 post-lingually deaf adult subjects, using the Nucleus CI 24M cochlear implant system. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups in a balanced crossover study design. The first group was initially fitted with SPEAK and the second group with CIS. The remaining strategies were tested sequentially over 8 to 10 weeks with systematic variations of number of channels and rate of stimulation. Following a further interval of 3 months, during which subjects were allowed to listen with their preferred strategy, they were tested again with all three strategies. Compound action potentials (CAPs) were recorded using neural response telemetry. Input/output functions in relation to increasing stimulus levels and inter-stimulus intervals between masker and probe were established to assess the physiological status of the cochlear nerve. Objective results and subjective rating showed significant differences in favour of the ACE strategy. Ten of the 11 subjects preferred the ACE strategy at the end of the study. The estimate of the refractory period based on the inter-stimulus interval correlated significantly with the overall performance with all three strategies, but CAP measures could not be related to individual preference of strategy or differences in performance between strategies. Based on these results, the ACE strategy can be recommended as an initial choice specifically for the Nucleus CI 24M cochlear implant system. Nevertheless, access to the other strategies may help to increase performance in individual patients. PMID:11296939

  7. Dorsal–Ventral Gradient for Neuronal Plasticity in the Embryonic Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Ricardo H.; Ribera, Angeles B.

    2008-01-01

    Within the developing Xenopus spinal cord, voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel genes display different expression patterns, many of which occur in opposing dorsal–ventral gradients. Regional differences in Kv gene expression would predict different patterns of potassium current (IKv) regulation. However, during the first 24 h of postmitotic differentiation, all primary spinal neurons undergo a temporally coordinated upregulation of IKv density that shortens the duration of the action potential. Here, we tested whether spinal neurons demonstrate regional differences in IKv regulation subsequent to action potential maturation. We show that two types of neurons, I and II, can be identified in culture on the basis of biophysical and pharmacological properties of IKv and different firing patterns. Chronic increases in extracellular potassium, a signature of high neuronal activity, do not alter excitability properties of either neuron type. However, elevating extracellular potassium acutely after the period of action potential maturation leads to different changes in membrane properties of the two types of neurons. IKv of type I neurons gains sensitivity to the blocker XE991, whereas type II neurons increase IKv density and fire fewer action potentials. Moreover, by recording from neurons in vivo, we found that primary spinal neurons can be identified as either type I or type II. Type I neurons predominate in dorsal regions, whereas type II neurons localize to ventral regions. The findings reveal a dorsal–ventral gradient for IKv regulation and a novel form of neuronal plasticity in spinal cord neurons. PMID:18385340

  8. A low-dimensional, time-resolved and adapting model neuron.

    PubMed

    Cartling, B

    1996-07-01

    A low-dimensional, time-resolved and adapting model neuron is formulated and evaluated. The model is an extension of the integrate-and-fire type of model with respect to adaptation and of a recent adapting firing-rate model with respect to time-resolution. It is obtained from detailed conductance-based models by a separation of fast and slow ionic processes of action potential generation. The model explicitly includes firing-rate regulation via the slow afterhyperpolarization phase of action potentials, which is controlled by calcium-sensitive potassium channels. It is demonstrated that the model closely reproduces the firing pattern and excitability behaviour of a detailed multicompartment conductance-based model of a neocortical pyramidal cell. The inclusion of adaptation in a model neuron is important for its capability to generate complex dynamics of networks of interconnected neurons. The time-resolution is required for studies of systems in which the temporal aspects of neural coding are important. The simplicity of the model facilitates analytical studies, insight into neurocomputational mechanisms and simulations of large-scale systems. The capability to generate complex network computations may also make the model useful in practical applications of artificial neural networks. PMID:8891839

  9. Population codes in the visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Every sensory event elicits activity in a broad population of cells that is distributed within and across cortical areas. How these neurons function together to represent the sensory environment is a major question in systems neuroscience. A number of proposals have been made, and recent advances in multi-neuronal recording have begun to allow researchers to test the predictions of these population-coding theories. In this review, I provide an introduction to some of the key concepts in population coding and describe several studies in the recent literature. The focus of this review is on sensory representation in the visual cortex and related perceptual decisions. The frameworks used to study population coding include population vectors, linear decoders, and Bayesian inference. Simple examples are provided to illustrate these concepts. Testing theories of population coding is an emerging subject in systems neuroscience, but advances in multi-neuronal recording and analysis suggest that an understanding is within reach. PMID:23542219

  10. Selective IT neurons are selective along many dimensions.

    PubMed

    Zhivago, Kalathupiriyan A; Arun, S P

    2016-03-01

    Our visual abilities are unsurpassed because of a sophisticated code for objects located in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex. This code has remained a mystery because IT neurons show extremely diverse shape selectivity with no apparent organizing principle. Here, we show that there is an intrinsic component to selectivity in IT neurons. We tested IT neurons on distinct shapes and their parametric variations and asked whether neurons selective along one dimension were also selective along others. Selective neurons responded to fewer shapes and were narrowly tuned to local variations of these shapes, both along arbitrary morph lines and along variations in size, position, or orientation. For a subset of neurons, selective neurons were selective for both shape and texture. Finally, selective neurons were also more invariant in that they preserved their shape preferences across changes in size, position, and orientation. These observations indicate that there is an intrinsic constraint on the sharpness of tuning for the features coded by each IT neuron, making it always sharply tuned or always broadly tuned along all dimensions. We speculate that this may be an organizing principle throughout visual cortex. PMID:26823517

  11. Selective IT neurons are selective along many dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Zhivago, Kalathupiriyan A.

    2016-01-01

    Our visual abilities are unsurpassed because of a sophisticated code for objects located in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex. This code has remained a mystery because IT neurons show extremely diverse shape selectivity with no apparent organizing principle. Here, we show that there is an intrinsic component to selectivity in IT neurons. We tested IT neurons on distinct shapes and their parametric variations and asked whether neurons selective along one dimension were also selective along others. Selective neurons responded to fewer shapes and were narrowly tuned to local variations of these shapes, both along arbitrary morph lines and along variations in size, position, or orientation. For a subset of neurons, selective neurons were selective for both shape and texture. Finally, selective neurons were also more invariant in that they preserved their shape preferences across changes in size, position, and orientation. These observations indicate that there is an intrinsic constraint on the sharpness of tuning for the features coded by each IT neuron, making it always sharply tuned or always broadly tuned along all dimensions. We speculate that this may be an organizing principle throughout visual cortex. PMID:26823517

  12. Neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements

    PubMed Central

    Krippl, Martin; Karim, Ahmed A.; Brechmann, André

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the somatotopy of finger movements has been extensively studied with neuroimaging, the neural foundations of facial movements remain elusive. Therefore, we systematically studied the neuronal correlates of voluntary facial movements using the Facial Action Coding System (FACS, Ekman et al., 2002). The facial movements performed in the MRI scanner were defined as Action Units (AUs) and were controlled by a certified FACS coder. The main goal of the study was to investigate the detailed somatotopy of the facial primary motor area (facial M1). Eighteen participants were asked to produce the following four facial movements in the fMRI scanner: AU1+2 (brow raiser), AU4 (brow lowerer), AU12 (lip corner puller) and AU24 (lip presser), each in alternation with a resting phase. Our facial movement task induced generally high activation in brain motor areas (e.g., M1, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, putamen), as well as in the thalamus, insula, and visual cortex. BOLD activations revealed overlapping representations for the four facial movements. However, within the activated facial M1 areas, we could find distinct peak activities in the left and right hemisphere supporting a rough somatotopic upper to lower face organization within the right facial M1 area, and a somatotopic organization within the right M1 upper face part. In both hemispheres, the order was an inverse somatotopy within the lower face representations. In contrast to the right hemisphere, in the left hemisphere the representation of AU4 was more lateral and anterior compared to the rest of the facial movements. Our findings support the notion of a partial somatotopic order within the M1 face area confirming the “like attracts like” principle (Donoghue et al., 1992). AUs which are often used together or are similar are located close to each other in the motor cortex. PMID:26578940

  13. Leptin signaling in GABA neurons, but not glutamate neurons, is required for reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Zuure, Wieteke A; Roberts, Amy L; Quennell, Janette H; Anderson, Greg M

    2013-11-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin acts in the brain to modulate the central driver of fertility: the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal system. This effect is indirect, as GnRH neurons do not express leptin receptors (LEPRs). Here we test whether GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons provide the intermediate pathway between the site of leptin action and the GnRH neurons. Leptin receptors were deleted from GABA and glutamate neurons using Cre-Lox transgenics, and the downstream effects on puberty onset and reproduction were examined. Both mouse lines displayed the expected increase in body weight and region-specific loss of leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. The GABA neuron-specific LEPR knock-out females and males showed significantly delayed puberty onset. Adult fertility observations revealed that these knock-out animals have decreased fecundity. In contrast, glutamate neuron-specific LEPR knock-out mice displayed normal fertility. Assessment of the estrogenic hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation in females showed that leptin action on GABA neurons is not necessary for estradiol-mediated suppression of tonic luteinizing hormone secretion (an indirect measure of GnRH neuron activity) but is required for regulation of a full preovulatory-like luteinizing hormone surge. In conclusion, leptin signaling in GABAergic (but not glutamatergic neurons) plays a critical role in the timing of puberty onset and is involved in fertility regulation throughout adulthood in both sexes. These results form an important step in explaining the role of central leptin signaling in the reproductive system. Limiting the leptin-to-GnRH mediators to GABAergic cells will enable future research to focus on a few specific types of neurons. PMID:24198376

