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Sample records for neurons gaba phenotype

  1. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Gay R.; Friedrich, Victor L. Jr.; Martinelli, Giorgio P.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  2. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    PubMed

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  3. Immature Responses to GABA in Fragile X Neurons Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Telias, Michael; Segal, Menahem; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited cognitive disability. However, functional deficiencies in FX neurons have been described so far almost exclusively in animal models. In a recent study we found several functional deficits in FX neurons differentiated in-vitro from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), including their inability to fire repetitive action potentials, and their lack of synaptic activity. Here, we investigated the responses of such neurons to pulse application of the neurotransmitter GABA. We found two distinct types of responses to GABA and sensitivity to the GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline; type 1 (mature) characterized by non-desensitized responses to GABA as well as a high sensitivity to bicuculline, and type 2 (immature) which are desensitized to GABA and insensitive to bicuculline. Type 1 responses were age-dependent and dominant in mature WT neurons. In contrast, FX neurons expressed primarily type 2 phenotype. Expression analysis of GABA-A receptor subunits demonstrated that this bias in human FX neurons was associated with a significant alteration in the expression pattern of the GABA-A receptor subunits α2 and β2. Our results indicate that FMRP may play a role in the development of the GABAergic synapse during neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration of the lack of a mature response to GABA in human FX neurons and may explain the inappropriate synaptic functions in FXS. PMID:27242433

  4. GABA-mediated regulation of the activity-dependent olfactory bulb dopaminergic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Yosuke; Sasaki, Hayato; Huerta, Patricio T.; Estevez, Alvaro G.; Baker, Harriet; Cave, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) regulates the proliferation and migration of olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron progenitors derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ), but the role of GABA in the differentiation of these progenitors has been largely unexplored. This study examined the role of GABA in the differentiation of OB dopaminergic interneurons using neonatal forebrain organotypic slice cultures prepared from transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) gene promoter (ThGFP). KCl-mediated depolarization of the slices induced ThGFP expression. The addition of GABA to the depolarized slices further increased GFP fluorescence by inducing ThGFP expression in an additional set of periglomerular cells. These findings showed that GABA promoted differentiation of SVZ-derived OB dopaminergic interneurons and suggested that GABA indirectly regulated Th expression and OB dopaminergic neuron differentiation through an acceleration of the maturation rate for the dopaminergic progenitors. Additional studies revealed that the effect of GABA on ThGFP expression required activation of L- and P/Q-type Ca+2 channels as well as GABAA and GABAB receptors. These voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and GABA receptors have previously been shown to be required for the co-expressed GABAergic phenotype in the OB interneurons. Together, these findings suggest that Th expression and the differentiation of OB dopaminergic interneurons are coupled to the co-expressed GABAergic phenotype, and demonstrate a novel role for GABA in neurogenesis. PMID:19301430

  5. Comparative mapping of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the central nervous systems of nudibranch molluscs.

    PubMed

    Gunaratne, Charuni A; Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    The relative simplicity of certain invertebrate nervous systems, such as those of gastropod molluscs, allows behaviors to be dissected at the level of small neural circuits composed of individually identifiable neurons. Elucidating the neurotransmitter phenotype of neurons in neural circuits is important for understanding how those neural circuits function. In this study, we examined the distribution of γ-aminobutyric-acid;-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) neurons in four species of sea slugs (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia, Nudibranchia): Tritonia diomedea, Melibe leonina, Dendronotus iris, and Hermissenda crassicornis. We found consistent patterns of GABA immunoreactivity in the pedal and cerebral-pleural ganglia across species. In particular, there were bilateral clusters in the lateral and medial regions of the dorsal surface of the cerebral ganglia as well as a cluster on the ventral surface of the pedal ganglia. There were also individual GABA-ir neurons that were recognizable across species. The invariant presence of these individual neurons and clusters suggests that they are homologous, although there were interspecies differences in the numbers of neurons in the clusters. The GABAergic system was largely restricted to the central nervous system, with the majority of axons confined to ganglionic connectives and commissures, suggesting a central, integrative role for GABA. GABA was a candidate inhibitory neurotransmitter for neurons in central pattern generator (CPG) circuits underlying swimming behaviors in these species, however none of the known swim CPG neurons were GABA-ir. Although the functions of these GABA-ir neurons are not known, it is clear that their presence has been strongly conserved across nudibranchs. PMID:24638845

  6. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, A; Kilb, W

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  7. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Fukuda, A.; Kilb, W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  8. Functional properties of GABA synaptic inputs onto GABA neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Diana C; Olezene, Cameron; Miyamae, Takeaki; Povysheva, Nadezhda V; Zaitsev, Aleksey V; Lewis, David A; Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo

    2015-03-15

    In rodent cortex GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synapses are a significant source of input onto GABA neurons, and the properties of these inputs vary among GABA neuron subtypes that differ in molecular markers and firing patterns. Some features of cortical interneurons are different between rodents and primates, but it is not known whether inhibition of GABA neurons is prominent in the primate cortex and, if so, whether these inputs show heterogeneity across GABA neuron subtypes. We thus studied GABAAR-mediated miniature synaptic events in GABAergic interneurons in layer 3 of monkey dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Interneurons were identified on the basis of their firing pattern as fast spiking (FS), regular spiking (RS), burst spiking (BS), or irregular spiking (IS). Miniature synaptic events were common in all of the recorded interneurons, and the frequency of these events was highest in FS neurons. The amplitude and kinetics of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (mIPSPs) also differed between DLPFC interneuron subtypes in a manner correlated with their input resistance and membrane time constant. FS neurons had the fastest mIPSP decay times and the strongest effects of the GABAAR modulator zolpidem, suggesting that the distinctive properties of inhibitory synaptic inputs onto FS cells are in part conferred by GABAARs containing α1 subunits. Moreover, mIPSCs differed between FS and RS interneurons in a manner consistent with the mIPSP findings. These results show that in the monkey DLPFC GABAAR-mediated synaptic inputs are prominent in layer 3 interneurons and may differentially regulate the activity of different interneuron subtypes. PMID:25540225

  9. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  10. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miho; Fukuda, Atsuo; Nabekura, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction. PMID:25506316

  11. Spinal Cord Neuronal Precursors Generate Multiple Neuronal Phenotypes in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Anjali J.; Piper, David; Mujtaba, Tahmina; Lucero, Mary T.; Rao, Mahendra S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal restricted precursors (NRPs) (Mayer-Proschel et al., 1997) can generate multiple neurotransmitter phenotypes during maturation in culture. Undifferentiated E-NCAM+ (embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule) immunoreactive NRPs are mitotically active and electrically immature, and they express only a subset of neuronal markers. Fully mature cells are postmitotic, process-bearing cells that are neurofilament-M and synaptophysin immunoreactive, and they synthesize and respond to different subsets of neurotransmitter molecules. Mature neurons that synthesize and respond to glycine, glutamate, GABA, dopamine, and acetylcholine can be identified by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and calcium imaging in mass cultures. Individual NRPs also generate heterogeneous progeny as assessed by neurotransmitter response and synthesis, demonstrating the multipotent nature of the precursor cells. Differentiation can be modulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 molecules. Shh acts as a mitogen and inhibits differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). BMP-2 and BMP-4, in contrast, inhibit cell division and promote differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). Thus, a single neuronal precursor cell can differentiate into multiple classes of neurons, and this differentiation can be modulated by environmental signals. PMID:9742154

  12. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1a1 Mediates a GABA Synthesis Pathway in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Ick; Ganesan, Subhashree; Luo, Sarah X.; Wu, Yu-Wei; Park, Esther; Huang, Eric J.; Chen, Lu; Ding, Jun B.

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are an essential component of the basal ganglia circuitry, playing key roles in the control of fine movement and reward. Recently, it has been demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter, is co-released by dopamine neurons. Here we show that GABA corelease in dopamine neurons does not utilize the conventional GABA synthesizing enzymes, glutamate decarboxylases GAD65 and GAD67. Our experiments reveal an evolutionarily conserved GABA synthesis pathway mediated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 (ALDH1a1). Moreover, GABA co-release is modulated by ethanol at binge drinking blood alcohol concentrations and diminished ALDH1a1 leads to enhanced alcohol consumption and preference. These findings provide insights into the functional role of GABA co-release in midbrain dopamine neurons, which may be essential for reward-based behavior and addiction. PMID:26430123

  13. GABA depolarizes immature neurons and inhibits network activity in the neonatal neocortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kirmse, Knut; Kummer, Michael; Kovalchuk, Yury; Witte, Otto W; Garaschuk, Olga; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-01-01

    A large body of evidence from in vitro studies suggests that GABA is depolarizing during early postnatal development. However, the mode of GABA action in the intact developing brain is unknown. Here we examine the in vivo effects of GABA in cells of the upper cortical plate using a combination of electrophysiological and Ca(2+)-imaging techniques. We report that at postnatal days (P) 3-4, GABA depolarizes the majority of immature neurons in the occipital cortex of anaesthetized mice. At the same time, GABA does not efficiently activate voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and fails to induce action potential firing. Blocking GABA(A) receptors disinhibits spontaneous network activity, whereas allosteric activation of GABA(A) receptors has the opposite effect. In summary, our data provide evidence that in vivo GABA acts as a depolarizing neurotransmitter imposing an inhibitory control on network activity in the neonatal (P3-4) neocortex. PMID:26177896

  14. Localization of glycine, GABA and neuropeptide containing neurons in tiger salamander retina

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Putative glycinergic and GABAergic neurons in the salamander retina were localized by a parallel analysis of high affinity {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and glycine-like immunoreactivity (Gly-IR) and a comparative analysis of high affinity {sup 3}H-GABA uptake, GABA, like immunoreactivity (GABA-IR), and glutamate decarboxylase immunoreactivity (GAD-IR) at the light microscopic level. Good correspondence of labeling of {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and Gly-IR as well as that of {sup 3}H-GABA uptake and GABA-IR were observed. In addition, GAD immunoreactive neurons contained GABA-IR as well. Extensive colocalization of {sup 3}H-glycine uptake and Gly-IR and that of {sup 3}H-GABA uptake, GABA-IR and perhaps GAD-IR were indicated by the similarities in the distribution, morphology and labeling frequency of neurons and lamination in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). However, the Gly-IR and the GABA-IR probes appeared to be more sensitive and can thus be a reliable marker for glycine and GABA containing neurons respectively.

  15. Leptin signaling in GABA neurons, but not glutamate neurons, is required for reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Zuure, Wieteke A; Roberts, Amy L; Quennell, Janette H; Anderson, Greg M

    2013-11-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin acts in the brain to modulate the central driver of fertility: the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal system. This effect is indirect, as GnRH neurons do not express leptin receptors (LEPRs). Here we test whether GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons provide the intermediate pathway between the site of leptin action and the GnRH neurons. Leptin receptors were deleted from GABA and glutamate neurons using Cre-Lox transgenics, and the downstream effects on puberty onset and reproduction were examined. Both mouse lines displayed the expected increase in body weight and region-specific loss of leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. The GABA neuron-specific LEPR knock-out females and males showed significantly delayed puberty onset. Adult fertility observations revealed that these knock-out animals have decreased fecundity. In contrast, glutamate neuron-specific LEPR knock-out mice displayed normal fertility. Assessment of the estrogenic hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation in females showed that leptin action on GABA neurons is not necessary for estradiol-mediated suppression of tonic luteinizing hormone secretion (an indirect measure of GnRH neuron activity) but is required for regulation of a full preovulatory-like luteinizing hormone surge. In conclusion, leptin signaling in GABAergic (but not glutamatergic neurons) plays a critical role in the timing of puberty onset and is involved in fertility regulation throughout adulthood in both sexes. These results form an important step in explaining the role of central leptin signaling in the reproductive system. Limiting the leptin-to-GnRH mediators to GABAergic cells will enable future research to focus on a few specific types of neurons. PMID:24198376

  16. Comparative Mapping of GABA-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Buccal Ganglia of Nudipleura Molluscs.

    PubMed

    Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2016-04-15

    Phylogenetic comparisons of neurotransmitter distribution are important for understanding the ground plan organization of nervous systems. This study describes the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) neurons in the buccal ganglia of six sea slug species (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Euthyneura, Nudipleura). In the nudibranch species, Hermissenda crassicornis, Tritonia diomedea, Tochuina tetraquetra, and Dendronotus iris, the number of GABA-ir neurons was highly consistent. Another nudibranch, Melibe leonina, however, contained approximately half the number of GABA-ir neurons. This may relate to its loss of a radula and its unique feeding behavior. The GABA immunoreactivity in a sister group to the nudibranchs, Pleurobranchaea californica, differed drastically from that of the nudibranchs. Not only did it have significantly more GABA-ir neurons but it also had a unique GABA distribution pattern. Furthermore, unlike the nudibranchs, the Pleurobranchaea GABA distribution was also different from that of other, more distantly related, euopisthobranch and panpulmonate snails and slugs. This suggests that the Pleurobranchaea GABA distribution may be a derived feature, unique to this lineage. The majority of GABA-ir axons and neuropil in the Nudipleura were restricted to the buccal ganglia, commissures, and connectives. However, in Tritonia and Pleurobranchaea, we detected a few GABA-ir fibers in buccal nerves that innervate feeding muscles. Although the specific functions of the GABA-ir neurons in the species in this study are not known, the innervation pattern suggests these neurons may play an integrative or regulatory role in bilaterally coordinated behaviors in the Nudipleura. PMID:26355705

  17. Dopamine receptor activation modulates GABA neuron migration from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Crandall, James E; McCarthy, Deirdre M; Araki, Kiyomi Y; Sims, John R; Ren, Jia-Qian; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2007-04-01

    GABA neurons of the cerebral cortex and other telencephalic structures are produced in the basal forebrain and migrate to their final destinations during the embryonic period. The embryonic basal forebrain is enriched in dopamine and its receptors, creating a favorable environment for dopamine to influence GABA neuron migration. However, whether dopamine receptor activation can influence GABA neuron migration is not known. We show that dopamine D1 receptor activation promotes and D2 receptor activation decreases GABA neuron migration from the medial and caudal ganglionic eminences to the cerebral cortex in slice preparations of embryonic mouse forebrain. Slice preparations from D1 or D2 receptor knock-out mouse embryos confirm the findings. In addition, D1 receptor electroporation into cells of the basal forebrain and pharmacological activation of the receptor promote migration of the electroporated cells to the cerebral cortex. Analysis of GABA neuron numbers in the cerebral wall of the dopamine receptor knock-out mouse embryos further confirmed the effects of dopamine receptor activation on GABA neuron migration. Finally, dopamine receptor activation mobilizes striatal neuronal cytoskeleton in a manner consistent with the effects on neuronal migration. These data show that impairing the physiological balance between D1 and D2 receptors can alter GABA neuron migration from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex. The intimate relationship between dopamine and GABA neuron development revealed here may offer novel insights into developmental disorders such as schizophrenia, attention deficit or autism, and fetal cocaine exposure, all of which are associated with dopamine and GABA imbalance. PMID:17409246

  18. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  19. Prenatal cocaine exposure decreases parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons and GABA-to-projection neuron ratio in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Deirdre M; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy produces harmful effects not only on the mother but also on the unborn child. The neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin are known as the principal targets of the action of cocaine in the fetal and postnatal brain. However, recent evidence suggests that cocaine can impair cerebral cortical GABA neuron development and function. We sought to analyze the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on the number and distribution of GABA and projection neurons (inhibitory interneurons and excitatory output neurons, respectively) in the mouse cerebral cortex. We found that the prenatal cocaine exposure decreased GABA neuron numbers and GABA-to-projection neuron ratio in the medial prefrontal cortex of 60-day-old mice. The neighboring prefrontal cortex did not show significant changes in either of these measures. However, there was a significant increase in projection neuron numbers in the prefrontal cortex but not in the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, the effects of cocaine on GABA and projection neurons appear to be cortical region specific. The population of parvalbumin-immunoreactive GABA neurons was decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex following the prenatal cocaine exposure. The cocaine exposure also delayed the developmental decline in the volume of the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, prenatal cocaine exposure produced persisting and region-specific effects on cortical cytoarchitecture and impaired the physiological balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. These structural changes may underlie the electrophysiological and behavioral effects of prenatal cocaine exposure observed in animal models and human subjects. PMID:22572769

  20. Dopaminergic neurons inhibit striatal output via non-canonical release of GABA

    PubMed Central

    Tritsch, Nicolas X.; Ding, Jun B.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2012-01-01

    The substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) contain the two largest populations of dopamine (DA)-releasing neurons in the mammalian brain. These neurons extend elaborate projections in striatum, a large subcortical structure implicated in motor planning and reward-based learning. Phasic activation of dopaminergic neurons in response to salient or reward-predicting stimuli is thought to modulate striatal output via the release of DA to promote and reinforce motor action1–4. Here we show that activation of DA neurons in striatal slices rapidly inhibits action potential firing in both direct-and indirect-pathway striatal projection neurons (SPNs) through vesicular release of the inhibitory transmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is released directly from dopaminergic axons but in a manner that is independent of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT. Instead GABA release requires activity of the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2, which is the vesicular transporter for DA. Furthermore, VMAT2 expression in GABAergic neurons lacking VGAT is sufficient to sustain GABA release. Thus, these findings expand the repertoire of synaptic mechanisms employed by DA neurons to influence basal ganglia circuits, reveal a novel substrate whose transport is dependent on VMAT2, and demonstrate that GABA can function as a bona fide co-transmitter in monoaminergic neurons. PMID:23034651

  1. Development of a high-affinity GABA uptake system in embryonic amphibian spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lamborghini, J E; Iles, A

    1985-11-01

    High-affinity uptake systems for amino acid neurotransmitter precursors have been highly correlated with the use of the particular amino acid or its derivative as a transmitter. We have found interneurons in the Xenopus embryo spinal cord which accumulate GABA by a high-affinity uptake system. They originate near the end of gastrulation and their ability to accumulate GABA first appears at the early tail bud stage. By position and appearance they are comparable to some of the embryonic interneurons described by A. Roberts and J. D. W. Clarke (1982, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London Ser. B 296, 195-212). GABA-accumulating neurons also develop in dissociated cell cultures made from the presumptive spinal cord of neural plate stage Xenopus embryos. GABA accumulation in cultured neurons, as in cells in vivo, occurs via a high-affinity uptake system; GABA-accumulating cells have the same time of origin as the cells in vivo, and the ability to accumulate GABA in the population of cultured neurons appears at a time equivalent to that observed in intact sibling embryos. Thus it seems likely that the population of GABA-accumulating neurons developing in cell culture corresponds to the GABA-accumulating interneurons in vivo. The development of these neurons in dissociated cell cultures permits perturbation experiments that would be difficult to perform in vivo. We have examined the development of high-affinity GABA uptake in conditions that permit no electrical impulse activity in the cultures. The onset and extent of development of GABA accumulation in the neuronal population are normal under these conditions. PMID:3932109

  2. Muscarinic control of rostromedial tegmental nucleus GABA neurons and morphine-induced locomotion.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, David I; Tan, Joel M J; Kim, Jun Chul; Yeomans, John S

    2016-07-01

    Opioids induce rewarding and locomotor effects by inhibiting rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons that express μ-opioid and nociceptin receptors. These GABA neurons then strongly inhibit dopamine neurons. Opioid-induced reward, locomotion and dopamine release also depend on pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental cholinergic and glutamate neurons, many of which project to and activate ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons. Here we show that laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine cholinergic neurons project to both rostromedial tegmental nucleus and ventral tegmental area, and that M4 muscarinic receptors are co-localized with μ-opioid receptors associated with rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons. To inhibit or excite rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons, we utilized adeno-associated viral vectors and DREADDs to express designed muscarinic receptors (M4D or M3D respectively) in GAD2::Cre mice. In M4D-expressing mice, clozapine-N-oxide increased morphine-induced, but not vehicle-induced, locomotion. In M3D-expressing mice, clozapine-N-oxide blocked morphine-induced, but not vehicle-induced, locomotion. We propose that cholinergic inhibition of rostromedial tegmental GABA neurons via M4 muscarinic receptors facilitates opioid inhibition of the same neurons. This model explains how mesopontine cholinergic systems and muscarinic receptors in the rostromedial tegmental nucleus and ventral tegmental area are important for dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent opioid-induced rewards and locomotion. PMID:26990801

  3. Neuropeptide co-release with GABA may explain functional non-monotonic uncertainty responses in dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Tan, Can Ozan; Bullock, Daniel

    2008-01-17

    Co-release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and the neuropeptide substance-P (SP) from single axons is a conspicuous feature of the basal ganglia, yet its computational role, if any, has not been resolved. In a new learning model, co-release of GABA and SP from axons of striatal projection neurons emerges as a highly efficient way to compute the uncertainty responses that are exhibited by dopamine (DA) neurons when animals adapt to probabilistic contingencies between rewards and the stimuli that predict their delivery. Such uncertainty-related dopamine release appears to be an adaptive phenotype, because it promotes behavioral switching at opportune times. Understanding the computational linkages between SP and DA in the basal ganglia is important, because Huntington's disease is characterized by massive SP depletion, whereas Parkinson's disease is characterized by massive DA depletion. PMID:18053647

  4. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Shimeng; Yang, Liukun; Shi, Qixin; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Le; Zhao, Minggao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT) cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T) expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB), a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment. PMID:27517961

  5. Ionic Mechanisms of Neuronal Excitation by Inhibitory GABA_A Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Kevin J.; Soldo, Brandi L.; Proctor, William R.

    1995-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA_A) receptors are the principal mediators of synaptic inhibition, and yet when intensely activated, dendritic GABA_A receptors excite rather than inhibit neurons. The membrane depolarization mediated by GABA_A receptors is a result of the differential, activity-dependent collapse of the opposing concentration gradients of chloride and bicarbonate, the anions that permeate the GABA_A ionophore. Because this depolarization diminishes the voltage-dependent block of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by magnesium, the activity-dependent depolarization mediated by GABA is sufficient to account for frequency modulation of synaptic NMDA receptor activation. Anionic gradient shifts may represent a mechanism whereby the rate and coherence of synaptic activity determine whether dendritic GABA_A receptor activation is excitatory or inhibitory.

  6. GABA-CREB signalling regulates maturation and survival of newly generated neurons in the adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jagasia, Ravi; Steib, Kathrin; Englberger, Elisabeth; Herold, Sabine; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Saxe, Michael; Gage, Fred H.; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D. Chichung

    2009-01-01

    Survival and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal circuit are rate-limiting steps in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Neuronal network activity is a major regulator of these processes, yet little is known about the respective downstream signalling pathways. Here, we investigate the role of CREB signalling in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. CREB is activated in new granule neurons during a distinct developmental period. Loss of CREB function in a cell-autonomous fashion impairs dendritic development, decreases the expression of the neurogenic transcription factor NeuroD and of the neuronal microtubule associated protein, DCX, and compromises the survival of newborn neurons. In addition, GABA-mediated excitation regulates CREB activation at early developmental stages. Importantly, developmental defects following loss of GABA-mediated excitation can be compensated by enhanced CREB signalling. These results indicate that CREB signalling is a central pathway in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the development and survival of new hippocampal neurons downstream of GABA-mediated excitation. PMID:19553437

  7. Molecular and functional differences in voltage-activated sodium currents between GABA projection neurons and dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shengyuan; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Fu-Ming

    2011-12-01

    GABA projection neurons (GABA neurons) in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) and dopamine projection neurons (DA neurons) in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) have strikingly different firing properties. SNc DA neurons fire low-frequency, long-duration spikes, whereas SNr GABA neurons fire high-frequency, short-duration spikes. Since voltage-activated sodium (Na(V)) channels are critical to spike generation, the different firing properties raise the possibility that, compared with DA neurons, Na(V) channels in SNr GABA neurons have higher density, faster kinetics, and less cumulative inactivation. Our quantitative RT-PCR analysis on immunohistochemically identified nigral neurons indicated that mRNAs for pore-forming Na(V)1.1 and Na(V)1.6 subunits and regulatory Na(V)β1 and Na(v)β4 subunits are more abundant in SNr GABA neurons than SNc DA neurons. These α-subunits and β-subunits are key subunits for forming Na(V) channels conducting the transient Na(V) current (I(NaT)), persistent Na current (I(NaP)), and resurgent Na current (I(NaR)). Nucleated patch-clamp recordings showed that I(NaT) had a higher density, a steeper voltage-dependent activation, and a faster deactivation in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. I(NaT) also recovered more quickly from inactivation and had less cumulative inactivation in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. Furthermore, compared with nigral DA neurons, SNr GABA neurons had a larger I(NaR) and I(NaP). Blockade of I(NaP) induced a larger hyperpolarization in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that Na(V) channels expressed in fast-spiking SNr GABA neurons and slow-spiking SNc DA neurons are tailored to support their different spiking capabilities. PMID:21880943

  8. Distinct modes of dopamine and GABA release in a dual transmitter neuron

    PubMed Central

    Borisovska, Maria; Bensen, AeSoon; Chong, Gene; Westbrook, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    We now know of a surprising number of cases where single neurons contain multiple neurotransmitters. Neurons that contain a fast-acting neurotransmitter such as glutamate or GABA, and a modulatory transmitter such as dopamine are a particularly interesting case because they presumably serve dual signaling functions. The olfactory bulb contains a large population of GABA and dopamine-containing neurons, which have been implicated in normal olfaction as well as in Parkinson’s disease. Yet, they have been classified as non-exocytotic catecholamine neurons because of the apparent lack of vesicular monoamine transporters. Thus we examined how dopamine is stored and released from tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive-GFP (TH+-GFP) mouse periglomerular neurons in vitro. TH+ cells expressed both VMAT2 and VGAT, consistent with vesicular storage of both dopamine and GABA. Carbon fiber amperometry revealed that release of dopamine was quantal and calcium-dependent, but quantal size was much less than expected for large dense core vesicles, suggesting that release originated from EM-identified small clear vesicles. A single action potential in a TH+ neuron evoked a brief GABA synaptic current whereas evoked dopamine release was asynchronous, lasting for tens of seconds. Our data suggests that dopamine and GABA serve temporally distinct roles in these dual transmitter neurons. PMID:23365218

  9. A neuron-glia interaction involving GABA Transaminase contributes to sleep loss in sleepless mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Feng; Maguire, Sarah; Sowcik, Mallory; Luo, Wenyu; Koh, Kyunghee; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is an essential process and yet mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Loss of the Drosophila quiver/sleepless (qvr/sss) gene increases neuronal excitability and diminishes daily sleep, providing an excellent model for exploring the underpinnings of sleep regulation. Here, we used a proteomic approach to identify proteins altered in sss brains. We report that loss of sleepless post-transcriptionally elevates the CG7433 protein, a mitochondrial γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABAT), and reduces GABA in fly brains. Loss of GABAT increases daily sleep and improves sleep consolidation, indicating that GABAT promotes wakefulness. Importantly, disruption of the GABAT gene completely suppresses the sleep phenotype of sss mutants, demonstrating that GABAT is required for loss of sleep in sss mutants. While SSS acts in distinct populations of neurons, GABAT acts in glia to reduce sleep in sss flies. Our results identify a novel mechanism of interaction between neurons and glia that is important for the regulation of sleep. PMID:24637426

  10. Phenotyping GABA transaminase deficiency: a case description and literature review.

    PubMed

    Louro, Pedro; Ramos, Lina; Robalo, Conceição; Cancelinha, Cândida; Dinis, Alexandra; Veiga, Ricardo; Pina, Raquel; Rebelo, Olinda; Pop, Ana; Diogo, Luísa; Salomons, Gajja S; Garcia, Paula

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder reported in only three unrelated families. It is caused by mutations in the ABAT gene, which encodes 4-aminobutyrate transaminase, an enzyme of GABA catabolism and mitochondrial nucleoside salvage. We report the case of a boy, deceased at 12 months of age, with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy, severe psychomotor retardation, hypotonia, lower-limb hyporeflexia, central hypoventilation, and rapid increase in weight and, to a lesser rate, length and head circumference. He presented signs of premature pubarche, thermal instability, and water-electrolyte imbalance. Serum total testosterone was elevated (43.3 ng/dl; normal range <16), as well as serum growth hormone (7.7 ng/ml; normal range <1). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed decreased myelination and generalized brain atrophy, later confirmed by post-mortem examination. ABAT gene sequencing was performed post-mortem, identifying a homozygous variant c.888G > T (p.Gln296His),not previously described. In vitro analysis concluded that this variant is pathogenic. The clinical features of this patient are similar to those reported so far in GABA-T deficiency. However, distinct mutations may have a different effect on enzymatic activity, which potentially could lead to a variable clinical outcome. Clinical investigation aiming for a diagnosis should not end with the patient's death, as it may allow a more precise genetic counselling for the family. PMID:27376954

  11. GABA accumulating neurons are relatively resistant to chronic hypoxia in vitro: An autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, P.K.; Hu, S. )

    1990-11-01

    Whether there is preferential loss of certain types of nerve cells or specific cellular functions after hypoxic or ischemic insults remains unclear. To evaluate this phenomenon in vitro, the vulnerability of GABAergic neurons to hypoxia was investigated both quantitatively and with autoradiography. Immature neuronal cortical cultures obtained from fetal mice were subjected to chronic hypoxia (5% O2) for 24 h or 48 h and then returned to the normoxic condition for 48 h. The shorter hypoxic exposure resulted in significantly reduced numbers of neurons in comparison to the longer exposure and also to controls (29% and 26%, respectively; p less than 0.001). LDH efflux, a reliable indicator of cell damage, also was higher after the shorter exposure insult. Nevertheless, in these same 24 h hypoxic cultures there was prominent sparing of those neurons which accumulate GABA: by 48 h of recovery GABAergic neurons constituted 29.3 +/- 2.0% of the remaining neuronal population in comparison to 11.6 +/- 0.6 and 14.4 +/- 0.8% for controls and 48 h hypoxia, respectively; (p less than 0.001). Although total GABA uptake per neuron was significantly decreased after both types of insult, there was a concomitant increase in glial GABA uptake (i.e., that which could be displaced by beta-alanine). These observations suggest that certain GABAergic cortical neurons are relatively more resistant to chronic hypoxia than the general neuronal population and that depression of overall neuronal GABA uptake may be associated with enhanced glial GABA uptake.

  12. GABA and GAD expression in the X-organ sinus gland system of the Procambarus clarkii crayfish: inhibition mediated by GABA between X-organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Polanco, Paola; Garduño, Julieta; Cebada, Jorge; Zarco, Natanael; Segovia, José; Lamas, Mónica; García, Ubaldo

    2011-09-01

    In crustaceans, the X-organ-sinus gland (XO-SG) neurosecretory system is formed of distinct populations of neurons that produce two families of neuropeptides: crustacean hyperglycemic hormone and adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone. On the basis of electrophysiological evidence, it has been proposed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) regulates both electrical and secretory activity of the XO-SG system. In this work we observed that depolarizing current pulses to neurons located in the external rim of the X-organ induced repetitive firing that suppressed the spontaneous firing of previously active X-organ neurons. Picrotoxin reversibly blocked this inhibitory effect suggesting that the GABA released from the stimulated neuron inhibited neighboring cells. Immunoperoxidase in X-organ serial sections showed co-localization of GABA and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) including the aforementioned neurons. Immunofluorescence in whole mount preparations showed that two subpopulations of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-containing neurons colocalized with GABA. The expression of GAD mRNA was determined in crayfish tissue and X-organ single cells by RT-PCR. Bioinformatics analysis shows, within the amplified region, 90.4% consensus and 41.9% identity at the amino acid level compared with Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We suggest that crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-GABA-containing neurons can regulate the excitability of other X-organ neurons that produce different neurohormones. PMID:21626307

  13. Genetic Deficiency of GABA Differentially Regulates Respiratory and Non-Respiratory Motor Neuron Development

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Bellingham, Mark C.; Noakes, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system GABAergic and glycinergic synaptic activity switches from postsynaptic excitation to inhibition during the stage when motor neuron numbers are being reduced, and when synaptic connections are being established onto and by motor neurons. In mice this occurs between embryonic (E) day 13 and birth (postnatal day 0). Our previous work on mice lacking glycinergic transmission suggested that altered motor neuron activity levels correspondingly regulated motor neuron survival and muscle innervation for all respiratory and non respiratory motor neuron pools, during this period of development [1]. To determine if GABAergic transmission plays a similar role, we quantified motor neuron number and the extent of muscle innervation in four distinct regions of the brain stem and spinal cord; hypoglossal, phrenic, brachial and lumbar motor pools, in mice lacking the enzyme GAD67. These mice display a 90% drop in CNS GABA levels ( [2]; this study). For respiratory-based motor neurons (hypoglossal and phrenic motor pools), we have observed significant drops in motor neuron number (17% decline for hypoglossal and 23% decline for phrenic) and muscle innervations (55% decrease). By contrast for non-respiratory motor neurons of the brachial lateral motor column, we have observed an increase in motor neuron number (43% increase) and muscle innervations (99% increase); however for more caudally located motor neurons within the lumbar lateral motor column, we observed no change in either neuron number or muscle innervation. These results show in mice lacking physiological levels of GABA, there are distinct regional changes in motor neuron number and muscle innervation, which appear to be linked to their physiological function and to their rostral-caudal position within the developing spinal cord. Our results also suggest that for more caudal (lumbar) regions of the spinal cord, the effect of GABA is less influential on motor neuron development compared to that of

  14. Effects of acetylcholine and GABA on neurons in the area postrema of Suncus murinus brainstem slices.

    PubMed

    Strominger, N L; Hori, N; Carpenter, D O; Tan, Y; Folger, W H

    2001-08-24

    Slices (400 microm) containing the area postrema were prepared from three Japanese house musk shrews. Data reported are from 16 representative units. Units fell into one of three separate groups with spontaneous firing rates of 36-41/s, 16-18/sec. and 6-8/sec., possibly reflecting different set points of an endogenous pacemaker. Most neurons did not respond to ionophoresis of GABA or ACh. In those that did, ACh briefly increased spike frequency in a dose-dependent manner. The firing pattern suggests that the membrane potential was depolarized strongly, coupled with an extremely large conductance increase. Bath perfusion of curare, but not atropine, inhibited the response. Ionophoresis of GABA caused strong inhibition. The data show Suncus AP contains neurons that are sensitive to nicotine and GABA and may be emetogenic. PMID:11502349

  15. Leptin Acts via Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurotensin Neurons to Inhibit Orexin Neurons by Multiple GABA-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Goforth, Paulette B.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Patterson, Christa M.

    2014-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin modulates neural systems appropriately for the status of body energy stores. Leptin inhibits lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin (OX; also known as hypocretin)-producing neurons, which control feeding, activity, and energy expenditure, among other parameters. Our previous results suggest that GABAergic LHA leptin receptor (LepRb)-containing and neurotensin (Nts)-containing (LepRbNts) neurons lie in close apposition with OX neurons and control Ox mRNA expression. Here, we show that, similar to leptin, activation of LHA Nts neurons by the excitatory hM3Dq DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs) hyperpolarizes membrane potential and suppresses action potential firing in OX neurons in mouse hypothalamic slices. Furthermore, ablation of LepRb from Nts neurons abrogated the leptin-mediated inhibition, demonstrating that LepRbNts neurons mediate the inhibition of OX neurons by leptin. Leptin did not significantly enhance GABAA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission, and GABA receptor antagonists did not block leptin-mediated inhibition of OX neuron activity. Rather, leptin diminished the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs onto OX neurons. Furthermore, leptin indirectly activated an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in OX neurons, which was required for the hyperpolarization of OX neurons by leptin. Although Nts did not alter OX activity, galanin, which is coexpressed in LepRbNts neurons, inhibited OX neurons, whereas the galanin receptor antagonist M40 (galanin-(1–12)-Pro3-(Ala-Leu)2-Ala amide) prevented the leptin-induced hyperpolarization of OX cells. These findings demonstrate that leptin indirectly inhibits OX neurons by acting on LHA LepRbNts neurons to mediate two distinct GABA-independent mechanisms of inhibition: the presynaptic inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission and the opening of KATP channels. PMID:25143620

  16. Limitations of Current GABA Agonists in Neonatal Seizures: Toward GABA Modulation Via the Targeting of Neuronal Cl− Transport

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Arjun; Walcott, Brian Patrick; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care has advanced rapidly in the last 40 years, with dramatic decreases in mortality and morbidity; however, for neonatal seizures, neither therapies nor outcomes have changed significantly. Basic and clinical studies indicate that seizures in neonates have long-term neurodevelopmental and psychiatric consequences, highlighting the need for novel pharmacotherapeutics. First-line treatments targeting GABAA receptors, like barbiturates and benzodiazepines, are limited in their efficacy and carry significant risks to the developing brain. Here, we review the use of current GABA agonist therapies for neonatal seizures and suggest other treatment strategies given recent developments in the understanding of disease pathogenesis. One promising avenue is the indirect manipulation of the GABAergic system, via the modulation of neuronal Cl− gradients, by targeting the cation-Cl− cotransporters (NKCC1 and KCC2) or their regulatory signaling molecules. This strategy might yield a novel class of more efficacious anti-epileptics with fewer side effects by specifically addressing disease pathophysiology. Moreover, this strategy may have ramifications for other adult seizure syndromes in which GABA receptor-mediated depolarizations play a pathogenic role, such as temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:23805124

  17. Low doses of alcohol potentiate GABA sub B inhibition of spontaneous activity of hippocampal CA1 neurons in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Criado, J.R.; Thies, R. )

    1991-03-11

    Low doses of alcohol facilitate firing of hippocampal neurons. Such doses also enhance the inhibitory actions of GABA. Alcohol is known to potentiate inhibition via GABA{sub A} receptors. However, the effects of alcohol on GABA{sub B} receptor function are not understood. Spontaneous activity of single units was recorded from CA1 neurons of male rats anesthetized with 1.0% halothane. Electrical recordings and local application of drugs were done with multi-barrel pipettes. CA1 pyramidal neurons fired spontaneous bursts of action potentials. Acute alcohol decreased the interval between bursts, a mild excitatory action. Alcohol also more than doubled the period of complete inhibition produced by local application of both GABA and baclofen. These data suggest that GABA{sub B}-mediated inhibition is also potentiated by low doses of alcohol.

  18. Cocaine disinhibits dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area via use-dependent blockade of GABA neuron voltage-sensitive sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Steffensen, Scott C.; Taylor, Seth R.; Horton, Malia L.; Barber, Elise N.; Lyle, Laura T.; Stobbs, Sarah H.; Allison, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cocaine on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Utilizing single-unit recordings in vivo, microelectrophoretic administration of DA enhanced the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons via D2/D3 DA receptor activation. Lower doses of intravenous cocaine (0.25–0.5 mg/kg), or the DA transporter (DAT) blocker methamphetamine, enhanced VTA GABA neuron firing rate via D2/D3 receptor activation. Higher doses of cocaine (1.0–2.0 mg/kg) inhibited their firing rate, which was not sensitive to the D2/D3 antagonist eticlopride. The voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) blocker lidocaine inhibited the firing rate of VTA GABA neurons at all doses tested (0.25–2.0 mg/kg). Cocaine or lidocaine reduced VTA GABA neuron spike discharges induced by stimulation of the internal capsule (ICPSDs) at dose levels 0.25–2 mg/kg (IC50 1.2 mg/kg). There was no effect of DA or methamphetamine on ICPSDs, or of DA antagonists on cocaine inhibition of ICPSDs. In VTA GABA neurons in vitro, cocaine reduced (IC50 13 μm) current-evoked spikes and TTX-sensitive sodium currents in a use-dependent manner. In VTA DA neurons, cocaine reduced IPSCs (IC50 13 μm), increased IPSC paired-pulse facilitation and decreased spontaneous IPSC frequency, without affecting miniature IPSC frequency or amplitude. These findings suggest that cocaine acts on GABA neurons to reduce activity-dependent GABA release on DA neurons in the VTA, and that cocaine's use-dependent blockade of VTA GABA neuron VSSCs may synergize with its DAT inhibiting properties to enhance mesolimbic DA transmission implicated in cocaine reinforcement. PMID:19046384

  19. NKCC1 knockdown decreases neuron production through GABA(A)-regulated neural progenitor proliferation and delays dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Young, Stephanie Z; Taylor, M Morgan; Wu, Sharon; Ikeda-Matsuo, Yuri; Kubera, Cathryn; Bordey, Angélique

    2012-09-26

    Signaling through GABA(A) receptors controls neural progenitor cell (NPC) development in vitro and is altered in schizophrenic and autistic individuals. However, the in vivo function of GABA(A) signaling on neural stem cell proliferation, and ultimately neurogenesis, remains unknown. To examine GABA(A) function in vivo, we electroporated plasmids encoding short-hairpin (sh) RNA against the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1 (shNKCC1) in NPCs of the neonatal subventricular zone in mice to reduce GABA(A)-induced depolarization. Reduced GABA(A) depolarization identified by a loss of GABA(A)-induced calcium responses in most electroporated NPCs led to a 70% decrease in the number of proliferative Ki67(+) NPCs and a 60% reduction in newborn neuron density. Premature loss of GABA(A) depolarization in newborn neurons resulted in truncated dendritic arborization at the time of synaptic integration. However, by 6 weeks the dendritic tree had partially recovered and displayed a small, albeit significant, decrease in dendritic complexity but not total dendritic length. To further examine GABA(A) function on NPCs, we treated animals with a GABA(A) allosteric agonist, pentobarbital. Enhancement of GABA(A) activity in NPCs increased the number of proliferative NPCs by 60%. Combining shNKCC1 and pentobarbital prevented the shNKCC1 and the pentobarbital effects on NPC proliferation, suggesting that these manipulations affected NPCs through GABA(A) receptors. Thus, dysregulation in GABA(A) depolarizing activity delayed dendritic development and reduced NPC proliferation resulting in decreased neuronal density. PMID:23015452

  20. Dietary Restriction Affects Neuronal Response Property and GABA Synthesis in the Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfang; Wang, Qian; He, Fenfen; Ding, Yanxia; Sun, Qingyan; Hua, Tianmiao; Xi, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent effects of dietary restriction (DR) on cortical inhibition. To clarify this issue, we examined the response properties of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of DR and control groups of cats using in vivo extracellular single-unit recording techniques, and assessed the synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the V1 of cats from both groups using immunohistochemical and Western blot techniques. Our results showed that the response of V1 neurons to visual stimuli was significantly modified by DR, as indicated by an enhanced selectivity for stimulus orientations and motion directions, decreased visually-evoked response, lowered spontaneous activity and increased signal-to-noise ratio in DR cats relative to control cats. Further, it was shown that, accompanied with these changes of neuronal responsiveness, GABA immunoreactivity and the expression of a key GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 in the V1 were significantly increased by DR. These results demonstrate that DR may retard brain aging by increasing the intracortical inhibition effect and improve the function of visual cortical neurons in visual information processing. This DR-induced elevation of cortical inhibition may favor the brain in modulating energy expenditure based on food availability. PMID:26863207

  1. Dietary Restriction Affects Neuronal Response Property and GABA Synthesis in the Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qingyan; Hua, Tianmiao; Xi, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent effects of dietary restriction (DR) on cortical inhibition. To clarify this issue, we examined the response properties of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of DR and control groups of cats using in vivo extracellular single-unit recording techniques, and assessed the synthesis of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in the V1 of cats from both groups using immunohistochemical and Western blot techniques. Our results showed that the response of V1 neurons to visual stimuli was significantly modified by DR, as indicated by an enhanced selectivity for stimulus orientations and motion directions, decreased visually-evoked response, lowered spontaneous activity and increased signal-to-noise ratio in DR cats relative to control cats. Further, it was shown that, accompanied with these changes of neuronal responsiveness, GABA immunoreactivity and the expression of a key GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD67 in the V1 were significantly increased by DR. These results demonstrate that DR may retard brain aging by increasing the intracortical inhibition effect and improve the function of visual cortical neurons in visual information processing. This DR-induced elevation of cortical inhibition may favor the brain in modulating energy expenditure based on food availability. PMID:26863207

  2. Equilibrium potential of GABA(A) current and implications for rebound burst firing in rat subthalamic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bevan, M D; Wilson, C J; Bolam, J P; Magill, P J

    2000-05-01

    Reciprocally connected glutamatergic subthalamic and GABAergic globus pallidus neurons have recently been proposed to act as a generator of low-frequency oscillatory activity in Parkinson's disease. To determine whether GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic potentials could theoretically generate rebound burst firing in subthalamic neurons, a feature that is central to the proposed oscillatory mechanism, we determined the equilibrium potential of GABA(A) current (E(GABA(A))) and the degree of hyperpolarization required for rebound firing using perforated-patch recording. In the majority of neurons that fired rebounds, E(GABA(A)) was equal to or more hyperpolarized than the hyperpolarization required for rebound burst firing. These data suggest that synchronous activity of pallidal inputs could underlie rhythmic bursting activity of subthalamic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:10805713

  3. Attenuated inhibition by levofloxacin, l-isomer of ofloxacin, on GABA response in the dissociated rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Imanishi, T; Akahane, K; Akaike, N

    1995-06-30

    The effects of ofloxacin (OFLX) and its isomers, levofloxacin (LVFX) and DR-3354, on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons were investigated using nystatin perforated patch recording configuration under voltage-clamp conditions. At 10(-5) M these 3 compounds themselves did not affect the GABA response. Biphenylacetic acid (BPA) at 10(-5) M also had no effect on the GABA response, but BPA greatly suppressed the GABA response in combination with these 3 compounds without affecting the reversal potential of GABA response. The inhibitory effects of OFLX and DR-3354 on the GABA response were stronger than that of LVFX. LVFX inhibited the response in a competitive and voltage-independent manner. The results suggest that LVFX has lower CNS adverse effects, such as convulsions, compared to OFLX. PMID:7478164

  4. Colocalization of serotonin and GABA in retinal neurons of Ichthyophis kohtaoensis (amphibia; Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Dünker, N

    1998-01-01

    Ichthyophis kohtaoensis, a member of the limbless Gymnophiona, has a specialized subterranean burrowing mode of life and a predominantly olfactory-guided orientation. The only visually guided behavior seems to be negative phototaxis. As these animals possess extremely small eyes (only 540 microm in diameter in adults), functional investigations of single retinal cells by electrophysiological methods have so far failed. Therefore, the content and distribution of retinal transmitters have been investigated as indications of a functioning sense organ in an animal that is supposed to be blind. Previous immunohistochemical investigation of the retinal transmitter system revealed immunoreactivity for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine synthetic pathway. The present studies have been performed in order to determine a possible colocalization of serotonin and GABA in retinal neurons of the caecilian retina. Therefore retinal cryostat sections of various developmental stages have been investigated by the indirect fluorescence method. In single-label preparations, serotonin is localized to cells in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. GABA immunocytochemistry labels a variety of cell types in the inner nuclear layer as well as cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer. In double-label preparations, some of the serotonergic cells are found to express GABA immunoreactivity and some GABAergic neurons also label for serotonin immunocytochemistry. Thus, despite the fact that caecilians mainly rely on olfaction and are believed to have a reduced visual system, their retina exhibits a surprisingly "normal" distribution of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, also typical of other anamniotes with a well-developed visual system, including the partial colocalization of serotonin and GABA at all developmental stages of I. kohtaoensis. These results indicate that a functional system

  5. NSAIDs modulate GABA-activated currents via Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LEI; LI, LI; MA, KE-TAO; WANG, YANG; LI, JING; SHI, WEN-YAN; ZHU, HE; ZHANG, ZHONG-SHUANG; SI, JUN-QIANG

    2016-01-01

    The ability of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to modulate γ-aminobutyrate (GABA)-activated currents via Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG), was examined in the present study. During the preparation of DRG neurons harvested from Sprague-Dawley rats, the whole-cell recording technique was used to record the effect of NSAIDs on GABA-activated inward currents, and the expression levels of the TMEM16A and TMEM16B subunits were revealed. In the event that DRG neurons were pre-incubated for 20 sec with niflumic acid (NFA) and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) prior to the administration of GABA, the GABA-induced inward currents were diminished markedly in the majority of neurons examined (96.3%). The inward currents induced by 100 µmol/l GABA were attenuated by (0±0.09%; neurons = 4), (5.32±3.51%; neurons = 6), (21.3±4.00%; neurons = 5), (33.8±5.20%; neurons = 17), (52.2±5.10%; neurons = 4) and (61.1±4.12%; neurons = 12) by 0.1, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 µmol/l NFA, respectively. The inward currents induced by 100 µmol/l GABA were attenuated by (13.8±6%; neurons = 6), (23.2±14.7%; neurons = 6) and (29.7±9.1%; neurons = 9) by 3, 10 and 30 µmol/l NPPB, respectively. NFA and NPPB dose-dependently inhibited GABA-activated currents with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 6.7 and 11 µmol/l, respectively. The inhibitory effect of 100 µmol/l NFA on the GABA-evoked inward current were also strongly inhibited by nitrendipine (NTDP; an L-type calcium channel blocker), 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (a highly selective calcium chelating reagent), caffeine (a widely available Ca2+ consuming drug) and calcium-free extracellular fluid, in a concentration-dependent manner. Immunofluorescent staining indicated that TMEM16A and TMEM16B expression was widely distributed in DRG neurons. The results suggest that NSAIDs may be able to regulate Ca2

  6. Cl− uptake promoting depolarizing GABA actions in immature rat neocortical neurones is mediated by NKCC1

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Junko; Okabe, Akihito; Toyoda, Hiroki; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2004-01-01

    GABA is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature brain, but during early postnatal development the elevated [Cl−]i in immature neocortical neurones causes GABAA receptor activation to be depolarizing. The molecular mechanisms underlying this intracellular Cl− accumulation remain controversial. Therefore, the GABA reversal potential (EGABA) or [Cl−]i in early postnatal rat neocortical neurones was measured by the gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp method, and the relative expression levels of the cation−Cl− cotransporter mRNAs (in the same cells) were examined by semiquantitative single-cell multiplex RT-PCR to look for statistical correlations with [Cl−]i. The mRNA expression levels were positively (the Cl− accumulating Na+,K+−2Cl− cotransporter NKCC1) or negatively (the Cl− extruding K+−Cl− cotransporter KCC2) correlated with [Cl−]i. NKCC1 mRNA expression was high in early postnatal days, but decreased during postnatal development, whereas KCC2 mRNA expression displayed the opposite pattern. [Cl−]i and NKCC1 mRNA expression were each higher in cortical plate (CP) neurones than in the presumably older layer V/VI pyramidal neurones in a given slice. The pharmacological effects of bumetanide on EGABA were consistent with the different expression levels of NKCC1 mRNA. These data suggest that NKCC1 may play a pivotal role in the generation of GABA-mediated depolarization in immature CP cells, while KCC2 promotes the later maturation of GABAergic inhibition in the rat neocortex. PMID:15090604

  7. Asynchronous GABA Release Is a Key Determinant of Tonic Inhibition and Controls Neuronal Excitability: A Study in the Synapsin II−/− Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Medrihan, Lucian; Ferrea, Enrico; Greco, Barbara; Baldelli, Pietro; Benfenati, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic epilepsies have frequently been linked to mutations in voltage-gated channels (channelopathies); recently, mutations in several genes encoding presynaptic proteins have been shown to cause epilepsy in humans and mice, indicating that epilepsy can also be considered a synaptopathy. However, the functional mechanisms by which presynaptic dysfunctions lead to hyperexcitability and seizures are not well understood. We show that deletion of synapsin II (Syn II), a presynaptic protein contributing to epilepsy predisposition in humans, leads to a loss of tonic inhibition in mouse hippocampal slices due to a dramatic decrease in presynaptic asynchronous GABA release. We also show that the asynchronous GABA release reduces postsynaptic cell firing, and the parallel impairment of asynchronous GABA release and tonic inhibition results in an increased excitability at both single-neuron and network levels. Restoring tonic inhibition with THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol; gaboxadol), a selective agonist of δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors, fully rescues the SynII−/− epileptic phenotype both ex vivo and in vivo. The results demonstrate a causal relationship between the dynamics of GABA release and the generation of tonic inhibition, and identify a novel mechanism of epileptogenesis generated by dysfunctions in the dynamics of release that can be effectively targeted by novel antiepileptic strategies. PMID:24962993

  8. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  9. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T; Oyama, Y; Akaike, N

    1989-11-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response. The benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, slightly augmented the GABA response at concentrations between 3 x 10 7M and 3 x 10 5 M. 3. These results show clear differences in the effects on the GABA response between these four categories of compounds known to affect the benzodiazepine recognition site of the GABA/ benzodiazepine receptor-chloride channel complex. Our experimental system of frog isolated sensory neurones and a 'concentration

  10. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  11. Regulation of GABA Equilibrium Potential by mGluRs in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Rajput, Padmesh S.; Kumar, Ujendra; Sastry, Bhagavatula R.

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium potential for GABA-A receptor mediated currents (EGABA) in neonatal central neurons is set at a relatively depolarized level, which is suggested to be caused by a low expression of K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) but a relatively high expression of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1). Theta-burst stimulation (TBS) in stratum radiatum induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. In the current study, the effects of TBS on EGABA in neonatal and juvenile hippocampal CA1 neurons and the underlying mechanisms were examined. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are suggested to modulate KCC2 and NKCC1 levels in cortical neurons. Therefore, the involvement of mGluRs in the regulation of KCC2 or NKCC1 activity, and thus EGABA, following TBS was also investigated. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, in a slice preparation. In neonates, TBS induces a positive shift in EGABA, which was prevented by NKCC1 antisense but not NKCC1 sense mRNA. (RS)-a-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), a group I and II mGluR antagonist, blocked TBS-induced shifts in both juvenile and neonatal hippocampal neurons. While blockade of mGluR1 or mGluR5 alone could interfere with TBS-induced shifts in EGABA in neonates, only a combined blockade could do the same in juveniles. These results indicate that TBS induces a negative shift in EGABA in juvenile hippocampal neurons but a positive shift in neonatal hippocampal neurons via corresponding changes in KCC2 and NKCC1 expressions, respectively. mGluR activation seems to be necessary for both shifts to occur while the specific receptor subtype involved seems to vary. PMID:26389591

  12. Dynamic regulation of glycine–GABA co-transmission at spinal inhibitory synapses by neuronal glutamate transporter

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Junya; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Nabekura, Junichi

    2013-01-01

    Fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system is mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine, which are accumulated into synaptic vesicles by a common vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VIAAT) and are then co-released. However, the mechanisms that control the packaging of GABA + glycine into synaptic vesicles are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate the dynamic control of the GABA–glycine co-transmission by the neuronal glutamate transporter, using paired whole-cell patch recording from monosynaptically coupled cultured spinal cord neurons derived from VIAAT-Venus transgenic rats. Short step depolarization of presynaptic neurons evoked unitary (cell-to-cell) inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). Under normal conditions, the fractional contribution of postsynaptic GABA or glycine receptors to the unitary IPSCs did not change during a 1 h recording. Intracellular loading of GABA or glycine via a patch pipette enhanced the respective components of inhibitory transmission, indicating the importance of the cytoplasmic concentration of inhibitory transmitters. Raised extracellular glutamate levels increased the amplitude of GABAergic IPSCs but reduced glycine release by enhancing glutamate uptake. Similar effects were observed when presynaptic neurons were intracellularly perfused with glutamate. Interestingly, high-frequency trains of stimulation decreased glycinergic IPSCs more than GABAergic IPSCs, and repetitive stimulation occasionally failed to evoke glycinergic but not GABAergic IPSCs. The present results suggest that the enhancement of GABA release by glutamate uptake may be advantageous for rapid vesicular refilling of the inhibitory transmitter at mixed GABA/glycinergic synapses and thus may help prevent hyperexcitability. PMID:23690564

  13. Dopamine-related drugs act presynaptically to potentiate GABA(A) receptor currents in VTA dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Avner; Yaka, Rami

    2011-01-01

    Electrical activity of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons is immediately inhibited following in vivo administration of cocaine and other DA-related drugs. While various forms of synaptic modulation were demonstrated in the VTA following exposure to DA-related drugs, comprehensive understanding of their ability to inhibit the activity of DA neurons, however, is still lacking. In this study, using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices, a novel form of synaptic modulation induced by DA-related drugs was isolated. DA exposure was shown to cause potentiation of γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptor type A (GABA(A)R)-mediated evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs), recorded from VTA DA neurons, under conditions of potassium channels blockade. The potentiation of these eIPSCs lasted for more than twenty minutes, could be mimicked by activation of D2-like but not D1-like DA receptors, and was accompanied by an increase in the frequency of GABA(A)R-mediated spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). Furthermore, exposure to inhibitors of DA transporter (DAT) led to potentiation of GABA(A) currents in a manner similar to the DA-mediated potentiation. Finally, a prolonged presence of l-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric-oxide (NO) signaling was found to conceal the potentiation of GABA(A) currents induced by the DA-related drugs. Taken together, this study demonstrates a new modulatory form of VTA GABA(A) neurotransmission mediated by DA-related drugs. These results also suggest better understanding of the initial inhibitory action of DA-related drugs on the activity of DA neurons in the VTA. PMID:21527263

  14. Glutamate and GABA imbalance promotes neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus after stress

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Wang, He; Liu, Yuan; Li, Ying-yu; Chen, Can; Liu, Liang-ming; Wu, Ya-min; Li, Sen; Yang, Ce

    2014-01-01

    Background People who experience traumatic events have an increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, PTSD-related pathological changes in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex remain poorly understood. Material/Methods We investigated the effect of a PTSD-like animal model induced by severe stress. The experimental rats received 20 inescapable electric foot shocks in an enclosed box for a total of 6 times in 3 days. The physiological state (body weight and plasma corticosterone concentrations), emotion, cognitive behavior, brain morphology, apoptosis, and balance of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were observed. Cell damages were examined with histological staining (HE, Nissl, and silver impregnation), while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using an Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) binding and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Results In comparison with the sham litter-mates, the stressed rats showed decreased body weight, inhibition of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, increase in freezing response to trauma reminder, hypoactivity and anxiety-like behaviors in elevated plus maze and open field test, poor learning in Morris water maze, and shortened latency in hot-plate test. There were significant damages in the hippocampus but not in the prefrontal cortex. Imbalance between glutamate and GABA was more evident in the hippocampus than in the prefrontal cortex. Conclusions These results suggest that neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus after severe traumatic stress is related to the imbalance between glutamate and GABA. Such modifications may resemble the profound changes observed in PTSD patients. PMID:24675061

  15. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Fukuda, T.; Oyama, Y.; Akaike, N.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2574062

  16. Opioid systems in the lateral hypothalamus regulate feeding behavior through orexin and GABA neurons.

    PubMed

    Ardianto, C; Yonemochi, N; Yamamoto, S; Yang, L; Takenoya, F; Shioda, S; Nagase, H; Ikeda, H; Kamei, J

    2016-04-21

    The hypothalamus controls feeding behavior. Since central opioid systems may regulate feeding behavior, we examined the role of μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the hunger center, in feeding behavior of mice. Non-selective (naloxone; 3 mg/kg, s.c.) and selective μ- (β-funaltrexamine, β-FNA; 10 mg/kg, s.c.), δ- (naltrindole; 3 mg/kg, s.c.) and κ- (norbinaltorphimine, norBNI; 20 mg/kg, s.c.) opioid receptor antagonists significantly decreased food intake in food-deprived mice. The injection of naloxone (20 μg/side) into the LH significantly decreased food intake whereas the injection of naloxone (20 μg/side) outside of the LH did not affect food intake. The injection of β-FNA (2 μg/side), naltrindole (1 μg/side) or norBNI (2 μg/side) into the LH significantly decreased food intake. Furthermore, all these antagonists significantly decreased the mRNA level of preproorexin, but not those of other hypothalamic neuropeptides. In addition, the injection of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (5 μg/side) into the LH significantly decreased food intake, and this effect was abolished by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (50 μg/side). Muscimol (1mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the mRNA level of preproorexin in the hypothalamus. Naloxone (3mg/kg, s.c.) significantly increased the GABA level in the LH and both bicuculline and the GABA release inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MP, 5 μg/side) attenuated the inhibitory effect of naloxone on feeding behavior. 3-MP also attenuated the effects of β-FNA and norBNI, but not that of naltrindole. These results show that opioid systems in the LH regulate feeding behavior through orexin neurons. Moreover, μ- and κ-, but not δ-, opioid receptor antagonists inhibit feeding behavior by activating GABA neurons in the LH. PMID:26855191

  17. WNK1-regulated inhibitory phosphorylation of the KCC2 cotransporter maintains the depolarizing action of GABA in immature neurons.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Perrine; Kahle, Kristopher T; Zhang, Jinwei; Hertz, Nicholas; Pisella, Lucie I; Buhler, Emmanuelle; Schaller, Fabienne; Duan, JingJing; Khanna, Arjun R; Bishop, Paul N; Shokat, Kevan M; Medina, Igor

    2015-06-30

    Activation of Cl(-)-permeable γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors elicits synaptic inhibition in mature neurons but excitation in immature neurons. This developmental "switch" in the GABA function depends on a postnatal decrease in intraneuronal Cl(-) concentration mediated by KCC2, a Cl(-)-extruding K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter. We showed that the serine-threonine kinase WNK1 [with no lysine (K)] forms a physical complex with KCC2 in the developing mouse brain. Dominant-negative mutation, genetic depletion, or chemical inhibition of WNK1 in immature neurons triggered a hyperpolarizing shift in GABA activity by enhancing KCC2-mediated Cl(-) extrusion. This increase in KCC2 activity resulted from reduced inhibitory phosphorylation of KCC2 at two C-terminal threonines, Thr(906) and Thr(1007). Phosphorylation of both Thr(906) and Thr(1007) was increased in immature versus mature neurons. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanism regulating Cl(-) homeostasis in immature neurons, and suggest that WNK1-regulated changes in KCC2 phosphorylation contribute to the developmental excitatory-to-inhibitory GABA sequence. PMID:26126716

  18. Non-neuronal, slow GABA signalling in the ventrobasal thalamus targets δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-González, Cristina; Pirttimaki, Tiina; Cope, David W; Parri, H R

    2011-01-01

    The rodent ventrobasal (VB) thalamus contains a relatively uniform population of thalamocortical (TC) neurons that receive glutamatergic input from the vibrissae and the somatosensory cortex, and inhibitory input from the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRT). In this study we describe γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-dependent slow outward currents (SOCs) in TC neurons that are distinct from fast inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and tonic currents. SOCs occurred spontaneously or could be evoked by hypo-osmotic stimulus, and were not blocked by tetrodotoxin, removal of extracellular Ca2+ or bafilomycin A1, indicating a non-synaptic, non-vesicular GABA origin. SOCs were more common in TC neurons of the VB compared with the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus, and were rarely observed in nRT neurons, whilst SOC frequency in the VB increased with age. Application of THIP, a selective agonist at δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors, occluded SOCs, whereas the benzodiazepine site inverse agonist β-CCB had no effect, but did inhibit spontaneous and evoked IPSCs. In addition, the occurrence of SOCs was reduced in mice lacking the δ-subunit, and their kinetics were also altered. The anti-epileptic drug vigabatrin increased SOC frequency in a time-dependent manner, but this effect was not due to reversal of GABA transporters. Together, these data indicate that SOCs in TC neurons arise from astrocytic GABA release, and are mediated by δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors. Furthermore, these findings suggest that the therapeutic action of vigabatrin may occur through the augmentation of this astrocyte–neuron interaction, and highlight the importance of glial cells in CNS (patho) physiology. PMID:21395866

  19. Modulation of Presynaptic GABA Release by Oxidative Stress in Mechanically-isolated Rat Cerebral Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eu-Teum; Seo, Jung-Woo; Hur, Jinyoung

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the superoxide anion (O2-·), and the hydroxyl radical (OH·), are generated as by-products of oxidative metabolism in cells. The cerebral cortex has been found to be particularly vulnerable to production of ROS associated with conditions such as ischemia-reperfusion, Parkinson's disease, and aging. To investigate the effect of ROS on inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission, we examined the electrophysiological mechanisms of the modulatory effect of H2O2 on GABAergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSCs) in mechanically isolated rat cerebral cortical neurons retaining intact synaptic boutons. The membrane potential was voltage-clamped at -60 mV and mIPSCs were recorded and analyzed. Superfusion of 1-mM H2O2 gradually potentiated mIPSCs. This potentiating effect of H2O2 was blocked by the pretreatment with either 10,000-unit/mL catalase or 300-µM N-acetyl-cysteine. The potentiating effect of H2O2 was occluded by an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and was blocked by a protein kinase A inhibitor, N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino] ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride. This study indicates that oxidative stress may potentiate presynaptic GABA release through the mechanism of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathways, which may result in the inhibition of the cerebral cortex neuronal activity. PMID:20631883

  20. Accumulation of GABAergic Neurons, Causing a Focal Ambient GABA Gradient, and Downregulation of KCC2 Are Induced During Microgyrus Formation in a Mouse Model of Polymicrogyria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianying; Kumada, Tatsuro; Morishima, Toshitaka; Iwata, Satomi; Kaneko, Takeshi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Yoshida, Sachiko; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Although focal cortical malformations are considered neuronal migration disorders, their formation mechanisms remain unknown. We addressed how the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system affects the GABAergic and glutamatergic neuronal migration underlying such malformations. A focal freeze-lesion (FFL) of the postnatal day zero (P0) glutamic acid decarboxylase–green fluorescent protein knock-in mouse neocortex produced a 3- or 4-layered microgyrus at P7. GABAergic interneurons accumulated around the necrosis including the superficial region during microgyrus formation at P4, whereas E17.5-born, Cux1-positive pyramidal neurons outlined the GABAergic neurons and were absent from the superficial layer, forming cell-dense areas in layer 2 of the P7 microgyrus. GABA imaging showed that an extracellular GABA level temporally increased in the GABAergic neuron-positive area, including the necrotic center, at P4. The expression of the Cl– transporter KCC2 was downregulated in the microgyrus-forming GABAergic and E17.5-born glutamatergic neurons at P4; these cells may need a high intracellular Cl– concentration to induce depolarizing GABA effects. Bicuculline decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in these microgyrus-forming cells. Thus, neonatal FFL causes specific neuronal accumulation, preceded by an increase in ambient GABA during microgyrus formation. This GABA increase induces GABAA receptor-mediated Ca2+ oscillation in KCC2-downregulated microgyrus-forming cells, as seen in migrating cells during early neocortical development. PMID:23246779

  1. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F; Mattson, Mark P; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here, we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling. PMID:25515406

  2. The canonical Notch pathway effector RBP-J regulates neuronal plasticity and expression of GABA transporters in hippocampal networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuxi; Wang, Yue; Worley, Paul F.; Mattson, Mark P.; Gaiano, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the Notch pathway in neurons is essential for learning and memory in various species from invertebrates to mammals. However, it remains unclear how Notch signaling regulates neuronal plasticity, and whether the transcriptional regulator and canonical pathway effector RBP-J plays a role. Here we report that conditional disruption of RBP-J in the postnatal hippocampus leads to defects in long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), and in learning and memory. Using gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified two GABA transporters, GAT2 and BGT1, as putative Notch/RBP-J pathway targets, which may function downstream of RBP-J to limit the accumulation of GABA in the Schaffer collateral pathway. Our results reveal an essential role for canonical Notch/RBP-J signaling in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that role, at least in part, is mediated by the regulation of GABAergic signaling. PMID:25515406

  3. Dopamine/Tyrosine Hydroxylase Neurons of the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus Release GABA, Communicate with Dopaminergic and Other Arcuate Neurons, and Respond to Dynorphin, Met-Enkephalin, and Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    We employ transgenic mice with selective expression of tdTomato or cre recombinase together with optogenetics to investigate whether hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) dopamine/tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons interact with other ARC neurons, how they respond to hypothalamic neuropeptides, and to test whether these cells constitute a single homogeneous population. Immunostaining with dopamine and TH antisera was used to corroborate targeted transgene expression. Using whole-cell recording on a large number of neurons (n = 483), two types of neurons with different electrophysiological properties were identified in the dorsomedial ARC where 94% of TH neurons contained immunoreactive dopamine: bursting and nonbursting neurons. In contrast to rat, the regular oscillations of mouse bursting neurons depend on a mechanism involving both T-type calcium and A-type potassium channel activation, but are independent of gap junction coupling. Optogenetic stimulation using cre recombinase-dependent ChIEF-AAV-DJ expressed in ARC TH neurons evoked postsynaptic GABA currents in the majority of neighboring dopamine and nondopamine neurons, suggesting for the first time substantial synaptic projections from ARC TH cells to other ARC neurons. Numerous met-enkephalin (mENK) and dynorphin-immunoreactive boutons appeared to contact ARC TH neurons. mENK inhibited both types of TH neuron through G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium currents mediated by δ and μ opioid receptors. Dynorphin-A inhibited both bursting and nonbursting TH neurons by activating κ receptors. Oxytocin excited both bursting and nonbursting neurons. These results reveal a complexity of TH neurons that communicate extensively with neurons within the ARC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we show that the great majority of mouse hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons that synthesize TH in the dorsomedial ARC also contain immunoreactive dopamine, and show either bursting or nonbursting electrical activity. Unlike

  4. Human locus coeruleus neurons express the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit gene and produce benzodiazepine binding.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Kati S; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E; Särkioja, Terttu; Maksimow, Anu; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2010-06-21

    Noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus project throughout the cerebral cortex and multiple subcortical structures. Alterations in the locus coeruleus firing are associated with vigilance states and with fear and anxiety disorders. Brain ionotropic type A receptors for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) serve as targets for anxiolytic and sedative drugs, and play an essential regulatory role in the locus coeruleus. GABA(A) receptors are composed of a variable array of subunits forming heteropentameric chloride channels with different pharmacological properties. The gamma2 subunit is essential for the formation of the binding site for benzodiazepines, allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors that are clinically often used as sedatives/hypnotics and anxiolytics. There are contradictory reports in regard to the gamma2 subunit's expression and participation in the functional GABA(A) receptors in the mammalian locus coeruleus. We report here that the gamma2 subunit is transcribed and participates in the assembly of functional GABA(A) receptors in the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neuromelanin-containing neurons within postmortem human locus coeruleus as demonstrated by in situ hybridization with specific gamma2 subunit oligonucleotides and autoradiographic assay for flumazenil-sensitive [(3)H]Ro 15-4513 binding to benzodiazepine sites. These sites were also sensitive to the alpha1 subunit-preferring agonist zolpidem. Our data suggest a species difference in the expression profiles of the alpha1 and gamma2 subunits in the locus coeruleus, with the sedation-related benzodiazepine sites being more important in man than rodents. This may explain the repeated failures in the transition of novel drugs with a promising neuropharmacological profile in rodents to human clinical usage, due to intolerable sedative effects. PMID:20417252

  5. Extent of colocalization of serotonin and GABA in neurons of the ventral medulla oblongata in rat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Seroogy, K; Verhofstad, A A

    1988-09-27

    The colocalization of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the ventral aspect of the rat medulla oblongata was studied using antibodies directed against 5-HT and GABA. Although 5-HT- and GABA-immunoreactive cell bodies were observed over the entire rostral-caudal extent of the ventral medulla, the colocalization of these two classical neurotransmitters in single cells was, for the most part, limited to a region that corresponds anatomically to nucleus raphe magnus/nucleus paragigantocellularis. Schematic drawings showing the distribution of 5-HT/GABA cell bodies in the ventral medulla are provided. PMID:3066433

  6. GAB(A) receptors present higher affinity and modified subunit composition in spinal motor neurons from a genetic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Carunchio, Irene; Mollinari, Cristiana; Pieri, Massimo; Merlo, Daniela; Zona, Cristina

    2008-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and cerebral cortex. In this study we have analysed the electrophysiological properties of GABA(A) receptors and GABA(A) alpha1 and alpha2 subunits expression in spinal motor neurons in culture obtained from a genetic model of ALS (G93A) and compared with transgenic wild type SOD1 (SOD1) and their corresponding non transgenic litter mates (Control). Although excitotoxic motor neuron death has been extensively studied in relation to Ca(2+)-dependent processes, strong evidence indicates that excitotoxic cell death is also remarkably dependent on Cl(-) ions and on GABA(A) receptor activation. In this study we have analysed the electrophysiological properties of GABA(A) receptors and the expression of GABA(A)alpha(1) and alpha(2) subunits in cultured motor neurons obtained from a genetic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (G93A) and compared them with transgenic wild-type Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and their corresponding non-transgenic littermates (Control). In all tested motor neurons, the application of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (0.5-100 mum) evoked an inward current that was reversibly blocked by bicuculline (100 mum), thus indicating that it was mediated by the activation of GABA(A) receptors. Our results indicate that the current density at high GABA concentrations is similar in control, Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase and G93A motor neurons. However, the dose-response curve significantly shifted toward lower concentration values in G93A motor neurons and the extent of desensitization also increased in these neurons. Finally, multiplex single-cell real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence revealed that the amount of GABA(A)alpha(1) subunit was significantly increased in G93A motor neurons, whereas the levels of alpha(2) subunit were unchanged. These data show that the functionality and

  7. Postsynaptic Depolarization Enhances GABA Drive to Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Neurons through Somatodendritic Cholecystokinin Release.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Karen M; Baimoukhametova, Dinara V; Bains, Jaideep S; Pittman, Quentin J

    2015-09-23

    Somatodendritically released peptides alter synaptic function through a variety of mechanisms, including autocrine actions that liberate retrograde transmitters. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide expressed in neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), a region implicated in satiety and stress. There are clear demonstrations that exogenous CCK modulates food intake and neuropeptide expression in the DMH, but there is no information on how endogenous CCK alters synaptic properties. Here, we provide the first report of somatodendritic release of CCK in the brain in male Sprague Dawley rats. CCK is released from DMH neurons in response to repeated postsynaptic depolarizations, and acts in an autocrine fashion on CCK2 receptors to enhance postsynaptic NMDA receptor function and liberate the retrograde transmitter, nitric oxide (NO). NO subsequently acts presynaptically to enhance GABA release through a soluble guanylate cyclase-mediated pathway. These data provide the first demonstration of synaptic actions of somatodendritically released CCK in the hypothalamus and reveal a new form of retrograde plasticity, depolarization-induced potentiation of inhibition. Significance statement: Somatodendritic signaling using endocannabinoids or nitric oxide to alter the efficacy of afferent transmission is well established. Despite early convincing evidence for somatodendritic release of neurohypophysial peptides in the hypothalamus, there is only limited evidence for this mode of release for other peptides. Here, we provide the first evidence for somatodendritic release of the satiety peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) in the brain. We also reveal a new form of synaptic plasticity in which postsynaptic depolarization results in enhancement of inhibition through the somatodendritic release of CCK. PMID:26400945

  8. Nutritional State-Dependent Ghrelin Activation of Vasopressin Neurons via Retrograde Trans-Neuronal–Glial Stimulation of Excitatory GABA Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Haam, Juhee; Halmos, Katalin C.; Di, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and physiological coupling between energy balance and fluid homeostasis is critical for survival. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin has been shown to stimulate the secretion of the osmoregulatory hormone vasopressin (VP), linking nutritional status to the control of blood osmolality, although the mechanism of this systemic crosstalk is unknown. Here, we show using electrophysiological recordings and calcium imaging in rat brain slices that ghrelin stimulates VP neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in a nutritional state-dependent manner by activating an excitatory GABAergic synaptic input via a retrograde neuronal–glial circuit. In slices from fasted rats, ghrelin activation of a postsynaptic ghrelin receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor type 1a (GHS-R1a), in VP neurons caused the dendritic release of VP, which stimulated astrocytes to release the gliotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP activation of P2X receptors excited presynaptic GABA neurons to increase GABA release, which was excitatory to the VP neurons. This trans-neuronal–glial retrograde circuit activated by ghrelin provides an alternative means of stimulation of VP release and represents a novel mechanism of neuronal control by local neuronal–glial circuits. It also provides a potential cellular mechanism for the physiological integration of energy and fluid homeostasis. PMID:24790191

  9. Altered pharmacology and GABA-A receptor subunit expression in dorsal midline thalamic neurons in limbic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Karthik; Sun, Chengsan; Bertram, Edward H

    2009-01-01

    The mediodorsal (MD) and paraventricular (PV) thalamic nuclei play a significant role in limbic epilepsy, and previous reports have shown changes in GABA-A receptor (GABAAR) mediated synaptic function. In this study, we examined changes in the pharmacology of GABAergic drugs and the expression of the GABAAR subunits in the MD and PV neurons in epilepsy. We observed nucleus specific changes in the sensitivity of sIPSCs to zolpidem and phenobarbital in MD and PV neurons from epileptic animals. In contrast, the magnitude of change in electrically evoked response (eIPSC) to zolpidem and phenobarbital were uniformly diminished in both MD and PV neurons in epilepsy. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that in epilepsy, there was a reduction in GAD65 expression and NeuN positive neurons in the MD neurons. Also, there was a decrease in immunoreactivity of the alpha1 and beta2/3 subunit of GABAARs, but not the gamma2 of the GABAAR in both MD and PV in epilepsy. These findings demonstrate significant alterations in the pharmacology of GABA and GABAARs in a key region for seizure generation, which may have implications for the physiology and pharmacology of limbic epilepsy. PMID:18992345

  10. [Influence of GABA agonist phenibut on the neuronal activity and interaction in hippocampus and neocortex in emotionally negative situations].

    PubMed

    Ziablintseva, E A; Pavlova, I V

    2009-09-01

    The activity of individual neurons and interaction of neighboring cells in hippocampus (CA1 area) and neocortical parieto-temporal area were compared in negative emotional situations in normal and in decreased anxiety produced by systemic injection of GABA agonist: phenibut. Analysis of the autocorrelation histogram shapes showed that in both structures phenibut increased bursts of neuronal discharges, decreased the interspike intervals within the burst, increased the number of neurons with delta-frequency oscillation and decreased the number of neurons with theta-1 oscillation. In hippocampus, in addition the intensity of theta-2 frequencies increased. During phenibut action, the irritating agents evoked lesser changes in neuronal activity as compared to the norm. Analysis of the crosscorrelation histogram shapes showed that, under exposure to phenibut in both structures, there were an increase in the number of common inputs to recorded neurons and a decrease in the number of excitatory connections. In hippocampus, there was still an increase in the number of inhibitory connections. The revealed changes in neuronal activity produced by phenibut indicated a decrease in the activation level of hippocampus and neocortex, an increase of neuronal synchronization and a decrease in excitation spread among neurons, that correlated with a reduction of behavioral reactivity and anxiety of animals. PMID:19899708

  11. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  12. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Davide; Yan McCurdy, Li; Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Emonet, Thierry; Nitabach, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  13. GABA as a rising gliotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Bo-Eun; Lee, C. Justin

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter that is known to be synthesized and released from GABAergic neurons in the brain. However, recent studies have shown that not only neurons but also astrocytes contain a considerable amount of GABA that can be released and activate GABA receptors in neighboring neurons. These exciting new findings for glial GABA raise further interesting questions about the source of GABA, its mechanism of release and regulation and the functional role of glial GABA. In this review, we highlight recent studies that identify the presence and release of GABA in glial cells, we show several proposed potential pathways for accumulation and modulation of glial intracellular and extracellular GABA content, and finally we discuss functional roles for glial GABA in the brain. PMID:25565970

  14. GABA Receptors on Orexin and Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons Are Differentially Homeostatically Regulated Following Sleep Deprivation123

    PubMed Central

    Toossi, Hanieh; del Cid-Pellitero, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Though overlapping in distribution through the hypothalamus, orexin (Orx) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons play opposite roles in the regulation of sleep–wake states. Orx neurons discharge during waking, whereas MCH neurons discharge during sleep. In the present study, we examined in mice whether GABAA and GABAB receptors (Rs) are present on Orx and MCH neurons and might undergo differential changes as a function of their different activities following sleep deprivation (SD) and sleep recovery (SR). Applying quantitative stereological image analysis to dual-immunofluorescent stained sections, we determined that the proportion of Orx neurons positively immunostained for GABAARs was significantly higher following SD (∼48%) compared with sleep control (SC; ∼24%) and SR (∼27%), and that the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly greater. In contrast, the average proportion of the MCH neurons immunostained for GABAARs was insignificantly lower following SD (∼43%) compared with SC (∼54%) and SR (56%), and the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly less. Although, GABABRs were observed in all Orx and MCH neurons (100%), the luminance of these receptors was differentially altered following SD. The intensity of GABABRs in the Orx neurons was significantly greater after SD than after SC and SR, whereas that in the MCH neurons was significantly less. The present results indicate that GABA receptors undergo dynamic and differential changes in the wake-active Orx neurons and the sleep-active MCH neurons as a function of and homeostatic adjustment to their preceding activity and sleep–wake state. PMID:27294196

  15. GABA Receptors on Orexin and Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons Are Differentially Homeostatically Regulated Following Sleep Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Toossi, Hanieh; Del Cid-Pellitero, Esther; Jones, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Though overlapping in distribution through the hypothalamus, orexin (Orx) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons play opposite roles in the regulation of sleep-wake states. Orx neurons discharge during waking, whereas MCH neurons discharge during sleep. In the present study, we examined in mice whether GABAA and GABAB receptors (Rs) are present on Orx and MCH neurons and might undergo differential changes as a function of their different activities following sleep deprivation (SD) and sleep recovery (SR). Applying quantitative stereological image analysis to dual-immunofluorescent stained sections, we determined that the proportion of Orx neurons positively immunostained for GABAARs was significantly higher following SD (∼48%) compared with sleep control (SC; ∼24%) and SR (∼27%), and that the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly greater. In contrast, the average proportion of the MCH neurons immunostained for GABAARs was insignificantly lower following SD (∼43%) compared with SC (∼54%) and SR (56%), and the luminance of the GABAARs was significantly less. Although, GABABRs were observed in all Orx and MCH neurons (100%), the luminance of these receptors was differentially altered following SD. The intensity of GABABRs in the Orx neurons was significantly greater after SD than after SC and SR, whereas that in the MCH neurons was significantly less. The present results indicate that GABA receptors undergo dynamic and differential changes in the wake-active Orx neurons and the sleep-active MCH neurons as a function of and homeostatic adjustment to their preceding activity and sleep-wake state. PMID:27294196

  16. Effect of phosphatidylserine on the basal and GABA-activated Cl- permeation across single nerve membranes from rabbit Deiters' neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Rapallino, M.V.; Cupello, A.; Mainardi, P.; Besio, G.; Loeb, C.W. )

    1990-06-01

    The permeation of labeled Cl- ions across single plasma membranes from Deiters' neurons has been studied in the presence of various concentrations of phosphatidylserine (PS) on their extracellular side. PS reduces significantly basal Cl- permeation only at 10(-5) M on the membrane exterior. No effect was found at other concentrations. GABA activable 36Cl- permeation is heavily reduced and almost abolished at 10(-11) - 10(-5) M phosphatidylserine. This exogenous phosphatidylserine effect is difficult to interpret in relation to the function of the endogenous phospholipid. However, it may be involved in the epileptogenic effect in vivo of exogenous phosphatidylserine administration to rats.

  17. The effects of quinolones and NSAIDs upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from rat dorsal root ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Davey, P G; Lambert, J J

    1991-02-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated a proconvulsant effect of certain quinolone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug combinations. Radioligand binding experiments have indicated that these actions may be mediated by antagonism of the GABAA receptor. The present study has further investigated this hypothesis in a functional assay by examining the effects of the quinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin alone and in combination with either fenbufen or biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA) upon GABA-evoked currents recorded from voltage-clamped rat dorsal root ganglion neurones (DRG) maintained in cell culture. GABA-evoked whole cell currents were weakly but dose-dependently (30 microM-1 mM) reduced in the presence of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. The IC50 for ciprofloxacin was 100 microM but greater than 1 mM for ofloxacin. Application of either fenbufen (100 microM) or BPAA (100 microM) alone produced little effect on the GABA-evoked currents. However, the inhibitory action of ciprofloxacin was enhanced in the presence of 100 microM fenbufen by approximately five-fold whereas the antagonism of GABA responses by ofloxacin was unaffected. In contrast, BPAA (100 microM) had a dramatic effect on the inhibitory actions of both antibiotics such that the IC50 for ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was reduced to 0.03 and 0.3 microM respectively. The present results support earlier binding studies and extend them by demonstrating electrophysiologically a potent quinolone/NSAID drug interaction at the GABAA receptor. The mechanism(s) of this novel interaction remains to be determined. These results are commensurate with clinical observations of an increased risk of fits in patients prescribed certain quinolones together with certain NSAIDs. PMID:1647389

  18. A Role for Diminished GABA Transporter Activity in the Cortical Discharge Phenotype of MeCP2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Wither, Robert G; Lang, Min; Wu, Chiping; Sidorova-Darmos, Elena; Netchev, Hristo; Matolcsy, Catherine B; Snead, Orlando Carter; Eubanks, James H

    2016-05-01

    Cortical network hyper-excitability is a common phenotype in mouse models lacking the transcriptional regulator methyl-CPG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Here, we implicate enhanced GABAB receptor activity stemming from diminished cortical expression of the GABA transporter GAT-1 in the genesis of this network hyper-excitability. We found that administering the activity-dependent GABAB receptor allosteric modulator GS-39783 to female Mecp2(+/-) mice at doses producing no effect in wild-type mice strongly potentiated their basal rates of spontaneous cortical discharge activity. Consistently, administering the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP-35348 significantly decreased basal discharge activity in these mice. Expression analysis revealed that while GABAB or extra-synaptic GABAA receptor prevalence is preserved in the MeCP2-deficient cortex, the expression of GAT-1 is significantly reduced from wild-type levels. This decrease in GAT-1 expression is consequential, as low doses of the GAT-1 inhibitor NO-711 that had no effects in wild-type mice strongly exacerbated cortical discharge activity in female Mecp2(+/-) mice. Taken together, these data indicate that the absence of MeCP2 leads to decreased cortical levels of the GAT-1 GABA transporter, which facilitates cortical network hyper-excitability in MeCP2-deficient mice by increasing the activity of cortical GABAB receptors. PMID:26499511

  19. Activation of GABA(A) receptors by taurine and muscimol blocks the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Paula-Lima, Andréa C; De Felice, Fernanda G; Brito-Moreira, Jordano; Ferreira, Sérgio T

    2005-12-01

    The beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) is centrally related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is potently neurotoxic to central nervous system neurons. The neurotoxicity of Abeta has been partially related to the over activation of glutamatergic transmission and excitotoxicity. Taurine is a naturally occurring beta-amino acid present in the mammalian brain. Due to its safety and tolerability, taurine has been clinically used in humans in the treatment of a number of non-neurological disorders. Here, we show that micromolar doses of taurine block the neurotoxicity of Abeta to rat hippocampal and cortical neurons in culture. Moreover, taurine also rescues central neurons from the excitotoxicity induced by high concentrations of extracellular glutamate. Neuroprotection by taurine is abrogated by picrotoxin, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. GABA and muscimol, an agonist of the GABA(A) receptor, also block neuronal death induced by Abeta in rat hippocampal and cortical neurons. These results suggest that activation of GABA(A) receptors protects neurons against Abeta toxicity in AD-affected regions of the mammalian brain and that taurine should be investigated as a novel therapeutic tool in the treatment of AD and of other neurological disorders in which excitotoxicity plays a relevant role. PMID:16150468

  20. Early expression of glycine and GABA(A) receptors in developing spinal cord neurons. Effects on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Tapia, J C; Mentis, G Z; Navarrete, R; Nualart, F; Figueroa, E; Sánchez, A; Aguayo, L G

    2001-01-01

    Using fluorometric and immunocytochemical techniques, we found that high glycine concentrations or blockade of glycine receptors increases neurite outgrowth in developing mouse spinal cord neurons. Glycine- and GABA(A)-activated currents were demonstrated during applications of glycine and GABA (50-100 microM) in 5 days in vitro (DIV) neurons. Long application (> or =10 min) of 100 microM glycine desensitized the membrane response by more than 95%. Application of glutamate in the absence of external Mg(2+), at several membrane potentials, did not produce any detectable membrane response in these cells. Immunocytochemical studies with NR1 and GluR1 antibodies showed a delayed appearance of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors respectively. Spontaneous synaptic activity was readily observed in 5 DIV neurons. The use of various receptor antagonists (strychnine, bicuculline, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate [APV], 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione [CNQX]) revealed that this activity was predominantly glycinergic, and to a smaller extent, GABAergic. In the presence of bicuculline, APV and CNQX, we detected abundant spontaneous depolarizing potentials which often reached the action potential threshold. Further evidence for functional synaptic activity was provided by the detection of co-localization of gephyrin and synaptophysin at 5 DIV using confocal microscopy. Fluorometric studies with Fluo-3, a Ca(2+) indicator, in 5 DIV cultures showed the presence of spontaneous fluctuations associated with tetrodotoxin-sensitive synaptic events. The number of neurons displaying these fluctuations was significantly increased (>100%) when the cells were bathed in a strychnine-containing solution. On the other hand, these synaptically mediated Ca(2+) events were blocked by the co-application of strychnine and bicuculline. This suggests that glycine and GABA(A) receptors provide a fundamental regulation of both

  1. Pharmacology of GABA.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, B

    1982-01-01

    GABA-ergic systems are involved in all the main functions of the brain. In most brain regions impairment of this system produces epileptic activity. GABA-mediated inhibitory function can be enhanced by drugs of at least seven different types. They act on the metabolism or synaptic release of GABA, or its reuptake into neurones of glia, or on various components of the GABA receptor complex (GABA recognition site, "benzodiazepine" receptor or chloride ionophore). Among such compounds, those which act most specifically and potently on GABA receptors remain primarily research tools. Among compounds in clinical use, valproate, benzodiazepines, and anticonvulsant barbiturates al enhance GABA-mediated inhibition. In the future, new inhibitors of GABA uptake, new GABA agonists and potent inhibitors of GABA-transaminase are likely to become available. Trials of drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function have been made in a wide variety of neurological disorders. In most forms of epilepsy a therapeutic effect is evident. Real benefit from GABA therapies has not been demonstrated in the principal disorders of movement (Huntington's chorea, Parkinson's disease, dystonias), except in so far as they have a myoclonic or paroxysmal component. Among psychiatric disorders the acute symptoms of schizophrenia are exacerbated by enhanced GABA-ergic function. Abstinence syndromes (alcohol, barbiturate or narcotic withdrawal) are ameliorated by drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function, and there is some evidence for a beneficial action in anxiety states and mania. Attempts to relate the molecular neurobiology of GABA with clinical pharmacology are of very recent origin. Improved understanding of the variety of GABA receptor mechanisms will provide the key to the more selective pharmacological manipulations that are required for therapeutic success. PMID:6214305

  2. Depolarizing GABA acts on intrinsically bursting pyramidal neurons to drive giant depolarizing potentials in the immature hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sipilä, Sampsa T; Huttu, Kristiina; Soltesz, Ivan; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2005-06-01

    Spontaneous periodic network events are a characteristic feature of developing neuronal networks, and they are thought to play a crucial role in the maturation of neuronal circuits. In the immature hippocampus, these types of events are seen in intracellular recordings as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) during the stage of neuronal development when GABA(A)-mediated transmission is depolarizing. However, the precise mechanism how GABAergic transmission promotes GDP occurrence is not known. Using whole-cell, cell-attached, perforated-patch, and field-potential recordings in hippocampal slices, we demonstrate here that CA3 pyramidal neurons in the newborn rat generate intrinsic bursts when depolarized. Furthermore, the characteristic rhythmicity of GDP generation is not based on a temporally patterned output of the GABAergic interneuronal network. However, GABAergic depolarization plays a key role in promoting voltage-dependent, intrinsic pyramidal bursting activity. The present data indicate that glutamatergic CA3 neurons have an instructive, pacemaker role in the generation of GDPs, whereas both synaptic and tonic depolarizing GABAergic mechanisms exert a temporally nonpatterned, facilitatory action in the generation of these network events. PMID:15930375

  3. Closing the Phenotypic Gap between Transformed Neuronal Cell Lines in Culture and Untransformed Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Tereance A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Ott, C. Mark; HonerzuBentrup, Kerstin; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Nelman-Gonzales, Mayra; Pierson, Duane L.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) are frequently limited by the failure of primary neurons to propagate in vitro. Neuronal cell lines can be substituted for primary cells but they often misrepresent normal conditions. We hypothesized that a dimensional (3-D) cell culture system would drive the phenotype of transformed neurons closer to that of untransformed cells. In our studies comparing 3-D versus 2-dimensional (2-D) culture, neuronal SH-SY5Y (SY) cells underwent distinct morphological changes combined with a significant drop in their rate of cell division. Expression of the proto-oncogene N-myc and the RNA binding protein HuD was decreased in 3-D culture as compared to standard 2-D conditions. We observed a decline in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in 3-D culture, coupled with increased expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Moreover, thapsigargin (TG)-induced apoptosis was enhanced in the 3-D cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly differing mRNA levels for over 700 genes in the cells of each culture type. These results indicate that a 3-D culture approach narrows the phenotypic gap between neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. The resulting cells may readily be used for in vitro research of neuronal pathogenesis.

  4. Retinoic Acid, GABA-ergic, and TGF-β Signaling Systems Are Involved in Human Cleft Palate Fibroblast Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Tiziano; Bellucci, Catia; Lilli, Cinzia; Pezzetti, Furio; Carinci, Francesco; Becchetti, Ennio; Carinci, Paolo; Stabellini, Giordano; Calvitti, Mario; Lumare, Eleonora; Bodo, Maria

    2006-01-01

    During embryogenesis, a complex interplay between extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, regulatory molecules, and growth factors mediates morphogenetic processes involved in palatogenesis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), retinoic acid (RA), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic signaling systems are also potentially involved. Using [3H]glucosamine and [35S]methionine incorporation, anion exchange chromatography, semiquantitative radioactive RT-PCR, and a TGF-β binding assay, we aimed to verify the presence of phenotypic differences between primary cultures of secondary palate (SP) fibroblasts from 2-year-old subjects with familial nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (CLP-SP fibroblasts) and age-matched normal SP (N-SP) fibroblasts. The effects of RA—which, at pharmacologic doses, induces cleft palate in newborns of many species—were also studied. We found an altered ECM production in CLP-SP fibroblasts that synthesized and secreted more glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fibronectin (FN) compared with N-SP cells. In CLP-SP cells, TGF-β3 mRNA expression and TGF-β receptor number were higher and RA receptor-α (RARA) gene expression was increased. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that GABA receptor (GABRB3) mRNA expression was upregulated in human CLP-SP fibroblasts. In N-SP and CLP-SP fibroblasts, RA decreased GAG and FN secretion and increased TGF-β3 mRNA expression but reduced the number of TGF-β receptors. TGF-β receptor type I mRNA expression was decreased, TGF-β receptor type II was increased, and TGF-β receptor type III was not affected. RA treatment increased RARA gene expression in both cell populations but upregulated GABRB3 mRNA expression only in N-SP cells. These results show that CLP-SP fibroblasts compared with N-SP fibroblasts exhibit an abnormal phenotype in vitro and respond differently to RA treatment, and suggest that altered crosstalk between RA, GABAergic, and TGF-β signaling systems could be involved in human cleft

  5. Selective reduction of cerebral cortex GABA neurons in a late gestation model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Smiley, John F; Saito, Mariko; Bleiwas, Cynthia; Masiello, Kurt; Ardekani, Babak; Guilfoyle, David N; Gerum, Scott; Wilson, Donald A; Vadasz, Csaba

    2015-09-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are associated with cognitive and behavioral deficits, and decreased volume of the whole brain and cerebral cortex. Rodent models have shown that early postnatal treatments, which mimic ethanol toxicity in the third trimester of human pregnancy, acutely induce widespread apoptotic neuronal degeneration and permanent behavioral deficits. However, the lasting cellular and anatomical effects of early ethanol treatments are still incompletely understood. This study examined changes in neocortex volume, thickness, and cellular organization that persist in adult mice after postnatal day 7 (P7) ethanol treatment. Post mortem brain volumes, measured by both MRI within the skull and by fluid displacement of isolated brains, were reduced 10-13% by ethanol treatment. The cerebral cortex showed a similar reduction (12%) caused mainly by lower surface area (9%). In spite of these large changes, several features of cortical organization showed little evidence of change, including cortical thickness, overall neuron size, and laminar organization. Estimates of total neuron number showed a trend level reduction of about 8%, due mainly to reduced cortical volume but unchanged neuron density. However, counts of calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) subtypes of GABAergic neurons showed a striking >30% reduction of neuron number. Similar ethanol effects were found in male and female mice, and in C57BL/6By and BALB/cJ mouse strains. Our findings indicate that the cortex has substantial capacity to develop normal cytoarchitectonic organization after early postnatal ethanol toxicity, but there is a selective and persistent reduction of GABA cells that may contribute to the lasting cognitive and behavioral deficits in FASD. PMID:26252988

  6. The neuroendocrine genesis of polycystic ovary syndrome: A role for arcuate nucleus GABA neurons.

    PubMed

    Moore, Aleisha M; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a prevalent and distressing endocrine disorder lacking a clearly identified aetiology. Despite its name, PCOS may result from impaired neuronal circuits in the brain that regulate steroid hormone feedback to the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. Ovarian function in all mammals is controlled by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, a small group of neurons that reside in the pre-optic area of the hypothalamus. GnRH neurons drive the secretion of the gonadotropins from the pituitary gland that subsequently control ovarian function, including the production of gonadal steroid hormones. These hormones, in turn, provide important feedback signals to GnRH neurons via a hormone sensitive neuronal network in the brain. In many women with PCOS this feedback pathway is impaired, resulting in the downstream consequences of the syndrome. This review will explore what is currently known from clinical and animal studies about the identity, relative contribution and significance of the individual neuronal components within the GnRH neuronal network that contribute to the pathophysiology of PCOS. We review evidence for the specific neuronal pathways hypothesised to mediate progesterone negative feedback to GnRH neurons, and discuss the potential mechanisms by which androgens may evoke disruptions in these circuits at different developmental time points. Finally, this review discusses data providing compelling support for disordered progesterone-sensitive GABAergic input to GnRH neurons, originating specifically within the arcuate nucleus in prenatal androgen induced forms of PCOS. PMID:26455490

  7. Loss of UBE3A from TH-expressing neurons suppresses GABA co-release and enhances VTA-NAc optical self-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, Janet; Stamatakis, Alice M.; Kantak, Pranish A.; McElligott, Zoe A.; Judson, Matthew C.; Aita, Megumi; Rougie, Marie; Stuber, Garret D.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivated reward-seeking behaviours are governed by dopaminergic ventral tegmental area projections to the nucleus accumbens. In addition to dopamine, these mesoaccumbal terminals co-release other neurotransmitters including glutamate and GABA, whose roles in regulating motivated behaviours are currently being investigated. Here we demonstrate that loss of the E3-ubiquitin ligase, UBE3A, from tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons impairs mesoaccumbal, non-canonical GABA co-release and enhances reward-seeking behaviour measured by optical self-stimulation. PMID:26869263

  8. New In Vitro Phenotypic Assay for Epilepsy: Fluorescent Measurement of Synchronized Neuronal Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Pacico, Nathalie; Mingorance-Le Meur, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Research in the epilepsy field is moving from a primary focus on controlling seizures to addressing disease pathophysiology. This requires the adoption of resource- and time-consuming animal models of chronic epilepsy which are no longer able to sustain the testing of even moderate numbers of compounds. Therefore, new in vitro functional assays of epilepsy are needed that are able to provide a medium throughput while still preserving sufficient biological context to allow for the identification of compounds with new modes of action. Here we describe a robust and simple fluorescence-based calcium assay to measure epileptiform network activity using rat primary cortical cultures in a 96-well format. The assay measures synchronized intracellular calcium oscillations occurring in the population of primary neurons and is amenable to medium throughput screening. We have adapted this assay format to the low magnesium and the 4-aminopyridine epilepsy models and confirmed the contribution of voltage-gated ion channels and AMPA, NMDA and GABA receptors to epileptiform activity in both models. We have also evaluated its translatability using a panel of antiepileptic drugs with a variety of modes of action. Given its throughput and translatability, the calcium oscillations assay bridges the gap between simplified target-based screenings and compound testing in animal models of epilepsy. This phenotypic assay also has the potential to be used directly as a functional screen to help identify novel antiepileptic compounds with new modes of action, as well as pathways with previously unknown contribution to disease pathophysiology. PMID:24416277

  9. Activation and integration of bilateral GABA-mediated synaptic inputs in neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whyment, Andrew D; Wilson, Jennifer M M; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2004-01-01

    The role of GABA receptors in synaptic transmission to neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs) was investigated utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques in longitudinal and transverse spinal cord slice preparations. In the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists (NBQX, 5 μm and D-APV, 10 μm), electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral or contralateral lateral funiculi (iLF and cLF, respectively) revealed monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in 75% and 65% of SPNs, respectively. IPSPs were sensitive to bicuculline (10 μm) in all neurones tested and reversed polarity around −55 mV, the latter indicating mediation via chloride conductances. In three neurones IPSPs evoked by stimulation of the iLF (n = 1) or cLF (n = 2) were partly sensitive to strychnine (2 μm). The expression of postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors were confirmed by the sensitivity of SPNs to agonists, GABA (2 mm), muscimol (10–100 μm) or baclofen (10–100 μm), in the presence of TTX, each of which produced membrane hyperpolarization in all SPNs tested. Muscimol-induced responses were sensitive to bicuculline (1–10 μm) and SR95531 (10 μm) and baclofen-induced responses were sensitive to 2-hydroxy-saclofen (100–200 μm) and CGP55845 (200 nm). The GABAC receptor agonist CACA (200 μm) was without significant effect on SPNs. These results suggest that SPNs possess postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors and that subsets of SPNs receive bilateral GABAergic inputs which activate GABAA receptors, coupled to a chloride conductance. At resting or holding potentials close to threshold either single or bursts (10–100 Hz) of IPSPs gave rise to a rebound excitation and action potential firing at the termination of the burst. This effect was mimicked by injection of small (10–20 pA) rectangular-wave current pulses, which revealed a time-dependent, Cs+-sensitive inward rectification and rebound excitation at the termination of the response to

  10. GABA-mediated repulsive coupling between circadian clock neurons in the SCN encodes seasonal time

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jihwan; Hong, Sungho; DeWoskin, Daniel; De Schutter, Erik; Forger, Daniel B.; Takumi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) forms not only the master circadian clock but also a seasonal clock. This neural network of ∼10,000 circadian oscillators encodes season-dependent day-length changes through a largely unknown mechanism. We show that region-intrinsic changes in the SCN fine-tune the degree of network synchrony and reorganize the phase relationship among circadian oscillators to represent day length. We measure oscillations of the clock gene Bmal1, at single-cell and regional levels in cultured SCN explanted from animals raised under short or long days. Coupling estimation using the Kuramoto framework reveals that the network has couplings that can be both phase-attractive (synchronizing) and -repulsive (desynchronizing). The phase gap between the dorsal and ventral regions increases and the overall period of the SCN shortens with longer day length. We find that one of the underlying physiological mechanisms is the modulation of the intracellular chloride concentration, which can adjust the strength and polarity of the ionotropic GABAA-mediated synaptic input. We show that increasing day-length changes the pattern of chloride transporter expression, yielding more excitatory GABA synaptic input, and that blocking GABAA signaling or the chloride transporter disrupts the unique phase and period organization induced by the day length. We test the consequences of this tunable GABA coupling in the context of excitation–inhibition balance through detailed realistic modeling. These results indicate that the network encoding of seasonal time is controlled by modulation of intracellular chloride, which determines the phase relationship among and period difference between the dorsal and ventral SCN. PMID:26130804

  11. During postnatal development endogenous neurosteroids influence GABA-ergic neurotransmission of mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Mitchell, Scott J.; Peden, Dianne R.; Herd, Murray B.; Seifi, Mohsen; Swinny, Jerome D.; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    As neuronal development progresses, GABAergic synaptic transmission undergoes a defined program of reconfiguration. For example, GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synaptic currents, (miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; mIPSCs), which initially exhibit a relatively slow decay phase, become progressively reduced in duration, thereby supporting the temporal resolution required for mature network activity. Here we report that during postnatal development of cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, GABAAR-mediated phasic inhibition is influenced by a resident neurosteroid tone, which wanes in the second postnatal week, resulting in the brief phasic events characteristic of mature neuronal signalling. Treatment of cortical slices with the immediate precursor of 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (5α3α), the GABAAR-inactive 5α-dihydroprogesterone, (5α-DHP), greatly prolonged the mIPSCs of P20 pyramidal neurons, demonstrating these more mature neurons retain the capacity to synthesize GABAAR-active neurosteroids, but now lack the endogenous steroid substrate. Previously, such developmental plasticity of phasic inhibition was ascribed to the expression of synaptic GABAARs incorporating the α1 subunit. However, the duration of mIPSCs recorded from L2/3 cortical neurons derived from α1 subunit deleted mice, were similarly under the developmental influence of a neurosteroid tone. In addition to principal cells, synaptic GABAARs of L2/3 interneurons were modulated by native neurosteroids in a development-dependent manner. In summary, local neurosteroids influence synaptic transmission during a crucial period of cortical neurodevelopment, findings which may be of importance for establishing normal network connectivity. PMID:26626485

  12. Effects of cocaine history on postsynaptic GABA receptors on dorsal raphe serotonin neurons in a stress-induced relapse model in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Kirby, Lynn G

    2016-01-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system plays an important role in stress-related psychiatric disorders and substance abuse. Stressors and stress hormones can inhibit the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system, which composes the majority of forebrain-projecting 5-HT. This inhibition is mediated via stimulation of GABA synaptic activity at DRN-5-HT neurons. Using swim stress-induced reinstatement of morphine conditioned place-preference, recent data from our laboratory indicate that morphine history sensitizes DRN-5-HT neurons to GABAergic inhibitory effects of stress. Moreover, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of the serotonergic DRN is required for this reinstatement. In our current experiment, we tested the hypothesis that GABAergic sensitization of DRN-5-HT neurons is a neuroadaptation elicited by multiple classes of abused drugs across multiple models of stress-induced relapse by applying a chemical stressor (yohimbine) to induce reinstatement of previously extinguished cocaine self-administration in Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of GABA synaptic activity in DRN-5-HT neurons were conducted after the reinstatement. Behavioral data indicate that yohimbine triggered reinstatement of cocaine self-administration. Electrophysiology data indicate that 5-HT neurons in the cocaine group exposed to yohimbine had increased amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents compared to yoked-saline controls exposed to yohimbine or unstressed animals in both drug groups. These data, together with previous findings, indicate that interaction between psychostimulant or opioid history and chemical or physical stressors may increase postsynaptic GABA receptor density and/or sensitivity in DRN-5-HT neurons. Such mechanisms may result in serotonergic hypofunction and consequent dysphoric mood states which confer vulnerability to stress-induced drug reinstatement. PMID:26640169

  13. Inhibition of recombinant N-type and native high voltage-gated neuronal Ca{sup 2+} channels by AdGABA: Mechanism of action studies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Sandoval, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Zoidis, Grigoris; Felix, Ricardo

    2011-02-01

    High-voltage activated Ca{sup 2+} (Ca{sub V}) channels play a key role in the regulation of numerous physiological events by causing transient changes in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration. These channels consist of a pore-forming Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} protein and three auxiliary subunits (Ca{sub V}{beta}, Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and Ca{sub V}{gamma}). Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} is an important component of Ca{sub V} channels in many tissues and of great interest as a drug target. It is well known that anticonvulsant agent gabapentin (GBP) binds to Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} and reduces Ca{sup 2+} currents by modulating the expression and/or function of the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 1} subunit. Recently, we showed that an adamantane derivative of GABA, AdGABA, has also inhibitory effects on Ca{sub V} channels. However, the importance of the interaction of AdGABA with the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} subunit has not been conclusively demonstrated and the mechanism of action of the drug has yet to be elucidated. Here, we describe studies on the mechanism of action of AdGABA. Using a combined approach of patch-clamp recordings and molecular biology we show that AdGABA inhibits Ca{sup 2+} currents acting on Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} only when applied chronically, both in a heterologous expression system and in dorsal root-ganglion neurons. AdGABA seems to require uptake and be acting intracellularly given that its effects are prevented by an inhibitor of the L-amino acid transport system. Interestingly, a mutation in the Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} that abolishes GBP binding did not affect AdGABA actions, revealing that its mechanism of action is similar but not identical to that of GBP. These results indicate that AdGABA is an important Ca{sub V}{alpha}{sub 2}{delta} ligand that regulates Ca{sub V} channels.

  14. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced currents of skate Muller (glial) cells are mediated by neuronal-like GABAA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Malchow, R P; Qian, H H; Ripps, H

    1989-01-01

    Radial glia (Muller cells) of the vertebrate retina appear to be intimately involved in regulating the actions of amino acid neurotransmitters. One of the amino acids thought to be important in mediating retinal information flow is gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The findings of this study indicate that enzymatically isolated skate Muller cells are depolarized by GABA and the GABAA agonist muscimol and that the actions of these agents are reduced by bicuculline and picrotoxin. Membrane currents induced by GABA under voltage clamp were dose dependent, were associated with an increase in membrane conductance, and showed marked desensitization when the concentration of GABA exceeded 2.5 microM. The responses had a reversal potential close to that calculated for chloride, indicating that the currents were generated by ions passing through channels. These data support the view that skate Muller cells possess functional GABAA receptors. The presence of such receptors on retinal glia may have important implications for the role of Muller cells in maintaining the constancy of the extracellular milieu, for neuron-glia interactions within the retina, and for theories concerning the generation of the electroretinogram. Images PMID:2567001

  15. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  16. GABAergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area receive dual GABA/enkephalin-mediated inhibitory inputs from the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takehiro; Konno, Kohtarou; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Sora, Ichiro; Minami, Masabumi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-06-01

    Activation of mu-opioid receptor (MOR) disinhibits dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) through inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons. This mechanism is thought to play a pivotal role in mediating reward behaviors. Here, we characterised VTA-projecting enkephalinergic neurons in the anterior division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) and investigated their targets by examining MOR expression in the VTA. In the BST, neurons expressing preproenkephalin mRNA were exclusively GABAergic, and constituted 37.2% of the total GABAergic neurons. Using retrograde tracer injected into the VTA, 21.6% of VTA-projecting BST neurons were shown to express preproenkephalin mRNA. Enkephalinergic projections from the BST exclusively formed symmetrical synapses onto the dendrites of VTA neurons. In the VTA, 74.1% of MOR mRNA-expressing neurons were GABAergic, with the rest being glutamatergic neurons expressing type-2 vesicular glutamate transporter mRNA. However, MOR mRNA was below the detection threshold in dopaminergic neurons. By immunohistochemistry, MOR was highly expressed on the extrasynaptic membranes of dendrites in GABAergic VTA neurons, including dendrites innervated by BST-VTA projection terminals. MOR was also expressed weakly on GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals in the VTA. Given that GABAA α1 is expressed at GABAergic BST-VTA synapses on dendrites of GABAergic neurons [T. Kudo et al. (2012) J. Neurosci., 32, 18035-18046], our results collectively indicate that the BST sends dual inhibitory outputs targeting GABAergic VTA neurons; GABAergic inhibition via 'wired' transmission, and enkephalinergic inhibition via 'volume' transmission. This dual inhibitory system provides the neural substrate underlying the potent disinhibitory control over dopaminergic VTA neurons exerted by the BST. PMID:24580812

  17. Exercise reduces GABA synaptic input onto NTS baroreceptor second-order neurons via NK1 receptor internalization in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bechtold, Andrea G.; Tabor, Jocelyn; Bonham, Ann C.

    2009-01-01

    A single bout of mild to moderate exercise can lead to a post-exercise decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive subjects, namely post-exercise hypotension (PEH). The full expression of PEH requires a functioning baroreflex, hypertension and activation of muscle afferents (exercise), suggesting that interactions in the neural networks regulating exercise and blood pressure result in this fall in blood pressure. The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is the first brain site that receives inputs from nerves carrying blood pressure and muscle activity information, making it an ideal site for integrating cardiovascular responses to exercise. During exercise, muscle afferents excite NTS GABA neurons via substance P and microinjection of a substance P-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R) antagonist into the NTS attenuates PEH. The data suggest that an interaction between the substance P NK1-R and GABAergic transmission in the NTS may contribute to PEH. We performed voltage-clamping on NTS baroreceptor second-order neurons in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). All animals were sacrificed within 30 min and the patch-clamp recordings were performed 2-8 hr after the sham/exercise protocol. The data showed that a single bout of exercise reduces 1) the frequency but not the amplitude of GABA spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPCs), 2) endogenous substance P influence on sIPSC frequency, and 3) sIPSC frequency response to exogenous application of substance P. Furthermore, immunofluorescence labeling in NTS show an increased substance P NK1-R internalization on GABA neurons. The data suggest that exercise-induced NK1-R internalization results in a reduced intrinsic inhibitory input to the neurons in the baroreflex pathway. PMID:19261870

  18. Toward dissecting the etiology of schizophrenia: HDAC1 and DAXX regulate GAD67 expression in an in vitro hippocampal GABA neuron model.

    PubMed

    Subburaju, S; Coleman, A J; Ruzicka, W B; Benes, F M

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is associated with GABA neuron dysfunction in the hippocampus, particularly the stratum oriens of sector CA3/2. A gene expression profile analysis of human postmortem hippocampal tissue followed by a network association analysis had shown a number of genes differentially regulated in SZ, including the epigenetic factors HDAC1 and DAXX. To characterize the contribution of these factors to the developmental perturbation hypothesized to underlie SZ, lentiviral vectors carrying short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi) for HDAC1 and DAXX were used. In the hippocampal GABA neuron culture model, HiB5, transduction with HDAC1 shRNAi showed a 40% inhibition of HDAC1 mRNA and a 60% inhibition of HDAC1 protein. GAD67, a enzyme associated with GABA synthesis, was increased twofold (mRNA); the protein showed a 35% increase. The expression of DAXX, a co-repressor of HDAC1, was not influenced by HDAC1 inhibition. Transduction of HiB5 cells with DAXX shRNAi resulted in a 30% inhibition of DAXX mRNA that translated into a 90% inhibition of DAXX protein. GAD1 mRNA was upregulated fourfold, while its protein increased by ~30%. HDAC1 expression was not altered by inhibition of DAXX. However, a physical interaction between HDAC1 and DAXX was demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of HDAC1 or DAXX increased expression of egr-1, transcription factor that had previously been shown to regulate the GAD67 promoter. Our in vitro results point to a key role of both HDAC1 and DAXX in the regulation of GAD67 in GABAergic HiB5 cells, strongly suggesting that these epigenetic/transcription factors contribute to mechanisms underlying GABA cell dysfunction in SZ. PMID:26812044

  19. Controlling the Regional Identity of hPSC-Derived Neurons to Uncover Neuronal Subtype Specificity of Neurological Disease Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Kent; Sone, Takefumi; Ibata, Keiji; Fujimori, Koki; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    The CNS contains many diverse neuronal subtypes, and most neurological diseases target specific subtypes. However, the mechanism of neuronal subtype specificity of disease phenotypes remains elusive. Although in vitro disease models employing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have great potential to clarify the association of neuronal subtypes with disease, it is currently difficult to compare various PSC-derived subtypes. This is due to the limited number of subtypes whose induction is established, and different cultivation protocols for each subtype. Here, we report a culture system to control the regional identity of PSC-derived neurons along the anteroposterior (A-P) and dorsoventral (D-V) axes. This system was successfully used to obtain various neuronal subtypes based on the same protocol. Furthermore, we reproduced subtype-specific phenotypes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) by comparing the obtained subtypes. Therefore, our culture system provides new opportunities for modeling neurological diseases with PSCs. PMID:26549851

  20. Electrophysiological Assessment of Serotonin and GABA Neuron Function in the Dorsal Raphe during the Third Trimester Equivalent Developmental Period in Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Yanagawa, Yuchio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alterations in the development of the serotonin system can have prolonged effects, including depression and anxiety disorders later in life. Serotonin axonal projections from the dorsal raphe undergo extensive refinement during the first 2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy). However, little is known about the functional properties of serotonin and GABA neurons in the dorsal raphe during this critical developmental period. We assessed the functional properties and synaptic connectivity of putative serotoninergic neurons and GABAergic neurons in the dorsal raphe during early [postnatal day (P) P5–P7] and late (P15–P17) stages of the third trimester equivalent period using electrophysiology. Our studies demonstrate that GABAergic neurons are hyperexcitable at P5–P7 relative to P15–P17. Furthermore, putative serotonin neurons exhibit an increase in both excitatory and GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous postsynaptic currents during this developmental period. Our data suggest that GABAergic neurons and putative serotonin neurons undergo significant electrophysiological changes during neonatal development. PMID:26730407

  1. Attenuated Glial K+ Clearance Contributes to Long-Term Synaptic Potentiation Via Depolarizing GABA in Dorsal Horn Neurons of Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaekwang; Favorov, Oleg V; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that long-term enhancement of superficial dorsal horn (DHs) excitatory synaptic transmission underlies central sensitization, secondary hyperalgesia, and persistent pain. We tested whether impaired clearance of K+ and glutamate by glia in DHs may contribute to initiation and maintenance of the CNS pain circuit and sensorimotor abnormalities. Transient exposure of the spinal cord slice to fluorocitrate (FC) is shown to be accompanied by a protracted decrease of the DHs optical response to repetitive electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral dorsal root, and by a similarly protracted increase in the postsynaptic response of the DHs like LTP. It also is shown that LTPFC does not occur in the presence of APV, and becomes progressively smaller as [K+]o in the perfusion solution decreased from 3.0 mM to 0.0 mM. Interestingly LTPFC is reduced by bath application of Bic. Whole-cell patch recordings were carried out to evaluate the effects of FC on the response of DHs neurons to puffer-applied GABA. The observations reveal that transient exposure to FC is reliably accompanied by a prolonged (>1 hr) depolarizing shift of the equilibrium potential for the DHs neuron transmembrane ionic currents evoked by GABA. Considered collectively, the findings demonstrate that LTPFC involves (1) elevation of [K+]o in the DHs, (2) NMDAR activation, and (3) conversion of the effect of GABA on DHs neurons from inhibition to excitation. It is proposed that a transient impairment of astrocyte energy production can trigger the cascade of dorsal horn mechanisms that underlies hyperalgesia and persistent pain. PMID:24737940

  2. A neuronal disruption in redox homeostasis elicited by ammonia alters the glycine/glutamate (GABA) cycle and contributes to MMA-induced excitability.

    PubMed

    Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Gabbi, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Della-Pace, Iuri Domingues; Rodrigues, Fernanda Silva; de Oliveira Ferreira, Ana Paula; da Silveira Junior, Mauro Eduardo Porto; da Silva, Luís Roberto Hart; Grisólia, Alan Barroso Araújo; Braga, Danielle Valente; Dobrachinski, Fernando; da Silva, Anderson Manoel Herculano Oliveira; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Marchesan, Sara; Furian, Ana Flavia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2016-06-01

    Hyperammonemia is a common finding in children with methylmalonic acidemia. However, its contribution to methylmalonate-induced excitotoxicty is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanisms by which ammonia influences in the neurotoxicity induced by methylmalonate (MMA) in mice. The effects of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl 3, 6, and 12 mmol/kg; s.c.) on electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioral convulsions induced by MMA (0.3, 0.66, and 1 µmol/2 µL, i.c.v.) were observed in mice. After, ammonia, TNF-α, IL1β, IL-6, nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels, mitochondrial potential (ΔΨ), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, Methyl-Tetrazolium (MTT) reduction, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity levels were measured in the cerebral cortex. The binding of [(3)H]flunitrazepam, release of glutamate-GABA; glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and neuronal damage [opening of blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cellular death volume] were also measured. EEG recordings showed that an intermediate dose of NH4Cl (6 mmol/kg) increased the duration of convulsive episodes induced by MMA (0.66 μmol/2 μL i.c.v). NH4Cl (6 mmol/kg) administration also induced neuronal ammonia and NOx increase, as well as mitochondrial ROS generation throughout oxidation of 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) to DCF-RS, followed by GS and GAD inhibition. The NH4Cl plus MMA administration did not alter cytokine levels, plasma fluorescein extravasation, or neuronal damage. However, it potentiated DCF-RS levels, decreased the ΔΨ potential, reduced MTT, inhibited SDH activity, and increased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. NH4Cl also altered the GABA cycle characterized by GS and GAD activity inhibition, [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding, and GABA release after MMA injection. On the basis of our findings, the changes in ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) levels elicited by ammonia alter the glycine

  3. Singular subsets of locus coeruleus neurons may recover tyrosine hydroxylase phenotype transiently expressed during development.

    PubMed

    Bezin, L; Marcel, D; Desgeorges, S; Pujol, J F; Weissmann, D

    2000-03-29

    The number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-expressing neurons appears to be precisely determined in basal conditions within the noradrenergic pontine nucleus locus coeruleus (LC). However, additional neurons exhibiting TH phenotype have been observed in the adult rat LC following a single administration of RU 24722, a potent inducer of TH expression specific to the LC. The neurons acquiring TH phenotype following treatment had a topographical localization similar to that of the neurons, which transiently expressed TH during postnatal development and lost TH phenotype during the third postnatal week. The idea that the fluctuation of TH phenotype in singular subsets of LC neurons during development may be selectively restored in adults is of particular interest. The present study attempted to determine whether the cells in which TH expression was repressed during the third postnatal week could correspond to those which exhibited TH phenotype in response to RU 24722 treatment in adults. We first verified that no massive cell death occurred in the LC during the period ranging from days 13 to 30. Then, we observed that both cell populations exhibited the same altered steady-state concentration of TH-mRNA as compared to cells that permanently expressed TH. Finally, we demonstrated the presence of TH-negative neurons expressing the homeodomain transcription factor Phox2a, specific for the determination of noradrenergic phenotype, providing further evidence that "resting-noradrenergic" neurons exist in the adult rat LC under basal conditions. These neurons provide interesting prospective for gain of noradrenergic function when classical noradrenergic LC neurons are impaired. PMID:10762702

  4. Salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) showing varying emamectin benzoate susceptibilities differ in neuronal acetylcholine receptor and GABA-gated chloride channel mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Caligid copepods, also called sea lice, are fish ectoparasites, some species of which cause significant problems in the mariculture of salmon, where the annual cost of infection is in excess of €300 million globally. At present, caligid control on farms is mainly achieved using medicinal treatments. However, the continued use of a restricted number of medicine actives potentially favours the development of drug resistance. Here, we report transcriptional changes in a laboratory strain of the caligid Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837) that is moderately (~7-fold) resistant to the avermectin compound emamectin benzoate (EMB), a component of the anti-salmon louse agent SLICE® (Merck Animal Health). Results Suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) was used to enrich transcripts differentially expressed between EMB-resistant (PT) and drug-susceptible (S) laboratory strains of L. salmonis. SSH libraries were subjected to 454 sequencing. Further L. salmonis transcript sequences were available as expressed sequence tags (EST) from GenBank. Contiguous sequences were generated from both SSH and EST sequences and annotated. Transcriptional responses in PT and S salmon lice were investigated using custom 15 K oligonucleotide microarrays designed using the above sequence resources. In the absence of EMB exposure, 359 targets differed in transcript abundance between the two strains, these genes being enriched for functions such as calcium ion binding, chitin metabolism and muscle structure. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel (GABA-Cl) and neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits showed significantly lower transcript levels in PT lice compared to S lice. Using RT-qPCR, the decrease in mRNA levels was estimated at ~1.4-fold for GABA-Cl and ~2.8-fold for nAChR. Salmon lice from the PT strain showed few transcriptional responses following acute exposure (1 or 3 h) to 200 μg L-1 of EMB, a drug concentration tolerated by PT lice, but

  5. β-Hydroxybutyrate is the preferred substrate for GABA and glutamate synthesis while glucose is indispensable during depolarization in cultured GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Lund, Trine M; Obel, Linea F; Risa, Øystein; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2011-08-01

    The ketogenic diet has multiple beneficial effects not only in treatment of epilepsy, but also in that of glucose transporter 1 deficiency, cancer, Parkinson's disease, obesity and pain. Thus, there is an increasing interest in understanding the mechanism behind this metabolic therapy. Patients on a ketogenic diet reach high plasma levels of ketone bodies, which are used by the brain as energy substrates. The interaction between glucose and ketone bodies is complex and there is still controversy as to what extent it affects the homeostasis of the neurotransmitters glutamate, aspartate and GABA. The present study was conducted to study this metabolic interaction in cultured GABAergic neurons exposed to different combinations of (13)C-labeled and unlabeled glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate. Depolarization was induced and the incorporation of (13)C into glutamate, GABA and aspartate was analyzed. The presence of β-hydroxybutyrate together with glucose did not affect the total GABA content but did, however, decrease the aspartate content to a lower value than when either glucose or β-hydroxybutyrate was employed alone. When combinations of the two substrates were used (13)C-atoms from β-hydroxybutyrate were found in all three amino acids to a greater extent than (13)C-atoms from glucose, but only the (13)C contribution from [1,6-(13)C]glucose increased upon depolarization. In conclusion, β-hydroxybutyrate was preferred over glucose as substrate for amino acid synthesis but the total content of aspartate decreased when both substrates were present. Furthermore only the use of glucose increased upon depolarization. PMID:21684314

  6. Non-linear developmental trajectory of electrical phenotype in rat substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Martial A; Woodhouse, Adele; Amendola, Julien; Goaillard, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Neurons have complex electrophysiological properties, however, it is often difficult to determine which properties are the most relevant to neuronal function. By combining current-clamp measurements of electrophysiological properties with multi-variate analysis (hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis), we were able to characterize the postnatal development of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons' electrical phenotype in an unbiased manner, such that subtle changes in phenotype could be analyzed. We show that the intrinsic electrical phenotype of these neurons follows a non-linear trajectory reaching maturity by postnatal day 14, with two developmental transitions occurring between postnatal days 3–5 and 9–11. This approach also predicted which parameters play a critical role in phenotypic variation, enabling us to determine (using pharmacology, dynamic-clamp) that changes in the leak, sodium and calcium-activated potassium currents are central to these two developmental transitions. This analysis enables an unbiased definition of neuronal type/phenotype that is applicable to a range of research questions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04059.001 PMID:25329344

  7. Phenotypical characterization of the rat striatal neurons expressing the D1 dopamine receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Le Moine, C; Normand, E; Bloch, B

    1991-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed in rat brain sections from normal and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in order to map and identify the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene in the striatum and the substantia nigra. Procedures of combined in situ hybridization, allowing the simultaneous detection of two mRNAs in the same section or in adjacent sections, were used to characterize the phenotypes of the neurons expressing the D1 receptor gene. D1 receptor mRNA was found in neurons all over the caudate-putamen, the accumbens nucleus, and the olfactory tubercle but not in the substantia nigra. In the caudate-putamen and accumbens nucleus, most of the neurons containing D1 receptor mRNA were characterized as medium-sized substance P neurons and distinct from those containing D2 receptor mRNA. Nevertheless, 15-20% of the substance P neurons did not contain D1 receptor mRNA. The neurons containing preproenkephalin A mRNA did not contain D1 receptor mRNA but contained D2 receptor mRNA. A small number of cholinergic and somatostatinergic neurons exhibited a weak reaction for D1 receptor mRNA. These results demonstrate that dopamine acts on efferent striatal neurons through expression of distinct receptors--namely, D1 and D2 in separate cell populations (substance P and preproenkephalin A neurons, respectively)--and can also act on nonprojecting neurons through D1 receptor expression. Images PMID:1827915

  8. Hyperpolarization-independent maturation and refinement of GABA/glycinergic connections in the auditory brain stem.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanmi; Bach, Eva; Noh, Jihyun; Delpire, Eric; Kandler, Karl

    2016-03-01

    During development GABA and glycine synapses are initially excitatory before they gradually become inhibitory. This transition is due to a developmental increase in the activity of neuronal potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2), which shifts the chloride equilibrium potential (ECl) to values more negative than the resting membrane potential. While the role of early GABA and glycine depolarizations in neuronal development has become increasingly clear, the role of the transition to hyperpolarization in synapse maturation and circuit refinement has remained an open question. Here we investigated this question by examining the maturation and developmental refinement of GABA/glycinergic and glutamatergic synapses in the lateral superior olive (LSO), a binaural auditory brain stem nucleus, in KCC2-knockdown mice, in which GABA and glycine remain depolarizing. We found that many key events in the development of synaptic inputs to the LSO, such as changes in neurotransmitter phenotype, strengthening and elimination of GABA/glycinergic connection, and maturation of glutamatergic synapses, occur undisturbed in KCC2-knockdown mice compared with wild-type mice. These results indicate that maturation of inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the LSO is independent of the GABA and glycine depolarization-to-hyperpolarization transition. PMID:26655825

  9. Dysregulation of Neuronal Ca2+ Channel Linked to Heightened Sympathetic Phenotype in Prohypertensive States

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Hege E.; Bardsley, Emma N.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with impaired nitric oxide (NO)–cyclic nucleotide (CN)-coupled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis that enhances cardiac sympathetic neurotransmission. Because neuronal membrane Ca2+ currents are reduced by NO-activated S-nitrosylation, we tested whether CNs affect membrane channel conductance directly in neurons isolated from the stellate ganglia of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and their normotensive controls. Using voltage-clamp and cAMP–protein kinase A (PKA) FRET sensors, we hypothesized that impaired CN regulation provides a direct link to abnormal signaling of neuronal calcium channels in the SHR and that targeting cGMP can restore the channel phenotype. We found significantly larger whole-cell Ca2+ currents from diseased neurons that were largely mediated by the N-type Ca2+ channel (Cav2.2). Elevating cGMP restored the SHR Ca2+ current to levels seen in normal neurons that were not affected by cGMP. cGMP also decreased cAMP levels and PKA activity in diseased neurons. In contrast, cAMP–PKA activity was increased in normal neurons, suggesting differential switching in phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity. PDE2A inhibition enhanced the Ca2+ current in normal neurons to a conductance similar to that seen in SHR neurons, whereas the inhibitor slightly decreased the current in diseased neurons. Pharmacological evidence supported a switching from cGMP acting via PDE3 in control neurons to PDE2A in SHR neurons in the modulation of the Ca2+ current. Our data suggest that a disturbance in the regulation of PDE-coupled CNs linked to N-type Ca2+ channels is an early hallmark of the prohypertensive phenotype associated with intracellular Ca2+ impairment underpinning sympathetic dysautonomia. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we identify dysregulation of cyclic-nucleotide (CN)-linked neuronal Ca2+ channel activity that could provide the trigger for the enhanced sympathetic neurotransmission observed in the prohypertensive state

  10. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  11. Early phenotype expression of cortical neurons: Evidence that a subclass of migrating neurons have callosal axons

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.L.; Rakic, P.; Goldman-Rakic, P.S. )

    1991-02-15

    The use of ({sup 3}H)thymidine labeling in combination with various axonal transport tracers has revealed that a subset of migrating neurons in the fetal monkey cerebrum issue axons to the opposite cerebral hemisphere while still migrating to their final positions in the cortical plate. Other cortical neurons with the same birthdate (i.e., that underwent their last round of DNA synthesis on the same day) are not retrogradely labeled by tracer injections of the opposite hemisphere. These findings suggest that the cardinal distinction between projection and local circuit neurons may be specified in postmitotic neurons before they acquire their final positions in the cortex.