  14. Direct conversion of human fibroblasts to induced serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Jiang, H; Zhong, P; Yan, Z; Chen, S; Feng, J

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic (5HT) neurons exert diverse and widespread functions in the brain. Dysfunction of the serotonergic system gives rise to a variety of mental illnesses including depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism and eating disorders. Here we show that human primary fibroblasts were directly converted to induced serotonergic (i5HT) neurons by the expression of Ascl1, Foxa2, Lmx1b and FEV. The transdifferentiation was enhanced by p53 knockdown and appropriate culture conditions including hypoxia. The i5HT neurons expressed markers for mature serotonergic neurons, had Ca(2+)-dependent 5HT release and selective 5HT uptake, exhibited spontaneous action potentials and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Application of serotonin significantly increased the firing rate of spontaneous action potentials, demonstrating the functional utility of i5HT neurons for studying serotonergic neurotransmission. The availability of human i5HT neurons will be very useful for research and drug discovery on many serotonin-related mental disorders. PMID:26216300

  15. Cracking the NAPLAN Code: Numeracy in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perso, Thelma

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the author recommends that every teacher of mathematics should undertake an analysis using their own data. She further recommends that they reflect on the outcomes of their analysis and share it with colleagues. Teachers can look at an individual student's results, variations in results between student sub-groups in their classes,…

  16. Archetypes as action patterns.

    PubMed

    Hogenson, George B

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons by researchers at the University of Parma promises to radically alter our understanding of fundamental cognitive and affective states. This paper explores the relationship of mirror neurons to Jung's theory of archetypes and proposes that archetypes may be viewed as elementary action patterns. The paper begins with a review of a proposed interpretation of the fainting spells of S. Freud in his relationship with Jung as an example of an action pattern that also defines an archetypal image. The challenge that mirror neurons present to traditional views in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis, however, is that they operate without recourse to a cognitive processing element. This is a position that is gaining increasing acceptance in other fields as well. The paper therefore reviews the most recent claims made by the Boston Process of Change Study Group as well as conclusions drawn from dynamic systems views of development and theoretical robotics to underline the conclusion that unconscious agency is not a requirement for coherent action. It concludes with the suggestion that this entire body of research may lead to the conclusion that the dynamic unconscious is an unnecessary hypothesis in psychoanalysis and analytical psychology. PMID:19531123

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Modulate the Differentiation of Neurons in Clonal Cortical Cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Tsatmali, Marina; Walcott, Elisabeth C.; Makarenkova, Helen; Crossin, Kathryn L.

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important regulators of intracellular signaling. We examined the expression of ROS during rat brain development and explored their role in differentiation using cortical cultures. High levels of ROS were found in newborn neurons. Neurons produced ROS, not connected with cell death, throughout embryogenesis and postnatal stages. By P20, ROS-producing cells were found only in neurogenic regions. Cells with low levels of ROS, isolated from E15 brains by FACS, differentiated into neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes in clonal cultures. Neurons produced high ROS early in culture and later differentiated into two types: large pyramidal-like neurons that fired no or only a single action potential and smaller neurons that expressed nuclear calretinin and fired repeated action potentials. Antioxidant treatment did not alter neuron number but increased the ratio of small to large neurons. These findings suggest that modulation of ROS levels influences multiple aspects of neuronal differentiation. PMID:17000118

  18. Cultured neuronal networks as environmental biosensors.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J; Gray, Samuel A; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2004-01-01

    Contamination of water by toxins, either intentionally or unintentionally, is a growing concern for both military and civilian agencies and thus there is a need for systems capable of monitoring a wide range of natural and industrial toxicants. The EILATox-Oregon Workshop held in September 2002 provided an opportunity to test the capabilities of a prototype neuronal network-based biosensor with unknown contaminants in water samples. The biosensor is a portable device capable of recording the action potential activity from a network of mammalian neurons grown on glass microelectrode arrays. Changes in the action potential fi ring rate across the network are monitored to determine exposure to toxicants. A series of three neuronal networks derived from mice was used to test seven unknown samples. Two of these unknowns later were revealed to be blanks, to which the neuronal networks did not respond. Of the five remaining unknowns, a significant change in network activity was detected for four of the compounds at concentrations below a lethal level for humans: mercuric chloride, sodium arsenite, phosdrin and chlordimeform. These compounds--two heavy metals, an organophosphate and an insecticide--demonstrate the breadth of detection possible with neuronal networks. The results generated at the workshop show the promise of the neuronal network biosensor as an environmental detector but there is still considerable effort needed to produce a device suitable for routine environmental threat monitoring. PMID:15478174

  19. Human sensory neurons: Membrane properties and sensitization by inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingming; Page, Guy; Ghetti, Andrea; Gereau, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Biological differences in sensory processing between human and model organisms may present significant obstacles to translational approaches in treating chronic pain. To better understand the physiology of human sensory neurons, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from 141 human dorsal root ganglion (hDRG) neurons from five young adult donors without chronic pain. Nearly all small diameter hDRG neurons (<50 μm) displayed an inflection on the descending slope of the action potential, a defining feature of rodent nociceptive neurons. A high proportion of hDRG neurons were responsive to the algogens allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and ATP, as well as the pruritogens histamine and chloroquine. We show that a subset of hDRG neurons responded to the inflammatory compounds bradykinin and prostaglandin E2 with action potential discharge and show evidence of sensitization including lower rheobase. Compared to electrically-evoked action potentials, chemically-induced action potentials were triggered from less depolarized thresholds and showed distinct after-hyperpolarization kinetics. These data indicate that most small/medium hDRG neurons can be classified as nociceptors, that they respond directly to compounds that produce pain and itch, and can be activated and sensitized by inflammatory mediators. The use of hDRG neurons as preclinical vehicles for target validation is discussed. PMID:24973718

  20. The Emergence of Single Neurons in Clinical Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Sydney S.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Single neuron actions and interactions are the sine qua non of brain function, and nearly all diseases and injuries of the central nervous system trace their clinical sequelae to neuronal dysfunction or failure. Remarkably, discussion of neuronal activity is largely absent in clinical neuroscience. Advances in neurotechnology and computational capabilities, accompanied by shifts in theoretical frameworks, have led to renewed interest in the information represented by single neurons. Using direct interfaces with the nervous system, millisecond-scale information will soon be extracted from single neurons in clinical environments, supporting personalized treatment of neurologic and psychiatric disease. In this review we focus on single neuronal activity in restoring communication and motor control in patients suffering from devastating neurological injuries. We also explore the single neuron's role in epilepsy and movement disorders, surgical anesthesia, and in cognitive processes disrupted in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disease. Finally, we speculate on how technological advances will revolutionize neurotherapeutics. PMID:25856488

  1. The emergence of single neurons in clinical neurology.

    PubMed

    Cash, Sydney S; Hochberg, Leigh R

    2015-04-01

    Single neuron actions and interactions are the sine qua non of brain function, and nearly all diseases and injuries of the CNS trace their clinical sequelae to neuronal dysfunction or failure. Remarkably, discussion of neuronal activity is largely absent in clinical neuroscience. Advances in neurotechnology and computational capabilities, accompanied by shifts in theoretical frameworks, have led to renewed interest in the information represented by single neurons. Using direct interfaces with the nervous system, millisecond-scale information will soon be extracted from single neurons in clinical environments, supporting personalized treatment of neurologic and psychiatric disease. In this Perspective, we focus on single-neuronal activity in restoring communication and motor control in patients suffering from devastating neurological injuries. We also explore the single neuron's role in epilepsy and movement disorders, surgical anesthesia, and in cognitive processes disrupted in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disease. Finally, we speculate on how technological advances will revolutionize neurotherapeutics. PMID:25856488

  2. Prefrontal neuronal assemblies temporally control fear behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Cyril; Courtin, Julien; Karalis, Nikolaos; Chaudun, Fabrice; Wurtz, Hélène; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2016-07-21

    Precise spike timing through the coordination and synchronization of neuronal assemblies is an efficient and flexible coding mechanism for sensory and cognitive processing. In cortical and subcortical areas, the formation of cell assemblies critically depends on neuronal oscillations, which can precisely control the timing of spiking activity. Whereas this form of coding has been described for sensory processing and spatial learning, its role in encoding emotional behaviour remains unknown. Fear behaviour relies on the activation of distributed structures, among which the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) is known to be critical for fear memory expression. In the dmPFC, the phasic activation of neurons to threat-predicting cues, a spike-rate coding mechanism, correlates with conditioned fear responses and supports the discrimination between aversive and neutral stimuli. However, this mechanism does not account for freezing observed outside stimuli presentations, and the contribution of a general spike-time coding mechanism for freezing in the dmPFC remains to be established. Here we use a combination of single-unit and local field potential recordings along with optogenetic manipulations to show that, in the dmPFC, expression of conditioned fear is causally related to the organization of neurons into functional assemblies. During fear behaviour, the development of 4 Hz oscillations coincides with the activation of assemblies nested in the ascending phase of the oscillation. The selective optogenetic inhibition of dmPFC neurons during the ascending or descending phases of this oscillation blocks and promotes conditioned fear responses, respectively. These results identify a novel phase-specific coding mechanism, which dynamically regulates the development of dmPFC assemblies to control the precise timing of fear responses. PMID:27409809