  12. Genotype-phenotype correlation in neuronal migration disorders and cortical dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration disorders are human (or animal) diseases that result from a disruption in the normal movement of neurons from their original birth site to their final destination during early development. As a consequence, the neurons remain somewhere along their migratory route, their location depending on the pathological mechanism and its severity. The neurons form characteristic abnormalities, which are morphologically classified into several types, such as lissencephaly, heterotopia, and cobblestone dysplasia. Polymicrogyria is classified as a group of malformations that appear secondary to post-migration development; however, recent findings of the underlying molecular mechanisms reveal overlapping processes in the neuronal migration and post-migration development stages. Mutations of many genes are involved in neuronal migration disorders, such as LIS1 and DCX in classical lissencephaly spectrum, TUBA1A in microlissencephaly with agenesis of the corpus callosum, and RELN and VLDLR in lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. ARX is of particular interest from basic and clinical perspectives because it is critically involved in tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons in the forebrain and its mutations cause a variety of phenotypes ranging from hydranencephaly or lissencephaly to early-onset epileptic encephalopathies, including Ohtahara syndrome and infantile spasms or intellectual disability with no brain malformations. The recent advances in gene and genome analysis technologies will enable the genetic basis of neuronal migration disorders to be unraveled, which, in turn, will facilitate genotype-phenotype correlations to be determined. PMID:26052266

  13. The spatiotemporal segregation of GAD forms defines distinct GABA signaling functions in the developing mouse olfactory system and provides novel insights into the origin and migration of GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Vastagh, Csaba; Schwirtlich, Marija; Kwakowsky, Andrea; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Margolis, Frank L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Katarova, Zoya; Szabó, Gábor

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has a dual role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system (CNS) and as a signaling molecule exerting largely excitatory actions during development. The rate-limiting step of GABA synthesis is catalyzed by two glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms GAD65 and GAD67 coexpressed in the GABAergic neurons of the CNS. Here we report that the two GADs show virtually nonoverlapping expression patterns consistent with distinct roles in the developing peripheral olfactory system. GAD65 is expressed exclusively in undifferentiated neuronal progenitors confined to the proliferative zones of the sensory vomeronasal and olfactory epithelia In contrast GAD67 is expressed in a subregion of the nonsensory epithelium/vomeronasal organ epithelium containing the putative Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) progenitors and GnRH neurons migrating from this region through the frontonasal mesenchyme into the basal forebrain. Only GAD67+, but not GAD65+ cells accumulate detectable GABA. We further demonstrate that GAD67 and its embryonic splice variant embryonic GAD (EGAD) concomitant with GnRH are dynamically regulated during GnRH neuronal migration in vivo and in two immortalized cell lines representing migratory (GN11) and postmigratory (GT1-7) stage GnRH neurons, respectively. Analysis of GAD65/67 single and double knock-out embryos revealed that the two GADs play complementary (inhibitory) roles in GnRH migration ultimately modulating the speed and/or direction of GnRH migration. Our results also suggest that GAD65 and GAD67/EGAD characterized by distinct subcellular localization and kinetics have disparate functions during olfactory system development mediating proliferative and migratory responses putatively through specific subcellular GABA pools. PMID:25125027

  14. Distribution of 3H-GABA uptake sites in the nematode Ascaris

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.; Stretton, A.O. )

    1991-05-22

    The distribution of uptake sites for the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the nematode Ascaris suum was examined by autoradiography of 3H-GABA uptake. Single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords were labeled with 3H-GABA. Serial section analysis identified the cells of origin of these processes as the RMEV-like and RMED-like neurons. These cells belong to a set of four neurons in the nerve ring, all of which are labeled by 3H-GABA. 3H-GABA labeling of at least two other sets of cephalic neurons was seen. One of these pairs consists of medium-sized lateral ganglia neurons, located at the level of the amphid commissure bundle. A second pair is located in the lateral ganglia at the level of the deirid commissure bundle. The position and size of these lateral ganglia cells suggest that they are the GABA-immunoreactive lateral ganglia cells frequently seen in whole-mount immunocytochemical preparations. Four neuronal cell bodies located in the retrovesicular ganglion were also labeled with 3H-GABA. These cells, which are probably cholinergic excitatory motor neurons, do not contain detectable GABA-like immunoreactivity. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed. The ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motor neurons, which are known to contain GABA-like immunoreactivity, were not labeled above background with 3H-GABA. Together with the experiments reported previously, these results define three classes of GABA-associated neurons in Ascaris: (1) neurons that contain endogenous GABA and possess a GABA uptake system; (2) neurons that contain endogenous GABA, but that either lack a GABA uptake system or possess a GABA uptake system of low activity; (3) neurons that possess a GABA uptake system, but that lack endogenous GABA.

  15. Serotonin 5-HT1B receptor-mediated calcium influx-independent presynaptic inhibition of GABA release onto rat basal forebrain cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Nishijo, Takuma; Momiyama, Toshihiko

    2016-07-01

    Modulatory roles of serotonin (5-HT) in GABAergic transmission onto basal forebrain cholinergic neurons were investigated, using whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the rat brain slices. GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were evoked by focal stimulation. Bath application of 5-HT (0.1-300 μm) reversibly suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Application of a 5-HT1B receptor agonist, CP93129, also suppressed the evoked IPSCs, whereas a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT had little effect on the evoked IPSCs amplitude. In the presence of NAS-181, a 5-HT1B receptor antagonist, 5-HT-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs was antagonised, whereas NAN-190, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist did not antagonise the 5-HT-induced suppression of evoked IPSCs. Bath application of 5-HT reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSCs without changing their amplitude distribution. The effect of 5-HT on miniature IPSCs remained unchanged when extracellular Ca(2+) was replaced by Mg(2+) . The paired-pulse ratio was increased by CP93129. In the presence of ω-CgTX, the N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-Aga-TK, the P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, or SNX-482, the R-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, 5-HT could still inhibit the evoked IPSCs. 4-AP, a K(+) channel blocker, enhanced the evoked IPSCs, and CP93129 had no longer inhibitory effect in the presence of 4-AP. CP93129 increased the number of action potentials elicited by depolarising current pulses. These results suggest that activation of presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors on the terminals of GABAergic afferents to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons inhibits GABA release in Ca(2+) influx-independent manner by modulation of K(+) channels, leading to enhancement of neuronal activities. PMID:27177433

  16. Age-related development of a heterozygous phenotype in solitary neurons of the homozygous Brattleboro rat.

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, F; van der Beek, E; Seger, M; Burbach, P; Ivell, R

    1989-01-01

    A single-base deletion in the single-copy vasopressin gene is the cause of diabetes insipidus in the homozygous Brattleboro rat (di/di). It results in the synthesis of an altered vasopressin precursor of which the axonal transport is blocked. Paradoxically, a small number of solitary hypothalamic neurons displays all the immunoreactivities of the wild-type vasopressin precursor (i.e., vasopressin, neurophysin, and a glycopeptide). In the present paper we provide evidence that these neurons have undergone a switch to a genuine heterozygous (di/+) phenotype; i.e., they contain the immunoreactivities of both the wild-type and the mutated vasopressin precursors. In the neural lobe, glycopeptide fibers are also present, showing that axonal transport of the wild-type precursor is restored. Moreover, the number of neurons displaying this di/+ phenotype increases markedly and in a linear way (from 0.1% up to 3% of the vasopressin cells) with age. These findings indicate that after mitotic division has ceased, genomic alterations occur in somatic neurons in vivo. The molecular event generating the di/+ phenotype in the di/di animal could involve a somatic intrachromosomal gene conversion between the homologous exons of the vasopressin and the related oxytocin genes. Images PMID:2762332

  17. Anthocyanin effects on microglia M1/M2 phenotype: Consequence on neuronal fractalkine expression.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Manuela; Marques, Cláudia; Norberto, Sónia; Santos, Paulo; Fernandes, Iva; Mateus, Nuno; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição

    2016-05-15

    Microglia mediate multiple aspects of neuroinflammation, including cytotoxicity, repair, regeneration, and immunosuppression due to their ability to acquire diverse activation states, or phenotypes. Modulation of microglial phenotype or microglia-neuron crosstalk can be an appealing neurotherapeutic strategy. Anthocyanins are a class of flavonoids found e.g., in berries that has been attracting interest due to its neuroprotective potential. However, there are no data clarifying the impact of anthocyanins on microglial phenotype or on microglia-neuron crosstalk (CX3CR1/CX3CL1). N9 microglia cell line was treated with 1μM cyanidin (Cy), cyanidin-3-glucose (Cy3glc) and a methylated form of cyanidin-3-glucose (Met-Cy3glc) in basal conditions and with LPS/IL-4 stimulation. SH-SY5Y cell line was treated with the conditioned medium of microglia and with the anthocyanins alone. At basal conditions, microglia treatment with anthocyanins for 24h induced a less pro-inflammatory profile. Decreased TNF-α mRNA expression was induced either by Cy and Met-Cy3glc. LPS markedly increase IL-6 mRNA expression, which was lowered by Cy3glc. IL-1β LPS-induced expression was reverted by Cy. Cy increased CX3CL1 mRNA expression in SH-SY5Y comparing either with control or LPS. Anthocyanins and metabolites were not able to shift microglia to an M2 strict phenotype however they did interact with microglia biology. There was an attenuation of M1 phenotype and increase of neuronal expression of CX3CL1 mRNA. Understanding how flavonoids modulate microglia-neuron crosstalk can open new directions for future nutritional interventions. PMID:26965567

  18. Midbrain dopamine neurons reflect affiliation phenotypes in finches and are tightly coupled to courtship.

    PubMed

    Goodson, James L; Kabelik, David; Kelly, Aubrey M; Rinaldi, Jacob; Klatt, James D

    2009-05-26

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) circuits mediate a wide range of goal-oriented behavioral processes, and DA strongly influences appetitive and consummatory aspects of male sexual behavior. In both birds and mammals, mesolimbic projections arise primarily from the ventral tegmental area (VTA), with a smaller contribution from the midbrain central gray (CG). Despite the well known importance of the VTA cell group for incentive motivation functions, relationships of VTA subpopulations to specific aspects of social phenotype remain wholly undescribed. We now show that in male zebra finches (Estrildidae: Taeniopygia guttata), Fos activity within a subpopulation of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir; presumably dopaminergic) neurons in the caudal VTA is significantly correlated with courtship singing and coupled to gonadal state. In addition, the number of TH-ir neurons in this caudal subpopulation dichotomously differentiates courting from non-courting male phenotypes, and evolves in relation to sociality (flocking vs. territorial) across several related finch species. Combined, these findings for the VTA suggest that divergent social phenotypes may arise due to the differential assignment of "incentive value" to conspecific stimuli. TH-ir neurons of the CG (a population of unknown function in mammals) exhibit properties that are even more selectively and tightly coupled to the expression of courtship phenotypes (and appetitive courtship singing), both in terms of TH-ir cell number, which correlates significantly with constitutive levels of courtship motivation, and with TH-Fos colocalization, which increases in direct proportion to the phasic expression of song. We propose that these neurons may be core components of social communication circuits across diverse vertebrate taxa. PMID:19439662

  19. Isoflurane modulates excitability in the mouse thalamus via GABA-dependent and GABA-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shui-Wang; Werner, David F; Homanics, Gregg E; Harrison, Neil L; Goldstein, Peter A

    2009-02-01

    GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) synapse onto thalamocortical neurons in the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus, and this reticulo-thalamocortical pathway is considered an anatomic target for general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. A mutant mouse was engineered to harbor two amino acid substitutions (S270H, L277A) in the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R) alpha1 subunit; this mutation abolished sensitivity to the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in recombinant GABA(A)-Rs, and reduced in vivo sensitivity to isoflurane in the loss-of-righting-reflex assay. We examined the effects of the double mutation on GABA(A)-R-mediated synaptic currents and isoflurane sensitivity by recording from thalamic neurons in brain slices. The double mutation accelerated the decay, and decreased the (1/2) width of, evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) in VB neurons and attenuated isoflurane-induced prolongation of the eIPSC. The hypnotic zolpidem, a selective modulator of GABA(A)-Rs containing the alpha1 subunit, prolonged eIPSC duration regardless of genotype, indicating that mutant mice incorporate alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)-Rs into synapses. In RTN neurons, which lack the alpha1 subunit, eIPSC duration was longer than in VB, regardless of genotype. Isoflurane reduced the efficacy of GABAergic transmission from RTN to VB, independent of genotype, suggesting a presynaptic action in RTN neurons. Consistent with this observation, isoflurane inhibited both tonic action potential and rebound burst firing in the presence of GABA(A)-R blockade. The suppressed excitability in RTN neurons is likely mediated by isoflurane-enhanced Ba(2+)-sensitive, but 4-aminopyridine-insenstive, potassium conductances. We conclude that isoflurane enhances inhibition of thalamic neurons in VB via GABA(A)-R-dependent, but in RTN via GABA(A)-R-independent, mechanisms. PMID:18948126

  20. Sensory and autonomic innervation of the rat eyelid: neuronal origins and peptide phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Simons, E; Smith, P G

    1994-07-01

    Neuronal origins, peptide phenotypes and target distributions were determined for sensory and autonomic nerves projecting to the eyelid. The retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Ruby, was injected into the superior tarsal muscle and meibomian gland of Sprague-Dawley rats. Labelled neurons were observed within the pterygopalatine (31 +/- 6 of a total of 8238 +/- 1610 ganglion neurons), trigeminal (173 +/- 43 of 62,082 +/- 5869) and superior cervical ganglia (184 +/- 35 of 21,900 +/- 1741). Immunostaining revealed vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity (VIP-ir) in nearly all Fluoro-Ruby-labelled pterygopalatine ganglion neurons (86 +/- 5%) but only rarely in trigeminal (0.3 +/- 0.3%) or superior cervical (1.4 +/- 1.4%) ganglion neurons. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-ir was not observed in pterygopalatine or superior cervical ganglion somata, but was present in 24 +/- 4% of trigeminal neurons. Bright dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) immunofluorescence was observed in the majority of eyelid-projecting neurons within the superior cervical ganglia (65 +/- 5%) and lighter staining was detected in pterygopalatine neurons (63 +/- 3%), but no DBH-ir was observed in trigeminal neurons. Examination of eyelid sections revealed dense VIP-ir innervation of meibomian gland acini and vasculature and modest distribution within tarsal muscle. CGRP-ir fibers surrounded ductal and vascular elements of the meibomian gland and the perimeter of tarsal muscle. DBH-ir fibers were associated with meibomian gland blood vessels and acini, and were more densely distributed within tarsal muscle. This study provides evidence for prominent meibomian gland innervation by parasympathetic pterygopalatine ganglion VIP-ir neurons, with more restricted innervation by sensory trigeminal CGRP-ir and sympathetic neurons. Tarsal muscle receives abundant sympathetic innervation, as well as moderate parasympathetic and sensory CGRP-ir projections. The eyelid contains substantial non-CGRP-ir sensory

  1. Induction of a dopaminergic phenotype in cultured striatal neurons by bone morphogenetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Stull, N D; Jung, J W; Iacovitti, L

    2001-09-23

    In the present study, we examined whether the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which are important in the developmental specification of transmitter type in certain classes of neurons, might also play a role in signaling the differentiation of a dopaminergic (DA) phenotype. We found that BMP-2, -4 and -6 were each capable of inducing, in a dose and time dependent manner, moderate levels of the DA enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in cultured neurons from the mouse embryonic striatum. In contradistinction to other TH-inducing agents, BMPs initiated de novo TH expression without the required synergy of exogenous growth factors or co-activating substances and in neurons presumably aged (E16) beyond the critical period for induction. However, the appearance of TH in induced cells was short-lived (24 h) and could not be prolonged by repeated supplementation with the BMPs. Inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, PD98059 and apigenin, did not prevent TH induction by BMP-4, as they did other TH inducing agents, indicating that the MAPK/ERK pathway does not mediate BMPs effects on TH expression. We conclude that BMP-2, -4 and -6 can be added to the expanding inventory of agents capable of inducing TH, making them potentially important in the specification of a DA phenotype in stem/precursor cells for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:11557097

  2. Age-related hearing loss: GABA, nicotinic acetylcholine and NMDA receptor expression changes in spiral ganglion neurons of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tang, X; Zhu, X; Ding, B; Walton, J P; Frisina, R D; Su, J

    2014-02-14

    Age-related hearing loss - presbycusis - is the number one communication disorder and most prevalent neurodegenerative condition of our aged population. Although speech understanding in background noise is quite difficult for those with presbycusis, there are currently no biomedical treatments to prevent, delay or reverse this condition. A better understanding of the cochlear mechanisms underlying presbycusis will help lead to future treatments. Objectives of the present study were to investigate GABAA receptor subunit α1, nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor subunit β2, and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA and protein expression changes in spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) of the CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea, that occur in age-related hearing loss, utilizing quantitative immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. We found that auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds shifted over 40dB from 3 to 48kHz in old mice compared to young adults. DPOAE thresholds also shifted over 40dB from 6 to 49kHz in old mice, and their amplitudes were significantly decreased or absent in the same frequency range. SGN density decreased with age in basal, middle and apical turns, and SGN density of the basal turn declined the most. A positive correlation was observed between SGN density and ABR wave 1amplitude. mRNA and protein expression of GABAAR α1 and AChR β2 decreased with age in SGNs in the old mouse cochlea. mRNA and protein expression of NMDAR NR1 increased with age in SGNs of the old mice. These findings demonstrate that there are functionally-relevant age-related changes of GABAAR, nAChR, NMDAR expression in CBA mouse SGNs reflecting their degeneration, which may be related to functional changes in cochlear synaptic transmission with age, suggesting biological mechanisms for peripheral age-related hearing loss. PMID:24316061

  3. Inherited disorders of GABA metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pearl, Phillip L; Hartka, Thomas R; Cabalza, Jessica L; Taylor, Jacob; Gibson, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    The inherited disorders of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism require an increased index of clinical suspicion. The known genetic disorders are GABA-transaminase deficiency, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency and homocarnosinosis. A recent link has also been made between impaired GABA synthesis and nonsyndromic cleft lip, with or without cleft palate. SSADH deficiency is the most commonly occurring of the inherited disorders of neurotransmitters. The disorder has a nonspecific phenotype with myriad neurological and psychiatric manifestations, and usually has a nonprogressive temporal course. Diagnosis is made by the detection of γ-hydroxybutyrate excretion on urine organic acid testing. The most consistent magnetic resonance imaging abnormality is an increased signal in the globus pallidus. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has demonstrated the first example of increased endogenous GABA in human brain parenchyma in this disorder. GABA-transaminase deficiency and homocarnosinosis appear to be very rare, but require cerebrospinal fluid for detection, thus allowing for the possibility that these entities, as in the other inherited neurotransmitter disorders, are under-recognized. PMID:23842532

  4. GABA and glycine in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Ito, Susumu

    2016-09-01

    GABA and glycine are major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the CNS and act on receptors coupled to chloride channels. During early developmental periods, both GABA and glycine depolarize membrane potentials due to the relatively high intracellular Cl(-) concentration. Therefore, they can act as excitatory neurotransmitters. GABA and glycine are involved in spontaneous neural network activities in the immature CNS such as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in neonatal hippocampal neurons, which are generated by the synchronous activity of GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic principal neurons. GDPs and GDP-like activities in the developing brains are thought to be important for the activity-dependent functiogenesis through Ca(2+) influx and/or other intracellular signaling pathways activated by depolarization or stimulation of metabotropic receptors. However, if GABA and glycine do not shift from excitatory to inhibitory neurotransmitters at the birth and in maturation, it may result in neural disorders including autism spectrum disorders. PMID:26951057

  5. Co-expression of GAD67 and choline acetyltransferase reveals a novel neuronal phenotype in the mouse medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Gotts, Jittima; Atkinson, Lucy; Edwards, Ian J; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Susan A; Deuchars, Jim

    2015-12-01

    GABAergic and cholinergic systems play an important part in autonomic pathways. To determine the distribution of the enzymes responsible for the production of GABA and acetylcholine in areas involved in autonomic control in the mouse brainstem, we used a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) neurones, combined with choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry. ChAT-immunoreactive (IR) and GAD67-GFP containing neurones were observed throughout the brainstem. A small number of cells contained both ChAT-IR and GAD67-GFP. Such double labelled cells were observed in the NTS (predominantly in the intermediate and central subnuclei), the area postrema, reticular formation and lateral paragigantocellular nucleus. All ChAT-IR neurones in the area postrema contained GAD67-GFP. Double labelled neurones were not observed in the dorsal vagal motor nucleus, nucleus ambiguus or hypoglossal nucleus. Double labelled ChAT-IR/GAD67-GFP cells in the NTS did not contain neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity, whereas those in the reticular formation and lateral paragigantocellular nucleus did. The function of these small populations of double labelled cells is currently unknown, however their location suggests a potential role in integrating signals involved in oromotor behaviours. PMID:26015156

  6. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  7. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Doubell, T P; Leslie, T; Woolf, C J

    1996-11-28

    Pain is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold A(delta) and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of A(delta) and C fibres at the site of inflammation. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold A(beta) fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P. Here we show that inflammation results in A(beta) fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. A(beta) fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli. PMID:8934522

  8. Glial GABA, synthesized by monoamine oxidase B, mediates tonic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Bo-Eun; Woo, Junsung; Chun, Ye-Eun; Chun, Heejung; Jo, Seonmi; Bae, Jin Young; An, Heeyoung; Min, Joo Ok; Oh, Soo-Jin; Han, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Taekeun; Kim, Young Soo; Bae, Yong Chul; Lee, C Justin

    2014-11-15

    GABA is the major inhibitory transmitter in the brain and is released not only from a subset of neurons but also from glia. Although neuronal GABA is well known to be synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the source of glial GABA is unknown. After estimating the concentration of GABA in Bergmann glia to be around 5-10 mM by immunogold electron microscopy, we demonstrate that GABA production in glia requires MAOB, a key enzyme in the putrescine degradation pathway. In cultured cerebellar glia, both Ca(2+)-induced and tonic GABA release are significantly reduced by both gene silencing of MAOB and the MAOB inhibitor selegiline. In the cerebellum and striatum of adult mice, general gene silencing, knock out of MAOB or selegiline treatment resulted in elimination of tonic GABA currents recorded from granule neurons and medium spiny neurons. Glial-specific rescue of MAOB resulted in complete rescue of tonic GABA currents. Our results identify MAOB as a key synthesizing enzyme of glial GABA, which is released via bestrophin 1 (Best1) channel to mediate tonic inhibition in the brain. PMID:25239459

  9. Inter- and intracellular relationship of substance P-containing neurons with serotonin and GABA in the dorsal raphe nucleus: combination of autoradiographic and immunocytochemical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Magoul, R.; Onteniente, B.; Oblin, A.; Calas, A.

    1986-06-01

    Double-labeling experiments were performed at the electron microscopic level in the dorsal raphe nucleus of rat, in order to study the inter- and intracellular relationship of substance P with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin. Autoradiography for either (/sup 3/H)serotonin or (/sup 3/H)GABA was coupled, on the same tissue section, with peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemistry for substance P in colchicine-treated animals. Intercellular relationships were represented by synaptic contacts made by (/sup 3/H)serotonin-labeled terminals on substance P-containing somata and dendrites, and by substance P-containing terminals on (/sup 3/H)GABA-labeled cells. Intracellular relationships were suggested by the occurrence of the peptide within (/sup 3/H)serotonin-containing and (/sup 3/H)GABA-containing cell bodies and fibers. Doubly labeled varicosities of the two kinds were also observed in the supraependymal plexus adjacent to the dorsal raphe nucleus. The results demonstrated that, in addition to reciprocal synaptic interactions made by substance P with serotonin and GABA, the dorsal raphe nucleus is the site of intracellular relationships between the peptide and either the amine or the amino acid.

  10. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    PubMed Central

    Savtchenko, Leonid; Megalogeni, Maria; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Walker, Matthew C.; Pavlov, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor currents in ex vivo hippocampal slices to examine GAT-1 operation under varying network conditions. Our simulations predict that synaptic GABA release during network activity robustly prevents GAT-1 reversal. We test this in the 0 Mg2+ model of epileptiform discharges using slices from healthy and chronically epileptic rats and find that epileptiform activity is associated with increased synaptic GABA release and is not accompanied by GAT-1 reversal. We conclude that sustained efflux of GABA through GAT-1 is unlikely to occur during physiological or pathological network activity. PMID:25798861

  11. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bastianini, Stefano; Silvani, Alessandro; Berteotti, Chiara; Lo Martire, Viviana; Cohen, Gary; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO). Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM) to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R) during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy. PMID:26474479

  12. Biphasic effects of direct, but not indirect, GABA mimetics and antagonists on haloperidol-induced catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Worms, P; Lloyd, K G

    1980-03-01

    At very low doses the GABA agonists SL 76002 and muscimol diminish haloperidol-induced catalepsy. At somewhat higher doses these compounds potentiate catalepsy. Biphasic effects on DA-receptor mediated functions have previously been noted with bicuculline and picrotoxinin. In contrast, manipulation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of haloperidol-induced catalepsy by GABA mimetics is also observed with dipropylacetate, delta-aminovaleric acid and gamma-acetylenic GABA. This GABA-mimetic potentiation of catakepsy was blocked by the coadministration of bicuculline. These results confirm and extend the hypothesis that GABA-neurons influence DA neuron function. Furthermore they suggest that more than one group of GABA receptors influence directly and/or indirectly DA neuronal function, with different resultant effects. PMID:7189827

  13. Marlin-1, a novel RNA-binding protein associates with GABA receptors.

    PubMed

    Couve, Andrés; Restituito, Sophie; Brandon, Julia M; Charles, Kelly J; Bawagan, Hinayana; Freeman, Katie B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Moss, Stephen J

    2004-04-01

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Whereas heterodimerization between GABA(B) receptor GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits is essential for functional expression, how neurons coordinate the assembly of these critical receptors remains to be established. Here we have identified Marlin-1, a novel GABA(B) receptor-binding protein that associates specifically with the GABA(B)R1 subunit in yeast, tissue culture cells, and neurons. Marlin-1 is expressed in the brain and exhibits a granular distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. Marlin-1 binds different RNA species including the 3'-untranslated regions of both the GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 mRNAs in vitro and also associates with RNA in cultured neurons. Inhibition of Marlin-1 expression via small RNA interference technology results in enhanced intracellular levels of the GABA(B)R2 receptor subunit without affecting the level of GABA(B)R1. Together our results suggest that Marlin-1 functions to regulate the cellular levels of GABA(B) R2 subunits, which may have significant effects on the production of functional GABA(B) receptor heterodimers. Therefore, our observations provide an added level of regulation for the control of GABA(B) receptor expression and for the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission. PMID:14718537

  14. A Retroviral CRISPR-Cas9 System for Cellular Autism-Associated Phenotype Discovery in Developing Neurons.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; Fricano-Kugler, Catherine J; Getz, Stephanie A; Skelton, Patrick D; Lee, Jeonghoon; Rizzuto, Christian P; Geller, Joseph S; Li, Meijie; Luikart, Bryan W

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses expressing a fluorescent protein, Cas9, and a small guide RNA are used to mimic nonsense PTEN mutations from autism patients in developing mouse neurons. We compare the cellular phenotype elicited by CRISPR-Cas9 to those elicited using shRNA or Cre/Lox technologies and find that knockdown or knockout (KO) produced a corresponding moderate or severe neuronal hypertrophy in all cells. In contrast, the Cas9 approach produced missense and nonsense Pten mutations, resulting in a mix of KO-equivalent hypertrophic and wild type-like phenotypes. Importantly, despite this mixed phenotype, the neuronal hypertrophy resulting from Pten loss was evident on average in the population of manipulated cells. Having reproduced the known Pten KO phenotype using the CRISPR-Cas9 system we design viruses to target a gene that has recently been associated with autism, KATNAL2. Katnal2 deletion in the mouse results in decreased dendritic arborization of developing neurons. We conclude that retroviral implementation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system is an efficient system for cellular phenotype discovery in wild-type animals. PMID:27161796

  15. A Retroviral CRISPR-Cas9 System for Cellular Autism-Associated Phenotype Discovery in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael R.; Fricano-Kugler, Catherine J.; Getz, Stephanie A.; Skelton, Patrick D.; Lee, Jeonghoon; Rizzuto, Christian P.; Geller, Joseph S.; Li, Meijie; Luikart, Bryan W.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses expressing a fluorescent protein, Cas9, and a small guide RNA are used to mimic nonsense PTEN mutations from autism patients in developing mouse neurons. We compare the cellular phenotype elicited by CRISPR-Cas9 to those elicited using shRNA or Cre/Lox technologies and find that knockdown or knockout (KO) produced a corresponding moderate or severe neuronal hypertrophy in all cells. In contrast, the Cas9 approach produced missense and nonsense Pten mutations, resulting in a mix of KO-equivalent hypertrophic and wild type-like phenotypes. Importantly, despite this mixed phenotype, the neuronal hypertrophy resulting from Pten loss was evident on average in the population of manipulated cells. Having reproduced the known Pten KO phenotype using the CRISPR-Cas9 system we design viruses to target a gene that has recently been associated with autism, KATNAL2. Katnal2 deletion in the mouse results in decreased dendritic arborization of developing neurons. We conclude that retroviral implementation of the CRISPR-Cas9 system is an efficient system for cellular phenotype discovery in wild-type animals. PMID:27161796

  16. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated responses in medial vestibular and prepositus hypoglossi nuclei neurons showing distinct neurotransmitter phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Saito, Yasuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Cholinergic transmission in both the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) and prepositus hypoglossi nucleus (PHN) plays an important role in horizontal eye movements. We previously demonstrated that the current responses mediated via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) were larger than those mediated via muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in cholinergic MVN and PHN neurons that project to the cerebellum. In this study, to clarify the predominant nAChR responses and the expression patterns of nAChRs in MVN and PHN neurons that exhibit distinct neurotransmitter phenotypes, we identified cholinergic, inhibitory, and glutamatergic neurons using specific transgenic rats and investigated current responses to the application of acetylcholine (ACh) using whole cell recordings in brain stem slices. ACh application induced larger nAChR-mediated currents than mAChR-mediated currents in every neuronal phenotype. In the presence of an mAChR antagonist, we found three types of nAChR-mediated currents that exhibited different rise and decay times and designated these as fast (F)-, slow (S)-, and fast and slow (FS)-type currents. F-type currents were the predominant response in inhibitory MVN neurons, whereas S-type currents were observed in the majority of glutamatergic MVN and PHN neurons. No dominant response type was observed in cholinergic neurons. Pharmacological analyses revealed that the F-, S-, and FS-type currents were mainly mediated by α7, non-α7, and both α7 and non-α7 nAChRs, respectively. These findings suggest that cholinergic responses in the major neuronal populations of the MVN and PHN are predominantly mediated by nAChRs and that the expression of α7 and non-α7 nAChRs differ among the neuronal phenotypes. PMID:26936981

  17. Exacerbated neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotype in Cln1/5 double-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Tea; Schmiedt, Mia-Lisa; Wong, Andrew M.; Kyttälä, Aija; Soronen, Jarkko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Tyynelä, Jaana; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Jalanko, Anu

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Both CLN1 and CLN5 deficiencies lead to severe neurodegenerative diseases of childhood, known as neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The broadly similar phenotypes of NCL mouse models, and the potential for interactions between NCL proteins, raise the possibility of shared or convergent disease mechanisms. To begin addressing these issues, we have developed a new mouse model lacking both Cln1 and Cln5 genes. These double-knockout (Cln1/5 dko) mice were fertile, showing a slight decrease in expected Mendelian breeding ratios, as well as impaired embryoid body formation by induced pluripotent stem cells derived from Cln1/5 dko fibroblasts. Typical disease manifestations of the NCLs, i.e. seizures and motor dysfunction, were detected at the age of 3 months, earlier than in either single knockout mouse. Pathological analyses revealed a similar exacerbation and earlier onset of disease in Cln1/5 dko mice, which exhibited a pronounced accumulation of autofluorescent storage material. Cortical demyelination and more pronounced glial activation in cortical and thalamic regions was followed by cortical neuron loss. Alterations in lipid metabolism in Cln1/5 dko showed a specific increase in plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity. Finally, gene expression profiling of Cln1/5 dko cortex revealed defects in myelination and immune response pathways, with a prominent downregulation of α-synuclein in Cln1/5 dko mouse brains. The simultaneous loss of both Cln1 and Cln5 genes might enhance the typical pathological phenotypes of these mice by disrupting or downregulating shared or convergent pathogenic pathways, which could potentially include interactions of CLN1 and CLN5. PMID:23065637

  18. Phenotyping the Function of TRPV1-Expressing Sensory Neurons by Targeted Axonal Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, Christian; Kistner, Katrin; Puopolo, Michelino; Segal, David; Roberson, David; Sisignano, Marco; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirós, Nerea; Strominger, Amanda; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Geisslinger, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W.; Bean, Bruce P.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Specific somatosensations may be processed by different subsets of primary afferents. C-fibers expressing heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels are proposed, for example, to be heat but not mechanical pain detectors. To phenotype in rats the sensory function of TRPV1+ afferents, we rapidly and selectively silenced only their activity, by introducing the membrane-impermeant sodium channel blocker QX-314 into these axons via the TRPV1 channel pore. Using tandem mass spectrometry we show that upon activation with capsaicin, QX-314 selectively accumulates in the cytosol only of TRPV1-expressing cells, and not in control cells. Exposure to QX-314 and capsaicin induces in small DRG neurons a robust sodium current block within 30 s. In sciatic nerves, application of extracellular QX-314 with capsaicin persistently reduces C-fiber but not A-fiber compound action potentials and this effect does not occur in TRPV1−/− mice. Behavioral phenotyping after selectively silencing TRPV1+ sciatic nerve axons by perineural injections of QX-314 and capsaicin reveals deficits in heat and mechanical pressure but not pinprick or light touch perception. The response to intraplantar capsaicin is substantially reduced, as expected. During inflammation, silencing TRPV1+ axons abolishes heat, mechanical, and cold hyperalgesia but tactile and cold allodynia remain following peripheral nerve injury. These results indicate that TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons process particular thermal and mechanical somatosensations, and that the sensory channels activated by mechanical and cold stimuli to produce pain in naive/inflamed rats differ from those in animals after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23283344

  19. Quantitative autoradiographic characterization of GA-BA sub B receptors in mammalian central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.Chin-Mei.

    1989-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of the amino acid neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) within the nervous system appear to be mediated through two distinct classes of receptors: GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} receptors. A quantitative autoradiographic method with {sup 3}H-GABA was developed to examine the hypotheses that GABA{sub A} and GABA{sub B} sites have distinct anatomical distributions, pharmacologic properties, and synaptic localizations within the rodent nervous system. The method was also applied to a comparative study of these receptors in postmortem human brain from individuals afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and those without neurologic disease. The results indicated that GABA{sub B} receptors occur in fewer numbers and have a lower affinity for GABA than GABA{sub A} receptors in both rodent and human brain. Within rodent brain, the distribution of these two receptor populations were clearly distinct. GABA{sub B} receptors were enriched in the medial habenula, interpeduncular nucleus, cerebellar molecular layer and olfactory glomerular layer. After selective lesions of postsynaptic neurons of the corticostriatal and perforant pathway, both GABA{sub B} and GABA{sub A} receptors were significantly decreased in number. Lesions of the presynaptic limbs of the perforant but not the corticostriatal pathway resulted in upregulation of both GABA receptors in the area of innervation. GABA{sub B} receptors were also upregulated in CA3 dendritic regions after destruction of dentate granule neurons.

  20. Neural stem cells from protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma knockout mice generate an altered neuronal phenotype in culture

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, David L; Pacey, Laura KK; Axford, Michelle M; Siu, Roberta; Rotin, Daniela; Doering, Laurie C

    2006-01-01

    Background The LAR family Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase sigma (PTPσ) has been implicated in neuroendocrine and neuronal development, and shows strong expression in specific regions within the CNS, including the subventricular zone (SVZ). We established neural stem cell cultures, grown as neurospheres, from the SVZ of PTPσ knockout mice and sibling controls to determine if PTPσ influences the generation and the phenotype of the neuronal, astrocyte and oligodendrocyte cell lineages. Results The neurospheres from the knockout mice acquired heterogeneous developmental characteristics and they showed similar morphological characteristics to the age matched siblings. Although Ptprs expression decreases as a function of developmental age in vivo, it remains high with the continual renewal and passage of the neurospheres. Stem cells, progenitors and differentiated neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes all express the gene. While no apparent differences were observed in developing neurospheres or in the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes from the PTPσ knockout mice, the neuronal migration patterns and neurites were altered when studied in culture. In particular, neurons migrated farther from the neurosphere centers and the neurite outgrowth exceeded the length of the neuronal processes from age matched sibling controls. Conclusion Our results imply a specific role for PTPσ in the neuronal lineage, particularly in the form of inhibitory influences on neurite outgrowth, and demonstrate a role for tyrosine phosphatases in neuronal stem cell differentiation. PMID:16784531

  1. The role of the area postrema in the anorectic effects of amylin and salmon calcitonin: behavioral and neuronal phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Braegger, Fiona E; Asarian, Lori; Dahl, Kirsten; Lutz, Thomas A; Boyle, Christina N

    2014-10-01

    Amylin reduces meal size by activating noradrenergic neurons in the area postrema (AP). Neurons in the AP also mediate the eating-inhibitory effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT), a potent amylin agonist, but the phenotypes of the neurons mediating its effect are unknown. Here we investigated whether sCT activates similar neuronal populations to amylin, and if its anorectic properties also depend on AP function. Male rats underwent AP lesion (APX) or sham surgery. Meal patterns were analysed under ad libitum and post-deprivation conditions. The importance of the AP in mediating the anorectic action of sCT was examined in feeding experiments of dose-response effects of sCT in APX vs. sham rats. The effect of sCT to induce Fos expression was compared between surgery groups, and relative to amylin. The phenotype of Fos-expressing neurons in the brainstem was examined by testing for the co-expression of dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). By measuring the apposition of vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2)-positive boutons, potential glutamatergic input to amylin- and sCT-activated AP neurons was compared. Similar to amylin, an intact AP was necessary for sCT to reduce eating. Further, co-expression between Fos activation and DBH after amylin or sCT did not differ markedly, while co-localization of Fos and TPH was minor. Approximately 95% of neurons expressing Fos and DBH after amylin or sCT treatment were closely apposed to VGLUT2-positive boutons. Our study suggests that the hindbrain pathways engaged by amylin and sCT share many similarities, including the mediation by AP neurons. PMID:25040689

  2. Pharmacological reversal of a pain phenotype in iPSC-derived sensory neurons and patients with inherited erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lishuang; McDonnell, Aoibhinn; Nitzsche, Anja; Alexandrou, Aristos; Saintot, Pierre-Philippe; Loucif, Alexandre J C; Brown, Adam R; Young, Gareth; Mis, Malgorzata; Randall, Andrew; Waxman, Stephen G; Stanley, Philip; Kirby, Simon; Tarabar, Sanela; Gutteridge, Alex; Butt, Richard; McKernan, Ruth M; Whiting, Paul; Ali, Zahid; Bilsland, James; Stevens, Edward B

    2016-04-20

    In common with other chronic pain conditions, there is an unmet clinical need in the treatment of inherited erythromelalgia (IEM). TheSCN9Agene encoding the sodium channel Nav1.7 expressed in the peripheral nervous system plays a critical role in IEM. A gain-of-function mutation in this sodium channel leads to aberrant sensory neuronal activity and extreme pain, particularly in response to heat. Five patients with IEM were treated with a new potent and selective compound that blocked the Nav1.7 sodium channel resulting in a decrease in heat-induced pain in most of the patients. We derived induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from four of five subjects and produced sensory neurons that emulated the clinical phenotype of hyperexcitability and aberrant responses to heat stimuli. When we compared the severity of the clinical phenotype with the hyperexcitability of the iPSC-derived sensory neurons, we saw a trend toward a correlation for individual mutations. The in vitro IEM phenotype was sensitive to Nav1.7 blockers, including the clinical test agent. Given the importance of peripherally expressed sodium channels in many pain conditions, our approach may have broader utility for a wide range of pain and sensory conditions. PMID:27099175

  3. Genotype-to-phenotype analysis: Search for clinical characteristics of a missense change in the GABA{sub A}-{beta}1 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sobell, J.L.; Sigurdson, D.C.; Sommer, S.S.

    1996-02-16

    Genotype-to-phenotype analysis reverses the classical approach to genetic disease in which an unknown genotype is sought for a known phenotype. This paper provides an example of genotype-to-phenotype analysis for the possible psychiatric effects of a missense mutation (H396Q) at a highly conserved residue of the {Beta}1 subunit gene of the gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor. DNA samples from 1,507 Caucasians of Western European descent were screened, and 10 heterozygotes for H396Q were identified. These individuals were matched to homozygous normal individuals by age, gender, and length of available medical records. The complete medical records of these 20 individuals were reviewed blindly by two psychiatrists (D.C.S., L.L.H.) to assess psychiatric symptomatology, with an emphasis on anxiety and related disorders. However, no association was found between this missense change at a conserved amino acid and a dominant neuropsychiatric disease phenotype. Thus, this missense change may be neutral or only mildly deleterious, may only cause recessive disease in rare individuals, or may interact epistatically with some other gene(s). 17 refs.

  4. Immunocytochemistry of GABA in the brain and suboesophageal ganglion of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Homberg, U; Kingan, T G; Hildebrand, J G

    1987-04-01

    We have used specific antisera against protein-conjugated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in immunocytochemical preparations to investigate the distribution of putatively GABAergic neurons in the brain and suboesophageal ganglion of the sphinx moth Manduca sexta. About 20,000 neurons per brain hemisphere exhibit GABA-immunoreactivity. Most of these are optic-lobe interneurons, especially morphologically centrifugal neurons of the lamina and tangential neurons that innervate the medulla or the lobula complex. Many GABA-immunoreactive neurons, among them giant fibers of the lobula plate, project into the median protocerebrum. Among prominent GABA-immunoreactive neurons of the median protocerebrum are about 150 putatively negative-feedback fibers of the mushroom body, innervating both the calyces and lobes, and a group of large, fan-shaped neurons of the lower division of the central body. Several commissures in the supra- and suboesophageal ganglion exhibit GABA-like immunoreactivity. In the suboesophageal ganglion, a group of contralaterally descending neurons shows GABA-like immunoreactivity. The frontal ganglion is innervated by immunoreactive processes from the tritocerebrum but does not contain GABA-immunoreactive somata. With few exceptions the brain nerves do not contain GABA-immunoreactive fibers. PMID:3552234

  5. Different transporter systems regulate extracellular GABA from vesicular and non-vesicular sources

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inseon; Volynski, Kirill; Brenner, Tanja; Ushkaryov, Yuri; Walker, Matthew; Semyanov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Tonic GABA type A (GABAA) conductance is a key factor regulating neuronal excitability and computation in neuronal networks. The magnitude of the tonic GABAA conductance depends on the concentration of ambient GABA originating from vesicular and non-vesicular sources and is tightly regulated by GABA uptake. Here we show that the transport system regulating ambient GABA responsible for tonic GABAA conductances in hippocampal CA1 interneurons depends on its source. In mice, GABA from vesicular sources is regulated by mouse GABA transporter 1 (mGAT1), while that from non-vesicular sources by mouse GABA transporters 3/4 (mGAT3/4). This finding suggests that the two transporter systems do not just provide backup for each other, but regulate distinct signaling pathways. This allows individual tuning of the two signaling systems and indicates that drugs designed to act at specific transporters will have distinct therapeutic actions. PMID:23494150

  6. An excitatory GABA loop operating in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Astorga, Guadalupe; Bao, Jin; Marty, Alain; Augustine, George J.; Franconville, Romain; Jalil, Abdelali; Bradley, Jonathan; Llano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    While it has been proposed that the conventional inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can be excitatory in the mammalian brain, much remains to be learned concerning the circumstances and the cellular mechanisms governing potential excitatory GABA action. Using a combination of optogenetics and two-photon calcium imaging in vivo, we find that activation of chloride-permeable GABAA receptors in parallel fibers (PFs) of the cerebellar molecular layer of adult mice causes parallel fiber excitation. Stimulation of PFs at submaximal stimulus intensities leads to GABA release from molecular layer interneurons (MLIs), thus creating a positive feedback loop that enhances excitation near the center of an activated PF bundle. Our results imply that elevated chloride concentration can occur in specific intracellular compartments of mature mammalian neurons and suggest an excitatory role for GABAA receptors in the cerebellar cortex of adult mice. PMID:26236197

  7. Phenotype-dependent inhibition of glutamatergic transmission on nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons by the abused inhalant toluene.

    PubMed

    Beckley, Jacob T; Randall, Patrick K; Smith, Rachel J; Hughes, Benjamin A; Kalivas, Peter W; Woodward, John J

    2016-05-01

    Abused inhalants are voluntarily inhaled at high concentrations to produce intoxicating effects. Results from animal studies show that the abused inhalant toluene triggers behaviors, such as self-administration and conditioned place preference, which are commonly associated with addictive drugs. However, little is known about how toluene affects neurons within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region within the basal ganglia that mediates goal-directed behaviors and is implicated in the development and maintenance of addictive behaviors. Here we report that toluene inhibits a component of the after-hyperpolarization potential, and dose-dependently inhibits N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated currents in rat NAc medium spiny neurons (MSN). Moreover, using the multivariate statistical technique, partial least squares discriminative analysis to analyze electrophysiological measures from rat NAc MSNs, we show that toluene induces a persistent depression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-mediated currents in one subtype of NAc MSNs, and that the electrophysiological features of MSN neurons predicts their sensitivity to toluene. The CB1 receptor antagonist AM281 blocked the toluene-induced long-term depression of AMPA currents, indicating that this process is dependent on endocannabinoid signaling. The neuronal identity of recorded cells was examined using dual histochemistry and shows that toluene-sensitive NAc neurons are dopamine D2 MSNs that express preproenkephalin mRNA. Overall, the results from these studies indicate that physiological characteristics obtained from NAc MSNs during whole-cell patch-clamp recordings reliably predict neuronal phenotype, and that the abused inhalant toluene differentially depresses excitatory neurotransmission in NAc neuronal subtypes. PMID:25752326

  8. Developing oligodendrocytes express functional GABA(B) receptors that stimulate cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Luyt, Karen; Slade, Timothy P; Dorward, Jienchi J; Durant, Claire F; Wu, Yue; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Mundell, Stuart J; Váradi, Anikó; Molnár, Elek

    2007-02-01

    GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) are involved in early events during neuronal development. The presence of GABA(B)Rs in developing oligodendrocytes has not been established. Using immunofluorescent co-localization, we have identified GABA(B)R proteins in O4 marker-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in 4-day-old mouse brain periventricular white matter. In culture, OPCs, differentiated oligodendrocytes (DOs) and type 2 astrocytes (ASTs) express both the GABA(B1abcdf) and GABA(B2) subunits of the GABA(B)R. Using semiquantitative PCR analysis with GABA(B)R isoform-selective primers we found that the expression level of GABA(B1abd) was substantially higher in OPCs or ASTs than in DOs. In contrast, the GABA(B2) isoform showed a similar level of expression in OPCs and DOs, and a significantly higher level in ASTs. This indicates that the expression of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits are under independent control during oligodendroglial development. Activation of GABA(B)Rs using the selective agonist baclofen demonstrated that these receptors are functionally active and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Manipulation of GABA(B)R activity had no effect on OPC migration in a conventional agarose drop assay, whereas baclofen significantly increased OPC migration in a more sensitive transwell microchamber-based assay. Exposure of cultured OPCs to baclofen increased their proliferation, providing evidence for a functional role of GABA(B)Rs in oligodendrocyte development. The presence of GABA(B)Rs in developing oligodendrocytes provides a new mechanism for neuronal-glial interactions during development and may offer a novel target for promoting remyelination following white matter injury. PMID:17144904

  9. A functional role for both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1 and GABA transporter-3 in the modulation of extracellular GABA and GABAergic tonic conductances in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kersanté, Flavie; Rowley, Samuel C S; Pavlov, Ivan; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Semyanov, Alexey; Reul, Johannes M H M; Walker, Matthew C; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2013-01-01

    Tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated signalling controls neuronal network excitability in the hippocampus. Although the extracellular concentration of GABA (e[GABA]) is critical in determining tonic conductances, knowledge on how e[GABA] is regulated by different GABA transporters (GATs) in vivo is limited. Therefore, we studied the role of GATs in the regulation of hippocampal e[GABA] using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats. Here we show that GAT-1, which is predominantly presynaptically located, is the major GABA transporter under baseline, quiescent conditions. Furthermore, a significant contribution of GAT-3 in regulating e[GABA] was revealed by administration of the GAT-3 inhibitor SNAP-5114 during simultaneous blockade of GAT-1 by NNC-711. Thus, the GABA transporting activity of GAT-3 (the expression of which is confined to astrocytes) is apparent under conditions in which GAT-1 is blocked. However, sustained neuronal activation by K+-induced depolarization caused a profound spillover of GABA into the extrasynaptic space and this increase in e[GABA] was significantly potentiated by sole blockade of GAT-3 (i.e. even when uptake of GAT-1 is intact). Furthermore, experiments using tetrodotoxin to block action potentials revealed that GAT-3 regulates extrasynaptic GABA levels from action potential-independent sources when GAT-1 is blocked. Importantly, changes in e[GABA] resulting from both GAT-1 and GAT-3 inhibition directly precipitate changes in tonic conductances in dentate granule cells as measured by whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Thus, astrocytic GAT-3 contributes to the regulation of e[GABA] in the hippocampus in vivo and may play an important role in controlling the excitability of hippocampal cells when network activity is increased. PMID:23381899

  10. Neuregulin-1β Regulates the migration of Different Neurochemical Phenotypic Neurons from Organotypically Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion Explants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Liu, Guixiang; Li, Hao; Bi, Yanwen

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) has multiple roles in the development and function in the nervous system and exhibits potent neuroprotective properties. In the present study, organotypically cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants were used to evaluate the effects of NRG-1β on migration of two major phenotypic classes of DRG neurons. The signaling pathways involved in these effects were also determined. Organotypically cultured DRG explants were exposed to NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), and LY294002 (10 μmol/L) plus PD98059 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 3 days. The DRG explants were continuously exposed to culture media as a control. After that, all above cultures were processed for detecting the mRNA levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament-200 (NF-200) by real-time PCR analysis. CGRP and NF-200 expression in situ was determined by fluorescent labeling technique. The results showed that NRG-1β elevated the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and NF-200. NRG-1β also increased the number and the percentage of CGRP-immunoreactive (IR) migrating neurons and NF-200-IR migrating neurons. Inhibitors (LY294002, PD98059) either alone or in combination blocked the effects of NRG-1β. The contribution of NRG-1β on modulating distinct neurochemical phenotypic plasticity of DRG neurons suggested that NRG-1β signaling system might play an important role on the biological effects of primary sensory neurons. PMID:26093851

  11. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  12. GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mutation A322D associated with autosomal dominant juvenile myoclonic epilepsy reduces the expression and alters the composition of wild type GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Feng, Hua-Jun; Macdonald, Robert L; Botzolakis, Emanuel J; Hu, Ningning; Gallagher, Martin J

    2010-08-20

    A GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) alpha1 subunit mutation, A322D (AD), causes an autosomal dominant form of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (ADJME). Previous studies demonstrated that the mutation caused alpha1(AD) subunit misfolding and rapid degradation, reducing its total and surface expression substantially. Here, we determined the effects of the residual alpha1(AD) subunit expression on wild type GABA(A)R expression to determine whether the AD mutation conferred a dominant negative effect. We found that although the alpha1(AD) subunit did not substitute for wild type alpha1 subunits on the cell surface, it reduced the surface expression of alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha3beta2gamma2 receptors by associating with the wild type subunits within the endoplasmic reticulum and preventing them from trafficking to the cell surface. The alpha1(AD) subunit reduced surface expression of alpha3beta2gamma2 receptors by a greater amount than alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, thus altering cell surface GABA(A)R composition. When transfected into cultured cortical neurons, the alpha1(AD) subunit altered the time course of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current kinetics and reduced miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current amplitudes. These findings demonstrated that, in addition to causing a heterozygous loss of function of alpha1(AD) subunits, this epilepsy mutation also elicited a modest dominant negative effect that likely shapes the epilepsy phenotype. PMID:20551311

  13. Ablation of μ opioid receptor-expressing GABA neurons in rostromedial tegmental nucleus increases ethanol consumption and regulates ethanol-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rao; Chen, Xing; Zuo, Wanhong; Li, Jing; Kang, Seungwoo; Zhou, Li-Hua; Siegel, Allan; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-08-01

    There has been increasing interest in the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg), given its potential regulatory role in many aversion-related behaviors. The RMTg contains mostly GABAergic neurons, sends a dense inhibitory projection to dopamine neurons in the midbrain, and is rich with μ-opioid receptors (MOR). Like most addictive drugs, ethanol has both aversive and rewarding properties. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the effects of ethanol, particularly the aversive effect that limits its intake are not well understood. Recent studies have linked aversion with synaptic inhibition of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. To determine a potential role that the RMTg plays in the effect of ethanol, in this study, we employed a neurotoxin, dermorphin-saporin (DS), to lesion RMTg neurons prior to assessing ethanol-related behaviors. Rats were infused with DS bilaterally into the RMTg. This manipulation substantially increased the intake and preference for ethanol but not sucrose. It also reduced the number of neurons with MOR and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity within the RMTg. These changes did not occur after intra-RMTg infusion of blank saporin or vehicle. Importantly, intra-RMTg DS infusion significantly enhanced expression of conditioned place preference induced by ethanol (2 g/kg, i.p.), and slowed the extinction process. These results suggest that MOR-expressing GABAergic neurons in the RMTg contribute significantly to the regulation of ethanol consumption and related behaviors. PMID:26921770

  14. Sex differences in GABA(B)R-GIRK signaling in layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the mouse prelimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Marron Fernandez de Velasco, Ezequiel; Hearing, Matthew; Xia, Zhilian; Victoria, Nicole C; Luján, Rafael; Wickman, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in multiple disorders characterized by clear sex differences, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and drug addiction. These sex differences likely represent underlying differences in connectivity and/or the balance of neuronal excitability within the mPFC. Recently, we demonstrated that signaling via the metabotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABABR) and G protein-gated inwardly-rectifying K(+) (GIRK/Kir3) channels modulates the excitability of the key output neurons of the mPFC, the layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons. Here, we report a sex difference in the GABABR-GIRK signaling pathway in these neurons. Specifically, GABABR-dependent GIRK currents recorded in the prelimbic region of the mPFC were larger in adolescent male mice than in female counterparts. Interestingly, this sex difference was not observed in layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons of the adjacent infralimbic cortex, nor was it seen in young adult mice. The sex difference in GABABR-GIRK signaling is not attributable to different expression levels of signaling pathway components, but rather to a phosphorylation-dependent trafficking mechanism. Thus, sex differences related to some diseases associated with altered mPFC function may be explained in part by sex differences in GIRK-dependent signaling in mPFC pyramidal neurons. PMID:25843643

  15. From the intrinsic properties to the functional role of a neuron phenotype: an example from electric fish during signal trade-off.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Javier; Caputi, Angel A

    2013-07-01

    This review deals with the question: what is the relationship between the properties of a neuron and the role that the neuron plays within a given neural circuit? Answering this kind of question requires collecting evidence from multiple neuron phenotypes and comparing the role of each type in circuits that perform well-defined computational tasks. The focus here is on the spherical neurons in the electrosensory lobe of the electric fish Gymnotus omarorum. They belong to the one-spike-onset phenotype expressed at the early stages of signal processing in various sensory modalities and diverse taxa. First, we refer to the one-spike neuron intrinsic properties, their foundation on a low-threshold K(+) conductance, and the potential roles of this phenotype in different circuits within a comparative framework. Second, we present a brief description of the active electric sense of weakly electric fish and the particularities of spherical one-spike-onset neurons in the electrosensory lobe of G. omarorum. Third, we introduce one of the specific tasks in which these neurons are involved: the trade-off between self- and allo-generated signals. Fourth, we discuss recent evidence indicating a still-undescribed role for the one-spike phenotype. This role deals with the blockage of the pathway after being activated by the self-generated electric organ discharge and how this blockage favors self-generated electrosensory information in the context of allo-generated interference. Based on comparative analysis we conclude that one-spike-onset neurons may play several functional roles in animal sensory behavior. There are specific adaptations of the neuron's 'response function' to the circuit and task. Conversely, the way in which a task is accomplished depends on the intrinsic properties of the neurons involved. In short, the role of a neuron within a circuit depends on the neuron and its functional context. PMID:23761463

  16. Assessing neurodegenerative phenotypes in Drosophila dopaminergic neurons by climbing assays and whole brain immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Barone, Maria Cecilia; Bohmann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a valuable model organism to study aging and pathological degenerative processes in the nervous system. The advantages of the fly as an experimental system include its genetic tractability, short life span and the possibility to observe and quantitatively analyze complex behaviors. The expression of disease-linked genes in specific neuronal populations of the Drosophila brain, can be used to model human neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's (5). Dopaminergic (DA) neurons are among the most vulnerable neuronal populations in the aging human brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, the accelerated loss of DA neurons leads to a progressive and irreversible decline in locomotor function. In addition to age and exposure to environmental toxins, loss of DA neurons is exacerbated by specific mutations in the coding or promoter regions of several genes. The identification of such PD-associated alleles provides the experimental basis for the use of Drosophila as a model to study neurodegeneration of DA neurons in vivo. For example, the expression of the PD-linked human α-synuclein gene in Drosophila DA neurons recapitulates some features of the human disease, e.g. progressive loss of DA neurons and declining locomotor function (2). Accordingly, this model has been successfully used to identify potential therapeutic targets in PD (8). Here we describe two assays that have commonly been used to study age-dependent neurodegeneration of DA neurons in Drosophila: a climbing assay based on the startle-induced negative geotaxis response and tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining of whole adult brain mounts to monitor the number of DA neurons at different ages. In both cases, in vivo expression of UAS transgenes specifically in DA neurons can be achieved by using a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter-Gal4 driver line (3, 10). PMID:23644755

  17. Long-lasting distortion of GABA signaling in MS/DB neurons after binge-like ethanol exposure during initial synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiying; DuBois, Dustin W; Tobery, Angelika N; Griffith, William H; Brandt, Paul; Frye, Gerald D

    2013-07-01

    Using a well-established model of binge-like ethanol treatment of rat pups on postnatal days (PD) 4-9, we found that maturation of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) was substantially blunted for medial septum/diagonal band (MS/DB) neurons in brain slices on PD 11-16. Ethanol reduced mPSC amplitude, frequency, and decay kinetics, while attenuating or exaggerating allosteric actions of zolpidem and allopregnanolone, respectively. The impact of ethanol in vivo was long lasting as most changes in MS/DB GABAAR mPSCs were still observed as late as PD 60-85. Maturing MS/DB neurons in naïve brain slices PD 4-16 showed increasing mPSC frequency, decay kinetics, and zolpidem sensitivity that were nearly identical to our earlier findings in cultured septal neurons (DuBois et al., 2004, 2006). These rapidly developing mPSC parameters continued to mature through the first month of life then stabilized throughout the remainder of the lifespan. Finally, equivalent ethanol-induced alterations in GABAAR mPSC signaling were present in MS/DB neurons from both male and female animals. Previously, we showed ethanol treatment of cultured embryonic day 20 septal neurons distorts the maturation of GABAAR mPSCs predicting that early stages of GABAergic transmission in MS/DB neurons are vulnerable to intoxication injury (DuBois et al., 2004, 2006). Since the overall character, timing, and magnitude of GABAergic mPSC developmental- and ethanol-induced changes in the in vivo model so closely mirror chronologically equivalent adaptations in cultured septal neurons, this suggests that such parallel models of ethanol impairment of GABAergic synaptic development in vivo and in vitro should be useful for translational studies exploring the efficacy and mechanism of action of potential therapeutic interventions from the cellular to whole animal level. PMID:23685190

  18. Chronic Exposure to Dietary Sterol Glucosides is Neurotoxic to Motor Neurons and Induces an ALS-PDC Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, R. C.; Wilson, J. M. B.; Ly, P.; Zwiegers, P.; Kwok, D.; Van Kampen, J. M.; Cashman, N.; Shaw, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of the Guamanian variants of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS-PDC), have shown a positive correlation between consumption of washed cycad seed flour and disease occurrence. Previous in vivo studies by our group have shown that the same seed flour induces ALS and PDC phenotypes in out bred adult male mice. In vitro studies using isolated cycad compounds have also demonstrated that several of these are neurotoxic, specifically, a number of water insoluble phytosterol glucosides of which β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG) forms the largest fraction. BSSG is neurotoxic to motor neurons and other neuronal populations in culture. The present study shows that an in vitro hybrid motor neuron (NSC-34) culture treated with BSSG undergoes a dose-dependent cell loss. Surviving cells show increased expression of HSP70, decreased cytosolic heavy neurofilament expression, and have various morphological abnormalities. CD-1 mice fed mouse chow pellets containing BSSG for 15 weeks showed motor deficits and motor neuron loss in the lumbar and thoracic spinal cord, along with decreased glutamate transporter labelling, and increased glial fibrillary acid protein reactivity. Other pathological outcomes included increased caspase-3 labelling in the striatum and decreased tyrosine-hydroxylase labelling in the striatum and substantia nigra. C57BL/6 mice fed BSSG-treated pellets for 10 weeks exhibited progressive loss of motor neurons in the lumbar spinal cord that continued to worsen even after the BSSG exposure ended. These results provide further support implicating sterol glucosides as one potential causal factor in the motor neuron pathology previously associated with cycad consumption and ALS-PDC. PMID:18196479

  19. The ADAR RNA editing enzyme controls neuronal excitability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianghua; Overton, Ian M; Baines, Richard A; Keegan, Liam P; O'Connell, Mary A

    2014-01-01

    RNA editing by deamination of specific adenosine bases to inosines during pre-mRNA processing generates edited isoforms of proteins. Recoding RNA editing is more widespread in Drosophila than in vertebrates. Editing levels rise strongly at metamorphosis, and Adar(5G1) null mutant flies lack editing events in hundreds of CNS transcripts; mutant flies have reduced viability, severely defective locomotion and age-dependent neurodegeneration. On the other hand, overexpressing an adult dADAR isoform with high enzymatic activity ubiquitously during larval and pupal stages is lethal. Advantage was taken of this to screen for genetic modifiers; Adar overexpression lethality is rescued by reduced dosage of the Rdl (Resistant to dieldrin), gene encoding a subunit of inhibitory GABA receptors. Reduced dosage of the Gad1 gene encoding the GABA synthetase also rescues Adar overexpression lethality. Drosophila Adar(5G1) mutant phenotypes are ameliorated by feeding GABA modulators. We demonstrate that neuronal excitability is linked to dADAR expression levels in individual neurons; Adar-overexpressing larval motor neurons show reduced excitability whereas Adar(5G1) null mutant or targeted Adar knockdown motor neurons exhibit increased excitability. GABA inhibitory signalling is impaired in human epileptic and autistic conditions, and vertebrate ADARs may have a relevant evolutionarily conserved control over neuronal excitability. PMID:24137011

  20. Excitatory GABA: How a Correct Observation May Turn Out to be an Experimental Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Bregestovski, Piotr; Bernard, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the excitatory action of GABA during early development is based on data obtained mainly in brain slice recordings. However, in vivo measurements as well as observations made in intact hippocampal preparations indicate that GABA is in fact inhibitory in rodents at early neonatal stages. The apparent excitatory action of GABA seems to stem from cellular injury due to the slicing procedure, which leads to accumulation of intracellular Cl− in injured neurons. This procedural artifact was shown to be attenuated through various manipulations such as addition of energy substrates more relevant to the in vivo situation. These observations question the very concept of excitatory GABA in immature neuronal networks. PMID:22529813

  1. Depressive-like phenotype induced by AAV-mediated overexpression of human α-synuclein in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Caudal, D; Alvarsson, A; Björklund, A; Svenningsson, P

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and by the presence of aggregates containing α-synuclein called Lewy bodies. Viral vector-induced overexpression of α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons represents a model of PD which recapitulates disease progression better than commonly used neurotoxin models. Previous studies using this model have reported motor and cognitive impairments, whereas depression, mood and anxiety phenotypes are less described. To investigate these psychiatric phenotypes, Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral injections of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing human α-synuclein or GFP into the substantia nigra pars compacta. Behavior was assessed at two timepoints: 3 and 8 weeks post-injection. We report that nigral α-synuclein overexpression led to a pronounced nigral dopaminergic cell loss accompanied by a smaller cell loss in the ventral tegmental area, and to a decreased striatal density of dopaminergic fibers. The AAV-α-synuclein group exhibited modest, but significant motor impairments 8 weeks after vector administration. The AAV-α-synuclein group displayed depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test after 3 weeks, and reduced sucrose preference at week 8. At both timepoints, overexpression of α-synuclein was linked to a hyperactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation of corticosterone. The depressive-like phenotype was also correlated with decreased nigral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and spinophilin levels, and with decreased striatal levels of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein. This study demonstrates that AAV-mediated α-synuclein overexpression in dopamine neurons is not only useful to model motor impairments of PD, but also depression. This study also provides evidence that depression in experimental Parkinsonism is correlated to dysregulation of the HPA axis and to

  2. Phosphorylation Status of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Distinguishes Metabolic Phenotypes of Cultured Rat Brain Astrocytes and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    HALIM, NADER D.; McFATE, THOMAS; MOHYELDIN, AHMED; OKAGAKI, PETER; KOROTCHKINA, LIOUBOV G; PATEL, MULCHAND S; JEOUNG, NAM HO; HARRIS, ROBERT A.; SCHELL, MICHAEL J.; VERMA, AJAY

    2010-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in nervous tissue has been proposed to occur in a compartmentalized manner with astrocytes contributing largely to glycolysis and neurons being the primary site of glucose oxidation. However, mammalian astrocytes and neurons both contain mitochondria and it remains unclear why in culture neurons oxidize glucose, lactate, and pyruvate to a much larger extent than astrocytes. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyruvate metabolism is differentially regulated in cultured neurons vs. astrocytes. Expression of all components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC), the rate-limiting step for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle, was determined in cultured astrocytes and neurons. In addition, regulation of PDC enzymatic activity in the two cell types via protein phosphorylation was examined. We show that all components of the PDC are expressed in both cell types in culture but that PDC activity is kept strongly inhibited in astrocytes through phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha subunit (PDHα). In contrast, neuronal PDC operates close to maximal levels with much lower levels of phosphorlyated PDHα. Dephosphorylation of astrocytic PDHα restores PDC activity and lowers lactate production. Our findings suggest that the glucose metabolism of astrocytes and neurons may be far more flexible than previously believed. PMID:20544852

  3. Why Are Cortical GABA Neurons Relevant to Internal Focus in Depression? A cross-level model linking cellular, biochemical, and neural network findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Major Depression is a complex and severe psychiatric disorder whose symptomatology encompasses a critical shift in awareness, specifically in the balance from external to internal mental focus. This is reflected by unspecific somatic symptoms and the predominance of the own cognitions manifested in increased self-focus and rumination. We posit here that sufficient empirical data has accumulated to build a coherent biological model that links these psychological concepts and symptom dimensions to observed biochemical, cellular, regional and neural network deficits. Specifically, deficits in inhibitory gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) regulating excitatory cell input/output and local cell circuit processing of information in key brain regions may underlie the shift that is observed in depressed subjects in resting state activities between the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). This regional dysbalance translates at the network level in a dysbalance between default-mode and executive networks, which psychopathologically surfaces as a shift in focus from external to internal mental content and associated symptoms (See overview in Figure 1). We focus here on primary evidence at each of those levels and on putative mechanistic links between those levels. Apart from its implications for neuropsychiatric disorders, our model provides for the first time a set of hypotheses for cross-level mechanisms of how internal and external mental contents may be constituted and balanced in healthy subjects, and thus also contributes to the neuroscientific debate on the neural correlates of consciousness. PMID:25048001

  4. Segregation of Acetylcholine and GABA in the Rat Superior Cervical Ganglia: Functional Correlation.

    PubMed

    Elinos, Diana; Rodríguez, Raúl; Martínez, Luis Andres; Zetina, María Elena; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs) and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh) and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX). We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level of segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region showed larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons. PMID:27092054

  5. Segregation of Acetylcholine and GABA in the Rat Superior Cervical Ganglia: Functional Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Elinos, Diana; Rodríguez, Raúl; Martínez, Luis Andres; Zetina, María Elena; Cifuentes, Fredy; Morales, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs) and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh) and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX). We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level of segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region showed larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons. PMID:27092054

  6. Characterization of dendritic morphology and neurotransmitter phenotype of thoracic descending propriospinal neurons after complete spinal cord transection and GDNF treatment.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lingxiao; Ruan, Yiwen; Chen, Chen; Frye, Christian Corbin; Xiong, Wenhui; Jin, Xiaoming; Jones, Kathryn; Sengelaub, Dale; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-03-01

    acetyltransferase (ChAT), glycine, and GABA was performed in the T7-9 spinal cord. We show that the majority of FG retrogradely-labeled dPSNs were located in the Rexed Lamina VII. Over 90% of FG-labeled neurons were glutamatergic, with the other three neurotransmitters contributing less than 10% of the total. To our knowledge this is the first report describing the morphologic characteristics of dPSNs and their neurotransmitter expressions, as well as the dendritic response of dPSNs after transection injury and GDNF treatment. PMID:26730519

  7. Pharmacological study of the one spike spherical neuron phenotype in Gymnotus omarorum.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, J; Caputi, A A

    2014-01-31

    The intrinsic properties of spherical neurons play a fundamental role in the sensory processing of self-generated signals along a fast electrosensory pathway in electric fish. Previous results indicate that the spherical neuron's intrinsic properties depend mainly on the presence of two resonant currents that tend to clamp the voltage near the resting potential. Here we show that these are: a low-threshold potassium current blocked by 4-aminopyridine and a mixed cationic current blocked by cesium chloride. We also show that the low-threshold potassium current also causes the long refractory period, explaining the necessary properties that implement the dynamic filtering of the self-generated signals previously described. Comparative data from other fish and from the auditory system indicate that other single spiking onset neurons might differ in the channel repertoire observed in the spherical neurons of Gymnotus omarorum. PMID:24269939

  8. Activity of phasic motor neurons partially transforms the neuronal and muscle phenotype to a tonic-like state.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R L; Warren, W M; Ashby, H E

    1998-07-01

    We present a model preparation, the crayfish, to investigate chronic stimulation effects in muscle fiber type and neuronal conversion from fast to slow. The results show a presynaptic alteration in transmitter release after 1 week of stimulation at 5 Hz for a 2-h daily regime. With the same stimulation paradigm, the muscle proteins displayed on a polyacrylamide gel only start to show changes after 3 weeks. The original phasic motoneurons within 1 week display an enhanced ability to resist synaptic depression, as do tonic motoneurons. The results show that identified phasic motoneurons and muscle fibers in the crayfish can be transformed to a toniclike state, and that the nerve terminals convert prior to the muscle fibers. Electrophysiological clinical measures indicating a change in transmitter release properties may not necessarily mean that the muscle fibers have fully adapted for long-lasting effects. This preparation allows stimulation conditions to be examined with ease. PMID:9626252

  9. Pharmacodynamic effects and possible therapeutic uses of THIP, a specific GABA-agonist.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A V; Svendsen, O; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1982-10-22

    THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) is a potent and specific GABA receptor agonist which does not influence the GABA uptake system or GABA metabolizing enzymes. The specificity for the GABA receptor is also demonstrated by lack of action on monoaminergic, cholinergic, histaminergic or opiate receptors. Since in recent years GABA receptor stimulants-among others THIP--have become available many have speculated as to what clinical indication GABA-ergic stimulation might be an important element. The first suggestion was that GABA-ergic drugs by an inhibitory effect on the dopamine neurons would improve the antischizophrenic effect of neuroleptics and improve tardive dyskinesia. Furthermore, studies on brains of deceased Parkinson and Huntington's chorea patients have demonstrated a low level of GABA and its synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in the basal ganglia. Also in epilepsy and diseases with dementia a deficit in the GABA system has been proposed. Therefore a therapeutic strategy for these diseases may be supplementary treatment with drugs which increase GABA receptor activity. Furthermore, recent results in humans have shown that GABA agonists perhaps also could be of benefit in mania and depressions. When considering the neurophysiological elements of nociception and muscle tone it is also reasonable to suggest that GABA-ergic stimulation may reduce pain perception and muscle tone. PMID:6292818

  10. The effects of agonists of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors on learning.

    PubMed

    Zyablitseva, Evgeniya A; Kositsyn, Nikolay S; Shul'gina, Galina I

    2009-05-01

    The research described here investigates the role played by inhibitory processes in the discriminations made by the nervous system of humans and animals between familiar and unfamiliar and significant and nonsignificant events. This research compared the effects of two inhibitory mediators of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA): 1) phenibut, a nonselective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors and 2) gaboxadol a selective agonist of ionotropic GABA(A) receptors on the process of developing active defensive and inhibitory conditioned reflexes in alert non-immobilized rabbits. It was found that phenibut, but not gaboxadol, accelerates the development of defensive reflexes at an early stage of conditioning. Both phenibut and gaboxadol facilitate the development of conditioned inhibition, but the effect of gaboxadol occurs at later stages of conditioning and is less stable than that of phenibut. The earlier and more stable effects of phenibut, as compared to gaboxadol, on storage in memory of the inhibitory significance of a stimulus may occur because GABA(B) receptors play the dominant role in the development of internal inhibition during an early stage of conditioning. On the other hand this may occur because the participation of both GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors are essential to the process. We discuss the polyfunctionality of GABA receptors as a function of their structure and the positions of the relevant neurons in the brain as this factor can affect regulation of various types of psychological processes. PMID:19476215

  11. Estrogen-related receptor gamma regulates dopaminergic neuronal phenotype by activating GSK3β/NFAT signaling in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Juhee; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Choi, Hyun Jin

    2015-05-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) is highly expressed in the nervous system during embryogenesis and in adult brains, but its physiological role in neuronal development remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the relevance of ERRγ in regulating dopaminergic (DAergic) phenotype and the corresponding signaling pathway. We used retinoic acid (RA) to differentiate human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. RA induced neurite outgrowth of SH-SY5Y cells with an increase in DAergic neuron-like properties, including up-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2. ERRγ, but not ERRα, was up-regulated by RA, and participated in RA effect on SH-SY5Y cells. ERRγ over-expression enhanced mature DAergic neuronal phenotype with neurite outgrowth as with RA treatment; and RA-induced increase in DAergic phenotype was attenuated by silencing ERRγ expression. ERRγ appears to have a crucial role in morphological and functional regulation of cells that is selective for DAergic neurons. Polo-like kinase 2 was up-regulated in ERRγ-over-expressing SH-SY5Y cells, which was involved in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and resulting downstream activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells. The likely involvement of ERRγ in regulating the DAergic neuronal phenotype makes this orphan nuclear receptor a novel target for understanding DAergic neuronal differentiation. We propose the relevance of estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) in regulating dopaminergic neuronal phenotype: ERRγ is up-regulated by retinoic acid in SH-SY5Y cells, and enhances dopaminergic phenotypes and induces neurite outgrowth; Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta/nuclear factor of activated T cells (GSK3β/NFAT) signaling are responsible for the ERRγ effect. Our findings provide the first insights into the role of ERRγ in the brain, as a novel approach toward understanding

  12. Loss of MeCP2 in Parvalbumin-and Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in Mice Leads to Distinct Rett Syndrome-like Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Ure, Kerstin; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-11-18

    Inhibitory neurons are critical for proper brain function, and their dysfunction is implicated in several disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, and Rett syndrome. These neurons are heterogeneous, and it is unclear which subtypes contribute to specific neurological phenotypes. We deleted Mecp2, the mouse homolog of the gene that causes Rett syndrome, from the two most populous subtypes, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) neurons. Loss of MeCP2 partially impairs the affected neuron, allowing us to assess the function of each subtype without profound disruption of neuronal circuitry. We found that mice lacking MeCP2 in either PV+ or SOM+ neurons have distinct, non-overlapping neurological features: mice lacking MeCP2 in PV+ neurons developed motor, sensory, memory, and social deficits, whereas those lacking MeCP2 in SOM+ neurons exhibited seizures and stereotypies. Our findings indicate that PV+ and SOM+ neurons contribute complementary aspects of the Rett phenotype and may have modular roles in regulating specific behaviors. PMID:26590342

  13. The morphologic and neurochemical basis of dementia: aging, hierarchical patterns of lesion distribution and vulnerable neuronal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hof, P R; Giannakopoulos, P; Vickers, J C; Bouras, C; Morrison, J H

    1995-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in elderly individuals. Approximately 11% of the population older than 65, and up to 50% of individuals over 85 qualify as having "probable Alzheimer's disease" on the basis of clinical evaluation. Since the early description of the clinical symptoms and neuropathologic features of Alzheimer's disease, there has been an extraordinary growth in the knowledge of the morphologic and molecular characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Although the pathogenetic events that lead to dementia are not yet fully understood, several hypotheses regarding the formation of the hallmark pathologic structures of Alzheimer's disease have been proposed. In this context, the use of specific histochemical techniques in the primate brain has greatly expanded our understanding of neuron typology, connectivity and circuit distribution in relation to neurochemical identity. In this respect, very specific subsets of cortical neurons and cortical afferents can be identified by their particular content of certain neurotransmitters and structural proteins. In this article, we discuss the possible relationships between the distribution of pathologic changes in aging, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly related dementing conditions, in the context of the specific elements of the cortical circuitry that are affected by these alterations. Also, evidence for links between the neurochemical phenotype of a given neuron and its relative vulnerability or resistance to the degenerative process are presented in order to correlate the distribution of cellular pathologic changes, neurochemical characteristics related to vulnerability, and affected cortical circuits. PMID:8564027

  14. Spinal muscular atrophy phenotype is ameliorated in human motor neurons by SMN increase via different novel RNA therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Dametti, Sara; Salani, Sabrina; Ulzi, Gianna; Pagliarani, Serena; Rizzo, Federica; Frattini, Emanuele; Pagani, Franco; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo; Corti, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a primary genetic cause of infant mortality due to mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) 1 gene. No cure is available. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) aimed at increasing SMN levels from the paralogous SMN2 gene represent a possible therapeutic strategy. Here, we tested in SMA human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and iPSC-differentiated motor neurons, three different RNA approaches based on morpholino antisense targeting of the ISSN-1, exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNA (ExSpeU1), and Transcription Activator-Like Effector-Transcription Factor (TALE-TF). All strategies act modulating SMN2 RNA: ASO affects exon 7 splicing, TALE-TF increase SMN2 RNA acting on the promoter, while ExSpeU1 improves pre-mRNA processing. These approaches induced up-regulation of full-length SMN mRNA and differentially affected the Delta-7 isoform: ASO reduced this isoform, while ExSpeU1 and TALE-TF increased it. All approaches upregulate the SMN protein and significantly improve the in vitro SMA motor neurons survival. Thus, these findings demonstrate that therapeutic tools that act on SMN2 RNA are able to rescue the SMA disease phenotype. Our data confirm the feasibility of SMA iPSCs as in vitro disease models and we propose novel RNA approaches as potential therapeutic strategies for treating SMA and other genetic neurological disorders. PMID:26123042

  15. Ablation of RIC8A function in mouse neurons leads to a severe neuromuscular phenotype and postnatal death.

    PubMed

    Ruisu, Katrin; Kask, Keiu; Meier, Riho; Saare, Merly; Raid, Raivo; Veraksitš, Alar; Karis, Alar; Tõnissoo, Tambet; Pooga, Margus

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (RIC8) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor required for the intracellular regulation of G protein signalling. RIC8 activates different Gα subunits via non-canonical pathway, thereby amplifying and prolonging the G protein mediated signal. In order to circumvent the embryonic lethality associated with the absence of RIC8A and to study its role in the nervous system, we constructed Ric8a conditional knockout mice using Cre/loxP technology. Introduction of a synapsin I promoter driven Cre transgenic mouse strain (SynCre) into the floxed Ric8a (Ric8a (F/F) ) background ablated RIC8A function in most differentiated neuron populations. Mutant SynCre (+/-) Ric8 (lacZ/F) mice were born at expected Mendelian ratio, but they died in early postnatal age (P4-P6). The mutants exhibited major developmental defects, like growth retardation and muscular weakness, impaired coordination and balance, muscular spasms and abnormal heart beat. Histological analysis revealed that the deficiency of RIC8A in neurons caused skeletal muscle atrophy and heart muscle hypoplasia, in addition, the sinoatrial node was misplaced and its size reduced. However, we did not observe gross morphological changes in brains of SynCre (+/-) Ric8a (lacZ/F) mutants. Our results demonstrate that in mice the activity of RIC8A in neurons is essential for survival and its deficiency causes a severe neuromuscular phenotype. PMID:23977396

  16. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  17. Daily Isoflurane Exposure Increases Barbiturate Insensitivity in Medullary Respiratory and Cortical Neurons via Expression of ε-Subunit Containing GABA ARs

    PubMed Central

    Hengen, Keith B.; Nelson, Nathan R.; Stang, Kyle M.; Johnson, Stephen M.; Smith, Stephanie M.; Watters, Jyoti J.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Behan, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The parameters governing GABAA receptor subtype expression patterns are not well understood, although significant shifts in subunit expression may support key physiological events. For example, the respiratory control network in pregnant rats becomes relatively insensitive to barbiturates due to increased expression of ε-subunit-containing GABAARs in the ventral respiratory column. We hypothesized that this plasticity may be a compensatory response to a chronic increase in inhibitory tone caused by increased central neurosteroid levels. Thus, we tested whether increased inhibitory tone was sufficient to induce ε-subunit upregulation on respiratory and cortical neurons in adult rats. Chronic intermittent increases in inhibitory tone in male and female rats was induced via daily 5-min exposures to 3% isoflurane. After 7d of treatment, phrenic burst frequency was less sensitive to barbiturate in isoflurane-treated male and female rats in vivo. Neurons in the ventral respiratory group and cortex were less sensitive to pentobarbital in vitro following 7d and 30d of intermittent isoflurane-exposure in both male and female rats. The pentobarbital insensitivity in 7d isoflurane-treated rats was reversible after another 7d. We hypothesize that increased inhibitory tone in the respiratory control network and cortex causes a compensatory increase in ε-subunit-containing GABAARs. PMID:25748028

  18. Efficient Conversion of Spermatogonial Stem Cells to Phenotypic and Functional Dopaminergic Neurons via the PI3K/Akt and P21/Smurf2/Nolz1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Hai, Yanan; Guo, Ying; Yang, Shi; Li, Zheng; Gao, Wei-Qiang; He, Zuping

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Generation of functional dopaminergic (DA) neurons is of unusual significance for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). However, direct conversion of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) to functional DA neurons without being reprogrammed to a pluripotent status has not been achieved. Here, we report an efficient approach to obtain morphological, phenotypic, and functional DA neurons from SSCs using a specific combination of olfactory ensheathing cell-conditioned medium (OECCM) and several defined growth factors (DGF). By following the current protocol, direct conversion of SSCs (both SSC line and primary SSCs) to neural cells and DA neurons was demonstrated by expression of numerous phenotypic genes and proteins for neural cells, as well as cell morphological features. More significantly, SSCs-derived DA neurons acquired neuronal functional properties such as synapse formation, electrophysiology activity, and dopamine secretion. Furthermore, PI3K/Akt pathway and p21/Nolz1 cascades were activated whereas Smurf2 was inactivated, leading to cell cycle exit during the conversion of SSCs into DA neurons. Collectively, this study could provide sufficient neural cells from SSCs for applications in the treatment of PD and offers novel insights into mechanisms underlying neural system development from the line of germ cells. PMID:25373443

  19. GABA(B) receptor subunit 1 binds to proteins affected in 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zunner, Dagmar; Deschermeier, Christina; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-03-01

    GABA(B) receptors mediate slow inhibitory effects of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. They function as heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors composed of the seven-transmembrane domain proteins GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), which are linked through a coiled-coil interaction. The ligand-binding subunit GABA(B1) is at first retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and is transported to the cell surface only upon assembly with GABA(B2). Here, we report that GABA(B1), via the coiled-coil domain, can also bind to soluble proteins of unknown function, that are affected in 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome and are therefore referred to as DiGeorge critical region 6 (DGCR6). In transfected neurons the GABA(B1)-DGCR6 association resulted in a redistribution of both proteins into intracellular clusters. Furthermore, the C-terminus of GABA(B2) interfered with the novel interaction, consistent with heterodimer formation overriding transient DGCR6-binding to GABA(B1). Thus, sequential coiled-coil interactions may direct GABA(B1) into functional receptors. PMID:20036641

  20. Fast detection of extrasynaptic GABA with a whole-cell sniffer

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Rasmus K.; Petersen, Anders V.; Schmitt, Nicole; Perrier, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory transmitter of the brain. It operates by binding to specific receptors located both inside and outside synapses. The extrasynaptic receptors are activated by spillover from GABAergic synapses and by ambient GABA in the extracellular space. Ambient GABA is essential for adjusting the excitability of neurons. However, due to the lack of suitable methods, little is known about its dynamics. Here we describe a new technique that allows detection of GABA transients and measurement of the steady state GABA concentration with high spatial and temporal resolution. We used a human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell line that stably expresses GABAA receptors composed of α1, β2, and γ2 subunits. We recorded from such a HEK cell with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The presence of GABA near the HEK cell generated a measurable electric current whose magnitude increased with concentration. A fraction of the current did not inactivate during prolonged exposition to GABA. This technique, which we refer to as a “sniffer” allows the measurement of ambient GABA concentration inside nervous tissue with a resolution of few tens of nanomolars. In addition, the sniffer detects variations in the extrasynaptic GABA concentration with millisecond time resolution. Pilot experiments demonstrate that the sniffer is able to report spillover of GABA induced by synaptic activation in real time. This is the first report on a GABA sensor that combines the ability to detect fast transients and to measure steady concentrations. PMID:24860433

  1. [GABA-Receptors in Modulation of Fear Memory Extinction].

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I

    2016-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system determining the efficacy of neuronal interaction. GABA-receptors play a key role in different aspects of fear memory--acquisition and consolidation, retention, reconsolidation and extinction. Extinction is an important behavioural phenomenon which allows organism to adapt its behavior to a changing environment. Extinction of fear memory is a form of new inhibitory learning which interferes with expression of the initial acquired fear conditioning. Resistance to extinction is symptom of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The aim of the present review was to summarize own and literary data about GABAergic modulation of fear extinction and pharmacological correction of extinction impairment at influences on GABA(A)- and GABA(B)- receptors. PMID:27538279

  2. Parkinson's Disease and Neurodegeneration: GABA-Collapse Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Błaszczyk, Janusz W.

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of age-related disorders that are characterized by a slow but irreversible deterioration of brain functions. Evidence accumulated over more than two decades has implicated calcium-related homeostatic mechanisms, giving rise to the Ca2+ hypothesis of brain aging and, ultimately, cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter within the central (CNS), peripheral and enteric nervous systems. It appears to be involved in a wide variety of physiological functions within and outside the nervous system, that are maintained through a complex interaction between GABA and calcium-dependent neurotransmission and cellular metabolic functions. Within CNS the Ca2+/GABA mechanism stabilizes neuronal activity both at cellular and systemic levels. Decline in the Ca2+/GABA control initiates several cascading processes leading to both weakened protective barriers (in particular the blood-brain barrier) and accumulations of intracellular deposits of calcium and Lewy bodies. Linking such a vital mechanism of synaptic transmission with metabolism (both at cellular and tissue level) by means of a common reciprocal Ca2+/GABA inhibition results in a fragile balance, which is prone to destabilization and auto-destruction. The GABA decline etiology proposed here appears to apply to all human neurodegenerative processes initiated by abnormal intracellular calcium levels. Therefore, the original description of Parkinson's disease (PD) as due to the selective damage of dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalon should be updated into the concept of a severe multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder of the nervous system, whose clinical symptoms reflect the localization and progression of the most advanced GABA pathology. A future and more complete therapeutic approach to PD should be aimed first at slowing (or stopping) the progression of Ca2+/GABA functional decline. PMID:27375426

  3. Parkinson's Disease and Neurodegeneration: GABA-Collapse Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Janusz W

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a heterogeneous group of age-related disorders that are characterized by a slow but irreversible deterioration of brain functions. Evidence accumulated over more than two decades has implicated calcium-related homeostatic mechanisms, giving rise to the Ca(2+) hypothesis of brain aging and, ultimately, cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter within the central (CNS), peripheral and enteric nervous systems. It appears to be involved in a wide variety of physiological functions within and outside the nervous system, that are maintained through a complex interaction between GABA and calcium-dependent neurotransmission and cellular metabolic functions. Within CNS the Ca(2+)/GABA mechanism stabilizes neuronal activity both at cellular and systemic levels. Decline in the Ca(2+)/GABA control initiates several cascading processes leading to both weakened protective barriers (in particular the blood-brain barrier) and accumulations of intracellular deposits of calcium and Lewy bodies. Linking such a vital mechanism of synaptic transmission with metabolism (both at cellular and tissue level) by means of a common reciprocal Ca(2+)/GABA inhibition results in a fragile balance, which is prone to destabilization and auto-destruction. The GABA decline etiology proposed here appears to apply to all human neurodegenerative processes initiated by abnormal intracellular calcium levels. Therefore, the original description of Parkinson's disease (PD) as due to the selective damage of dopaminergic neurons in the mesencephalon should be updated into the concept of a severe multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder of the nervous system, whose clinical symptoms reflect the localization and progression of the most advanced GABA pathology. A future and more complete therapeutic approach to PD should be aimed first at slowing (or stopping) the progression of Ca(2+)/GABA functional decline. PMID:27375426

  4. Novel functions of GABA signaling in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Adalto; Zhang, Yonggang; Hu, Wenhui

    2013-10-01

    Neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutiric acid (GABA) through ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors plays key roles in modulating the development, plasticity and function of neuronal networks. GABA is inhibitory in mature neurons but excitatory in immature neurons, neuroblasts and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). The switch from excitatory to inhibitory occurs following the development of glutamatergic synaptic input and results from the dynamic changes in the expression of Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter NKCC1 driving Cl(-) influx and neuron-specific K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter KCC2 driving Cl(-) efflux. The developmental transition of KCC2 expression is regulated by Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. The excitatory GABA signaling during early neurogenesis is important to the activity/experience-induced regulation of NSC quiescence, NPC proliferation, neuroblast migration and newborn neuronal maturation/functional integration. The inhibitory GABA signaling allows for the sparse and static functional networking essential for learning/memory development and maintenance. PMID:24285940

  5. Novel functions of GABA signaling in adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    PONTES, Adalto; ZHANG, Yonggang; HU, Wenhui

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutiric acid (GABA) through ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors plays key roles in modulating the development, plasticity and function of neuronal networks. GABA is inhibitory in mature neurons but excitatory in immature neurons, neuroblasts and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs). The switch from excitatory to inhibitory occurs following the development of glutamatergic synaptic input and results from the dynamic changes in the expression of Na+/K+/2Cl− co-transporter NKCC1 driving Cl− influx and neuron-specific K+/Cl− co-transporter KCC2 driving Cl− efflux. The developmental transition of KCC2 expression is regulated by Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. The excitatory GABA signaling during early neurogenesis is important to the activity/experience-induced regulation of NSC quiescence, NPC proliferation, neuroblast migration and newborn neuronal maturation/functional integration. The inhibitory GABA signaling allows for the sparse and static functional networking essential for learning/memory development and maintenance. PMID:24285940

  6. Altered discharges of spinal neurons parallel the behavioral phenotype shown by rats with bortezomib related chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Caleb R.; Zhang, Hongmei; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Bortezomib is a first generation proteasome inhibitor that is the frontline chemotherapy for multiple myeloma with the chief dose-limiting side effect of painful peripheral neuropathy. The goal of this study was to define the behavioral phenotype in a preclinical model of bortezomib chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and to test whether this is matched by changes in the physiological responses of spinal wide dynamic range neurons. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with four injections of bortezomib at four doses, 0.05mg/kg, 0.10 mg/kg, 0.15 mg/kg, 0.20 mg/kg, or equal volume of saline. All doses of bortezomib above 0.05mg/kg produced showed significant dose-dependent mechanical hyperalgesia that was fully established at 30 days after treatment and that recovered to baseline levels by day 69 after treatment. Thermal, cold, and motor testing were all unaffected by treatment with bortezomib. Spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in rats with confirmed bortzomib-related CIPN showed an increase in number of evoked discharges to mechanical stimuli and exaggerated after-discharges in rats with bortezomib CIPN. PMID:24949562

  7. Withania somnifera alleviates parkinsonian phenotypes by inhibiting apoptotic pathways in dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jay; Chouhan, Shikha; Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Westfall, Susan; Rai, Sachchida Nand; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2014-12-01

    Maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ) are environmental toxins that have been experimentally used to induce selective damage of dopaminergic neurons leading to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the mechanism of this selective neuronal toxicity in not fully understood, oxidative stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of PD. The present study investigates the mechanisms of neuroprotection elicited by Withania somnifera (Ws), a herb traditionally recognized by the Indian system of medicine, Ayurveda. An ethanolic root extract of Ws was co-treated with the MB-PQ induced mouse model of PD and was shown to significantly rescue canonical indicators of PD including compromised locomotor activity, reduced dopamine in the substantia nigra and various aspects of oxidative damage. In particular, Ws reduced the expression of iNOS, a measure of oxidative stress. Ws also significantly improved the MB + PQ mediated induction of a pro-apoptotic state by reducing Bax and inducing Bcl-2 protein expression, respectively. Finally, Ws reduced expression of the pro-inflammatory marker of astrocyte activation, GFAP. Altogether, the present study suggests that Ws treatment provides nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuroprotection against MB-PQ induced Parkinsonism by the modulation of oxidative stress and apoptotic machinery possibly accounting for the behavioural effects. PMID:25403619

  8. Comparative density of CCK- and PV-GABA cells within the cortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Whissell, Paul D.; Cajanding, Janine D.; Fogel, Nicole; Kim, Jun Chul

    2015-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK)- and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing neurons constitute the two major populations of perisomatic GABAergic neurons in the cortex and the hippocampus. As CCK- and PV-GABA neurons differ in an array of morphological, biochemical and electrophysiological features, it has been proposed that they form distinct inhibitory ensembles which differentially contribute to network oscillations and behavior. However, the relationship and balance between CCK- and PV-GABA neurons in the inhibitory networks of the brain is currently unclear as the distribution of these cells has never been compared on a large scale. Here, we systemically investigated the distribution of CCK- and PV-GABA cells across a wide number of discrete forebrain regions using an intersectional genetic approach. Our analysis revealed several novel trends in the distribution of these cells. While PV-GABA cells were more abundant overall, CCK-GABA cells outnumbered PV-GABA cells in several subregions of the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral temporal cortex. Interestingly, CCK-GABA cells were relatively more abundant in secondary/association areas of the cortex (V2, S2, M2, and AudD/AudV) than they were in corresponding primary areas (V1, S1, M1, and Aud1). The reverse trend was observed for PV-GABA cells. Our findings suggest that the balance between CCK- and PV-GABA cells in a given cortical region is related to the type of processing that area performs; inhibitory networks in the secondary cortex tend to favor the inclusion of CCK-GABA cells more than networks in the primary cortex. The intersectional genetic labeling approach employed in the current study expands upon the ability to study molecularly defined subsets of GABAergic neurons. This technique can be applied to the investigation of neuropathologies which involve disruptions to the GABAergic system, including schizophrenia, stress, maternal immune activation and autism. PMID:26441554

  9. Loss of MeCP2 in cholinergic neurons causes part of RTT-like phenotypes via α7 receptor in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Cao, Shu-Xia; Sun, Peng; He, Hai-Yang; Yang, Ci-Hang; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Shen, Chen-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Zhong; Berg, Darwin K; Duan, Shumin; Li, Xiao-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT), an autism spectrum disorder characterized by impaired social interactions, motor abnormalities, cognitive defects and a high risk of epilepsy. Here, we showed that conditional deletion of Mecp2 in cholinergic neurons caused part of RTT-like phenotypes, which could be rescued by re-expressing Mecp2 in the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons rather than in the caudate putamen of conditional knockout (Chat-Mecp2(-/y)) mice. We found that choline acetyltransferase expression was decreased in the BF and that α7 nicotine acetylcholine receptor signaling was strongly impaired in the hippocampus of Chat-Mecp2(-/y) mice, which is sufficient to produce neuronal hyperexcitation and increase seizure susceptibility. Application of PNU282987 or nicotine in the hippocampus rescued these phenotypes in Chat-Mecp2(-/y) mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that MeCP2 is critical for normal function of cholinergic neurons and dysfunction of cholinergic neurons can contribute to numerous neuropsychiatric phenotypes. PMID:27103432

  10. GABA and GABA receptors in the gastrointestinal tract: from motility to inflammation.

    PubMed

    Auteri, Michelangelo; Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Serio, Rosa

    2015-03-01

    Although an extensive body of literature confirmed γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as mediator within the enteric nervous system (ENS) controlling gastrointestinal (GI) function, the true significance of GABAergic signalling in the gut is still a matter of debate. GABAergic cells in the bowel include neuronal and endocrine-like cells, suggesting GABA as modulator of both motor and secretory GI activity. GABA effects in the GI tract depend on the activation of ionotropic GABAA and GABAC receptors and metabotropic GABAB receptors, resulting in a potential noteworthy regulation of both the excitatory and inhibitory signalling in the ENS. However, the preservation of GABAergic signalling in the gut could not be limited to the maintenance of physiologic intestinal activity. Indeed, a series of interesting studies have suggested a potential key role of GABA in the promising field of neuroimmune interaction, being involved in the modulation of immune cell activity associated with different systemic and enteric inflammatory conditions. Given the urgency of novel therapeutic strategies against chronic immunity-related pathologies, i.e. multiple sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease, an in-depth comprehension of the enteric GABAergic system in health and disease could provide the basis for new clinical application of nerve-driven immunity. Hence, in the attempt to drive novel researches addressing both the physiological and pathological importance of the GABAergic signalling in the gut, we summarized current evidence on GABA and GABA receptor function in the different parts of the GI tract, with particular focus on the potential involvement in the modulation of GI motility and inflammation. PMID:25526825

  11. Reversal of a full-length mutant huntingtin neuronal cell phenotype by chemical inhibitors of polyglutamine-mediated aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Gines, Silvia; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2005-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder triggered by an expanded polyglutamine tract in huntingtin that is thought to confer a new conformational property on this large protein. The propensity of small amino-terminal fragments with mutant, but not wild-type, glutamine tracts to self-aggregate is consistent with an altered conformation but such fragments occur relatively late in the disease process in human patients and mouse models expressing full-length mutant protein. This suggests that the altered conformational property may act within the full-length mutant huntingtin to initially trigger pathogenesis. Indeed, genotype-phenotype studies in HD have defined genetic criteria for the disease initiating mechanism, and these are all fulfilled by phenotypes associated with expression of full-length mutant huntingtin, but not amino-terminal fragment, in mouse models. As the in vitro aggregation of amino-terminal mutant huntingtin fragment offers a ready assay to identify small compounds that interfere with the conformation of the polyglutamine tract, we have identified a number of aggregation inhibitors, and tested whether these are also capable of reversing a phenotype caused by endogenous expression of mutant huntingtin in a striatal cell line from the HdhQ111/Q111 knock-in mouse. Results We screened the NINDS Custom Collection of 1,040 FDA approved drugs and bioactive compounds for their ability to prevent in vitro aggregation of Q58-htn 1–171 amino terminal fragment. Ten compounds were identified that inhibited aggregation with IC50 < 15 μM, including gossypol, gambogic acid, juglone, celastrol, sanguinarine and anthralin. Of these, both juglone and celastrol were effective in reversing the abnormal cellular localization of full-length mutant huntingtin observed in mutant HdhQ111/Q111 striatal cells. Conclusions At least some compounds identified as aggregation inhibitors also prevent a neuronal cellular phenotype caused

  12. Identification of the sites for CaMK-II-dependent phosphorylation of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Houston, Catriona M; Lee, Henry H C; Hosie, Alastair M; Moss, Stephen J; Smart, Trevor G

    2007-06-15

    Phosphorylation can affect both the function and trafficking of GABA(A) receptors with significant consequences for neuronal excitability. Serine/threonine kinases can phosphorylate the intracellular loops between M3-4 of GABA(A) receptor beta and gamma subunits thereby modulating receptor function in heterologous expression systems and in neurons (1, 2). Specifically, CaMK-II has been demonstrated to phosphorylate the M3-4 loop of GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed as GST fusion proteins (3, 4). It also increases the amplitude of GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in a number of neuronal cell types (5-7). To identify which substrate sites CaMK-II might phosphorylate and the consequent functional effects, we expressed recombinant GABA(A) receptors in NG108-15 cells, which have previously been shown to support CaMK-II modulation of GABA(A) receptors containing the beta3 subunit (8). We now demonstrate that CaMK-II mediates its effects on alpha1beta3 receptors via phosphorylation of Ser(383) within the M3-4 domain of the beta subunit. Ablation of beta3 subunit phosphorylation sites for CaMK-II revealed that for alphabetagamma receptors, CaMK-II has a residual effect on GABA currents that is not mediated by previously identified sites of CaMK-II phosphorylation. This residual effect is abolished by mutation of tyrosine phosphorylation sites, Tyr(365) and Tyr(367), on the gamma2S subunit, and by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. These results suggested that CaMK-II is capable of directly phosphorylating GABA(A) receptors and activating endogenous tyrosine kinases to phosphorylate the gamma2 subunit in NG108-15 cells. These findings were confirmed in a neuronal environment by expressing recombinant GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar granule neurons. PMID:17442679

  13. Neurochemical phenotype of corticocortical connections in the macaque monkey: quantitative analysis of a subset of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive projection neurons in frontal, parietal, temporal, and cingulate cortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Nimchinsky, E. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The neurochemical characteristics of the neuronal subsets that furnish different types of corticocortical connections have been only partially determined. In recent years, several cytoskeletal proteins have emerged as reliable markers to distinguish subsets of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex of primates. In particular, previous studies using an antibody to nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32) have revealed a consistent degree of regional and laminar specificity in the distribution of a subpopulation of pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex. The density of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons was shown to vary across corticocortical pathways in macaque monkeys. In the present study, we have used the antibody SMI-32 to examine further and to quantify the distribution of a subset of corticocortically projecting neurons in a series of long ipsilateral corticocortical pathways in comparison to short corticocortical, commissural, and limbic connections. The results demonstrate that the long association pathways interconnecting the frontal, parietal, and temporal neocortex have a high representation of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons (45-90%), whereas short corticocortical, callosal, and limbic pathways are characterized by much lower numbers of such neurons (4-35%). These data suggest that different types of corticocortical connections have differential representation of highly specific neuronal subsets that share common neurochemical characteristics, thereby determining regional and laminar cortical patterns of morphological and molecular heterogeneity. These differences in neuronal neurochemical phenotype among corticocortical circuits may have considerable influence on cortical processing and may be directly related to the type of integrative function subserved by each cortical pathway. Finally, it is worth noting that neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons are dramatically affected in the course of

  14. Regulation of Local Ambient GABA Levels via Transporter-Mediated GABA Import and Export for Subliminal Learning.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Osamu

    2015-06-01

    Perception of supraliminal stimuli might in general be reflected in bursts of action potentials (spikes), and their memory traces could be formed through spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Memory traces for subliminal stimuli might be formed in a different manner, because subliminal stimulation evokes a fraction (but not a burst) of spikes. Simulations of a cortical neural network model showed that a subliminal stimulus that was too brief (10 msec) to perceive transiently (more than about 500 msec) depolarized stimulus-relevant principal cells and hyperpolarized stimulus-irrelevant principal cells in a subthreshold manner. This led to a small increase or decrease in ongoing-spontaneous spiking activity frequency (less than 1 Hz). Synaptic modification based on STDP during this period effectively enhanced relevant synaptic weights, by which subliminal learning was improved. GABA transporters on GABAergic interneurons modulated local levels of ambient GABA. Ambient GABA molecules acted on extrasynaptic receptors, provided principal cells with tonic inhibitory currents, and contributed to achieving the subthreshold neuronal state. We suggest that ongoing-spontaneous synaptic alteration through STDP following subliminal stimulation may be a possible neuronal mechanism for leaving its memory trace in cortical circuitry. Regulation of local ambient GABA levels by transporter-mediated GABA import and export may be crucial for subliminal learning. PMID:25774546

  15. Requirement of a dopaminergic neuronal phenotype for toxicity of low concentrations of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium to human cells.

    PubMed

    Schildknecht, Stefan; Pöltl, Dominik; Nagel, Daniel M; Matt, Florian; Scholz, Diana; Lotharius, Julie; Schmieg, Nathalie; Salvo-Vargas, Alberto; Leist, Marcel

    2009-11-15

    LUHMES cells are conditionally-immortalized non-transformed human fetal cells that can be differentiated to acquire a dopaminergic neuron-like phenotype under appropriate growth conditions. After differentiation by GDNF and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, LUHMES were sensitive to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) toxicity at < or =5 microM, but resistant to the parental compound 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). The high homogeneity and purity of the cultures allowed the detection of metabolic changes during the degeneration. Cellular ATP dropped in two phases after 24 and 48 h; cellular glutathione (GSH) decreased continuously, paralleled by an increase in lipid peroxidation. These events were accompanied by a time-dependent degeneration of neurites. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR 12909 or mazindol completely abrogated MPP(+) toxicity. Inhibition of de novo dopamine synthesis by alpha-methyl-l-tyrosine or 3-iodo-l-tyrosine attenuated toxicity, but did not reduce the initial drop in ATP. Inhibition of mixed lineage kinases by CEP1347 completely prevented the MPP(+)-induced loss of viability and intracellular GSH, but failed to attenuate the initial drop of ATP. For the quantitative assessment of neurite degeneration, an automated imaging-based high content screening approach was applied and confirmed the findings made by pharmacological interventions in this study. Our data indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis is not sufficient to trigger cell death in MPP(+)-treated LUHMES. PMID:19647008

  16. Requirement of a dopaminergic neuronal phenotype for toxicity of low concentrations of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium to human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schildknecht, Stefan; Poeltl, Dominik; Nagel, Daniel M.; Matt, Florian; Scholz, Diana; Lotharius, Julie; Schmieg, Nathalie; Salvo-Vargas, Alberto; Leist, Marcel

    2009-11-15

    LUHMES cells are conditionally-immortalized non-transformed human fetal cells that can be differentiated to acquire a dopaminergic neuron-like phenotype under appropriate growth conditions. After differentiation by GDNF and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, LUHMES were sensitive to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}) toxicity at <= 5 muM, but resistant to the parental compound 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). The high homogeneity and purity of the cultures allowed the detection of metabolic changes during the degeneration. Cellular ATP dropped in two phases after 24 and 48 h; cellular glutathione (GSH) decreased continuously, paralleled by an increase in lipid peroxidation. These events were accompanied by a time-dependent degeneration of neurites. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR 12909 or mazindol completely abrogated MPP{sup +} toxicity. Inhibition of de novo dopamine synthesis by alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine or 3-iodo-L-tyrosine attenuated toxicity, but did not reduce the initial drop in ATP. Inhibition of mixed lineage kinases by CEP1347 completely prevented the MPP{sup +}-induced loss of viability and intracellular GSH, but failed to attenuate the initial drop of ATP. For the quantitative assessment of neurite degeneration, an automated imaging-based high content screening approach was applied and confirmed the findings made by pharmacological interventions in this study. Our data indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis is not sufficient to trigger cell death in MPP{sup +}-treated LUHMES.

  17. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): modifying serotonin's downstream effects on glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) release.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. These actions modify the release of both glutamate and GABA (gamma amino butyric acid) within various brain circuits. PMID:26062900

  18. nNOS inhibition during profound asphyxia reduces seizure burden and improves survival of striatal phenotypic neurons in preterm fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Paul P.; Davidson, Joanne O.; Mathai, Sam; van den Heuij, Lotte G.; Ji, Haitao; Bennet, Laura; Tan, Sidhartha; Silverman, Richard B.; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2014-01-01

    Basal ganglia injury after hypoxia-ischemia remains common in preterm infants, and is closely associated with later cerebral palsy. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that a highly selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor, JI-10, would improve survival of striatal phenotypic neurons after profound asphyxia, and that the subsequent seizure burden and recovery of EEG are associated with neural outcome. 24 chronically instrumented preterm fetal sheep were randomized to either JI-10 (3 ml of 0.022 mg/ml, n=8) or saline (n=8) infusion 15 min before 25 min complete umbilical cord occlusion, or saline plus sham-occlusion (n=8). Umbilical cord occlusion was associated with reduced numbers of calbindin-28k-, GAD-, NPY-, PV-, Calretinin- and nNOS-positive striatal neurons (p < 0.05 vs. sham occlusion) but not ChAT-positive neurons. JI-10 was associated with increased numbers of calbindin-28k-, GAD-, nNOS-, NPY-, PV-, Calretinin- and ChAT-positive striatal neurons (p < 0.05 vs. saline+occlusion). Seizure burden was strongly associated with loss of calbindin-positive cells (p < 0.05), greater seizure amplitude was associated with loss of GAD-positive cells (p < 0.05), and with more activated microglia in the white matter tracts (p < 0.05). There was no relationship between EEG power after 7 days recovery and total striatal cell loss, but better survival of NPY-positive neurons was associated with lower EEG power. In summary, these findings suggest that selective nNOS inhibition during asphyxia is associated with protection of phenotypic striatal projection neurons and has potential to help reduce basal ganglia injury in some premature babies. PMID:24726307

  19. Neuronal expression of GalNAc transferase is sufficient to prevent the age-related neurodegenerative phenotype of complex ganglioside-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Denggao; McGonigal, Rhona; Barrie, Jennifer A; Cappell, Joanna; Cunningham, Madeleine E; Meehan, Gavin R; Fewou, Simon N; Edgar, Julia M; Rowan, Edward; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi; Brophy, Peter J; Willison, Hugh J

    2014-01-15

    Gangliosides are widely expressed sialylated glycosphingolipids with multifunctional properties in different cell types and organs. In the nervous system, they are highly enriched in both glial and neuronal membranes. Mice lacking complex gangliosides attributable to targeted ablation of the B4galnt1 gene that encodes β-1,4-N-acetylegalactosaminyltransferase 1 (GalNAc-transferase; GalNAcT(-/-)) develop normally before exhibiting an age-dependent neurodegenerative phenotype characterized by marked behavioral abnormalities, central and peripheral axonal degeneration, reduced myelin volume, and loss of axo-glial junction integrity. The cell biological substrates underlying this neurodegeneration and the relative contribution of either glial or neuronal gangliosides to the process are unknown. To address this, we generated neuron-specific and glial-specific GalNAcT rescue mice crossed on the global GalNAcT(-/-) background [GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) and GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial)] and analyzed their behavioral, morphological, and electrophysiological phenotype. Complex gangliosides, as assessed by thin-layer chromatography, mass spectrometry, GalNAcT enzyme activity, and anti-ganglioside antibody (AgAb) immunohistology, were restored in both neuronal and glial GalNAcT rescue mice. Behaviorally, GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) retained a normal "wild-type" (WT) phenotype throughout life, whereas GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial) resembled GalNAcT(-/-) mice, exhibiting progressive tremor, weakness, and ataxia with aging. Quantitative electron microscopy demonstrated that GalNAcT(-/-) and GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(glial) nerves had significantly increased rates of axon degeneration and reduced myelin volume, whereas GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) and WT appeared normal. The increased invasion of the paranode with juxtaparanodal Kv1.1, characteristically seen in GalNAcT(-/-) and attributed to a breakdown of the axo-glial junction, was normalized in GalNAcT(-/-)-Tg(neuronal) but remained present in Gal

  20. Multiplexed neurochemical signaling by neurons of the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Barker, David J; Root, David H; Zhang, Shiliang; Morales, Marisela

    2016-04-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is an evolutionarily conserved structure that has roles in reward-seeking, safety-seeking, learning, motivation, and neuropsychiatric disorders such as addiction and depression. The involvement of the VTA in these various behaviors and disorders is paralleled by its diverse signaling mechanisms. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of neuronal diversity in the VTA with a focus on cell phenotypes that participate in 'multiplexed' neurotransmission involving distinct signaling mechanisms. First, we describe the cellular diversity within the VTA, including neurons capable of transmitting dopamine, glutamate or GABA as well as neurons capable of multiplexing combinations of these neurotransmitters. Next, we describe the complex synaptic architecture used by VTA neurons in order to accommodate the transmission of multiple transmitters. We specifically cover recent findings showing that VTA multiplexed neurotransmission may be mediated by either the segregation of dopamine and glutamate into distinct microdomains within a single axon or by the integration of glutamate and GABA into a single axon terminal. In addition, we discuss our current understanding of the functional role that these multiplexed signaling pathways have in the lateral habenula and the nucleus accumbens. Finally, we consider the putative roles of VTA multiplexed neurotransmission in synaptic plasticity and discuss how changes in VTA multiplexed neurons may relate to various psychopathologies including drug addiction and depression. PMID:26763116

  1. Enhanced phasic GABA inhibition during the repair phase of stroke: a novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Jeanne T.; Wang, Eric Hou Jen; Badgely, Corrine; Olson, Andrew; Micheva, Kristina D.; Wang, Gordon; Lemmens, Robin; Tran, Kevin V.; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Liang, Xibin; Hamilton, Scott A.; O’Rourke, Nancy; Smith, Stephen J.; Huguenard, John R.; Bliss, Tonya M.

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic stroke is the leading cause of severe long-term disability yet lacks drug therapies that promote the repair phase of recovery. This repair phase of stroke occurs days to months after stroke onset and involves brain remapping and plasticity within the peri-infarct zone. Elucidating mechanisms that promote this plasticity is critical for the development of new therapeutics with a broad treatment window. Inhibiting tonic (extrasynaptic) GABA signalling during the repair phase was reported to enhance functional recovery in mice suggesting that GABA plays an important function in modulating brain repair. While tonic GABA appears to suppress brain repair after stroke, less is known about the role of phasic (synaptic) GABA during the repair phase. We observed an increase in postsynaptic phasic GABA signalling in mice within the peri-infarct cortex specific to layer 5; we found increased numbers of α1 receptor subunit-containing GABAergic synapses detected using array tomography, and an associated increased efficacy of spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing phasic GABA signalling using zolpidem, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved GABA-positive allosteric modulator, during the repair phase improved behavioural recovery. These data identify potentiation of phasic GABA signalling as a novel therapeutic strategy, indicate zolpidem’s potential to improve recovery, and underscore the necessity to distinguish the role of tonic and phasic GABA signalling in stroke recovery. PMID:26685158

  2. Enhanced phasic GABA inhibition during the repair phase of stroke: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Hiu, Takeshi; Farzampour, Zoya; Paz, Jeanne T; Wang, Eric Hou Jen; Badgely, Corrine; Olson, Andrew; Micheva, Kristina D; Wang, Gordon; Lemmens, Robin; Tran, Kevin V; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Liang, Xibin; Hamilton, Scott A; O'Rourke, Nancy; Smith, Stephen J; Huguenard, John R; Bliss, Tonya M; Steinberg, Gary K

    2016-02-01

    Ischaemic stroke is the leading cause of severe long-term disability yet lacks drug therapies that promote the repair phase of recovery. This repair phase of stroke occurs days to months after stroke onset and involves brain remapping and plasticity within the peri-infarct zone. Elucidating mechanisms that promote this plasticity is critical for the development of new therapeutics with a broad treatment window. Inhibiting tonic (extrasynaptic) GABA signalling during the repair phase was reported to enhance functional recovery in mice suggesting that GABA plays an important function in modulating brain repair. While tonic GABA appears to suppress brain repair after stroke, less is known about the role of phasic (synaptic) GABA during the repair phase. We observed an increase in postsynaptic phasic GABA signalling in mice within the peri-infarct cortex specific to layer 5; we found increased numbers of α1 receptor subunit-containing GABAergic synapses detected using array tomography, and an associated increased efficacy of spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing phasic GABA signalling using zolpidem, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved GABA-positive allosteric modulator, during the repair phase improved behavioural recovery. These data identify potentiation of phasic GABA signalling as a novel therapeutic strategy, indicate zolpidem's potential to improve recovery, and underscore the necessity to distinguish the role of tonic and phasic GABA signalling in stroke recovery. PMID:26685158

  3. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies.

  4. Identification and characterization of GABA(A) receptor autoantibodies in autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Toshika; Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Yokoi, Norihiko; Miyazaki, Yu; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Sobue, Gen; Takashima, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Fukata, Yuko; Fukata, Masaki

    2014-06-11

    Autoimmune forms of encephalitis have been associated with autoantibodies against synaptic cell surface antigens such as NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors, GABA(B) receptor, and LGI1. However, it remains unclear how many synaptic autoantigens are yet to be defined. Using immunoproteomics, we identified autoantibodies against the GABA(A) receptor in human sera from two patients diagnosed with encephalitis who presented with cognitive impairment and multifocal brain MRI abnormalities. Both patients had antibodies directed against the extracellular epitope of the β3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor. The β3-subunit-containing GABA(A) receptor was a major target of the patients' serum antibodies in rat hippocampal neurons because the serum reactivity to the neuronal surface was greatly decreased by 80% when the β3 subunit was knocked down. Our developed multiplex ELISA testing showed that both patients had similar levels of GABA(A) receptor antibodies, one patient also had a low level of LGI1 antibodies, and the other also had CASPR2 antibodies. Application of the patients' serum at the time of symptom presentation of encephalitis to rat hippocampal neuron cultures specifically decreased both synaptic and surface GABA(A) receptors. Furthermore, treatment of neurons with the patients' serum selectively reduced miniature IPSC amplitude and frequency without affecting miniature EPSCs. These results strongly suggest that the patients' GABA(A) receptor antibodies play a central role in the patients' symptoms. Therefore, this study establishes anti-GABA(A) receptor encephalitis and expands the pathogenic roles of GABA(A) receptor autoantibodies. PMID:24920620

  5. Stimulation of TM3 Leydig cell proliferation via GABAA receptors: A new role for testicular GABA

    PubMed Central

    Geigerseder, Christof; Doepner, Richard FG; Thalhammer, Andrea; Krieger, Annette; Mayerhofer, Artur

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and subtypes of GABA receptors were recently identified in adult testes. Since adult Leydig cells possess both the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as GABAA and GABAB receptors, it is possible that GABA may act as auto-/paracrine molecule to regulate Leydig cell function. The present study was aimed to examine effects of GABA, which may include trophic action. This assumption is based on reports pinpointing GABA as regulator of proliferation and differentiation of developing neurons via GABAA receptors. Assuming such a role for the developing testis, we studied whether GABA synthesis and GABA receptors are already present in the postnatal testis, where fetal Leydig cells and, to a much greater extend, cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage proliferate. Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, Western blotting and a radioactive enzymatic GAD assay evidenced that fetal Leydig cells of five-six days old rats possess active GAD protein, and that both fetal Leydig cells and cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage possess GABAA receptor subunits. TM3 cells, a proliferating mouse Leydig cell line, which we showed to possess GABAA receptor subunits by RT-PCR, served to study effects of GABA on proliferation. Using a colorimetric proliferation assay and Western Blotting for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we demonstrated that GABA or the GABAA agonist isoguvacine significantly increased TM3 cell number and PCNA content in TM3 cells. These effects were blocked by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, implying a role for GABAA receptors. In conclusion, GABA increases proliferation of TM3 Leydig cells via GABAA receptor activation and proliferating Leydig cells in the postnatal rodent testis bear a GABAergic system. Thus testicular GABA may play an as yet unrecognized role in the development of Leydig cells during the differentiation of the testicular interstitial compartment. PMID:15040802

  6. Drosophila neuroligin 4 regulates sleep through modulating GABA transmission.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhou, Zikai; Zhang, Xinwang; Tong, Huawei; Li, Peipei; Zhang, Zi Chao; Jia, Zhengping; Xie, Wei; Han, Junhai

    2013-09-25

    Sleep is an essential and evolutionarily conserved behavior that is closely related to synaptic function. However, whether neuroligins (Nlgs), which are cell adhesion molecules involved in synapse formation and synaptic transmission, are involved in sleep is not clear. Here, we show that Drosophila Nlg4 (DNlg4) is highly expressed in large ventral lateral clock neurons (l-LNvs) and that l-LNv-derived DNlg4 is essential for sleep regulation. GABA transmission is impaired in mutant l-LNv, and sleep defects in dnlg4 mutant flies can be rescued by genetic manipulation of GABA transmission. Furthermore, dnlg4 mutant flies exhibit a severe reduction in GABAA receptor RDL clustering, and DNlg4 associates with RDLs in vivo. These results demonstrate that DNlg4 regulates sleep through modulating GABA transmission in l-LNvs, which provides the first known link between a synaptic adhesion molecule and sleep in Drosophila. PMID:24068821

  7. Molecular and functional expression of cation-chloride cotransporters in dorsal root ganglion neurons during postnatal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shihong; Garzon-Muvdi, Tomás; Di Fulvio, Mauricio; Chen, Yanfang; Delpire, Eric; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    GABA depolarizes and excites central neurons during early development, becoming inhibitory and hyperpolarizing with maturation. This “developmental shift” occurs abruptly, reflecting a decrease in intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i) and a hyperpolarizing shift in Cl− equilibrium potential due to upregulation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2b, a neuron-specific Cl− extruder. In contrast, primary afferent neurons (PANs) are depolarized by GABA throughout adulthood because of expression of NKCC1, a Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter that accumulates Cl− above equilibrium. The GABAA-mediated depolarization of PANs determines presynaptic inhibition in the spinal cord, a key mechanism gating somatosensory information. Little is known about developmental changes in Cl− transporter expression and Cl− homeostasis in PANs. Whether NKCC1 is expressed in PANs of all phenotypes or is restricted to subpopulations (e.g., nociceptors) is debatable. Likewise, whether PANs express KCC2s is controversial. We investigated NKCC1 and K+-Cl− cotransporter expression in rat and mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with molecular methods. Using fluorescence imaging microscopy, we measured [Cl−]i in acutely dissociated rat DRG neurons (P0–P21) loaded with N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide and classified with phenotypic markers. DRG neurons of all sizes express two NKCC1 mRNAs, one full-length and a shorter splice variant lacking exon 21. Immunolabeling with validated antibodies revealed ubiquitous expression of NKCC1 in DRG neurons irrespective of postnatal age and phenotype. As maturation progresses [Cl−]i decreases gradually, persisting above equilibrium in >95% mature neurons. DRG neurons express mRNAs for KCC1, KCC3s, and KCC4, but not for KCC2s. Mechanisms underlying PANs' developmental changes in Cl− homeostasis are discussed and compared with those of central neurons. PMID:22457464

  8. Etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC increase the GABA efficacy of recombinant alpha4beta3delta and alpha4beta3 GABA A receptors expressed in HEK cells.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    General anesthetics, once thought to exert their effects through non-specific membrane effects, have highly specific ion channel targets that can silence neuronal populations in the nervous system, thereby causing unconsciousness and immobility, characteristic of general anesthesia. Inhibitory GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs), particularly highly GABA-sensitive extrasynaptic receptor subtypes that give rise to sustained inhibitory currents, are uniquely sensitive to GABA(A)R-active anesthetics. A prominent population of extrasynaptic GABA(A)Rs is made up of alpha4, beta2 or beta3, and delta subunits. Considering the demonstrated importance of GABA receptor beta3 subunits for in vivo anesthetic effects of etomidate and propofol, we decided to investigate the effects of GABA anesthetics on "extrasynaptic" alpha4beta3delta and also binary alpha4beta3 receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Consistent with previous work on similar receptor subtypes we show that maximal GABA currents through "extrasynaptic" alpha4beta3delta receptors, receptors defined by sensitivity to EtOH (30mM) and the beta-carboline beta-CCE (1microM), are enhanced by the GABA(A)R-active anesthetics etomidate, propofol, and the neurosteroid anesthetic THDOC. Furthermore, we show that receptors formed by alpha4beta3 subunits alone also show high GABA sensitivity and that saturating GABA responses of alpha4beta3 receptors are increased to the same extent by etomidate, propofol, and THDOC as are alpha4beta3delta receptors. Therefore, both alpha4beta3 and alpha4beta3delta receptors show low GABA efficacy, and GABA is also a partial agonist on certain binary alphabeta receptor subtypes. Increasing GABA efficacy on alpha4/6beta3delta and alpha4beta3 receptors is likely to make an important contribution to the anesthetic effects of etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC. PMID:18778723

  9. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  10. The glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle: function, regional differences in glutamate and GABA production and effects of interference with GABA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-02-01

    The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide information about glutamine transfer. The present review will give information about glutamine trafficking and the tools used to map it as exemplified by discussions of published work employing brain cell cultures as well as intact animals. It will be documented that considerably more glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to glutamatergic than to GABAergic neurons. However, glutamine does have an important role in GABAergic neurons despite their capability of re-utilizing their neurotransmitter by re-uptake. PMID:25380696

  11. Disorders of GABA metabolism: SSADH and GABA-transaminase deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Parviz, Mahsa; Vogel, Kara; Gibson, K. Michael; Pearl, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical disorders known to affect inherited gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism are autosomal recessively inherited succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase and GABA-transaminase deficiency. The clinical presentation of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency includes intellectual disability, ataxia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy with a nonprogressive course in typical cases, although a progressive form in early childhood as well as deterioration in adulthood with worsening epilepsy are reported. GABA-transaminase deficiency is associated with a severe neonatal-infantile epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:25485164

  12. Refuting the challenges of the developmental shift of polarity of GABA actions: GABA more exciting than ever!

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Woodin, Melanie A.; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cancedda, Laura; Vinay, Laurent; Rivera, Claudio; Legendre, Pascal; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Bordey, Angelique; Wenner, Peter; Fukuda, Atsuo; van den Pol, Anthony N.; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    During brain development, there is a progressive reduction of intracellular chloride associated with a shift in GABA polarity: GABA depolarizes and occasionally excites immature neurons, subsequently hyperpolarizing them at later stages of development. This sequence, which has been observed in a wide range of animal species, brain structures and preparations, is thought to play an important role in activity-dependent formation and modulation of functional circuits. This sequence has also been considerably reinforced recently with new data pointing to an evolutionary preserved rule. In a recent “Hypothesis and Theory Article,” the excitatory action of GABA in early brain development is suggested to be “an experimental artefact” (Bregestovski and Bernard, 2012). The authors suggest that the excitatory action of GABA is due to an inadequate/insufficient energy supply in glucose-perfused slices and/or to the damage produced by the slicing procedure. However, these observations have been repeatedly contradicted by many groups and are inconsistent with a large body of evidence including the fact that the developmental shift is neither restricted to slices nor to rodents. We summarize the overwhelming evidence in support of both excitatory GABA during development, and the implications this has in developmental neurobiology. PMID:22973192

  13. Morphology, Distribution and Phenotype of Polycystin Kidney Disease 2-like 1-Positive Cerebrospinal Fluid Contacting Neurons in The Brainstem of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Orts-Del’Immagine, Adeline; Kastner, Anne; Tillement, Vanessa; Tardivel, Catherine; Trouslard, Jérôme; Wanaverbecq, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian spinal cord and medulla oblongata harbor unique neurons that remain in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-cNs). These neurons were shown recently to express a polycystin member of the TRP channels family (PKD2L1) that potentially acts as a chemo- or mechanoreceptor. Recent studies carried out in young rodents indicate that spinal CSF-cNs express immature neuronal markers that appear to persist even in adult cells. Nevertheless, little is known about the phenotype and morphological properties of medullar CSF-cNs. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy techniques on tissues obtained from three-month old PKD2L1:EGFP transgenic mice, we analyzed the morphology, distribution, localization and phenotype of PKD2L1+ CSF-cNs around the brainstem and cervical spinal cord central canal. We show that PKD2L1+ CSF-cNs are GABAergic neurons with a subependymal localization, projecting a dendrite towards the central canal and an axon-like process running through the parenchyma. These neurons display a primary cilium on the soma and the dendritic process appears to bear ciliary-like structures in contact with the CSF. PKD2L1+ CSF-cNs present a conserved morphology along the length of the medullospinal central canal with a change in their density, localization and dendritic length according to the rostro-caudal axis. At adult stages, PKD2L1+ medullar CSF-cNs appear to remain in an intermediate state of maturation since they still exhibit characteristics of neuronal immaturity (DCX positive, neurofilament 160 kDa negative) along with the expression of a marker representative of neuronal maturation (NeuN). In addition, PKD2L1+ CSF-cNs express Nkx6.1, a homeodomain protein that enables the differentiation of ventral progenitors into somatic motoneurons and interneurons. The present study provides valuable information on the cellular properties of this peculiar neuronal population that will be crucial for understanding the physiological role of CSF

  14. GAD67-mediated GABA Synthesis and Signaling Regulate Inhibitory Synaptic Innervation in the Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Di Cristo, Graziella; Wu, Cai Zhi; Knott, Graham; Kuhlman, Sandra; Fu, Yu; Palmiter, Richard D.; Huang, Z. Josh

    2007-01-01

    The development of GABAergic inhibitory circuits is shaped by neural activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. we demonstrate a novel function of GABA in regulating GABAergic innervation in the adolescent brain, when GABA is mainly known as an inhibitory transmitter. Conditional knockdown of the rate-limiting synthetic enzyme GAD67 in basket interneurons in adolescent visual cortex resulted in cell autonomous deficits in axon branching, perisomatic synapse formation around pyramidal neurons, and complexity of the innervation fields; the same manipulation had little influence on the subsequent maintenance of perisomatic synapses. These effects of GABA deficiency were rescued by suppressing GABA re-uptake and by GABA receptor agonists. Germ-line knockdown of GAD67 but not GAD65 showed similar deficits, suggesting a specific role of GAD67 in the maturation of perisomatic innervation. Since intracellular GABA levels are modulated by neuronal activity, our results implicate GAD67-mediated GABA synthesis in activity-dependent regulation of inhibitory innervation patterns. PMID:17582330

  15. Regulation of GABA-modulin phosphorylation and GABA receptor binding by excitatory amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarino, F.; Guidotti, A.