  3. Imitation learning based on an intrinsic motivation mechanism for efficient coding

    PubMed Central

    Triesch, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis regarding the development of imitation learning is presented that is rooted in intrinsic motivations. It is derived from a recently proposed form of intrinsically motivated learning (IML) for efficient coding in active perception, wherein an agent learns to perform actions with its sense organs to facilitate efficient encoding of the sensory data. To this end, actions of the sense organs that improve the encoding of the sensory data trigger an internally generated reinforcement signal. Here it is argued that the same IML mechanism might also support the development of imitation when general actions beyond those of the sense organs are considered: The learner first observes a tutor performing a behavior and learns a model of the the behavior's sensory consequences. The learner then acts itself and receives an internally generated reinforcement signal reflecting how well the sensory consequences of its own behavior are encoded by the sensory model. Actions that are more similar to those of the tutor will lead to sensory signals that are easier to encode and produce a higher reinforcement signal. Through this, the learner's behavior is progressively tuned to make the sensory consequences of its actions match the learned sensory model. I discuss this mechanism in the context of human language acquisition and bird song learning where similar ideas have been proposed. The suggested mechanism also offers an account for the development of mirror neurons and makes a number of predictions. Overall, it establishes a connection between principles of efficient coding, intrinsic motivations and imitation. PMID:24204350

  4. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state.

    PubMed

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity. PMID:26151674

  5. Neuronal Ensemble Synchrony during Human Focal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Harrison, Matthew T.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Madsen, Joseph R.; Blum, Andrew S.; Potter, N. Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Cash, Sydney S.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are classically characterized as the expression of hypersynchronous neural activity, yet the true degree of synchrony in neuronal spiking (action potentials) during human seizures remains a fundamental question. We quantified the temporal precision of spike synchrony in ensembles of neocortical neurons during seizures in people with pharmacologically intractable epilepsy. Two seizure types were analyzed: those characterized by sustained gamma (∼40–60 Hz) local field potential (LFP) oscillations or by spike-wave complexes (SWCs; ∼3 Hz). Fine (<10 ms) temporal synchrony was rarely present during gamma-band seizures, where neuronal spiking remained highly irregular and asynchronous. In SWC seizures, phase locking of neuronal spiking to the SWC spike phase induced synchrony at a coarse 50–100 ms level. In addition, transient fine synchrony occurred primarily during the initial ∼20 ms period of the SWC spike phase and varied across subjects and seizures. Sporadic coherence events between neuronal population spike counts and LFPs were observed during SWC seizures in high (∼80 Hz) gamma-band and during high-frequency oscillations (∼130 Hz). Maximum entropy models of the joint neuronal spiking probability, constrained only on single neurons' nonstationary coarse spiking rates and local network activation, explained most of the fine synchrony in both seizure types. Our findings indicate that fine neuronal ensemble synchrony occurs mostly during SWC, not gamma-band, seizures, and primarily during the initial phase of SWC spikes. Furthermore, these fine synchrony events result mostly from transient increases in overall neuronal network spiking rates, rather than changes in precise spiking correlations between specific pairs of neurons. PMID:25057195

  6. Multiplexed coding in the human basal ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, D. S.; Cerquetti, D.; Merello, M.

    2016-04-01

    A classic controversy in neuroscience is whether information carried by spike trains is encoded by a time averaged measure (e.g. a rate code), or by complex time patterns (i.e. a time code). Here we apply a tool to quantitatively analyze the neural code. We make use of an algorithm based on the calculation of the temporal structure function, which permits to distinguish what scales of a signal are dominated by a complex temporal organization or a randomly generated process. In terms of the neural code, this kind of analysis makes it possible to detect temporal scales at which a time patterns coding scheme or alternatively a rate code are present. Additionally, finding the temporal scale at which the correlation between interspike intervals fades, the length of the basic information unit of the code can be established, and hence the word length of the code can be found. We apply this algorithm to neuronal recordings obtained from the Globus Pallidus pars interna from a human patient with Parkinson’s disease, and show that a time pattern coding and a rate coding scheme co-exist at different temporal scales, offering a new example of multiplexed neuronal coding.

  7. Computer Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    COSMIC MINIVER, a computer code developed by NASA for analyzing aerodynamic heating and heat transfer on the Space Shuttle, has been used by Marquardt Company to analyze heat transfer on Navy/Air Force missile bodies. The code analyzes heat transfer by four different methods which can be compared for accuracy. MINIVER saved Marquardt three months in computer time and $15,000.

  8. Outputs of radula mechanoafferent neurons in Aplysia are modulated by motor neurons, interneurons, and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rosen, S C; Miller, M W; Cropper, E C; Kupfermann, I

    2000-03-01

    The gain of sensory inputs into the nervous system can be modulated so that the nature and intensity of afferent input is variable. Sometimes the variability is a function of other sensory inputs or of the state of motor systems that generate behavior. A form of sensory modulation was investigated in the Aplysia feeding system at the level of a radula mechanoafferent neuron (B21) that provides chemical synaptic input to a group of motor neurons (B8a/b, B15) that control closure and retraction movements of the radula, a food grasping structure. B21 has been shown to receive both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs from a variety of neuron types. The current study investigated the morphological basis of these heterosynaptic inputs, whether the inputs could serve to modulate the chemical synaptic outputs of B21, and whether the neurons producing the heterosynaptic inputs were periodically active during feeding motor programs that might modulate B21 outputs in a phase-specific manner. Four cell types making monosynaptic connections to B21 were found capable of heterosynaptically modulating the chemical synaptic output of B21 to motor neurons B8a and B15. These included the following: 1) other sensory neurons, e.g. , B22; 2) interneurons, e.g., B19; 3) motor neurons, e.g., B82; and 4) multifunction neurons that have sensory, motor, and interneuronal functions, e.g., B4/5. Each cell type was phasically active in one or more feeding motor programs driven by command-like interneurons, including an egestive motor program driven by CBI-1 and an ingestive motor program driven by CBI-2. Moreover, the phase of activity differed for each of the modulator cells. During the motor programs, shifts in B21 membrane potential were related to the activity patterns of some of the modulator cells. Inhibitory chemical synapses mediated the modulation produced by B4/5, whereas excitatory and/or electrical synapses were involved in the other instances. The data indicate that

  9. Norepinephrine metabolism in neuronal cultures is increased by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Shalit, S.L.; Kalberg, C.J.; Raizada, M.K.

    1987-06-01

    In this study the authors have examined the actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) on catecholamine metabolism in neuronal brain cell cultures prepared from the hypothalamus and brain stem. Neuronal cultures prepared from the brains of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit specific neuronal uptake mechanisms for both norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), and also monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity. Separate neuronal uptake sites for NE and DA were identified by using specific neuronal uptake inhibitors for each amine. In previous studies, they determined that ANG II (10 nM-1 ..mu..M) stimulates increased neuronal (/sup 3/H)NE uptake by acting as specific receptors. They have confirmed these results here and in addition have shown that ANG II has not significant effects on neuronal (/sup 3/H)DA uptake. These results suggest that the actions of ANG II are restricted to the NE transporter in neuronal cultures. It is possible that ANG II stimulates the intraneuronal metabolism of at least part of the NE that is taken up, because the peptide stimulates MAO activity, an effect mediated by specific ANG II receptors. ANG II had no effect on COMT activity in neuronal cultures. Therefore, the use of neuronal cultures of hypothalamus and brain stem they have determined that ANG II can specifically alter NE metabolism in these areas, while apparently not altering DA metabolism.

  10. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival. PMID:11529497

  11. Glia as drivers of abnormal neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Robel, Stefanie; Sontheimer, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Reactive astrocytes have been proposed to become incompetent bystanders in epilepsy as a result of cellular changes rendering them unable to perform important housekeeping functions. Indeed, successful surgical treatment of mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy hinges on the removal of the glial scar. New research now extends the role of astrocytes, suggesting that they may drive the disease process by impairing the inhibitory action of neuronal GABA receptors. Here we discuss studies that include hyperexcitability resulting from impaired supply of astrocytic glutamine for neuronal GABA synthesis, and epilepsy resulting from genetically induced astrogliosis or malignant transformation, both of which render the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA excitatory. In these examples, glial cells alter the expression or function of neuronal proteins involved in excitability. Although epilepsy has traditionally been thought of as a disease caused by changes in neuronal properties exclusively, these new findings challenge us to consider the contribution of glial cells as drivers of epileptogenesis in acquired epilepsies. PMID:26713746

  12. Neurophysiological characterization of mammalian osmosensitive neurones

    PubMed Central

    Bourque, Charles W.; Ciura, Sorana; Trudel, Eric; Stachniak, Tevye J. E.; Sharif-Naeini, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, the osmolality of the extracellular fluid is maintained near a predetermined set-point through a negative feedback regulation of thirst, diuresis, salt appetite and natriuresis. This homeostatic control is believed to be mediated by osmosensory neurones which synaptically regulate the electrical activity of command neurones that mediate each of these osmoregulatory effector responses. Our present understanding of the molecular, cellular and network basis that underlies the central control of osmoregulation is largely derived from studies on primary osmosensory neurones in the organum vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT) and effector neurones in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), which release hormones that regulate diuresis and natriuresis. Primary osmosensory neurones in the OVLT exhibit changes in action potential firing rate that vary in proportion with ECF osmolality. This effect results from the intrinsic depolarizing receptor potential which these cells generate via a molecular transduction complex that may comprise various members of the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) family of cation channel proteins, notably TRPV1 and TRPV4. Osmotically evoked changes in the firing rate of OVLT neurones then regulate the electrical activity of downstream neurones in the SON through graded changes in glutamate release. PMID:17350993

  13. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  14. The mirror neuron system and treatment of stroke.