    1987-05-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells phosphorylate numerous proteins including GABA-modulin (GM), which is a putative allosteric modulator of GABA receptors. Cell depolarization and treatment with dicarboxylic excitatory amino acids, which activate PI turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ influx and guanylate cyclase in granule cells increase the phosphorylation of specific proteins. To determine GM phosphorylation by endogenous protein kinases in living granule cell cultures, GM was isolated by immunoprecipitation and reverse-phase HPLC. High K/sup +/, veratridine, glutamate and NMDA treatment stimulated GM phosphorylation over 2-fold. This increase was abolished by the absence of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and was antagonized by Mg/sup 2 +/ ions and by AVP. The excitatory amino acid action was mimicked by phorbol esters but not by forskolin or by cGMP, and thus may be mediated by an activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Moreover, excitatory amino acids increase /sup 3/H-labelled phorbol ester binding sites in granule cell membrane. The same cultures, treated with glutamate or kainate, showed a 50-fold greater efficacy of muscimol for the stimulation of benzodiazepine (BZ) binding. These data-suggest that excitatory amino acid stimulation of neurons triggers PKC translocation and the activated enzyme phosphorylates GM. The extent of GM phosphorylation may regulate the coupling between GABA and BZ binding sites.

  16. Phasic, Nonsynaptic GABA-A Receptor-Mediated Inhibition Entrains Thalamocortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Rovó, Zita; Mátyás, Ferenc; Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Lecci, Sandro; Pellegrini, Chiara; Astori, Simone; Dávid, Csaba; Hangya, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    GABA-A receptors (GABA-ARs) are typically expressed at synaptic or nonsynaptic sites mediating phasic and tonic inhibition, respectively. These two forms of inhibition conjointly control various network oscillations. To disentangle their roles in thalamocortical rhythms, we focally deleted synaptic, γ2 subunit-containing GABA-ARs in the thalamus using viral intervention in mice. After successful removal of γ2 subunit clusters, spontaneous and evoked GABAergic synaptic currents disappeared in thalamocortical cells when the presynaptic, reticular thalamic (nRT) neurons fired in tonic mode. However, when nRT cells fired in burst mode, slow phasic GABA-AR-mediated events persisted, indicating a dynamic, burst-specific recruitment of nonsynaptic GABA-ARs. In vivo, removal of synaptic GABA-ARs reduced the firing of individual thalamocortical cells but did not abolish slow oscillations or sleep spindles. We conclude that nonsynaptic GABA-ARs are recruited in a phasic manner specifically during burst firing of nRT cells and provide sufficient GABA-AR activation to control major thalamocortical oscillations. PMID:24849349

  17. Beta Peak Frequencies at Rest Correlate with Endogenous GABA+/Cr Concentrations in Sensorimotor Cortex Areas

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Thomas J.; Oeltzschner, Georg; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Wittsack, Hans-Jörg; Schnitzler, Alfons; Lange, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal oscillatory activity in the beta band (15–30 Hz) is a prominent signal within the human sensorimotor cortex. Computational modeling and pharmacological modulation studies suggest an influence of GABAergic interneurons on the generation of beta band oscillations. Accordingly, studies in humans have demonstrated a correlation between GABA concentrations and power of beta band oscillations. It remains unclear, however, if GABA concentrations also influence beta peak frequencies and whether this influence is present in the sensorimotor cortex at rest and without pharmacological modulation. In the present study, we investigated the relation between endogenous GABA concentration (measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and beta oscillations (measured by magnetoencephalography) at rest in humans. GABA concentrations and beta band oscillations were measured for left and right sensorimotor and occipital cortex areas. A significant positive linear correlation between GABA concentration and beta peak frequency was found for the left sensorimotor cortex, whereas no significant correlations were found for the right sensorimotor and the occipital cortex. The results show a novel connection between endogenous GABA concentration and beta peak frequency at rest. This finding supports previous results that demonstrated a connection between oscillatory beta activity and pharmacologically modulated GABA concentration in the sensorimotor cortex. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that for a predominantly right-handed sample, the correlation between beta band oscillations and endogenous GABA concentrations is evident only in the left sensorimotor cortex. PMID:27258089

  18. Capsaicin-induced inactivation of sensory neurons promotes a more aggressive gene expression phenotype in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Erin, Nuray; Zhao, Wei; Bylander, John; Chase, Gary; Clawson, Gary

    2006-10-01

    Capsaicin-induced inactivation of sensory neurons has been reported to enhance metastasis of a murine breast cancer cell line, specifically enhancing myocardial metastases. Here we characterized changes in gene expression patterns in primary tumors which developed in capsaicin-treated vs. control mice. We identified a small cohort of genes (17) which all showed significant decreases in expression levels. All of the identified genes have been linked to cell growth, differentiation, and/or cancer progression. Three representative genes, Caspase-7 (an executor of apoptosis), ADAM-10 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease), and Elk-3 (a transcriptional repressor of the ternary factor subfamily of the Ets factors) were further investigated. All three showed dramatic downregulation at the protein level in primary tumors from capsaicin-treated animals compared with control (vehicle-treated) animals, and their expression was also lost in cell culture. Elk-3 and Caspase-7 were not expressed in vitro in cultured cell lines, suggesting that their expression was induced by the tumor microenvironment. Loss of Caspase-7 expression can be expected to result in loss of function of apoptotic pathways. At first glance, loss of ADAM-10 expression would be expected to result in decreased invasive capability, due to loss of matrix metalloprotease activity. However, just the opposite appears to be true. We found that ADAM-10 actually hydrolyzes Substance P. Specifically ADAM-10 produces the same growth-inhibitory products from Substance P (i.e., SP (1-7)) that Neprilysin does, so that loss of ADAM-10 expression actually results in loss of production of growth inhibitory peptides from Substance P. Similarly, ADAM-10 also efficiently hydrolyzes Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide, which may act in concert with Substance P. Finally, overactivity of Ets transcriptional suppressor functions has been linked to inhibition of tumorigenesis (e.g., Erf and Mef), and in addition loss of Elk-3 expression

  19. Reversal of dendritic phenotypes in 16p11.2 microduplication mouse model neurons by pharmacological targeting of a network hub.

    PubMed

    Blizinsky, Katherine D; Diaz-Castro, Blanca; Forrest, Marc P; Schürmann, Britta; Bach, Anthony P; Martin-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Wang, Lei; Csernansky, John G; Duan, Jubao; Penzes, Peter

    2016-07-26

    The architecture of dendritic arbors contributes to neuronal connectivity in the brain. Conversely, abnormalities in dendrites have been reported in multiple mental disorders and are thought to contribute to pathogenesis. Rare copy number variations (CNVs) are genetic alterations that are associated with a wide range of mental disorders and are highly penetrant. The 16p11.2 microduplication is one of the CNVs most strongly associated with schizophrenia and autism, spanning multiple genes possibly involved in synaptic neurotransmission. However, disease-relevant cellular phenotypes of 16p11.2 microduplication and the driver gene(s) remain to be identified. We found increased dendritic arborization in isolated cortical pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of 16p11.2 duplication (dp/+). Network analysis identified MAPK3, which encodes ERK1 MAP kinase, as the most topologically important hub in protein-protein interaction networks within the 16p11.2 region and broader gene networks of schizophrenia-associated CNVs. Pharmacological targeting of ERK reversed dendritic alterations associated with dp/+ neurons, outlining a strategy for the analysis and reversal of cellular phenotypes in CNV-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27402753

  20. Striatal cholinergic interneurons drive GABA release from dopamine terminals

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F.; Shah, Nirao M.; Seal, Rebecca P.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically-driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons, but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. PMID:24613418

  1. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)–containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67+/GFP), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl− concentrations ([Cl−]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca2+) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca2+ levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca2+ concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  2. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67(+/GFP)), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl(-) concentrations ([Cl(-)]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca(2+) levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca(2+) concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  3. GABA(A) receptor subunit alteration-dependent diazepam insensitivity in the cerebellum of phospholipase C-related inactive protein knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Akiko; Tanaka, Hiroto; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Umebayashi, Hisanori; Fukami, Kiyoko; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nabekura, Junichi; Kanematsu, Takashi; Hirata, Masato

    2010-07-01

    The GABA(A) receptor, a pentamer composed predominantly of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, mediates fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. We have previously reported that phospholipase C-related inactive protein (PRIP) is a modulator of GABA(A) receptor trafficking and that knockout (KO) mice exhibit a diazepam-insensitive phenotype in the hippocampus. The alpha subunit affects diazepam sensitivity; alpha1, 2, 3, and 5 subunits assemble with any form of beta and the gamma2 subunits to produce diazepam-sensitive receptors, whereas alpha4 or alpha6/beta/gamma2 receptors are diazepam-insensitive. Here, we investigated how PRIP is implicated in the diazepam-insensitive phenotype using cerebellar granule cells in animals expressing predominantly the alpha6 subunit. The expression of alpha1/beta/gamma2 diazepam-sensitive receptors was decreased in the PRIP-1 and 2 double KO cerebellum without any change in the total number of benzodiazepine-binding sites as assessed by radioligand-binding assay. Since levels of the alpha6 subunit were increased, the alpha1/beta/gamma2 receptors might be replaced with alpha6 subunit-containing receptors. Then, we further performed autoradiographic and electrophysiologic analyses. These results suggest that the expression of alpha6/delta receptors was decreased in cerebellar granule neurons, while that of alpha6/gamma2 receptors was increased. PRIP-1 and 2 double KO mice exhibit a diazepam-insensitive phenotype because of a decrease in diazepam-sensitive (alpha1/gamma2) and increase in diazepam-insensitive (alpha6/gamma2) GABA(A) receptors in the cerebellar granule cells. PMID:20412381

  4. Neurosteroids and GABA-A Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingde

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids represent a class of endogenous steroids that are synthesized in the brain, the adrenals, and the gonads and have potent and selective effects on the GABAA-receptor. 3α-hydroxy A-ring reduced metabolites of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, and testosterone are positive modulators of GABAA-receptor in a non-genomic manner. Allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one), 5α-androstane-3α, 17α-diol (Adiol), and 3α5α-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (3α5α-THDOC) enhance the GABA-mediated Cl- currents acting on a site (or sites) distinct from the GABA, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, and picrotoxin binding sites. 3α5α-P and 3α5α-THDOC potentiate synaptic GABAA-receptor function and activate δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic receptors that mediate tonic currents. On the contrary, 3β-OH pregnane steroids and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are GABAA-receptor antagonists and induce activation-dependent inhibition of the receptor. The activities of neurosteroid are dependent on brain regions and types of neurons. In addition to the slow genomic action of the parent steroids, the non-genomic, and rapid actions of neurosteroids play a significant role in the GABAA-receptor function and shift in mood and memory function. This review describes molecular mechanisms underlying neurosteroid action on the GABAA-receptor, mood changes, and cognitive functions. PMID:22654809

  5. Differential effects of GABA in modulating nociceptive vs. non-nociceptive synapses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Summers, T; Peterson, W; Miiller, E; Burrell, B D

    2015-07-01

    GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) -mediated signaling is normally associated with synaptic inhibition due to ionotropic GABA receptors that gate an inward Cl(-) current, hyperpolarizing the membrane potential. However, there are also situations where ionotropic GABA receptors trigger a Cl(-) efflux that results in depolarization. The well-characterized central nervous system of the medicinal leech was used to study the functional significance of opposing effects of GABA at the synaptic circuit level. Specifically, we focused on synapses made by the nociceptive N cell and the non-nociceptive P (pressure) cell that converge onto a common postsynaptic target. It is already known that GABA hyperpolarizes the P cell, but depolarizes the N cell and that inhibition of ionotropic GABA receptors by bicuculline (BIC) has opposing effects on the synapses made by these two inputs; enhancing P cell synaptic transmission, but depressing N cell synapses. The goal of the present study was to determine whether the opposing effects of GABA were due to differences in Cl(-) homeostasis between the two presynaptic neurons. VU 0240551 (VU), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) exporter K-Cl co-transporter isoform 2 (KCC2), attenuated GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the non-nociceptive afferent while bumetanide (BUM), an inhibitor of the Cl(-) importer Na-K-Cl co-transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), reduced GABA-mediated depolarization of the nociceptive neuron. VU treatment also enhanced P cell synaptic signaling, similar to the previously observed effects of BIC and consistent with the idea that GABA inhibits synaptic signaling at the presynaptic level. BUM treatment depressed N cell synapses, again similar to what is observed following BIC treatment and suggests that GABA has an excitatory effect on these synapses. The opposing effects of GABA could also be observed at the behavioral level with BIC and VU increasing responsiveness to non-nociceptive stimulation while BIC and BUM decreased responsiveness

  6. Complex Neurological Phenotype in Mutant Mice Lacking Tsc2 in Excitatory Neurons of the Developing Forebrain123

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Beth; Hwa Lee, Gum; Nikolaeva, Ina; Dal Pozzo, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 genes cause tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a genetic disease often associated with epilepsy, intellectual disability, and autism, and characterized by the presence of anatomical malformations in the brain as well as tumors in other organs. The TSC1 and TSC2 proteins form a complex that inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. Previous animal studies demonstrated that Tsc1 or Tsc2 loss of function in the developing brain affects the intrinsic development of neural progenitor cells, neurons, or glia. However, the interplay between different cellular elements during brain development was not previously investigated. In this study, we generated a novel mutant mouse line (NEX-Tsc2) in which the Tsc2 gene is deleted specifically in postmitotic excitatory neurons of the developing forebrain. Homozygous mutant mice failed to thrive and died prematurely, whereas heterozygous mice appeared normal. Mutant mice exhibited distinct neuroanatomical abnormalities, including malpositioning of selected neuronal populations, neuronal hypertrophy, and cortical astrogliosis. Intrinsic neuronal defects correlated with increased mTORC1 signaling, whereas astrogliosis did not result from altered intrinsic signaling, since these cells were not directly affected by the gene knockout strategy. All neuronal and non-neuronal abnormalities were suppressed by continuous postnatal treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor RAD001. The data suggest that the loss of Tsc2 and mTORC1 signaling activation in excitatory neurons not only disrupts their intrinsic development, but also disrupts the development of cortical astrocytes, likely through the mTORC1-dependent expression of abnormal signaling proteins. This work thus provides new insights into cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of Tsc2 in brain development. PMID:26693177

  7. Increased probability of GABA release during withdrawal from morphine.

    PubMed

    Bonci, A; Williams, J T

    1997-01-15

    Opioid receptors located on interneurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) inhibit GABA(A)-mediated synaptic transmission to dopamine projection neurons. The resulting disinhibition of dopamine cells in the VTA is thought to play a pivotal role in drug abuse; however, little is known about how this GABAA synapse is affected after chronic morphine treatment. The regulation of GABA release during acute withdrawal from morphine was studied in slices from animals treated for 6-7 d with morphine. Slices containing the VTA were prepared and maintained in morphine-free solutions, and GABAA IPSCs were recorded from dopamine cells. The amplitude of evoked IPSCs and the frequency of spontaneous miniature IPSCs measured in slices from morphine-treated guinea pigs were greater than placebo-treated controls. In addition, activation of adenylyl cyclase, with forskolin, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, with Sp-cAMPS, caused a larger increase in IPSCs in slices from morphine-treated animals. Conversely, the kinase inhibitors staurosporine and Rp-CPT-cAMPS decreased GABA IPSCs to a greater extent after drug treatment. The results indicate that the probability of GABA release was increased during withdrawal from chronic morphine treatment and that this effect resulted from an upregulation of the cAMP-dependent cascade. Increased transmitter release from opioid-sensitive synapses during acute withdrawal may be one adaptive mechanism that results from prolonged morphine treatment. PMID:8987801

  8. GABA release in the medial preoptic area of cyclic female rats.

    PubMed

    Mitsushima, D; Shwe, T-T-W; Funabashi, T; Shinohara, K; Kimura, F

    2002-01-01

    GABA is a potent regulator of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the hypothalamus. To determine the profile of GABA release in the medial preoptic area where the gonadotropin surge generator resides, an in vivo microdialysis study was performed in cyclic female rats. The microdialysis samples were collected and sequential blood samples (150 microl each) were also obtained, at 1-h intervals. During estrus and diestrus 1, GABA release in the medial preoptic area was relatively low. A small increase in the GABA release began in the afternoon of diestrus 1 and attained its peak in the morning of diestrus 2, but declined in the afternoon of that day. The GABA release markedly increased from late in the night of diestrus 2 through the morning of proestrus, when it attained its peak, and thereafter it declined sharply until the critical period of proestrus. A distinct preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge was observed in the afternoon of proestrus in all proestrous rats. From these results we suggest that the preovulatory elevation of the GABA release from the night through to the morning of proestrus, followed by a sharp decline, is closely associated with the onset of the preovulatory luteinizing hormone surge in cyclic female rats. The present study is the first to report the 4-day profile of GABA release in the medial preoptic area during the estrous cycle. PMID:12123689

  9. Wavelength-Selective One- and Two-Photon Uncaging of GABA

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have synthesized photolabile 7-diethylamino coumarin (DEAC) derivatives of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These caged neurotransmitters efficiently release GABA using linear or nonlinear excitation. We used a new DEAC-based caging chromophore that has a vinyl acrylate substituent at the 3-position that shifts the absorption maximum of DEAC to about 450 nm and thus is named “DEAC450”. DEAC450-caged GABA is photolyzed with a quantum yield of 0.39 and is highly soluble and stable in physiological buffer. We found that DEAC450-caged GABA is relatively inactive toward two-photon excitation at 720 nm, so when paired with a nitroaromatic caged glutamate that is efficiently excited at such wavelengths, we could photorelease glutamate and GABA around single spine heads on neurons in brain slices with excellent wavelength selectivity using two- and one-photon photolysis, respectively. Furthermore, we found that DEAC450-caged GABA could be effectively released using two-photon excitation at 900 nm with spatial resolution of about 3 μm. Taken together, our experiments show that the DEAC450 caging chromophore holds great promise for the development of new caged compounds that will enable wavelength-selective, two-color interrogation of neuronal signaling with excellent subcellular resolution. PMID:24304264

  10. Gestational changes of GABA levels and GABA binding in the human uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Erdoe, S.L.; Villanyi, P.; Laszlo, A.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the activities of L-glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, and the nature of the sodium-independent binding of GABA were examined in uterine tissue pieces obtained surgically from pregnant and non-pregnant women. GABA concentrations were reduced, while the activity of GABA-transaminase and the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA significantly increased in specimens from pregnant subjects. These findings suggest some gestation-related functional role for the GABA system in the human uterus.

  11. GABA-A Receptor Inhibition of Local Calcium Signaling in Spines and Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Marlin, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical interneurons activate GABA-A receptors to rapidly control electrical and biochemical signaling at pyramidal neurons. Different populations of interneurons are known to uniquely target the soma and dendrites of pyramidal neurons. However, the ability of these interneurons to inhibit Ca2+ signaling at spines and dendrites is largely unexplored. Here we use whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, GABA uncaging and optogenetics to study dendritic inhibition at layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in slices of mouse PFC. We first show that GABA-A receptors strongly inhibit action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ signals at both spines and dendrites. We find robust inhibition over tens of milliseconds that spreads along the dendritic branch. However, we observe no difference in the amount of inhibition at neighboring spines and dendrites. We then examine the influence of interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), or 5HT3a receptors. We determine that these populations of interneurons make unique contacts onto the apical and basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons. We also show that SOM and 5HT3a but not PV interneurons potently inhibit AP Ca2+ signals via GABA-A receptors at both spines and dendrites. These findings reveal how multiple interneurons regulate local Ca2+ signaling in pyramidal neurons, with implications for cortical function and disease. PMID:25429132

  12. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus encode reward signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Weixin; Wang, Daqing; Feng, Qiru; Liu, Zhixiang; Zhou, Jingfeng; Jia, Chunying; Hu, Fei; Zeng, Jiawei; Guo, Qingchun; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in organizing reward-related behaviours; however, it remains unclear how genetically defined neurons in the DRN of a freely behaving animal respond to various natural rewards. Here we addressed this question using fibre photometry and single-unit recording from serotonin (5-HT) neurons and GABA neurons in the DRN of behaving mice. Rewards including sucrose, food, sex and social interaction rapidly activate 5-HT neurons, but aversive stimuli including quinine and footshock do not. Both expected and unexpected rewards activate 5-HT neurons. After mice learn to wait for sucrose delivery, most 5-HT neurons fire tonically during waiting and then phasically on reward acquisition. Finally, GABA neurons are activated by aversive stimuli but inhibited when mice seek rewards. Thus, DRN 5-HT neurons positively encode a wide range of reward signals during anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward responses. Moreover, GABA neurons play a complementary role in reward processing. PMID:26818705

  13. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus encode reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Weixin; Wang, Daqing; Feng, Qiru; Liu, Zhixiang; Zhou, Jingfeng; Jia, Chunying; Hu, Fei; Zeng, Jiawei; Guo, Qingchun; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in organizing reward-related behaviours; however, it remains unclear how genetically defined neurons in the DRN of a freely behaving animal respond to various natural rewards. Here we addressed this question using fibre photometry and single-unit recording from serotonin (5-HT) neurons and GABA neurons in the DRN of behaving mice. Rewards including sucrose, food, sex and social interaction rapidly activate 5-HT neurons, but aversive stimuli including quinine and footshock do not. Both expected and unexpected rewards activate 5-HT neurons. After mice learn to wait for sucrose delivery, most 5-HT neurons fire tonically during waiting and then phasically on reward acquisition. Finally, GABA neurons are activated by aversive stimuli but inhibited when mice seek rewards. Thus, DRN 5-HT neurons positively encode a wide range of reward signals during anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward responses. Moreover, GABA neurons play a complementary role in reward processing. PMID:26818705

  14. Tricyclic pyrone compounds prevent aggregation and reverse cellular phenotypes caused by expression of mutant huntingtin protein in striatal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Trushina, Eugenia; Rana, Sandeep; McMurray, Cynthia T; Hua, Duy H

    2009-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation in the coding region of a novel gene. The mechanism of HD is unknown. Most data suggest that polyglutamine-mediated aggregation associated with expression of mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt) contributes to the pathology. However, recent studies have identified early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Suppression of aggregation is accepted as one of the markers of successful therapeutic approaches. Previously, we demonstrated that tricyclic pyrone (TP) compounds efficiently inhibited formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates in cell and mouse models representing Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In the present study, we aimed to determine whether TP compounds could prevent aggregation and restore early cellular defects in primary embryonic striatal neurons from animal model representing HD. Results TP compounds effectively inhibit aggregation caused by mhtt in neurons and glial cells. Treatment with TP compounds also alleviated cholesterol accumulation and restored clathrin-independent endocytosis in HD neurons. Conclusion We have found that TP compounds not only blocked mhtt-induced aggregation, but also alleviated early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Our data suggest TP molecules may be used as lead compounds for prevention or treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including HD and AD. PMID:19586540

  15. Neurochemical phenotype and function of endomorphin 2-immunopositive neurons in the myenteric plexus of the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Ping; Wang, Xi-Yu; Gao, Chang-Jun; Liao, Yong-Hui; Qu, Juan; He, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Guo-Du; Li, Yun-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and activity of endomorphins (EMs), which are endogenous μ-opioid receptor (MOR) ligands in the gastrointestinal tract (GI), are yet to be elucidated. The current study aimed to shed light on this topic. EM2 was expressed in the enteric neurons in the myenteric plexus of the mid-colon. Of the EM2-immunoreactive (EM2-IR) neurons, 53 ± 4.6%, 26 ± 4.5%, 26 ± 2.8% and 49 ± 4.2% displayed immunopositive staining for choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), substance P (SP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), respectively. A bath application of EM2 (2 μM) enhanced spontaneous contractile amplitude and tension, which were reversed by β-FNA (an antagonist of MOR) but not NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ether (L-NAME, a non-selective inhibitor of NOS) or VIP6-28 (an antagonist of the VIP receptor) in the colonic strips. EM2 significantly suppressed inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) in 14 of the 17 examined circular muscle cells, and this effect was not antagonized by preincubation in L-NAME. EM2 was widely expressed in interneurons and motor neurons in the myenteric plexus and presynaptically inhibited fast IJPs, thereby enhancing spontaneous contraction and tension in the colonic smooth muscle. PMID:25565974

  16. GABA transporters control GABAergic neurotransmission in the mouse subplate.

    PubMed

    Unichenko, P; Kirischuk, S; Luhmann, H J

    2015-09-24

    The subplate is a transient layer between the cortical plate and intermediate zone in the developing cortex. Thalamo-cortical axons form temporary synapses on subplate neurons (SPns) before invading the cortical plate. Neuronal activity within the subplate is of critical importance for the development of neocortical circuits and architecture. Although both glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs on SPns were reported, short-term plasticity of GABAergic transmission has not been investigated yet. GABAergic postsynaptic currents (GPSCs) were recorded from SPns in coronal neocortical slices prepared from postnatal day 3-4 mice using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Evoked GPSCs (eGPSCs) elicited by electrical paired-pulse stimulation demonstrated paired-pulse depression at all interstimulus intervals tested. Baclofen, a specific GABAB receptor (GABABR) agonist, reduced eGPSC amplitudes and increased paired-pulse ratio (PPR), suggesting presynaptic location of functional GABABRs. Baclofen-induced effects were alleviated by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP55845), a selective GABABR blocker. Moreover, CGP55845 increased eGPSC amplitudes and decreased PPR even under control conditions, indicating that GABABRs are tonically activated by ambient GABA. Because extracellular GABA concentration is mainly regulated by GABA transporters (GATs), we asked whether GATs release GABA. 1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-[2-[[(diphenylmethylene)amino]oxy]ethyl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid (NNC-711) (10μM), a selective GAT-1 blocker, increased eGPSC decay time, decreased eGPSC amplitudes and PPR. The two last effects but not the first one were blocked by CGP55845, indicating that GAT-1 blockade causes an elevation of extracellular GABA concentration and in turn activation of extrasynaptic GABAARs and presynaptic GABABRs. 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP-5114), a specific GAT-2/3 blocker, failed

  17. The Timing of the Excitatory-to-Inhibitory GABA Switch Is Regulated by the Oxytocin Receptor via KCC2.

    PubMed

    Leonzino, Marianna; Busnelli, Marta; Antonucci, Flavia; Verderio, Claudia; Mazzanti, Michele; Chini, Bice

    2016-04-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor (Oxtr) play a crucial role in the postnatal transition of neuronal GABA neurotransmission from excitatory to inhibitory, a developmental process known as the GABA switch. Using hippocampal neurons from Oxtr-null mice, we show that (1) Oxtr is necessary for the correct timing of the GABA switch by upregulating activity of the chloride cotransporter KCC2, (2) Oxtr, in a very early and narrow time window, directly modulates the functional activity of KCC2 by promoting its phosphorylation and insertion/stabilization at the neuronal surface, and (3) in the absence of Oxtr, electrophysiological alterations are recorded in mature neurons, a finding consistent with a reduced level of KCC2 and increased susceptibility to seizures observed in adult Oxtr-null mice. These data identify KCC2 as a key target of oxytocin in postnatal events that may be linked to pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27052180

  18. The Timing of the Excitatory-to-Inhibitory GABA Switch Is Regulated by the Oxytocin Receptor via KCC2

    PubMed Central

    Leonzino, Marianna; Busnelli, Marta; Antonucci, Flavia; Verderio, Claudia; Mazzanti, Michele; Chini, Bice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oxytocin and its receptor (Oxtr) play a crucial role in the postnatal transition of neuronal GABA neurotransmission from excitatory to inhibitory, a developmental process known as the GABA switch. Using hippocampal neurons from Oxtr-null mice, we show that (1) Oxtr is necessary for the correct timing of the GABA switch by upregulating activity of the chloride cotransporter KCC2, (2) Oxtr, in a very early and narrow time window, directly modulates the functional activity of KCC2 by promoting its phosphorylation and insertion/stabilization at the neuronal surface, and (3) in the absence of Oxtr, electrophysiological alterations are recorded in mature neurons, a finding consistent with a reduced level of KCC2 and increased susceptibility to seizures observed in adult Oxtr-null mice. These data identify KCC2 as a key target of oxytocin in postnatal events that may be linked to pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27052180

  19. Direct conversion of mouse fibroblasts to GABAergic neurons with combined medium without the introduction of transcription factors or miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiming; Wang, Yonghui; He, Zuping; Yang, Hao; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Degeneration or loss of GABAergic neurons frequently may lead to many neuropsychiatric disorders such as epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders. So far no clinically effective therapies can slow and halt the progression of these diseases. Cell-replacement therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of these neuropsychiatric diseases. Although increasing evidence showed that mammalian somatic cells can be directly converted into functional neurons using specific transcription factors or miRNAs via virus delivery, the application of these induced neurons is potentially problematic, due to integration of vectors into the host genome, which results in the disruption or dysfunction of nearby genes. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts could be efficiently reprogrammed into GABAergic neurons in a combined medium composed of conditioned medium from neurotrophin-3 modified Olfactory Ensheathing Cells (NT3-OECs) plus SB431542, GDNF and RA. Following 3 weeks of induction, these cells derived from fibroblasts acquired the morphological and phenotypical GABAerigic neuronal properties, as demonstrated by the expression of neuronal markers including Tuj1, NeuN, Neurofilament-L, GABA, GABA receptors and GABA transporter 1. More importantly, these converted cells acquired neuronal functional properties such as synapse formation and increasing intracellular free calcium influx when treated with BayK, a specific activator of L-type calcium channel. Therefore, our findings demonstrate for the first time that fibroblasts can be directly converted into GABAergic neurons without ectopic expression of specific transcription factors or miRNA. This study may provide a promising cell source for the application of cell replacement therapy in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26114472

  20. Paradoxical effects of GABA-A modulators may explain sex steroid induced negative mood symptoms in some persons.

    PubMed

    Bäckström, T; Haage, D; Löfgren, M; Johansson, I M; Strömberg, J; Nyberg, S; Andréen, L; Ossewaarde, L; van Wingen, G A; Turkmen, S; Bengtsson, S K

    2011-09-15

    Some women have negative mood symptoms, caused by progestagens in hormonal contraceptives or sequential hormone therapy or by progesterone in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, which may be attributed to metabolites acting on the GABA-A receptor. The GABA system is the major inhibitory system in the adult CNS and most positive modulators of the GABA-A receptor (benzodiazepines, barbiturates, alcohol, GABA steroids), induce inhibitory (e.g. anesthetic, sedative, anticonvulsant, anxiolytic) effects. However, some individuals have adverse effects (seizures, increased pain, anxiety, irritability, aggression) upon exposure. Positive GABA-A receptor modulators induce strong paradoxical effects including negative mood in 3%-8% of those exposed, while up to 25% have moderate symptoms. The effect is biphasic: low concentrations induce an adverse anxiogenic effect while higher concentrations decrease this effect and show inhibitory, calming properties. The prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is also 3%-8% among women in fertile ages, and up to 25% have more moderate symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Patients with PMDD have severe luteal phase-related symptoms and show changes in GABA-A receptor sensitivity and GABA concentrations. Findings suggest that negative mood symptoms in women with PMDD are caused by the paradoxical effect of allopregnanolone mediated via the GABA-A receptor, which may be explained by one or more of three hypotheses regarding the paradoxical effect of GABA steroids on behavior: (1) under certain conditions, such as puberty, the relative fraction of certain GABA-A receptor subtypes may be altered, and at those subtypes the GABA steroids may act as negative modulators in contrast to their usual role as positive modulators; (2) in certain brain areas of vulnerable women the transmembrane Cl(-) gradient may be altered by factors such as estrogens that favor excitability; (3) inhibition of inhibitory neurons may promote

  1. Genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 recapitulates phenotypic alterations underlying cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Alshammari, T K; Alshammari, M A; Nenov, M N; Hoxha, E; Cambiaghi, M; Marcinno, A; James, T F; Singh, P; Labate, D; Li, J; Meltzer, H Y; Sacchetti, B; Tempia, F; Laezza, F

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive processing is highly dependent on the functional integrity of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) interneurons in the brain. These cells regulate excitability and synaptic plasticity of principal neurons balancing the excitatory/inhibitory tone of cortical networks. Reduced function of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and disruption of GABAergic synapses in the cortical circuitry result in desynchronized network activity associated with cognitive impairment across many psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms underlying these complex phenotypes are still poorly understood. Here we show that in animal models, genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 (Fgf14), a regulator of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission, leads to loss of PV interneurons in the CA1 hippocampal region, a critical area for cognitive function. Strikingly, this cellular phenotype associates with decreased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and also coincides with disrupted CA1 inhibitory circuitry, reduced in vivo gamma frequency oscillations and impaired working memory. Bioinformatics analysis of schizophrenia transcriptomics revealed functional co-clustering of FGF14 and genes enriched within the GABAergic pathway along with correlatively decreased expression of FGF14, PVALB, GAD67 and VGAT in the disease context. These results indicate that Fgf14(-/-) mice recapitulate salient molecular, cellular, functional and behavioral features associated with human cognitive impairment, and FGF14 loss of function might be associated with the biology of complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:27163207

  2. Excitation by Axon Terminal GABA Spillover in a Sound Localization Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Catherine J.C.; Rubio, Maria E.; Givens, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Synapses from neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) onto neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem are glycinergic in maturity, but also GABAergic and glutamatergic in development. The role for this neurotransmitter cotransmission is poorly understood. Here we use electrophysiological recordings in brainstem slices from P3-P21 mice to demonstrate that GABA release evoked from MNTB axons can spill over to neighboring MNTB axons and cause excitation by activating GABAAR. This spillover excitation generates patterns of staggered neurotransmitter release from different MNTB axons resulting in characteristic “doublet” postsynaptic currents in LSO neurons. Postembedding immunogold labeling and electron microscopy provide evidence that GABAARs are localized at MNTB axon terminals. Photolytic uncaging of p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) GABA demonstrates backpropagation of GABAAR-mediated depolarizations from MNTB axon terminals to the soma, some hundreds of microns away. These somatic depolarizations enhanced somatic excitability by increasing the probability of action potential generation. GABA spillover excitation between MNTB axon terminals may entrain neighboring MNTB neurons, which may play a role in the developmental refinement of the MNTB-LSO pathway. Axonal spillover excitation persisted beyond the second postnatal week, suggesting that this mechanism may play a role in sound localization, by providing new avenues of communication between MNTB neurons via their distal axonal projections. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, a new mechanism of neuronal communication between auditory synapses in the mammalian sound localization pathway is described. Evidence is provided that the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can spill over between axon terminals to cause excitation of nearby synapses to further stimulate neurotransmitter release. Excitatory GABA spillover between inhibitory axon terminals may have important

  3. Excitation by Axon Terminal GABA Spillover in a Sound Localization Circuit.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Catherine J C; Rubio, Maria E; Givens, Richard S; Kandler, Karl

    2016-01-20

    Synapses from neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) onto neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem are glycinergic in maturity, but also GABAergic and glutamatergic in development. The role for this neurotransmitter cotransmission is poorly understood. Here we use electrophysiological recordings in brainstem slices from P3-P21 mice to demonstrate that GABA release evoked from MNTB axons can spill over to neighboring MNTB axons and cause excitation by activating GABAAR. This spillover excitation generates patterns of staggered neurotransmitter release from different MNTB axons resulting in characteristic "doublet" postsynaptic currents in LSO neurons. Postembedding immunogold labeling and electron microscopy provide evidence that GABAARs are localized at MNTB axon terminals. Photolytic uncaging of p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) GABA demonstrates backpropagation of GABAAR-mediated depolarizations from MNTB axon terminals to the soma, some hundreds of microns away. These somatic depolarizations enhanced somatic excitability by increasing the probability of action potential generation. GABA spillover excitation between MNTB axon terminals may entrain neighboring MNTB neurons, which may play a role in the developmental refinement of the MNTB-LSO pathway. Axonal spillover excitation persisted beyond the second postnatal week, suggesting that this mechanism may play a role in sound localization, by providing new avenues of communication between MNTB neurons via their distal axonal projections. Significance statement: In this study, a new mechanism of neuronal communication between auditory synapses in the mammalian sound localization pathway is described. Evidence is provided that the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can spill over between axon terminals to cause excitation of nearby synapses to further stimulate neurotransmitter release. Excitatory GABA spillover between inhibitory axon terminals may have important implications

  4. Phenotyping of sensory and sympathetic ganglion neurons of a galanin-overexpressing mouse--possible implications for pain processing.

    PubMed

    Brumovsky, Pablo; Hygge-Blakeman, Karin; Villar, Marcelo J; Watanabe, Masahiko; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2006-06-01

    The distribution of galanin was studied in the lumbar 5 dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and spinal cord, superior cervical ganglia (SCGs), and skin of transgenic mice overexpressing galanin under the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) promoter (GalOE-DBH mice) and in wild type (WT) mice. The DRGs and spinal cord were analysed before and after a unilateral, complete transection (axotomy) of the sciatic nerve and after dorsal rhizotomy. Both galanin protein and transcript were studied by, respectively, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Increased galanin expression was observed in several small, medium-sized and large DRG neuron profiles (NPs) in the naïve transgenic mouse, frequently in neurons lacking calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and isolectin B4-binding. This lack of coexistence was particularly evident in the medium-sized/large NPs. In the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, no differences were detected between GalOE-DBH and WT mice, both displaying a strong galanin-positive neuropil in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn, but the transgenic mice showed a more abundant galanin-positive innervation of the ventral horn. A 12-day dorsal rhizotomy, surprisingly, failed to alter the galanin staining patterns in the dorsal (and ventral) dorsal horn. Unilateral axotomy induced upregulation of galanin in DRG NPs of all sizes in both types of mouse. In the hindpaw skin, a profuse galanin-positive fiber plexus was observed in sweat glands and around blood vessels of the transgenic mice, being much more restricted in WT mice. Finally, GalOE mice exhibited a strong galanin-like immunoreactivity in most SCG NPs. The overexpression of the peptide in DRGs and SCGs was paralleled by increased mRNA levels. The present results show that overexpression of galanin under the control of the DBH promoter does not only occur, as expected in these mice, in noradrenline/adrenaline neurons but also in DRG neurons, particularly in large and medium-sized NPs. To what

  5. Type II Cochlear Ganglion Neurons Do Not Drive the Olivocochlear Reflex: Re-Examination of the Cochlear Phenotype in Peripherin Knock-Out Mice.

    PubMed

    Maison, Stéphane; Liberman, Leslie D; Liberman, M Charles

    2016-01-01

    The cochlear nerve includes a small population of unmyelinated sensory fibers connecting outer hair cells to the brain. The functional role of these type II afferent neurons is controversial, because neurophysiological data are sparse. A recent study (Froud et al., 2015) reported that targeted deletion of peripherin, a type of neurofilament, eliminated type II afferents and inactivated efferent feedback to the outer hair cells, thereby suggesting that type II afferents were the sensory drive to this sound-evoked, negative-feedback reflex, the olivocochlear pathway. Here, we re-evaluated the cochlear phenotype in mice from the peripherin knock-out line and show that (1) type II afferent terminals are present in normal number and (2) olivocochlear suppression of cochlear responses is absent even when this efferent pathway is directly activated by shocks. We conclude that type II neurons are not the sensory drive for the efferent reflex and that peripherin deletion likely causes dysfunction of synaptic transmission between olivocochlear terminals and their peripheral targets. PMID:27570826

  6. Type II Cochlear Ganglion Neurons Do Not Drive the Olivocochlear Reflex: Re-Examination of the Cochlear Phenotype in Peripherin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The cochlear nerve includes a small population of unmyelinated sensory fibers connecting outer hair cells to the brain. The functional role of these type II afferent neurons is controversial, because neurophysiological data are sparse. A recent study (Froud et al., 2015) reported that targeted deletion of peripherin, a type of neurofilament, eliminated type II afferents and inactivated efferent feedback to the outer hair cells, thereby suggesting that type II afferents were the sensory drive to this sound-evoked, negative-feedback reflex, the olivocochlear pathway. Here, we re-evaluated the cochlear phenotype in mice from the peripherin knock-out line and show that (1) type II afferent terminals are present in normal number and (2) olivocochlear suppression of cochlear responses is absent even when this efferent pathway is directly activated by shocks. We conclude that type II neurons are not the sensory drive for the efferent reflex and that peripherin deletion likely causes dysfunction of synaptic transmission between olivocochlear terminals and their peripheral targets. PMID:27570826

  7. Portuguese family with the co-occurrence of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis phenotypes due to progranulin gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria R; Macário, Maria C; Ramos, Lina; Baldeiras, Inês; Ribeiro, Maria H; Santana, Isabel

    2016-05-01

    We and others have reported heterozygous progranulin mutations as an important cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It has been identified a complete progranulin deficiency because of a homozygous mutation in a sibling pair with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). Here, we describe the first case of NCL caused by a homozygous progranulin mutation segregating in a family with neuropathological confirmed FTLD. In this FTLD-NCL family, we detail the clinical phenotype, neuropsychological evaluation and imaging data of our proband harboring a homozygous mutation, c.900_901dupGT, with serum progranulin level (<6 ng/mL). Symptoms included rapidly progressive visual deficit, slightly dysarthria, and cerebellar ataxia. The electroretinogram confirmed a severe attenuation of rod and cone responses compatible with retinal dystrophy diagnosis and magnetic resonance imaging showed severe global cerebellar atrophy. In contrast, heterozygous relatives presented behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and some also developed extrapyramidal features compatible with corticobasal syndrome. Our findings suggest the importance of assessing serum progranulin levels in suspected recessive adult-onset NCL cases. Overall, a more holistic neurologic intervention is needed to guarantee a proper genetic counseling in cases like the present family where two distinct phenotypes are generated according to the individuals' mutation state. PMID:27021778

  8. Rescue of an In Vitro Neuron Phenotype Identified in Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C1 Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons by Modulating the WNT Pathway and Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Efthymiou, Anastasia G.; Steiner, Joe; Pavan, William J.; Wincovitch, Stephen; Larson, Denise M.; Porter, Forbes D.; Rao, Mahendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a familial disorder that has devastating consequences on postnatal development with multisystem effects, including neurodegeneration. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment option for NPC1; however, several potentially therapeutic compounds have been identified in assays using yeast, rodent models, and NPC1 human fibroblasts. Although these discoveries were made in fibroblasts from NPC1 subjects and were in some instances validated in animal models of the disease, testing these drugs on a cell type more relevant for NPC1 neurological disease would greatly facilitate both study of the disease and identification of more relevant therapeutic compounds. Toward this goal, we have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a subject homozygous for the most frequent NPC1 mutation (p.I1061T) and subsequently created a stable line of neural stem cells (NSCs). These NSCs were then used to create neurons as an appropriate disease model. NPC1 neurons display a premature cell death phenotype, and gene expression analysis of these cells suggests dysfunction of important signaling pathways, including calcium and WNT. The clear readout from these cells makes them ideal candidates for high-throughput screening and will be a valuable tool to better understand the development of NPC1 in neural cells, as well as to develop better therapeutic options for NPC1. PMID:25637190

  9. Rescue of an in vitro neuron phenotype identified in Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons by modulating the WNT pathway and calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Efthymiou, Anastasia G; Steiner, Joe; Pavan, William J; Wincovitch, Stephen; Larson, Denise M; Porter, Forbes D; Rao, Mahendra S; Malik, Nasir

    2015-03-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a familial disorder that has devastating consequences on postnatal development with multisystem effects, including neurodegeneration. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment option for NPC1; however, several potentially therapeutic compounds have been identified in assays using yeast, rodent models, and NPC1 human fibroblasts. Although these discoveries were made in fibroblasts from NPC1 subjects and were in some instances validated in animal models of the disease, testing these drugs on a cell type more relevant for NPC1 neurological disease would greatly facilitate both study of the disease and identification of more relevant therapeutic compounds. Toward this goal, we have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a subject homozygous for the most frequent NPC1 mutation (p.I1061T) and subsequently created a stable line of neural stem cells (NSCs). These NSCs were then used to create neurons as an appropriate disease model. NPC1 neurons display a premature cell death phenotype, and gene expression analysis of these cells suggests dysfunction of important signaling pathways, including calcium and WNT. The clear readout from these cells makes them ideal candidates for high-throughput screening and will be a valuable tool to better understand the development of NPC1 in neural cells, as well as to develop better therapeutic options for NPC1. PMID:25637190

  10. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude.

    PubMed

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G; Harrison, Paul J; Nobre, Anna C

    2014-06-24

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  11. C. elegans Punctin Clusters GABA(A) Receptors via Neuroligin Binding and UNC-40/DCC Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haijun; Pinan-Lucarré, Bérangère; Ji, Tingting; Jospin, Maelle; Bessereau, Jean-Louis

    2015-06-17

    Positioning type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) in front of GABA release sites sets the strength of inhibitory synapses. The evolutionarily conserved Ce-Punctin/MADD-4 is an anterograde synaptic organizer that specifies GABAergic versus cholinergic identity of postsynaptic domains at the C. elegans neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Here we show that the Ce-Punctin secreted by GABAergic motor neurons controls the clustering of GABA(A)Rs through the synaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin (NLG-1) and the netrin receptor UNC-40/DCC. The short isoform of Ce-Punctin binds and clusters NLG-1 postsynaptically at GABAergic NMJs. NLG-1 disruption causes a strong reduction of GABA(A)R content at GABAergic synapses. Ce-Punctin also binds and localizes UNC-40 receptors in the postsynaptic membrane of NMJs, which promotes the recruitment of GABA(A)Rs by NLG-1. Since the mammalian orthologs of these genes are expressed in the central nervous system and their mutations are implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases, this molecular pathway might have been evolutionarily conserved. PMID:26028575

  12. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G.; Harrison, Paul J.; Nobre, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  13. Increased GABA(A) inhibition of the RVLM after hindlimb unloading in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, Julia A.; Heesch, Cheryl M.; Hasser, Eileen M.

    2002-01-01

    Attenuated baroreflex-mediated increases in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in hindlimb unloaded (HU) rats apparently are due to changes within the central nervous system. We hypothesized that GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is increased after hindlimb unloading. Responses to bilateral microinjection of the GABA(A) antagonist (-)-bicuculline methiodide (BIC) into the RVLM were examined before and during caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) inhibition in Inactin-anesthetized control and HU rats. Increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and RSNA in response to BIC in the RVLM were significantly enhanced in HU rats. Responses to bilateral CVLM blockade were not different. When remaining GABA(A) inhibition in the RVLM was blocked by BIC during CVLM inhibition, the additional increases in MAP and RSNA were significantly greater in HU rats. These data indicate that GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of RVLM neurons is augmented after hindlimb unloading. Effects of input from the CVLM were unaltered. Thus, after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents, the attenuated increase in sympathetic nerve activity in response to hypotension is associated with greater GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition of RVLM neurons originating at least in part from sources other than the CVLM.

  14. Immunocytochemical localization of amines and GABA in the optic lobe of the butterfly, Papilio xuthus.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Homberg, Uwe; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    Butterflies have sophisticated color vision. While the spectral organization of the compound eye has been well characterized in the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, neural mechanisms underlying its color vision are largely unexplored. Towards a better understanding of signal processing in the visual system of P. xuthus, we used immunocytochemical techniques to analyze the distribution of transmitter candidates, namely, histamine, serotonin, tyramine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Photoreceptor terminals in the lamina and medulla exhibited histamine immunoreactivity as demonstrated in other insects. The anti-histamine antiserum also labeled a few large medulla neurons. Medulla intrinsic neurons and centrifugal neurons projecting to the lamina showed serotonin immunoreactivity. Tyramine immunostaining was detected in a subset of large monopolar cells (LMCs) in the lamina, transmedullary neurons projecting to the lobula plate, and cell bodies surrounding the first optic chiasma. An anti-GABA antiserum labeled a subset of LMCs and populations of columnar and tangential neurons surrounding the medulla. Each of the four antisera also labeled a few centrifugal neurons that innervate the lobula complex from the central brain, suggesting that they have neuromodulatory roles. A distinctive feature we found in this study is the possibility that tyramine and GABA act as transmitters in LMCs of P. xuthus, which has not been reported in any other insects so far. PMID:22844431

  15. Immunocytochemical Localization of Amines and GABA in the Optic Lobe of the Butterfly, Papilio xuthus

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Kinoshita, Michiyo; Homberg, Uwe; Arikawa, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    Butterflies have sophisticated color vision. While the spectral organization of the compound eye has been well characterized in the Japanese yellow swallowtail butterfly, Papilio xuthus, neural mechanisms underlying its color vision are largely unexplored. Towards a better understanding of signal processing in the visual system of P. xuthus, we used immunocytochemical techniques to analyze the distribution of transmitter candidates, namely, histamine, serotonin, tyramine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Photoreceptor terminals in the lamina and medulla exhibited histamine immunoreactivity as demonstrated in other insects. The anti-histamine antiserum also labeled a few large medulla neurons. Medulla intrinsic neurons and centrifugal neurons projecting to the lamina showed serotonin immunoreactivity. Tyramine immunostaining was detected in a subset of large monopolar cells (LMCs) in the lamina, transmedullary neurons projecting to the lobula plate, and cell bodies surrounding the first optic chiasma. An anti-GABA antiserum labeled a subset of LMCs and populations of columnar and tangential neurons surrounding the medulla. Each of the four antisera also labeled a few centrifugal neurons that innervate the lobula complex from the central brain, suggesting that they have neuromodulatory roles. A distinctive feature we found in this study is the possibility that tyramine and GABA act as transmitters in LMCs of P. xuthus, which has not been reported in any other insects so far. PMID:22844431

  16. [Effect of the GABA derivative phenibut on learning].

    PubMed

    Shul'gina, G I; Ziablitseva, E A

    2005-01-01

    The learning effect of phenibut, a beta-phenyl derivative of the inhibitory neuromediator GABA, used in a subcutaneous dose of 40 mg/kg 2 hours before each experiment, was studied in rabbits. The injection of phenibut was shown to enhance not only the inhibitory, but also excitatory components of cerebral cortical neuronal responses to all applied stimuli. The findings support the concept that the GABAergic neuromediator system is involved in the elaboration of internal inhibition and explain the sense of intracerebral processes that ensure both the sedative properties of phenibut and its ability to improve patients' systemic tone and health status when brain dysfunctions are treated. PMID:15776965

  17. Enhanced neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression is central to cardiac vagal phenotype in exercise-trained mice

    PubMed Central

    Danson, E J F; Paterson, D J

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether enhanced cardiac vagal responsiveness elicited by exercise training is dependent on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS-1), since the NO-cGMP pathway facilitates acetylcholine release. Isolated atria with intact right vagal innervation were taken from male mice (18-22 weeks old) after a period of 10 weeks voluntary wheel-running (+EX, n = 27; peaked 9.8 ± 0.6 km day−1 at 5 weeks), and from mice housed in cages without wheels (-EX, n = 27). Immunostaining of whole atria for NOS-1 identified intrinsic neurones, all of which co-localized with choline acetyltransferase-positive ganglia. Western blot analysis confirmed that NOS-1 protein level was significantly greater in +EX compared to -EX atria (P < 0.05, unpaired t test). Basal heart rates (HR) were slower in +EX than in -EX atria (322 ± 6 versus 360 ± 7 beats min−1; P < 0.05, unpaired t test) However, in +EX atria, HR responses to vagal stimulation (VNS, 3 and 5 Hz) were significantly enhanced compared to -EX atria (3 Hz, +EX: −76 ± 8 beats min−1versus -EX: −62 ± 7 beats min−1; 5 Hz, +EX: −106 ± 4 beats min−1versus -EX: −93 ± 3 beats min−1; P < 0.01, unpaired t test). Inhibition of NOS-1 with vinyl-l-N-5-(1-imino-3-butenyl)-l-ornithine (l-VNIO, 100 μm) or soluble guanylyl cyclase with 1H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo[4, 3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 μm) abolished the difference in HR responses to VNS between +EX and -EX atria, and effects of l-VNIO were reversed by excess l-arginine (1 mm; P < 0.01, ANOVA). There were no differences between the HR responses to the bath-applied acetylcholine analogue carbamylcholine chloride in +EX and -EX atria (IC50 concentrations were 5.9 ± 0.4 μm (-EX) and 5.7 ± 0.4 μm (+EX)), suggesting that the changes in vagal responsiveness resulted from presynaptic facilitation of neurotransmission. In conclusion, NOS-1 appears to be a key protein in generating the cardiac vagal gain of function elicited by exercise training. PMID:12509490

  18. GABA and glutamate in schizophrenia: A 7 T 1H-MRS study

    PubMed Central

    Marsman, Anouk; Mandl, René C.W.; Klomp, Dennis W.J.; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boer, Vincent O.; Andreychenko, Anna; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S.; Luijten, Peter R.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by loss of brain volume, which may represent an ongoing pathophysiological process. This loss of brain volume may be explained by reduced neuropil rather than neuronal loss, suggesting abnormal synaptic plasticity and cortical microcircuitry. A possible mechanism is hypofunction of the NMDA-type of glutamate receptor, which reduces the excitation of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, resulting in a disinhibition of glutamatergic pyramidal neurons. Disinhibition of pyramidal cells may result in excessive stimulation by glutamate, which in turn could cause neuronal damage or death through excitotoxicity. In this study, GABA/creatine ratios, and glutamate, NAA, creatine and choline concentrations in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices were measured in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 23 healthy controls using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at an ultra-high magnetic field strength of 7 T. Significantly lower GABA/Cr ratios were found in patients with schizophrenia in the prefrontal cortex as compared to healthy controls, with GABA/Cr ratios inversely correlated with cognitive functioning in the patients. No significant change in the GABA/Cr ratio was found between patients and controls in the parieto-occipital cortex, nor were levels of glutamate, NAA, creatine, and choline differed in patients and controls in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices. Our findings support a mechanism involving altered GABA levels distinguished from glutamate levels in the medial prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, particularly in high functioning patients. A (compensatory) role for GABA through altered inhibitory neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex may be ongoing in (higher functioning) patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25379453

  19. Ablation of neurons expressing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in adult mice improves glucose tolerance independent of MCH signaling.

    PubMed

    Whiddon, Benjamin B; Palmiter, Richard D

    2013-01-30

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-expressing neurons have been ascribed many roles based on studies of MCH-deficient mice. However, MCH neurons express other neurotransmitters, including GABA, nesfatin, and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript. The importance of these other signaling molecules made by MCH neurons remains incompletely characterized. To determine the roles of MCH neurons in vivo, we targeted expression of the human diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) to the gene for MCH (Pmch). Within 2 weeks of diphtheria toxin injection, heterozygous Pmch(DTR/+) mice lost 98% of their MCH neurons. These mice became lean but ate normally and were hyperactive, especially during a fast. They also responded abnormally to psychostimulants. For these phenotypes, ablation of MCH neurons recapitulated knock-out of MCH, so MCH appears to be the critical neuromodulator released by these neurons. In contrast, MCH-neuron-ablated mice showed improved glucose tolerance when compared with MCH-deficient mutant mice and wild-type mice. We conclude that MCH neurons regulate glucose tolerance through signaling molecules other than MCH. PMID:23365238

  20. Blockade of capsaicin-induced reduction of GABA-immunoreactivity by spantide in cat spinal superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Wei, F; Zhao, Z Q

    1996-03-01

    In our previous study, perineural application of capsaicin not only produced release and depletion of substance P from primary nociceptive afferent terminals, but also reduced GABA immunoreactivity in the superficial dorsal horn. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the release of GABA is triggered by substance P released from primary nociceptive afferent terminals by capsaican. GABA and substance P immunoreactivity in the lumbar dorsal horn was examined in two groups: in the first group the tibial nerve was treated with 3% capsaicin, and in the second group the dorsal surface of the lumbar cord was infused with spantide (50 nM), a substance P receptor antagonist, before application of capsaicin to the tibial nerve. Following perineural treatment of capsaicin for 30 min, both the GABA-immunostaining density and the number of GABA immunoreactive neurons were reduced significantly in the ipsilateral laminae I-II at L5 through L7. GABA immunoreactivity was reduced by 54.12%, 44.46% and 31.0% in the medial, central and lateral parts of the ipsilateral laminae I-II at L7, respectively. With pre-application of spantide to the spinal cord, GABA immunoreactivity was reduced only to 14.4%, 16.4% and 10.16%, respectively, in the medial, central and lateral parts of laminae I-II at L7 and no reduction of GABA immunoreactive neurons was observed. Additionally, capsaicin-induced reduction of substance P immunoreactivity was partially blocked by spantide. These results suggest that capsaicin produces substance P release from primary nociceptive afferent terminals, and that substance P, in turn, activates the second-order GABAergic interneurons in the dorsal horn. The functional significance of capsaicin-induced activation of GABAergic neurons in modulation of spinal nociception is discussed. PMID:8834409

  1. GABA(B) receptors and synaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2006-11-01

    GABA(B) receptors modulate transmitter release and postsynaptic membrane potential at various types of central synapses. They function as heterodimers of two related seven-transmembrane domain receptor subunits. Trafficking, activation and signalling of GABA(B) receptors are regulated both by allosteric interactions between the subunits and by the binding of additional proteins. Recent studies have shed light on the roles of GABA(B) receptors in plasticity processes at excitatory synapses. This review summarizes our knowledge of the localization, structure and function of GABA(B) receptors in the central nervous system and their use as drug targets for neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:16932937

  2. GABA interaction with lipids in organic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Beltramo, D.; Kivatinitz, S.; Lassaga, E.; Arce, A.

    1987-08-10

    The interaction of TH-GABA and UC-glutamate with lipids in an aqueous organic partition system was studied. With this partition system TH-GABA and UC-glutamate were able to interact with sphingomyelin, sulfatide, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidic acid but not with cholesterol or ceramide. In an homogeneous aqueous medium the authors could not demonstrate any interaction between TH-GABA-lipids. The apparent dissociation constants (K/sub d/) for TH-GABA-lipids or UC-glutamate-lipids interactions inorganic medium were in the millimolar range and maximal charge between 3 and 7 moles of GABA or glutamate by mole of lipid. Amino acids such as glutamic acid, US -alanine and glycine displaced TH-GABA with the same potency as GABA itself; thus these results show that the interaction lacks pharmacological specificity. To detect this interaction lipid concentrations higher than 2 M were required and in the partition system TH-GABA and lipid phosphorus were both concentrated at the interface. Therefore, lipids tested with a biphasic partition system do not fulfill the classical criteria for a neurotransmitter receptor at least not for GABA and glutamate. 15 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  3. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway. PMID:25851259

  4. Functional Inactivation of the Genome-Wide Association Study Obesity Gene Neuronal Growth Regulator 1 in Mice Causes a Body Mass Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Angela W. S.; Berriel-Diaz, Mauricio; Loreth, Desirée; Kirsch, Matthias; Kretz, Oliver; Haas, Carola A.; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Herzig, Stephan; Brümmendorf, Thomas; Klingenspor, Martin; Rathjen, Fritz G.; Rozman, Jan; Nicholson, George; Cox, Roger D.; Schäfer, Michael K. E.

    2012-01-01

    To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified at least 32 novel loci for obesity and body mass-related traits. However, the causal genetic variant and molecular mechanisms of specific susceptibility genes in relation to obesity are yet to be fully confirmed and characterised. Here, we examined whether the candidate gene NEGR1 encoding the neuronal growth regulator 1, also termed neurotractin or Kilon, accounts for the obesity association. To characterise the function of NEGR1 for body weight control in vivo, we generated two novel mutant mouse lines, including a constitutive NEGR1-deficient mouse line as well as an ENU-mutagenised line carrying a loss-of-function mutation (Negr1-I87N) and performed metabolic phenotypic analyses. Ablation of NEGR1 results in a small but steady reduction of body mass in both mutant lines, accompanied with a small reduction in body length in the Negr1-I87N mutants. Magnetic resonance scanning reveals that the reduction of body mass in Negr1-I87N mice is due to a reduced proportion of lean mass. Negr1-I87N mutants display reduced food intake and physical activity while normalised energy expenditure remains unchanged. Expression analyses confirmed the brain-specific distribution of NEGR1 including strong expression in the hypothalamus. In vitro assays show that NEGR1 promotes cell-cell adhesion and neurite growth of hypothalamic neurons. Our results indicate a role of NEGR1 in the control of body weight and food intake. This study provides evidence that supports the link of the GWAS candidate gene NEGR1 with body weight control. PMID:22844493

  5. Functional and phenotypic differences of pure populations of stem cell-derived astrocytes and neuronal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kleiderman, Susanne; Sá, João V; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Gutbier, Simon; Evje, Lars G; Hadera, Mussie G; Glaab, Enrico; Henry, Margit; Sachinidis, Agapios; Alves, Paula M; Sonnewald, Ursula; Leist, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Availability of homogeneous astrocyte populations would facilitate research concerning cell plasticity (metabolic and transcriptional adaptations; innate immune responses) and cell cycle reactivation. Current protocols to prepare astrocyte cultures differ in their final content of immature precursor cells, preactivated cells or entirely different cell types. A new method taking care of all these issues would improve research on astrocyte functions. We found here that the exposure of a defined population of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSC) to BMP4 results in pure, nonproliferating astrocyte cultures within 24-48 h. These murine astrocytes generated from embryonic stem cells (mAGES) expressed the positive markers GFAP, aquaporin 4 and GLT-1, supported neuronal function, and acquired innate immune functions such as the response to tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1. The protocol was applicable to several normal or disease-prone pluripotent cell lines, and the corresponding mAGES all exited the cell cycle and lost most of their nestin expression, in contrast to astrocytes generated by serum-addition or obtained as primary cultures. Comparative gene expression analysis of mAGES and NSC allowed quantification of differences between the two cell types and a definition of an improved marker set to define astrocytes. Inclusion of several published data sets in this transcriptome comparison revealed the similarity of mAGES with cortical astrocytes in vivo. Metabolic analysis of homogeneous NSC and astrocyte populations revealed distinct neurochemical features: both cell types synthesized glutamine and citrate, but only mature astrocytes released these metabolites. Thus, the homogeneous cultures allowed an improved definition of NSC and astrocyte features. PMID:26689134

  6. Morphological Differentiation Towards Neuronal Phenotype of SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells by Estradiol, Retinoic Acid and Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Teppola, Heidi; Sarkanen, Jertta-Riina; Jalonen, Tuula O; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2016-04-01

    Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells maintain their potential for differentiation and regression in culture conditions. The induction of differentiation could serve as a strategy to inhibit cell proliferation and tumor growth. Previous studies have shown that differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells can be induced by all-trans-retinoic-acid (RA) and cholesterol (CHOL). However, signaling pathways that lead to terminal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells are still largely unknown. The goal of this study was to examine in the RA and CHOL treated SH-SY5Y cells the additive impacts of estradiol (E2) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cell morphology, cell population growth, synaptic vesicle recycling and presence of neurofilaments. The above features indicate a higher level of neuronal differentiation. Our data show that treatment for 10 days in vitro (DIV) with RA alone or when combined with E2 (RE) or CHOL (RC), but not when combined with BDNF (RB), significantly (p < 0.01) inhibited the cell population growth. Synaptic vesicle recycling, induced by high-K(+) depolarization, was significantly increased in all treatments where RA was included (RE, RC, RB, RCB), and when all agents were added together (RCBE). Specifically, our results show for the first time that E2 treatment can alone increase synaptic vesicle recycling in SH-SY5Y cells. This work contributes to the understanding of the ways to improve suppression of neuroblastoma cells' population growth by inducing maturation and differentiation. PMID:26518675

  7. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type CLN2: A new rationale for the construction of phenotypic subgroups based on a survey of 25 cases in South America

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Romina; Noelia Carabelos, María; Xin, Winnie; Sims, Katherine; Guelbert, Norberto; Adriana Cismondi, Inés; Pons, Patricia; Alonso, Graciela Irene; Troncoso, Mónica; Witting, Scarlet; Pearce, David A.; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Oller-Ramírez, Ana María; de Halac, Inés Noher

    2013-01-01

    Tripeptidyl-peptidase 1 (TPP1) null or residual activity occurs in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) with underlying TPP1/CLN2 mutations. A survey of 25 South American CLN2 affected individuals enabled the differentiation of two phenotypes: classical late-infantile and variant juvenile, each in approximately 50% of patients, with residual TPP1 activity occurring in approximately 32%. Each individual was assigned to one of three subgroups: (I) n=11, null TPP1 activity in leukocytes; (II) n=8, residual TPP1 activity of 0.60–15.85 nmol/h/mg (nr 110–476); (III) n=6, activity not measured in leukocytes. Curvilinear bodies (CB) appeared in almost all studied CLN2 subjects; the only exceptions occurred in cases of subgroup II: two individuals had combined CBs/fingerprints (FPs), and one case had pure FPs. There were 15 mutations (4 first published in this paper, 3 previously observed in South America by our group, and 8 previously observed by others). In subgroup I, mutations were either missense or nonsense; in subgroups II and III, mutations prevailed at the non-conserved intronic site, c.887-10A>G (intron 7), and to a lesser extent at c.89+5G>C (intron 2), in heterozygous combinations. Grouping phenotypically and genetically known individuals on the basis of TPP1 activity supported the concept that residual enzyme activity underlies a protracted disease course. The prevalence of intronic mutations at nonconserved sites in subgroup II individuals indicates that some alternative splicing might allow some residual TPP1 activity. PMID:23266810

  8. Fine Tuning of Synaptic Plasticity and Filtering by GABA Released from Hippocampal Autaptic Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Orlando, Marta; Raimondi, Andrea; Benfenati, Fabio; Baldelli, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    The functional consequence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release at mossy fiber terminals is still a debated topic. Here, we provide multiple evidence of GABA release in cultured autaptic hippocampal granule cells. In ∼50% of the excitatory autaptic neurons, GABA, VGAT, or GAD67 colocalized with vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive puncta, where both GABAB and GABAA receptors (Rs) were present. Patch-clamp recordings showed a clear enhancement of autaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents in response to the application of the GABABR antagonist CGP58845 only in neurons positive to the selective granule cell marker Prox1, and expressing low levels of GAD67. Indeed, GCP non-responsive excitatory autaptic neurons were both Prox1- and GAD67-negative. Although the amount of released GABA was not sufficient to activate functional postsynaptic GABAARs, it effectively activated presynaptic GABABRs that maintain a tonic "brake" on the probability of release and on the size of the readily releasable pool and contributed to resting potential hyperpolarization possibly through extrasynaptic GABAAR activation. The autocrine inhibition exerted by GABABRs on glutamate release enhanced both paired-pulse facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation. Such GABABR-mediated changes in short-term plasticity confer to immature granule cells the capability to modulate their filtering properties in an activity-dependent fashion, with remarkable consequences on the dynamic behavior of neural circuits. PMID:25576534

  9. Glia as drivers of abnormal neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Robel, Stefanie; Sontheimer, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Reactive astrocytes have been proposed to become incompetent bystanders in epilepsy as a result of cellular changes rendering them unable to perform important housekeeping functions. Indeed, successful surgical treatment of mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy hinges on the removal of the glial scar. New research now extends the role of astrocytes, suggesting that they may drive the disease process by impairing the inhibitory action of neuronal GABA receptors. Here we discuss studies that include hyperexcitability resulting from impaired supply of astrocytic glutamine for neuronal GABA synthesis, and epilepsy resulting from genetically induced astrogliosis or malignant transformation, both of which render the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA excitatory. In these examples, glial cells alter the expression or function of neuronal proteins involved in excitability. Although epilepsy has traditionally been thought of as a disease caused by changes in neuronal properties exclusively, these new findings challenge us to consider the contribution of glial cells as drivers of epileptogenesis in acquired epilepsies. PMID:26713746

  10. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  11. Altered GABA Signaling in Early Life Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Stephen W.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of seizures is particularly high in the early ages of life. The immaturity of inhibitory systems, such as GABA, during normal brain development and its further dysregulation under pathological conditions that predispose to seizures have been speculated to play a major role in facilitating seizures. Seizures can further impair or disrupt GABAA signaling by reshuffling the subunit composition of its receptors or causing aberrant reappearance of depolarizing or hyperpolarizing GABAA receptor currents. Such effects may not result in epileptogenesis as frequently as they do in adults. Given the central role of GABAA signaling in brain function and development, perturbation of its physiological role may interfere with neuronal morphology, differentiation, and connectivity, manifesting as cognitive or neurodevelopmental deficits. The current GABAergic antiepileptic drugs, while often effective for adults, are not always capable of stopping seizures and preventing their sequelae in neonates. Recent studies have explored the therapeutic potential of chloride cotransporter inhibitors, such as bumetanide, as adjunctive therapies of neonatal seizures. However, more needs to be known so as to develop therapies capable of stopping seizures while preserving the age- and sex-appropriate development of the brain. PMID:21826277

  12. Role of transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) in non-transferrin-bound iron uptake in neuronal phenotype PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mwanjewe, James; Grover, Ashok K

    2004-01-01

    Cells take up transferrin-bound iron or NTBI (non-transferrin-bound iron). After treatment with NGF (nerve growth factor), PC12 cells exhibited a neuronal phenotype and an increase in the NTBI uptake (55Fe2+ or 55Fe3+). We loaded the cells with the dye calcein, whose fluorescence increases in the presence of Ca2+ but is quenched with Fe2+ or Fe3+. When examined using calcein fluorescence or radioactive iron, DAG (diacylglycerol)-stimulated NTBI entry was more in NGF-treated PC12 cells compared with untreated cells. All experiments were performed at 1.5 mM extracellular Ca2+. Nramp2 (natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 2) mRNA expression did not change after the NGF treatment. Expression of the bivalent cation entry protein TRPC6 (transient receptor potential canonical 6) was detected only in the NGF-treated cells. To verify that increased NTBI uptake depended on TRPC6, we examined whether transfecting HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells with TRPC6 also increased the NTBI (55Fe) uptake. We also cotransfected HEK-293 cells with two plasmids, one expressing TRPC6 and the other expressing the fluorescent protein DsRED2 to identify the transfected cells. Challenging the calcein-loaded HEK-293 cells (which intrinsically express the a1-adrenergic receptors) with phenylephrine or a cell-permeant DAG increased the fluorescence signal more rapidly in transfected cells compared with untransfected cells. However, when iron (Fe2+ and Fe3+) was added before adding phenylephrine or DAG, the fluorescence intensity decreased more rapidly in transfected cells compared with untransfected cells, thereby indicating a greater stimulation of the NTBI uptake in cells expressing TRPC6. We postulate that the increase in the NTBI entry into neuronal PC12 cells is through TRPC6, a pathway that is unique since it is receptor-stimulated. Since neuronal cells express TRPC6, this pathway may have a role in neurotoxicity. PMID:14640978

  13. NRSF causes cAMP-sensitive suppression of sodium current in cultured hippocampal neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeau, H.; Lester, H. A.

    2002-01-01

    The neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST) has been shown to bind to the promoters of many neuron-specific genes and is able to suppress transcription of Na(+) channels in PC12 cells, although its functional effect in terminally differentiated neurons is unknown. We constructed lentiviral vectors to express NRSF as a bicistronic message with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and followed infected hippocampal neurons in culture over a period of 1-2 wk. NRSF-expressing neurons showed a time-dependent suppression of Na(+) channel function as measured by whole cell electrophysiology. Suppression was reversed or prevented by the addition of membrane-permeable cAMP analogues and enhanced by cAMP antagonists but not affected by increasing protein expression with a viral enhancer. Secondary effects, including altered sensitivity to glutamate and GABA and reduced outward K(+) currents, were duplicated by culturing GFP-infected control neurons in TTX. The striking similarity of the phenotypes makes NRSF potentially useful as a genetic "silencer" and also suggests avenues of further exploration that may elucidate the transcription factor's in vivo role in neuronal plasticity.

  14. Signaling between periglomerular cells reveals a bimodal role for GABA in modulating glomerular microcircuitry in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Pirooz Victor; D’Souza, Rinaldo David; Vijayaraghavan, Sukumar

    2015-01-01

    In the mouse olfactory bulb glomerulus, the GABAergic periglomerular (PG) cells provide a major inhibitory drive within the microcircuit. Here we examine GABAergic synapses between these interneurons. At these synapses, GABA is depolarizing and exerts a bimodal control on excitability. In quiescent cells, activation of GABAA receptors can induce the cells to fire, thereby providing a means for amplification of GABA release in the glomerular microcircuit via GABA-induced GABA release. In contrast, GABA is inhibitory in neurons that are induced to fire tonically. PG–PG interactions are modulated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and our data suggest that changes in intracellular calcium concentrations triggered by nAChR activation can be amplified by GABA release. Our results suggest that bidirectional control of inhibition in PG neurons can allow for modulatory inputs, like the cholinergic inputs from the basal forebrain, to determine threshold set points for filtering out weak olfactory inputs in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb via the activation of nAChRs. PMID:26170298

  15. GABA Regulates the Multidirectional Tangential Migration of GABAergic Interneurons in Living Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Miho; Uchida, Taku; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Wake, Hiroaki; Nemoto, Tomomi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Fukuda, Atsuo; Nabekura, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons originate from ganglionic eminences and tangentially migrate into the cortical plate at early developmental stages. To elucidate the characteristics of this migration of GABAergic interneurons in living animals, we established an experimental design specialized for in vivo time-lapse imaging of the neocortex of neonate mice with two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. In vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mice from birth (P0) through P3, we observed multidirectional tangential migration of genetically-defined GABAergic interneurons in the neocortical marginal zone. The properties of this migration, such as the motility rate (distance/hr), the direction moved, and the proportion of migrating neurons to stationary neurons, did not change through P0 to P3, although the density of GABAergic neurons at the marginal zone decreased with age. Thus, the characteristics of the tangential motility of individual GABAergic neurons remained constant in development. Pharmacological block of GABAA receptors and of the Na+-K+-Cl− cotransporters, and chelating intracellular Ca2+, all significantly reduced the motility rate in vivo. The motility rate and GABA content within the cortex of neonatal VGAT-Venus transgenic mice were significantly greater than those of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, suggesting that extracellular GABA concentration could facilitate the multidirectional tangential migration. Indeed, diazepam applied to GAD67-GFP mice increased the motility rate substantially. In an in vitro neocortical slice preparation, we confirmed that GABA induced a NKCC sensitive depolarization of GABAergic interneurons in VGAT-Venus mice at P0-P3. Thus, activation of GABAAR by ambient GABA depolarizes GABAergic interneurons, leading to an acceleration of their multidirectional motility in vivo. PMID:22180776

  16. Modeling Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome with induced pluripotent stem cells reveals a causal role for Wnt/β-catenin defects in neuronal cholesterol synthesis phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Francis, Kevin R; Ton, Amy N; Xin, Yao; O'Halloran, Peter E; Wassif, Christopher A; Malik, Nasir; Williams, Ian M; Cluzeau, Celine V; Trivedi, Niraj S; Pavan, William J; Cho, Wonhwa; Westphal, Heiner; Porter, Forbes D

    2016-04-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a malformation disorder caused by mutations in DHCR7, which impair the reduction of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) to cholesterol. SLOS results in cognitive impairment, behavioral abnormalities and nervous system defects, though neither affected cell types nor impaired signaling pathways are fully understood. Whether 7DHC accumulation or cholesterol loss is primarily responsible for disease pathogenesis is also unclear. Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from subjects with SLOS, we identified cellular defects that lead to precocious neuronal specification within SLOS derived neural progenitors. We also demonstrated that 7DHC accumulation, not cholesterol deficiency, is critical for SLOS-associated defects. We further identified downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling as a key initiator of aberrant SLOS iPSC differentiation through the direct inhibitory effects of 7DHC on the formation of an active Wnt receptor complex. Activation of canonical Wnt signaling prevented the neural phenotypes observed in SLOS iPSCs, suggesting that Wnt signaling may be a promising therapeutic target for SLOS. PMID:26998835

  17. Closing the loop on the GABA shunt in plants: are GABA metabolism and signaling entwined?

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Simon; Fromm, Hillel

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that is found in uni- and multi-cellular organisms and is involved in many aspects of plant life cycle. GABA metabolism occurs by the action of evolutionary conserved enzymes that constitute the GABA shunt, bypassing two steps of the TCA cycle. The central position of GABA in the interface between plant carbon and nitrogen metabolism is well established. In parallel, there is evidence to support a role for GABA as a signaling molecule in plants. Here we cover some of the recent findings on GABA metabolism and signaling in plants and further suggest that the metabolic and signaling aspects of GABA may actually be inseparable. PMID:26106401

  18. Coexistence of choline acetyltransferase and GABA in axon terminals in the dorsal cap of the rat inferior olive.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Hawkins, R K; De Zeeuw, C I

    1996-06-10

    The dorsal cap of Kooy of the inferior olive (DC) is involved in compensatory eye movements. The rat DC receives a prominent input from the nucleus prepositus hypoglossi (NPH); part of these axon terminals are immunoreactive for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and part of them are GABAergic. In the present study we investigated the fine distribution of cholinergic terminals in the rat DC, and the possible coexistence of ChAT and GABA. ChAT-positive terminals were observed throughout the entire neuropil of the rat DC contacting both extraglomerular and intraglomerular dendrites. Twenty nine percent of these terminals also contained GABA. The ChAT/GABA double-labelled terminals showed the same morphological characteristics as terminals traced from the NPH. The present data demonstrate colocalization of ChAT and GABA in axon terminals of the rat DC and strongly suggest that neurons in the NPH are the source of these profiles. PMID:8816268

  19. GABA induces functionally active low-affinity GABA receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meier, E; Drejer, J; Schousboe, A

    1984-12-01

    The effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its agonists muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5-4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the development of GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was studied by cultivation of the cells in media containing these substances. It was found that the presence of 50 microM GABA in the culture media led to the induction of low-affinity GABA receptors (KD 546 +/- 117 nM) in addition to the high-affinity receptors (KD 7 +/- 0.5 nM) which were present regardless of the presence of GABA in the culture media. The functional activity of the GABA receptors was tested by investigating the ability of GABA to modulate evoked glutamate release from the cells. It was found that GABA could inhibit evoked glutamate release (ED50 10 +/- 3 microM) only when the cells had been cultured in the presence of 50 microM GABA, 50 microM muscimol, or 150 microM THIP, i.e., under conditions where low-affinity GABA receptors were present on the cells. This inhibitory effect of GABA could be blocked by 120 microM bicuculline and mimicked by 50 microM muscimol or 150 microM THIP whereas 150 microM (-)-baclofen had no effect. It is concluded that GABA acting extracellularly induces formation of low-affinity receptors on cerebellar granule cells and that these receptors are necessary for mediating an inhibitory effect of GABA on evoked glutamate release. The pharmacological properties of these GABA receptors indicate that they belong to the so-called GABAA receptors. PMID:6149269

  20. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Makoto; Ling, Yun; Yang, Xinling; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR) RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and a lower affinity non-competitive action. The A282S;T286V double mutation of RDL, which impairs the actions of fipronil, hardly affected the blocking action of chrodrimanin B, indicating a binding site of chrodrimanin B distinct from that of fipronil. Chrodrimanin B showed approximately 1,000-fold lower blocking action on human α1β2γ2 GABAR compared to RDL and thus is a selective blocker of insect GABARs. PMID:25902139

  1. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Furutani, Shogo; Ihara, Makoto; Ling, Yun; Yang, Xinling; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR) RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to 10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and a lower affinity non-competitive action. The A282S;T286V double mutation of RDL, which impairs the actions of fipronil, hardly affected the blocking action of chrodrimanin B, indicating a binding site of chrodrimanin B distinct from that of fipronil. Chrodrimanin B showed approximately 1,000-fold lower blocking action on human α1β2γ2 GABAR compared to RDL and thus is a selective blocker of insect GABARs. PMID:25902139

  2. Cortical GABA Levels in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Peter T.; Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Mason, Graeme F.; Forselius, Erica; Fasula, Madonna; Valentine, Gerald W.; Sanacora, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: GABA is increasingly recognized as an important neurotransmitter for the initiation and maintenance of sleep. We sought to measure cortical GABA content through proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in persons with and without primary insomnia, and relate brain GABA levels to polysomnographic sleep measures. Design: Two-group comparison study. Setting: Outpatient study at a university research clinic. Participants: Non-medicated persons with primary insomnia (N = 16) and no sleep complaints (N = 17). Interventions: Participants kept sleep diaries and a regular time-in-bed schedule for 9 days, culminating in 2 consecutive nights of ambulatory polysomnography and a single proton MRS session. The main outcome measure was occipital GABA/creatine ratios; secondary measures included sleep measurements and relationship between polysomnographically measured time awake after sleep onset and occipital GABA content. Measurements and Results: The primary insomnia group was distinguished from persons with no sleep complaints on self-reported and polysomnographically measured sleep. The two groups did not differ in age, sex, body mass index, habitual bed- and wake-times, napping, use of caffeine, or use of cigarettes. Mean occipital GABA level was 12% higher in persons with insomnia than in persons without sleep complaints (P < 0.05). In both groups, GABA levels correlated negatively with polysomnographically measured time awake after sleep onset (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Increased GABA levels in persons with insomnia may reflect an allostatic response to chronic hyperarousal. The preserved, negative relationship between GABA and time awake after sleep onset supports this notion, indicating that the possible allostatic response is adaptive. Citation: Morgan PT; Pace-Schott EF; Mason GF; Forselius E; Fasula M; Valentine GW; Sanacora G. Cortical GABA levels in primary insomnia. SLEEP 2012;35(6):807-814. PMID:22654200

  3. Tonic inhibition in spinal ventral horn interneurons mediated by α5 subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Castro, Alberto; Aguilar, Justo; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Loeza-Alcocer, Emanuel; Canto-Bustos, Martha; Felix, Ricardo; Delgado-Lezama, Rodolfo

    2011-08-19

    GABA(A) receptors mediate synaptic and tonic inhibition in many neurons of the central nervous system. These receptors can be constructed from a range of different subunits deriving from seven identified families. Among these subunits, α(5) has been shown to mediate GABAergic tonic inhibitory currents in neurons from supraspinal nuclei. Likewise, immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization studies have shown the presence of the α(5) subunit in spinal cord neurons, though almost nothing is known about its function. In the present report, using slices of the adult turtle spinal cord as a model system we have recorded a tonic inhibitory current in ventral horn interneurons (VHIs) and determined the functional contribution of the α(5) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors to this current. Patch clamp studies show that the GABAergic tonic inhibitory current in VHIs is not affected by the application of antagonists of the α(4/6) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors, but is sensitive to L-655708, an antagonist of the GABA(A) receptors containing α(5) subunits. Last, by using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we confirmed the expression of the α(5) subunit in the turtle spinal cord. Together, these results suggest that GABA(A) receptors containing the α(5) subunit mediate the tonic inhibitory currents observed in VHIs. PMID:21798246

  4. The physiological roles of vesicular GABA transporter during embryonic development: a study using knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) loads GABA and glycine from the neuronal cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles. To address functional importance of VGAT during embryonic development, we generated global VGAT knockout mice and analyzed them. Results VGAT knockouts at embryonic day (E) 18.5 exhibited substantial increases in overall GABA and glycine, but not glutamate, contents in the forebrain. Electrophysiological recordings from E17.5-18.5 spinal cord motoneurons demonstrated that VGAT knockouts presented no spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by GABA and glycine. Histological examination of E18.5 knockout fetuses revealed reductions in the trapezius muscle, hepatic congestion and little alveolar spaces in the lung, indicating that the development of skeletal muscle, liver and lung in these mice was severely affected. Conclusion VGAT is fundamental for the GABA- and/or glycine-mediated transmission that supports embryonic development. VGAT knockout mice will be useful for further investigating the roles of VGAT in normal physiology and pathophysiologic processes. PMID:21190592

  5. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    -term inflammatory process mediates neuronal damage and intramuscular and intramural denervation, leading to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle cells associated with fibrosis. These long-term structural changes may represent the basic mechanism for the formation of the Chagasic megacolon. PMID:27045678

  6. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Campos, Camila França; Cangussú, Silvia Dantas; Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    -term inflammatory process mediates neuronal damage and intramuscular and intramural denervation, leading to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle cells associated with fibrosis. These long-term structural changes may represent the basic mechanism for the formation of the Chagasic megacolon. PMID:27045678

  7. Area-specific analysis of the distribution of hypothalamic neurons projecting to the rat ventral tegmental area, with special reference to the GABAergic and glutamatergic efferents

    PubMed Central

    Kalló, Imre; Molnár, Csilla S.; Szöke, Sarolta; Fekete, Csaba; Hrabovszky, Erik; Liposits, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a main regulator of reward and integrates a wide scale of hormonal and neuronal information. Feeding-, energy expenditure-, stress, adaptation- and reproduction-related hypothalamic signals are processed in the VTA and influence the reward processes. However, the neuroanatomical origin and chemical phenotype of neurons mediating these signals to the VTA have not been fully characterized. In this study we have systematically mapped hypothalamic neurons that project to the VTA using the retrograde tracer Choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) and analyzed their putative gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and/or glutamate character with in situ hybridization in male rats. 23.93 ± 3.91% of hypothalamic neurons projecting to the VTA was found in preoptic and 76.27 ± 4.88% in anterior, tuberal and mammillary hypothalamic regions. Nearly half of the retrogradely-labeled neurons in the preoptic, and more than one third in the anterior, tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus appeared in medially located regions. The analyses of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) and glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) mRNA expression revealed both amino acid markers in different subsets of retrogradely-labeled hypothalamic neurons, typically with the predominance of the glutamatergic marker VGLUT2. About one tenth of CTB-IR neurons were GAD65-positive even in hypothalamic nuclei expressing primarily VGLUT2. Some regions were populated mostly by GAD65 mRNA-containing retrogradely-labeled neurons. These included the perifornical part of the lateral hypothalamus where 58.63 ± 19.04% of CTB-IR neurons were GABAergic. These results indicate that both the medial and lateral nuclear compartments of the hypothalamus provide substantial input to the VTA. Furthermore, colocalization studies revealed that these projections not only use glutamate but also GABA for neurotransmission. These GABAergic afferents may underlie important inhibitory mechanism to fine-tune the

  8. Area-specific analysis of the distribution of hypothalamic neurons projecting to the rat ventral tegmental area, with special reference to the GABAergic and glutamatergic efferents.

    PubMed

    Kalló, Imre; Molnár, Csilla S; Szöke, Sarolta; Fekete, Csaba; Hrabovszky, Erik; Liposits, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a main regulator of reward and integrates a wide scale of hormonal and neuronal information. Feeding-, energy expenditure-, stress, adaptation- and reproduction-related hypothalamic signals are processed in the VTA and influence the reward processes. However, the neuroanatomical origin and chemical phenotype of neurons mediating these signals to the VTA have not been fully characterized. In this study we have systematically mapped hypothalamic neurons that project to the VTA using the retrograde tracer Choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) and analyzed their putative gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and/or glutamate character with in situ hybridization in male rats. 23.93 ± 3.91% of hypothalamic neurons projecting to the VTA was found in preoptic and 76.27 ± 4.88% in anterior, tuberal and mammillary hypothalamic regions. Nearly half of the retrogradely-labeled neurons in the preoptic, and more than one third in the anterior, tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus appeared in medially located regions. The analyses of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) and glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) mRNA expression revealed both amino acid markers in different subsets of retrogradely-labeled hypothalamic neurons, typically with the predominance of the glutamatergic marker VGLUT2. About one tenth of CTB-IR neurons were GAD65-positive even in hypothalamic nuclei expressing primarily VGLUT2. Some regions were populated mostly by GAD65 mRNA-containing retrogradely-labeled neurons. These included the perifornical part of the lateral hypothalamus where 58.63 ± 19.04% of CTB-IR neurons were GABAergic. These results indicate that both the medial and lateral nuclear compartments of the hypothalamus provide substantial input to the VTA. Furthermore, colocalization studies revealed that these projections not only use glutamate but also GABA for neurotransmission. These GABAergic afferents may underlie important inhibitory mechanism to fine-tune the

  9. Exercise leads to the re-emergence of the cholinergic/nestin neuronal phenotype within the medial septum/diagonal band and subsequent rescue of both hippocampal ACh efflux and spatial behavior.

    PubMed

    Hall, Joseph M; Savage, Lisa M

    2016-04-01

    Exercise has been shown to improve cognitive functioning in a range of species, presumably through an increase in neurotrophins throughout the brain, but in particular the hippocampus. The current study assessed the ability of exercise to restore septohippocampal cholinergic functioning in the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) rat model of the amnestic disorder Korsakoff Syndrome. After voluntary wheel running or sedentary control conditions (stationary wheel attached to the home cage), PTD and control rats were behaviorally tested with concurrent in vivo microdialysis, at one of two time points: 24-h or 2-weeks post-exercise. It was found that only after the 2-week adaption period did exercise lead to an interrelated sequence of events in PTD rats that included: (1) restored spatial working memory; (2) rescued behaviorally-stimulated hippocampal acetylcholine efflux; and (3) within the medial septum/diagonal band, the re-emergence of the cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase [ChAT+]) phenotype, with the greatest change occurring in the ChAT+/nestin+ neurons. Furthermore, in control rats, exercise followed by a 2-week adaption period improved hippocampal acetylcholine efflux and increased the number of neurons co-expressing the ChAT and nestin phenotype. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism by which exercise can modulate the mature cholinergic/nestin neuronal phenotype leading to improved neurotransmitter function as well as enhanced learning and memory. PMID:26836322

  10. New inducible genetic method reveals critical roles of GABA in the control of feeding and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fantao; Han, Yong; Srisai, Dollada; Belakhov, Valery; Farias, Monica; Xu, Yong; Palmiter, Richard D; Baasov, Timor; Wu, Qi

    2016-03-29

    Currently available inducible Cre/loxP systems, despite their considerable utility in gene manipulation, have pitfalls in certain scenarios, such as unsatisfactory recombination rates and deleterious effects on physiology and behavior. To overcome these limitations, we designed a new, inducible gene-targeting system by introducing an in-frame nonsense mutation into the coding sequence of Cre recombinase (nsCre). Mutant mRNAs transcribed from nsCre transgene can be efficiently translated into full-length, functional Cre recombinase in the presence of nonsense suppressors such as aminoglycosides. In a proof-of-concept model, GABA signaling from hypothalamic neurons expressing agouti-related peptide (AgRP) was genetically inactivated within 4 d after treatment with a synthetic aminoglycoside. Disruption of GABA synthesis in AgRP neurons in young adult mice led to a dramatic loss of body weight due to reduced food intake and elevated energy expenditure; they also manifested glucose intolerance. In contrast, older mice with genetic inactivation of GABA signaling by AgRP neurons had only transient reduction of feeding and body weight; their energy expenditure and glucose tolerance were unaffected. These results indicate that GABAergic signaling from AgRP neurons plays a key role in the control of feeding and metabolism through an age-dependent mechanism. This new genetic technique will augment current tools used to elucidate mechanisms underlying many physiological and neurological processes. PMID:26976589

  11. Hypocretin/orexin antagonism enhances sleep-related adenosine and GABA neurotransmission in rat basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-DeRose, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Gulati, Srishti; Mathew, Thomas K; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    Hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons provide excitatory input to wake-promoting brain regions including the basal forebrain (BF). The dual HCRT receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases waking and increases sleep. We hypothesized that HCRT antagonists induce sleep, in part, through disfacilitation of BF neurons; consequently, ALM should have reduced efficacy in BF-lesioned (BFx) animals. To test this hypothesis, rats were given bilateral IgG-192-saporin injections, which predominantly targets cholinergic BF neurons. BFx and intact rats were then given oral ALM, the benzodiazepine agonist zolpidem (ZOL) or vehicle (VEH) at lights-out. ALM was less effective than ZOL at inducing sleep in BFx rats compared to controls. BF adenosine (ADO), γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA), and glutamate levels were then determined via microdialysis from intact, freely behaving rats following oral ALM, ZOL or VEH. ALM increased BF ADO and GABA levels during waking and mixed vigilance states, and preserved sleep-associated increases in GABA under low and high sleep pressure conditions. ALM infusion into the BF also enhanced cortical ADO release, demonstrating that HCRT input is critical for ADO signaling in the BF. In contrast, oral ZOL and BF-infused ZOL had no effect on ADO levels in either BF or cortex. ALM increased BF ADO (an endogenous sleep-promoting substance) and GABA (which is increased during normal sleep), and required an intact BF for maximal efficacy, whereas ZOL blocked sleep-associated BF GABA release, and required no functional contribution from the BF to induce sleep. ALM thus induces sleep by facilitating the neural mechanisms underlying the normal transition to sleep. PMID:25431268

  12. Shifted pallidal co-release of GABA and glutamate in habenula drives cocaine withdrawal and relapse.

    PubMed

    Meye, Frank J; Soiza-Reilly, Mariano; Smit, Tamar; Diana, Marco A; Schwarz, Martin K; Mameli, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Cocaine withdrawal produces aversive states and vulnerability to relapse, hallmarks of addiction. The lateral habenula (LHb) encodes negative stimuli and contributes to aversive withdrawal symptoms. However, it remains unclear which inputs to LHb promote this and what the consequences are for relapse susceptibility. We report, using rabies-based retrolabeling and optogenetic mapping, that the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN, the mouse equivalent of the globus pallidus interna) projects to an LHb neuronal subset innervating aversion-encoding midbrain GABA neurons. EPN-to-LHb excitatory signaling is limited by GABAergic cotransmission. This inhibitory component decreases during cocaine withdrawal as a result of reduced presynaptic vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT). This shifts the EPN-to-LHb GABA/glutamate balance, disinhibiting EPN-driven LHb activity. Selective virally mediated VGAT overexpression at EPN-to-LHb terminals during withdrawal normalizes GABAergic neurotransmission. This intervention rescues cocaine-evoked aversive states and prevents stress-induced reinstatement, used to model relapse. This identifies diminished inhibitory transmission at EPN-to-LHb GABA/glutamate synapses as a mechanism contributing to the relapsing feature of addictive behavior. PMID:27348214

  13. The appearance and development of neurotransmitter sensitivity in Xenopus embryonic spinal neurones in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bixby, J L; Spitzer, N C

    1984-01-01

    We have determined the time of onset and examined some of the properties of neurotransmitter sensitivity in Xenopus spinal neurones developing in dissociated cell culture. These cells are initially insensitive, but acquire responses to several agonists over a period of 6 h. Nearly one-third of the neurones were depolarized by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or by both GABA and glycine; these cells were not affected by glutamate. The reversal potential of the ionophoretic GABA response is -35 mV. These neurones are likely to be Rohon-Beard neurones. Roughly two-thirds of the neurones were depolarized by glutamate and hyperpolarized by GABA and by glycine. The reversal potential of the ionophoretic GABA response is -58 mV. These neurones are likely to include motoneurones. A quantitative measure of the sensitivity to a given GABA dose was obtained at early and intermediate stages of development. The mean 'sensitivity index' (ionophoretic sensitivity/input resistance) for both classes of neurones in vitro was initially the same as that seen in Rohon-Beard neurones in vivo. This sensitivity index did not increase with time in culture to attain the value at intermediate stages in vivo. The development of chemosensitivity in Rohon-Beard-like neurones in these cultures resembles that of Rohon-Beard neurones in the spinal cord with respect to the time of onset of responses to GABA, the reversal potential, pharmacology and desensitization of these responses, and the spectrum of agonists to which they are sensitive. It differs in the absence of a developmental increase in sensitivity to GABA. The development of chemosensitivity in motoneurone-like neurones in these cultures parallels that of Rohon-Beard-like neurones, with respect to the time of onset and level of sensitivity, as well as susceptibility to pharmacological blockers. Several features of normal neurotransmitter sensitivity, like features of the action potential, differentiate in culture in the absence of normal

  14. Mutant Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase (Gars) Ameliorates SOD1G93A Motor Neuron Degeneration Phenotype but Has Little Affect on Loa Dynein Heavy Chain Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Hazel P.; Chia, Ruth; Achilli, Francesca; Bryson, J. Barney; Greensmith, Linda; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Background In humans, mutations in the enzyme glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) cause motor and sensory axon loss in the peripheral nervous system, and clinical phenotypes ranging from Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy to a severe infantile form of spinal muscular atrophy. GARS is ubiquitously expressed and may have functions in addition to its canonical role in protein synthesis through catalyzing the addition of glycine to cognate tRNAs. Methodology/Principal Findings We have recently described a new mouse model with a point mutation in the Gars gene resulting in a cysteine to arginine change at residue 201. Heterozygous GarsC201R/+ mice have locomotor and sensory deficits. In an investigation of genetic mutations that lead to death of motor and sensory neurons, we have crossed the GarsC201R/+ mice to two other mutants: the TgSOD1G93A model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the Legs at odd angles mouse (Dync1h1Loa) which has a defect in the heavy chain of the dynein complex. We found the Dync1h1Loa/+;GarsC201R/+ double heterozygous mice are more impaired than either parent, and this is may be an additive effect of both mutations. Surprisingly, the GarsC201R mutation significantly delayed disease onset in the SOD1G93A;GarsC201R/+ double heterozygous mutant mice and increased lifespan by 29% on the genetic background investigated. Conclusions/Significance These findings raise intriguing possibilities for the study of pathogenetic mechanisms in all three mouse mutant strains. PMID:19593442

  15. Differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells to a neuronal phenotype changes cellular bioenergetics and the response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lonnie; Giordano, Samantha; Zelickson, Blake R; S Johnson, Michelle; A Benavides, Gloria; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Fineberg, Naomi; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Zhang, Jianhua

    2011-12-01

    differentiation of neuroblastoma cells to a neuron-like phenotype. PMID:21945098

  16. Altered emotionality and neuronal excitability in mice lacking KCTD12, an auxiliary subunit of GABAB receptors associated with mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cathomas, F; Stegen, M; Sigrist, H; Schmid, L; Seifritz, E; Gassmann, M; Bettler, B; Pryce, C R

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, is fundamental to brain function and implicated in the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders. GABA activates G-protein-coupled GABAB receptors comprising principal GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits as well as auxiliary KCTD8, 12, 12b and 16 subunits. The KCTD12 gene has been associated with bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. Here we compare Kctd12 null mutant (Kctd12−/−) and heterozygous (Kctd12+/−) with wild-type (WT) littermate mice to determine whether lack of or reduced KCTD12 expression leads to phenotypes that, extrapolating to human, could constitute endophenotypes for neuropsychiatric disorders with which KCTD12 is associated. Kctd12−/− mice exhibited increased fear learning but not increased memory of a discrete auditory-conditioned stimulus. Kctd12+/− mice showed increased activity during the inactive (light) phase of the circadian cycle relative to WT and Kctd12−/− mice. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal slices, a region of high Kctd12 expression, revealed an increased intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons in Kctd12−/− and Kctd12+/− mice. This is the first direct evidence for involvement of KCTD12 in determining phenotypes of emotionality, behavioral activity and neuronal excitability. This study provides empirical support for the polymorphism and expression evidence that KCTD12 confers risk for and is associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25689571

  17. An evolutionarily conserved switch in response to GABA affects development and behavior of the locomotor circuit of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjie; Bellemer, Andrew; Koelle, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is depolarizing in the developing vertebrate brain, but in older animals switches to hyperpolarizing and becomes the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adults. We discovered a similar developmental switch in GABA response in Caenorhabditis elegans and have genetically analyzed its mechanism and function in a well-defined circuit. Worm GABA neurons innervate body wall muscles to control locomotion. Activation of GABAA receptors with their agonist muscimol in newly hatched first larval (L1) stage animals excites muscle contraction and thus is depolarizing. At the mid-L1 stage, as the GABAergic neurons rewire onto their mature muscle targets, muscimol shifts to relaxing muscles and thus has switched to hyperpolarizing. This muscimol response switch depends on chloride transporters in the muscles analogous to those that control GABA response in mammalian neurons: the chloride accumulator sodium-potassium-chloride-cotransporter-1 (NKCC-1) is required for the early depolarizing muscimol response, while the two chloride extruders potassium-chloride-cotransporter-2 (KCC-2) and anion-bicarbonate-transporter-1 (ABTS-1) are required for the later hyperpolarizing response. Using mutations that disrupt GABA signaling, we found that neural circuit development still proceeds to completion but with an ∼6-hr delay. Using optogenetic activation of GABAergic neurons, we found that endogenous GABAA signaling in early L1 animals, although presumably depolarizing, does not cause an excitatory response. Thus a developmental depolarizing-to-hyperpolarizing shift is an ancient conserved feature of GABA signaling, but existing theories for why this shift occurs appear inadequate to explain its function upon rigorous genetic analysis of a well-defined neural circuit. PMID:25644702

  18. An Evolutionarily Conserved Switch in Response to GABA Affects Development and Behavior of the Locomotor Circuit of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bingjie; Bellemer, Andrew; Koelle, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is depolarizing in the developing vertebrate brain, but in older animals switches to hyperpolarizing and becomes the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adults. We discovered a similar developmental switch in GABA response in Caenorhabditis elegans and have genetically analyzed its mechanism and function in a well-defined circuit. Worm GABA neurons innervate body wall muscles to control locomotion. Activation of GABAA receptors with their agonist muscimol in newly hatched first larval (L1) stage animals excites muscle contraction and thus is depolarizing. At the mid-L1 stage, as the GABAergic neurons rewire onto their mature muscle targets, muscimol shifts to relaxing muscles and thus has switched to hyperpolarizing. This muscimol response switch depends on chloride transporters in the muscles analogous to those that control GABA response in mammalian neurons: the chloride accumulator sodium-potassium-chloride-cotransporter-1 (NKCC-1) is required for the early depolarizing muscimol response, while the two chloride extruders potassium-chloride-cotransporter-2 (KCC-2) and anion-bicarbonate-transporter-1 (ABTS-1) are required for the later hyperpolarizing response. Using mutations that disrupt GABA signaling, we found that neural circuit development still proceeds to completion but with an ∼6-hr delay. Using optogenetic activation of GABAergic neurons, we found that endogenous GABAA signaling in early L1 animals, although presumably depolarizing, does not cause an excitatory response. Thus a developmental depolarizing-to-hyperpolarizing shift is an ancient conserved feature of GABA signaling, but existing theories for why this shift occurs appear inadequate to explain its function upon rigorous genetic analysis of a well-defined neural circuit. PMID:25644702

  19. Brain regional distribution of GABA(A) receptors exhibiting atypical GABA agonism: roles of receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Halonen, Lauri M; Sinkkonen, Saku T; Chandra, Dev; Homanics, Gregg E; Korpi, Esa R

    2009-11-01

    The major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), has only partial efficacy at certain subtypes of GABA(A) receptors. To characterize these minor receptor populations in rat and mouse brains, we used autoradiographic imaging of t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35)S]thionate ([(35)S]TBPS) binding to GABA(A) receptors in brain sections and compared the displacing capacities of 10mM GABA and 1mM 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), a competitive GABA-site agonist. Brains from GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha4, delta, and alpha4+delta subunit knockout (KO) mouse lines were used to understand the contribution of these particular receptor subunits to "GABA-insensitive" (GIS) [(35)S]TBPS binding. THIP displaced more [(35)S]TBPS binding than GABA in several brain regions, indicating that THIP also inhibited GIS-binding. In these regions, GABA prevented the effect of THIP on GIS-binding. GIS-binding was increased in the cerebellar granule cell layer of delta KO and alpha4+delta KO mice, being only slightly diminished in that of alpha1 KO mice. In the thalamus and some other forebrain regions of wild-type mice, a significant amount of GIS-binding was detected. This GIS-binding was higher in alpha4 KO mice. However, it was fully abolished in alpha1 KO mice, indicating that the alpha1 subunit was obligatory for the GIS-binding in the forebrain. Our results suggest that native GABA(A) receptors in brain sections showing reduced displacing capacity of [(35)S]TBPS binding by GABA (partial agonism) minimally require the assembly of alpha1 and beta subunits in the forebrain and of alpha6 and beta subunits in the cerebellar granule cell layer. These receptors may function as extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors. PMID:19397945

  20. Guinea Pig Horizontal Cells Express GABA, the GABA-Synthesizing Enzyme GAD65, and the GABA Vesicular Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenying; Hirano, Arlene A.; Stella, Salvatore L.; Bitzer, Michaela; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is likely expressed in horizontal cells of all species, although conflicting physiological findings have led to considerable controversy regarding its role as a transmitter in the outer retina. This study has evaluated key components of the GABA system in the outer retina of guinea pig, an emerging retinal model system. The presence of GABA, its rate-limiting synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67 isoforms), the plasma membrane GABA transporters (GAT-1 and GAT-3), and the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) was evaluated by using immunohistochemistry with well-characterized antibodies. The presence of GAD65 mRNA was also evaluated by using laser capture microdissection and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Specific GABA, GAD65, and VGAT immunostaining was localized to horizontal cell bodies, as well as to their processes and tips in the outer plexiform layer. Furthermore, immunostaining of retinal whole mounts and acutely dissociated retinas showed GAD65 and VGAT immunoreactivity in both A-type and B-type horizontal cells. However, these cells did not contain GAD67, GAT-1, or GAT-3 immunoreactivity. GAD65 mRNA was detected in horizontal cells, and sequencing of the amplified GAD65 fragment showed approximately 85% identity with other mammalian GAD65 mRNAs. These studies demonstrate the presence of GABA, GAD65, and VGAT in horizontal cells of the guinea pig retina, and support the idea that GABA is synthesized from GAD65, taken up into synaptic vesicles by VGAT, and likely released by a vesicular mechanism from horizontal cells. PMID:20235161

  1. Treating enhanced GABAergic inhibition in Down syndrome: use of GABA α5-selective inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cué, Carmen; Delatour, Benoît; Potier, Marie-Claude

    2014-10-01

    Excess inhibition in the brain of individuals carrying an extra copy of chromosome 21 could be responsible for cognitive deficits observed throughout their lives. A change in the excitatory/inhibitory balance in adulthood would alter synaptic plasticity, potentially triggering learning and memory deficits. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature central nervous system and binds to GABAA receptors, opens a chloride channel, and reduces neuronal excitability. In this review we discuss methods to alleviate neuronal inhibition in a mouse model of Down syndrome, the Ts65Dn mouse, using either an antagonist (pentylenetetrazol) or two different inverse agonists selective for the α5-subunit containing receptor. Both inverse agonists, which reduce inhibitory GABAergic transmission, could rescue learning and memory deficits in Ts65Dn mice. We also discuss safety issues since modulation of the excitatory-inhibitory balance to improve cognition without inducing seizures remains particularly difficult when using GABA antagonists. PMID:24412222

  2. Selective pyramidal cell reduction of GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit messenger RNA expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Glausier, Jill R; Lewis, David A

    2011-09-01

    Levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) for the α1 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor, which is present in 60% of cortical GABA(A) receptors, have been reported to be lower in layer 3 of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in subjects with schizophrenia. This subunit is expressed in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, and thus lower α1 subunit levels in each cell population would have opposite effects on net cortical excitation. We used dual-label in situ hybridization to quantify GABA(A) α1 subunit mRNA expression in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II α (CaMKIIα)-containing pyramidal cells and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa (GAD65)-containing interneurons in layer 3 of the PFC from matched schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. In subjects with schizophrenia, mean GABA(A) α1 subunit mRNA expression was significantly 40% lower in pyramidal cells, but was not altered in interneurons. Lower α1 subunit mRNA expression in pyramidal cells was not attributable to potential confounding factors, and thus appeared to reflect the disease process of schizophrenia. These results suggest that pyramidal cell inhibition is reduced in schizophrenia, whereas inhibition of GABA neurons is maintained. The cell type specificity of these findings may reflect a compensatory response to enhance layer 3 pyramidal cell activity in the face of the diminished excitatory drive associated with the lower dendritic spine density on these neurons. PMID:21677653

  3. Chronic cortisol exposure promotes the development of a GABAergic phenotype in the primate hippocampus.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Pamela J; Wilkinson, Charles W; Greenup, Lynne; Raskind, Murray A; Peskind, Elaine R; Leverenz, James B

    2004-11-01

    Glucocorticoids regulate plasticity and survival of hippocampal neurons. Aberrant exposure to this steroid hormone can result in neurodegeneration, perhaps secondary to disruption of calcium homeostasis. Calbindin, a calcium-binding protein that buffers excess calcium, may protect against neurodegeneration resulting from overabundance of intracellular calcium. In this study, we examined whether chronic treatment (1 year) with cortisol enhances hippocampal calbindin expression in primates. Calbindin is a marker for inhibitory neurons and the dentate gyrus is known to adopt an inhibitory phenotype in response to extreme conditions such as seizures. Thus, we hypothesized that chronic cortisol exposure may also promote a GABAergic phenotype. Therefore, we examined the expression of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is responsive to glucocorticoids, was also examined. Our results demonstrate significant increases in calbindin, glutamic acid decarboxylase and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in several regions of the primate hippocampus, including the dentate gyrus and CA3, in response to chronic cortisol exposure. These results suggest that chronic cortisol exposure may shift the balance towards a GABAergic phenotype, perhaps as part of a compensatory feedback mechanism to dampen the initial excitatory effects of glucocorticoids in the hippocampus. PMID:15525338

  4. GABA content within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex is related to trait anxiety.

    PubMed

    Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Padulo, Caterina; Brancucci, Alfredo; Bubbico, Giovanna; Edden, Richard A; Ferretti, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella; Manippa, Valerio; Marzoli, Daniele; Onofrj, Marco; Sepede, Gianna; Tartaro, Armando; Tommasi, Luca; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-05-01

    The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) plays a key role in emotion processing and regulation. vmPFC dysfunction may lead to disinhibition of amygdala causing high anxiety levels. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) inter-neurons within vmPFC shape the information flow to amygdala. Thus, we hypothesize that GABA content within vmPFC could be relevant to trait anxiety. Forty-three healthy volunteers aged between 20 and 88 years were assessed for trait anxiety with the Subscale-2 of the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y2) and were studied with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate GABA and Glx (glutamate+glutamine) contents within vmPFC. Total creatine (tCr) was used as internal reference. Partial correlations assessed the association between metabolite levels and STAI-Y2 scores, removing the effect of possible nuisance factors including age, educational level, volumes of gray matter and white matter within magnetic resonance spectroscopy voxel. We observed a positive relationship between GABA/tCr and STAI-Y2 scores. No significant relationships were found between Glx/tCr and STAI-Y2 and between tCr/water and STAI-Y2. No differences were found between males and females as regards to age, STAI-Y2, GABA/tCr, Glx/tCr, tCr/water, gray matter and white matter volumes. We suggest a close relationship between GABA content within vmPFC and trait anxiety providing new insights in the physiology of emotional brain. PMID:26722018

  5. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    PubMed

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood. PMID:27406773

  6. Differential properties of type I and type II benzodiazepine receptors in mammalian CNS neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Munakata, M.; Hirata, A.; Akaike, N.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) partial agonists, Y-23684 and CL218,872, were compared with its full agonist, diazepam, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current (ICl) in acutely dissociated rat cerebral cortex (CTX), cerebellar Purkinje (CPJ) and spinal ventral horn (SVH) neurones, by the whole-cell mode patch-clamp technique. 2. The GABA-induced responses were essentially the same in both SVH and CPJ neurones, but the KD value of the GABA response in CTX neurone was lower than those in the other two brain regions. 3. Enhancement of the GABA response by the two partial agonists was about one-third of that by diazepam in the SVH neurones (where type II subtype of BZR, BZ2, is predominant), whereas these partial agonists potentiated the GABA response as much as diazepam in CPJ neurones (where the type I subtype of BZR, BZ1, is predominant). In CTX neurones where both type I and II variants are expressed, the augmentation ratio of the GABA response by diazepam was between the values in CPJ and SVH neurones. 4. In concentration-response relationships of BZR partial agonists, the threshold concentrations, KD values and maximal augmentation ratio of the GABA response were similar in all CTX, CPJ and SVH neurones. Also, in all preparations, the threshold concentration and KD values of diazepam action were 10 fold less than those induced by partial agonists. 5. All BZR agonists shifted the concentration-response relationship for GABA to the left without changing the maximum current amplitude, indicating that activation of both BZ1 and BZ2 increase the affinity of the GABAA receptor for GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8395299

  7. Honeybee Kenyon cells are regulated by a tonic GABA receptor conductance.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Mary J; Harvey, Jenni

    2014-10-15

    The higher cognitive functions of insects are dependent on their mushroom bodies (MBs), which are particularly large in social insects such as honeybees. MB Kenyon cells (KCs) receive multisensory input and are involved in associative learning and memory. In addition to receiving sensory input via excitatory nicotinic synapses, KCs receive inhibitory GABAergic input from MB feedback neurons. Cultured honeybee KCs exhibit ionotropic GABA receptor currents, but the properties of GABA-mediated inhibition in intact MBs are currently unknown. Here, using whole cell recordings from KCs in acutely isolated honeybee brain, we show that KCs exhibit a tonic current that is inhibited by picrotoxin but not by bicuculline. Bath application of GABA (5 μM) and taurine (1 mM) activate a tonic current in KCs, but l-glutamate (0.1-0.5 mM) has no effect. The tonic current is strongly potentiated by the allosteric GABAA receptor modulator pentobarbital and is reduced by inhibition of Ca(2+) channels with Cd(2+) or nifedipine. Noise analysis of the GABA-evoked current gives a single-channel conductance value for the underlying receptors of 27 ± 3 pS, similar to that of resistant to dieldrin (RDL) receptors. The amount of injected current required to evoke action potential firing in KCs is significantly lower in the presence of picrotoxin. KCs recorded in an intact honeybee head preparation similarly exhibit a tonic GABA receptor conductance that reduces neuronal excitability, a property that is likely to contribute to the sparse coding of sensory information in insect MBs. PMID:25031259

  8. Molecular cloning and expression of a GABA receptor subunit from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Vázquez, Eric N; Díaz-Velásquez, Clara E; Uribe, R M; Arias, Juan M; García, Ubaldo

    2016-02-01

    Molecular cloning has introduced an unexpected, large diversity of neurotransmitter hetero- oligomeric receptors. Extensive research on the molecular structure of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABAR) has been of great significance for understanding how the nervous system works in both vertebrates and invertebrates. However, only two examples of functional homo-oligomeric GABA-activated Cl(-) channels have been reported. In the vertebrate retina, the GABAρ1 subunit of various species forms homo-oligomeric receptors; in invertebrates, a cDNA encoding a functional GABA-activated Cl(-) channel has been isolated from a Drosophila melanogaster head cDNA library. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, these subunits function efficiently as a homo-oligomeric complex. To investigate the structure-function of GABA channels from the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, we cloned a subunit and expressed it in human embryonic kidney cells. Electrophysiological recordings show that this subunit forms a homo-oligomeric ionotropic GABAR that gates a bicuculline-insensitive Cl(-) current. The order of potency of the agonists was GABA > trans-4-amino-crotonic acid = cis-4-aminocrotonic acid > muscimol. These data support the notion that X-organ sinus gland neurons express at least two GABA subunits responsible for the formation of hetero-oligomeric and homo-oligomeric receptors. In addition, by in situ hybridization studies we demonstrate that most X-organ neurons from crayfish eyestalk express the isolated pcGABAA β subunit. This study increases the knowledge of the genetics of the crayfish, furthers the understanding of this important neurotransmitter receptor family, and provides insight into the evolution of these genes among vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:26577600

  9. Control of cortical axon elongation by a GABA-driven Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Takemoto-Kimura, Sayaka; Nonaka, Mio; Adachi-Morishima, Aki; Suzuki, Kanzo; Kamijo, Satoshi; Fujii, Hajime; Mano, Tatsuo; Blaeser, Frank; Chatila, Talal A.; Mizuno, Hidenobu; Hirano, Tomoo; Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Bito, Haruhiko

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling plays important roles during both axonal and dendritic growth. Yet, whether and how Ca2+ rises may trigger and contribute to the development of long range cortical connections remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that two separate limbs of CaMK kinase (CaMKK) - CaMKI cascades, CaMKK-CaMKIα and CaMKK-CaMKIγ, critically coordinate axonal and dendritic morphogenesis of cortical neurons, respectively. The axon-specific morphological phenotype required a diffuse cytoplasmic localization and a strikingly α-isoform-specific kinase activity of CaMKI. Unexpectedly, treatment with muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist, selectively stimulated elongation of axons but not of dendrites, and the CaMKK-CaMKIα cascade critically mediated this axonogenic effect. Consistent with these findings, during early brain development, in vivo knockdown of CaMKIα significantly impaired the terminal axonal extension, and thereby perturbed the refinement of the interhemispheric callosal projections into the contralateral cortices. Our findings thus indicate a novel role for the GABA-driven CaMKK-CaMKIα cascade as a mechanism critical for accurate cortical axon pathfinding, an essential process which may contribute to fine-tuning the formation of interhemispheric connectivity during the perinatal development of the central nervous system. PMID:19864584

  10. Inhibition of thalamic excitability by 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol: a selective role for delta-GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Herd, Murray B; Foister, Nicola; Chandra, Dev; Peden, Dianne R; Homanics, Gregg E; Brown, Verity J; Balfour, David J K; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia

    2009-03-01

    The sedative and hypnotic agent 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP) is a GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) agonist that preferentially activates delta-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (delta-GABA(A)Rs). To clarify the role of delta-GABA(A)Rs in mediating the sedative actions of THIP, we utilized mice lacking the alpha(1)- or delta-subunit in a combined electrophysiological and behavioural analysis. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were obtained from ventrobasal thalamic nucleus (VB) neurones at a holding potential of -60 mV. Application of bicuculline to wild-type (WT) VB neurones revealed a GABA(A)R-mediated tonic current of 92 +/- 19 pA, which was greatly reduced (13 +/- 5 pA) for VB neurones of delta(0/0) mice. Deletion of the delta- but not the alpha(1)-subunit dramatically reduced the THIP (1 mum)-induced inward current in these neurones (WT, -309 +/- 23 pA; delta(0/0), -18 +/- 3 pA; alpha(1) (0/0), -377 +/- 45 pA). Furthermore, THIP selectively decreased the excitability of WT and alpha(1) (0/0) but not delta(0/0) VB neurones. THIP did not affect the properties of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents in any of the genotypes. No differences in rotarod performance and locomotor activity were observed across the three genotypes. In WT mice, performance of these behaviours was impaired by THIP in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of THIP on rotarod performance was blunted for delta(0/0) but not alpha(1) (0/0) mice. We previously reported that deletion of the alpha(1)-subunit abolished synaptic GABA(A) responses of VB neurones. Therefore, collectively, these findings suggest that extrasynaptic delta-GABA(A)Rs vs. synaptic alpha(1)-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs of thalamocortical neurones represent an important molecular target underpinning the sedative actions of THIP. PMID:19302153

  11. Eugenol Inhibits the GABAA Current in Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Moon, Jee Youn; Jung, Sung Jun; Kang, Jin Gu; Choi, Seung Pyo; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol has sedative, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects, but also serves as an irritant through the regulation of a different set of ion channels. Activation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on sensory neurons leads to the stabilization of neuronal excitability but contributes to formalin-induced inflammatory pain. In this study, we examined the effect of eugenol on the GABA-induced current in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor α1β2γ2 subtype using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the expression of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit mRNA and protein in the TG and hippocampus. Eugenol decreased the amplitude ratio of the GABA-induced current to 27.5 ± 3.2% (p < 0.05) in TG neurons, which recovered after a 3-min washout. In HEK 293 cells expressing the α1β2γ2 subtype, eugenol inhibited GABA-induced currents in a dose-dependent manner. Application of eugenol also decreased the GABA response in the presence of a G-protein blocker. Eugenol pretreatment with different concentrations of GABA resulted in similar inhibition of the GABA-induced current in a non-competitive manner. In conclusion, eugenol inhibits the GABA-induced current in TG neurons and HEK 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor in a reversible, dose-dependent, and non-competitive manner, but not via the G-protein pathway. We suggest that the GABAA receptor could be a molecular target for eugenol in the modulation of nociceptive information. PMID:25635877

  12. GABAergic neurons immunoreactive for calcium binding proteins are reduced in the prefrontal cortex in major depression.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; O'Dwyer, Gillian; Teleki, Zsofia; Stockmeier, Craig A; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier

    2007-02-01

    Post-mortem morphometric studies report reductions in the average density and size of cortical neurons in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (ORB) in major depressive disorder (MDD). The contribution of specific neuronal phenotypes to this general pathology in depression is still unclear. Post-mortem sections from the dlPFC and ORB regions of 14 subjects with MDD and 11 controls were immunostained to visualize calbindin-immunoreactive (CB-IR) and parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) presumptive GABAergic neurons. A three-dimensional cell counting probe was used to assess the cell packing density and size of CB-IR neurons in layers II+IIIa and PV-IR neurons in layers III-VI. The density of CB-IR neurons was significantly reduced by 50% in depression in the dlPFC and there was a trend toward reduction in the ORB. The size of CB-IR somata was significantly decreased (18%) in depression in the dlPFC with a trend toward reduction in the ORB. In contrast, there was no difference in the density of PV-IR neurons between the depressed and control groups in the dlPFC. The size of PV-IR neuronal soma was unchanged in depressed compared to control subjects in either dlPFC or ORB. In depression, subpopulations of GABAergic neurons may be affected differently in dlPFC and ORB. A significant reduction in the density and size of GABAergic interneurons immunoreactive for calcium binding proteins was found predominantly in the dlPFC region. These cellular changes are consistent with recent neuroimaging studies revealing a reduction in the cortical levels of GABA in depression. PMID:17063153

  13. Gs-coupled GPCR signalling in AgRP neurons triggers sustained increase in food intake

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ken-ichiro; Cui, Zhenzhong; Li, Chia; Meister, Jaroslawna; Cui, Yinghong; Fu, Ou; Smith, Adam S.; Jain, Shalini; Lowell, Bradford B.; Krashes, Michael J.; Wess, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons of the hypothalamus play a key role in regulating food intake and body weight, by releasing three different orexigenic molecules: AgRP; GABA; and neuropeptide Y. AgRP neurons express various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with different coupling properties, including Gs-linked GPCRs. At present, the potential role of Gs-coupled GPCRs in regulating the activity of AgRP neurons remains unknown. Here we show that the activation of Gs-coupled receptors expressed by AgRP neurons leads to a robust and sustained increase in food intake. We also provide detailed mechanistic data linking the stimulation of this class of receptors to the observed feeding phenotype. Moreover, we show that this pathway is clearly distinct from other GPCR signalling cascades that are operative in AgRP neurons. Our data suggest that drugs able to inhibit this signalling pathway may become useful for the treatment of obesity. PMID:26743492

  14. Single Cell Transcriptomics of Hypothalamic Warm Sensitive Neurons that Control Core Body Temperature and Fever Response

    PubMed Central

    Eberwine, James; Bartfai, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    We report on an ‘unbiased’ molecular characterization of individual, adult neurons, active in a central, anterior hypothalamic neuronal circuit, by establishing cDNA libraries from each individual, electrophysiologically identified warm sensitive neuron (WSN). The cDNA libraries were analyzed by Affymetrix microarray. The presence and frequency of cDNAs was confirmed and enhanced with Illumina sequencing of each single cell cDNA library. cDNAs encoding the GABA biosynthetic enzyme. GAD1 and of adrenomedullin, galanin, prodynorphin, somatostatin, and tachykinin were found in the WSNs. The functional cellular and in vivo studies on dozens of the more than 500 neurotransmitter -, hormone- receptors and ion channels, whose cDNA was identified and sequence confirmed, suggest little or no discrepancy between the transcriptional and functional data in WSNs; whenever agonists were available for a receptor whose cDNA was identified, a functional response was found.. Sequencing single neuron libraries permitted identification of rarely expressed receptors like the insulin receptor, adiponectin receptor2 and of receptor heterodimers; information that is lost when pooling cells leads to dilution of signals and mixing signals. Despite the common electrophysiological phenotype and uniform GAD1 expression, WSN- transcriptomes show heterogenity, suggesting strong epigenetic influence on the transcriptome. Our study suggests that it is well-worth interrogating the cDNA libraries of single neurons by sequencing and chipping. PMID:20970451

  15. Electrophysiological evidence for 4-isobutyl-3-isopropylbicyclophosphorothionate as a selective blocker of insect GABA-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Yuki; Ju, Xiu-Lian; Furutani, Shogo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2013-06-01

    Invertebrate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls), which function as inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors, are important targets of insecticides and antiparasitic agents. The antagonism of GABACls and GluCls by 4-isobutyl-3-isopropylbicyclophosphorothionate (PS-14) was examined in cultured cockroach and rat neurons using a whole-cell patch-clamp method. The results indicated that PS-14 selectively blocks cockroach GABACls relative to cockroach GluCls and rat GABACls. PS-14 represents a useful probe for the study of insect GABA receptors. PMID:23591113

  16. Cortical Gene Expression After a Conditional Knockout of 67 kDa Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in Parvalbumin Neurons.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Danko; Yoshihara, Toru; Kawabata, Rika; Matsubara, Takurou; Tsubomoto, Makoto; Minabe, Yoshio; Lewis, David A; Hashimoto, Takanori

    2016-07-01

    In the cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), the enzyme primarily responsible for cortical GABA synthesis, is reduced in the subset of GABA neurons that express parvalbumin (PV). This GAD67 deficit is accompanied by lower cortical levels of other GABA-associated transcripts, including GABA transporter-1, PV, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tropomyosin receptor kinase B, somatostatin, GABAA receptor α1 subunit, and KCNS3 potassium channel subunit mRNAs. In contrast, messenger RNA (mRNA) levels for glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), another enzyme for GABA synthesis, are not altered. We tested the hypothesis that this pattern of GABA-associated transcript levels is secondary to the GAD67 deficit in PV neurons by analyzing cortical levels of these GABA-associated mRNAs in mice with a PV neuron-specific GAD67 knockout. Using in situ hybridization, we found that none of the examined GABA-associated transcripts had lower cortical expression in the knockout mice. In contrast, PV, BDNF, KCNS3, and GAD65 mRNA levels were higher in the homozygous mice. In addition, our behavioral test battery failed to detect a change in sensorimotor gating or working memory, although the homozygous mice exhibited increased spontaneous activities. These findings suggest that reduced GAD67 expression in PV neurons is not an upstream cause of the lower levels of GABA-associated transcripts, or of the characteristic behaviors, in schizophrenia. In PV neuron-specific GAD67 knockout mice, increased levels of PV, BDNF, and KCNS3 mRNAs might be the consequence of increased neuronal activity secondary to lower GABA synthesis, whereas increased GAD65 mRNA might represent a compensatory response to increase GABA synthesis. PMID:26980143

  17. Modifications of the input currents on VTA dopamine neurons following acute versus chronic cocaine exposure.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Avner; Matzner, Henry; Poltyrev, Tatyana; Yaka, Rami

    2012-03-01

    Excitatory synapses on dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are modulated following exposure to various addictive drugs, including cocaine. Previously we have shown that cocaine affects GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated neurotransmission in VTA DA neurons. This finding led us to reexamine the modulation of the excitatory synapse on these neurons in response to cocaine exposure, while the activity of GABA(A)R is uninterrupted. Using rat brain slices, evoked post synaptic currents (ePSC) were monitored and inhibitors of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and AMPA receptor (AMPAR) were gradually added to inhibitors-free bath solution. Modifications in the efficacy of the excitatory synapses were evaluated by comparing AMPAR-mediated and NMDAR-mediated currents (AMPA/NMDA ratio). The lack of GABA(A)R inhibitors enabled us to examine parallel changes in the relation between GABA(A)R-mediated and NMDAR-mediated currents (GABA(A)/NMDA ratio). First, we found that AMPA/NMDA ratio measured under complete availability of GABA(A)R, is significantly higher than the ratio measured under GABA(A)R blockade. In addition, GABA(A)/NMDA ratio, but not AMPA/NMDA ratio, is augmented a few hours following in vitro acute cocaine exposure. When measured 24 h after in vivo single cocaine injection, no change in GABA(A)/NMDA ratio was observed, however, the AMPA/NMDA ratio was found to be significantly higher. Finally, a decrease in both ratios was detected in rats repeatedly injected with cocaine. Taken together, these results lead to a better understanding of the means by which cocaine modifies synaptic inputs on VTA DA neurons. The parallel changes in GABA(A)/NMDA ratio may suggest an interaction between inhibitory and excitatory neural systems. PMID:22197515

  18. Globus pallidus neurons dynamically regulate the activity pattern of subthalamic nucleus neurons through the frequency-dependent activation of postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors.