    PubMed

    Small, Steven L; Buccino, Giovanni; Solodkin, Ana

    2012-04-01

    Mirror neurons discharge during the execution of ecological goal-directed manual and oral actions, as well as during the observation of the same actions done by other individuals. These neurons were first identified in the ventral premotor cortex (PMv; area F5) and later on in the inferior parietal lobule (areas PF and PFG) of monkey brain, constituting a "mirror neuron" system. Several pieces of experimental data suggest that a mirror neuron system devoted to hand, mouth, and foot actions might also be present in humans. In the present paper, we review the experimental evidence on the role of the mirror neuron system in action understanding and imitation, both in hand motor function and speech. Based on the features of the mirror neuron system and its role in action understanding and imitation, we discuss the use of action observation and imitation as an approach for systematic training in the rehabilitation of patients with motor impairment of the upper limb and aphasia following stroke. We present the results of some preliminary studies to test this concept, and a discussion of network models as a measure of neurobiological change. PMID:22415917

  15. Leptin Acts via Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurotensin Neurons to Inhibit Orexin Neurons by Multiple GABA-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Goforth, Paulette B.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Patterson, Christa M.

    2014-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin modulates neural systems appropriately for the status of body energy stores. Leptin inhibits lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin (OX; also known as hypocretin)-producing neurons, which control feeding, activity, and energy expenditure, among other parameters. Our previous results suggest that GABAergic LHA leptin receptor (LepRb)-containing and neurotensin (Nts)-containing (LepRbNts) neurons lie in close apposition with OX neurons and control Ox mRNA expression. Here, we show that, similar to leptin, activation of LHA Nts neurons by the excitatory hM3Dq DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs) hyperpolarizes membrane potential and suppresses action potential firing in OX neurons in mouse hypothalamic slices. Furthermore, ablation of LepRb from Nts neurons abrogated the leptin-mediated inhibition, demonstrating that LepRbNts neurons mediate the inhibition of OX neurons by leptin. Leptin did not significantly enhance GABAA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission, and GABA receptor antagonists did not block leptin-mediated inhibition of OX neuron activity. Rather, leptin diminished the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs onto OX neurons. Furthermore, leptin indirectly activated an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in OX neurons, which was required for the hyperpolarization of OX neurons by leptin. Although Nts did not alter OX activity, galanin, which is coexpressed in LepRbNts neurons, inhibited OX neurons, whereas the galanin receptor antagonist M40 (galanin-(1–12)-Pro3-(Ala-Leu)2-Ala amide) prevented the leptin-induced hyperpolarization of OX cells. These findings demonstrate that leptin indirectly inhibits OX neurons by acting on LHA LepRbNts neurons to mediate two distinct GABA-independent mechanisms of inhibition: the presynaptic inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission and the opening of KATP channels. PMID:25143620

  16. Coding and transformations in the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoshige; Poo, Cindy; Haddad, Rafi

    2014-01-01

    How is sensory information represented in the brain? A long-standing debate in neural coding is whether and how timing of spikes conveys information to downstream neurons. Although we know that neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) exhibit rich temporal dynamics, the functional relevance of temporal coding remains hotly debated. Recent recording experiments in awake behaving animals have elucidated highly organized temporal structures of activity in the OB. In addition, the analysis of neural circuits in the piriform cortex (PC) demonstrated the importance of not only OB afferent inputs but also intrinsic PC neural circuits in shaping odor responses. Furthermore, new experiments involving stimulation of the OB with specific temporal patterns allowed for testing the relevance of temporal codes. Together, these studies suggest that the relative timing of neuronal activity in the OB conveys odor information and that neural circuits in the PC possess various mechanisms to decode temporal patterns of OB input. PMID:24905594

  17. Temporal Characteristics of Gustatory Responses in Rat Parabrachial Neurons Vary by Stimulus and Chemosensitive Neuron Type

    PubMed Central

    Geran, Laura; Travers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN) neurons elicited by multiple applications of “sweet” (sucrose), “salty” (NaCl), “sour” (citric acid), and “bitter” (quinine and cycloheximide) stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H) afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H) compared to the later response (9.5%). Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H) in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best). Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs. PMID:24124597

  18. The SH2 domain is crucial for function of Fyn in neuronal migration and cortical lamination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Hu, Xinde; Song, Lingzhen; An, Lei; Duan, Minghui; Chen, Shulin; Zhao, Shanting

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the developing brain form the cortical plate (CP) in an inside-out manner, in which the late-born neurons are located more superficially than the early-born neurons. Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases, plays an important role in neuronal migration by binding to many substrates. However, the role of the Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain in function of Fyn in neuronal migration remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the SH2 domain is essential for the action of Fyn in neuronal migration and cortical lamination. A point mutation in the Fyn SH2 domain (FynR176A) impaired neuronal migration and their final location in the cerebral cortex, by inducing neuronal aggregation and branching. Thus, we provide the first evidence of the Fyn SH2 domain contributing to neuronal migration and neuronal morphogenesis. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(2): 97-102] PMID:24912779

  19. Morphine disinhibits glutamatergic input to VTA dopamine neurons and promotes dopamine neuron excitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Zhao, Yanfang; Yang, Hualan; Luan, Wenjie; Song, Jiaojiao; Cui, Dongyang; Dong, Yi; Lai, Bin; Ma, Lan; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    One reported mechanism for morphine activation of dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is the disinhibition model of VTA-DA neurons. Morphine inhibits GABA inhibitory neurons, which shifts the balance between inhibitory and excitatory input to VTA-DA neurons in favor of excitation and then leads to VTA-DA neuron excitation. However, it is not known whether morphine has an additional strengthening effect on excitatory input. Our results suggest that glutamatergic input to VTA-DA neurons is inhibited by GABAergic interneurons via GABAB receptors and that morphine promotes presynaptic glutamate release by removing this inhibition. We also studied the contribution of the morphine-induced disinhibitory effect on the presynaptic glutamate release to the overall excitatory effect of morphine on VTA-DA neurons and related behavior. Our results suggest that the disinhibitory action of morphine on presynaptic glutamate release might be the main mechanism for morphine-induced increase in VTA-DA neuron firing and related behaviors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09275.001 PMID:26208338

  20. Objects tell us what action we can expect: dissociating brain areas for retrieval and exploitation of action knowledge during action observation in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Schubotz, Ricarda I.; Wurm, Moritz F.; Wittmann, Marco K.; von Cramon, D. Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objects are reminiscent of actions often performed with them: knife and apple remind us on peeling the apple or cutting it. Mnemonic representations of object-related actions (action codes) evoked by the sight of an object may constrain and hence facilitate recognition of unrolling actions. The present fMRI study investigated if and how action codes influence brain activation during action observation. The average number of action codes (NAC) of 51 sets of objects was rated by a group of n = 24 participants. In an fMRI study, different volunteers were asked to recognize actions performed with the same objects presented in short videos. To disentangle areas reflecting the storage of action codes from those exploiting them, we showed object-compatible and object-incompatible (pantomime) actions. Areas storing action codes were considered to positively co-vary with NAC in both object-compatible and object-incompatible action; due to its role in tool-related tasks, we here hypothesized left anterior inferior parietal cortex (aIPL). In contrast, areas exploiting action codes were expected to show this correlation only in object-compatible but not incompatible action, as only object-compatible actions match one of the active action codes. For this interaction, we hypothesized ventrolateral premotor cortex (PMv) to join aIPL due to its role in biasing competition in IPL. We found left anterior intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) to co-vary with NAC. In addition to these areas, action codes increased activity in object-compatible action in bilateral PMv, right IPS, and lateral occipital cortex (LO). Findings suggest that during action observation, the brain derives possible actions from perceived objects, and uses this information to shape action recognition. In particular, the number of expectable actions quantifies the activity level at PMv, IPL, and pMTG, but only PMv reflects their biased competition while observed action unfolds

  1. Auditory Stimuli Coding by Postsynaptic Potential and Local Field Potential Features

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Juliana M.; Santos, Mikaelle O.; de Assis, Francisco M.