    PubMed

    Hallworth, Nicholas E; Bevan, Mark D

    2005-07-01

    Reciprocally connected GABAergic neurons of the globus pallidus (GP) and glutamatergic neurons of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are a putative generator of pathological rhythmic burst firing in Parkinson's disease (PD). Burst firing of STN neurons may be driven by rebound depolarization after barrages of GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-mediated IPSPs arising from pallidal fibers. To determine the conditions under which pallidosubthalamic transmission activates these and other postsynaptic GABARs, a parasagittal mouse brain slice preparation was developed in which pallidosubthalamic connections were preserved. Intact connectivity was first confirmed through the injection of a neuronal tracer into the GP. Voltage-clamp and gramicidin-based perforated-patch current-clamp recordings were then used to study the relative influences of GABA(A)R- and GABA(B)R-mediated pallidosubthalamic transmission on STN neurons. Spontaneous phasic, but not tonic, activation of postsynaptic GABA(A)Rs reduced the frequency and disrupted the rhythmicity of autonomous firing in STN neurons. However, postsynaptic GABA(B)Rs were only sufficiently activated to impact STN firing when pallidosubthalamic transmission was elevated or pallidal fibers were synchronously activated by electrical stimulation. In a subset of neurons, rebound burst depolarizations followed high-frequency, synchronous stimulation of pallidosubthalamic fibers. Although GABA(B)R-mediated hyperpolarization was itself sufficient to generate rebound bursts, coincident activation of postsynaptic GABA(A)Rs produced longer and more intense burst firing. These findings elucidate a novel route through which burst activity can be generated in the STN, and suggest that GABARs on STN neurons could act in a synergistic manner to generate abnormal burst activity in PD. PMID:16000620

  19. Production of gaba (γ - Aminobutyric acid) by microorganisms: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Radhika; Bajpai, Vivek K; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2012-10-01

    GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods. PMID:24031948

  20. Involvement of GABA in environmental temperature-induced change in body temperature.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Poddar, M K

    1988-12-01

    Acute exposure of adult male albino rats (110-120 g) to higher environmental temperature (40 +/- 1 degrees C) increased body temperature (BT). This increase of BT was also dependent on the duration of exposure. Treatment with muscimol (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a GABA agonist, produced hypothermia at room temperature (28 +/- 1 degree C) and resistance to increase the body temperature when exposed to higher temperature (40 +/- 1 degree C). Administration of bicuculline (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a GABA antagonist, on the other hand, enhanced BT more than that observed in control (normal) rat exposed to higher temperature (40 +/- 1 degree C), although at room temperature bicuculline treatment did not show any effect on BT. Pretreatment with ethanolamine-O-sulfate (EOS) (2 g/kg, s.c.), a GABA transaminase inhibitor, to rats exposed to higher temperature increased BT as in control (normal) rat. Inhibition of central GAD activity with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) (70 mg/kg, i.p.) produced resistance to increase BT during its period of action when rats were exposed to higher environmental temperature (28 +/- 1 degree C). These results thus suggest that central inhibitory neuron, GABA, plays a regulatory role in thermoregulation. PMID:3236943

  1. Localization of GABA-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Ríos, M; Suess, E; Miller, M W

    1999-10-18

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is present in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) where its role as a neurotransmitter is supported by pharmacological, biochemical, and anatomical investigations. In this study, the distribution of GABA-immunoreactive (GABAi) neurons and fiber systems in Aplysia was examined by using wholemount immunohistochemistry and nerve backfill methods. GABAi neurons were located in the buccal, cerebral, and pedal ganglia. Major commissural fiber systems were present in each of these ganglia, whereas more limited fiber systems were observed in the ganglionic connectives. Some of the interganglionic fibers were found to originate from two unpaired GABAi neurons, one in the buccal ganglion and one in the right pedal ganglion, each of which exhibited bilateral projections. No GABAi fibers were found in the nerves that innervate peripheral sensory, motor, or visceral organs. Although GABAi cells were not observed in the pleural or abdominal ganglia, these ganglia did receive limited projections of GABAi fibers originating from neurons in the pedal ganglia. The distribution of GABAi neurons suggests that this transmitter system may be primarily involved in coordinating certain bilateral central pattern generator (CPG) systems related to feeding and locomotion. In addition, the presence of specific interganglionic GABAi projections also suggests a role in the regulation or coordination of circuits that produce components of complex behaviors. PMID:10524338

  2. Synaptic response patterns of neurons in the cortex of rat inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Evans, M S; Faingold, C L

    1999-11-01

    The present study examined synaptic potentials of neurons in inferior colliculus (IC) cortex slice and the roles of GABA and glutamate receptors in generating these potentials. Multipolar (82%) and elongated (18%) cells were observed with intracellular biocytin staining. Electrical stimulation of the IC commissure (CoIC) elicited only inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) (10% of cells), only excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) (51%), or both (38%). IPSPs were elicited at lower thresholds and shorter latencies than EPSPs (mean: 1.6+/-1.2 ms) and IPSPs were observed in all neurons following membrane depolarization. Short-latency EPSPs were blocked by non-NMDA receptor antagonists, and longer-latency EPSPs were blocked by NMDA antagonists. CoIC stimulation evoked short-latency IPSPs (mean: 0.55+/-0.33 ms) in 48% of neurons, and the IPSPs persisted despite glutamate receptor blockade, which implies monosynaptic inhibitory input. A GABA(A) antagonist blocked IPSPs and paired pulse inhibition of EPSPs, suggesting GABA(A) receptor mediation. A GABA(B) antagonist reduced paired pulse inhibition of IPSPs, suggesting GABA(B) receptor modulation. Thus, GABA-mediated inhibition plays a critical role in shaping synaptic responses of IC cortex neurons. Normal GABAergic function in IC has been shown to be important in acoustic coding, and reduced efficacy of GABA function in IC neurons is critical in IC pathophysiology in presbycusis, tinnitus and audiogenic seizures. PMID:10545630

  3. A hyperexcitability phenotype in mouse trigeminal sensory neurons expressing the R192Q Cacna1a missense mutation of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1.

    PubMed

    Hullugundi, S K; Ansuini, A; Ferrari, M D; van den Maagdenberg, A M J M; Nistri, A

    2014-04-25

    Missense mutation R192Q in the CACNA1A gene causes familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM1), a monogenic subtype of migraine with aura. Using knock-in (KI) gene targeting we introduced this mutation into the mouse gene and generated a transgenic mouse model to investigate basic mechanisms of migraine pathophysiology. While FHM1 R192Q KI trigeminal ganglia were previously shown to exhibit constitutive up-regulation of ATP-gated P2X3 receptors, little is known about the firing properties of trigeminal sensory neurons, which convey nociceptive inputs to higher brain centers. We patch-clamped trigeminal sensory neurons to search for differences in firing properties between wildtype (WT) and KI cells in culture. Although various subclasses of trigeminal neurons were observed with respect to their firing patterns evoked by intracellular current injection, their distribution among WT and KI cells was similar with only small differences in rheobase or input resistance values. However, when neurons were excited by either α,β-methyl-ATP to stimulate P2X3 receptors or capsaicin to activate transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) receptors, the firing threshold in KI neurons was significantly lowered and followed by a larger number of spikes. Activation by α,β-methyl-ATP was associated with a transient cluster of action potentials, while capsaicin elicited more persistent firing. Using α,β-methyl-ATP or capsaicin, two functional classes of WT or KI neurons were distinguished according to the first spike latency, which suggests that a subgroup of neurons may be indirectly activated, probably via crosstalk between neurons and satellite glial cells. Thus, our results are consistent with reported facilitated trigeminal pain behavior of FHM1 R192Q KI mice. PMID:24583041

  4. Inhibition of the kinase WNK1/HSN2 ameliorates neuropathic pain by restoring GABA inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Schmouth, Jean-François; Lavastre, Valérie; Latremoliere, Alban; Zhang, Jinwei; Andrews, Nick; Omura, Takao; Laganière, Janet; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Castonguay, Geneviève; Gaudet, Rébecca; Mapplebeck, Josiane C S; Sotocinal, Susana G; Duan, JingJing; Ward, Catherine; Khanna, Arjun R; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Dion, Patrick A; Woolf, Clifford J; Inquimbert, Perrine; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-03-29

    HSN2is a nervous system predominant exon of the gene encoding the kinase WNK1 and is mutated in an autosomal recessive, inherited form of congenital pain insensitivity. The HSN2-containing splice variant is referred to as WNK1/HSN2. We created a knockout mouse specifically lacking theHsn2exon ofWnk1 Although these mice had normal spinal neuron and peripheral sensory neuron morphology and distribution, the mice were less susceptible to hypersensitivity to cold and mechanical stimuli after peripheral nerve injury. In contrast, thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were similar to control mice in an inflammation-induced pain model. In the nerve injury model of neuropathic pain, WNK1/HSN2 contributed to a maladaptive decrease in the activity of the K(+)-Cl(-)cotransporter KCC2 by increasing its inhibitory phosphorylation at Thr(906)and Thr(1007), resulting in an associated loss of GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-mediated inhibition of spinal pain-transmitting nerves. Electrophysiological analysis showed that WNK1/HSN2 shifted the concentration of Cl(-)such that GABA signaling resulted in a less hyperpolarized state (increased neuronal activity) rather than a more hyperpolarized state (decreased neuronal activity) in mouse spinal nerves. Pharmacologically antagonizing WNK activity reduced cold allodynia and mechanical hyperalgesia, decreased KCC2 Thr(906)and Thr(1007)phosphorylation, and restored GABA-mediated inhibition (hyperpolarization) of injured spinal cord lamina II neurons. These data provide mechanistic insight into, and a compelling therapeutic target for treating, neuropathic pain after nerve injury. PMID:27025876

  5. [GABA-ergic system in defense against excitatory kynurenines].

    PubMed

    Lapin, I P

    1997-01-01

    Protection against the excitatory action of L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid in mice is related to the activation of GABA-B and dopamine receptors of the brain and to much lesser degree to the activation of GABA-A receptors. It is hardly believable that the anticonvulsant effect of phenibut (beta-phenyl-GABA), baclofen (CL-phenibut), sodium hydroxybutyrate and taurine against seizures induced by these two kynurenines is determined by alterations in metabolism of GABA. PMID:9503572

  6. Angiotensin Type-2 Receptors Influence the Activity of Vasopressin Neurons in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    de Kloet, Annette D; Pitra, Soledad; Wang, Lei; Hiller, Helmut; Pioquinto, David J; Smith, Justin A; Sumners, Colin; Stern, Javier E; Krause, Eric G

    2016-08-01

    It is known that angiotensin-II acts at its type-1 receptor to stimulate vasopressin (AVP) secretion, which may contribute to angiotensin-II-induced hypertension. Less well known is the impact of angiotensin type-2 receptor (AT2R) activation on these processes. Studies conducted in a transgenic AT2R enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter mouse revealed that although AT2R are not themselves localized to AVP neurons within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), they are localized to neurons that extend processes into the PVN. In the present set of studies, we set out to characterize the origin, phenotype, and function of nerve terminals within the PVN that arise from AT2R-enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive neurons and synapse onto AVP neurons. Initial experiments combined genetic and neuroanatomical techniques to determine that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons derived from the peri-PVN area containing AT2R make appositions onto AVP neurons within the PVN, thereby positioning AT2R to negatively regulate neuroendocrine secretion. Subsequent patch-clamp electrophysiological experiments revealed that selective activation of AT2R in the peri-PVN area using compound 21 facilitates inhibitory (ie, GABAergic) neurotransmission and leads to reduced activity of AVP neurons within the PVN. Final experiments determined the functional impact of AT2R activation by testing the effects of compound 21 on plasma AVP levels. Collectively, these experiments revealed that AT2R expressing neurons make GABAergic synapses onto AVP neurons that inhibit AVP neuronal activity and suppress baseline systemic AVP levels. These findings have direct implications in the targeting of AT2R for disorders of AVP secretion and also for the alleviation of high blood pressure. PMID:27267713

  7. Localization and Function of GABA Transporters GAT-1 and GAT-3 in the Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Galvan, Adriana; Wichmann, Thomas; Smith, Yoland

    2011-01-01

    GABA transporter type 1 and 3 (GAT-1 and GAT-3, respectively) are the two main subtypes of GATs responsible for the regulation of extracellular GABA levels in the central nervous system. These transporters are widely expressed in neuronal (mainly GAT-1) and glial (mainly GAT-3) elements throughout the brain, but most data obtained so far relate to their role in the regulation of GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic tonic and phasic inhibition in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Taking into consideration the key role of GABAergic transmission within basal ganglia networks, and the importance for these systems to be properly balanced to mediate normal basal ganglia function, we analyzed in detail the localization and function of GAT-1 and GAT-3 in the globus pallidus of normal and Parkinsonian animals, in order to further understand the substrate and possible mechanisms by which GABA transporters may regulate basal ganglia outflow, and may become relevant targets for new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of basal ganglia-related disorders. In this review, we describe the general features of GATs in the basal ganglia, and give a detailed account of recent evidence that GAT-1 and GAT-3 regulation can have a major impact on the firing rate and pattern of basal ganglia neurons through pre- and post-synaptic GABAA- and GABAB-receptor-mediated effects. PMID:21847373

  8. All-trans-retinoid acid induces the differentiation of encapsulated mouse embryonic stem cells into GABAergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Addae, Cynthia; Yi, Xiaoping; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Cheng, Henrique; Musto, Alberto; Martinez-Ceballos, Eduardo

    2012-06-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into all three main germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Although a number of methods have been developed to differentiate ES cells into neuronal phenotypes such as sensory and motor neurons, the efficient generation of GABAergic interneurons from ES cells still presents an ongoing challenge. Because the main output of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons is the gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter whose controlled homeostasis is required for normal brain function, the efficient generation in culture of functional interneurons may have future implications on the treatment of neurological disorders such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. The goal of this work was to examine the generation of GABAergic neurons from mouse ES cells by comparing an embryoid body-based methodology versus a hydrogel-based encapsulation protocol that involves the use of all-trans-retinoid acid (RA). We observed that (1) there was a 2-fold increase in neuronal differentiation in encapsulated versus non-encapsulated cells and (2) there was an increase in the specificity for interneuronal differentiation in encapsulated cells, as assessed by mRNA expression and electrophysiology approaches. Furthermore, our results indicate that most of the neurons obtained from encapsulated mouse ES cells are GABA-positive (∼87%). Thus, these results suggest that combining encapsulation of ES cells and RA treatment provide a more efficient and scalable differentiation strategy for the generation in culture of functional GABAergic interneurons. This technology may have implications for future cell replacement therapies and the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:22466603

  9. All-Trans-Retinoid Acid Induces the Differentiation of Encapsulated Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells into GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Addae, Cynthia; Yi, Xiaoping; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Cheng, Henrique; Musto, Alberto; Martinez-Ceballos, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into all three main germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Although a number of methods have been developed to differentiate ES cells into neuronal phenotypes such as sensory and motor neurons, the efficient generation of GABAergic interneurons from ES cells still presents an ongoing challenge. Because the main output of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons is the gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter whose controlled homeostasis is required for normal brain function, the efficient generation in culture of functional interneurons may have future implications on the treatment of neurological disorders such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. The goal of this work was to examine the generation of GABAergic neurons from mouse ES cells by comparing an embryoid body-based methodology versus a hydrogel-based encapsulation protocol that involves the use of all-trans-retinoid acid (RA). We observed that 1) there was a 2-fold increase in neuronal differentiation in encapsulated versus non-encapsulated cells and 2) there was an increase in the specificity for interneuronal differentiation in encapsulated cells, as assessed by mRNA expression and electrophysiology approaches. Furthermore, our results indicate that most of the neurons obtained from encapsulated mouse ES cells are GABA-positive (~87%). Thus, these results suggest that combining encapsulation of ES cells and RA treatment provide a more efficient and scalable differentiation strategy for the generation in culture of functional GABAergic interneurons. This technology may have implications for future cell replacement therapies and the treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:22466603

  10. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for control of behavioral state.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, U

    2010-12-15

    Cholinergic neurons of the pontine laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) play a critical role in regulation of behavioral state. Therefore, elucidation of mechanisms that control their activity is vital for understanding of how switching between wakefulness, sleep and anesthetic states is effectuated. In vivo studies suggest that GABAergic mechanisms within the pons play a critical role in behavioral state switching. However, the postsynaptic, electrophysiological actions of GABA on LDT neurons, as well as the identity of GABA receptors present in the LDT mediating these actions is virtually unexplored. Therefore, we studied the actions of GABA agonists and antagonists on cholinergic LDT cells by performing patch clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. Under conditions where detection of Cl(-) -mediated events was optimized, GABA induced gabazine (GZ)-sensitive inward currents in the majority of LDT neurons. Post-synaptic location of GABA(A) receptors was demonstrated by persistence of muscimol-induced inward currents in TTX and low Ca(2+) solutions. THIP, a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist with a preference for δ-subunit containing GABA(A) receptors, induced inward currents, suggesting the existence of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors. LDT cells also possess GABA(B) receptors as baclofen-activated a TTX- and low Ca(2+)-resistant outward current that was attenuated by the GABA(B) antagonists CGP 55845 and saclofen. The tertiapin sensitivity of baclofen-induced outward currents suggests that a G(IRK) mediated this effect. Further, outward currents were never additive with those induced by application of carbachol, suggesting that they were mediated by activation of GABA(B) receptors linked to the same G(IRK) activated in these cells by muscarinic receptor stimulation. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibited Ca(2+) increases induced by a depolarizing voltage step shown previously to activate VOCCs in cholinergic LDT neurons. Baclofen-mediated reductions in depolarization

  11. Olfactory bulb short axon cell release of GABA and dopamine produces a temporally biphasic inhibition-excitation response in external tufted cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaolin; Plachez, Celine; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam; Shipley, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for co-expression of two or more classic neurotransmitters in neurons has increased but less is known about co-transmission. Ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons, co-release dopamine (DA), the excitatory transmitter glutamate and the inhibitory transmitter GABA onto target cells in the striatum. Olfactory bulb (OB) short axon cells (SACs) form interglomerular connections and co-express markers for dopamine (DA) and GABA. Using an optogenetic approach we provide evidence that mouse OB SACs release both GABA and DA onto external tufted cells (ETCs) in other glomeruli. Optical activation of channelrhodopsin specifically expressed in DAergic SACs produced a GABAA receptor-mediated monosynaptic inhibitory response followed by DA-D1-like receptor-mediated excitatory response in ETCs. The GABAA receptor-mediated hyperpolarization activates Ih current in ETCs; synaptically released DA increases Ih, which enhances post-inhibitory rebound spiking. Thus, the opposing actions of synaptically released GABA and DA are functionally integrated by Ih to generate an inhibition-to-excitation “switch” in ETCs. Consistent with the established role of Ih in ETC burst firing, we show that endogenous DA release increases ETC spontaneous bursting frequency. ETCs transmit sensory signals to mitral/tufted output neurons and drive intraglomerular inhibition to shape glomerulus output to downstream olfactory networks. GABA and DA co-transmission from SACs to ETCs may play a key role in regulating output coding across the glomerular array. PMID:23407950

  12. Distribution of immunoreactive GABA and glutamate receptors in the gustatory portion of the nucleus of the solitary tract in rat.

    PubMed

    King, Michael S

    2003-05-15

    The distribution of glutamate (GLU) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors within the gustatory portion of the rat nucleus of the solitary tract (gNST) was investigated using immunohistochemical, histological and neural tract tracing techniques. Numerous somata throughout the gNST were immunoreactive for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, while few were labeled for kainate receptors. AMPA and NMDA receptors were particularly abundant in the rostral central (RC) subdivision of the gNST, which receives most of the primary afferent input from the oral cavity and contains most of the gNST neurons that project to the parabrachial nuclei (PBN). This finding supports electrophysiological evidence that AMPA and NMDA receptors are involved in responses to orosensory input and indicates that their action may influence ascending taste signals as well. Compared to the ionotropic GLU receptors, few cell bodies were immunoreactive for metabotropic GLU receptors. Somata immunoreactive for GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors were located throughout the nucleus. The densest neuropil labeling was for GABA(A) receptors in the ventral (V) subnucleus, the gNST subdivision that sends output to brainstem oromotor centers. The distributions of immunolabeling for GLU and GABA receptors imply that different functional roles may exist for specific receptors within this nucleus. PMID:12754086

  13. Neural pathways associated with loss of consciousness caused by intracerebral microinjection of GABA A-active anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Sukhotinsky, I; Zalkind, V; Lu, J; Hopkins, D A; Saper, C B; Devor, M

    2007-03-01

    Anesthesia, slow-wave sleep, syncope, concussion and reversible coma are behavioral states characterized by loss of consciousness, slow-wave cortical electroencephalogram, and motor and sensory suppression. We identified a focal area in the rat brainstem, the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA), at which microinjection of pentobarbital and other GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R) agonists reversibly induced an anesthesia-like state. This effect was attenuated by local pre-treatment with the GABA(A)-R antagonist bicuculline. Using neuroanatomical tracing we identified four pathways ascending from the MPTA that are positioned to mediate electroencephalographic synchronization and loss of consciousness: (i) projections to the intralaminar thalamic nuclei that, in turn, project to the cortex; (ii) projections to several pontomesencephalic, diencephalic and basal forebrain nuclei that project cortically and are considered parts of an ascending "arousal system"; (iii) a projection to other parts of the subcortical forebrain, including the septal area, hypothalamus, zona incerta and striato-pallidal system, that may indirectly affect cortical arousal and hippocampal theta rhythm; and (iv) modest projections directly to the frontal cortex. Several of these areas have prominent reciprocal projections back to the MPTA, notably the zona incerta, lateral hypothalamus and frontal cortex. We hypothesize that barbiturate anesthetics and related agents microinjected into the MPTA enhance the inhibitory response of local GABA(A)-R-bearing neurons to endogenous GABA released at baseline during wakefulness. This modulates activity in one or more of the identified ascending neural pathways, ultimately leading to loss of consciousness. PMID:17425568

  14. A Comprehensive Optogenetic Pharmacology Toolkit for In Vivo Control of GABA(A) Receptors and Synaptic Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Chen; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Davenport, Christopher M; Smith, Caleb M; Veit, Julia; Wilson, Neil M; Adesnik, Hillel; Kramer, Richard H

    2015-12-01

    Exogenously expressed opsins are valuable tools for optogenetic control of neurons in circuits. A deeper understanding of neural function can be gained by bringing control to endogenous neurotransmitter receptors that mediate synaptic transmission. Here we introduce a comprehensive optogenetic toolkit for controlling GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition in the brain. We developed a series of photoswitch ligands and the complementary genetically modified GABA(A) receptor subunits. By conjugating the two components, we generated light-sensitive versions of the entire GABA(A) receptor family. We validated these light-sensitive receptors for applications across a broad range of spatial scales, from subcellular receptor mapping to in vivo photo-control of visual responses in the cerebral cortex. Finally, we generated a knockin mouse in which the "photoswitch-ready" version of a GABA(A) receptor subunit genomically replaces its wild-type counterpart, ensuring normal receptor expression. This optogenetic pharmacology toolkit allows scalable interrogation of endogenous GABA(A) receptor function with high spatial, temporal, and biochemical precision. PMID:26606997

  15. Etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC increase the GABA efficacy of recombinant α4β3δ and α4β3 GABAA receptors expressed in HEK cells

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W.; Otis, Thomas S.; Wallner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    General anesthetics, once thought to exert their effects through non-specific membrane effects, have highly specific ion channel targets that can silence neuronal populations in the nervous system, thereby causing unconsciousness and immobility, characteristic of general anesthesia. Inhibitory GABAA receptors (GABAARs), particularly highly GABA-sensitive extrasynaptic receptor subtypes that give rise to sustained inhibitory currents, are uniquely sensititive to GABAAR-active anesthetics. A prominent population of extrasynaptic GABAARs is made up of α4, β2 or β3, and δ subunits. Considering the demonstrated importance of GABA receptor β3 subunits for in vivo anesthetic effects of etomidate and propofol, we decided to investigate the effects of GABA anesthetics on ”extrasynaptic” α4β3δ and also binary α4β3 receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Consistent with previous work on similar receptor subtypes we show that maximal GABA currents through “extrasynaptic” α4β3δ receptors, receptors defined by sensitivity to EtOH (30 mM) and the β-carboline β-CCE (1 µM), are enhanced by the GABAAR-active anesthetics etomidate propofol, and the neurosteroid anesthetic THDOC. Furthermore, we show that receptors formed by α4β3 subunits alone also show high GABA sensitivity and that saturating GABA responses of α4β3 receptors are increased to the same extent by etomidate, propofol, and THDOC as are α4β3δ receptors. Therefore, both α4β3 and α4β3δ receptors show low GABA efficacy, and GABA is also a partial agonist on certain binary αβ receptor subtypes. Increasing GABA efficacy on α4/6β3δ and α4β3 receptors is likely to make an important contribution to the anesthetic effects of etomidate, propofol and the neurosteroid THDOC. PMID:18778723

  16. The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA evokes long-lasting Ca(2+) oscillations in cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Letizia; Losi, Gabriele; Sessolo, Michele; Marcon, Iacopo; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Studies over the last decade provided evidence that in a dynamic interaction with neurons glial cell astrocytes contribut to fundamental phenomena in the brain. Most of the knowledge on this derives, however, from studies monitoring the astrocyte Ca(2+) response to glutamate. Whether astrocytes can similarly respond to other neurotransmitters, including the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, is relatively unexplored. By using confocal and two photon laser-scanning microscopy the astrocyte response to GABA in the mouse somatosensory and temporal cortex was studied. In slices from developing (P15-20) and adult (P30-60) mice, it was found that in a subpopulation of astrocytes GABA evoked somatic Ca(2+) oscillations. This response was mediated by GABAB receptors and involved both Gi/o protein and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 ) signalling pathways. In vivo experiments from young adult mice, revealed that also cortical astrocytes in the living brain exibit GABAB receptor-mediated Ca(2+) elevations. At all astrocytic processes tested, local GABA or Baclofen brief applications induced long-lasting Ca(2+) oscillations, suggesting that all astrocytes have the potential to respond to GABA. Finally, in patch-clamp recordings it was found that Ca(2+) oscillations induced by Baclofen evoked astrocytic glutamate release and slow inward currents (SICs) in pyramidal cells from wild type but not IP3 R2(-/-) mice, in which astrocytic GABAB receptor-mediated Ca(2+) elevations are impaired. These data suggest that cortical astrocytes in the mouse brain can sense the activity of GABAergic interneurons and through their specific recruitment contribut to the distinct role played on the cortical network by the different subsets of GABAergic interneurons. PMID:26496414

  17. Serotonin-2C Receptor Agonists Decrease Potassium-Stimulated GABA Release In the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, James M; Booth, Raymond G; Peris, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2C receptor has shown promise in vivo as a pharmacotherapeutic target for alcoholism. For example, recently, a novel 4-phenyl-2-N,N-dimethylaminotetralin (PAT) drug candidate, that demonstrates 5-HT2C receptor agonist activity together with 5-HT2A/2B receptor inverse agonist activity, was shown to reduce operant responding for ethanol after peripheral administration to rats. Previous studies have shown that the 5-HT2C receptor is found throughout the mesoaccumbens pathway and that 5-HT2C receptor agonism causes activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) GABA neurons. It is unknown what effect 5-HT2C receptor modulation has on GABA release in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcc). To this end, microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence was used to quantify extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations in the NAcc under basal and after potassium stimulation conditions, in response to PAT analogs and other 5-HT2C receptor modulators administered by reverse dialysis to rats. 5-HT2C receptor agonists specifically attenuated stimulated GABA release in the NAcc while 5-HT2C antagonists or inverse agonists had no effect. Agents with activity at 5-HT2A receptors had no effect on GABA release. Thus, in contrast to results reported for the VTA, current results suggest 5-HT2C receptor agonists decrease stimulated GABA release in the NAcc, and provide a possible mechanism of action for 5HT2C-mediated negative modulation of ethanol self-administration. PMID:25382408

  18. Hypothalamic oxytocin attenuates CRF expression via GABA(A) receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Mehmet; Babygirija, Reji; Cerjak, Diana; Yoshimoto, Sazu; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2011-04-28

    Centrally released oxytocin (OXT) has anxiolytic and anti-stress effects. Delayed gastric emptying (GE) induced by acute restraint stress (ARS) for 90 min is completely restored following 5 consecutive days of chronic homotypic restraint stress (CHS), via up-regulating hypothalamic OXT expression in rats. However, the mechanism behind the restoration of delayed GE following CHS remains unclear. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-projecting neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) have been shown to inhibit corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) synthesis via GABA(A) receptors. We hypothesized that GABA(A) receptors are involved in mediating the inhibitory effect of OXT on CRF expression in the PVN, which in turn restores delayed GE following CHS. OXT (0.5 μg) and selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide (BMI) (100 ng), were administered intracerebroventricularly (icv). Solid GE was measured under non-stressed (NS), ARS and CHS conditions. Expression of CRF mRNA in the PVN was evaluated by real time RT-PCR. Neither OXT nor BMI changed GE and CRF mRNA expression under NS conditions. Delayed GE and increased CRF mRNA expression induced by ARS were restored by icv-injection of OXT. The effects of OXT on delayed GE and increased CRF mRNA expression in ARS were abolished by icv-injection of BMI. Following CHS, delayed GE was completely restored in saline (icv)-injected rats, whereas daily injection of BMI (icv) attenuated the restoration of delayed GE. Daily injection of BMI (icv) significantly increased CRF mRNA expression following CHS. It is suggested that central OXT inhibits ARS-induced CRF mRNA expression via GABA(A) receptors in the PVN. GABAergic system is also involved in OXT-mediated adaptation response of delayed GE under CHS conditions. PMID:21382355

  19. Assignment of the human GABA transporter gene (GABATHG) locus to chromosome 3p24-p25

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Fang; Fei, Jian; Guo, Li-He

    1995-09-01

    An essential regulatory process of synaptic transmission is the inactivation of released neurotransmitters by the transmitter-specific uptake mechanism, {gamma}-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory transmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system; its activity is terminated by a high-affinity Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} -dependent specific GABA transporter (GAT), which carries the neurotransmitter to the presynaptic neuron and/or glial elements surrounding the synaptic cleft. Deficiency of the transporter may cause epilepsy and some other nervous diseases. The human GAT gene (GABATHG), approximately 25 kb in length, has been cloned and sequenced by our colleagues (7). Here the results of the in situ hybridization mapping with the gene are presented. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Circadian Control of the Daily Plasma Glucose Rhythm: An Interplay of GABA and Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Foppen, Ewout; Schalij, Ingrid; Van Heijningen, Caroline; van der Vliet, Jan; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian biological clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), imposes its temporal structure on the organism via neural and endocrine outputs. To further investigate SCN control of the autonomic nervous system we focused in the present study on the daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is an important target area of biological clock output and harbors the pre-autonomic neurons that control peripheral sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. Using local administration of GABA and glutamate receptor (ant)agonists in the PVN at different times of the light/dark-cycle we investigated whether daily changes in the activity of autonomic nervous system contribute to the control of plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations. Activation of neuronal activity in the PVN of non-feeding animals, either by administering a glutamatergic agonist or a GABAergic antagonist, induced hyperglycemia. The effect of the GABA-antagonist was time dependent, causing increased plasma glucose concentrations only when administered during the light period. The absence of a hyperglycemic effect of the GABA-antagonist in SCN-ablated animals provided further evidence for a daily change in GABAergic input from the SCN to the PVN. On the other hand, feeding-induced plasma glucose and insulin responses were suppressed by inhibition of PVN neuronal activity only during the dark period. These results indicate that the pre-autonomic neurons in the PVN are controlled by an interplay of inhibitory and excitatory inputs. Liver-dedicated sympathetic pre-autonomic neurons (responsible for hepatic glucose production) and pancreas-dedicated pre-autonomic parasympathetic neurons (responsible for insulin release) are controlled by inhibitory GABAergic contacts that are mainly active during the light period. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic pre-autonomic PVN neurons also receive excitatory inputs, either from the

  1. Colocalization of gamma-aminobutyric acid and acetylcholine in neurons in the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei in the cat: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-Ge; Yamuy, Jack; Sampogna, Sharon; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2003-12-01

    Cholinergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mechanisms in the dorsolateral pontomesencephalic tegmentum have been implicated in the control of active (REM) sleep and wakefulness. To determine the relationships between neurons that contain these neurotransmitters in this region of the brainstem in adult cats, combined light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical procedures were employed. Light microscopic analyses revealed that choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and GABA immunoreactive neurons were distributed throughout the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT and PPT). Surprisingly, approximately 50% of the ChAT immunoreactive neurons in these nuclei also contained GABA. Using electron microscopic pre-embedding immunocytochemistry, GABA immunoreactivity was observed in somas, dendrites and axon terminals in both the LDT and PPT. Most of the GABA immunoreactive terminals formed symmetrical synapses with non-immunolabeled dendrites. Electron microscopic double-immunolabeling techniques revealed that ChAT and GABA were colocalized in axon terminals in the LDT/PPT. Approximately 30% of the ChAT immunoreactive terminals were also GABA immunoreactive, whereas only 6-8% of the GABA immunoreactive terminals were ChAT immunoreactive. Most of the ChAT/GABA immunoreactive terminals formed symmetrical synapses with non-immunolabeled dendrites; however, ChAT/GABA immunoreactive terminals were also observed that contacted ChAT immunoreactive dendrites. With respect to ChAT immunoreactive postsynaptic profiles, approximately 40% of the somas and 50% of the dendrites received synaptic contact from GABA immunoreactive terminals in both the LDT and PPT. These findings (a) indicate that there are fundamental interactions between cholinergic and GABAergic neurons within the LDT/PPT that play an important role in the control of active sleep and wakefulness and (b) provide an anatomical basis for the intriguing possibility that a mechanism of acetylcholine and

  2. [Anti-arrhythmic properties of GABA and GABA-ergic system activators].

    PubMed

    Tiurenkov, I N; Perfilova, V N

    2002-01-01

    Clinical and experimental data available in the literature are summarized, which are indicative of the antiarrhythmogenic properties of GABA and substances possessing GABA-positive activity (phenibut, piracetam, sodium hydroxybutyrate, lithium hydroxybutyrate, etc.). The antiarrhythmic effects are manifested in various cases of the heart rhythm violation. The mechanism of this action is related to activation of the central and peripheral retarding GABAergic system, as well as to antihypoxant, antioxidant, and antistressor effects. PMID:12025796

  3. Dependence-induced ethanol drinking and GABA neurotransmission are altered in Alk deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Paul; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Varodayan, Florence P; Nadav, Tali; Roberto, Marisa; Lasek, Amy W; Roberts, Amanda J

    2016-08-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in the brain and implicated in alcohol abuse in humans and behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. Previous studies have shown an association of human ALK with acute responses to alcohol and alcohol dependence. In addition, Alk knockout (Alk -/-) mice consume more ethanol in a binge-drinking test and show increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation. However, the function of ALK in excessive drinking following the establishment of ethanol dependence has not been examined. In this study, we tested Alk -/- mice for dependence-induced drinking using the chronic intermittent ethanol-two bottle choice drinking (CIE-2BC) protocol. We found that Alk -/- mice initially consume more ethanol prior to CIE exposure, but do not escalate ethanol consumption after exposure, suggesting that ALK may promote the escalation of drinking after ethanol dependence. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for this behavioral phenotype we used an electrophysiological approach to examine GABA neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a brain region that regulates alcohol consumption and shows increased GABA signaling after chronic ethanol exposure. GABA transmission in ethanol-naïve Alk -/- mice was enhanced at baseline and potentiated in response to acute ethanol application when compared to wild-type (Alk +/+) mice. Moreover, basal GABA transmission was not elevated by CIE exposure in Alk -/- mice as it was in Alk +/+ mice. These data suggest that ALK plays a role in dependence-induced drinking and the regulation of presynaptic GABA release in the CeA. PMID:26946429

  4. Colocalization of synaptic GABA(C)-receptors with GABA (A)-receptors and glycine-receptors in the rodent central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Frazao, Renata; Nogueira, Maria Ines; Wässle, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Fast inhibition in the nervous system is preferentially mediated by GABA- and glycine-receptors. Two types of ionotropic GABA-receptor, the GABA(A)-receptor and GABA(C)-receptor, have been identified; they have specific molecular compositions, different sensitivities to GABA, different kinetics, and distinct pharmacological profiles. We have studied, by immunocytochemistry, the synaptic localization of glycine-, GABA(A)-, and GABA(C)-receptors in rodent retina, spinal cord, midbrain, and brain-stem. Antibodies specific for the alpha1 subunit of the glycine-receptor, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A)-receptor, and the rho subunits of the GABA(C)-receptor have been applied. Using double-immunolabeling, we have determined whether these receptors are expressed at the same postsynaptic sites. In the retina, no such colocalization was observed. However, in the spinal cord, we found the colocalization of glycine-receptors with GABA(A)- or GABA(C)-receptors and the colocalization of GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors in approximately 25% of the synapses. In the midbrain and brain-stem, GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors were colocalized in 10%-15% of the postsynaptic sites. We discuss the possible expression of heteromeric (hybrid) receptors assembled from GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptor subunits. Our results suggest that GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors are colocalized in a minority of synapses of the central nervous system. PMID:17610086

  5. GABA binding to an insect GABA receptor: a molecular dynamics and mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Jamie A; McGonigle, Ian V; Price, Kerry L; Cohen, Netta; Comitani, Federico; Dougherty, Dennis A; Molteni, Carla; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2012-11-21

    RDL receptors are GABA-activated inhibitory Cys-loop receptors found throughout the insect CNS. They are a key target for insecticides. Here, we characterize the GABA binding site in RDL receptors using computational and electrophysiological techniques. A homology model of the extracellular domain of RDL was generated and GABA docked into the binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations predicted critical GABA binding interactions with aromatic residues F206, Y254, and Y109 and hydrophilic residues E204, S176, R111, R166, S176, and T251. These residues were mutated, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and their functions assessed using electrophysiology. The data support the binding mechanism provided by the simulations, which predict that GABA forms many interactions with binding site residues, the most significant of which are cation-π interactions with F206 and Y254, H-bonds with E204, S205, R111, S176, T251, and ionic interactions with R111 and E204. These findings clarify the roles of a range of residues in binding GABA in the RDL receptor, and also show that molecular dynamics simulations are a useful tool to identify specific interactions in Cys-loop receptors. PMID:23200041

  6. [Influence of GABA(C)-Receptor Antagonist on Formation of Evoked Potentials in Columns of the Rat Somatosensory Cortex].

    PubMed

    Matukhno, A E; Lysenko, L V; Andreeva, Y V; Sukhov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode studies of evoked potentials (EP) in neuronal column of rats barrel cortex show activating action of selective GABA(C)-receptor antagonist 1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl-methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) mainly on secondary components of EP of supragranular afferent layers of column compared to the efferent infragranular layers. These data suggest localization of GABA(C)-receptors on pre- synaptic terminals of thalamo-cortical glutamatergic afferents and ascending apical dendrites of pyramidal cells. A blockade of GABA(C)-receptors with the selective antagonist TPM PA leads to dose-dependent afferent depolarization with development of presynaptic inhibition and suppression of primary components of EP GABA(C)-receptors blocker produces different effects on secondary components of EP in supragranular layers of the cortex caused by the development of neuronal after hyperpolarization followed by high-amplitude primary response and afterdepolarization followed by low-amplitude primary responses with subsequent activation of different voltage-gated channels and formation of different level of cortical direct current potential gradients. PMID:26841661

  7. Linking Metabolism to Membrane Signaling: The GABA-Malate Connection.

    PubMed

    Gilliham, Matthew; Tyerman, Stephen D

    2016-04-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration increases rapidly in tissues when plants encounter abiotic or biotic stress, and GABA manipulation affects growth. This, coupled to GABA's well-described role as a neurotransmitter in mammals, led to over a decade of speculation that GABA is a signal in plants. The discovery of GABA-regulated anion channels in plants provides compelling mechanistic proof that GABA is a legitimate plant-signaling molecule. Here we examine research avenues unlocked by this finding and propose that these plant 'GABA receptors' possess novel properties ideally suited to translating changes in metabolic status into physiological responses. Specifically, we suggest they have a role in signaling altered cycling of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) intermediates during stress via eliciting changes in electrical potential differences across membranes. PMID:26723562

  8. Impact of exogenous GABA treatments on endogenous GABA metabolism in anthurium cut flowers in response to postharvest chilling temperature.

    PubMed

    Aghdam, Morteza Soleimani; Naderi, Roohangiz; Jannatizadeh, Abbasali; Babalar, Mesbah; Sarcheshmeh, Mohammad Ali Askari; Faradonbe, Mojtaba Zamani

    2016-09-01

    Anthurium flowers are susceptible to chilling injury, and the optimum storage temperature is 12.5-20 °C. The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt pathway may alleviate chilling stress in horticultural commodities by providing energy (ATP), reducing molecules (NADH), and minimizing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this experiment, the impact of a preharvest spray treatment with 1 mM GABA and postharvest treatment of 5 mM GABA stem-end dipping on GABA shunt pathway activity of anthurium cut flowers (cv. Sirion) in response to cold storage (4 °C for 21 days) was investigated. GABA treatments resulted in lower glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and higher GABA transaminase (GABA-T) activities in flowers during cold storage, which was associated with lower GABA content and coincided with higher ATP content. GABA treatments also enhanced accumulation of endogenous glycine betaine (GB) in flowers during cold storage, as well as higher spathe relative water content (RWC). These findings suggest that GABA treatments may alleviate chilling injury of anthurium cut flowers by enhancing GABA shunt pathway activity leading to provide sufficient ATP and promoting endogenous GB accumulation. PMID:27135813

  9. Paradoxical widespread c-Fos expression induced by a GABA agonist in the forebrain of transgenic mice with ectopic expression of the GABA(A) α6 subunit.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, K S; Linden, A-M; Korpi, E R

    2015-05-01

    A GABA-site agonist gaboxadol (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) at 3 mg/kg induces strong anxiolytic response in a transgenic Thy1α6 mouse line ectopically expressing the GABA(A) receptor α6 subunit gene under the Thy-1.2 promoter. Now, we compared brain activation patterns between Thy1α6 and wild-type mice to identify brain structures potentially mediating this anxiolytic response. Acutely efficient anxiolytics such as benzodiazepines typically depress most brain regions while activating specifically neurons within the central extended amygdala. Gaboxadol treatment (3 mg/kg, i.p., 2 h) induced a significant increase in c-Fos expression selectively in many Thy1α6 brain regions including the limbic cortex, anterior olfactory nucleus, septal area and central and basolateral nuclei of amygdala. It failed to activate the lateral part of mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (MDL) in the Thy1α6 mice that was activated in the wild-type mice. Detailed mapping of the α6 subunit mRNA by in situ hybridization revealed expression in the middle layers of the isocortex, olfactory areas, hippocampal formation and basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA) in the Thy1α6 forebrain. The ligand autoradiographies (t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35)S]thionate ([(35)S]TBPS) and [(3)H]Ro 15-4513) revealed high levels of pharmacologically active extrasynaptic α6β and α6βγ2 GABA(A) receptors in these same areas. However, c-Fos induction by gaboxadol treatment in Thy1α6 brain was not restricted to areas highly expressing the α6-containing GABA(A) receptors suggesting that indirect pathways lead to the paradoxically widespread activation. Interestingly, the activation pattern by gaboxadol at the dose that is anxiolytic in Thy1α6 mice resembled closely that observed after various fear- and stress-provoking challenges. However, our results are consistent with a recent observation that optogenetic activation of specific neuronal pathways in the extended amygdala mediates anxiolytic

  10. Selective antagonism of the GABA(A) receptor by ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Green, M A; Halliwell, R F

    1997-10-01

    1. Previous studies have shown that ciprofloxacin and biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) synergistically inhibit y-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. In the present study, we have investigated the actions of these two drugs on other neuronal ligand-gated ion channels. 2. Agonist-evoked depolarizations were recorded from rat vagus and optic nerves in vitro by use of an extracellular recording technique. 3. GABA (50 microM)-evoked responses, in the vagus nerve in vitro, were inhibited by bicuculline (0.3-10 microM) and picrotoxin (0.3-10 microM), with IC50 values and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 1.2 microM (1.1-1.4) and 3.6 microM (3.0-4.3), respectively, and were potentiated by sodium pentobarbitone (30 microM) and diazepam (1 microM) to (mean+/-s.e.mean) 168+/-18% and 117+/-4% of control, respectively. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 0.5 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by MDL 72222 (1 microM) to 10+/-4% of control; DMPP (10 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by hexamethonium (100 microM) to 12+/-5% of control, and alphabetaMeATP (30 microM)-evoked responses were inhibited by PPADS (10 microM) to 21+/-5% of control. Together, these data are consistent with activation of GABA(A), 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors, respectively. 4 Ciprofloxacin (10-3000 microM) inhibited GABA(A)-mediated responses in the vagus nerve with an IC50 (and 95% CI) of 202 microM (148-275). BPAA (1-1000 microM) had little or no effect on the GABA(A)-mediated response but concentration-dependently potentiated the effects of ciprofloxacin by up to 33,000 times. 5. Responses mediated by 5-HT3, nicotinic ACh and P2X receptors in the vagus nerve and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in the optic nerve were little or unaffected by ciprofloxacin (100 microM), BPAA (100 microM) or the combination of these drugs (both at 100 microM). 6. GABA (1 mM)-evoked responses in the optic nerve were inhibited by bicuculline with an IC50 of 3.6 microM (2.8-4.5), a value not significantly different

  11. Electrophysiological study of SR 42641, a novel aminopyridazine derivative of GABA: antagonist properties and receptor selectivity of GABAA versus GABAB responses.

    PubMed Central

    Desarmenien, M.; Desaulles, E.; Feltz, P.; Hamann, M.

    1987-01-01

    A new arylamino-pyridazine gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivative, SR 42641, has been tested for its ability to antagonize the actions of GABA on mammalian sensory neurones. SR 42641 and bicuculline reversibly decreased GABAA-induced depolarizations and currents recorded intracellularly from dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG). Dose-response curves were shifted to the right in a parallel fashion. KB values (determined under voltage clamp conditions) were respectively 0.12 +/- 0.05 and 0.38 +/- 0.08 microM. Similar values were obtained with current clamp recording conditions. The study of the GABA-induced Cl- current under voltage-clamp conditions did not show any voltage-dependency of the antagonist effect of SR 42641. In nodose ganglion neurones, SR 42641 (0.4-4.5 microM) did not alter the (-)-baclofen-induced shortening of the calcium component of action potentials. At concentrations higher than 10 microM, SR 42641 itself prolonged calcium-dependent action potentials. Patch-clamp recordings from DRG cultured neurones indicated that SR 42641 did not affect the calcium current responsible for sustained calcium entry into cells. We conclude that SR 42641 is a potent competitive GABA antagonist, specific for the GABAA receptor. It does not act at the level of the chloride ionophore. PMID:2435350

  12. Expression variations of chromogranin A and α1,2,4 GABA(A)Rs in discrete limbic and brainstem areas rescue cardiovascular alterations.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Ennio; Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Mele, Maria; Carelli, Antonio; Canonaco, Alessia; Mosciaro, Lucia; Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico; Mahata, Sushil K; Canonaco, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Recent interferences of hemodynamic functions via modified brain neuronal mechanisms have proven to be major causes of dementia and sleeping disorders. In this work, cerebral expression differences of the neuroactive vesicular chromogranin A (CgA) and distinct α GABA(A)R subunits were detected in the facultative hibernating hamster. In particular, damaged neuronal fields of hypotensive torpor (TORP) state were correlated to elevated CgA and GABA(A)R α1, α4 mRNA levels in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), central amygdalar nucleus (CeA) plus solitary tractus nucleus (NTS). Conversely, few neurodegeneration signals of hypertensive arousal (AROU) state, accounted for mostly lower CgA levels in the same areas. This state also provided increased α2-containing sites in amygdala, hippocampal and NTS neurons together with elevated α4-containing receptors in the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus (Pe). Interestingly in our hibernating model, CgA appeared to preferentially feature inhibitory neurosignals as indicated by preliminary perfusion of amygdalar sites with its highly specific antihypertensive derived peptide (catestatin) promoting GABA-dependent sIPSCs. Overall, evident neuronal damages plus altered expression capacities of CgA and α1-, α2-, α4-GABA(A)Rs in CeA, Pe, PVN as well as NTS during both hibernating states corroborate for the first time key molecular switching events guaranteeing useful cardiovascular rescuing abilities of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23916832

  13. Expression by midbrain dopamine neurons of Sema3A and 3F receptors is associated with chemorepulsion in vitro but a mild in vivo phenotype.

    PubMed

    Torre, Enrique R; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2010-06-01

    Here we explore the role of semaphorin 3A and 3F (Sema3A, Sema3F) in the formation of the mesotelencephalic pathway. We show that Sema3A and 3F are expressed in the ventral mesencephalon (VM) of E13.5 rat embryos; the receptors Neuropilin 1 and Neuropilin 2, and co-receptors L1CAM, NrCAM, and Plexins A1 and A3 but not A4 are expressed by VM dopaminergic neurons; these neurons bind Sema3A and 3F in vitro which induces collapse of their growth cones and elicits, with different potencies, a repulsive response; and this response is absent in axons from Nrp1 and Nrp2 null embryos. Despite these in vitro effects, only very mild anatomical defects were detected in the organization of the mesotelencephalic pathway in embryonic and adult Nrp1 or Nrp2 null mice. However, the dopaminergic meso-habenular pathway and catecholaminergic neurons in the parafascicular and paraventricular nuclei of the thalamus were significantly affected in Nrp2 null mice. These data are consistent with a model whereby Sema3A and 3F, in combination with other guidance molecules, contributes to the navigation of DA axons to their final synaptic targets. PMID:20298787

  14. Across-frequency nonlinear inhibition by GABA in processing of interaural time difference.

    PubMed

    Mori, K

    1997-09-01

    The barn owl uses the interaural time difference (ITD) to determine the azimuth of a sound source. Narrowband ITD-sensitive neurons cannot distinguish a given ITD from those that produce the same interaural phase difference (phase ambiguity). Neurons in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx) resolve the ambiguity by gathering ITD information across many frequencies, thereby suppressing false responses (side peaks, SP) relative to the true ITD (the main peak, MP) in a response versus ITD curve. This process was quantitatively studied by comparing the ITD curve for a pair of tones presented simultaneously (two-tone curve) to the simple sum (predicted curve) of the individual ITD curves for the same tones presented separately. Sixteen of the 39 neurons tested did not show a significant difference in MP and SP responses between these curves (category I); 14 neurons showed significant SP suppression (category II). During iontophoretic application of bicuculline methiodide, a GABA(A) antagonist, most (n = 7/8) category II neurons lost nonlinear SP suppression and became linear, whereas category I neurons retained linear summation (n = 3/3). Thus, the nonlinear cross-frequency interaction of ITD responses in ICx neurons was mediated mostly by GABAergic inhibition, which enhanced SP suppression, and helped resolve phase ambiguity. PMID:9307308

  15. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S.

    2006-06-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, astrocytes exert a complex modulatory control on the olfactory network. glutamate | GABA | inhibition | olfactory bulb | synchronization

  16. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils. PMID:24141311

  17. POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ORGANOTYPIC CO-CULTURES: EXPERIMENTAL DOPAMINE DEPLETION PREVENTS REDUCTIONS IN GABA

    PubMed Central

    Lyng, Gregory D.; Seegal, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that have been demonstrated to be toxic to the dopamine (DA) systems of the central nervous system. One proposed mechanism for PCB-induced DA neurotoxicity is inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT); such inhibition results in increased levels of unsequestered DA and DA metabolism leading to oxidative stress. We have used an organotypic co-culture system of developing rat striatum and ventral mesencephalon (VM) to determine whether alterations in the vesicular storage of DA, resulting from PCB exposure and consequent induction of oxidative stress, leads to GABA and DA neuronal dysfunction. 24 hr exposure to an environmentally relevant mixture of PCBs reduced tissue DA and GABA concentrations, increased medium levels of DA and measures of oxidative stress in both the striatum and VM. Alterations in neurochemistry and increases in measures of oxidative stress were blocked in the presence of n-acetylcysteine (NAC). Although NAC treatment did not alter PCB-induced changes in DA neurochemistry, it did protect against reductions in GABA concentration. To determine whether alterations in the vesicular storage of DA were responsible for PCB-induced oxidative stress and consequent reductions in GABA levels, we depleted DA from the co-cultures using α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT). AMPT reduced striatal and VM DA levels by 90% and 70%, respectively. PCB exposure, following DA depletion, neither increased levels of oxidative stress nor resulted in GABA depletion. These results suggest that PCB-induced alterations in the vesicular storage of DA, resulting in increased levels of unsequestered DA, leads to increased oxidative stress, depletion of tissue glutathione, and consequent reductions in tissue GABA concentrations. PMID:18262273

  18. Modulation of diazepam-insensitive GABA(A) receptors by micromolar concentrations of thyroxine and related compounds in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Witt, Michael-Robin; Nabekura, Junichi; Nielsen, Mogens

    2013-01-15

    The effects of thyroxine and its related compounds on the benzodiazepine-insensitive γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors were studied. Thyroxine at micromolar concentrations potentiated the (3)H-Ro15-4513 binding to rat brain membranes in-vitro in the thalamus, striatum, cortex and hippocampus, but not in cerebellum. In the thalamus, the rank order of potency was the following: 3,3',5,5'-tetraiodothyroacetic acid (TETRAC)>L-thyroxine>3,5-diiodo-l-thyronine (3,5-T2). TETRAC induced a slight potentiation of flumazenil binding to diazepam-sensitive GABA(A) receptors in the thalamus and striatum while no effect was found in cortex and hippocampus. Consequently, we examined whether these compounds could exert their modulatory effect on the currents mediated by benzodiazepine-insensitive GABA(A) receptors. The diazepam-insensitive GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents were recorded from acutely isolated rat ventrobasal thalamic neurons by applying low concentrations of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP). TETRAC and thyroxine at low μM concentrations potentiated the THIP-evoked currents, although 3,5-T2 had no effect on the THIP-induced currents. Ethanol had no effect on the enhancing effects of TETRAC. TETRAC itself evoked GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents at high concentrations beyond 30 μM. Although the effects of TETRAC and thyroxine were observed at non-physiological concentrations of hormones, the present results might lead to new lead structures with specificity to diazepam-insensitive GABA(A) receptor subtypes. PMID:23103412

  19. Embryonic GABA(B) receptor blockade alters cell migration, adult hypothalamic structure, and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors sex specifically in mice.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Matthew S; Staros, Michelle; Budefeld, Tomaz; Searcy, Brian T; Nash, Connor; Eitel, Chad; Carbone, David; Handa, Robert J; Majdic, Gregor; Tobet, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulate the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system. Females lacking functional GABA(B) receptors because of a genetic disruption of the R1 subunit have altered cellular characteristics in and around the PVN at birth. The genetic disruption precluded appropriate assessments of physiology or behavior in adulthood. The current study was conducted to test the long term impact of a temporally restricting pharmacological blockade of the GABA(B) receptor to a 7-day critical period (E11-E17) during embryonic development. Experiments tested the role of GABA(B) receptor signaling in fetal development of the PVN and later adult capacities for adult stress related behaviors and physiology. In organotypic slices containing fetal PVN, there was a female specific, 52% increase in cell movement speeds with GABA(B) receptor antagonist treatment that was consistent with a sex-dependent lateral displacement of cells in vivo following 7 days of fetal exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors, open-field activity, and HPA mediated responses to restraint stress were measured in adult offspring of mothers treated with GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Embryonic exposure to GABA(B) receptor antagonist resulted in reduced HPA axis activation following restraint stress and reduced depression-like behaviors. There was also increased anxiety-like behavior selectively in females and hyperactivity in males. A sex dependent response to disruptions of GABA(B) receptor signaling was identified for PVN formation and key aspects of physiology and behavior. These changes correspond to sex specific prevalence in similar human disorders, namely anxiety disorders and hyperactivity. PMID:25162235

  20. Distinct effects of pramipexole on the proliferation of adult mouse sub-ventricular zone-derived cells and the appearance of a neuronal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Sara; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Sortino, Maria Angela

    2011-05-01

    Pramipexole (PPX) is a dopamine agonist with an 8-fold higher affinity for D3 than D2 receptor, whose efficacy in the treatment of Parkinson's disease is based on dopamine agonistic activity. PPX has also been recently shown to be endowed with neuroprotective activity and neurogenic potential. The aim of this study was a more detailed characterization of PPX-induced neurogenesis. Both D2 and D3 receptors are expressed in floating and differentiated neurospheres obtained from the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mice. Treatment of secondary neurospheres with 10 μM PPX causes a marked induction of cell proliferation, assessed by enhanced cell number and S phase population at cell cycle analysis. Stimulation of proliferation by PPX is still detectable in plated neurospheres before the onset of migration and differentiation, as by enhanced BrdU incorporation. This effect is sensitive to the selective D3 dopamine receptor antagonist U99194A, as well as to sulpiride. A 24 h treatment with PPX does not modify the morphology of neurosphere-derived cells, but causes an increase of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells, an effect sensitive to both D2 and D3 antagonism. Differentiation toward the neuronal lineage is increased by PPX as shown by enhancement of the cell population positive to the early neuronal marker doublecortin (DCX) at 24 h and the mature neuronal marker microtubule associated protein (MAP2) at 72 h. This effect is not modified by treatment with U99194A and is mimicked by BDNF. Accordingly, PPX increases BDNF release with a mechanism involving D2 but not D3 receptors. PMID:21272591

  1. The Glutamate–Glutamine (GABA) Cycle: Importance of Late Postnatal Development and Potential Reciprocal Interactions between Biosynthesis and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif

    2013-01-01

    The gold standard for studies of glutamate–glutamine (GABA) cycling and its connections to brain biosynthesis from glucose of glutamate and GABA and their subsequent metabolism are the elegant in vivo studies by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), showing the large fluxes in the cycle. However, simpler experiments in intact brain tissue (e.g., immunohistochemistry), brain slices, cultured brain cells, and mitochondria have also made important contributions to the understanding of details, mechanisms, and functional consequences of glutamate/GABA biosynthesis and degradation. The purpose of this review is to attempt to integrate evidence from different sources regarding (i) the enzyme(s) responsible for the initial conversion of α-ketoglutarate to glutamate; (ii) the possibility that especially glutamate oxidation is essentially confined to astrocytes; and (iii) the ontogenetically very late onset and maturation of glutamine–glutamate (GABA) cycle function. Pathway models based on the functional importance of aspartate for glutamate synthesis suggest the possibility of interacting pathways for biosynthesis and degradation of glutamate and GABA and the use of transamination as the default mechanism for initiation of glutamate oxidation. The late development and maturation are related to the late cortical gliogenesis and convert brain cortical function from being purely neuronal to becoming neuronal-astrocytic. This conversion is associated with huge increases in energy demand and production, and the character of potentially incurred gains of function are discussed. These may include alterations in learning mechanisms, in mice indicated by lack of pairing of odor learning with aversive stimuli in newborn animals but the development of such an association 10–12 days later. The possibility is suggested that analogous maturational changes may contribute to differences in the way learning is accomplished in the newborn human brain and during later

  2. GABA shapes the dynamics of bistable perception.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Anouk M; Knapen, Tomas; Scholte, H Steven; St John-Saaltink, Elexa; Donner, Tobias H; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-05-01

    Sometimes, perception fluctuates spontaneously between two distinct interpretations of a constant sensory input. These bistable perceptual phenomena provide a unique window into the neural mechanisms that create the contents of conscious perception. Models of bistable perception posit that mutual inhibition between stimulus-selective neural populations in visual cortex plays a key role in these spontaneous perceptual fluctuations. However, a direct link between neural inhibition and bistable perception has not yet been established experimentally. Here, we link perceptual dynamics in three distinct bistable visual illusions (binocular rivalry, motion-induced blindness, and structure from motion) to measurements of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in human visual cortex (as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and to pharmacological stimulation of the GABAA receptor by means of lorazepam. As predicted by a model of neural interactions underlying bistability, both higher GABA concentrations in visual cortex and lorazepam administration induced slower perceptual dynamics, as reflected in a reduced number of perceptual switches and a lengthening of percept durations. Thus, we show that GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter, shapes the dynamics of bistable perception. These results pave the way for future studies into the competitive neural interactions across the visual cortical hierarchy that elicit conscious perception. PMID:23602476

  3. Somatostatin-expressing neurons in cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Barth, Alison L

    2016-07-01

    Somatostatin-expressing GABAergic neurons constitute a major class of inhibitory neurons in the mammalian cortex and are characterized by dense wiring into the local network and high basal firing activity that persists in the absence of synaptic input. This firing provides both GABA type A receptor (GABAAR)- and GABABR-mediated inhibition that operates at fast and slow timescales. The activity of somatostatin-expressing neurons is regulated by brain state, during learning and in rewarded behaviour. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of how this class of cells can control network activity, with specific reference to how this is constrained by their anatomical and electrophysiological properties. PMID:27225074

  4. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  5. Electrophysiological evidence for functionally distinct neuronal populations in the human substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Ramayya, Ashwin G; Zaghloul, Kareem A; Weidemann, Christoph T; Baltuch, Gordon H; Kahana, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The human substantia nigra (SN) is thought to consist of two functionally distinct neuronal populations-dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the pars compacta subregion and GABA-ergic neurons in the pars reticulata subregion. However, a functional dissociation between these neuronal populations has not previously been demonstrated in the awake human. Here we obtained microelectrode recordings from the SN of patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson's disease as they performed a two-alternative reinforcement learning task. Following positive feedback presentation, we found that putative DA and GABA neurons demonstrated distinct temporal dynamics. DA neurons demonstrated phasic increases in activity (250-500 ms post-feedback) whereas putative GABA neurons demonstrated more delayed and sustained increases in activity (500-1000 ms post-feedback). These results provide the first electrophysiological evidence for a functional dissociation between DA and GABA neurons in the human SN. We discuss possible functions for these neuronal responses based on previous findings in human and animal studies. PMID:25249957

  6. Substantial DNA methylation differences between two major neuronal subtypes in human brain.

    PubMed

    Kozlenkov, Alexey; Wang, Minghui; Roussos, Panos; Rudchenko, Sergei; Barbu, Mihaela; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; Dwork, Andrew J; Zhang, Bin; Hurd, Yasmin L; Koonin, Eugene V; Wegner, Michael; Dracheva, Stella

    2016-04-01

    The brain is built from a large number of cell types which have been historically classified using location, morphology and molecular markers. Recent research suggests an important role of epigenetics in shaping and maintaining cell identity in the brain. To elucidate the role of DNA methylation in neuronal differentiation, we developed a new protocol for separation of nuclei from the two major populations of human prefrontal cortex neurons--GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic (GLU) projection neurons. Major differences between the neuronal subtypes were revealed in CpG, non-CpG and hydroxymethylation (hCpG). A dramatically greater number of undermethylated CpG sites in GLU versus GABA neurons were identified. These differences did not directly translate into differences in gene expression and did not stem from the differences in hCpG methylation, as more hCpG methylation was detected in GLU versus GABA neurons. Notably, a comparable number of undermethylated non-CpG sites were identified in GLU and GABA neurons, and non-CpG methylation was a better predictor of subtype-specific gene expression compared to CpG methylation. Regions that are differentially methylated in GABA and GLU neurons were significantly enriched for schizophrenia risk loci. Collectively, our findings suggest that functional differences between neuronal subtypes are linked to their epigenetic specification. PMID:26612861

  7. Neurosteroid Structure-Activity Relationships for Functional Activation of Extrasynaptic δGABA(A) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carver, Chase Matthew; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-04-01

    Synaptic GABAA receptors are primary mediators of rapid inhibition in the brain and play a key role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and other neurologic disorders. The δ-subunit GABAA receptors are expressed extrasynaptically in the dentate gyrus and contribute to tonic inhibition, promoting network shunting as well as reducing seizure susceptibility. However, the neurosteroid structure-function relationship at δGABA(A) receptors within the native hippocampus neurons remains unclear. Here we report a structure-activity relationship for neurosteroid modulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated tonic inhibition in the murine dentate gyrus granule cells. We recorded neurosteroid allosteric potentiation of GABA as well as direct activation of tonic currents using a wide array of natural and synthetic neurosteroids. Our results shows that, for all neurosteroids, the C3α-OH group remains obligatory for extrasynaptic receptor functional activity, as C3β-OH epimers were inactive in activating tonic currents. Allopregnanolone and related pregnane analogs exhibited the highest potency and maximal efficacy in promoting tonic currents. Alterations at the C17 or C20 region of the neurosteroid molecule drastically altered the transduction kinetics of tonic current activation. The androstane analogs had the weakest modulatory response among the analogs tested. Neurosteroid potentiation of tonic currents was completely (approximately 95%) diminished in granule cells from δ-knockout mice, suggesting that δ-subunit receptors are essential for neurosteroid activity. The neurosteroid sensitivity of δGABA(A) receptors was confirmed at the systems level using a 6-Hz seizure test. A consensus neurosteroid pharmacophore model at extrasynaptic δGABA(A) receptors is proposed based on a structure-activity relationship for activation of tonic current and seizure protection. PMID:26857959

  8. GABAB receptor deficiency causes failure of neuronal homeostasis in hippocampal networks.

    PubMed

    Vertkin, Irena; Styr, Boaz; Slomowitz, Edden; Ofir, Nir; Shapira, Ilana; Berner, David; Fedorova, Tatiana; Laviv, Tal; Barak-Broner, Noa; Greitzer-Antes, Dafna; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Lotan, Ilana; Slutsky, Inna

    2015-06-23

    Stabilization of neuronal activity by homeostatic control systems is fundamental for proper functioning of neural circuits. Failure in neuronal homeostasis has been hypothesized to underlie common pathophysiological mechanisms in a variety of brain disorders. However, the key molecules regulating homeostasis in central mammalian neural circuits remain obscure. Here, we show that selective inactivation of GABAB, but not GABA(A), receptors impairs firing rate homeostasis by disrupting synaptic homeostatic plasticity in hippocampal networks. Pharmacological GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) blockade or genetic deletion of the GB(1a) receptor subunit disrupts homeostatic regulation of synaptic vesicle release. GABA(B)Rs mediate adaptive presynaptic enhancement to neuronal inactivity by two principle mechanisms: First, neuronal silencing promotes syntaxin-1 switch from a closed to an open conformation to accelerate soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex assembly, and second, it boosts spike-evoked presynaptic calcium flux. In both cases, neuronal inactivity removes tonic block imposed by the presynaptic, GB(1a)-containing receptors on syntaxin-1 opening and calcium entry to enhance probability of vesicle fusion. We identified the GB(1a) intracellular domain essential for the presynaptic homeostatic response by tuning intermolecular interactions among the receptor, syntaxin-1, and the Ca(V)2.2 channel. The presynaptic adaptations were accompanied by scaling of excitatory quantal amplitude via the postsynaptic, GB(1b)-containing receptors. Thus, GABA(B)Rs sense chronic perturbations in GABA levels and transduce it to homeostatic changes in synaptic strength. Our results reveal a novel role for GABA(B)R as a key regulator of population firing stability and propose that disruption of homeostatic synaptic plasticity may underlie seizure's persistence in the absence of functional GABA(B)Rs. PMID:26056260

  9. Glucose sensing by GABAergic neurons in the mouse nucleus tractus solitarii.

    PubMed

    Boychuk, Carie R; Gyarmati, Peter; Xu, Hong; Smith, Bret N

    2015-08-01

    Changes in blood glucose concentration alter autonomic function in a manner consistent with altered neural activity in brain regions controlling digestive processes, including neurons in the brain stem nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), which process viscerosensory information. With whole cell or on-cell patch-clamp recordings, responses to elevating glucose concentration from 2.5 to 15 mM were assessed in identified GABAergic NTS neurons in slices from transgenic mice that express EGFP in a subset of GABA neurons. Single-cell real-time RT-PCR was also performed to detect glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) in recorded neurons. In most identified GABA neurons (73%), elevating glucose concentration from 2.5 to 15 mM resulted in either increased (40%) or decreased (33%) neuronal excitability, reflected by altered membrane potential and/or action potential firing. Effects on membrane potential were maintained when action potentials or fast synaptic inputs were blocked, suggesting direct glucose sensing by GABA neurons. Glucose-inhibited GABA neurons were found predominantly in the lateral NTS, whereas glucose-excited cells were mainly in the medial NTS, suggesting regional segregation of responses. Responses were prevented in the presence of glucosamine, a glucokinase (GCK) inhibitor. Depolarizing responses were prevented when KATP channel activity was blocked with tolbutamide. Whereas effects on synaptic input to identified GABAergic neurons were variable in GABA neurons, elevating glucose increased glutamate release subsequent to stimulation of tractus solitarius in unlabeled, unidentified neurons. These results indicate that GABAergic NTS neurons act as GCK-dependent glucose sensors in the vagal complex, providing a means of modulating central autonomic signals when glucose is elevated. PMID:26084907

  10. The ventral surface of the medulla in the rat: pharmacologic and autoradiographic localization of GABA-induced cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Keeler, J R; Shults, C W; Chase, T N; Helke, C J

    1984-04-16

    Experiments were done to evaluate a rat model for studying the cardiovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations of the ventral surface of the medulla. GABAergic drugs were used because of their well-characterized actions at the ventral surface of the medulla in the cat. GABA and muscimol, applied to the exposed ventral surface with filter paper pledgets, produced dose-dependent decreases in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) which were reversed with bicuculline but not with strychnine. Bicuculline alone raised HR and MAP. The GABA- or bicuculline-induced cardiovascular effects were mediated primarily by inhibition of sympathetic outflow. The most sensitive site was localized to an intermediate area on the ventral surface of the medulla, between the trapezoid body and exits of the hypoglossal nerves and just lateral to the pyramids. Topical application of [3H]GABA to the intermediate area resulted in labeling that was concentrated at the site of application, and which penetrated the parenchyma 1 mm dorsally. The heaviest labeling was found primarily in the ventral halves of the lateral paragigantocellular nuclei. No tritium was detected in peripheral blood. These data provide evidence for a neuronal system at the ventral medullary surface of the rat which influences sympathetic outflow and is modulated by GABA. PMID:6326937

  11. Carboxylation and anaplerosis in neurons and glia.

    PubMed

    Hassel, B

    2000-01-01

    Anaplerosis, or de novo formation of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, compensates for losses of TCA cycle intermediates, especially alpha-ketoglutarate, from brain cells. Loss of alpha-ketoglutarate occurs through release of glutamate and GABA from neurons and through export of glutamine from glia, because these amino acids are alpha-ketoglutarate derivatives. Anaplerosis in the brain may involve four different carboxylating enzymes: malic enzyme, phosphoenopyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and pyruvate carboxylase. Anaplerotic carboxylation was for many years thought to occur only in glia through pyruvate carboxylase; therefore, loss of transmitter glutamate and GABA from neurons was thought to be compensated by uptake of glutamine from glia. Recently, however, anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation was demonstrated in glutamatergic neurons, meaning that these neurons to some extent can maintain transmitter synthesis independently of glutamine. Malic enzyme, which may carboxylate pyruvate, was recently detected in neurons. The available data suggest that neuronal and glial pyruvate carboxylation could operate at as much as 30% and 40-60% of the TCA cycle rate, respectively. Cerebral carboxylation reactions are probably balanced by decarboxylation reactions,, because cerebral CO2 formation equals O2 consumption. The finding of pyruvate carboxylation in neurons entails a major revision of the concept of the glutamine cycle. PMID:11414279

  12. Molecular basis for the high THIP/gaboxadol sensitivity of extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S

    2011-10-01

    Extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors (eGABARs) allow ambient GABA to tonically regulate neuronal excitability and are implicated as targets for ethanol and anesthetics. These receptors are thought to be heteropentameric proteins made up of two α subunits-either α4 or α6-two β2 or β3 subunits, and one δ subunit. The GABA analog 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo (5,4-c)pyridin-3(-ol) (THIP) has been proposed as a selective ligand for eGABARs. Behavioral and in vitro studies suggest that eGABARs have nanomolar affinity for THIP; however, all published studies on recombinant versions of eGABARs report micromolar affinities. Here, we examine THIP sensitivity of native eGABARs on cerebellar neurons and on reconstituted GABARs in heterologous systems. Concentration-response data for THIP, obtained from cerebellar granule cells and molecular layer interneurons in wild-type and δ subunit knockout slices, confirm that submicromolar THIP sensitivity requires δ subunits. In recombinant experiments, we find that δ subunit coexpression leads to receptors activated by nanomolar THIP concentrations (EC(50) of 30-50 nM for α4β3δ and α6β3δ), a sensitivity almost 1,000-fold higher than receptors formed by α4/6 and β3 subunits. In contrast, γ2 subunit expression significantly reduces THIP sensitivity. Even when δ subunit cDNA or cRNA was supplied in excess, high- and low-sensitivity THIP responses were often apparent, indicative of variable mixtures of low-affinity αβ and high-affinity αβδ receptors. We conclude that δ subunit incorporation into GABARs leads to a dramatic increase in THIP sensitivity, a defining feature that accounts for the unique behavioral and neurophysiological properties of THIP. PMID:21795619

  13. GABA levels in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex during the viewing of appetitive and disgusting food images.