    2016-01-01

    The relation between physical stimuli and neurophysiological responses, such as action potentials (spikes) and Local Field Potentials (LFP), has recently been experimented in order to explain how neurons encode auditory information. However, none of these experiments presented analyses with postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). In the present study, we have estimated information values between auditory stimuli and amplitudes/latencies of PSPs and LFPs in anesthetized rats in vivo. To obtain these values, a new method of information estimation was used. This method produced more accurate estimates than those obtained by using the traditional binning method; a fact that was corroborated by simulated data. The traditional binning method could not certainly impart such accuracy even when adjusted by quadratic extrapolation. We found that the information obtained from LFP amplitude variation was significantly greater than the information obtained from PSP amplitude variation. This confirms the fact that LFP reflects the action of many PSPs. Results have shown that the auditory cortex codes more information of stimuli frequency with slow oscillations in groups of neurons than it does with slow oscillations in neurons separately. PMID:27513950

  2. The Increase in Signaling by Kisspeptin Neurons in the Preoptic Area and Associated Changes in Clock Gene Expression That Trigger the LH Surge in Female Rats Are Dependent on the Facilitatory Action of a Noradrenaline Input.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Bruna; Ribeiro, Aline B; Leite, Cristiane M; Uchôa, Ernane T; Carolino, Ruither O; Cardoso, Thais S R; Elias, Lucila L K; Rodrigues, José A; Plant, Tony M; Poletini, Maristela O; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, kisspeptin neurons in the rostral periventricular area of the third ventricle (RP3V) of the preoptic area are considered to provide a major stimulatory input to the GnRH neuronal network that is responsible for triggering the preovulatory LH surge. Noradrenaline (NA) is one of the main modulators of GnRH release, and NA fibers are found in close apposition to kisspeptin neurons in the RP3V. Our objective was to interrogate the role of NA signaling in the kisspeptin control of GnRH secretion during the estradiol induced LH surge in ovariectomized rats, using prazosin, an α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist. In control rats, the estradiol-induced LH surge at 17 hours was associated with a significant increase in GnRH and kisspeptin content in the median eminence with the increase in kisspeptin preceding that of GnRH and LH. Prazosin, administered 5 and 3 hours prior to the predicted time of the LH surge truncated the LH surge and abolished the rise in GnRH and kisspeptin in the median eminence. In the preoptic area, prazosin blocked the increases in Kiss1 gene expression and kisspeptin content in association with a disruption in the expression of the clock genes, Per1 and Bmal1. Together these findings demonstrate for the first time that NA modulates kisspeptin synthesis in the RP3V through the activation of α1-adrenergic receptors prior to the initiation of the LH surge and indicate a potential role of α1-adrenergic signaling in the circadian-controlled pathway timing of the preovulatory LH surge. PMID:26556532

  3. Contributions of intrinsic neuronal dynamics to input-output information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garibay Ruiz, Enrique

    The human brain can be said to be the most complex system known today. It contains billions of cells called neurons. Simplified models of neurons have been shown to reproduce many of the experimental results available. Therefore it is important to understand these models well in order to gain some insight into the neural code used by nervous systems. Information theoretical techniques allow us to quantify the input-output relationship in those models. In this work we have applied information theory to neuronal models while focusing on two important issues: input signals containing naturalistic correlations and models that include intrinsic dynamics. To determine the input-output mutual information we have used a simple and efficient algorithm, based on the direct method (Strong et al. 1998). Spike frequency adaptation, which is a feature shared by most neurons, is shown here to enhance the encoding of signals with naturalistic statistics. Two distinct aspects of adaptation were analyzed in detail, namely the reduction in the spiking rate and the decorrelation of the output. Our results indicate that adaptation provides a nerve cell with an excellent mechanism to improve its use of the energetically expensive action potentials. More complex spiking patterns known as bursts, were also analyzed. The mutual information calculations were also applied to investigate the difference between encoding by bursts and encoding by individual spikes. We have found that isolated spikes have a much larger variability (entropy) than spikes belonging to a burst, due to the strong correlations among the spikes within a burst. However bursts were found to be clearly more robust to noise than isolated spikes. We also found that bursts, taken as single events, are capable of carrying information more efficiently than individual spikes. These facts lead us to conclude that despite the information transmission per spike being smaller in bursts, these may constitute a preferable encoding

  4. Tinbergen on mirror neurons

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology—the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that the latter provides the defeasible ‘best explanation’ for current data on the causation and ontogeny of MNs; and to argue that functional analysis, of the kind that Tinbergen identified somewhat misleadingly with studies of ‘survival value’, should be a high priority for future research. In this kind of functional analysis, system-level theories would assign MNs a small, but potentially important, role in the achievement of action understanding—or another social cognitive function—by a production line of interacting component processes. These theories would be tested by experimental intervention in human and non-human animal samples with carefully documented and controlled developmental histories. PMID:24778376

  5. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits. PMID:26062900

  6. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity. PMID:26940513

  7. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-03-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity.

  8. Light-evoked hyperpolarization and silencing of neurons by conjugated polymers

    PubMed Central

    Feyen, Paul; Colombo, Elisabetta; Endeman, Duco; Nova, Mattia; Laudato, Lucia; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio; Ghezzi, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control and modulate the action potential firing in neurons represents a powerful tool for neuroscience research and clinical applications. While neuronal excitation has been achieved with many tools, including electrical and optical stimulation, hyperpolarization and neuronal inhibition are typically obtained through patch-clamp or optogenetic manipulations. Here we report the use of conjugated polymer films interfaced with neurons for inducing a light-mediated inhibition of their electrical activity. We show that prolonged illumination of the interface triggers a sustained hyperpolarization of the neuronal membrane that significantly reduces both spontaneous and evoked action potential firing. We demonstrate that the polymeric interface can be activated by either visible or infrared light and is capable of modulating neuronal activity in brain slices and explanted retinas. These findings prove the ability of conjugated polymers to tune neuronal firing and suggest their potential application for the in-vivo modulation of neuronal activity. PMID:26940513

  9. Long non-coding RNA regulation of gene expression during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Pajares, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptome analysis of mammalian genomes has revealed widespread transcription, much of which does not encode protein. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a subset of the non-coding transcriptome that are emerging as critical regulators of various cellular processes. Differentiation of stem and progenitor cells requires a careful execution of specific genetic programs, and recent studies have revealed that lncRNA expression contributes to specification of cell identity. LncRNAs participate in regulating differentiation at multiple levels of gene expression through various mechanisms of action. In this review, functional roles of lncRNAs in regulating cellular differentiation of blood, muscle, skin, cardiomyocytes, adipocytes, and neurons are discussed. PMID:26996975

  10. How Neurons Work: An Analogy & Demonstration Using a Sparkler & a Frying Pan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griff, Edwin R.

    2006-01-01

    Information in the nervous system is conveyed by impulses called action potentials: large, transient electrochemical changes in a neuron's membrane. Though action potentials are a basic feature of neurons, teachers often have trouble explaining this neurophysiological concept, and students have difficulty understanding it. While easy-to-understand…

  11. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  12. Experience-Dependent Specialization of Receptive Field Surround for Selective Coding of Natural Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Pecka, Michael; Han, Yunyun; Sader, Elie; Mrsic-Flogel, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary At eye opening, neurons in primary visual cortex (V1) are selective for stimulus features, but circuits continue to refine in an experience-dependent manner for some weeks thereafter. How these changes contribute to the coding of visual features embedded in complex natural scenes remains unknown. Here we show that normal visual experience after eye opening is required for V1 neurons to develop a sensitivity for the statistical structure of natural stimuli extending beyond the boundaries of their receptive fields (RFs), which leads to improvements in coding efficiency for full-field natural scenes (increased selectivity and information rate). These improvements are mediated by an experience-dependent increase in the effectiveness of natural surround stimuli to hyperpolarize the membrane potential specifically during RF-stimulus epochs triggering action potentials. We suggest that neural circuits underlying surround modulation are shaped by the statistical structure of visual input, which leads to more selective coding of features in natural scenes. PMID:25263755

  13. Choosing Actions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Chapman, Kate M.; Coelho, Chase J.; Gong, Lanyun; Studenka, Breanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Actions that are chosen have properties that distinguish them from actions that are not. Of the nearly infinite possible actions that can achieve any given task, many of the unchosen actions are irrelevant, incorrect, or inappropriate. Others are relevant, correct, or appropriate but are disfavored for other reasons. Our research focuses on the question of what distinguishes actions that are chosen from actions that are possible but are not. We review studies that use simple preference methods to identify factors that contribute to action choices, especially for object-manipulation tasks. We can determine which factors are especially important through simple behavioral experiments. PMID:23761769

  14. Modeling of Biological Neurons using Superconducting Circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadka, Shreeya; Svitelskiy, Oleksiy; Kaplan, Steve; Segall, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    With the goal of understanding the collective behavior of large network of neurons, we purpose a new analog method based on superconducting Josephson junction (JJ) circuitry. Through numerical simulations, we were able to show that these JJ neurons reproduce many characteristic features of biological neurons such as action potential, firing threshold and refractory period. For preliminary testing, we have designed and fabricated a superconducting chip consisting of two coupled JJ neurons, connected to each other in a closed loop. The numerical simulations of the two synchronized coupled neurons, showed a characteristic phase-flip-bifurcation where the two neurons would fire either in-phase or out-of-phase depending on their coupling strength. Thus, we are looking for the characteristic phase-flip-bifurcation in the experiment also. If these encouraging observations find further confirmation, our JJ model will open a way for developing a fast and low power method of studying the dynamics of large neural networks. We would like to thank Zictools/WRSpice for layout and simulation, and Hypres Inc. for fabricating the chip.