    PubMed

    Padulo, Caterina; Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Bonanni, Laura; Edden, Richard A E; Ferretti, Antonio; Marzoli, Daniele; Franciotti, Raffaella; Manippa, Valerio; Onofrj, Marco; Sepede, Gianna; Tartaro, Armando; Tommasi, Luca; Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Brancucci, Alfredo

    2016-10-01

    Characterizing how the brain appraises the psychological dimensions of reward is one of the central topics of neuroscience. It has become clear that dopamine neurons are implicated in the transmission of both rewarding information and aversive and alerting events through two different neuronal populations involved in encoding the motivational value and the motivational salience of stimuli, respectively. Nonetheless, there is less agreement on the role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and the related neurotransmitter release during the processing of biologically relevant stimuli. To address this issue, we employed magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a non-invasive methodology that allows detection of some metabolites in the human brain in vivo, in order to assess the role of the vmPFC in encoding stimulus value rather than stimulus salience. Specifically, we measured gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and, with control purposes, Glx levels in healthy subjects during the observation of appetitive and disgusting food images. We observed a decrease of GABA and no changes in Glx concentration in the vmPFC in both conditions. Furthermore, a comparatively smaller GABA reduction during the observation of appetitive food images than during the observation of disgusting food images was positively correlated with the scores obtained to the body image concerns sub-scale of Body Uneasiness Test (BUT). These results are consistent with the idea that the vmPFC plays a crucial role in processing both rewarding and aversive stimuli, possibly by encoding stimulus salience through glutamatergic and/or noradrenergic projections to deeper mesencephalic and limbic areas. PMID:27436536

  14. Electrophysiological studies in cultured mouse CNS neurones of the actions of an agonist and an inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M. S.; Lambert, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The action of agents which bind with the benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor has been investigated by use of intracellular recordings from dissociated mouse neurones grown in tissue culture. The agents tested were midazolam (an agonist at the BZ receptor) and methyl 6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM-an inverse agonist at the BZ receptor). These were applied to the neurone under study by one of the following methods: iontophoresis; pressure application of known concentrations from blunt pipettes; directly in the perfusing medium. On only very few occasions did midazolam or DMCM have a direct effect on the membrane potential (EM) or conductance (GM) of the impaled neurone. For the neurones where direct effects were present, there was no consistent pattern of response. Neither substance affected the threshold for action potential generation. The effect of midazolam and DMCM on responses evoked by iontophoretic application of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was also investigated. Three parameters were used to quantify GABA responses: the depolarization (VGABA); the increase in GM (gGABA) measured with constant current pulses; using voltage clamp, the GABA current (IGABA). The GABA response should be quantified by a parameter which is linearly related to the number of GABA-operated channels which are conducting at any instant. VGABA does not fulfil this criterion. gGABA is an appropriate parameter, but is difficult to determine for large responses where the membrane is nearly short circuited. IGABA measured during voltage clamp fulfils this criterion. Midazolam (greater than 10(-6) M) reliably potentiated GABA responses with a parallel shift to the left of the dose-response curve. This is in agreement with biochemical studies where BZs increase the affinity of the GABA receptor for its ligand. The effect of DMCM on GABA responses was more variable. In the majority of cases GABA responses were reduced by DMCM. The threshold dose for this depression was

  15. Developmental Changes in Synaptic Distribution in Arcuate Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kirigiti, Melissa A.; Baquero, Karalee C.; Lee, Shin J.; Smith, M. Susan; Grove, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons coexpressing neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide, and GABA (NAG) play an important role in ingestive behavior and are located in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. NAG neurons receive both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic inputs, however, the developmental time course of synaptic input organization of NAG neurons in mice is unknown. In this study, we show that these neurons have low numbers of GABAergic synapses and that GABA is inhibitory to NAG neurons during early postnatal period. In contrast, glutamatergic inputs onto NAG neurons are relatively abundant by P13 and are comparatively similar to the levels observed in the adult. As mice reach adulthood (9–10 weeks), GABAergic tone onto NAG neurons increases. At this age, NAG neurons received similar numbers of inhibitory and EPSCs. To further differentiate age-associated changes in synaptic distribution, 17- to 18-week-old lean and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice were studied. Surprisingly, NAG neurons from lean adult mice exhibit a reduction in the GABAergic synapses compared with younger adults. Conversely, DIO mice display reductions in the number of GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs onto NAG neurons. Based on these experiments, we propose that synaptic distribution in NAG neurons is continuously restructuring throughout development to accommodate the animals' energy requirements. PMID:26041922

  16. Substantial DNA methylation differences between two major neuronal subtypes in human brain

    PubMed Central

    Kozlenkov, Alexey; Wang, Minghui; Roussos, Panos; Rudchenko, Sergei; Barbu, Mihaela; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; Dwork, Andrew J.; Zhang, Bin; Hurd, Yasmin L.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Wegner, Michael; Dracheva, Stella

    2016-01-01

    The brain is built from a large number of cell types which have been historically classified using location, morphology and molecular markers. Recent research suggests an important role of epigenetics in shaping and maintaining cell identity in the brain. To elucidate the role of DNA methylation in neuronal differentiation, we developed a new protocol for separation of nuclei from the two major populations of human prefrontal cortex neurons—GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic (GLU) projection neurons. Major differences between the neuronal subtypes were revealed in CpG, non-CpG and hydroxymethylation (hCpG). A dramatically greater number of undermethylated CpG sites in GLU versus GABA neurons were identified. These differences did not directly translate into differences in gene expression and did not stem from the differences in hCpG methylation, as more hCpG methylation was detected in GLU versus GABA neurons. Notably, a comparable number of undermethylated non-CpG sites were identified in GLU and GABA neurons, and non-CpG methylation was a better predictor of subtype-specific gene expression compared to CpG methylation. Regions that are differentially methylated in GABA and GLU neurons were significantly enriched for schizophrenia risk loci. Collectively, our findings suggest that functional differences between neuronal subtypes are linked to their epigenetic specification. PMID:26612861

  17. Iontophoretic studies on rat hippocampus with some novel GABA antagonists.

    PubMed

    Dalkara, T; Saederup, E; Squires, R F; Krnjevic, K

    1986-08-01

    Twelve substances which appear to be GABA antagonists, judging by their ability to reverse the inhibitory effect of GABA on 35S-TBPS binding to rat brain membranes, were tested iontophoretically on population spikes in the rat hippocampus. Eight of them, including seven which completely reversed the inhibitory action of GABA on 35S-TBPS binding, caused a marked enhancement of population spikes, with slow onset and long duration and they antagonized the inhibition of population spikes by GABA. These effects were similar to those produced by bicuculline. Electrophysiologically, the most potent of the "complete reversers" were bathophenanthroline disulfonate and brucine. In vitro, amoxapine and brucine most effectively reversed the inhibitory action of GABA on 35S-TBPS binding. Of the five substances which only partly reversed the inhibitory effect of GABA on 35S-TBPS binding, four depressed the population spikes and potentiated the inhibitory action of GABA. The fifth "partial reverser", pipazethate, potently increased the population spikes, like the "complete reversers". Although other interpretations are possible the results are consistent with the existence of several GABA-A receptor types in brain, only some of which are blocked by certain partial reversers. PMID:2874465

  18. Physiological bases of the K+ and the glutamate/GABA hypotheses of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Mangia, Silvia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a heterogeneous family of neurological disorders that manifest as seizures, i.e. the hypersynchronous activity of large population of neurons. About 30% of epileptic patients do not respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs. Decades of intense research have elucidated the involvement of a number of possible signaling pathways, however, at present we do not have a fundamental understanding of epileptogenesis. In this paper, we review the literature on epilepsy under a wide-angle perspective, a mandatory choice that responds to the recurrent and unanswered question about what is epiphenomenal and what is causal to the disease. While focusing on the involvement of K+ and glutamate/GABA in determining neuronal hyperexcitability, emphasis is given to astrocytic contribution to epileptogenesis, and especially to loss-of-function of astrocytic glutamine synthetase following reactive astrogliosis, a hallmark of epileptic syndromes. We finally introduce the potential involvement of abnormal glycogen synthesis induced by excess glutamate in increasing susceptibility to seizures. PMID:24818957

  19. GABA and enkephalin tonically alter sympathetic outflows in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Belinda R; Goodchild, Ann K

    2015-12-01

    GABA and enkephalin provide significant innervation of sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Despite some investigation as to the identity of premotor sources of these innervations no comprehensive analyses have been conducted. Similarly, although data describing the cardiovascular effects of blockade of GABAA receptors in the spinal cord is available, the effects at other sympathetic outflows are unknown. In contrast the sympathetic effects of opioid blockade in the spinal cord are unclear. The aims of this study were to identify potential sympathetic premotor sources of GABAergic and enkephalinergic input to the spinal cord and to describe the sympathetic and cardiovascular effects of spinal GABAA receptor and delta/mu opioid receptor blockade in urethane anaesthetised rats. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA were found in all regions containing sympathetic premotor neurons, with the medullary raphe and RVMM providing the major GABAergic projections, while the PVN, RVMM and medullary raphe provided the major enkephalinergic projections. Intrathecal injection of bicuculline, a GABAA antagonist, elicited large and prolonged increases in all outflows measured, confirming previous work describing a tonic GABAergic influence on vasomotor tone, and revealing a tonic GABAergic inhibition of interscapular brown adipose tissue temperature. Intrathecal naloxone elicited transient small inhibitory effects only on MAP and HR. Thus GABA acting in the spinal cord plays an important role in the tonic suppression of sympathetic outflows while enkephalin appears to play only a minor role. PMID:26329875

  20. GABA promotes the competitive selection of dendritic spines by controlling local Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tatsuya; Noguchi, Jun; Watanabe, Satoshi; Takahashi, Noriko; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Ellis-Davies, Graham C R; Matsuzaki, Masanori; Kasai, Haruo

    2013-10-01

    Activity-dependent competition of synapses plays a key role in neural organization and is often promoted by GABA; however, its cellular bases are poorly understood. Excitatory synapses of cortical pyramidal neurons are formed on small protrusions known as dendritic spines, which exhibit structural plasticity. We used two-color uncaging of glutamate and GABA in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and found that spine shrinkage and elimination were markedly promoted by the activation of GABAA receptors shortly before action potentials. GABAergic inhibition suppressed bulk increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, whereas it preserved the Ca(2+) nanodomains generated by NMDA-type receptors, both of which were necessary for spine shrinkage. Unlike spine enlargement, spine shrinkage spread to neighboring spines (<15 μm) and competed with their enlargement, and this process involved the actin-depolymerizing factor ADF/cofilin. Thus, GABAergic inhibition directly suppresses local dendritic Ca(2+) transients and strongly promotes the competitive selection of dendritic spines. PMID:23974706

  1. Inhibiting neuroinflammation: The role and therapeutic potential of GABA in neuro-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Tadhg; Cryan, John F; Downer, Eric J; O'Leary, Olivia F

    2016-05-01

    The central nervous system, once thought to be a site of immunological privilege, has since been found to harbour immunocompetent cells and to communicate with the peripheral nervous system. In the central nervous system (CNS), glial cells display immunological responses to pathological and physiological stimuli through pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine signalling, antigen presentation and the clearing of cellular debris through phagocytosis. While this neuroinflammatory signalling can act to reduce neuronal damage and comprises a key facet of CNS homeostasis, persistent inflammation or auto-antigen-mediated immunoreactivity can induce a positive feedback cycle of neuroinflammation that ultimately results in necrosis of glia and neurons. Persistent neuroinflammation has been recognised as a major pathological component of virtually all neurodegenerative diseases and has also been a focus of research into the pathology underlying psychiatric disorders. Thus, pharmacological strategies to curb the pathological effects of persistent neuroinflammation are of interest for many disorders of the CNS. Accumulating evidence suggests that GABAergic activities are closely bound to immune processes and signals, and thus the GABAergic neurotransmitter system might represent an important therapeutic target in modulating neuroinflammation. Here, we review evidence that inflammation induces changes in the GABA neurotransmitter system in the CNS and that GABAergic signalling exerts a reciprocal influence over neuroinflammatory processes. Together, the data support the hypothesis that the GABA system is a potential therapeutic target in the modulation of central inflammation. PMID:26851553

  2. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Ulrike; Platt, Sarah J; Wolf, Steffen; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans, and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus project widely throughout the central nervous system. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) and, in high concentrations (10 mM), as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABAARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABAARs. We expressed GABAARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues β2(N265) and β2(M286), which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues α1(R120), β2(Y157), β2(D163), β3(V175), and β3(Q185). We showed that the amino acid residues β2(Y157) and β3(Q185) mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas α1(R120) and β2(D163) form a potential histamine interaction site in GABAARs. PMID:26074818

  3. Deficiency of Schnurri-2, an MHC Enhancer Binding Protein, Induces Mild Chronic Inflammation in the Brain and Confers Molecular, Neuronal, and Behavioral Phenotypes Related to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Keizo; Kobayashi, Katsunori; Hagihara, Hideo; Ohira, Koji; Shoji, Hirotaka; Hattori, Satoko; Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Umemori, Juzoh; Toyama, Keiko; Nakamura, Hironori K; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Maeda, Jun; Atsuzawa, Kimie; Esaki, Kayoko; Yamaguchi, Shun; Furuya, Shigeki; Takagi, Tsuyoshi; Walton, Noah M; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Hidenori; Higuchi, Makoto; Usuda, Nobuteru; Suhara, Tetsuya; Nishi, Akinori; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Ishii, Shunsuke; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Schnurri-2 (Shn-2), an nuclear factor-κB site-binding protein, tightly binds to the enhancers of major histocompatibility complex class I genes and inflammatory cytokines, which have been shown to harbor common variant single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with schizophrenia. Although genes related to immunity are implicated in schizophrenia, there has been no study showing that their mutation or knockout (KO) results in schizophrenia. Here, we show that Shn-2 KO mice have behavioral abnormalities that resemble those of schizophrenics. The mutant brain demonstrated multiple schizophrenia-related phenotypes, including transcriptome/proteome changes similar to those of postmortem schizophrenia patients, decreased parvalbumin and GAD67 levels, increased theta power on electroencephalograms, and a thinner cortex. Dentate gyrus granule cells failed to mature in mutants, a previously proposed endophenotype of schizophrenia. Shn-2 KO mice also exhibited mild chronic inflammation of the brain, as evidenced by increased inflammation markers (including GFAP and NADH/NADPH oxidase p22 phox), and genome-wide gene expression patterns similar to various inflammatory conditions. Chronic administration of anti-inflammatory drugs reduced hippocampal GFAP expression, and reversed deficits in working memory and nest-building behaviors in Shn-2 KO mice. These results suggest that genetically induced changes in immune system can be a predisposing factor in schizophrenia. PMID:23389689

  4. Deficiency of schnurri-2, an MHC enhancer binding protein, induces mild chronic inflammation in the brain and confers molecular, neuronal, and behavioral phenotypes related to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Takao, Keizo; Kobayashi, Katsunori; Hagihara, Hideo; Ohira, Koji; Shoji, Hirotaka; Hattori, Satoko; Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Umemori, Juzoh; Toyama, Keiko; Nakamura, Hironori K; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Maeda, Jun; Atsuzawa, Kimie; Esaki, Kayoko; Yamaguchi, Shun; Furuya, Shigeki; Takagi, Tsuyoshi; Walton, Noah M; Hayashi, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Hidenori; Higuchi, Makoto; Usuda, Nobuteru; Suhara, Tetsuya; Nishi, Akinori; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Ishii, Shunsuke; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Schnurri-2 (Shn-2), an nuclear factor-κB site-binding protein, tightly binds to the enhancers of major histocompatibility complex class I genes and inflammatory cytokines, which have been shown to harbor common variant single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with schizophrenia. Although genes related to immunity are implicated in schizophrenia, there has been no study showing that their mutation or knockout (KO) results in schizophrenia. Here, we show that Shn-2 KO mice have behavioral abnormalities that resemble those of schizophrenics. The mutant brain demonstrated multiple schizophrenia-related phenotypes, including transcriptome/proteome changes similar to those of postmortem schizophrenia patients, decreased parvalbumin and GAD67 levels, increased theta power on electroencephalograms, and a thinner cortex. Dentate gyrus granule cells failed to mature in mutants, a previously proposed endophenotype of schizophrenia. Shn-2 KO mice also exhibited mild chronic inflammation of the brain, as evidenced by increased inflammation markers (including GFAP and NADH/NADPH oxidase p22 phox), and genome-wide gene expression patterns similar to various inflammatory conditions. Chronic administration of anti-inflammatory drugs reduced hippocampal GFAP expression, and reversed deficits in working memory and nest-building behaviors in Shn-2 KO mice. These results suggest that genetically induced changes in immune system can be a predisposing factor in schizophrenia. PMID:23389689

  5. The role of voltage-gated calcium channels in neurotransmitter phenotype specification: Coexpression and functional analysis in Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Brittany B; Miller, Lauren E; Herbst, Wendy A; Saha, Margaret S

    2014-01-01

    Calcium activity has been implicated in many neurodevelopmental events, including the specification of neurotransmitter phenotypes. Higher levels of calcium activity lead to an increased number of inhibitory neural phenotypes, whereas lower levels of calcium activity lead to excitatory neural phenotypes. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) allow for rapid calcium entry and are expressed during early neural stages, making them likely regulators of activity-dependent neurotransmitter phenotype specification. To test this hypothesis, multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to characterize the coexpression of eight VGCC α1 subunits with the excitatory and inhibitory neural markers xVGlut1 and xVIAAT in Xenopus laevis embryos. VGCC coexpression was higher with xVGlut1 than xVIAAT, especially in the hindbrain, spinal cord, and cranial nerves. Calcium activity was also analyzed on a single-cell level, and spike frequency was correlated with the expression of VGCC α1 subunits in cell culture. Cells expressing Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 displayed increased calcium spiking compared with cells not expressing this marker. The VGCC antagonist diltiazem and agonist (−)BayK 8644 were used to manipulate calcium activity. Diltiazem exposure increased the number of glutamatergic cells and decreased the number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic cells, whereas (−)BayK 8644 exposure decreased the number of glutamatergic cells without having an effect on the number of GABAergic cells. Given that the expression and functional manipulation of VGCCs are correlated with neurotransmitter phenotype in some, but not all, experiments, VGCCs likely act in combination with a variety of other signaling factors to determine neuronal phenotype specification. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2518–2531, 2014. PMID:24477801

  6. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment and cortical responses to adenosine and GABA.

    PubMed

    Mally, J; Connick, J H; Stone, T W

    1990-10-22

    The effects of chronic treatment of mice with clonazepam have been examined on the responses of neocortical slices to adenosine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Responses to these agonists were measured as changes in the depolarisation induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Added to the superfusion medium diazepam blocked responses to adenosine but not 5-HT; this effect was not observed with 2-chloroadenosine or in the presence of 2-hydroxynitrobenzylthioguanosine. GABA was inactive in control slices but chronic treatment with clonazepam induced responses to GABA and enhanced responses to adenosine but not 5-HT. It is suggested that the induction of GABA responses may reflect the up-regulation of GABA receptors, but the increase of adenosine responses by clonazepam implies that there is no simple relationship between adenosine receptor binding and functional responses. PMID:1979931

  7. Interactions between hypocretinergic and GABAergic systems in the control of activity of neurons in the cat pontine reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Xi, M; Fung, S J; Yamuy, J; Chase, M H

    2015-07-01

    Anatomical studies have demonstrated that hypocretinergic and GABAergic neurons innervate cells in the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO), a nucleus responsible for the generation of active (rapid eye movement (REM)) sleep (AS) and wakefulness (W). Behavioral and electrophysiological studies have shown that hypocretinergic and GABAergic processes in the NPO are involved in the generation of AS as well as W. An increase in hypocretin in the NPO is associated with both AS and W, whereas GABA levels in the NPO are elevated during W. We therefore examined the manner in which GABA modulates NPO neuronal responses to hypocretin. We hypothesized that interactions between the hypocretinergic and GABAergic systems in the NPO play an important role in determining the occurrence of AS or W. To determine the veracity of this hypothesis, we examined the effects of the juxtacellular application of hypocretin-1 and GABA on the activity of NPO neurons, which were recorded intracellularly, in chloralose-anesthetized cats. The juxtacellular application of hypocretin-1 significantly increased the mean amplitude of spontaneous EPSPs and the frequency of discharge of NPO neurons; in contrast, the juxtacellular microinjection of GABA produced the opposite effects, i.e., there was a significant reduction in the mean amplitude of spontaneous EPSPs and a decrease in the discharge of these cells. When hypocretin-1 and GABA were applied simultaneously, the inhibitory effect of GABA on the activity of NPO neurons was reduced or completely blocked. In addition, hypocretin-1 also blocked GABAergic inhibition of EPSPs evoked by stimulation of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. These data indicate that hypocretin and GABA function within the context of a neuronal gate that controls the activity of AS-on neurons. Therefore, we suggest that the occurrence of either AS or W depends upon interactions between hypocretinergic and GABAergic processes as well as inputs from other sites that project to AS

  8. Study of GABA in Healthy Volunteers: Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Liu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yi; Mao, Fei; Mao, Junjun; Lu, Xiaolan; Jiang, Dongdong; Wan, Yun; Lv, Jia-Ying; Cao, Guoying; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Naiqing; Atkinson, Mark; Greiner, Dale L.; Prud'homme, Gerald J.; Jiao, Zheng; Li, Yiming; Wang, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies show that GABA exerts anti-diabetic effects in rodent models of type 1 diabetes. Because little is known about its absorption and effects in humans, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GABA in healthy volunteers. Twelve subjects were subjected to an open-labeled, three-period trial involving sequential oral administration of placebo, 2 g GABA once, and 2 g GABA three times/day for 7 days, with a 7-day washout between each period. GABA was rapidly absorbed (Tmax: 0.5 ~ 1 h) with the half-life (t1/2) of 5 h. No accumulation was observed after repeated oral GABA administration for 7 days. Remarkably, GABA significantly increased circulating insulin levels in the subjects under either fasting (1.6-fold, single dose; 2.0-fold, repeated dose; p < 0.01) or fed conditions (1.4-fold, single dose; 1.6-fold, repeated dose; p < 0.01). GABA also increased glucagon levels only under fasting conditions (1.3-fold, single dose, p < 0.05; 1.5-fold, repeated dose, p < 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in the insulin-to-glucagon ratio and no significant change in glucose levels in these healthy subjects during the study period. Importantly, GABA significantly decreased glycated albumin levels in the repeated dosing period. Subjects with repeated dosing showed an elevated incidence of minor adverse events in comparison to placebo or the single dosing period, most notably transient discomforts such as dizziness and sore throat. However, there were no serious adverse events observed throughout the study. Our data show that GABA is rapidly absorbed and tolerated in human beings; its endocrine effects, exemplified by increasing islet hormonal secretion, suggest potential therapeutic benefits for diabetes. PMID:26617516

  9. GABA selectively increases mucin-1 expression in isolated pig jejunum.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Sponder, Gerhard; Pieper, Robert; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Deiner, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase, which is expressed in the central nervous system and in various other tissues including the intestine. Moreover, GABA can be ingested in vegetarian diets or produced by bacterial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. As previous studies in lung have suggested a link between locally increased GABA availability and mucin 5AC production, the present study sought to test whether the presence or lack of GABA (and its precursor glutamine) has an effect on intestinal mucin expression. Porcine jejunum epithelial preparations were incubated with two different amounts of GABA or glutamine on the mucosal side for 4 h, and changes in the relative gene expression of seven different mucins, enzymes involved in mucin shedding, GABA B receptor, enzymes involved in glutamine/GABA metabolism, glutathione peroxidase 2, and interleukin 10 were examined by quantitative PCR (TaqMan(®) assays). Protein expression of mucin-1 (MUC1) was analyzed by Western blot. On the RNA level, only MUC1 was significantly up-regulated by both GABA concentrations compared with the control. Glutamine-treated groups showed the same trend. On the protein level, all treatment groups showed a significantly higher MUC1 expression than the control group. We conclude that GABA selectively increases the expression of MUC1, a cell surface mucin that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms, because of its size and negative charge, and therefore propose that the well-described positive effects of glutamine on enterocytes and intestinal integrity are partly attributable to effects of its metabolite GABA. PMID:26471792

  10. Chronic stress shifts the GABA reversal potential in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Georgina; Maguire, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures is stress. However, the underlying mechanisms whereby stress triggers seizures are not yet fully understood. Here we demonstrate a potential mechanism underlying changes in neuronal excitability in the hippocampus following chronic stress, involving a shift in the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) associated with a dephosphorylation of the potassium chloride co-transporter, KCC2. Mice subjected to chronic restraint stress (30min/day for 14 consecutive days) exhibit an increase in serum corticosterone levels which is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures induced with kainic acid (20mg/kg). Following chronic stress, but not acute stress, we observe a dephosphorylation of KCC2 residue S940, which regulates KCC2 cell surface expression and function, in the hippocampus. To determine the impact of alterations in KCC2 expression following chronic stress, we performed gramicidin perforated patch recordings to measure changes in EGABA and neuronal excitability of principal hippocampal neurons. We observe a depolarizing shift in EGABA in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons after chronic stress. In addition, there is an increase in the intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, evident by a shift in the input-output curve which could be reversed with the NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide. These data uncover a potential mechanism involving chronic stress-induced plasticity in chloride homeostasis which may contribute to stress-induced seizure susceptibility. PMID:25524838

  11. Chronic stress shifts the GABA reversal potential in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Georgina; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures is stress. However, the underlying mechanisms whereby stress triggers seizures are not yet fully understood. Here we demonstrate a potential mechanism underlying changes in neuronal excitability in the hippocampus following chronic stress, involving a shift in the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) associated with a dephosphorylation of the potassium chloride co-transporter, KCC2. Mice subjected to chronic restraint stress (30 mins/day for 14 consecutive days) exhibit an increase in serum corticosterone levels which is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures induced with kainic acid (20 mg/kg). Following chronic stress, but not acute stress, we observe a dephosphorylation of KCC2 residue S940, which regulates KCC2 cell surface expression and function, in the hippocampus. To determine the impact of alterations in KCC2 expression following chronic stress, we performed gramicidin perforated patch recordings to measure changes in EGABA and neuronal excitability of principal hippocampal neurons. We observe a depolarizing shift in EGABA in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons after chronic stress. In addition, there is an increase in the intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, evident by a shift in the input-output curve which could be reversed with the NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide. These data uncover a potential mechanism involving chronic stress-induced plasticity in chloride homeostasis which may contribute to stress-induced seizure susceptibility. PMID:25524838

  12. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  13. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Andrew; Faure, Philippe; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA) to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition. PMID:26283955

  14. Direct activation of GABAA receptors by barbiturates in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Rho, J M; Donevan, S D; Rogawski, M A

    1996-01-01

    1. The direct activation of the GABAA receptor by pentobarbitone (PB) and phenobarbitone (PHB) was characterized in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using whole-cell voltage clamp and single channel recording techniques. 2. In whole-cell recordings, PB and PHB produced a concentration-dependent activation of Cl- current (EC50 values, 0.33 and 3.0 mM, respectively). The response to the barbiturates was similar to that produced by GABA, although GABA was more potent (EC50, 5.5 microM). PB and PHB were substantially more potent in enhancing the response to 1 microM GABA (EC50 values, 94 microM and 0.89 mM, respectively). The maximal magnitude of the responses to PB was similar to that of the maximal response to GABA or GABA + PB. PHB appeared to be modestly less efficacious. 3. The mean deactivation time constant for whole-cell Cl- currents evoked by 1 mM PB + 1 microM GABA was significantly longer (480 +/- 34 ms) than for 1 mM PB (170 +/- 9 ms) or 1 microM GABA (180 +/- 14 ms) alone. 4. Whole-cell currents directly activated by 300 microM PB and 1 microM GABA were blocked by the GABA receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. 5. Unitary GABAA receptor channel currents evoked by 300 microM PB had similar main conductance, mean open time and mean burst duration as those activated by 2 microM GABA alone. Single channel openings and bursts were of shorter mean duration when 100 and 300 microM PHB were used. 6. High concentrations of PB (1-3 mM) and PHB (3-10 mM) produced a rapid block of currents activated by the barbiturate alone or by the barbiturate in the presence of 1 microM GABA. The estimated IC50 values for block of PB- and PHB-potentiated GABA currents were 2.8 and 12.9 mM, respectively. 7. Single channel currents activated by high concentrations of PB and PHB alone or in the presence of GABA demonstrated flickering, probably reflecting fast channel block. 8. We conclude that the gating of the GABAA receptor channel by PHB and PB is functionally similar to

  15. Depression of the vestibulospinal reflex adaptation by intravermal microinjection of GABA-A and GABA-B agonists in the cat.

    PubMed

    Manzoni, D; Andre, P; d'Ascanio, P; Pompeiano, O

    1994-10-01

    In decerebrate cats the gain of the vestibulospinal reflex (VSR), elicited by sinusoidal roll tilt of the animal at 0.15 Hz, +/- 10 degrees, was tested every 10-15 min during and after a sustained (3 h) period of roll tilt of the head at the parameters indicated above, associated with synchronous roll tilt of the body at 0.15 Hz, +/- 12.5 degrees; this stimulus led to 2.5 degrees of neck rotation, which was thus out of phase with respect to head rotation. In this condition the gain of the VSR progressively increased during the first h of neck-vestibular stimulation, to reach a plateau level at the end of the third h of stimulation. This adaptive process was followed for at least 1 h after stimulation. Microinjection into the zone B of the cerebellar anterior vermis of the GABA-A agonist muscimol (0.25 microliter at 8 micrograms/microliter saline) producing only a slight or negligible depression of the VSR gain in non-adaptive conditions, prevented the occurrence of the adapted increase in gain of the VSR following a 3-h period of sustained head and neck rotation. In addition, intravermal injection of the GABA-A or the GABA-B agonist muscimol or baclofen, respectively, at the same dose indicated above supressed the adapted increase in gain occurring after a 3-h period of continuous neck-vestibular stimulation. The effective sites were located into the zone B of the cerebellar anterior vermis, from which the direct corticocerebellar projection to the lateral vestibular nucleus originates. In conclusion, the results seem to indicate that the adaptive increase in gain of the VSR which occurs in decerebrate cats depend upon plastic changes which affect the Purkinje cells of the cerebellar anterior vermis. These changes were in fact suppressed by GABAergic inhibition of these neurons. The demonstration that the effects of the GABA agonists occurred suddenly makes unlikely the hypothesis that the cerebellar anterior vermis represents either a relay for adaptive changes

  16. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  17. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    PubMed

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain. PMID:7272066

  18. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lightstone, Felice C.

    2016-01-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a ‘funnel’ that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  19. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Timothy S; Lightstone, Felice C

    2016-04-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a 'funnel' that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site. PMID:27119953

  20. Agonist pharmacology of two Drosophila GABA receptor splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The Drosophila melanogaster gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor subunits, RDLac and DRC 17-1-2, form functional homo-oligomeric receptors when heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The subunits differ in only 17 amino acids, principally in regions of the N-terminal domain which determine agonist pharmacology in vertebrate ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors. A range of conformationally restricted GABA analogues were tested on the two homo-oligomers and their agonists pharmacology compared with that of insect and vertebrate iontropic GABA receptors. 2. The actions of GABA, isoguvacine and isonipecotic acid on RDLac and DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers were compared, by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp. All three compounds were full agonists of both receptors, but were 4-6 fold less potent agonists of DRC 17-1-2 homo-oligomers than of RDLac. However, the relative potencies of these agonists on each receptor were very similar. 3. A more complete agonist profile was established for RDLac homo-oligomers. The most potent agonists of these receptors were GABA, muscimol and trans-aminocrotonic acid (TACA), which were approximately equipotent. RDLac homo-oligomers were fully activated by a range of GABA analogues, with the order of potency: GABA > ZAPA ((Z)-3-[(aminoiminomethyl)thio]prop-2-enoic acid) > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid > or = isonipecotic acid > or = cis-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) > beta-alanine. 3-Aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS), a partial agonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, was the weakest agonist tested and 100 fold less potent than GABA. 4. SR95531, an antagonist of vertebrate GABAA receptors, competitively inhibited the GABA responses of RDLac homo-oligomers, which have previously been found to insensitive to bicuculline. However, its potency (IC50 500 microM) was much reduced when compared to GABAA receptors. 5. The agonist pharmacology of Drosophila RDLac homo-oligomers exhibits aspects of the characteristic pharmacology of

  1. Pallidal neuronal apolipoprotein E in pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration recapitulates ischemic injury to the globus pallidus.

    PubMed

    Woltjer, Randall L; Reese, Lindsay C; Richardson, Brian E; Tran, Huong; Green, Sarah; Pham, Thao; Chalupsky, Megan; Gabriel, Isabella; Light, Tyler; Sanford, Lynn; Jeong, Suh Young; Hamada, Jeffrey; Schwanemann, Leila K; Rogers, Caleb; Gregory, Allison; Hogarth, Penelope; Hayflick, Susan J

    2015-12-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a progressive movement disorder that is due to mutations in PANK2. Pathologically, it is a member of a class of diseases known as neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) and features increased tissue iron and ubiquitinated proteinaceous aggregates in the globus pallidus. We have previously determined that these aggregates represent condensed residue derived from degenerated pallidal neurons. However, the protein content, other than ubiquitin, of these aggregates remains unknown. In the present study, we performed biochemical and immunohistochemical studies to characterize these aggregates and found them to be enriched in apolipoprotein E that is poorly soluble in detergent solutions. However, we did not determine a significant association between APOE genotype and the clinical phenotype of disease in our database of 81 cases. Rather, we frequently identified similar ubiquitin- and apolipoprotein E-enriched lesions in these neurons in non-PKAN patients in the penumbrae of remote infarcts that involve the globus pallidus, and occasionally in other brain sites that contain large γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons. Our findings, taken together, suggest that tissue or cellular hypoxic/ischemic injury within the globus pallidus may underlie the pathogenesis of PKAN. PMID:26547561

  2. Neuronal cell cycle: the neuron itself and its circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Frade, José M; Ovejero-Benito, María C

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are usually regarded as postmitotic cells that undergo apoptosis in response to cell cycle reactivation. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates the existence of a defined developmental program that induces DNA replication in specific populations of neurons, which remain in a tetraploid state for the rest of their adult life. Similarly, de novo neuronal tetraploidization has also been described in the adult brain as an early hallmark of neurodegeneration. The aim of this review is to integrate these recent developments in the context of cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in neurons. We conclude that a variety of mechanisms exists in neuronal cells for G1/S and G2/M checkpoint regulation. These mechanisms, which are connected with the apoptotic machinery, can be modulated by environmental signals and the neuronal phenotype itself, thus resulting in a variety of outcomes ranging from cell death at the G1/S checkpoint to full proliferation of differentiated neurons. PMID:25590687

  3. Chemical integrity of ( sup 3 H)GABA used in binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balcar, V.J. )

    1989-07-01

    A method which is claimed to be able to determine the proportion of true GABA within radiolabeled GABA used in binding studies was tested using (3H)GABA. The method was found to be unsuitable for {sup 3}H-labeled GABA and, furthermore, both theoretical considerations and the present experimental data indicated that it could also produce misleading results with ({sup 14}C)GABA.

  4. Tectothalamic inhibitory projection neurons in the avian torus semicircularis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsufumi; Atoji, Yasuro

    2016-09-01

    Inhibitory feedforward projection is one of key features of the organization of the central auditory system. In mammals, the inferior colliculus (IC) is the origin of a substantial inhibitory feedforward projection as well as an excitatory projection to the auditory thalamus. This inhibitory feedforward projection is provided by large γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic (LG) neurons, which are characterized by their receipt of dense excitatory axosomatic terminals positive for vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 2. In the avian torus semicircularis (TS), which is the homolog of the IC, neither the homology of cell types nor the presence of inhibitory feedforward inhibition have been established. In this study, we tested the presence of LG neurons in pigeon and chicken by neuroanatomical techniques. The TS contained two types of GABAergic neurons of different soma size. Of these, larger GABA + cells were encircled by dense VGLUT2 + axosomatic terminals. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that more than 30% of the perimeter of a large GABA+, but not small GABA + or GABA-, soma was covered by presumptive excitatory axosomatic terminals, suggesting that large GABA + cells are the sole recipient of dense excitatory axosomatic synapses. After injection of a retrograde tracer into the auditory thalamus, many retrogradely labeled neurons were found bilaterally in the TS, a few of which were GABA+. Almost all tectothalamic GABA + neurons had large somata, and received dense VGLUT2 + axosomatic terminals. These results clearly demonstrated the presence of LG neurons in birds. The similar morphology of LG neurons implies that the function of tectothalamic inhibition is similar among amniotes. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2604-2622, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850847

  5. Effects of inhibitory amino acids on expression of GABAA Rα and glycine Rα1 in hypoxic rat cortical neurons during development

    PubMed Central

    Qian, H; Feng, Y; He, XZ; Yang, YL; Sung, JH; Xia, Y

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that GABA and glycine are protective to mature but toxic to immature cortical neurons during prolonged hypoxia. Since the action of these inhibitory amino acids is mediated by GABA and glycine receptors, the expression of these receptors is a critical factor in determining neuronal response to GABAA and glycine in hypoxia. Therefore, we asked whether in rat cortical neurons, 1) hypoxia alters the expression of the GABA and glycine receptors; 2) inhibitory amino acids change the course of GABA and glycine receptor expression; and 3) there are any differences between the immature and mature neurons. In cultured rat cortical neurons from day 4 (4 Days in Vitro or DIV 4) to day 20 (DIV 20), we observed that 1) GABAARα and GlyRα1 underwent differential changes in expression during the development in-vitro; 2) hypoxia for 3 days decreased GABAARα and GlyRα1 density in the neurons in-between DIV 4 and DIV 20, but did not induce a major change in immature (DIV 4) and mature (DIV 20) neurons; 3) during normoxia GABA, glycine and taurine decreased GABAARα and GlyRα1 density in the immature neurons, but had a tendency to increase the density in the mature neurons, except for taurine; 4) under hypoxia, all these amino acids decreased GABAARα and GlyRα1 density in most groups of the immature neurons with a slight effect on the mature neurons; and 5) δ-opioid receptor activation with DADLE increased GABAARα and GlyRα1 density in both the immature and mature neurons under normoxia and in the mature neurons under hypoxic condition. These data suggest that inhibitory amino acids differentially regulate the expression of GABAA and glycine receptors in rat cortical neurons in normoxic and hypoxic conditions with major differences between the immature and mature neurons. PMID:22018691

  6. Pharmacological analysis of conditioning in sensorimotor cortex neurons in a model.

    PubMed

    Chizhenkova, R A

    1989-01-01

    In awake mobile rabbits, with electrodes implanted in the medial lemniscus, midbrain tegmental reticular nucleus, and pyramidal tract, combined stimulation of two brain of two brain structures resulted in elaboration of conditional connections in sensorimotor cortex neuronal populations. The main criterion of the conditioning was the appearance of changes in the neuronal activity on omission of the second stimulus. These changes represented a complex of electrical events, some of which were similar to and others different from the evoked responses to the second stimulus. Application of atropine, sulfate, chlorpromazine hydrochloride, serotonin creatinine sulfate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to the cortex at the site of the recording exerted a modulating effect on the conditional neuronal activity patterns. Of the above substances, GABA and atropine had the most pronounced effect. The GABA removed the short-latency components of the conditional changes which were similar to evoked responses. The atropine abolished the long-latency changes which differed from evoked responses. PMID:2539578

  7. How and why does tomato accumulate a large amount of GABA in the fruit?

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mariko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has received much attention as a health-promoting functional compound, and several GABA-enriched foods have been commercialized. In higher plants, GABA is primarily metabolized via a short pathway called the GABA shunt. The GABA shunt bypasses two steps (the oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate) of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle via reactions catalyzed by three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase, GABA transaminase, and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. The GABA shunt plays a major role in primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism and is an integral part of the TCA cycle under stress and non-stress conditions. Tomato is one of the major crops that accumulate a relatively high level of GABA in its fruits. The GABA levels in tomato fruits dramatically change during fruit development; the GABA levels increase from flowering to the mature green stage and then rapidly decrease during the ripening stage. Although GABA constitutes up to 50% of the free amino acids at the mature green stage, the molecular mechanism of GABA accumulation and the physiological function of GABA during tomato fruit development remain unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies of GABA accumulation in tomato fruits and discuss the potential biological roles of GABA in tomato fruit development. PMID:26322056

  8. Preferential development of neuropeptide Y/GABA circuit in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in postnatal rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoping; Fukami, Tatsuya; Li, Tie; Desai, Mina; Ross, Michael G

    2016-03-15

    The hypothalamus, which plays a critical role in regulation of energy homeostasis, is formed during the perinatal period and thus vulnerable to fetal/newborn environmental conditions. We investigated synaptogenesis and neurotransmission of neurons in arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) during the postnatal period using immunohistochemical and electrophysiological methods. Our results show that the density of neuropeptide Y (NPY) fibers increases abruptly after the second postnatal week. NPY and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) immunoreactive fibers/varicosities puncta are mutually juxtaposed to perikarya of both neurons with increasing NPY and decreasing POMC apposition until the third postnatal week. The frequencies of spontaneous GABAergic inhibitory and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (sIPSC and sEPSC) increase with age, with action potential dependent sIPSCs predominant during first postnatal week and sEPSCs thereafter. The presynaptic function of ARH synapses appears to reach adult levels around the age of weaning, while the postsynaptic receptors are still undergoing modification, evidenced by changes of frequencies, amplitudes and deactivation kinetics of PSCs. The number of NPY fibers juxtaposed to NPY neurons is correlated with the frequency of postsynaptic currents, suggesting that NPY/GABA release may facilitate maturation of synapses on their innervated neurons. Our results indicate that a neural circuit in ARH with a stronger NPY/GABAergic tone undergoes significant development during the postnatal period, which may be important for the maturation and/or remodeling of ARH neural circuits. PMID:26790345

  9. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses–based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  10. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses-based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  11. Characterization of the interaction between a novel convulsant agent, norbiphen, and GABA(A) and other ligand-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Halliwell, R F; Su, Jiping; Demuro, A; Martinez-Torres, A; Miledi, R

    2002-09-01

    A hybrid molecule composed of the antimicrobial, norfloxacin, linked to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), biphenylacetic acid, which we have termed norbiphen, is a lethal convulsant in vivo and an antagonist of rodent GABA(A) receptors in vitro. In the present study, the selectivity, molecular site(s) and mechanism of action of this novel convulsant were investigated using electrophysiological techniques. Sub-maximal GABA-evoked currents recorded from rodent hippocampal neurons were reversibly inhibited by norbiphen (1 microM) to 5+/-2% of control whereas glutamate, NMDA and glycine activated responses were little or unaffected. Sub-maximal GABA-evoked currents recorded from oocytes expressing recombinant human alpha1beta2gamma2s or alpha1beta2 GABA(A) receptors were also reversibly inhibited by norbiphen (1-1000 nM) with an IC(50) (+/-s.e.m.) of 5.7+/-1 and 8.8+/-1 nM, respectively. Similarly, GABA currents recorded from alpha1beta1gamma2s, alpha1beta1 and beta2gamma2s receptors were inhibited with IC(50)s of 16.1+/-1, 18.8+/-1 and 4.2+/-1 nM, respectively. In contrast, norbiphen (100 nM) had little or no effect at rho1 GABA(C) homomers. At alpha1beta2gamma2s receptors, norbiphen had no affect on the GABA reversal potential, and inhibition was not voltage-dependent, suggesting that this compound does not act at the ion channel. The GABA concentration response curve was shifted in a competitive-like fashion by norbiphen (10-300 nM) and a Schild analysis of these data yielded a slope of 0.94+/-0.1 and a pA(2) of 7.77. Our data reveal a novel, selective and highly potent antagonist of GABA(A) receptors. Norbiphen should be a valuable agent in future studies of this receptor complex. PMID:12367622

  12. Glycine: an alternative transmitter candidate of the pallidosubthalamic projection neurons in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, M.; Hattori, T.

    1987-08-22

    Autoradiographic retrograde tracing techniques with radioactive transmitters were used to analyse the identity of a putative transmitter in the rat pallidosubthalamic (GP-STN) pathway. One to 2 hours after the stereotaxic injection of /sup 3/H-glycine restricted to the STN, a large number of neuronal somata were radiolabeled in the GP. No comparable labeling was observed following the injection of /sup 3/H-gamma-aminobutyric acid (/sup 3/H-GABA) into the same nucleus even with survival times as long as 6 hours. Specifically, no significant somatic labeling was detected either in the GP or in the caudoputamen (CPU). Only when /sup 3/H-GABA was injected into the substantia nigra did CPU and GP neurons become labeled. On the contrary, STN neuronal somata were invariably labeled 6 hours after the intrapallidal injection of /sup 3/H-GABA, whereas no perikaryal labeling was observed in the STN after /sup 3/H-glycine injection into the GP. The perikaryal labeling was prevented in all cases by intraventricular administration of colchicine 1 day before the isotope injections. The observations suggest that /sup 3/H-glycine was preferentially transported retrogradely through the GP-STN pathway, and /sup 3/H-GABA through the STN-GP projection. In view of the recent controversy on the role of GABA as a putative transmitter of the GP-STN projection, we now propose glycine as an alternative transmitter candidate of these critically situated neurons in the basal ganglia.

  13. Vestibular Neuronitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  14. Metabotropic GABA signalling modulates longevity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Lei; Gong, Jianke; Yuan, Fengling; Zhang, Bi; Liu, Hongkang; Zheng, Tianlin; Yu, Teng; Xu, X. Z. Shawn; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important but poorly understood role in modulating longevity. GABA, a prominent inhibitory neurotransmitter, is best known to regulate nervous system function and behaviour in diverse organisms. Whether GABA signalling affects aging, however, has not been explored. Here we examined mutants lacking each of the major neurotransmitters in C. elegans, and find that deficiency in GABA signalling extends lifespan. This pro-longevity effect is mediated by the metabotropic GABAB receptor GBB-1, but not ionotropic GABAA receptors. GBB-1 regulates lifespan through G protein-PLCβ signalling, which transmits longevity signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO, a key regulator of lifespan. Mammalian GABAB receptors can functionally substitute for GBB-1 in lifespan control in C. elegans. Our results uncover a new role of GABA signalling in lifespan regulation in C. elegans, raising the possibility that a similar process may occur in other organisms. PMID:26537867

  15. Ca^2+ Dynamics and Propagating Waves in Neural Networks with Excitatory and Inhibitory Neurons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Vladimir E.

    2008-03-01

    Dynamics of neural spikes, intracellular Ca^2+, and Ca^2+ in intracellular stores was investigated both in isolated Chay's neurons and in the neurons coupled in networks. Three types of neural networks were studied: a purely excitatory neural network, with only excitatory (AMPA) synapses; a purely inhibitory neural network with only inhibitory (GABA) synapses; and a hybrid neural network, with both AMPA and GABA synapses. In the hybrid neural network, the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory neurons was 4:1. For each case, we considered two types of connections, ``all-with-all" and 20 connections per neuron. Each neural network contained 100 neurons with randomly distributed connection strengths. In the neural networks with ``all-with-all" connections and AMPA/GABA synapses an increase in average synaptic strength yielded bursting activity with increased/decreased number of spikes per burst. The neural bursts and Ca^2+ transients were synchronous at relatively large connection strengths despite random connection strengths. Simulations of the neural networks with 20 connections per neuron and with only AMPA synapses showed synchronous oscillations, while the neural networks with GABA or hybrid synapses generated propagating waves of membrane potential and Ca^2+ transients.

  16. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  17. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  18. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway. PMID:26838342

  19. Novel subunit-specific tonic GABA currents and differential effects of ethanol in the central amygdala of CRF receptor-1 reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Herman, Melissa A; Contet, Candice; Justice, Nicholas J; Vale, Wylie; Roberto, Marisa

    2013-02-20

    The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is an important integrative site for the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, such as ethanol. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 (CRF1) receptors in the CeA plays a critical role in the development of ethanol dependence, but these neurons remain uncharacterized. Using CRF1:GFP reporter mice and a combined electrophysiological/immunohistochemical approach, we found that CRF1 neurons exhibit an α1 GABA(A) receptor subunit-mediated tonic conductance that is driven by action potential-dependent GABA release. In contrast, unlabeled CeA neurons displayed a δ subunit-mediated tonic conductance that is enhanced by ethanol. Ethanol increased the firing discharge of CRF1 neurons and decreased the firing discharge of unlabeled CeA neurons. Retrograde tracing studies indicate that CeA CRF1 neurons project into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Together, these data demonstrate subunit-specific tonic signaling and provide mechanistic insight into the specific effects of ethanol on CeA microcircuitry. PMID:23426657

  20. A Role for GAT-1 in Presynaptic GABA Homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Fiorenzo; Melone, Marcello; Fattorini, Giorgia; Bragina, Luca; Ciappelloni, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    In monoamine-releasing terminals, neurotransmitter transporters – in addition to terminating synaptic transmission by clearing released transmitters from the extracellular space – are the primary mechanism for replenishing transmitter stores and thus regulate presynaptic homeostasis. Here, we analyze whether GAT-1, the main plasma membrane GABA transporter, plays a similar role in GABAergic terminals. Re-examination of existing literature and recent data gathered in our laboratory show that GABA homeostasis in GABAergic terminals is dominated by the activity of the GABA synthesizing enzyme and that GAT-1-mediated GABA transport contributes to cytosolic GABA levels. However, analysis of GAT-1 KO, besides demonstrating the effects of reduced clearance, reveals the existence of changes compatible with an impaired presynaptic function, as miniature IPSCs frequency is reduced by one-third and glutamic acid decarboxylases and phosphate-activated glutaminase levels are significantly up-regulated. Although the changes observed are less robust than those reported in mice with impaired dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin plasma membrane transporters, they suggest that in GABAergic terminals GAT-1 impacts on presynaptic GABA homeostasis, and may contribute to the activity-dependent regulation of inhibitory efficacy. PMID:21503156

  1. Involvement of GABA(A) receptors in myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R R; Truong, D D; Nguyen, K D; Dang, A T; Hoang, T T; Vo, P Q; Sandroni, P

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in multiple neurochemical systems have been reported in animal and human studies of posthypoxic myoclonus. It is impossible, however, to establish causative relationships between the observed changes and the myoclonic movements from these studies. Therefore, to establish causative links between neurochemical changes and myoclonus, ligands that target neurotransmitter systems that are altered in posthypoxic myoclonus were microinjected into the lateral ventricles of normal rats to identify the changes that can produce myoclonus. Of the ligands that were tested, only the GABA(A) antagonists produced myoclonus after intracerebroventricular administration, suggesting the importance of disinhibition of GABAergic systems in myoclonus. To further examine the role of GABA in myoclonus, GABAergic antagonists were microinjected into the nucleus reticularis of the thalamus (NRT), an area of the brain in which extensive pathologic changes are seen in posthypoxic animals. GABA(A), but not GABA(B), antagonists produced myoclonus after microinjection into the NRT. Earlier investigators have further reported the ability of GABA(A) antagonists to produce myoclonus after microinjection into the caudate. The data therefore suggest that disruption of activity at GABA(A) receptors at any one of a number of levels in the neural axis can produce myoclonus. PMID:10755272

  2. GABA-independent GABAA Receptor Openings Maintain Tonic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka I.; Sylantyev, Sergiy; Herd, Murray B.; Kersanté, Flavie; Lambert, Jeremy J.; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Linthorst, Astrid C.E.; Semyanov, Alexey; Belelli, Delia; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) produces two forms of inhibition: ‘phasic’ inhibition generated by the rapid, transient activation of synaptic GABAARs by presynaptic GABA release, and tonic inhibition generated by the persistent activation of peri- or extrasynaptic GABAARs which can detect extracellular GABA. Such tonic GABAAR-mediated currents are particularly evident in dentate granule cells in which they play a major role in regulating cell excitability. Here we show that in rat dentate granule cells in ex-vivo hippocampal slices, tonic currents are predominantly generated by GABA-independent GABAA receptor openings. This tonic GABAAR conductance is resistant to the competitive GABAAR antagonist SR95531, which at high concentrations acts as a partial agonist, but can be blocked by an open channel blocker picrotoxin. When slices are perfused with 200 nM GABA, a concentration that is comparable to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations but is twice that measured by us in the hippocampus in vivo using zero-net-flux microdialysis, negligible GABA is detected by dentate granule cells. Spontaneously opening GABAARs, therefore, maintain dentate granule cell tonic currents in the face of low extracellular GABA concentrations. PMID:23447601

  3. In vivo measurements of glutamate, GABA, and NAAG in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Laura M; Kontson, Kimberly; West, Jeffrey; Edden, Richard A; Zhu, He; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Holcomb, Henry H; Barker, Peter B

    2013-09-01

    The major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively, are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide that modulates the Glu system, may also be altered in schizophrenia. This study investigated GABA, Glu + glutamine (Glx), and NAAG levels in younger and older subjects with schizophrenia. Forty-one subjects, 21 with chronic schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls, participated in this study. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used to measure GABA, Glx, and NAAG levels in the anterior cingulate (AC) and centrum semiovale (CSO) regions. NAAG in the CSO was higher in younger schizophrenia subjects compared with younger control subjects. The opposite pattern was observed in the older groups. Glx was reduced in the schizophrenia group irrespective of age group and brain region. There was a trend for reduced AC GABA in older schizophrenia subjects compared with older control subjects. Poor attention performance was correlated to lower AC GABA levels in both groups. Higher levels of CSO NAAG were associated with greater negative symptom severity in schizophrenia. These results provide support for altered glutamatergic and GABAergic function associated with illness course and cognitive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The study also highlights the importance of studies that combine MRS measurements of NAAG, GABA, and Glu for a more comprehensive neurochemical characterization of schizophrenia. PMID:23081992

  4. Inhibition of protein kinase C decreases sensitivity of GABA receptor subtype to fipronil insecticide in insect neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Laurence; Hamon, Alain; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Itier, Valérie; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno

    2011-12-01

    Phosphorylation by serine/threonine kinases has been described as a new mechanism for regulating the effects of insecticides on insect neuronal receptors and channels. Although insect GABA receptors are commercially important targets for insecticides (e.g. fipronil), their modulation by kinases is poorly understood and the influence of phosphorylation on insecticide sensitivity is unknown. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the modulatory effect of PKC and CaMKinase II on GABA receptor subtypes (GABAR1 and GABAR2) in DUM neurons isolated from the terminal abdominal ganglion (TAG) of Periplaneta americana. Chloride currents through GABAR2 were selectively abolished by PMA and PDBu (the PKC activators) and potentiated by Gö6983, an inhibitor of PKC. Furthermore, using KN-62, a specific CaMKinase II inhibitor, we demonstrated that CaMKinase II activation was also involved in the regulation of GABAR2 function. In addition, using CdCl(2) (the calcium channel blocker) and LOE-908, a blocker of TRPγ, we revealed that calcium influx through TRPγ played an important role in kinase activations. Comparative studies performed with CACA, a selective agonist of GABAR1 in DUM neurons confirmed the involvement of these kinases in the specific regulation of GABAR2. Furthermore, our study reported that GABAR1 was less sensitive than GABAR2 to fipronil. This was demonstrated by the biphasic concentration-response curve and the current-voltage relationship established with both GABA and CACA. Finally, we demonstrated that GABAR2 was 10-fold less sensitive to fipronil following inhibition of PKC, whereas inhibition of CaMKinase II did not alter the effect of fipronil. PMID:21684305

  5. Anisatin modulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor-channel in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Tomoko; Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Okuyama, Emi; Nagata, Keiichi; Honda, Hiroshi; Shono, Toshio; Narahashi, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    Anisatin, a toxic, insecticidally active component of Sikimi plant, is known to act on the GABA system. In order to elucidate the mechanism of anisatin interaction with the GABA system, whole-cell and single-channel patch clamp experiments were performed with rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in primary culture.Repeated co-applications of GABA and anisatin suppressed GABA-induced whole-cell currents with an EC50 of 1.10 μM. No recovery of currents was observed after washout with anisatin-free solution.However, pre-application of anisatin through the bath had no effect on GABA-induced currents. The decay phase of currents was accelerated by anisatin. These results indicate that anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents requires opening of the channels and is use-dependent.Anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents was not voltage dependent.Picrotoxinin attenuated anisatin suppression of GABA-induced currents. [3H]-EBOB binding to rat brain membranes was competitively inhibited by anisatin. These data indicated that anisatin bound to the picrotoxinin site.At the single-channel level, anisatin did not alter the open time but prolonged the closed time. The burst duration was reduced and channel openings per burst were decreased indicating that anisatin decreased the probability of openings. PMID:10455311

  6. On the dynamical mechanisms of influence of synaptic currents on the neuron model with response differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, D. G.; Kuznetsov, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The combined effect of synaptic NMDA, AMPA, and GABA currents on the neuron model with response differentiation has been considered. It has been shown that the GABA and NMDA currents can compensate the effects of each other, whereas the AMPA current not only leads to the suppression of oscillations but also significantly amplifies the high-frequency activity of the neuron induced by the NMDA current. Two bifurcation scenarios underlying these effects have been revealed. It has been predicted which scenario takes place under the combined influence of all three currents.

  7. Electrophysiological properties and thermosensitivity of mouse preoptic and anterior hypothalamic neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, I V; Conti, B; Behrens, M; Korn, H; Bartfai, T

    2005-01-01

    Responses of mouse preoptic and anterior hypothalamic neurons to variations of temperature are key elements in regulating the setpoint of homeotherms. The goal of the present work was to assess the relevance of culture preparations for investigating the cellular mechanisms underlying thermosensitivity in hypothalamic cells. Our working hypothesis was that some of the main properties of preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons in culture are similar to those reported by other authors in slice preparations. Indeed, cultured preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons share many of the physiological and morphological properties of neurons in hypothalamic slices. They display heterogenous dendritic arbors and somatic shapes. Most of them are GABAergic and their activity is synaptically driven by the activation of alp