  15. Intrinsic plasticity induced by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors via enhancement of high-threshold KV currents in sound localizing neurons.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, W R; Lu, Y

    2016-06-01

    Intrinsic plasticity has emerged as an important mechanism regulating neuronal excitability and output under physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we report a novel form of intrinsic plasticity. Using perforated patch clamp recordings, we examined the modulatory effects of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) on voltage-gated potassium (KV) currents and the firing properties of neurons in the chicken nucleus laminaris (NL), the first central auditory station where interaural time cues are analyzed for sound localization. We found that activation of mGluR II by synthetic agonists resulted in a selective increase of the high-threshold KV currents. More importantly, synaptically released glutamate (with reuptake blocked) also enhanced the high-threshold KV currents. The enhancement was frequency-coding region dependent, being more pronounced in low-frequency neurons compared to middle- and high-frequency neurons. The intracellular mechanism involved the Gβγ signaling pathway associated with phospholipase C and protein kinase C. The modulation strengthened membrane outward rectification, sharpened action potentials, and improved the ability of NL neurons to follow high-frequency inputs. These data suggest that mGluR II provides a feedforward modulatory mechanism that may regulate temporal processing under the condition of heightened synaptic inputs. PMID:26964678

  16. Quantifying higher-order correlations in a neuronal pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montangie, Lisandro; Montani, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Recent experiments involving a relatively large population of neurons have shown a very significant amount of higher-order correlations. However, little is known of how these affect the integration and firing behavior of a population of neurons beyond the second order statistics. To investigate how higher-order inputs statistics can shape beyond pairwise spike correlations and affect information coding in the brain, we consider a neuronal pool where each neuron fires stochastically. We develop a simple mathematically tractable model that makes it feasible to account for higher-order spike correlations in a neuronal pool with highly interconnected common inputs beyond second order statistics. In our model, correlations between neurons appear from q-Gaussian inputs into threshold neurons. The approach constitutes the natural extension of the Dichotomized Gaussian model, where the inputs to the model are just Gaussian distributed and therefore have no input interactions beyond second order. We obtain an exact analytical expression for the joint distribution of firing, quantifying the degree of higher-order spike correlations, truly emphasizing the functional aspects of higher-order statistics, as we account for beyond second order inputs correlations seen by each neuron within the pool. We determine how higher-order correlations depend on the interaction structure of the input, showing that the joint distribution of firing is skewed as the parameter q increases inducing larger excursions of synchronized spikes. We show how input nonlinearities can shape higher-order correlations and enhance coding performance by neural populations.

  17. How to make a mesodiencephalic dopaminergic neuron.

    PubMed

    Smidt, Marten P; Burbach, J Peter H

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons located in the ventral mesodiencephalon are essential for the control of voluntary movement and the regulation of emotion, and are severely affected in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Recent advances in molecular biology and mouse genetics have helped to unravel the mechanisms involved in the development of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons, including their specification, migration and differentiation, as well as the processes that govern axonal pathfinding and their specific patterns of connectivity and maintenance. Here, we follow the developmental path of these neurons with the goal of generating a molecular code that could be exploited in cell-replacement strategies to treat diseases such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:17180160

  18. Intentional Action and Action Slips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Heinz; Beckmann, Jurgen

    1990-01-01

    An explanation of action slips is offered that examines controlled actions in the context of an intentional behavior theory. Actions are considered guided by mentally represented intentions, subdivided into goal intentions and contingent instrumental intentions. Action slips are categorized according to problem areas in the enactment of goal…

  19. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. PMID:20167276

  20. 26 CFR 301.7433-1 - Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized collection actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7433-1 Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... under the Internal Revenue Code, such taxpayer may bring a civil action for damages against the...

  1. 26 CFR 301.7433-1 - Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized collection actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7433-1 Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... under the Internal Revenue Code, such taxpayer may bring a civil action for damages against the...

  2. 26 CFR 301.7433-1 - Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized collection actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7433-1 Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... under the Internal Revenue Code, such taxpayer may bring a civil action for damages against the...

  3. 26 CFR 301.7433-1 - Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized collection actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7433-1 Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... under the Internal Revenue Code, such taxpayer may bring a civil action for damages against the...

  4. 26 CFR 301.7433-1 - Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized collection actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... Proceedings Civil Actions by the United States § 301.7433-1 Civil cause of action for certain unauthorized... under the Internal Revenue Code, such taxpayer may bring a civil action for damages against the...

  5. The neuronal genome of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hobert, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The ~100 MB genome of C. elegans codes for ~20,000 protein-coding genes many of which are required for the function of the nervous system, composed of 302 neurons in the adult hermaphrodite and of 383 neurons in the adult male. In addition to housekeeping genes, a differentiated neuron is thought to express many hundreds if not thousands of genes that define its functional properties. These genes code for ion channels, G-protein-coupled receptors, neurotransmitter-synthesizing enzymes, transporters and receptors, neuropeptides and their receptors, cell adhesion molecules, motor proteins, signaling molecules and many others. Collectively such genes have been referred to as "terminal differentiation genes" or "effector genes". The differential expression of distinct combinations of terminal differentiation genes define different neuron types. This paper provides a compendium of more than 2,800 putative terminal differentiation genes. One pervasive theme revealed by the analysis of many gene families is the nematode-specific expansions of many neuron function-related gene families, including, for example, many types of ion channel families, sensory receptors and neurotransmitter receptors. The gene lists provided here can serve multiple purposes. They can serve as quick reference guides for individual gene families or they can be used to mine large datasets (e.g., expression datasets) for genes with likely functions in the nervous system. They also serve as a starting point for future projects. For example, a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of the often complex expression patterns of these genes in the nervous system will eventually explain how nervous systems are built. PMID:24081909

  6. Coherent neuronal ensembles are rapidly recruited when making a look-reach decision

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yan T.; Fabiszak, Margaret M.; Novikov, Yevgeny; Daw, Nathaniel D.; Pesaran, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Selecting and planning actions recruits neurons across many areas of the brain but how ensembles of neurons work together to make decisions is unknown. Temporally-coherent neural activity may provide a mechanism by which neurons coordinate their activity in order to make decisions. If so, neurons that are part of coherent ensembles may predict movement choices before other ensembles of neurons. We recorded neuronal activity in the lateral and medial banks of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) of the posterior parietal cortex, while monkeys made choices about where to look and reach and decoded the activity to predict the choices. Ensembles of neurons that displayed coherent patterns of spiking activity extending across the IPS, “dual coherent” ensembles, predicted movement choices substantially earlier than other neuronal ensembles. We propose that dual-coherent spike timing reflects interactions between groups of neurons that play an important role in how we make decisions. PMID:26752158

  7. QR Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  8. RNA-seq analysis of developing olfactory bulb projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Salzberg, Anna C; Li, Mingfeng; Šestan, Nenad; Greer, Charles A; Imamura, Fumiaki

    2016-07-01

    Transmission of olfactory information to higher brain regions is mediated by olfactory bulb (OB) projection neurons, the mitral and tufted cells. Although mitral/tufted cells are often characterized as the OB counterpart of cortical projection neurons (also known as pyramidal neurons), they possess several unique morphological characteristics and project specifically to the olfactory cortices. Moreover, the molecular networks contributing to the generation of mitral/tufted cells during development are largely unknown. To understand the developmental patterns of gene expression in mitral/tufted cells in the OB, we performed transcriptome analyses targeting purified OB projection neurons at different developmental time points with next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Through these analyses, we found 1202 protein-coding genes that are temporally differentially-regulated in developing projection neurons. Among them, 388 genes temporally changed their expression level only in projection neurons. The data provide useful resource to study the molecular mechanisms regulating development of mitral/tufted cells. We further compared the gene expression profiles of developing mitral/tufted cells with those of three cortical projection neuron subtypes, subcerebral projection neurons, corticothalamic projection neurons, and callosal projection neurons, and found that the molecular signature of developing olfactory projection neuron bears resemblance to that of subcerebral neurons. We also identified 3422 events that change the ratio of splicing isoforms in mitral/tufted cells during maturation. Interestingly, several genes expressed a novel isoform not previously reported. These results provide us with a broad perspective of the molecular networks underlying the development of OB projection neurons. PMID:27073125

  9. Classifying Facial Actions

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Gianluca; Bartlett, Marian Stewart; Hager, Joseph C.; Ekman, Paul; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [23] is an objective method for quantifying facial movement in terms of component actions. This system is widely used in behavioral investigations of emotion, cognitive processes, and social interaction. The coding is presently performed by highly trained human experts. This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. These techniques include analysis of facial motion through estimation of optical flow; holistic spatial analysis, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, local feature analysis, and linear discriminant analysis; and methods based on the outputs of local filters, such as Gabor wavelet representations and local principal components. Performance of these systems is compared to naive and expert human subjects. Best performances were obtained using the Gabor wavelet representation and the independent component representation, both of which achieved 96 percent accuracy for classifying 12 facial actions of the upper and lower face. The results provide converging evidence for the importance of using local filters, high spatial frequencies, and statistical independence for classifying facial actions. PMID:21188284

  10. Kisspeptin Regulation of Neuronal Activity throughout the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhuai; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-06-01

    Kisspeptin signaling at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron is now relatively well characterized and established as being critical for the neural control of fertility. However, kisspeptin fibers and the kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) are detected throughout the brain suggesting that kisspeptin is involved in regulating the activity of multiple neuronal circuits. We provide here a review of kisspeptin actions on neuronal populations throughout the brain including the magnocellular oxytocin and vasopressin neurons, and cells within the arcuate nucleus, hippocampus, and amygdala. The actions of kisspeptin in these brain regions are compared to its effects upon GnRH neurons. Two major themes arise from this analysis. First, it is apparent that kisspeptin signaling through KISS1R at the GnRH neuron is a unique, extremely potent form or neurotransmission whereas kisspeptin actions through KISS1R in other brain regions exhibit neuromodulatory actions typical of other neuropeptides. Second, it is becoming increasingly likely that kisspeptin acts as a neuromodulator not only through KISS1R but also through other RFamide receptors such as the neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFRs). We suggest likely locations of kisspeptin signaling through NPFFRs but note that only limited tools are presently available for examining kisspeptin cross-signaling within the RFamide family of neuropeptides. PMID:27246282

  11. Kisspeptin Regulation of Neuronal Activity throughout the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinhuai

    2016-01-01

    Kisspeptin signaling at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron is now relatively well characterized and established as being critical for the neural control of fertility. However, kisspeptin fibers and the kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) are detected throughout the brain suggesting that kisspeptin is involved in regulating the activity of multiple neuronal circuits. We provide here a review of kisspeptin actions on neuronal populations throughout the brain including the magnocellular oxytocin and vasopressin neurons, and cells within the arcuate nucleus, hippocampus, and amygdala. The actions of kisspeptin in these brain regions are compared to its effects upon GnRH neurons. Two major themes arise from this analysis. First, it is apparent that kisspeptin signaling through KISS1R at the GnRH neuron is a unique, extremely potent form or neurotransmission whereas kisspeptin actions through KISS1R in other brain regions exhibit neuromodulatory actions typical of other neuropeptides. Second, it is becoming increasingly likely that kisspeptin acts as a neuromodulator not only through KISS1R but also through other RFamide receptors such as the neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFRs). We suggest likely locations of kisspeptin signaling through NPFFRs but note that only limited tools are presently available for examining kisspeptin cross-signaling within the RFamide family of neuropeptides. PMID:27246282

  12. Duality of rate coding and temporal coding in multilayered feedforward networks.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Naoki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2003-01-01

    A functional role for precise spike timing has been proposed as an alternative hypothesis to rate coding. We show in this article that both the synchronous firing code and the population rate code can be used dually in a common framework of a single neural network model. Furthermore, these two coding mechanisms are bridged continuously by several modulatable model parameters, including shared connectivity, feedback strength, membrane leak rate, and neuron heterogeneity. The rates of change of these parameters are closely related to the response time and the timescale of learning. PMID:12590821

  13. Environmental Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Jesse; Allen, Rodney F.

    This booklet, a general guide to citizen eco-action, discusses a plan of action on community environmental problems. It offers factors to be considered in any community eco-action situation, but it is not a rigid set of rules. An overview identifies seven key ideas of environmental issues, including the universal participation of all humans in the…

  14. 75 FR 20833 - Building Energy Codes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Building Energy Codes AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Request for Information. SUMMARY: The...

  15. Encoding of fear learning and memory in distributed neuronal circuits.

    PubMed

    Herry, Cyril; Johansen, Joshua P

    2014-12-01

    How sensory information is transformed by learning into adaptive behaviors is a fundamental question in neuroscience. Studies of auditory fear conditioning have revealed much about the formation and expression of emotional memories and have provided important insights into this question. Classical work focused on the amygdala as a central structure for fear conditioning. Recent advances, however, have identified new circuits and neural coding strategies mediating fear learning and the expression of fear behaviors. One area of research has identified key brain regions and neuronal coding mechanisms that regulate the formation, specificity and strength of fear memories. Other work has discovered critical circuits and neuronal dynamics by which fear memories are expressed through a medial prefrontal cortex pathway and coordinated activity across interconnected brain regions. Here we review these recent advances alongside prior work to provide a working model of the extended circuits and neuronal coding mechanisms mediating fear learning and memory. PMID:25413091

  16. Neuron Morphology Influences Axon Initial Segment Plasticity123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In most vertebrate neurons, action potentials are initiated in the axon initial segment (AIS), a specialized region of the axon containing a high density of voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. It has recently been proposed that neurons use plasticity of AIS length and/or location to regulate their intrinsic excitability. Here we quantify the impact of neuron morphology on AIS plasticity using computational models of simplified and realistic somatodendritic morphologies. In small neurons (e.g., dentate granule neurons), excitability was highest when the AIS was of intermediate length and located adjacent to the soma. Conversely, neurons having larger dendritic trees (e.g., pyramidal neurons) were most excitable when the AIS was longer and/or located away from the soma. For any given somatodendritic morphology, increasing dendritic membrane capacitance and/or conductance favored a longer and more distally located AIS. Overall, changes to AIS length, with corresponding changes in total sodium conductance, were far more effective in regulating neuron excitability than were changes in AIS location, while dendritic capacitance had a larger impact on AIS performance than did dendritic conductance. The somatodendritic influence on AIS performance reflects modest soma-to-AIS voltage attenuation combined with neuron size-dependent changes in AIS input resistance, effective membrane time constant, and isolation from somatodendritic capacitance. We conclude that the impact of AIS plasticity on neuron excitability will depend largely on somatodendritic morphology, and that, in some neurons, a shorter or more distally located AIS may promote, rather than limit, action potential generation. PMID:27022619

  17. Optical control of neuronal excitation and inhibition using a single opsin protein, ChR2

    PubMed Central

    Liske, Holly; Qian, Xiang; Anikeeva, Polina; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The effect of electrical stimulation on neuronal membrane potential is frequency dependent. Low frequency electrical stimulation can evoke action potentials, whereas high frequency stimulation can inhibit action potential transmission. Optical stimulation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressed in neuronal membranes can also excite action potentials. However, it is unknown whether optical stimulation of ChR2-expressing neurons produces a transition from excitation to inhibition with increasing light pulse frequencies. Here we report optical inhibition of motor neuron and muscle activity in vivo in the cooled sciatic nerves of Thy1-ChR2-EYFP mice. We also demonstrate all-optical single-wavelength control of neuronal excitation and inhibition without co-expression of inhibitory and excitatory opsins. This all-optical system is free from stimulation-induced electrical artifacts and thus provides a new approach to investigate mechanisms of high frequency inhibition in neuronal circuits in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24173561

  18. Quantum neuron design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrman, Elizabeth; Steck, James

    2014-03-01

    In previous work, we have developed quantum systems that can learn and do information processing much like artificial neural networks. These learning methods have some advantages over other implementations of quantum computing in that they construct their own algorithms and could be robust to noise and decoherence. Here we take the next step, by designing quantum neurons that have some of the important behaviors of biological neurons, yet have the advantage of being complex valued and having quantum computing power. Our neuron model consists of a two-level system coupled to a Gaussian bath representing the environment. Simulations of a interconnected network of these neurons show that the model can both learn standard AI tasks, as similar networks of classical neurons have been shown to do, and, in addition, perform quantum mechanical calculations.

  19. Patterning human neuronal networks on photolithographically engineered silicon dioxide substrates functionalized with glial analogues.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark A; Brennan, Paul M; Bunting, Andrew S; Cameron, Katherine; Murray, Alan F; Shipston, Mike J

    2014-05-01

    Interfacing neurons with silicon semiconductors is a challenge being tackled through various bioengineering approaches. Such constructs inform our understanding of neuronal coding and learning and ultimately guide us toward creating intelligent neuroprostheses. A fundamental prerequisite is to dictate the spatial organization of neuronal cells. We sought to pattern neurons using photolithographically defined arrays of polymer parylene-C, activated with fetal calf serum. We used a purified human neuronal cell line [Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES)] to establish whether neurons remain viable when isolated on-chip or whether they require a supporting cell substrate. When cultured in isolation, LUHMES neurons failed to pattern and did not show any morphological signs of differentiation. We therefore sought a cell type with which to prepattern parylene regions, hypothesizing that this cellular template would enable secondary neuronal adhesion and network formation. From a range of cell lines tested, human embryonal kidney (HEK) 293 cells patterned with highest accuracy. LUHMES neurons adhered to pre-established HEK 293 cell clusters and this coculture environment promoted morphological differentiation of neurons. Neurites extended between islands of adherent cell somata, creating an orthogonally arranged neuronal network. HEK 293 cells appear to fulfill a role analogous to glia, dictating cell adhesion, and generating an environment conducive to neuronal survival. We next replaced HEK 293 cells with slower growing glioma-derived precursors. These primary human cells patterned accurately on parylene and provided a similarly effective scaffold for neuronal adhesion. These findings advance the use of this microfabrication-compatible platform for neuronal patterning. PMID:23733444

  20. Recording axonal conduction to evaluate the integration of pluripotent cell-derived neurons into a neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Shimba, Kenta; Sakai, Koji; Takayama, Yuzo; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-10-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising therapy to treat neurodegenerative disorders, and a number of in vitro models have been developed for studying interactions between grafted neurons and the host neuronal network to promote drug discovery. However, methods capable of evaluating the process by which stem cells integrate into the host neuronal network are lacking. In this study, we applied an axonal conduction-based analysis to a co-culture study of primary and differentiated neurons. Mouse cortical neurons and neuronal cells differentiated from P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, a model for early neural differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, were co-cultured in a microfabricated device. The somata of these cells were separated by the co-culture device, but their axons were able to elongate through microtunnels and then form synaptic contacts. Propagating action potentials were recorded from these axons by microelectrodes embedded at the bottom of the microtunnels and sorted into clusters representing individual axons. While the number of axons of cortical neurons increased until 14 days in vitro and then decreased, those of P19 neurons increased throughout the culture period. Network burst analysis showed that P19 neurons participated in approximately 80% of the bursting activity after 14 days in vitro. Interestingly, the axonal conduction delay of P19 neurons was significantly greater than that of cortical neurons, suggesting that there are some physiological differences in their axons. These results suggest that our method is feasible to evaluate the process by which stem cell-derived neurons integrate into a host neuronal network. PMID:26303583

  1. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M; Plesser, Hans E; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  2. Spiking network simulation code for petascale computers

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Susanne; Schmidt, Maximilian; Eppler, Jochen M.; Plesser, Hans E.; Masumoto, Gen; Igarashi, Jun; Ishii, Shin; Fukai, Tomoki; Morrison, Abigail; Diesmann, Markus; Helias, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    Brain-scale networks exhibit a breathtaking heterogeneity in the dynamical properties and parameters of their constituents. At cellular resolution, the entities of theory are neurons and synapses and over the past decade researchers have learned to manage the heterogeneity of neurons and synapses with efficient data structures. Already early parallel simulation codes stored synapses in a distributed fashion such that a synapse solely consumes memory on the compute node harboring the target neuron. As petaflop computers with some 100,000 nodes become increasingly available for neuroscience, new challenges arise for neuronal network simulation software: Each neuron contacts on the order of 10,000 other neurons and thus has targets only on a fraction of all compute nodes; furthermore, for any given source neuron, at most a single synapse is typically created on any compute node. From the viewpoint of an individual compute node, the heterogeneity in the synaptic target lists thus collapses along two dimensions: the dimension of the types of synapses and the dimension of the number of synapses of a given type. Here we present a data structure taking advantage of this double collapse using metaprogramming techniques. After introducing the relevant scaling scenario for brain-scale simulations, we quantitatively discuss the performance on two supercomputers. We show that the novel architecture scales to the largest petascale supercomputers available today. PMID:25346682

  3. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways. PMID:26786898

  4. Neuronal response impedance mechanism implementing cooperative networks with low firing rates and μs precision

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Marmari, Hagar; Brama, Haya; Stern, Edward A.; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Realizations of low firing rates in neural networks usually require globally balanced distributions among excitatory and inhibitory links, while feasibility of temporal coding is limited by neuronal millisecond precision. We show that cooperation, governing global network features, emerges through nodal properties, as opposed to link distributions. Using in vitro and in vivo experiments we demonstrate microsecond precision of neuronal response timings under low stimulation frequencies, whereas moderate frequencies result in a chaotic neuronal phase characterized by degraded precision. Above a critical stimulation frequency, which varies among neurons, response failures were found to emerge stochastically such that the neuron functions as a low pass filter, saturating the average inter-spike-interval. This intrinsic neuronal response impedance mechanism leads to cooperation on a network level, such that firing rates are suppressed toward the lowest neuronal critical frequency simultaneously with neuronal microsecond precision. Our findings open up opportunities of controlling global features of network dynamics through few nodes with extreme properties. PMID:26124707

  5. Neuronal response impedance mechanism implementing cooperative networks with low firing rates and μs precision.

    PubMed

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Marmari, Hagar; Brama, Haya; Stern, Edward A; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Realizations of low firing rates in neural networks usually require globally balanced distributions among excitatory and inhibitory links, while feasibility of temporal coding is limited by neuronal millisecond precision. We show that cooperation, governing global network features, emerges through nodal properties, as opposed to link distributions. Using in vitro and in vivo experiments we demonstrate microsecond precision of neuronal response timings under low stimulation frequencies, whereas moderate frequencies result in a chaotic neuronal phase characterized by degraded precision. Above a critical stimulation frequency, which varies among neurons, response failures were found to emerge stochastically such that the neuron functions as a low pass filter, saturating the average inter-spike-interval. This intrinsic neuronal response impedance mechanism leads to cooperation on a network level, such that firing rates are suppressed toward the lowest neuronal critical frequency simultaneously with neuronal microsecond precision. Our findings open up opportunities of controlling global features of network dynamics through few nodes with extreme properties. PMID:26124707

  6. Astrocyte and Neuronal Plasticity in the Somatosensory System

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Robert E.; Butcher, John B.; Parri, H. Rheinallt; Glazewski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Changing the whisker complement on a rodent's snout can lead to two forms of experience-dependent plasticity (EDP) in the neurons of the barrel cortex, where whiskers are somatotopically represented. One form, termed coding plasticity, concerns changes in synaptic transmission and connectivity between neurons. This is thought to underlie learning and memory processes and so adaptation to a changing environment. The second, called homeostatic plasticity, serves to maintain a restricted dynamic range of neuronal activity thus preventing its saturation or total downregulation. Current explanatory models of cortical EDP are almost exclusively neurocentric. However, in recent years, increasing evidence has emerged on the role of astrocytes in brain function, including plasticity. Indeed, astrocytes appear as necessary partners of neurons at the core of the mechanisms of coding and homeostatic plasticity recorded in neurons. In addition to neuronal plasticity, several different forms of astrocytic plasticity have recently been discovered. They extend from changes in receptor expression and dynamic changes in morphology to alteration in gliotransmitter release. It is however unclear how astrocytic plasticity contributes to the neuronal EDP. Here, we review the known and possible roles for astrocytes in the barrel cortex, including its plasticity. PMID:26345481

  7. Predicting olfactory receptor neuron responses from odorant structure

    PubMed Central

    Schmuker, Michael; de Bruyne, Marien; Hähnel, Melanie; Schneider, Gisbert

    2007-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors work at the interface between the chemical world of volatile molecules and the perception of scent in the brain. Their main purpose is to translate chemical space into information that can be processed by neural circuits. Assuming that these receptors have evolved to cope with this task, the analysis of their coding strategy promises to yield valuable insight in how to encode chemical information in an efficient way. Results We mimicked olfactory coding by modeling responses of primary olfactory neurons to small molecules using a large set of physicochemical molecular descriptors and artificial neural networks. We then tested these models by recording in vivo receptor neuron responses to a new set of odorants and successfully predicted the responses of five out of seven receptor neurons. Correlation coefficients ranged from 0.66 to 0.85, demonstrating the applicability of our approach for the analysis of olfactory receptor activation data. The molecular descriptors that are best-suited for response prediction vary for different receptor neurons, implying that each receptor neuron detects a different aspect of chemical space. Finally, we demonstrate that receptor responses themselves can be used as descriptors in a predictive model of neuron activation. Conclusion The chemical meaning of molecular descriptors helps understand structure-response relationships for olfactory receptors and their "receptive fields". Moreover, it is possible to predict receptor neuron activation from chemical structure using machine-learning techniques, although this is still complicated by a lack of training data. PMID:17880742

  8. Computation Through Neuronal Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, K.

    Some of us believe that natural sciences are governed by simple and predictive general principles. This hope has not yet been fulfilled in physics for unifying gravitation and quantum mechanics. Epigenetics has shaken the monopoly of the genetic code to determine inheritance (Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell. Garland, New York, 2008). It is therefore not surprising that quantum mechanics does not explain consciousness or more generally the coherence of the brain in perception, action and cognition. In an other context, others (Tegmark, Phys Rev E 61:4194-4206, 2000) and we (Koch and Hepp, Nature 440:611-612, 2006; Koch and Hepp, Visions of Discovery: New Light on Physics, Cosmology, and Consciousness. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2011) have strongly argued against the absurdity of such a claim, because consciousness is a higher brain function and not a molecular binding mechanism. Decoherence in the warm and wet brain is by many orders of magnitude too strong. Moreover, there are no efficient algorithms for neural quantum computations. However, the controversy over classical and quantum consciousness will probably never be resolved (see e.g. Hepp, J Math Phys 53:095222, 2012; Hameroff and Penrose, Phys Life Rev 11:39-78, 2013).

  9. Persistent histamine excitation of glutamatergic preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  10. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  11. To amend title 10, United States Code, to require an Inspector General investigation of allegations of retaliatory personnel actions taken in response to making protected communications regarding sexual assault.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Walorski, Jackie [R-IN-2

    2013-05-07

    07/08/2013 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Armed Services. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation: