Science.gov

Sample records for neurotoxic catecholamine metabolite

  1. Neurotoxic catecholamine metabolite in nociceptors contributes to painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dina, Olayinka A; Khasar, Sachia G; Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Bogen, Oliver; Chen, Xiaojie; Green, Paul G; Reichling, David B; Messing, Robert O; Levine, Jon D

    2008-09-01

    The neurotoxic effects of catecholamine metabolites have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. As some sensory neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase and monoamine oxidase (MAO), we investigated the potential contribution of catecholamine metabolites to neuropathic pain in a model of alcoholic neuropathy. The presence of catecholamines in sensory neurons is supported by capsaicin-stimulated epinephrine release, an effect enhanced in ethanol-fed rats. mRNA for enzymes in dorsal root ganglia involved in catecholamine uptake and metabolism, dopamine beta-hydroxylase and MAO-A, were decreased by neonatal administration of capsaicin. Ethanol-induced hyperalgesia was attenuated by systemic and local peripheral administration of inhibitors of MAO-A, reduction of norepinephrine transporter (NET) in sensory neurons and a NET inhibitor. Finally, intradermal injection of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycolaldehyde (DOPEGAL), a neurotoxic MAO-A catecholamine metabolite, produced robust mechanical hyperalgesia. These observations suggest that catecholamines in nociceptors are metabolized to neurotoxic products by MAO-A, which can cause neuronal dysfunction underlying neuropathic pain. PMID:18783367

  2. ALTERATION OF CATECHOLAMINES IN PHOECHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS IN VITRO BY THE METABOLITES OF CHLOROTRIAZINE HERBICIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of four major chlorotriazine metabolites on the constitutive synthesis of the catecholamines dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) were examined using undifferentiated PC12 cells. NE release and intracellular DA and NE concentrations were quantified following treatme...

  3. Determination of nine catecholamine metabolites and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid in urine by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    de Jong, E B; Horsten, B P; Goldschmidt, H M

    1983-11-25

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of nine urinary acidic and alcoholic catecholamine metabolites and urinary 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid. Incubation of a urine sample in the presence of ascorbic acid, glucuronidase and acylase and subsequent extraction with ethyl acetate precedes derivatization to trimethylsilyl compounds, capillary gas chromatographic separation and flame-ionization detection. The automated dual injection procedure and the analytical characteristics of the proposed method are reported in detail. Special attention is paid to problems that occur in analysis on a routine basis. PMID:6200488

  4. Catecholamines 101

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This review of clinical catecholamine neurochemistry is based on the Streeten Memorial Lecture at the 19th annual meeting of the American Autonomic Society and lectures at a satellite of the 6th Congress of the International Society of Autonomic Neuroscience. Here I provide historical perspective, describe sources and meanings of plasma levels of catecholamines and their metabolites, present a model of a sympathetic noradrenergic neuron that conveys how particular aspects of sympathetic nervous function affect plasma levels of catecholamines and their metabolites, and apply the model to understand plasma neurochemical patterns associated with some drugs and disease states. PMID:20623313

  5. Neurotoxicity of Ecstasy metabolites in rat cortical neurons, and influence of hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Capela, João Paulo; Meisel, Andreas; Abreu, Artur Reis; Branco, Paula Sério; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Lobo, Ana Maria; Remião, Fernando; Bastos, Maria Lurdes; Carvalho, Félix

    2006-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "Ecstasy") is a widely abused, psychoactive recreational drug. There is growing evidence that the MDMA neurotoxic profile may be highly dependent on both its hepatic metabolism and body temperature. Metabolism of MDMA involves N-demethylation to 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), which is also a drug of abuse. MDMA and MDA are O-demethylenated to N-methyl-alpha-methyldopamine (N-Me-alpha-MeDA) and alpha-methyldopamine (alpha-MeDA), respectively, both of which are catechols that can undergo oxidation to the corresponding ortho-quinones. In the presence of glutathione (GSH), ortho-quinones may be conjugated with GSH to form glutathionyl adducts. In this study, we evaluated the neurotoxicity of MDMA and three of its metabolites obtained by synthesis, N-Me-alpha-MeDA, alpha-MeDA, and 5-(GSH)-alpha-MeDA [5-(glutathion-S-yl)-alpha-methyldopamine] in rat cortical neuronal serum-free cultures under normal (36.5 degrees C) and hyperthermic (40 degrees C) conditions. Cell viability was assessed, and the mechanism of cell death was also evaluated. Our study shows that these metabolites are more neurotoxic [5-(GSH)-alpha-MeDA being the most toxic] than the parent compound MDMA. The neurotoxicity of MDMA metabolites was partially prevented by the antioxidants N-acetylcystein and also, in a minor extent, by alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone. All the tested compounds induced apoptotic cell death in cortical neurons, and their neurotoxic effect was potentiated under hyperthermic conditions. These data suggest that MDMA metabolites, especially under hyperthermic conditions, contribute to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:16183702

  6. The Metabolic Fate of ortho-Quinones Derived from Catecholamine Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shosuke; Yamanaka, Yuta; Ojika, Makoto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    ortho-Quinones are produced in vivo through the oxidation of catecholic substrates by enzymes such as tyrosinase or by transition metal ions. Neuromelanin, a dark pigment present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus of the brain, is produced from dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) via an interaction with cysteine, but it also incorporates their alcoholic and acidic metabolites. In this study we examined the metabolic fate of ortho-quinones derived from the catecholamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPE), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylene glycol (DOPEG), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylmandelic acid (DOMA). The oxidation of catecholic substrates by mushroom tyrosinase was followed by UV-visible spectrophotometry. HPLC analysis after reduction with NaBH4 or ascorbic acid enabled measurement of the half-lives of ortho-quinones and the identification of their reaction products. Spectrophotometric examination showed that the ortho-quinones initially formed underwent extensive degradation at pH 6.8. HPLC analysis showed that DOPE-quinone and DOPEG-quinone degraded with half-lives of 15 and 30 min at pH 6.8, respectively, and >100 min at pH 5.3. The major product from DOPE-quinone was DOPEG which was produced through the addition of a water molecule to the quinone methide intermediate. DOPEG-quinone yielded a ketone, 2-oxo-DOPE, through the quinone methide intermediate. DOPAC-quinone and DOMA-quinone degraded immediately with decarboxylation of the ortho-quinone intermediates to form 3,4-dihydroxybenzylalcohol (DHBAlc) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (DHBAld), respectively. DHBAlc-quinone was converted to DHBAld with a half-life of 9 min, while DHBAld-quinone degraded rapidly with a half-life of 3 min. This study confirmed the fact that ortho-quinones from DOPE, DOPEG, DOPAC and DOMA are converted to quinone methide tautomers as common intermediates, through proton rearrangement or decarboxylation. The unstable quinone methides

  7. The Metabolic Fate of ortho-Quinones Derived from Catecholamine Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shosuke; Yamanaka, Yuta; Ojika, Makoto; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    ortho-Quinones are produced in vivo through the oxidation of catecholic substrates by enzymes such as tyrosinase or by transition metal ions. Neuromelanin, a dark pigment present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus of the brain, is produced from dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) via an interaction with cysteine, but it also incorporates their alcoholic and acidic metabolites. In this study we examined the metabolic fate of ortho-quinones derived from the catecholamine metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPE), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylene glycol (DOPEG), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylmandelic acid (DOMA). The oxidation of catecholic substrates by mushroom tyrosinase was followed by UV-visible spectrophotometry. HPLC analysis after reduction with NaBH₄ or ascorbic acid enabled measurement of the half-lives of ortho-quinones and the identification of their reaction products. Spectrophotometric examination showed that the ortho-quinones initially formed underwent extensive degradation at pH 6.8. HPLC analysis showed that DOPE-quinone and DOPEG-quinone degraded with half-lives of 15 and 30 min at pH 6.8, respectively, and >100 min at pH 5.3. The major product from DOPE-quinone was DOPEG which was produced through the addition of a water molecule to the quinone methide intermediate. DOPEG-quinone yielded a ketone, 2-oxo-DOPE, through the quinone methide intermediate. DOPAC-quinone and DOMA-quinone degraded immediately with decarboxylation of the ortho-quinone intermediates to form 3,4-dihydroxybenzylalcohol (DHBAlc) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (DHBAld), respectively. DHBAlc-quinone was converted to DHBAld with a half-life of 9 min, while DHBAld-quinone degraded rapidly with a half-life of 3 min. This study confirmed the fact that ortho-quinones from DOPE, DOPEG, DOPAC and DOMA are converted to quinone methide tautomers as common intermediates, through proton rearrangement or decarboxylation. The unstable quinone

  8. Simultaneous determination of catecholamines and their metabolites related to Alzheimer's disease in human urine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Li, Qing; Li, Naijing; Ling, Junhong; Liu, Ran; Wang, Yixiang; Sun, Lixin; Chen, Xiao Hui; Bi, Kaishun

    2011-05-01

    A simple and specific high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FL) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, norepinephrine, dopamine, epinephrine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in human urine. The samples were derivatized by 1,2-diphenylethylenediamine with isoprenaline as internal standard. The factors affecting the fluorescence yield were investigated, including the reaction and separation conditions. The catecholamine derivatives were separated on a Kromasil C(18) column with methanol and sodium acetate buffer as mobile phase. The limits of detection for all catecholamines ranged from 0.2 to 1.1 ng/mL. The linear ranges were from 2.5 to 200 ng/mL except 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid from 5 to 200 ng/mL. The intra- and interday RSDs for all catecholamines were 1.0-8.0 and 2.1-14%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine the catecholamines in human urine from 14 Alzheimer's disease patients and 14 healthy volunteers. It was concluded that the mean levels of catecholamines in urine of Alzheimer's disease patients were all lower than those in healthy volunteers. The cluster analysis and independent samples T-test were used to distinguish the Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy volunteers. PMID:21462336

  9. Diurnal profiles of melatonin synthesis-related indoles, catecholamines and their metabolites in the duck pineal organ.

    PubMed

    Lewczuk, Bogdan; Ziółkowska, Natalia; Prusik, Magdalena; Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the diurnal profiles of ten melatonin synthesis-related indoles, the quantitative relations between these compounds, and daily variations in the contents of catecholamines and their metabolites in the domestic duck pineal organ. Fourteen-week-old birds, which were reared under a 12L:12D cycle, were killed at two-hour intervals. The indole contents were measured using HPLC with fluorescence detection, whereas the levels of catecholamines and their metabolites were measured using HPLC with electrochemical detection. All indole contents, except for tryptophan, showed significant diurnal variations. The 5-hydroxytryptophan level was approximately two-fold higher during the scotophase than during the photophase. The serotonin content increased during the first half of the photophase, remained elevated for approximately 10 h and then rapidly decreased in the middle of the scotophase. N-acetylserotonin showed the most prominent changes, with a more than 15-fold increase at night. The melatonin cycle demonstrated only an approximately 5-fold difference between the peak and nadir. The 5-methoxytryptamine content was markedly elevated during the scotophase. The 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophol, 5-methoxyindole acetic acid and 5-methoxytryptophol profiles were analogous to the serotonin rhythm. The norepinephrine and dopamine contents showed no significant changes. The DOPA, DOPAC and homovanillic acid levels were higher during the scotophase than during the photophase. Vanillylmandelic acid showed the opposite rhythm, with an elevated level during the daytime. PMID:25032843

  10. Diurnal Profiles of Melatonin Synthesis-Related Indoles, Catecholamines and Their Metabolites in the Duck Pineal Organ

    PubMed Central

    Lewczuk, Bogdan; Ziółkowska, Natalia; Prusik, Magdalena; Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the diurnal profiles of ten melatonin synthesis-related indoles, the quantitative relations between these compounds, and daily variations in the contents of catecholamines and their metabolites in the domestic duck pineal organ. Fourteen-week-old birds, which were reared under a 12L:12D cycle, were killed at two-hour intervals. The indole contents were measured using HPLC with fluorescence detection, whereas the levels of catecholamines and their metabolites were measured using HPLC with electrochemical detection. All indole contents, except for tryptophan, showed significant diurnal variations. The 5-hydroxytryptophan level was approximately two-fold higher during the scotophase than during the photophase. The serotonin content increased during the first half of the photophase, remained elevated for approximately 10 h and then rapidly decreased in the middle of the scotophase. N-acetylserotonin showed the most prominent changes, with a more than 15-fold increase at night. The melatonin cycle demonstrated only an approximately 5-fold difference between the peak and nadir. The 5-methoxytryptamine content was markedly elevated during the scotophase. The 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophol, 5-methoxyindole acetic acid and 5-methoxytryptophol profiles were analogous to the serotonin rhythm. The norepinephrine and dopamine contents showed no significant changes. The DOPA, DOPAC and homovanillic acid levels were higher during the scotophase than during the photophase. Vanillylmandelic acid showed the opposite rhythm, with an elevated level during the daytime. PMID:25032843

  11. An automatic analyzer for catecholamines and their 3-O-methyl metabolites using a micro coulometric flow cell as a postcolumn reactor for fluorogenic reaction.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, K; Tsunoda, M; Watanabe, N; Imai, K

    2000-09-01

    A coulometric flow cell for a miniaturized LC system was developed. The cell was examined, as 3-O-methyl catecholamines were converted to their relative omicron-quinones for subsequent fluorometric and chemiluminescence detection. Its performance was evaluated in comparison with commercially available amperometric and coulometric detectors in terms of specification of the low dead volume and high conversion efficiency. The fully automated small-bore LC analyzer for simultaneous determination of catecholamines and their 3-O-methyl metabolites included precolumn pretreatment, column switching, column separation, postcolumn oxidative conversion, fluorometric derivatization, and chemiluminescence detection. The detection limits were 0.3-2.0 fmol for catecholamines and their 3-O-methyl metabolites. Because of the high sensitivity, the required volume of rat plasma sample was only 15 microL. PMID:10994958

  12. Evaluation of the effects of zilpateral hydrochloride supplementation on catecholamin response and other blood metabolites following a combined corticotropin releasing hormone and vasopressin challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stress response of cattle supplemented with zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) has become a topic due to anecdotal claims of supplemented cattle responding poorly to stress. This study was designed to determine if differences exist in the catecholamine and blood metabolite response of ZH-supplemente...

  13. Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning and brevetoxin metabolites: a case study from Florida.

    PubMed

    Poli, M A; Musser, S M; Dickey, R W; Eilers, P P; Hall, S

    2000-07-01

    In June of 1996, three family members were diagnosed as suffering from neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) as a result of eating shellfish harvested from Sarasota Bay, Florida. Urine from two of these patients and extracts of shellfish collected from the same location were analyzed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and by receptor binding assay. Activity consistent with brevetoxins was present in both urine and shellfish extracts. High performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of shellfish extracts demonstrated multiple fractions recognized by specific anti-brevetoxin antibodies, suggesting metabolic conversion of parent brevetoxins. Affinity-purification of these extracts yielded four major peaks of activity. One peak was identified by HPLC-mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS) to be PbTx-3, which was likely produced metabolically from the dominant parent toxin PbTx-2. No PbTx-2, however, was detected. Other peaks of activity were determined to consist of compounds of apparent masses of [M + H]+ of 1018, 1034, and 1005. These higher masses are suggestive of conjugated metabolites, but their structures have yet to be determined. The material associated with these latter three peaks were recognized by both RIA and receptor binding assay, but they quantitated differently. This finding suggests that these metabolites react differently in the two assays, and this result may have important implications for seafood safety and regulation. We suggest these metabolites to be the true cause of NSP, and they should be taken into account during regulatory testing. PMID:10728835

  14. Comparative neurochemical profile of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its metabolite alpha-methyldopamine on key targets of MDMA neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Escubedo, E; Abad, S; Torres, I; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D

    2011-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of MDMA or "Ecstasy" in rats is selectively serotonergic, while in mice it is both dopaminergic and serotonergic. MDMA metabolism may play a key role in this neurotoxicity. The function of serotonin and dopamine transporter and the effect of MDMA and its metabolites on them are essential to understand MDMA neurotoxicity. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the effects of MDMA and its metabolite alpha-methyldopamine (MeDA) on several molecular targets, mainly the dopamine and serotonin transporter functionality, to provide evidence for the role of this metabolite in the neurotoxicity of MDMA in rodents. MeDA had no affinity for the serotonin transporter but competed with serotonin for its uptake. It had no persistent effects on the functionalism of the serotonin transporter, in contrast to the effect of MDMA. Moreover, MeDA inhibited the uptake of dopamine into the serotonergic terminal and also MAO(B) activity. MeDA inhibited dopamine uptake with a lower IC(50) value than MDMA. After drug washout, the inhibition by MeDA persisted while that of MDMA was significantly reduced. The effect of MDMA on the dopamine transporter is related with dopamine release from vesicular stores, as this inhibition disappeared in reserpine-treated animals. However, the effect of MeDA seems to be a persistent conformational change of this transporter. Moreover, in contrast with MDMA, MeDA did not show affinity for nicotinic receptors, so no effects of MeDA derived from these interactions can be expected. The metabolite reduced cell viability at lower concentrations than MDMA. Apoptosis plays a key role in MDMA induced cellular toxicity but necrosis is the major process involved in MeDA cytotoxicity. We conclude that MeDA could protect against the serotonergic lesion induced by MDMA but potentiate the dopaminergic lesion as a result of the persistent blockade of the dopamine transporter induced this metabolite. PMID:21074589

  15. Serotonergic Neurotoxic Thioether Metabolites of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “Ecstasy”): Synthesis, Isolation and Characterization of Diastereoisomers

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Nieves; de la Torre, Rafael; Joglar, Jesús; Okumura, Noriko; Perfetti, Ximena; Lau, Serrine S.; Monks, Terrence J.

    2014-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is a synthetic recreational drug of abuse that produces long-term toxicity associated with the degeneration of serotonergic nerve terminals. In various animal models direct administration of MDMA into the brain fails to reproduce the serotonergic neurotoxicity, implying a requirement for the systemic metabolism and bioactivation of MDMA. Catechol-thioether metabolites of MDMA, formed via oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxymetamphetamine and 3,4-dihydroxyamphetamine (HHMA and HHA) and subsequent conjugation with glutathione (GSH), are selective serotonergic neurotoxicants when administered directly into brain. Moreover, following systemic administration of MDMA, the thioether adducts are present in rat brain dialysate. MDMA contains a stereogenic center, and is consumed as a racemate. Interestingly, different pharmacological properties have been attributed to the two enantiomers, (S)-MDMA being the most active in the central nervous system and responsible for the entactogenic effects, and most likely also for the neurodegeneration. The present study focused on the synthesis and stereochemical analysis of the neurotoxic MDMA thioether metabolites, 5-(glutathion-S-yl)-HHMA, 5-(N-acetylcysteine-S-yl)-HHMA, 2,5-bis-(glutathion-S-yl)-HHMA and 2,5-bis-(N-acetylcysteine-S-yl)-HHMA. Both enzymatic and electrochemical syntheses were explored, and methodologies for analytical and semi-preparative diastereoisomeric separation of MDMA thioether conjugates by HPLC-CEAS and HPLC-UV respectively were developed. Synthesis, diastereoisomeric separation, and unequivocal identification of the thioether conjugates of MDMA provide the chemical tools necessary for appropriate toxicological and metabolic studies on MDMA metabolites contributing to its neurotoxicity. PMID:19548351

  16. Putative Neuroprotective and Neurotoxic Kynurenine Pathway Metabolites Are Associated with Hippocampal and Amygdalar Volumes in Subjects with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, Jonathan; Drevets, Wayne C; Smith, Chelsey M; Victor, Teresa A; Wurfel, Brent E; Bellgowan, Patrick SF; Bodurka, Jerzy; Teague, T Kent; Dantzer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation-related changes in the concentrations of kynurenine pathway metabolites occur in depression secondary to medical conditions but are not firmly established in primary mood disorders. Reductions in hippocampal and amygdalar volume that putatively reflect dendritic atrophy are widely reported in major depressive disorder (MDD). Here we tested whether the relative serum concentrations of putatively neuroprotective (kynurenic acid (KA)) and neurotoxic (3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA)) kynurenine pathway metabolites were altered in primary MDD and whether these metabolites were associated with hippocampal and amygdalar volume. A total of 29 moderately to severely depressed unmedicated subjects who met DSM-IV criteria for MDD and 20 healthy controls (HCs) completed a structural MRI scan and provided blood sample for kynurenine metabolite analysis, performed using high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Cytokine concentrations were measured with ELISA and gray matter volumes were measured with the automated segmentation software, FreeSurfer. An a priori defined variable of interest, the KA/QA ratio, a putative neuroprotective index, trended lower in the MDD versus the HC group and correlated negatively with anhedonia but positively with the total hippocampal and amygdala volume in the MDD subjects. The post hoc data reduction methods yielded three principal components. Component 1 (interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, QA, and kynurenine) was significantly elevated in MDD participants versus the HCs, whereas component 2 (KA, tryptophan, and kynurenine) was positively correlated with hippocampal and amygdala volume within the MDD group. Our results raise the possibility that an immune-related imbalance in the relative metabolism of KA and QA predisposes to depression-associated dendritic atrophy and anhedonia. PMID:25074636

  17. Cyclodextrin-modified MEKC method for quantification of selected acidic metabolites of catecholamines in the presence of various biogenic amines. Application to diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Miękus, Natalia; Kowalski, Piotr; Olędzka, Ilona; Plenis, Alina; Bień, Ewa; Miękus, Aleksandra; Krawczyk, Małgorzata; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Bączek, Tomasz

    2015-10-15

    The main aim of the presented study was to develop a reliable and non-time-consuming method for the simultaneous separation of biogenic amines (BAs) like noradrenalin, adrenalin, dopamine and their main metabolites - homovanillic acid (HVA), vanillylmandelic acid (VMA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) - in urine samples. To achieve this, the validated α-cyclodextrin (α-CD)-modified micellar electrokinetic chromatography method with DAD was proposed. The optimized separation parameters were as follows: background electrolyte was composed of 10mM sodium tetraborate decahydrate, 30mM SDS, 15% (v/v) methanol and 25mM α-CD, adjusted to pH 9.36 with 1N NaOH; uncoated fused silica capillary (75μm i.d.×60.2cm length); λ=200nm; injection time 5s, applied voltage 25kV; temperature 25 (±0.1)°C. Next, the developed MEKC method was practically applied to evaluate the levels of selected acidic metabolites of catecholamines like HVA, VMA and DOPAC in urine samples collected from patients diagnosed with neuroblastoma (NB), melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy (MNTI). PMID:26402573

  18. Simultaneous automatic determination of catecholamines and their 3-O-methyl metabolites in rat plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography using peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence reaction.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, M; Takezawa, K; Santa, T; Imai, K

    1999-05-01

    A highly specific and sensitive automated high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of catecholamines (CAs; norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine) and their 3-O-methyl metabolites (normetanephrine, metanephrine, and 3-methoxytyramine) is described. Automated precolumn ion-exchange extraction of diluted plasma is coupled with HPLC separation of CAs and their 3-O-methyl metabolites on an ODS column, postcolumn coulometric oxidation, fluorescence derivatization with ethylenediamine, and finally peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence reaction detection. The detection limits were about 3 fmol for norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine, 5 fmol for normetanephrine, and 10 fmol for metanephrine and 3-methoxytyramine (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). Fifty microliters of rat plasma was used and 4-methoxytyramine was employed as an internal standard. The relative standard deviations for the method (n = 5) were 2.5-7.6% for the intraday assay and 6.3-9.1% for the interday assay. The method was applicable to the determination of normetanephrine and metanephrine in 50 microl of rat plasma. PMID:10222014

  19. Relationship between neurotoxic kynurenine metabolites and reductions in right medial prefrontal cortical thickness in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Meier, Timothy B; Drevets, Wayne C; Wurfel, Brent E; Ford, Bart N; Morris, Harvey M; Victor, Teresa A; Bodurka, Jerzy; Teague, T Kent; Dantzer, Robert; Savitz, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Reductions in gray matter volume of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), especially the rostral and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (rACC, sgACC) are a widely reported finding in major depressive disorder (MDD). Inflammatory mediators, which are elevated in a subgroup of patients with MDD, activate the kynurenine metabolic pathway and increase production of neuroactive metabolites such as kynurenic acid (KynA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA) which influence neuroplasticity. It is not known whether the alterations in brain structure and function observed in major depressive disorders are due to the direct effect of inflammatory mediators or the effects of neurotoxic kynurenine metabolites. Here, using partial posterior predictive distribution mediation analysis, we tested whether the serum concentrations of kynurenine pathway metabolites mediated reductions in cortical thickness in mPFC regions in MDD. Further, we tested whether any association between C-reactive protein (CRP) and cortical thickness would be mediated by kynurenine pathway metabolites. Seventy-three unmedicated subjects who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD and 91 healthy controls (HC) completed MRI scanning using a pulse sequence optimized for tissue contrast resolution. Automated cortical parcellation was performed using the PALS-B12 Brodmann area atlas as implemented in FreeSurfer in order to compare the cortical thickness and cortical area of six PFC regions: Brodmann areas (BA) 9, 10, 11, 24, 25, and 32. Serum concentrations of kynurenine pathway metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection, while high-sensitivity CRP concentration was measured immunoturbidimetrically. Compared with HCs, the MDD group showed a reduction in cortical thickness of the right BA24 (p<0.01) and BA32 (p<0.05) regions and MDD patients with a greater number of depressive episodes displayed thinner cortex in BA32 (p<0

  20. [An experimental study on the neurotoxicity of 2-octanone and 2-hexanol, a metabolite of n-hexane].

    PubMed

    Misumi, J; Nagano, M; Nomura, S

    1982-09-01

    An electrophysiological study of the neurotoxicity of 2-octanone (an analogue of methyl n-butyl ketone) and 2-hexanol (a metabolite of n-hexane) was conducted on rats as a part of the study to determine the specific molecular arrangement required for the development of peripheral neuropathy. The compound 2-octanone or 2-hexanol was administered subcutaneously in the daily dose of 400 mg/kg of each compound into the back of seven rats, weighing 290 g, 5 days per week for a period of 21 weeks. Animals treated with 2-octanone for 21 weeks failed to exhibit apparent clinical and neurophysiological evidence except a slight inhibition of weight gain and narcotic effects after treatment with the compound. The same doses of 2-hexanol for 21 weeks caused hypersalivation, gait disturbances, crossing phenomena of hind limbs and a failure of normal growth. Retardation of the conduction velocity in the motor and sensory nerve fibers and the prolonged motor latencies of the tail nerves (distal part) began to appear at the 14th week of the experiment when 9.6 g in the total dose had been given to each animal. These changes were intensified in the subsequent course of the experiment. Our previous experiments and the present results showed that n-hexane barely produced peripheral neuropathy in doses over 10.5 g, and that 2-hexanone (MBK), 2,5-hexanediol or 2,5-hexanedione never failed to produce a neuropathy even in doses less than 9.6 g of each compound. The above results suggest that the neurotoxic potency of 2-hexanol is greater than that of n-hexane but less than that of MBK, 2,5-hexanediol or 2,5-hexanedione. PMID:6296504

  1. Brain levels of the neurotoxic pyridinium metabolite HPP+ and extrapyramidal symptoms in haloperidol-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Crowley, James J; Ashraf-Khorassani, Mehdi; Castagnoli, Neal; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2013-12-01

    The typical antipsychotic haloperidol is a highly effective treatment for schizophrenia but its use is limited by a number of serious, and often irreversible, motor side effects. These adverse drug reactions, termed extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS), result from an unknown pathophysiological mechanism. One theory relates to the observation that the haloperidol metabolite HPP+ (4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-4-oxobutyl]-pyridinium) is structurally similar to MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium), a neurotoxin responsible for an irreversible neurodegenerative condition similar to Parkinson's disease. To determine whether HPP+ contributes to haloperidol-induced EPS, we measured brain HPP+ and haloperidol levels in strains of mice at high (C57BL/6J and NZO/HILtJ) and low (BALB/cByJ and PWK/PhJ) liability to haloperidol-induced EPS following chronic treatment (7-10 adult male mice per strain). Brain levels of HPP+ and the ratio of HPP+ to haloperidol were not significantly different between the haloperidol-sensitive and haloperidol-resistant strain groups (P=0.50). Within each group, however, strain differences were seen (P<0.01), indicating that genetic variation regulating steady-state HPP+ levels exists. Since the HPP+ levels that we observed in mouse brain overlap the range of those detected in post-mortem human brains following chronic haloperidol treatment, the findings from this study are physiologically relevant to humans. The results suggest that strain differences in steady-state HPP+ levels do not explain sensitivity to haloperidol-induced EPS in the mice we studied. PMID:24107597

  2. Metabolite

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolite is any substance produced during metabolism (digestion or other bodily chemical processes). The term metabolite may also refer to the product that remains after a drug is broken down (metabolized) by the body.

  3. Determination of the role of calcium on instability of neurotoxic metabolite of ecstasy by HPTLC-mass

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ecstasy is one of the popular illicit drugs in the world and its usage has been recently increased in Iran. This compound can destroy the serotonergic neurons and produces cognitive and psychopathology diseases. 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (HHMA) which is the main metabolite of this compound, seems to be responsible for this effect. However, no consensus has been reached among the researchers about its role. This disagreement between the researches may be due to failure in determination of HHMA as free form in physiological fluids. In this study, the stability of this crucial metabolite of ecstasy was examined in different mediums. Methods The stability of HHMA was studied in the perfusion medium and water at 100 and 10 ng/mL concentrations. Moreover, the effect of temperature (0–25°C), pH (3–10), calcium chloride (0–150 g/L) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the stability of HHMA was also examined. Results Our result suggested that the free form of HHMA could be degraded in the perfusion medium. The rate of this degradation has direct proportion to temperature (at 25°C = 0.037 min-1 and at 0°C = 0.002 min-1). Calcium chloride and sodium bicarbonate are two responsible components in this instability. Moreover, the alkaline pHs and increasing the shaking time can accelerate this effect. Although, while degradation was prevented at pH=3, EDTA could only reduce this rate about 30%. Conclusions Calcium cation can act as an accelerator of HHMA degradation. Therefore, the perfusion medium should not contain Ca2+ and the pH of medium is better to be adjusted at acidic range. Since, the internal cellular source of calcium is endoplasmic reticulum system, it can be assumed that, this cation may change HHMA and dopamine to reactive compounds that can bind covalently to the cysteinyl group of biological compounds and damage cellular components. PMID:23351707

  4. Unique pentafluorobenzylation and collision-induced dissociation for specific and accurate GC-MS/MS quantification of the catecholamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) in human urine.

    PubMed

    Zoerner, Alexander A; Heusser, Karsten; Gutzki, Frank M; Mitschke, Anja; Tank, Jens; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Jordan, Jens; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2011-05-15

    In the human body, the catecholamine norepinephrine is mainly metabolized to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) which therefore serves as an important biomarker for norepinephrine's metabolism. Most data on DHPG concentrations in human plasma and urine has been generated by using HPLC-ECD or GC-MS technologies. Here, we describe a stable-isotope dilution GC-MS/MS method for the quantitative determination of DHPG in human urine using trideutero-DHPG (d(3)-DHPG) as internal standard and a two-step derivatization process with pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFB-Br) and N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA). Two pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives were obtained and identified, i.e., two isomeric DHPG-PFB-(TMS)(3) derivatives and the later eluting DHPG-tetrafluorobenzyl-(TMS)(2) derivative, i.e., DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2). To our knowledge the DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2) derivative and the underlying reaction have not been reported previously. In this reaction both vicinal aromatic hydroxyl groups of DHPG react with PFB-Br to form a heterocyclic seven-membered [1,4]dioxepin compound. The DHPG-TFB-(TMS)(2) derivative was used for quantitative GC-MS/MS analysis in the electron-capturing negative-ion chemical ionization mode by selected-reaction monitoring of m/z 351 from m/z 401 for DHPG and of m/z 352 from m/z 404 for d(3)-DHPG. Validation experiments on human urine samples spiked with DHPG in a narrow (0-33 nM) and a wide range (0-901 nM) revealed high recovery (86-104%) and low imprecision (RSD; 0.01-2.8%). LOD and relative LLOQ (rLLOQ) values of the method for DHPG were determined to be 76 amol and 9.4%, respectively. In urine of 28 patients suffering from chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, DHPG was measured at a mean concentration of 238 nM (38.3 μg/g creatinine). The DHPG concentration in the respective control group of 40 healthy subjects was measured to be 328 nM (39.2 μg/g creatinine). Given the unique derivatization reaction and collision

  5. Catecholamine blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Norepinephrine -- blood; Epinephrine -- blood; Adrenalin -- blood; Dopamine -- blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... the test. This is especially true if both blood and urine catecholamines are to be measured. You ...

  6. NEUROTOXICITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neurotoxicity of DBPs in general has not been well characterized. The literature provides reports of neurotoxicity of DCA following exposures to relatively high doses. Studies completed at EPA, however, have shown that relatively low doses of DCA (as low as 16 mg/kg/day; simi...

  7. Determination of catecholamines and their metabolites in rat urine by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the study of identifying potential markers for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chunxiao; Li, Qing; Liu, Xujia; He, Bosai; Sui, Zhenyu; Xu, Huarong; Yin, Yidi; Liu, Ran; Bi, Kaishun

    2015-02-01

    In order to investigate the potential links between catecholamines (CAs) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), rapid and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods in different ionization modes for the quantification of 14 CAs and their metabolites in rat urine without derivatization or complex sample pre-treatments were developed. After addition of the internal standard, isoproterenol, the urine samples were extracted by protein precipitation and separated on an Inertsil ODS-EP column (Shimadzu, Japan) at a flow of 1.0 ml min(-1). Tandem mass spectrometric detection was performed on a 4000Q UPLC-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode with turbo ion spray source. Tyrosine, dopamine, noradrenaline, epinephrine, 3-methoxytyramine, normetanephrine and metanephrine were determined in positive mode, while 3,4-dihyroxy-L-phenylalanine (DOPA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DL-3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid, DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl glycol, homovanillic acid, DL-4-hydroxy-3-methoxymandelic acid and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenylglycol were determined in negative mode. The methods were examined and were found to be precise and accurate within the linearity range of the assays. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy of the analytes were well within acceptance criteria (±15%). The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and internal standard were all more than 60%. The validated methods have been successfully applied to compare CAs profiles in normal and AD rats. The results indicated the urine levels of DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl glycol and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-phenylglycol in AD rats were significantly higher than those in the normal group, and the other CAs have an opposite performance. These may attribute to the difference of some enzyme activity between rats with AD and normal. Furthermore, this may be helpful in clinical diagnostics and monitor the efficacy of AD treatment. PMID:25800017

  8. Catecholamines and stress.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Miklós

    2014-03-30

    A brief survey is offering of debates on two long-standing questions in stress studies and theories: 1) question of stress nonspecificity (i.e. homo- or heterogeneity in stress responses), and 2) what is the functional role of central catecholamines in stress mechanisms, especially in stress signal-transduction and in the realization of stress responses. PMID:26118253

  9. Neuroprotective effects of vinpocetine and its major metabolite cis-apovincaminic acid on NMDA-induced neurotoxicity in a rat entorhinal cortex lesion model.

    PubMed

    Nyakas, Csaba; Felszeghy, Klára; Szabó, Róbert; Keijser, Jan N; Luiten, Paul G M; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Tihanyi, Károly

    2009-01-01

    Vinpocetine (ethyl-apovincaminate, Cavinton), a synthetic derivative of the Vinca minor alkaloid vincamine, has been used now for decades for prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases predisposing to development of dementia. Both vinpocetine and its main metabolite cis-apovincaminic acid (cAVA) exert a neuroprotective type of action. Bilateral N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced neurodegeneration in the entorhinal cortex of rat was used as a dementia model to confirm the neuroprotective action of these compounds in vivo. NMDA-lesioned rats were treated 60 min before lesion and throughout 3 postoperative days with a 10 mg/kg intraperitoneal dose of vinpocetine or cAVA. Behavioral tests started after termination of drug treatment and consisted of novel object recognition, social discrimination, and spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze, and spatial learning in the Morris water maze. At the end of behavioral testing brains were perfused with fixative and the size of the excitotoxic neuronal lesion and that of microglial activation around the lesion were assayed quantitatively on brain sections immunostained for neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) and integrin CD11b, respectively. Entorhinal NMDA lesions impaired recognition of novel objects and the new social partner, and suppressed spontaneous alternation and spatial learning performance in the Morris maze. Both vinpocetine and cAVA effectively attenuated the behavioral deficits, and significantly decreased lesion size and the region of microglia activation. Both lesion-induced attention deficit and learning disabilities were markedly alleviated by vinpocetine and cAVA. The morphological findings corroborated the behavioral observations and indicated reduced lesion size and microglia activation especially after vinpocetine treatment which supports an in vivo neuroprotective mode of action of vinpocitine and a less potent action of cAVA. PMID:19492990

  10. Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    deCastro, F.J.

    1990-04-01

    Plasma catecholamines where measured in 15 children with chronic lead poisoning and 15 matched controls by radioimmunassay. The data suggest that plasma catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinphrine) were significantly elevated in chronic lead poisoning. Plasma catecholamine elevation may well be important in the clinical finding of hyperactivity and hypertension associated with chronic lead poisoning.

  11. Biomarkers of neurotoxic shellfish poisoning.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ann; Plakas, Steven M; Flewelling, Leanne J; El Said, Kathleen R; Jester, Edward L E; Granade, Hudson R; White, Kevin D; Dickey, Robert W

    2008-08-01

    Urine specimens from patients diagnosed with neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) were examined for biomarkers of brevetoxin intoxication. Brevetoxins were concentrated from urine by using solid-phase extraction (SPE), and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Urine extracts were fractionated by LC, and fractions analyzed for brevetoxins by ELISA. In subsequent LC-MS/MS analyses, several brevetoxin metabolites of B-type backbone were identified, with elution profiles consistent with those of ELISA. The more abundant brevetoxin metabolites in urine were characterized structurally by LC-MS/MS. With the exception of BTX-3, brevetoxin metabolites in urine differed from those found in shellfish and in shellfish meal remnants. Proposed structures of these major urinary metabolites are methylsulfoxy BTX-3, 27-epoxy BTX-3, and reduced BTX-B5. BTX-3 was found in all specimens examined. BTX-3 concentrations in urine, as determined by LC-MS/MS, correlated well with composite toxin measurements by ELISA (r(2)=0.96). BTX-3 is a useful biomarker for confirmation of clinical diagnosis of NSP. PMID:18582487

  12. ENHANCED NEUROTOXICITY OF 3,3-IMINODIPROPIONITRILE FOLLOWING PRETREATMENT WITH CARBON TETRACHLORIDE IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present work tested the hypothesis that IDPN must be metabolized by the liver to an active metabolite to neurotoxic. Thus a reduction in IDPN neurotoxicity would be expected when liver function is compromised. ale rats were given ip injections of saline, 100 (IDPN1) or 200 (I...

  13. Catecholamine autotoxicity. Implications for pharmacology and therapeutics of Parkinson disease and related disorders☆

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Kopin, Irwin J.; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2015-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases involve loss of catecholamine neurons—Parkinson disease is a prototypical example. Catecholamine neurons are rare in the nervous system, and why they are vulnerable in PD and related disorders has been mysterious. Accumulating evidence supports the concept of “autotoxicity”—inherent cytotoxicity of catecholamines and their metabolites in the cells in which they are produced. According to the “catecholaldehyde hypothesis” for the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease, long-term increased build-up of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), the catecholaldehyde metabolite of dopamine, causes or contributes to the eventual death of dopaminergic neurons. Lewy bodies, a neuropathologic hallmark of PD, contain precipitated alpha-synuclein. Bases for the tendency of alpha-synuclein to precipitate in the cytoplasm of catecholaminergic neurons have also been mysterious. Since DOPAL potently oligomerizes and aggregates alpha-synuclein, the catecholaldehyde hypothesis provides a link between alpha-synucleinopathy and catecholamine neuron loss in Lewy body diseases. The concept developed here is that DOPAL and alpha-synuclein are nodes in a complex nexus of interacting homeostatic systems. Dysfunctions of several processes, including decreased vesicular sequestration of cytoplasmic catecholamines, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and oligomerization of alpha-synuclein, lead to conversion from the stability afforded by negative feedback regulation to the instability, degeneration, and system failure caused by induction of positive feedback loops. These dysfunctions result from diverse combinations of genetic predispositions, environmental exposures, stress, and time. The notion of catecholamine autotoxicity has several implications for treatment, disease modification, and prevention. Conversely, disease modification clinical trials would provide key tests of the catecholaldehyde hypothesis. PMID:24945828

  14. Neurotoxicity in risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, B.

    1988-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is a property of many metals, even those deemed biologically essential. Manganese, one of the essential elements, can induce a syndrome displaying aspects of both Parkinsonism and dystonia, but accompanied, as well, by psychological abnormalities. At low exposure levels, however, neurotoxicity may be detectable with psychological tests. Mercury vapor exposure also induces neurological signs, psychological aberrations, and subtle evidence of dysfunction on psychological tests. Methylmercury and lead are particularly toxic to the developing brain. The most recent research indicates that psychological testing may uncover deficits even in children showing no evidence of impairment. Because of their special features, neurotoxic endpoints may have to be evaluated for risks by a process that diverges significantly from the standard program based on carcinogenicity.

  15. Does escitalopram reduce neurotoxicity in major depression?

    PubMed

    Halaris, Angelos; Myint, Aye-Mu; Savant, Vidushi; Meresh, Edwin; Lim, Edwin; Guillemin, Gilles; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Fareed, Jawed; Sinacore, James

    2015-01-01

    A pro-inflammatory state and a dysregulation in the tryptophan/kynurenine pathway have been documented in depression. This study examined whether treatment with the SSRI, escitalopram (ESC), could suppress inflammation and favorably shift metabolites of the kynurenine pathway in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) within the utilized treatment period. Twenty seven healthy control subjects were included for comparison. Thirty patients were enrolled after completing baseline assessments. They received a 12-week ESC monotherapy. Twenty subjects were completers. Clinical assessments were carried out at each visit using the HAM-D, HAM-A, CGI and BDI rating scales. Blood samples were collected at each assessment and stored until analyzed. Cytokines were analyzed with Randox multiplex assay and tryptophan and kynurenine metabolites were analyzed using HPLC/GCMS. Baseline plasma concentrations of hsCRP, TNFα, IL6 and MCP-1 were significantly higher in patients compared to healthy controls. IL10 trended toward an increase. Baseline plasma IL1β correlated significantly with IL1α, and IL4. Patients showed significant improvement in all outcome measures with a high remission rate. Significant correlations were obtained between specific symptoms and certain biomarkers at baseline but these correlations must be viewed as very preliminary. During ESC treatment concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers did not change except for TNFα that trended lower. Metabolites and ratios of the tryptophan/kynurenine pathway showed reductions of the neurotoxic metabolites, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid, 3-hydroxykynurenine/kynurenine, quinolinic acid/tryptophan, kynurenic acid/quinolinic acid and quinolinic acid/3-hydroxykynurenine. The results indicate that ESC may exert its antidepressant effect in part through inhibition of synthesis of certain neurotoxic kynurenine metabolites and possibly also through reduction of the inflammatory response, although there was no

  16. Neurotoxic Weapons and Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Carota, Antonio; Calabrese, Pasquale; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The modern era of chemical and biological warfare began in World War I with the large-scale production and use of blistering and choking agents (chlorine, phosgene and mustard gases) in the battlefield. International treaties (the 1925 Geneva Protocol, the 1975 Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention and the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention) banned biological and chemical weapons. However, several countries are probably still engaged in their development. Hence, there is risk of these weapons being used in the future. This chapter will focus on neurotoxic weapons (e.g. nerve agents, chemical and biological neurotoxins, psychostimulants), which act specifically or preeminently on the central nervous system and/or the neuromuscular junction. Deeply affecting the function of the nervous system, these agents either have incapacitating effects or cause clusters of casualties who manifest primary symptoms of encephalopathy, seizures, muscle paralysis and respiratory failure. The neurologist should be prepared both to notice patterns of symptoms and signs that are sufficiently consistent to raise the alarm of neurotoxic attacks and to define specific therapeutic interventions. Additionally, extensive knowledge on neurotoxic syndromes should stimulate scientific research to produce more effective antidotes and antibodies (which are still lacking for most neurotoxic weapons) for rapid administration in aerosolized forms in the case of terrorist or warfare scenarios. PMID:27035576

  17. Neurotoxicity and Behavior

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxicity is important to consider as a component of occupational and environmental safety and health programs. The failure to do so has contributed to a number of cases in which workers, consumers of manufactured products, and people exposed in the environment were irreparab...

  18. Platinum Neurotoxicity Pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    McWhinney, Sarah R.; Goldberg, Richard M.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    Cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin anticancer drugs are commonly used to treat lung, colorectal, ovarian, breast, head/neck, and genitourinary cancers. However, the efficacy of platinum-based drugs is often compromised because of the substantial risk for severe toxicities, including neurotoxicity. Neurotoxicity can result in both acute and chronic debilitation. Moreover, colorectal cancer patients treated with oxaliplatin more often discontinue therapy due to peripheral neuropathy than for tumor progression, potentially compromising patient benefit. Numerous methods to prevent neurotoxicity have so far proven unsuccessful. In order to circumvent this life-altering side effect, while taking advantage of the antitumor activities of the platinum agents, efforts to identify mechanism-based biomarkers are underway. In this review, we detail findings from the current literature for genetic markers associated with neurotoxicity induced by single agent and combination platinum chemotherapy. These data have the potential for broad clinical implications if mechanistic associations lead to the development of toxicity modulators to minimize the noxious sequelae of platinum chemotherapy. PMID:19139108

  19. Tyrosine - Effects on catecholamine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acworth, Ian N.; During, Matthew J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine administration elevates striatal levels of dopamine metabolites in animals given treatments that accelerate nigrostriatal firing, but not in untreated rats. We examined the possibility that the amino acid might actually enhance dopamine release in untreated animals, but that the technique of measuring striatal dopamine metabolism was too insensitive to demonstrate such an effect. Dopamine release was assessed directly, using brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid. Tyrosine administration (50-200 mg/kg IP) did indeed cause a dose related increase in extracellular fluid dopamine levels with minor elevations in levels of DOPAC and HVA, its major metabolites, which were not dose-related. The rise in dopamine was short-lived, suggesting that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms responded to the increased dopamine release by diminishing neuronal firing or sensitivity to tyrosine. These observations indicate that measurement of changes in striatal DOPAC and HVA, if negative, need not rule out increases in nigrostriatal dopamine release.

  20. Functionally active ganglioneuroma with increased plasma and urinary catecholamines and positive iodine 131-meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Clerico, A.; Jenkner, A.; Castello, M.A.; Ciofetta, G.; Lucarelli, C.; Codini, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Ganglioneuromas are usually considered not to be functionally active. Studies of their catecholamine excretory pattern and of their imaging by means of the adrenergic tracing agent 131-I-MIBG have been therefore sparse. We report on a case of secretory ganglioneuroma, as demonstrated by the increased urinary excretion of the catecholamine metabolites HVA and VMA, increased plasma dopamine and epinephrine levels, and positive 131-I-MIBG scintigraphy. We must therefore be aware that a functionally active tumor is not necessarily a neuroblastoma, and that the diagnosis should be biopsy proven.

  1. Superoxide anion radical scavenging property of catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2013-01-01

    The direct effect of the four catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine and isoproterenol) on superoxide anion radicals (O2•) was investigated. The reaction between 18-crown-6-ether and potassium superoxide in dimethylsulfoxide was used as a source of O2•. The reactivity of catecholamines with O2• was examined using chemiluminescence, reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping techniques. 5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide was included as the spin trap. The results showed that the four catecholamines were effective and efficient in inhibiting chemiluminescence accompanying the potassium superoxide/18-crown-6-ether system in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.05-2 mM in the following order: adrenaline > noradrenaline > dopamine > isoproterenol, with, IC50 = 0.15 ± 0.02 mM 0.21 ± 0.03 mM, 0.27 ± 0.03 mM and 0.50 ± 0.04 mM, respectively. The catecholamines examined also exhibited a strong scavenging effect towards O2• when evaluated this property by the inhibition of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction (56-73% at 1 M concentration). A very similar capacity of O2• scavenging was monitored in the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide spin-trapping assay. The results suggest that catecholamines tested may involve a direct effect on scavenging O2- radicals. PMID:23319391

  2. Homocysteine excess: delineating the possible mechanism of neurotoxicity and depression.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Pankaj; Singh, Nirmal

    2015-12-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a nonproteogenic sulfur containing amino acid derived from dietary methionine through demethylation. Homocysteine can be re-methylated to methionine [precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)] via the re-methylation or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate pathway or undergoes transsulfuration to form cysteine by the action of metabolic enzymes and cofactors. Impaired metabolism due to genetic alteration in metabolic enzymes (methionine synthase, methyltetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), cystathionine β-synthase (CβS), and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CγL) or deficiency in cofactors (vitamin B6 , B12 , folate) may lead to acquired metabolic anomaly known as hyperhomocysteinemia. Hcy excess decreases the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent synthesis of catecholamines, viz. dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and noncatecholamine, viz. serotonin (5-HT), due to genetic alteration in key enzyme MTHFR in the homocysteine metabolism pathway that leads to depression. Thus, hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy)-induced SAM level is influenced by the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) MTHFR C677T. Furthermore, HHcy leads to production of precarious neurotoxic product homocysteic acid (HCA) and cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA) which acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist and has neurotoxic effects on dopaminergic neurons. In the current review, an attempt has been made to discuss the neurotoxic effects of HHcy in the pathogenesis of depression. PMID:26376956

  3. Noncholinergic control of adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Livett, B G; Marley, P D

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that adrenal catecholamine secretion can be modulated or elicited by noncholinergic neurotransmitters and hormones. However, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which these agents produce their effects and the physiological conditions under which they act are not well characterised. Here we briefly review the mechanisms by which one such agent (the neuropeptide substance P) modulates the cholinergic secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells, and another agent (angiotensin II) elicits catecholamine secretion independently of the cholinergic innervation. PMID:7507911

  4. The Dipeptides Ile-Tyr and Ser-Tyr Exert Distinct Effects on Catecholamine Metabolism in the Mouse Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Moriyasu, Kazuki; Ichinose, Takashi; Nakahata, Akane; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro; Furuya, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Catecholamine synthesis and transmission in the brain are influenced by the availability of Tyr in the body. In this study, we compared the effects of oral administration of Tyr-containing dipeptides Ile-Tyr, Ser-Tyr, and Tyr-Pro with Tyr alone on catecholamine metabolism in the mouse brainstem. Among these dipeptides, Ile-Tyr administration led to increases in dopamine, the dopamine metabolites homovanillic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, compared to administration of Ser-Tyr, Tyr-Pro, or Tyr alone. In comparison, administration of Ser-Tyr induced significantly increasing noradrenaline turnover, while Tyr-Pro administration suppressed dopamine turnover. Therefore, oral administration of Ile-Tyr, Ser-Tyr, and Tyr-Pro differentially affected metabolism of dopamine and noradrenaline. These observations strongly suggest that Tyr-containing dipeptides exert distinct effects on catecholamine metabolism in the brainstem when ingested orally. PMID:26981137

  5. [Neurotoxicity of radiation].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that the central nervous system is thoroughly resistant to ionizing radiation as high-dose radiation exposure is required for causing neuronal death. In contrast, recent studies have revealed that the hippocampus, which could be the main organ involved in disorder of higher brain functions after radiation therapy, contains radiation-sensitive cell fractions. In this paper, the basics of radiation effects and the molecular mechanism of neurotoxicity of radiation have been reviewed and discussed. PMID:25585436

  6. Catecholamines and cognition after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Peter O; Mehta, Mitul A; Sharp, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive problems are one of the main causes of ongoing disability after traumatic brain injury. The heterogeneity of the injuries sustained and the variability of the resulting cognitive deficits makes treating these problems difficult. Identifying the underlying pathology allows a targeted treatment approach aimed at cognitive enhancement. For example, damage to neuromodulatory neurotransmitter systems is common after traumatic brain injury and is an important cause of cognitive impairment. Here, we discuss the evidence implicating disruption of the catecholamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) and review the efficacy of catecholaminergic drugs in treating post-traumatic brain injury cognitive impairments. The response to these therapies is often variable, a likely consequence of the heterogeneous patterns of injury as well as a non-linear relationship between catecholamine levels and cognitive functions. This individual variability means that measuring the structure and function of a person's catecholaminergic systems is likely to allow more refined therapy. Advanced structural and molecular imaging techniques offer the potential to identify disruption to the catecholaminergic systems and to provide a direct measure of catecholamine levels. In addition, measures of structural and functional connectivity can be used to identify common patterns of injury and to measure the functioning of brain 'networks' that are important for normal cognitive functioning. As the catecholamine systems modulate these cognitive networks, these measures could potentially be used to stratify treatment selection and monitor response to treatment in a more sophisticated manner. PMID:27256296

  7. Catecholamines and cognition after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Peter O.; Mehta, Mitul A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive problems are one of the main causes of ongoing disability after traumatic brain injury. The heterogeneity of the injuries sustained and the variability of the resulting cognitive deficits makes treating these problems difficult. Identifying the underlying pathology allows a targeted treatment approach aimed at cognitive enhancement. For example, damage to neuromodulatory neurotransmitter systems is common after traumatic brain injury and is an important cause of cognitive impairment. Here, we discuss the evidence implicating disruption of the catecholamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) and review the efficacy of catecholaminergic drugs in treating post-traumatic brain injury cognitive impairments. The response to these therapies is often variable, a likely consequence of the heterogeneous patterns of injury as well as a non-linear relationship between catecholamine levels and cognitive functions. This individual variability means that measuring the structure and function of a person’s catecholaminergic systems is likely to allow more refined therapy. Advanced structural and molecular imaging techniques offer the potential to identify disruption to the catecholaminergic systems and to provide a direct measure of catecholamine levels. In addition, measures of structural and functional connectivity can be used to identify common patterns of injury and to measure the functioning of brain ‘networks’ that are important for normal cognitive functioning. As the catecholamine systems modulate these cognitive networks, these measures could potentially be used to stratify treatment selection and monitor response to treatment in a more sophisticated manner. PMID:27256296

  8. Effect of microgravity on plasma catecholamine responses to stressors during space flight.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, R; Macho, L; Koska, J; Pacak, K; Hoff, T; Ksinantova, L; Noskov, V B; Kobzev, E; Grigoriev, A I; Vigas, M

    2001-07-01

    The effect of microgravity on the sympathicoadrenal system (SAS) activity in humans and animals has not yet been clarified. Our previous studies suggested that the SAS activity, evaluated by circulating and/or urinary catecholamine (CA) levels in astronauts during space flights, was found to be rather unchanged. However, CA levels were measured in astronauts only at rest conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of microgravity during space flight and post-flight readaptation on responsiveness of the SAS to somatic and psychic stressors evaluated by levels of catecholamines and their metabolite in the blood of the Slovak cosmonaut during his stay on board the space station Mir. PMID:12650201

  9. Neurotoxic cyanobacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Molgó, Jordi; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole

    2010-10-01

    Worldwide development of cyanobacterial blooms has significantly increased in marine and continental waters in the last century due to water eutrophication. This phenomenon is favoured by the ability of planktonic cyanobacteria to synthesize gas vesicles that allow them to float in the water column. Besides, benthic cyanobacteria that proliferate at the bottom of lakes, rivers and costal waters form dense mats near the shore. Cyanobacterial massive proliferation is of public concern regarding the capacity of certain cyanobacterial strains to produce hepatotoxic and neurotoxic compounds that can affect public health, human activities and wild and stock animals. The cholinergic synapses and voltage-gated sodium channels constitute the targets of choice of cyanobacterial neurotoxins. Anatoxin-a and homoanatoxin-a are agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Anatoxin-a(s) is an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase. Saxitoxin, kalkitoxin and jamaicamide are blockers of voltage-gated sodium channels, whereas antillatoxin is an activator of such channels. Moreover the neurotoxic amino acid l-beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine was shown to be produced by diverse cyanobacterial taxa. Although controversial, increasing in vivo and in vitro evidence suggest a link between the ingestion of l-beta-N-methylamino-l-alanine and the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinsonism-dementia complex, a neurodegenerative disease. This paper reviews the occurrence of cyanobacterial neurotoxins, their chemical properties, mode of action and biosynthetic pathways. PMID:19660486

  10. Fish scales as biosensors for catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Elwing, H; Karlsson, J O; Grundström, N; Gustafsson, A L; von Schenck, H; Sundgren, H; Odman, S; Andersson, R G; Lundström, I

    1990-01-01

    Certain fish scales contain specialized cells (chromatophores) with pigment granulas, which can be dispersed or aggregated in the cells. The degree of aggregation is determined by a transmitter substance, noradrenaline, released by the sympathetic nerve endings in the skin. Isolated scales from, for example, cuckoo wrasse (Labrus ossifagus) retain a large sensitivity to externally applied noradrenaline (or more generally catecholamines) for several weeks. The degree of aggregation in isolated scales can be measured objectively by simple photometric techniques. We demonstrate in this paper how fish scales can be used to monitor catecholamine levels in human blood plasma. A discussion of other potential biosensor applications of this intact biological receptor-effector system is also given. PMID:2271145

  11. Brain catecholamine metabolism in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Huotari, Marko; Gogos, Joseph A; Karayiorgou, Maria; Koponen, Olli; Forsberg, Markus; Raasmaja, Atso; Hyttinen, Juha; Männistö, Pekka T

    2002-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyses the O-methylation of compounds having a catechol structure and its main function involves the elimination of biologically active or toxic catechols and their metabolites. By means of homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells, a strain of mice has been produced in which the gene encoding the COMT enzyme is disrupted. We report here the levels of catecholamines and their metabolites in striatal extracellular fluid in these mice as well as in homogenates from different parts of the brain, under normal conditions and after acute levodopa administration. In immunoblotting studies, COMT-knockout mice had no COMT protein in brain or kidney tissues but the amounts of catecholamine synthesizing and other metabolizing enzyme proteins were normal. Under normal conditions, COMT deficiency does not appear to affect significantly brain dopamine and noradrenaline levels in spite of relevant changes in their metabolites. This finding is consistent with previous pharmacological studies with COMT inhibitors and confirms the pivotal role of synaptic reuptake processes and monoamine oxidase-dependent metabolism in terminating the actions of catecholamines at nerve terminals. In contrast, when COMT-deficient mice are challenged with l-dihydroxyphenylalanine, they show an extensive accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglycol and even dopamine, revealing an important role for COMT under such situations. Notably, in some cases these changes appear to be Comt gene dosage-dependent, brain-region specific and sexually dimorphic. Our results may have implications for improving the treatment of Parkinson's disease and for understanding the contribution of the natural variation in COMT activity to psychiatric phenotypes. PMID:11849292

  12. Perivascular adipose tissue contains functional catecholamines

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lopez, Nadia; Martini, Marisa; Jackson, William F; Darios, Emma; Burnett, Robert; Seitz, Bridget; Fink, Gregory D; Watts, Stephanie W

    2014-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system and its neurotransmitter effectors are undeniably important to blood pressure control. We made the novel discovery that perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) contains significant concentrations of catecholamines. We hypothesized that PVAT contains sufficient releasable catecholamines to affect vascular function. High-pressure liquid chromatography, isometric contractility, immunohistochemistry, whole animal approaches, and pharmacology were used to test this hypothesis. In normal rat thoracic aorta and superior mesenteric artery, the indirect sympathomimetic tyramine caused a concentration-dependent contraction that was dependent on the presence of PVAT. Tyramine stimulated release of norepinephrine (NA), dopamine (DA) and the tryptamine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) from PVAT isolated from both arteries. In both arteries, tyramine-induced concentration-dependent contraction was rightward-shifted and reduced by the noradrenaline transporter inhibitor nisoxetine (1 μmol/L), the vesicular monoamine transporter inhibitor tetrabenazine (10 μmol/L), and abolished by the α adrenoreceptor antagonist prazosin (100 nmol/L). Inhibitors of the DA and 5-HT transporter did not alter tyramine-induced, PVAT-dependent contraction. Removal of the celiac ganglion as a neuronal source of catecholamines for superior mesenteric artery PVAT did not significantly reduce the maximum or shift the concentration-dependent contraction to tyramine. Electrical field stimulation of the isolated aorta was not affected by the presence of PVAT. These data suggest that PVAT components that are independent of sympathetic nerves can release NA in a tyramine-sensitive manner to result in arterial contraction. Because PVAT is intimately apposed to the artery, this raises the possibility of local control of arterial function by PVAT catecholamines. PMID:24904751

  13. Neurotoxicity and risk assessment of brominated and alternative flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Hester S; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are widely used chemicals that prevent or slow the onset and spreading of fire. Unfortunately, many of these compounds pose serious threats for human health and the environment, indicating an urgent need for safe(r) and less persistent alternative flame retardants (AFRs). As previous research identified the nervous system as a sensitive target organ, the neurotoxicity of past and present flame retardants is reviewed. First, an overview of the neurotoxicity of BFRs in humans and experimental animals is provided, and some common in vitro neurotoxic mechanisms of action are discussed. The combined epidemiological and toxicological studies clearly underline the need for replacing BFRs. Many potentially suitable AFRs are already in use, despite the absence of a full profile of their environmental behavior and toxicological properties. To prioritize the suitability of some selected halogenated and non-halogenated organophosphorous flame retardants and inorganic halogen-free flame retardants, the available neurotoxic data of these AFRs are discussed. The suitability of the AFRs is rank-ordered and combined with human exposure data (serum concentrations, breast milk concentrations and house dust concentrations) and physicochemical properties (useful to predict e.g. bioavailability and persistence in the environment) for a first semi-quantitative risk assessment of the AFRs. As can be concluded from the reviewed data, several BFRs and AFRs share some neurotoxic effects and modes of action. Moreover, the available neurotoxicity data indicate that some AFRs may be suitable substitutes for BFRs. However, proper risk assessment is hampered by an overall scarcity of data, particularly regarding environmental persistence, human exposure levels, and the formation of breakdown products and possible metabolites as well as their toxicity. Until these data gaps in environmental behavioral and toxicological profiles are filled, large scale use of

  14. Colistin-mediated neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wadia, Subeer; Tran, Betty

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 51-year-old man who developed renal and neural toxicity after the administration of colistin. He developed respiratory apnoea, neuromuscular blockade and severe comatose encephalopathy with the lack of brainstem reflexes. After discontinuation of the antibiotic, he made a prompt recovery to his baseline neurological function. The case illustrates the importance of recognising the toxicities associated with colistin. Although recent literature details its nephrotoxicity, current data have been discordant with the rare cases of respiratory apnoea or neuromuscular blockade once cited over 30 years ago. Additionally, no cases have ever described the profound encephalopathy with lack of brainstem function described here. The awareness of colistin's potentially fatal effects must be kept in mind when administering this antibiotic. Vigilance of the encephalopathic picture can also facilitate the diagnosis of colistin-mediated neurotoxicity in a patient with altered mental status of otherwise unknown aetiology. PMID:25199193

  15. GLIA AND METHYLMERCURY NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Mingwei; Li, Xin; Rocha, João B. T.; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global environmental pollutant with significant adverse effects on human health. As the major target of MeHg, the central nervous system (CNS) exhibits the most recognizable poisoning symptoms. The role of the two major nonneuronal cell types, astrocytes and microglia, in response to MeHg exposure was recently compared. These two cell types share several common features in MeHg toxicity, but interestingly, these cells types also exhibit distinct response kinetics, indicating a cell-specific role in mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. The aim of this study was to review the most recent literature and summarize key features of glial responses to this organometal. PMID:22852858

  16. Chemotherapy-Related Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Le Rhun, Emilie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy may have detrimental effects on either the central or peripheral nervous system. Central nervous system neurotoxicity resulting from chemotherapy manifests as a wide range of clinical syndromes including acute, subacute, and chronic encephalopathies, posterior reversible encephalopathy, acute cerebellar dysfunction, chronic cognitive impairment, myelopathy, meningitis, and neurovascular syndromes. These clinical entities vary by causative agent, degree of severity, evolution, and timing of occurrence. In the peripheral nervous system, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and myopathy are the two main complications of chemotherapy. CIPN is the most common complication, and the majority manifest as a dose-dependent length-dependent sensory axonopathy. In severe cases of CIPN, the dose of chemotherapy is reduced, the administration delayed, or the treatment discontinued. Few treatments are available for CIPN and based on meta-analysis, duloxetine is the preferred symptomatic treatment. Myopathy due to corticosteroid use is the most frequent cause of muscle disorders in patients with cancer. PMID:27443648

  17. Neurotoxicity of metals.

    PubMed

    Caito, Samuel; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metals are frequently used in industry and represent a major source of toxin exposure for workers. For this reason governmental agencies regulate the amount of metal exposure permissible for worker safety. While essential metals serve physiologic roles, metals pose significant health risks upon acute and chronic exposure to high levels. The central nervous system is particularly vulnerable to metals. The brain readily accumulates metals, which under physiologic conditions are incorporated into essential metalloproteins required for neuronal health and energy homeostasis. Severe consequences can arise from circumstances of excess essential metals or exposure to toxic nonessential metal. Herein, we discuss sources of occupational metal exposure, metal homeostasis in the human body, susceptibility of the nervous system to metals, detoxification, detection of metals in biologic samples, and chelation therapeutic strategies. The neurologic pathology and physiology following aluminum, arsenic, lead, manganese, mercury, and trimethyltin exposures are highlighted as classic examples of metal-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26563789

  18. Catecholamines up Integrates Dopamine Synthesis and Synaptic Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ferdousy, Faiza; Lawal, Hakeem; Huang, Zhinong; Daigle, J. Gavin; Izevbaye, Iyare; Doherty, Olugbenga; Thomas, Jerrad; Stathakis, Dean G; O’Donnell, Janis M.

    2011-01-01

    The highly reactive nature of dopamine renders dopaminergic neurons vulnerable to oxidative damage. We recently demonstrated that loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila gene Catecholamines up (Catsup) elevate dopamine pools but, paradoxically, also confer resistance to paraquat, an herbicide that induces oxidative stress-mediated toxicity in dopaminergic neurons. We now report a novel association of the membrane protein, Catsup, with GTP cyclohydrolase rate-limiting enzyme for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthesis and tyrosine hydroxylase, rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis, which requires BH4 as a cofactor. Loss-of-function Catsup mutations cause dominant hyperactivation of both enzymes. Elevated dopamine levels in Catsup mutants coincide with several distinct characteristics, including hypermobility, minimal basal levels of 3,4-Dihydroxy-Phenylacetic Acid, an oxidative metabolite of dopamine, and resistance to the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter inhibitor, reserpine, suggesting that excess dopamine is synaptically active and that Catsup functions in the regulation of synaptic vesicle loading and release of dopamine. We conclude that Catsup regulates and links the dopamine synthesis and transport networks. PMID:21985068

  19. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  20. Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Sharon M; Reich, Andrew; Fleming, Lora E; Hammond, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) is caused by consumption of molluscan shellfish contaminated with brevetoxins primarily produced by the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. Blooms of K. brevis, called Florida red tide, occur frequently along the Gulf of Mexico. Many shellfish beds in the US (and other nations) are routinely monitored for presence of K. brevis and other brevetoxin-producing organisms. As a result, few NSP cases are reported annually from the US. However, infrequent larger outbreaks do occur. Cases are usually associated with recreationally-harvested shellfish collected during or post red tide blooms. Brevetoxins are neurotoxins which activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels causing sodium influx and nerve membrane depolarization. No fatalities have been reported, but hospitalizations occur. NSP involves a cluster of gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms: nausea and vomiting, paresthesias of the mouth, lips and tongue as well as distal paresthesias, ataxia, slurred speech and dizziness. Neurological symptoms can progress to partial paralysis; respiratory distress has been recorded. Recent research has implicated new species of harmful algal bloom organisms which produce brevetoxins, identified additional marine species which accumulate brevetoxins, and has provided additional information on the toxicity and analysis of brevetoxins. A review of the known epidemiology and recommendations for improved NSP prevention are presented. PMID:19005578

  1. Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Sharon M.; Reich, Andrew; Fleming, Lora E.; Hammond, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP) is caused by consumption of molluscan shellfish contaminated with brevetoxins primarily produced by the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. Blooms of K. brevis, called Florida red tide, occur frequently along the Gulf of Mexico. Many shellfish beds in the US (and other nations) are routinely monitored for presence of K. brevis and other brevetoxin-producing organisms. As a result, few NSP cases are reported annually from the US. However, infrequent larger outbreaks do occur. Cases are usually associated with recreationally-harvested shellfish collected during or post red tide blooms. Brevetoxins are neurotoxins which activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels causing sodium influx and nerve membrane depolarization. No fatalities have been reported, but hospitalizations occur. NSP involves a cluster of gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms: nausea and vomiting, paresthesias of the mouth, lips and tongue as well as distal paresthesias, ataxia, slurred speech and dizziness. Neurological symptoms can progress to partial paralysis; respiratory distress has been recorded. Recent research has implicated new species of harmful algal bloom organisms which produce brevetoxins, identified additional marine species which accumulate brevetoxins, and has provided additional information on the toxicity and analysis of brevetoxins. A review of the known epidemiology and recommendations for improved NSP prevention are presented. PMID:19005578

  2. Autophagy and ethanol neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Excessive ethanol exposure is detrimental to the brain. The developing brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol such that prenatal ethanol exposure causes fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Neuronal loss in the brain is the most devastating consequence and is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Since alcohol consumption during pregnancy has not declined, it is imperative to elucidate the underlying mechanisms and develop effective therapeutic strategies. One cellular mechanism that acts as a protective response for the central nervous system (CNS) is autophagy. Autophagy regulates lysosomal turnover of organelles and proteins within cells, and is involved in cell differentiation, survival, metabolism, and immunity. We have recently shown that ethanol activates autophagy in the developing brain. The autophagic preconditioning alleviates ethanol-induced neuron apoptosis, whereas inhibition of autophagy potentiates ethanol-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and exacerbates ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. The expression of genes encoding proteins required for autophagy in the CNS is developmentally regulated; their levels are much lower during an ethanol-sensitive period than during an ethanol-resistant period. Ethanol may stimulate autophagy through multiple mechanisms; these include induction of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress, modulation of MTOR and AMPK signaling, alterations in BCL2 family proteins, and disruption of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. This review discusses the most recent evidence regarding the involvement of autophagy in ethanol-mediated neurotoxicity as well as the potential therapeutic approach of targeting autophagic pathways. PMID:25484085

  3. Identification of catecholamine neurotransmitters using fluorescence sensor array.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Forough; Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-04-21

    A nano-based sensor array has been developed for identification and discrimination of catecholamine neurotransmitters based on optical properties of their oxidation products under alkaline conditions. To produce distinct fluorescence response patterns for individual catecholamine, quenching of thioglycolic acid functionalized cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots, by oxidation products, were employed along with the variation of fluorescence spectra of oxidation products. The spectral changes were analyzed with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) to identify catecholamine patterns. The proposed sensor could efficiently discriminate the individual catecholamine (i.e., dopamine, norepinephrine, and l-DOPA) and their mixtures in the concentration range of 0.25-30 μmol L(-1). Finally, we found that the sensor had capability to identify the various catecholamines in urine sample. PMID:27026604

  4. Nanomechanics of Poly(catecholamine) Coatings in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chanoong; Huang, Jun; Kim, Sunjin; Lee, Haeshin; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-03-01

    Mussel-inspired self-polymerized catecholamine coatings have been widely utilized as a versatile coating strategy that can be applied to a variety of substrates. For the first time, nanomechanical measurements and an evaluation of the contribution of primary amine groups to poly(catecholamine) coatings have been conducted using a surface-forces apparatus. The adhesive strength between the poly(catecholamine) layers is 30-times higher than that of a poly(catechol) coating. The origin of the strong attraction between the poly(catecholamine) layers is probably due to surface salt displacement by the primary amine, π-π stacking (the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction of indolic crosslinks), and cation-π interactions (the monopole-quadrupole interaction between positively charged amine groups and the indolic crosslinks). The contribution of the primary amine group to the catecholamine coating is vital for the design and development of mussel-inspired catechol-based coating materials. PMID:26833974

  5. VARIATIONS IN THE NEUROTOXIC POTENCY OF TRIMETHYLTIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven samples of trimethyltin obtained from three commercial sources were evaluated for neurotoxic potency in the rat. Hippocampus weight, histology and assays of the astrocyte protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, were used as indices of neurotoxicity. A single administratio...

  6. Biomarkers, mechanisms, and potential prevention of catecholamine neuron loss in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is on biomarkers, mechanisms, and potential treatment of catecholamine neuron loss in Parkinson disease (PD). PD is characterized by a movement disorder from loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons. An intense search is going on for biomarkers of the disease process. Theoretically, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the deaminated DA metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), should be superior to other neurochemical indices of loss of central dopamine. CSF DOPAC is low in PD-even in patients with recent onset of Parkinsonism. Cardiac norepinephrine depletion is as severe as the loss of putamen dopamine. PD importantly involves nonmotor manifestations, including anosmia, dementia, REM behavior disorder, and orthostatic hypotension, and all of these nonmotor features are associated with neuroimaging evidence for cardiac sympathetic denervation, which seems to occur independently of the movement disorder and striatal dopaminergic lesion. Analogy to a bank robber's getaway car conveys the catecholaldehyde hypothesis, according to which buildup of the dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), the immediate product of the action of monoamine oxidase on cytosolic dopamine, causes or contributes to the death of dopamine neurons. Decreased vesicular uptake of dopamine and decreased DOPAL detoxification by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) determine this buildup. Vesicular uptake is also markedly decreased in the heart in PD. Multiple factors influence vesicular uptake and ALDH activity. Evidence is accruing for aging-related induction of positive feedback loops and an autotoxic final common pathway in the death of catecholamine neurons, mediated by metabolites produced continuously in neuronal life. The catecholaldehyde hypothesis also leads to testable experimental therapeutic ideas. PMID:24054148

  7. The source of circulating catecholamines in forced dived ducks.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, A M; Jones, D R

    1990-10-01

    Plasma catecholamines have been measured in chronically adrenalectomized (ADX) ducks, in chronically adrenal-denervated ducks (DNX), and in their respective shamoperated controls (SH-adx, SH-dnx) after 3 min forced submergence. The results showed that 100% of the plasma epinephrine (EP) and 70 to 80% of plasma norepinephrine (NE) released during the dive came from the adrenal glands. Only 20 to 30% of plasma NE came from the endings of the autonomic vascular sympathetic nerves which are strongly stimulated during diving. Adrenal catecholamines were released by nerve activation only; nonneural mechanisms did not play any role in their release. The action of adrenal catecholamines on the cardiovascular system during dives was investigated by measuring heart rate and arterial blood pressure in operated and sham-operated ducks. Cardiovascular adjustments, associated with 3 min of forced diving, were not affected by any differences in the levels of plasma catecholamines. PMID:2272478

  8. A potentiometric study of lithium complexation with catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, B J; Luk, H T

    1986-01-01

    A potentiometric study of lithium complexation with tyramine, dopamine, norepinephrine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine was undertaken using monovalent cationic selective and pH glass electrodes. The conditional stability constants for the lithium catecholamine complexes were calculated for a range of pH values from direct potentiometric measurement of the free lithium ion concentration. The ionic strength was maintained at 0.5 with tetramethylammonium chloride and glycine buffers. Temperature was maintained at 25 degrees C. Titration data for the catecholamines and lithium-catecholamine complexes at the same temperature and ionic strength were also obtained using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as titrant. All solutions were maintained essentially oxygen free during the analytical procedure. Alkali metals are generally recognized as being weakly complexed in aqueous solution. The magnitude of the stability constants determined in this study indicates there is a weak interaction of lithium with catecholamines. PMID:3958910

  9. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment. PMID:24684896

  10. Protein adduct formation as a molecular mechanism in neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lopachin, Richard M; Decaprio, Anthony P

    2005-08-01

    Chemicals that cause nerve injury and neurological deficits are a structurally diverse group. For the majority, the corresponding molecular mechanisms of neurotoxicity are poorly understood. Many toxicants (e.g., hepatotoxicants) of other organ systems and/or their oxidative metabolites have been identified as electrophiles and will react with cellular proteins by covalently binding nucleophilic amino acid residues. Cellular toxicity occurs when adduct formation disrupts protein structure and/or function, which secondarily causes damage to submembrane organelles, metabolic pathways, or cytological processes. Since many neurotoxicants are also electrophiles, the corresponding pathophysiological mechanism might involve protein adduction. In this review, we will summarize the principles of covalent bond formation that govern reactions between xenobiotic electrophiles and biological nucleophiles. Because a neurotoxicant can form adducts with multiple nucleophilic residues on proteins, the challenge is to identify the mechanistically important adduct. In this regard, it is now recognized that despite widespread chemical adduction of tissue proteins, neurotoxicity can be mediated through binding of specific target nucleophiles in key neuronal proteins. Acrylamide and 2,5-hexanedione are prototypical neurotoxicants that presumably act through the formation of protein adducts. To illustrate both the promise and the difficulty of adduct research, these electrophilic chemicals will be discussed with respect to covalent bond formation, suspected protein sites of adduction, and proposed mechanisms of neurotoxicity. The goals of future investigations are to identify and quantify specific protein adducts that play a causal role in the generation of neurotoxicity induced by electrophilic neurotoxicants. This is a challenging but critical objective that will be facilitated by recent advances in proteomic methodologies. PMID:15901921

  11. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  12. Multiple mechanisms of PCB neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.O.; Stoner, C.T.; Lawrence, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been implicated in cancer, but many of the symptoms in humans exposed to PCBs are related to the nervous system and behavior. We demonstrated three different direct mechanisms whereby PCBs are neurotoxic in rats. By using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that the orthosubstituted PCB congener 2,4,4{prime}, but neither TCDD nor the coplanar PCB congener 3,4,5,3{prime},4{prime}, causes rapid death of cerebellar granule cells. The ortho-substituted congener 2,4,4{prime} reduced long-term potentiation, an indicator of cognitive potential, in hippocampal brain slices, but a similar effect was observed for the coplanar congener 3,4,3{prime},4{prime}, indicating that this effect may be caused by both ortho- and coplanar congeners by mechanisms presumably not mediated via the Ah receptor. It was previously shown that some ortho-substituted PCB congeners cause a reduction in levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine, and we present in vitro and in vivo evidence that this is due to reduction of synthesis of dopamine via inhibition of the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase. Thus, PCBs have a variety of mechanisms of primary neurotoxicity, and neurotoxicity is a characteristic of ortho-substituted, non-dioxin-like congeners as well as some coplanar congeners. The relative contribution of each of these mechanisms to the loss of cognitive function in humans exposed to PCBs remains to be determined. 42 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W; Stevens, Markus F; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  14. What is microglia neurotoxicity (Not)?

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; Owens, Trevor; Boddeke, Erik

    2014-06-01

    Microglia most likely appeared early in evolution as they are not only present in vertebrates, but are also found in nervous systems of various nonvertebrate organisms. Mammalian microglia are derived from a specific embryonic, self-renewable myeloid cell population that is throughout lifetime not replaced by peripheral myeloid cells. These phylogenic and ontogenic features suggest that microglia serve vital functions. Yet, microglia often are described as neurotoxic cells, that actively kill (healthy) neurons. Since it is from an evolutionary point of view difficult to understand why an important and vulnerable organ like the brain should host numerous potential killers, we here review the concept of microglia neurotoxicity. On one hand it is discussed that most of our understanding about how microglia kill neurons is based on in vitro experiments or correlative staining studies that suffer from the difficulty to discriminate microglia and peripheral myeloid cells in the diseased brain. On the other hand it is described that a more functional approach by mutating, inactivating or deleting microglia is seldom associated with a beneficial outcome in an acute injury situation, suggesting that microglia are normally important protective elements in the brain. This might change in chronic disease or the aged brain, where; however, it remains to be established whether microglia simply lose their protective capacities or whether microglia become truly neurotoxic cells. PMID:24590682

  15. Occupational neurotoxic diseases in taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi-Hung; Huang, Chu-Yun; Huang, Chin-Chang

    2012-12-01

    Occupational neurotoxic diseases have become increasingly common in Taiwan due to industrialization. Over the past 40 years, Taiwan has transformed from an agricultural society to an industrial society. The most common neurotoxic diseases also changed from organophosphate poisoning to heavy metal intoxication, and then to organic solvent and semiconductor agent poisoning. The nervous system is particularly vulnerable to toxic agents because of its high metabolic rate. Neurological manifestations may be transient or permanent, and may range from cognitive dysfunction, cerebellar ataxia, Parkinsonism, sensorimotor neuropathy and autonomic dysfunction to neuromuscular junction disorders. This study attempts to provide a review of the major outbreaks of occupational neurotoxins from 1968 to 2012. A total of 16 occupational neurotoxins, including organophosphates, toxic gases, heavy metals, organic solvents, and other toxic chemicals, were reviewed. Peer-reviewed articles related to the electrophysiology, neuroimaging, treatment and long-term follow up of these neurotoxic diseases were also obtained. The heavy metals involved consisted of lead, manganese, organic tin, mercury, arsenic, and thallium. The organic solvents included n-hexane, toluene, mixed solvents and carbon disulfide. Toxic gases such as carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide were also included, along with toxic chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, organophosphates, and dimethylamine borane. In addition we attempted to correlate these events to the timeline of industrial development in Taiwan. By researching this topic, the hope is that it may help other developing countries to improve industrial hygiene and promote occupational safety and health care during the process of industrialization. PMID:23251841

  16. EPA's neurotoxicity risk assessment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Boyes, W K; Dourson, M L; Patterson, J; Tilson, H A; Sette, W F; MacPhail, R C; Li, A A; O'Donoghue, J L

    1997-12-01

    The proposed Neurotoxicity Risk Assessment Guidelines (U.S. EPA, 1995c Fed. Reg. 60(192), 52032-52056) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) were the subject of a workshop at the 1997 Meeting of the Society of Toxicology. The workshop considered the role of guidelines in the risk assessment process, the primary features, scientific basis, and implications of the guidelines for EPA program offices, as well as for industrial neurotoxicologists from the perspectives of both pesticides and toxic substances regulation. The U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 1983, Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process) established a framework for distinguishing risk management from risk assessment, the latter being the result of integrating hazard identification, hazard characterization, and exposure assessment data. The guidelines are intended to establish operating principles that will be used when examining data in a risk assessment context. The proposed neurotoxicity risk assessment guidelines provide a conceptual framework for deciding whether or not a chemically induced effect can be considered to be evidence of neurotoxicity. Topics in the proposed guidelines include structural and functional effects, dose-response and -duration considerations, and relationships between effects. Among the issues that must be considered are the multiplicity of chemical effects, the levels of biological organization in the nervous system, and the tests, measurements, and protocols used. Judgment of the adversity of an effect depends heavily on the amount and types of data available. The attribution of a chemically induced effect to an action on the nervous system depends on several factors such as the quality of the study, the nature of the outcome, dose-response and time-response relationships, and the possible involvement of nonneural factors. The guidelines will also serve as a reference for those conducting neurotoxicity testing, as well as establish a

  17. Scavenging of hydroxyl radical by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Kładna, Aleksandra; Berczyński, Paweł; Kruk, Irena; Michalska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2012-01-01

    The direct effects of the four catecholamines (CATs), adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (D) and isoproterenol (I), on free radicals were investigated using the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) and hydroxyl radial (HO(•)). The CATs examined were found to inhibit the ESR signal intensity of DPPH(•) in a dose-dependent manner over the range 0.1-2.5 mmol/L in the following order: NA > A > I > D, with IC50= 0.30 ± 0.03 for noradrenaline and IC50= 0.86 ± 0.02 for dopamine. Hydroxyl radicals were produced using a Fenton reaction in the presence of the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), and ESR technique was applied to detect the CATs reactivity toward the radicals. The reaction rates constant (k(r)) of CATs with HO(•) were found to be in the order of 10(9)  L/mol/s, and the k(r) value for noradrenaline was the highest (k(r)= 8.4 × 10(9)  L/mol/s). The CATs examined exhibited also a strong decrease in the light emission (62-73% at 1 mmol/L concentration and 79-89% at 2 mmol/L concentration) from a Fenton-like reaction. These reactions may be relevant to the biological action of these important polyphenolic compounds. PMID:22238226

  18. Catecholamines for inflammatory shock: a Jekyll-and-Hyde conundrum.

    PubMed

    Andreis, Davide Tommaso; Singer, Mervyn

    2016-09-01

    Catecholamines are endogenous neurosignalling mediators and hormones. They are integral in maintaining homeostasis by promptly responding to any stressor. Their synthetic equivalents are the current mainstay of treatment in shock states to counteract myocardial depression and/or vasoplegia. These phenomena are related in large part to decreased adrenoreceptor sensitivity and altered adrenergic signalling, with resultant vascular and cardiomyocyte hyporeactivity. Catecholamines are predominantly used in supraphysiological doses to overcome these pathological consequences. However, these adrenergic agents cause direct organ damage and have multiple 'off-target' biological effects on immune, metabolic and coagulation pathways, most of which are not monitored or recognised at the bedside. Such detrimental consequences may contribute negatively to patient outcomes. This review explores the schizophrenic 'Jekyll-and-Hyde' characteristics of catecholamines in critical illness, as they are both necessary for survival yet detrimental in excess. This article covers catecholamine physiology, the pleiotropic effects of catecholamines on various body systems and pathways, and potential alternatives for haemodynamic support and adrenergic modulation in the critically ill. PMID:26873833

  19. Catecholamines: Mediator of the Hypermetabolic Response to Thermal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilmore, Douglas W.; Long, James M.; Mason, Arthur D.; Skreen, Robert W.; Pruitt, Basil A.

    1974-01-01

    Hypermetabolism characterizes the metabolic response to thermal injury and the extent of energy production is positively related to the rate of urinary catecholamine excretion. Alpha and beta adrenergic blockade decreased metabolism from 69.6 ± 5.3 Kcal/m2/hr to 57.4 ± 5.2 (p < 0.01), and infusion of 6 µgm epinephrine/minute in normal man significantly increased metabolic rate. Twenty noninfected burned adults with a mean burn size of 45% total body surface (range 7-84%) and four normal controls were studied in an environmental chamber at two or more temperatures between 19 and 33 C with vapor pressure constant at 11.88 mm Hg. All burn patients were hypermetabolic at all temperatures studied and their core and mean skin temperatures were significantly elevated above control values. Between 25 and 33 C ambient, metabolism was unchanged in controls and burns of less than 40% total body surface (48.9 ± 4.6 Kcal/m2/hr vs. 48.9 ± 4.5), but metabolic rate decreased in larger burns in the warmer environment (72.0 ± 1.9 vs. 65.8 ± 1.7, p < 0.001). At 21 C, metabolism and catecholamines increased, except in four nonsurvivors who became hypothermic with decreased catechol elaboration. Metabolic rate in ten patients with bacteremia was below predicted levels while catecholamines were markedly elevated suggesting interference with tissue uptake of the neurohormonal transmitters. Feeding burn patients or administering glucose and insulin improved nitrogen retention and altered substrate flow but did not significantly reduce urinary catecholamines or metabolic rate. Burned patients are internally warm, not externally cold, and catecholamines appear to mediate their increased heat production. Hypermetabolism may be modified by ambient temperature, infection, and pharmacologic means. Alterations in hypothalamic function due to injury, resulting in increased catecholamine elaboration, would explain the metabolic response to thermal injury. PMID:4412350

  20. Current Challenges in Neurotoxicity Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxicity risk assessment must continue to evolve in parallel with advances in basic research. Along with this evolution is an expansion in the scope of neurotoxicity assessments of environmental health risks. Examples of this expansion include an increasing emphasis on compl...

  1. RISK CHARACTERIZATION OF PERSISTENT NEUROTOXIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxicity is an adverse change in structure or function of the central and/or peripheral nervous system following exposure to a chemical, physical, or biological agent. Thousands of chemicals have been estimated to have neurotoxic potential. Many persistent and bioaccumulat...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF AN 'IN VITRO' NEUROTOXICITY ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aim of this research project was to investigate the possibility of developing the neurotoxic esterase (NTE) assay into a totally in vitro system to enable neurotoxicity assessment to be carried out rapidly on large numbers of compounds. The purified enzyme was to be immobiliz...

  3. Neurotoxicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ transplants, as well as exposure to heavy metals such as lead and mercury, certain foods and food additives, pesticides, industrial and/or cleaning solvents, cosmetics, and some naturally occurring substances. Symptoms may appear immediately after exposure or be ...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  9. Factors involved in maintenance of cardiac catecholamine content

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, B.; Friedman, Eitan

    1969-01-01

    1. When animals were exposed to a temperature of 4° C for 6 hr, endogenous catecholamines remained unaltered or reduced slightly depending upon the strain of rats used. In contrast, labelled noradrenaline declined rapidly, but the decline was inhibited when animals were pretreated with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. 2. Increased sympathetic nervous activity associated with cold resulted in a four-fold increase in rate of synthesis of noradrenaline. 3. Reduction in endogenous and labelled catecholamine levels associated with cold was exaggerated by pretreatment with cocaine, imipramine or phenoxybenzamine—drugs known to inhibit the uptake of noradrenaline into the nerve terminal. 4. Cocaine and imipramine in higher doses inhibited the release of both endogenous and labelled noradrenaline, suggesting a dual action: in small doses they increased the depletion of catecholamines by blocking the reincorporation, while in higher doses they inhibited the release of noradrenaline. 5. It is concluded that, under normal conditions, the re-uptake mechanism may not play a significant role in the maintenance of normal cardiac catecholamine levels and that such levels are maintained by synthesis alone. However, when the heart is subjected to high impulse nerve activity, synthesis is not sufficiently accelerated to compensate for impulse-induced massive release and may require the support of an additional mechanism, such as the partial reincorporation of released transmitter. In fact, the re-uptake mechanism is enhanced during high impulse activity. PMID:4390484

  10. Molecular Profiling: Catecholamine Modulation of Gene Expression in Enteropathogenic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigations of the enteric pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Vibrio parahaemolyticus have demonstrated that these bacteria can respond to the presence of catecholamines, including norepinephrine and/or epinephrine, in their environment by modulating g...

  11. Reduced catecholamine response to exercise in amenorrheic athletes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have found an array of endocrine disturbances related to energy deprivation in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. Purpose: We examined the catecholamine response to exercise in five eumenorrheic (EU) and five amenorrheic (AM) athletes, matched by age (mean T SEM: EU = 29.8 T 2.5 ...

  12. Misonidazole neurotoxicity in mice decreased by administration with pyridoxine

    SciTech Connect

    Eifel, P.J.; Brown, D.M.; Lee, W.W.; Brown, J.M.

    1983-10-01

    A series of toxicological and pharmacological experiments was performed to test the hypothesis that alterations of pyridoxine (Vitamin B/sub 6/) metabolism may play an important role in the development of misonidazole (MISO) neurotoxicity. The formation of a Schiff's base between the final reduction product of MISO, 2-amino MISO (NH/sub 2/-MISO), and pyridoxal-HCl in ethanol was demonstrated. Mice receiving daily intraperitoneal injections of MISO suffered significantly less toxicity (as determined by survival, weight gain and neurological tests) when large doses of pyridoxine-HCl (PYR) were delivered concomitantly, and consequently were able to tolerate administration of more than twice as many MISO injections. PYR did not alter the pharmacokinetics of MISO, either when given simultaneously or when given by multiple repeated daily injections prior to MISO. The administration of PYR also did not alter the radiosensitization by MISO in an in vivo-in vitro cloning assay with the EMT6 tumor in BALB/c mice. If depletion or altered metabolism of pyridoxine by reduced metabolites is also responsible for the neurotoxic effects of nitroimidazoles in humans, then concomitant administration of pyridoxine (in doses greater than the molar quantity of NH/sub 2/-MISO formed) should inhibit the development of such symptoms and allow administration of larger doses of MISO than are currently clinically employable.

  13. Biomarkers of adult and developmental neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Slikker, William

    2005-08-07

    Neurotoxicity may be defined as any adverse effect on the structure or function of the central and/or peripheral nervous system by a biological, chemical, or physical agent. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to assess adult and developmental neurotoxicity due to the complex and diverse functions of the nervous system. The overall strategy for understanding developmental neurotoxicity is based on two assumptions: (1) significant differences in the adult versus the developing nervous system susceptibility to neurotoxicity exist and they are often developmental stage dependent; (2) a multidisciplinary approach using neurobiological, including gene expression assays, neurophysiological, neuropathological, and behavioral function is necessary for a precise assessment of neurotoxicity. Application of genomic approaches to developmental studies must use the same criteria for evaluating microarray studies as those in adults including consideration of reproducibility, statistical analysis, homogenous cell populations, and confirmation with non-array methods. A study using amphetamine to induce neurotoxicity supports the following: (1) gene expression data can help define neurotoxic mechanism(s) (2) gene expression changes can be useful biomarkers of effect, and (3) the site-selective nature of gene expression in the nervous system may mandate assessment of selective cell populations.

  14. Reduced vesicular storage of catecholamines causes progressive degeneration in the locus ceruleus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Tonya N; Alter, Shawn P; Wang, Minzheng; Goldstein, David S; Miller, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative motor disease. Pathologically, PD is characterized by Lewy body deposition and subsequent death of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. PD also consistently features degeneration of the locus ceruleus, the main source of norepinephrine in the central nervous system. We have previously reported a mouse model of dopaminergic neurodegeneration based on reduced expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2 LO). To determine if reduced vesicular storage can also cause noradrenergic degeneration, we examined indices of damage to the catecholaminergic systems in brain and cardiac tissue of VMAT2 LO mice. At two months of age, neurochemical analyses revealed substantial reductions in striatal dopamine (94%), cortical dopamine (57%) and norepinephrine (54%), as well as cardiac norepinephrine (97%). These losses were accompanied by increased conversion of dopamine and norepinephrine to their deaminated metabolites. VMAT2 LO mice exhibited loss of noradrenergic innervation in the cortex, as determined by norepinephrine transporter immunoreactivity and (3)H-nisoxetine binding. Using unbiased stereological techniques, we observed progressive degeneration in the locus ceruleus that preceded degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta. In contrast, the ventral tegmental area, which is spared in human PD, remained unaffected. The coordinate loss of dopamine and norepinephrine neurons in VMAT2 LO mice parallels the pattern of neurodegeneration that occurs in human PD, and demonstrates that insufficient catecholamine storage can cause spontaneous degeneration in susceptible neurons, underscoring cytosolic catecholamine catabolism as a determinant of neuronal susceptibility in PD. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'. PMID:24025942

  15. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of ecstasy-induced neurotoxicity: an overview.

    PubMed

    Capela, João Paulo; Carmo, Helena; Remião, Fernando; Bastos, Maria Lourdes; Meisel, Andreas; Carvalho, Félix

    2009-06-01

    "Ecstasy" [(+/-)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, MDMA, XTC, X, E] is a psychoactive recreational hallucinogenic substance and a major worldwide drug of abuse. Several reports raised the concern that MDMA has the ability to induce neurotoxic effects both in laboratory animals and humans. Despite more than two decades of research, the mechanisms by which MDMA is neurotoxic are still to be fully elucidated. MDMA induces serotonergic terminal loss in rats and also in some mice strains, but also a broader neuronal degeneration throughout several brain areas such as the cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. Meanwhile, in human "ecstasy" abusers, there are evidences for deficits in seronergic biochemical markers, which correlate with long-term impairments in memory and learning. There are several factors that contribute to MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, namely, hyperthermia, monoamine oxidase metabolism of dopamine and serotonin, dopamine oxidation, the serotonin transporter action, nitric oxide, and the formation of peroxinitrite, glutamate excitotoxicity, serotonin 2A receptor agonism, and, importantly, the formation of MDMA neurotoxic metabolites. The present review covered the following topics: history and epidemiology, pharmacological mechanisms, metabolic pathways and the influence of isoenzyme genetic polymorphisms, as well as the acute effects of MDMA in laboratory animals and humans, with a special focus on MDMA-induced neurotoxic effects at the cellular and molecular level. The main aim of this review was to contribute to the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in MDMA neurotoxicity, which can help in the development of therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat the long-term neuropsychiatric complications of MDMA abuse in humans. PMID:19373443

  16. Immunosuppressant-associated neurotoxicity responding to olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressants, particularly tacrolimus, can induce neurotoxicity in solid organ transplantation cases. A lower clinical threshold to switch from tacrolimus to another immunosuppressant agent has been a common approach to reverse this neurotoxicity. However, immunosuppressant switch may place the graft at risk, and, in some cases, continuation of the same treatment protocol may be necessary. We report a case of immunosuppressant-associated neurotoxicity with prominent neuropsychiatric manifestation and describe psychiatric intervention with olanzapine that led to clinical improvement while continuing tacrolimus maintenance. PMID:25114826

  17. Strategies for enhancing catecholamine-mediated neurotransmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Major findings made during this project period included the following observations: changes in tyrosine availability do affect brain dopamine release, as assessed by in vivo microdialysis, but that neuronal feedback mechanisms limit the durations of this effect except when dopaminergic neurotransmission has been deficient; the circulating hormone TRH markedly stimulates brain dopamine release, an effect probably mediated by its diketopiperazine metabolite; the amount of circulating L-dopa which enters the brain is both enhanced by carbohydrate consumption and suppressed by protein intake (both nutritional effects can be damaging, inasmuch as a sudden rush of L-dopa into the brain can facilitate dyskinesias, while the inhibition of brain L-dopa uptake by proteins suppresses its conversion to brain dopamine; an appropriate mixture of dietary proteins and carbohydrates can obviate both effects); serotonin release from superfused hypothalamic slices is a linear function of available tryptophan levels throughout the normal dynamic range; the daily rhythm in plasma melatonin levels is abnormal both in the sudden infant death syndrome and in women with secondary amenorrhea; tyrosine can potentiate the anorectic effects of widely-used sympathomimetic drugs; newly-described COMT inhibitors can enhance brain dopamine release in vivo; and a cell culture system, based on Y-79 (retinoblast) cells, exists in which melatonin reliably suppresses dopamine release.

  18. ASSESSING HIPPOCAMPAL CHANGES INDICATIVE OF NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subtle changes in cognitive function are often the earliest indication of neurotoxic effects in humans. The hippocampus is a large forebrain structure subserving specific kinds of information encoding and consolidation in humans and other animals. Because of it laminar structur...

  19. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF ORGANOTINS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organotins, including monomethyltin (MMT), dimethyltin (DMT), and dibutyltin (DBT), are widely used as heat stabilizers in PVC and CPVC piping, which results in their presence in drinking water supplies. Concern for developmental neurotoxic effects were raised by published findi...

  20. Neurotoxicity of industrial and commercial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donoghue, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents a collection of information on the neurotoxicity of chemicals used in industry or having commercial value. Chemicals reported to cause a variety of effects on the nervous system are thoroughly reviewed. Exposure data, clinical manifestations, pathology, experimental neurology, metabolism, and structure activity correlates are integrated and presented by the anatomical and functional areas of the nervous systems affected, and also by chemical classes with neurotoxic effects. Much of the information is presented in tabular format.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of central catecholamine deficiency in Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Holmes, Courtney; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2012-06-01

    Central catecholamine deficiency characterizes α-synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid levels of neuronal metabolites of catecholamines provide neurochemical biomarkers of these disorders. To test this hypothesis we measured cerebrospinal fluid levels of catechols including dopamine, norepinephrine and their main respective neuronal metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglycol in Parkinson's disease and two other synucleinopathies, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure. Cerebrospinal fluid catechols were assayed in 146 subjects-108 synucleinopathy patients (34 Parkinson's disease, 54 multiple system atrophy, 20 pure autonomic failure) and 38 controls. In 14 patients cerebrospinal fluid was obtained before or within 2 years after the onset of parkinsonism. The Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and pure autonomic failure groups all had lower cerebrospinal fluid dihydroxyphenylacetic acid [0.86 ± 0.09 (SEM), 1.00 ± 0.09, 1.32 ± 0.12 nmol/l] than controls (2.15 ± 0.18 nmol/l; P < 0.0001; P < 0.0001; P = 0.0002). Dihydroxyphenylglycol was also lower in the three synucleinopathies (8.82 ± 0.44, 7.75 ± 0.42, 5.82 ± 0.65 nmol/l) than controls (11.0 ± 0.62 nmol/l; P = 0.009, P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001). Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was lower and dihydroxyphenylglycol higher in Parkinson's disease than in pure autonomic failure. Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was 100% sensitive at 89% specificity in separating patients with recent onset of parkinsonism from controls but was of no value in differentiating Parkinson's disease from multiple system atrophy. Synucleinopathies feature cerebrospinal fluid neurochemical evidence for central dopamine and norepinephrine deficiency. Parkinson's disease and pure autonomic failure involve differential dopaminergic versus noradrenergic lesions. Cerebrospinal fluid

  2. Urinary catecholamines in iron deficiency anemia: effects of environmental temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.M.; Beard, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Iron deficiency (ID) is associated with increased levels of norepinephrine (NE) in plasma and urine. They investigated the effect of 5-7 days exposure to three different environmental temperatures (10/sup 0/C, 24/sup 0/C, 30/sup 0/C) on urinary catecholamine levels to test the hypothesis that increased thermogenic activity is causal to this increased excretion in iron deficiency. Catecholamines were analyzed from acidified urine by HPLC-EC. The mean Hb in ID animals was 3.1 +/- .5 versus controls of 12.8 +/- 9. These data demonstrate that contrary to previous reports NE excretion is not normalized at a thermoneutral temperature and suggests a basic abnormality in peripheral SNS activity and NE metabolism in iron deficiency that is independent of environmental drive from thermogenesis.

  3. A catecholamine-secreting neuroblastoma leading to hydrops fetalis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Ito, Y; Nakamura, T; Matsuoka, K; Sago, H

    2014-05-01

    A case of fetal neuroblastoma of the right adrenal gland, with rapid development of hydrops fetalis due to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, is reported. A fetus with a right suprarenal mass detected during ultrasonography at 32 weeks gestation progressively developed into hydrops fetalis by 35.2 weeks gestation. An emergent cesarean section was performed. At birth, the female neonate was hypertensive, with markedly elevated catecholamine levels; echocardiography showed poor contractility. Morphine, human atrial natriuretic peptide, milrinone, nitroprusside and dobutamine were initiated and her blood pressure was maintained within the normal range and her cardiac contractility improved 2 weeks after birth. Neuroblastoma cells were detected in the placenta, resulting in the right adrenal mass being diagnosed as a neuroblastoma. She was well, and the mass diminished in size within 4 months, without surgery. A fetus with suspected neuroblastoma, indicated by a suprarenal mass, should be managed with appropriate consideration of hydrops. PMID:24776602

  4. Pathophysiological mechanisms of catecholamine and cocaine-mediated cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liaudet, Lucas; Calderari, Belinda; Pacher, Pal

    2014-11-01

    Overactivation of the sympatho-adrenergic system is an essential mechanism providing short-term adaptation to the stressful conditions of critical illnesses. In the same way, the administration of exogenous catecholamines is mandatory to support the failing circulation in acutely ill patients. In contrast to these short-term benefits, prolonged adrenergic stress is detrimental to the cardiovascular system by initiating a series of adverse effects triggering significant cardiotoxicity, whose pathophysiological mechanisms are complex and only partially elucidated. In addition to the development of myocardial oxygen supply/demand imbalance induced by the sustained activation of adrenergic receptors, catecholamines can damage cardiomyocytes by fostering mitochondrial dysfunction, via two main mechanisms. The first one is calcium overload, consecutive to β-adrenergic receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase A and subsequent phosphorylation of multiple Ca(2+)-cycling proteins. The second one is oxidative stress, primarily related to the transformation of catecholamines into "aminochromes," which undergo redox cycling in mitochondria to generate copious amounts of oxygen-derived free radicals. In turn, calcium overload and oxidative stress promote mitochondrial permeability transition and cardiomyocyte cell death, both via the apoptotic and necrotic pathways. Comparable mechanisms of myocardial toxicity, including marked oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, have been reported with the use of cocaine, a common recreational drug with potent sympathomimetic activity. The aim of the current review is to present in detail the pathophysiological processes underlying the development of catecholamine and cocaine-induced cardiomyopathy, as such conditions may be frequently encountered in the clinical practice of cardiologists and ICU specialists. PMID:24398587

  5. Stress, allostatic load, catecholamines, and other neurotransmitters in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D S

    2011-04-01

    As populations age, the prevalence of geriatric neurodegenerative diseases will increase. These diseases generally are multifactorial, arising from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities, treatments, and time. This essay provides a concept for the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases such as Parkinson disease, by considering them in the context of allostasis and allostatic load. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators-"homeostats." Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. "Allostatic load" refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of an idling car, the revolutions per minute of the engine can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states). Just as allostatic load (cumulative wear and tear) reflects design and manufacturing variations, byproducts of combustion, and time, eventually leading to engine breakdown, allostatic load in catecholaminergic neurons might eventually lead to Lewy body diseases. Central to the argument is that catecholamines in the neuronal cytoplasm are autotoxic and that catecholamines from storage visicles leak into the cytoplasm continuously during life. These neurons therefore depend on vesicular sequestration to limit autotoxicity of cytosolic transmitter. Parkinson disease might be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load, which depends on genetic predispositions, environmental exposures, repeated stress-related catecholamine release, and time. PMID:21615193

  6. ASSAY OF CHICKEN BRAIN NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE ACTIVITY USING LEPTOPHOSOXON AS THE SELECTIVE NEUROTOXIC INHIBITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hen brain microsomal preparation has phenyl valeratehydrolyzing activity associated with neurotoxic esterase activity. Part of that activity is due to paraoxon-insensitive esterases and a sub-part of this is sensitive to neurotoxic organophosphates, i.e., mipafox and leptophosoxo...

  7. DIETHYLDITHIOCARBAMATE POTENTIATES THE NEUROTOXICITY OF IN VIVO 1-METHYL-4-PHENYL-1,2,3,6-TETRAHYDROPYRIDINE AND OF IN VITRO 1-METHYL-4-PHENYLPYRIDINIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DDC), a dithiocarbamate, potentiates the neurotoxicity of 1-methyl-r-pheny-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in vivo and of its major metabolite, 1,-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), in bovine adrenal medullary (BAM) cells maintained in culture. ale C5...

  8. Mechanisms of mycotoxin-induced neurotoxicity through oxidative stress-associated pathways.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kunio; Uetsuka, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Among many mycotoxins, T-2 toxin, macrocyclic trichothecenes, fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) and ochratochin A (OTA) are known to have the potential to induce neurotoxicity in rodent models. T-2 toxin induces neuronal cell apoptosis in the fetal and adult brain. Macrocyclic trichothecenes bring about neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammation in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. FB(1) induces neuronal degeneration in the cerebral cortex, concurrent with disruption of de novo ceramide synthesis. OTA causes acute depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, accompanying evidence of neuronal cell apoptosis in the substantia nigra, striatum and hippocampus. This paper reviews the mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by these mycotoxins especially from the viewpoint of oxidative stress-associated pathways. PMID:21954354

  9. An integrated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach for the ultra-sensitive determination of catecholamines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to assess neural-immune communication.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoguang Sunny; Li, Shu; Kellermann, Gottfried

    2016-06-01

    Catecholamines play a vital role in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems and their dysfunctions are implicated in various autoimmune and neurological diseases. However, accurate quantitation of catecholamines in the immune system presents a special analytical challenge. We proposed the first LC-MS/MS method for the determination of catecholamines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with significantly improved sensitivity, selectivity and throughput without requiring derivatization, evaporation and ion-pairing reagent. PBMC were separated by density gradient centrifugation and lysed with 0.2M acetic acid. The analytical novelty includes the first solid phase extraction on a 96-well hydrophilic-lipophilic-balanced (HLB) μElution plate upon complexation with phenylboronic acid (PBA), enabling specific clean-up and fivefold pre-concentration of catecholamines in a single extraction. LC chromatographic separation was obtained on a PFP column with 0.01% HCOOH as additive with enhanced signal response. Summation of five MRM transitions yielded three-four fold rise in sensitivity. The lower limit of quantification of 1pg/mL for epinephrine (E) and 5pg/mL for norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) represents a considerable sensitivity improvement over available methods. Less than 8.7% of intraday and interday precision, 91.8-111.3% of accuracy and successful assessment of reference intervals for 40 healthy donors suggested good reproducibility and reliability of the assay. The novel PBA-HLB-PFP-MRM summation approach allows rapid, sensitive and reliable determination of catecholamines in PBMC, which will facilitate better understanding of the new arena of neural-immune network. Additionally, the substantially improved method can be modified to quantify catecholamines and metabolites in other biological matrices. PMID:27157427

  10. Ca/sup 2 +/-stimulated catecholamine release from. cap alpha. -toxin-permeabilized PC12 cells: biochemical evidence for exocytosis and its modulation by protein kinase C and G protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnert-Hilger, G.; Braeutigam, M.; Gratzl, M.

    1987-12-01

    Two possible cellular pathways of catecholamines from the chromaffin vesicles of PC12 cells to the surrounding medium are explored in this study. The direct one circumventing the cytoplasm can be activated in ..cap alpha..-toxin-permeabilized cells with micromolar levels of free Ca/sup 2 +/. Catecholamine metabolites formed in the cytoplasm (i.e., 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol) are neither formed nor released from the cells under these conditions. However, when vesicular catecholamines were discharged into the cytoplasm by addition of the ionophore nigericin, such metabolites are formed and released into the medium independent of Ca/sup 2 +/. Both types of experiments provide direct evidence for the operation of Ca/sup 2 +/-induced exocytosis of dopamine and noradrenaline in permeabilized PC12 cells. The Ca/sup 2 +/ dependence of dopamine or noradrenaline release, as measured by the determination of the endogenous catecholamines using the high-performance liquid chromatography technique, exhibits two different phases. One is already activated below ..mu..M free Ca/sup 2 +/ and plateaus at 1-5 ..mu..M free Ca/sup 2 +/, while a second occurs in the presence of larger amounts of free Ca/sup 2 +/ (10-100 ..mu..M). Ca/sup 2 +/-induced catecholamine release from the permeabilized cells can be modulated in different ways: It is enhanced by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate and the diacylglycerol 1-oleyl-2-acetylglycerol provided Mg/sup 2 +//ATP is present, and it is inhibited by guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). The latter effect is abolished by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin but not by cholera toxin. Thus, it appears that Ca/sup 2 +/-induced exocytosis can be modulated via the protein kinase C system, as well as via GTP binding proteins.

  11. Stereoselective peripheral sensory neurotoxicity of diaminocyclohexane platinum enantiomers related to ormaplatin and oxaliplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Screnci, D.; Er, H. M.; Hambley, T. W.; Galettis, P.; Brouwer, W.; McKeage, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    The diaminocyclohexane platinum (Pt(DACH)) derivatives ormaplatin and oxaliplatin have caused severe and dose-limiting peripheral sensory neurotoxicity in a clinical trial. We hypothesized that this toxicity could vary in relation to the biotransformation and stereochemistry of these Pt(DACH) derivatives. We prepared pure R,R and S,S enantiomers of ormaplatin (Pt(DACH)Cl4), oxaliplatin (Pt(DACH)oxalato) and their metabolites (Pt(DACH)Cl2 and Pt(DACH)methionine) and assessed their peripheral sensory neurotoxicity and tissue distribution in the rat and in vitro anti-tumour activity in human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. The R,R enantiomers of Pt(DACH)Cl4, Pt(DACH)oxalato and Pt(DACH)Cl2, induced peripheral sensory neurotoxicity at significantly lower cumulative doses (18 +/- 5.7 vs 32 +/- 2.3 micromol kg(-1); P < 0.01) and at earlier times (4 +/- 1 vs 6.7 +/- 0.6 weeks; P = 0.016) during repeat-dose treatment than the S,S enantiomers. Pt(DACH)methionine enantiomers showed no biological activity. There was no difference between Pt(DACH) enantiomers in the platinum concentration in sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, brain or blood at the end of each experiment. Three human ovarian carcinoma cell lines (41 M, 41 McisR and SKOV-3) showed no (or inconsistent) chiral discrimination in their sensitivity to Pt(DACH) enantiomers, whereas two cell lines (CH-1 and CH-1cisR) showed modest enantiomeric selectivity favouring the R,R isomer (more active). In conclusion, Pt(DACH) derivatives exhibit enantiomeric-selective peripheral sensory neurotoxicity during repeated dosing in rats favouring S,S isomers (less neurotoxic). They exhibited less chiral discrimination in their accumulation within peripheral nerves and in vitro anti-tumour activity. PMID:9275028

  12. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  13. Plasma and urine catecholamine levels in cosmonauts during long-term stay on Space Station Salyut-7.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, R; Davydova, N A; Noskov, V B; Vigas, M; Popova, I A; Usakov, A C; Macho, L; Grigoriev, A I

    1988-02-01

    The activity of the sympathetic adrenal system in cosmonauts exposed to a stay in space lasting for about half a year has so far been studied only by measuring catecholamine levels in plasma and urine samples taken before space flight and after landing. The device "Plasma 01", specially designed for collecting and processing venous blood from subjects during space flight on board the station Salyut-7 rendered it possible for the first time to collect and freeze samples of blood from cosmonauts in the course of a long-term 237-day space flight. A physician-cosmonaut collected samples of blood and urine from two cosmonauts over the period of days 217-219 of their stay in space. The samples were transported to Earth frozen. As indicators of the sympathetic adrenal system activity, plasma and urine concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine as well as urine levels of the catecholamine metabolites metanephrine, normetanephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid were determined before, during and after space flight. On days 217-219 of space flight plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were slightly increased, yet not substantially different from normal. During stress situations plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels usually exhibit a manifold increase. On days 217-219 of space flight norepinephrine and epinephrine levels in urine were comparable with pre-flight values and the levels of their metabolites were even significantly decreased. All the parameters studied, particularly plasma norepinephrine as well as urine norepinephrine, normetanephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid, reached the highest values 8 days after landing. The results obtained suggest that, in the period of days 217-219 of the cosmonauts stay in space in the state of weightlessness, the sympathetic adrenal system is either not activated at all or there is but a slight activation induced by specific activities of the cosmonauts, whereas in the process of re-adaptation after space flight on

  14. Catecholamine-resistant hypotension and myocardial performance following patent ductus arteriosus ligation

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Shahab; McNamara, Patrick; Jain, Amish; Lavoie, Pascal M.; Wickremasinghe, Andrea; Merritt, T. Allen; Solomon, Tabitha; Sekar, Krishnamurthy; Attridge, Joshua T.; Swanson, Jonathan R.; Gillam-Krakauer, Maria; Reese, Jeff; Poindexter, Brenda B.; Brook, Michael; Auchus, Richard J.; Clyman, Ronald I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We performed a multicenter study of preterm infants, who were about to undergo patent ductus arteriosus ligation, to determine if echocardiographic indices of impaired myocardial performance were associated with subsequent development of catecholamine-resistant hypotension following ligation. Study Design A standardized treatment approach for hypotension was followed at each center. Infants were considered to have catecholamine-resistant hypotension if their dopamine infusion was >15 µg/kg/min. Echocardiograms and cortisol measurements were obtained between 6 and 14 hours after the ligation (prior to the presence of catecholamine-resistant hypotension). Results 45 infants were enrolled: 10 received catecholamines (6 were catecholamine-responsive, 4 developed catecholamine-resistant hypotension). Catecholamine-resistant hypotension was not associated with decreased preload, shortening fraction or ventricular output. Infants with catecholamine-resistant hypotension had significantly lower levels of systemic vascular resistance and postoperative cortisol concentration. Conclusion We speculate that low cortisol levels and impaired vascular tone may play a more important role than impaired cardiac performance in post-ligation catecholamine-resistant hypotension. PMID:25118721

  15. Effects of catecholamines on rat myocardial metabolism. II. Influence of catecholamines on 32p-incorporation into rat myocardial adenylic nucleotides and their turn-over.

    PubMed

    Merouze, P; Gaudemer, Y; Gautheron, D

    1975-01-01

    1. The influence of catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline) on 32Pi incorporation into intracellular phosphate and adenylic nucleotides has been studied on rat myocardium slices; consequently, the turn-over of nucleotides could be determined and compared under the influence of these two hormones. 2. In order to specify the site of action of these catecholamines, several inhibitors and activators of energetic metabolism were included in the incubation medium: 3'5'-AMP, caffein, ouabain, oligomycin, rotenone + antimycin. 3. Both catecholamines favour Pi exchanges between intra and extracellular spaces; ATP turn-over is greatly increased, while ADP turn-over is slightly decreased, and 32P-incorporation into ADP is increased. 4. 3'5'-AMP and caffein are without effect on Pi penetration; however, caffein increases catecholamine effects on this penetration. ATP turn-over is slightly increased by 3'5'-AMP or caffein. 5. Ouabain decreases ATP turn-over but does not prevent the adrenaline induced acceleration. Inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport decrease ATP-turn-over severely; this inhibition is not released by catecholamines. 6. It is concluded that the catecholamine effects observed are dependent on the oxidative phosphorylations process. The increase of Pi exchange by catecholamines may be related to the increase of extracellular space and cation translocations we observed with the hormones. PMID:173417

  16. Can Zebrafish be used to Identify Developmentally Neurotoxic Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Can Zebrafish be Used to Identify Developmentally Neurotoxic Chemicals? The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating methods to screen and prioritize large numbers of chemicals for developmental neurotoxicity. We are exploring behavioral methods using zebrafish by desig...

  17. Nucleus Accumbens Invulnerability to Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Donald M.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure. PMID:23382149

  18. Neurotoxicity of Immunosuppressive Therapies in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    ANGHEL, Daniela; TANASESCU, Radu; CAMPEANU, Ana; LUPESCU, Ioana; PODDA, Giulio; BAJENARU, Ovidiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunosuppressive agents have revolutionized clinical transplantation medicine, allowing the avoidance of immune system attack on the transplanted graft. Nevertheless, the use of medications such as cyclosporine, tacrolimus and others also brought the side effects of these drugs. Early identification of drug-induced neurotoxicity in transplanted patients and of its specific causes is important, not only because of patient's poor clinical status but because of concomitant systemic and metabolic disorders which may obscure symptoms. Treatment and prognosis are highly dependent on the type of complication and it's early recognition. This review focuses on the clinical entities of neurotoxicity caused by immunosuppressive drugs in transplanted patients. PMID:24371481

  19. Pb Neurotoxicity: Neuropsychological Effects of Lead Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Lisa H.; Harp, Jordan P.; Han, Dong Y.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is a term used to describe neurophysiological changes caused by exposure to toxic agents. Such exposure can result in neurocognitive symptoms and/or psychiatric disturbances. Common toxic agents include heavy metals, drugs, organophosphates, bacterial, and animal neurotoxins. Among heavy metal exposures, lead exposure is one of the most common exposures that can lead to significant neuropsychological and functional decline in humans. In this review, neurotoxic lead exposure's pathophysiology, etiology, and epidemiology are explored. In addition, commonly associated neuropsychological difficulties in intelligence, memory, executive functioning, attention, processing speed, language, visuospatial skills, motor skills, and affect/mood are explored. PMID:24516855

  20. The catecholamine response to spaceflight: role of diet and gender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    Compared with men, women appear to have a decreased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) response to stress. The two manifestations where the sexual dimorphism has been the most pronounced involve the response of the SNS to fluid shifts and fuel metabolism during exercise. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether a similar sexual dimorphism was found in the response to spaceflight. To do so, we compared catecholamine excretion by male and female astronauts from two similar shuttle missions, Spacelab Life Sciences 1 (SLS1, 1991) and 2 (SLS2, 1993) for evidence of sexual dimorphism. To evaluate the variability of the catecholamine response in men, we compared catecholamine excretion from the two SLS missions against the 1996 Life and Microgravity Sciences Mission (LMS) and the 1973 Skylab missions. RESULTS: No gender- or mission-dependent changes were found with epinephrine. Separating out the SLS1/2 data by gender shows that norepinephrine excretion was essentially unchanged with spaceflight in women (98 +/- 10%; n = 3) and substantially decreased with the men (41 +/- 9%; n = 4, P < 0.05). Data are a percentage of mean preflight value +/- SE. Comparisons among males demonstrated significant mission effects on norepinephrine excretion. After flight, there was a transient increase in norepinephrine but no evidence of any gender-specific effects. We conclude that norepinephrine excretion during spaceflight is both mission and gender dependent. Men show the greater response, with at least three factors being involved, a response to microgravity, energy balance, and the ratio of carbohydrate to fat in the diet.

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of protein components of catecholamine storage vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Geffen, L. B.; Livett, B. G.; Rush, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    1. The distribution of specific proteins in sympathetic neurones has been examined by immunofluorescent histology using antibodies prepared against soluble protein components of the catecholamine storage vesicles of the adrenal medulla. 2. Two antigen preparations were separated by ion exchange chromatography of the soluble proteins released on osmotic lysis of catecholamine storage vesicles which had been isolated by centrifugation from homogenates of sheep adrenal medulla. One fraction (AgDH) had high dopamine-β-hydroxylase activity, while another (AgCB), consisting of the bulk of the protein, had some capacity to bind catecholamines. On disk gel electrophoresis the antigens ran as single bands with very different mobilities. 3. Antisera (AsDH) and (AsCB) produced in rabbits to the two antigens were shown to react specifically with their antigens by immunodiffusion and electrophoresis in agarose. 4. Indirect immunofluorescent staining of tissue sections was achieved by layering first the rabbit anti-sera, followed by goat anti-rabbit globulin serum which had been conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate. 5. The adrenal medulla and the cell bodies of sympathetic ganglia showed the most intense green fluorescence with the immune rabbit sera, and hardly stained when pre-immune serum from the same animal was used. The reactivity of the antisera could be abolished by incubation with the corresponding antigen. 6. The preterminal and terminal axons of sympathetic nerves also stained specifically but less intensely with both antisera. When the nerves were ligated for up to 24 hr, the portion immediately proximal to the constriction showed an enhanced reaction to the antisera. 7. The results provide evidence that sympathetic neurones contain proteins immunologically identical to those involved in the synthesis and storage of noradrenaline in the adrenal medulla, and support the concept that granular vesicles are synthesized in the perikaryon of the neurone and are

  2. FORMATION OF HEMOGLOBIN ADDUCTS OF ACRYLAMIDE AND ITS EPOXIDE METABOLITE GLYCIDAMIDE IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for the determination of hemoglobin (Hb) adducts form by the neurotoxic agent acrylamide and its mutagenic epoxide metabolite glycidamide. he method was based on simultaneous measurements of the cysteine adducts formed by these two agents by means of gas ch...

  3. The pattern of catecholamine response to burst activity in leopard frogs, Rana pipiens.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P A; Nadeau, A; Guderley, H

    1994-07-01

    It is well known that burst activity causes a rapid breakdown of muscle glycogen and extensive accumulation of lactate in frogs. During recovery, it has been shown that lactate is nearly totally recycled into muscle glycogen. Since catecholamines are likely to play some role in the regulation of postexercise repletion of muscle glycogen, the pattern of catecholamine response was assessed in frogs during intense physical activity and the ensuing recovery period. Chronically cannulated frogs were forced to swim until exhaustion, and serial blood samples were taken at regular time intervals for the measurements of catecholamines. The pattern of changes in plasma and muscle lactate and glucose and muscle glycogen during and after burst activity is similar to that reported in previous studies using noncannulated frogs, a result which indicates that the animals recover well from the surgical trauma associated with cannulation. The concentrations of plasma catecholamines in frogs at rest are comparable to those measured in other amphibians, and the levels of plasma epinephrine in resting frogs are much higher than those of norepinephrine. Burst activity causes a marked increase in plasma catecholamines, with higher levels reached by epinephrine. During recovery, the concentration of plasma catecholamines returns to normal within 30 min. Although this pattern of catecholamine response to intense physical activity may be favorable to the repletion of muscle glycogen postexercise, it remains to be clarified how critical the low levels and fast reduction in plasma catecholamines are for optimum glycogen resynthesis. PMID:7926648

  4. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES: CRITICAL REVIEW.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are widely utilized insecticides whose primary action is the disruption of voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSC). Although these compounds have been in use for over 30 years and their acute neurotoxicity has been well characterized, there is considerably less info...

  5. Manganese Neurotoxicity: A Focus on the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Keith M.; Thompson, Khristy; Aschner, Judy; Aschner, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal found in all tissues, and it is required for normal amino acid, lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism. While Mn deficiency is extremely rare in humans, toxicity due to overexposure of Mn is more prevalent. The brain appears to be especially vulnerable. Mn neurotoxicity is most commonly associated with occupational exposure to aerosols or dusts that contain extremely high levels (> 1-5 mg Mn/m3) of Mn, consumption of contaminated well water, or parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with liver disease or immature hepatic functioning such as the neonate. This review will focus primarily on the neurotoxicity of Mn in the neonate. We will discuss putative transporters of the metal in the neonatal brain and then focus on the implications of high Mn exposure to the neonate focusing on typical exposure modes (e.g., dietary and parenteral). Although Mn exposure via parenteral nutrition is uncommon in adults, in premature infants, it is more prevalent, so this mode of exposure becomes salient in this population. We will briefly review some of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity and conclude with a discussion of ripe areas for research in this underreported area of neurotoxicity. PMID:17084903

  6. MANAGING EXPOSURES TO NEUROTOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers at EPA's National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory are developing a biologically-based dose-response model to describe the neurotoxic effects of exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The model is being developed to improve risk assessment...

  7. Neurotoxic effects of gasoline and gasoline constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Burbacher, T.M.

    1993-12-01

    This overview was developed as part of a symposium on noncancer end points of gasoline and key gasoline components. The specific components included are methyl tertiary butyl ether, ethyl tertiary butyl ether, tertiary amyl methyl ether, butadiene, benzene, xylene, toluene, methyl alcohol, and ethyl alcohol. The overview focuses on neurotoxic effects related to chronic low-level exposures. A few general conclusions and recommendations can be made based on the results of the studies to date. (a) All the compounds reviewed are neuroactive and, as such, should be examined for their neurotoxicity. (b) For most of the compounds, there is a substantial margin of safety between the current permissible exposure levels and levels that would be expected to cause overt signs of neurotoxicity in humans. This is not the case for xylene, toluene, and methanol, however, where neurologic effects are observed at or below the current Threshold Limit Value. (c) For most of the compounds, the relationship between chronic low-level exposure and subtle neurotoxic effects has not been studied. Studies therefore should focus on examining the dose-response relationship between chronic low-level exposure and subtle changes in central nervous system function. 96 refs., 7 tabs.

  8. NEUROTOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE): DISCUSSION PAPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is a background document for a meeting of neurotoxicity experts to discuss the central nervous system effects of exposure to perchloroethylene (perc). The document reviews the literature on neurological testing of people exposed to perc occupationally in dry cleanin...

  9. PRINCIPLES OF IDENTIFYING AND CHARACTERIZING NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is currently considerable interest in the neurotoxic effects of environmental pollutants. ome of this interest is due to epidemiological, clinical and laboratory studies showing that the nervous system is a target for many toxic substances. he interest is also due to a real...

  10. USE OF CELL CULTURE FOR EVALUATING NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter familiarizes the reader with the need to develop, validate and utilize in vitro models to test chemicals for neurotoxic potential. he major advantages and disadvantages of using cell and tissue culture, factors which have stimulated and hampered the promulgation of i...

  11. Evidence for participation of catecholamines in cardiac action of ouabain

    PubMed Central

    Seifen, E.

    1974-01-01

    1 The shortening of cycle length (=positive chronotropic effect) by ouabain produced in isolated spontaneously beating atria of the guinea-pig was analyzed. 2 The action of ouabain was dose-dependent; threshold response was seen at 1 × 10-7 M, and maximal response occurred at 4 × 10-7 M. The half-time of the ouabain effect was about 20 minutes. 3 The positive chronotropic effect of ouabain was reduced to 40% by β-adrenoceptor blockade (3.3 × 10-9 M propranolol) or by reserpine-depletion of catecholamines. Incubation of reserpine-treated atria with noradrenaline partially restored the action of ouabain. 4 The effect of ouabain was greatly dependent upon the calcium concentration. The optimal calcium level was 2.5 × 10-3 M. Calcium and ouabain acted synergistically. 5 Increasing calcium concentrations inhibited the positive chronotropic effect of noradrenaline in a manner similar to increasing ouabain concentrations. 6 A hypothesis is proposed which explains the chronotropic effect of ouabain on the basis of two mechanisms: (1) increase of the catecholamine concentration affecting the pacemaker; (2) mobilization of calcium, i.e. increase of the biologically effective intracellular calcium level. PMID:4451762

  12. Catecholamine-induced excitation of nociceptors in sympathetically maintained pain.

    PubMed

    Jørum, Ellen; Ørstavik, Kristin; Schmidt, Roland; Namer, Barbara; Carr, Richard W; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Hilliges, Marita; Handwerker, Hermann; Torebjörk, Erik; Schmelz, Martin

    2007-02-01

    Sympathetically maintained pain could either be mediated by ephaptic interactions between sympathetic efferent and afferent nociceptive fibers or by catecholamine-induced activation of nociceptive nerve endings. We report here single fiber recordings from C nociceptors in a patient with sympathetically maintained pain, in whom sympathetic blockade had repeatedly eliminated the ongoing pain in both legs. We classified eight C-fibers as mechano-responsive and six as mechano-insensitive nociceptors according to their mechanical responsiveness and activity-dependent slowing of conduction velocity (latency increase of 0.5+/-1.1 vs. 7.1+/-2.0 ms for 20 pulses at 0.125 Hz). Two C-fibers were activated with a delay of several seconds following strong endogenous sympathetic bursts; they were also excited for about 3 min following the injection of norepinephrine (10 microl, 0.05%) into their innervation territory. In these two fibers, a prolonged activation by injection of low pH solution (phosphate buffer, pH 6.0, 10 microl) and sensitization of their heat response following prostaglandin E2 injection were recorded, evidencing their afferent nature. Moreover, their activity-dependent slowing was typical for mechano-insensitive nociceptors. We conclude that sensitized mechano-insensitive nociceptors can be activated by endogenously released catecholamines and thereby may contribute to sympathetically maintained pain. No evidence for ephaptic interaction between sympathetic efferent and nociceptive afferent fibers was found. PMID:16997471

  13. Hypersensitivity of lung vessels to catecholamines in systemic hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Guazzi, M D; Alimento, M; Fiorentini, C; Pepi, M; Polese, A

    1986-01-01

    Among patients with primary systemic hypertension pressure and arteriolar resistance in the pulmonary circulation exceed normal values and are hyper-reactive to sympathetic stimulation. A study was therefore carried out in 16 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension and nine healthy subjects to compare the pulmonary vascular reactivity to exogenous catecholamines. In the normotensive group the dose response relation to adrenaline (microgram: dyn) was 1 = -4, 2 = -9, 3 = -9, and 4 = -10 and to noradrenaline 2 = +3, 4 = /8, 6 = +4, and 8 = +3. The relations in the hypertensive subjects were 1 = +18, 2 = +42, 3 = +59, and 4 = +77 and 2 = +39, 4 = +54, 6 = +76, and 8 = +100, respectively. Group differences were highly significant. Cardiac output (blood flow through the lungs) was raised by adrenaline and reduced by noradrenaline. In either case the driving pressure across the lungs was significantly augmented in the hypertensive patients but not in the normotensive group. Both catecholamines had a vasoconstrictor effect on the pulmonary circulation as a result of vascular over-reactivity. The opposite changes in resistance between normal and hypertensive subjects produced by adrenaline suggest that a constrictor vascular hypersensitivity occurs in the pulmonary circulation with the development of systemic high blood pressure. PMID:3089490

  14. [Case of catecholamine-resistant shock caused by drug overdose].

    PubMed

    Sato, Rui; Shimizu, Keiki; Taguchi, Shigemasa; Sekii, Hajime; Yokote, Ryo; Kiyota, Kazuya

    2007-01-01

    A 27-year-old man with schizophrenia took an overdose of a psychotic agent. He became unconscious and had severe hypotension. Although he was diagnosed as having distributive shock caused by drug overdose and treated by hydration and catecholamine, the shock status was lasting. The use of vasopressin changed the situation dramatically. After the injection of vasopressin at maximum dose, 0.1 U/min, the dose of vasopressin could be tapered. He recovered from shock and was discharged on the third day without sequelae. There are an increasing number of reports that indicate that vasopressin is effective for distributive shock, especially catecholamine-resistant septic shock. It seems that the appropriate dose of vasopressin is under 0.04U/min considering the deterioration of cardiac function although the maximum dose of vasopressin was O.1U/min in this case. For that reason, monitoring by pulmonary artery catheter is recommended. The side effects of vasopressin should be discussed for appropriate use. PMID:17319503

  15. Catecholamine-Based Treatment in AD Patients: Expectations and Delusions

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Olivola, Enrica; Liguori, Claudio; Hainsworth, Atticus H.; Saviozzi, Valentina; Angileri, Giacoma; D’Angelo, Vincenza; Galati, Salvatore; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the gap between excellence of diagnostics and efficacy of therapy is wide. Despite sophisticated imaging and biochemical markers, the efficacy of available therapeutic options is limited. Here we examine the possibility that assessment of endogenous catecholamine levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may fuel new therapeutic strategies. In reviewing the available literature, we consider the effects of levodopa, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and noradrenaline (NE) modulators, showing disparate results. We present a preliminary assessment of CSF concentrations of dopamine (DA) and NE, determined by HPLC, in a small dementia cohort of either Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia patients, compared to control subjects. Our data reveal detectable levels of DA, NE in CSF, though we found no significant alterations in the dementia population as a whole. AD patients exhibit a small impairment of the DA axis and a larger increase of NE concentration, likely to represent a compensatory mechanism. While waiting for preventive strategies, a pragmatic approach to AD may re-evaluate catecholamine modulation, possibly stratified to dementia subtypes, as part of the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25999852

  16. Stress, Allostatic Load, Catecholamines, and Other Neurotransmitters in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    As populations age, the prevalence of geriatric neurodegenerative diseases will increase. These diseases generally are multifactorial, arising from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities, treatments, and time. This essay provides a concept for the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases such as Parkinson disease, by considering them in the context of allostasis and allostatic load. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators—“homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of an idling car, the revolutions per minute of the engine can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states). Just as allostatic load (cumulative wear and tear) reflects design and manufacturing variations, byproducts of combustion, and time, eventually leading to engine breakdown, allostatic load in catecholaminergic neurons might eventually lead to Lewy body diseases. Central to the argument is that catecholaminergic neurons leak vesicular contents into the cytoplasm continuously during life and that catecholamines in the neuronal cytoplasm are autotoxic. These neurons therefore depend on vesicular sequestration to limit autotoxicity of cytosolic transmitter. Parkinson disease might be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load, which depends on genetic predispositions, environmental exposures, repeated stress-related catecholamine release, and time. PMID:22297542

  17. Differential regulation of renal phospholipase C isoforms by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Yu, P Y; Asico, L D; Eisner, G M; Jose, P A

    1995-01-01

    Dopamine and D1 agonists and NE all increase phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity, but whereas dopamine produces a natriuresis, NE has an antinatriuretic effect. To determine if catecholamines differentially regulate the expression of PLC isoforms, we infused fenoldopam, a D1 agonist, or pramipexole, a D1/D2 agonist, intravenously or infused fenoldopam or NE into the renal artery of anesthetized rats. After 3-4 h of infusion, when the expected natriuresis (fenoldopam or pramipexole) or antinatriuresis (NE) occurred, the kidneys were removed for analysis of PLC isoform protein expression activity. Western blot analysis revealed that in renal cortical membranes, fenoldopam and pramipexole increased expression of PLC beta 1 and decreased expression of PLC gamma 1; PLC delta was unchanged. In the cytosol, pramipexole and fenoldopam increased expression of both PLC beta 1 and PLC gamma 1. No effects were noted in the medulla. A preferential D1 antagonist, SKF 83742, which by itself had no effect, blocked the effects of pramipexole, thus confirming the involvement of the D1 receptor. In contrast, NE also increased PLC beta 1 but did not affect PLC gamma 1 protein expression in membranes. The changes in PLC isoform expression were accompanied by similar changes in PLC isoform activity. These studies demonstrate for the first time differential regulation of PLC isoforms by catecholamines. PMID:7814630

  18. Pathophysiology of Manganese-Associated Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Racette, Brad A.; Aschner, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Dydak, Ulrike; Criswell, Susan R.; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Conference Summary Manganese (Mn) is a well established neurotoxin associated with specific damage to the basal ganglia in humans. The phenotype associated with Mn neurotoxicity was first described in two workers with occupational exposure to Mn oxide.(Couper, 1837) Although the description did not use modern clinical terminology, a parkinsonian illness characterized by slowness of movement (bradykinesia), masked facies, and gait impairment (postural instability) appears to have predominated. Nearly 100 years later an outbreak of an atypical parkinsonian illness in a Chilean Mn mine provided a phenotypic description of a fulminant neurologic disorder with parkinsonism, dystonia, and neuropsychiatric symptoms.(Rodier J, 1955) Exposures associated with this syndrome were massive and an order of magnitude greater than modern exposures.(Rodier J, 1955; Hobson et al., 2011) The clinical syndrome associated with Mn neurotoxicity has been called manganism. Modern exposures to Mn occur primarily through occupations in the steel industry and welding. These exposures are often chronic and varied, occurring over decades in the healthy workforce. Although the severe neurologic disorder described by Rodier and Couper are no longer seen, several reports have suggested a possible increased risk of neurotoxicity in these workers.(Racette et al., 2005b; Bowler et al., 2007; Harris et al., 2011) Based upon limited prior imaging and pathologic investigations into the pathophysiology of neurotoxicity in Mn exposed workers,(Huang et al., 2003) many investigators have concluded that the syndrome spares the dopamine system distinguishing manganism from Parkinson disease (PD), the most common cause of parkinsonism in the general population, and a disease with characteristic degenerative changes in the dopaminergic system.(Jankovic, 2005) The purpose of this symposium was to highlight recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of Mn associated neurotoxicity from C. elegans

  19. Organophosphate-induced delayed neurotoxicity of triarylphosphates.

    PubMed

    Weiner, M L; Jortner, B S

    1999-08-01

    This paper reviews the characteristics of organophosphate-induced delayed neurotoxicity, its mechanism, lesions, species sensitivities and structure activity-relationships as they relate to the class of compounds known as triaryl phosphates. The triaryl phosphates have been widely used in commerce for over thirty years as flame retardants in fluids and plastics. Concern has been raised regarding their potential to cause organophosphate-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN), due to structural similarities to the potent neurotoxicant, tri-ortho cresyl phosphate (TOCP). Based on research on many pure isomers, Johnson (1975a, 1975b) found that certain structural features are required for a triaryl phosphate to react with the enzyme, neuropathy target enzyme (NTE), in a manner which induces OPIDN. Results of acute hen OPIDN studies, the experimental model of choice, support his findings as regards the structure-activity relationships for commercial triaryl phosphates. Thus, standard acute hen OPIDN studies on triphenyl phosphate and butylated triaryl phosphates fail to demonstrate a potential to elicit OPIDN by these products after a single dose. Studies on the mixed isopropyl phenyl phosphates indicate that, while some are neurotoxic, they are much less potent than tricresyl phosphate (TCP) and TOCP in the induction of OPIDN. Most commercial isopropylated triaryl phosphates lacked the potential to induce acute OPIDN using a limit dose of 2000 mg/kg. Although in early studies these compounds appeared to be neurotoxic, they were generally tested at excessively high doses, often exceeding 10,000 mg/kg in acute hen OPIDN studies. In contrast to the isopropylated and butylated triaryl phosphate products, TCP, and especially its ortho substituted isomer, TOCP, were found to be neurotoxic in both acute and subchronic hen OPIDN studies. Recent advances in the synthesis of commercial TCP products have resulted in products with reduced neurotoxic potential (McCormick et al, 1993

  20. Corneal Neurotoxicity Due to Topical Benzalkonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Joy; Chaudhary, Shweta; Namavari, Abed; Ozturk, Okan; Chang, Jin-Hong; Yco, Lisette; Sonawane, Snehal; Khanolkar, Vishakha; Hallak, Joelle; Jain, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize the effect of topical application of benzalkonium chloride (BAK) on corneal nerves in vivo and in vitro. Methods. Thy1-YFP+ neurofluorescent mouse eyes were treated topically with vehicle or BAK (0.01% or 0.1%). Wide-field stereofluorescence microscopy was performed to sequentially image the treated corneas in vivo every week for 4 weeks, and changes in stromal nerve fiber density (NFD) and aqueous tear production were determined. Whole-mount immunofluorescence staining of corneas was performed with antibodies to axonopathy marker SMI-32. Western immunoblot analyses were performed on trigeminal ganglion and corneal lysates to determine abundance of proteins associated with neurotoxicity and regeneration. Compartmental culture of trigeminal ganglion neurons was performed in Campenot devices to determine whether BAK affects neurite outgrowth. Results. BAK-treated corneas exhibited significantly reduced NFD and aqueous tear production, and increased inflammatory cell infiltration and fluorescein staining at 1 week (P < 0.05). These changes were most significant after 0.1% BAK treatment. The extent of inflammatory cell infiltration in the cornea showed a significant negative correlation with NFD. Sequential in vivo imaging of corneas showed two forms of BAK-induced neurotoxicity: reversible neurotoxicity characterized by axonopathy and recovery, and irreversible neurotoxicity characterized by nerve degeneration and regeneration. Increased abundance of beta III tubulin in corneal lysates confirmed regeneration. A dose-related significant reduction in neurites occurred after BAK addition to compartmental cultures of dissociated trigeminal ganglion cells. Although both BAK doses (0.0001% and 0.001%) reduced nerve fiber length, the reduction was significantly more with the higher dose (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Topical application of BAK to the eye causes corneal neurotoxicity, inflammation, and reduced aqueous

  1. Relationship between Urinary Pesticide Residue Levels and Neurotoxic Symptoms among Women on Farms in the Western Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Motsoeneng, Portia M.; Dalvie, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between urinary pesticide residue levels and neurotoxic symptoms amongst women working on Western Cape farms in South Africa. Method: A total of 211 women were recruited from farms (n = 121) and neighbouring towns (n = 90). Participant assessment was via a Q16 questionnaire, reporting on pesticide exposures and measurement of urinary OP metabolite concentrations of dialkyl phosphates (DAP) and chlorpyriphos, 3,5,6-trichloropyridinol (TCPY) and of pyrethroid (PYR) metabolite concentrations (3- phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), 4-fluoro-3-phenoxybenzoic acid (4F3PBA), cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (DBCA), and the cis- and trans isomers of 2,2-dichlorovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Results: Median urinary pesticide metabolites were slightly (6%–49%) elevated in the farm group compared to the town group, with 2 metabolites significantly higher and some lower in the farm group. The prevalence of all Q16 symptoms was higher amongst farm women compared to town women. Three Q16 symptoms (problems with buttoning, reading and notes) were significantly positively associated with three pyrethroid metabolites (cis- and trans-DCCA and DBCA), although associations may due to chance as multiple comparisons were made. The strongest association for a pyrethroid metabolite was between problems with buttoning and DBCA (odds ratio (OR) = 8.93, 95% confidence interval (CI):1.71–46.5. There was no association between Q16 symptoms and OP metabolites. Conclusions: Women farm residents and rural women from neighbouring towns in the Western Cape are exposed to OP and PYR pesticides. The study did not provide strong evidence that pesticides are associated with neurotoxic symptoms but associations found could be explored further. PMID:26042367

  2. Prostanoid signaling: dual role for prostaglandin E2 in neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Milatovic, Dejan; Montine, Thomas J.; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The prostanoids, a naturally occurring subclass of eicosanoids, are lipid mediators generated through oxidative pathways from arachidonic acid. These cyclooxygenase metabolites, consisting of the prostaglandins (PG), prostacyclin and tromboxane, are released in response to a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli in almost all organs, including the brain. They are produced by various cell types and act upon targeted cells via specific G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of multiple receptors, cross-reactivity and coupling to different signal transduction pathways for each prostanoid, collectively establish their diverse effects. Notably, these effects can occur in functionally opposing directions within the same cell or organ. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the most versatile prostanoid because of its receptors, E Prostanoid (EP) receptor subtypes 1 through 4, its biological heterogeneity and its differential expression on neuronal and glial cells throughout the central nervous system. Since PGE2 plays an important role in processes associated with various neurological diseases, this review focuses on its dual neuroprotective and neurotoxic role in EP receptor subtype signaling pathways in different models of brain injury. PMID:21376752

  3. Accumulation of neurotoxic organochlorines and trace elements in brain of female European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, C; Scaion, D; Lemaire, B; Belpaire, C; Thomé, J-P; Thonon, M; Leermaker, M; Gao, Y; Debier, C; Silvestre, F; Kestemont, P; Rees, J-F

    2016-07-01

    Xenobiotics such as organochlorine compounds (OCs) and metals have been suggested to play a significant role in the collapse of European eel stocks in the last decades. Several of these pollutants could affect functioning of the nervous system. Still, no information is so far available on levels of potentially neurotoxic pollutants in eel brain. In present study, carried out on female eels caught in Belgian rivers and canals, we analyzed brain levels of potentially-neurotoxic trace elements (Ag, Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, MeHg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Sb, Zn) and OCs (Polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs; Hexachlorocyclohexanes, HCHs; Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites, DDTs). Data were compared to levels in liver and muscle tissues. Eel brain contained very high amounts of OCs, superior to those found in the two other tissues. Interestingly, the relative abundance of PCB congeners markedly differed between tissues. In brain, a predominance of low chlorinated PCBs was noted, whereas highly chlorinated congeners prevailed in muscle and liver. HCHs were particularly abundant in brain, which contains the highest amounts of β-HCH and ϒ-HCH. p,p'-DDTs concentration was similar between brain and muscle (i.e., about twice that of liver). A higher proportion of p,p'-DDT was noticed in brain. Except for Cr and inorganic Hg, all potentially neurotoxic metals accumulated in brain to levels equal to or lower than hepatic levels. Altogether, results indicate that eel brain is an important target for organic and, to a lesser extent, for inorganic neurotoxic pollutants. PMID:27376663

  4. Effect of heart failure on catecholamine granule morphology and storage in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Mahata, Sushil K; Zheng, Hong; Mahata, Sumana; Liu, Xuefei; Patel, Kaushik P

    2016-09-01

    One of the key mechanisms involved in sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure (HF) is the activation of the adrenal glands. Impact of the elevated catecholamines on the hemodynamic parameters has been previously demonstrated. However, studies linking the structural effects of such overactivation with secretory performance and cell metabolism in the adrenomedullary chromaffin cells in vivo have not been previously reported. In this study, HF was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligation of the left coronary artery. Five weeks after surgery, cardiac function was assessed by ventricular hemodynamics. HF rats showed increased adrenal weight and adrenal catecholamine levels (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) compared with sham-operated rats. Rats with HF demonstrated increased small synaptic and dense core vesicle in splanchnic-adrenal synapses indicating trans-synaptic activation of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes, increased endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi lumen width to meet the demand of increased catecholamine synthesis and release, and more mitochondria with dilated cristae and glycogen to accommodate for the increased energy demand for the increased biogenesis and exocytosis of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. These findings suggest that increased trans-synaptic activation of the chromaffin cells within the adrenal medulla may lead to increased catecholamines in the circulation which in turn contributes to the enhanced neurohumoral drive, providing a unique mechanistic insight for enhanced catecholamine levels in plasma commonly observed in chronic HF condition. PMID:27402067

  5. Catecholamine and cortisol levels in Oxford college rowers.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, R; Ungpakorn, G; Harrison, G A

    1995-01-01

    Urinary catecholamines and cortisol levels in two teams of Oxford college eight oarsmen were compared on three different day types: training days, racing days, and non-rowing days. Adrenaline and cortisol were raised on racing and training days compared to non-racing days. Noradrenaline was raised on training days, reflecting longer periods of physical exercise during training. There was evidence of a progressive lowering of adrenaline output over consecutive race days and that the outcome of the races had an effect on both adrenaline and cortisol. In addition to this there seemed to be differences in cortisol levels between the two teams of rowers on both racing days and non-rowing days. PMID:8800851

  6. Inhibition of radioemesis by disruption of catecholamines in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Luthra, Y.K.; Mattsson, J.L.; Yochmowitz, M.G.

    1981-03-01

    Dogs were treated 30 min to 1 h before x irradiation with ..cap alpha..-methyl-p-tyrosine or 6-hydroxydopamine. A third group of dogs was given a known antiradioemetic drug, haloperidol to verify the sensitivity of the procedure. Irradiated but untreated controls were also used. Light methoxyflurane anesthesia was used for restraint during the exposure. Exposure dose was 800 rad kerma delivered at 50 rad/min to a 10 x 10-cm area covering the abdominal area from xiphoid to pubis. Haloperidol and 6-hydroxydopamine significantly reduced the number of emetic episodes and delayed the onset time to the first episode, ..cap alpha..-Methyl-p-tyrosine caused no significant changes. The effectiveness of 6-hydroxydopamine indicates that catecholaminergic neurons are involved in radioemesis, whereas haloperidol and phenothiazine-derivative tranquilizers inhibit radiomesis by blocking catecholamine receptor neurons.

  7. Effects of water immersion on plasma catecholamines in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Johnson, G.; Denunzio, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine whether water immersion to the neck (NI) alters plasma catecholamines in normal humans. Eight normal subjects were studied during a seated control study (C) and during 4 hr of NI, and the levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) as determined by radioenzymatic assay were measured hourly. Results show that despite the induction of a marked natriuresis and diuresis indicating significant central hypervolemia, NI failed to alter plasma NE or E levels compared with those of either C or the corresponding prestudy 1.5 hr. In addition, the diuresis and natriuresis was found to vary independently of NE. These results indicate that the response of the sympathetic nervous system to acute volume alteration may differ from the reported response to chronic volume expansion.

  8. Phagocytic function in cyclists: correlation with catecholamines and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Ortega Rincón, E; Marchena, J M; García, J J; Schmidt, A; Schulz, T; Malpica, I; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C; Michna, H; Lötzerich, H

    2001-09-01

    Flow cytometer measurements were made of the basal variations in peripheral blood functional monocytes and granulocytes over the course of a training season (January to November) of a cycling team. Parallel determinations were made of plasma concentration of catecholamines (chromatography) and cortisol (RIA) in a search for neuroendocrine markers. The results showed the greatest phagocytic capacity to occur in the central months (March, May, and July), coinciding with the greatest number and highest level of competitive events with good correlation with a peak in epinephrine during these months (r(2) = 0.998 for monocytes and r(2) = 0.674 for granulocytes). No good correlations were found between phagocytosis and norepinephrine or cortisol. The highest values for phagocytosis and epinephrine concentration were found in May. These results suggest that blood epinephrine concentration could be a good neuroendocrine marker of sportspeople's phagocytic response. PMID:11509500

  9. A more sensitive and specific radioenzymatic assay for catecholamines

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B.; Ziegler, M.G. )

    1990-01-01

    This modification of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) based radioenzymatic assay for norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) improves sensitivity, selectivity and eliminates many inhibitors of COMT. Prior to assay, samples are extracted into heptane with diphenylborate, then into dilute acetic acid. This extraction procedure has an efficiency of 78% for NE but less than 2% for S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). The extraction procedure also excludes calcium and other COMT inhibitors present in urine, plasma and every tissue tested. This eliminates the requirement for individual standardization of tissue and urine samples. Sensitivity of the assay for NE and E is 10 and 6 pg/ml respectively in 1 ml of plasma. The intraassay coefficients of variation for NE and E are 4 and 13% and the interassay coefficients of variation for NE and E are 10 and 16% in a human plasma sample containing low catecholamine levels. The assay permits quantitation of plasma E levels that were undetectable in prior assays.

  10. Developmental Neurotoxicity: Some Old and New Issues

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Gennaro; Costa, Lucio G.

    2012-01-01

    The developing central nervous system is often more vulnerable to injury than the adult one. Of the almost 200 chemicals known to be neurotoxic, many are developmental neurotoxicants. Exposure to these compounds in utero or during childhood can contribute to a variety of neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders. Two established developmental neurotoxicants, methylmercury and lead, and two classes of chemicals, the polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants and the organophosphorus insecticides, which are emerging as potential developmental neurotoxicants, are discussed in this paper. Developmental neurotoxicants may also cause silent damage, which would manifest itself only as the individual ages, and may contribute to neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's diseases. Guidelines for developmental neurotoxicity testing have been implemented, but there is still room for their improvement and for searching and validating alternative testing approaches. PMID:23724296

  11. Melatonin Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wongprayoon, Pawaris; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an illegal psycho-stimulant, is widely known as a recreational drug. In addition to its addictive effect, METH induces neurotoxicity via multiple mechanisms. The major contributors to METH-induced neurotoxicity are reactive oxygen species, which lead to cell death through apoptotic pathway and disturbances in mitochondria, the generation of neuroinflammation, and autophagy. Melatonin, a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, is a potent antioxidant compound that plays a beneficial role by protecting against the oxidative stress caused by METH. Melatonin also plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. Nanomolar concentrations of melatonin have been shown to protect against the inflammation caused by METH and to prevent the decrease in neurogenesis caused by METH in progenitor cells obtained from adult rat hippocampal tissue. The intent of this review is to describe the underlying mechanisms involving melatonin that protect against the neurodegeneration caused by METH. PMID:25248807

  12. Environmental neurotoxicity of chemicals and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, M.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Epidemiologic and societal concerns continue to stimulate studies in the field of environmental neurotoxicology. Although the role of heavy metals, aluminum, and iron are unclear in the etiology of human neurodegenerative disorders, these toxins have provided fertile ground for in vivo and in vitro experimental studies to elucidate their role in neurotoxic injury. Experimental models of clinical syndromes are discussed with special relevance to developmental neurotoxicology. Cycloleucine, tellurium, and 1,3-dinitrobenzene provide models of subacute combined degeneration, primary peripheral nerve demyelination, and thiamine deficiency-like lesions, respectively. Increasing attention is being given to irradiation neurotoxicity, especially in the developing or young central nervous system. A fuller understanding of the pathogenesis of low-dose irradiation injury allows for a clearer understanding of its neurobiology and also provides a more rational approach to understanding an interventional therapy associated with brain irradiation for childhood neoplasia. 43 refs.

  13. Glutamate neurotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Calissano, P; Bobba, A; Giannattasio, S; Marra, E; Passarella, S

    2001-05-18

    The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate plays a major role in determining certain neurological disorders. This situation, referred to as 'glutamate neurotoxicity' (GNT), is characterized by an increasing damage of cell components, including mitochondria, leading to cell death. In the death process, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated. The present study describes the state of art in the field of GNT with a special emphasis on the oxidative stress and mitochondria. In particular, we report how ROS are generated and how they affect mitochondrial function in GNT. The relationship between ROS generation and cytochrome c release is described in detail, with the released cytochrome c playing a role in the cell defense mechanism against neurotoxicity. PMID:11376653

  14. Persistent Mobility Disability After Neurotoxic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The impact of cancer and its treatments on balance and functional mobility in older adults remains unknown but is increasingly important, given the evolution of cancer treatments. Subacute and more persistent side effects such as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy are on the rise, and the effects on mobility and balance, as well as the prognosis for resolution of any functional deficits, must be established before interventions can be trialed. The purpose of this case report is to describe the severity and long-term persistence of mobility decline in an older adult who received neurotoxic chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe an older adult with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy using results of standardized balance and mobility tests and to focus on prognosis by repeating these measures more than 2 years after chemotherapy. Case Description An 81-year-old woman received a neurotoxic agent (paclitaxel) after curative mastectomy for breast cancer. Baseline testing prior to taxane therapy revealed a socially active woman with no reported functional deficits or neuropathic symptoms, 1.2-m/s gait speed, and performance at the ceiling on balance and gait portions of a standardized mobility measure. Outcomes After 3 cycles, paclitaxel therapy was stopped by the oncologist because of neurotoxicity. Declines as large as 50% were seen in performance-based measures at 12 weeks and persisted at 2.5 years, and the patient reported recurrent falls, cane use, and mobility-related disability. Discussion This case highlights the extent to which function can decline in an older individual receiving neurotoxic chemotherapy, the potential for these deficits to persist years after treatment is stopped, and the need for physical therapy intervention and further research in this population. PMID:20813818

  15. Catecholamines and in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria: enhancement of growth varies greatly among bacterial species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Aviles, Hernan; Vance, Monique; Fountain, Kimberly; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of a range of bacterial species, including anaerobes. Bacteria tested included: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteriodes fragilis, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnie, Enterobacter Sp, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The results of the current study indicated that supplementation of bacterial cultures in minimal medium with norepinephrine or epinephrine did not result in increased growth of bacteria. Positive controls involving treatment of Escherichia coli with catecholamines did result in increased growth of that bacterial species. The results of the present study extend previous observations that showed differential capability of catecholamines to enhance bacterial growth in vitro.

  16. Rescue therapy with terlipressin by continuous infusion in a child with catecholamine-resistant septic shock.

    PubMed

    Zeballos, Gonzalo; López-Herce, Jesús; Fernández, Carmen; Brandstrup, Kay B; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A 2-month-old female infant presented with septic shock, refractory to high doses of catecholamines. Continuous infusion of terlipressin at a rate of 10 mcg/kgh produced a significant increase in the mean arterial pressure that was evident within half and hour, so allowing a reduction in the rate of catecholamine infusion. However, 18 h later, the blood pressure fell again and finally the patient died. This case shows the potential value of terlipressin infusion to restore normal mean arterial pressure in children with vasodilatory shock and hypotension refractory to catecholamines. PMID:16325320

  17. Optical fiber biosensor based on enzymatic coating matrix for catecholamines assessment in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Lurdes I. B.; Freitas, Ana C.; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A. P.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, Armando C.

    2010-09-01

    An optical fiber (OF) biosensor has been developed and applied for simultaneous determination of catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine) in human urine. The developed analytical device shows a high potential for catecholamines quantification with a detection limit of 2.1, 2.6 and 3.4 pg mL-1 for dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine, respectively. The analytical performance of the OF biosensor was found to be similar to that of the High Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrochemical Detector (HPLC-ED) regarding catecholamines determination in samples of human urine.

  18. Neurotoxicity of Acrylamide in Exposed Workers

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Manuela; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Puglisi, Valentina; Vinciguerra, Luisa; Vacante, Marco; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a water-soluble chemical used in different industrial and laboratory processes. ACR monomer is neurotoxic in humans and laboratory animals. Subchronic exposure to this chemical causes neuropathies, hands and feet numbness, gait abnormalities, muscle weakness, ataxia, skin and in some cases, cerebellar alterations. ACR neurotoxicity involves mostly the peripheral but also the central nervous system, because of damage to the nerve terminal through membrane fusion mechanisms and tubulovescicular alterations. Nevertheless, the exact action mechanism is not completely elucidated. In this paper we have reviewed the current literature on its neurotoxicity connected to work-related ACR exposure. We have analyzed not only the different pathogenetic hypotheses focusing on possible neuropathological targets, but also the critical behavior of ACR poisoning. In addition we have evaluated the ACR-exposed workers case studies. Despite all the amount of work which have being carried out on this topic more studies are necessary to fully understand the pathogenetic mechanisms, in order to propose suitable therapies. PMID:23985770

  19. GSK3β in Ethanol Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy is a significant public health problem and may result in a wide range of adverse outcomes for the child. The developing central nervous system (CNS) is particularly susceptible to ethanol toxicity. Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) have a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and neurological impairments. FASD currently represents the leading cause of mental retardation in North America ahead of Down syndrome and cerebral palsy. Ethanol exposure during development causes multiple abnormalities in the brain such as permanent loss of neurons, ectopic neurons, and alterations in synaptogenesis and myelinogenesis. These alcohol-induced structural alterations in the developing brain underlie many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of ethanol neurotoxicity, however, remain unclear. Ethanol elicits cellular stresses, including oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a multifunctional serine/ threonine kinase, responds to various cellular stresses. GSK3β is particularly abundant in the developing CNS, and regulates diverse developmental events in the immature brain, such as neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation, migration, and survival. Available evidence indicates that the activity of GSK3β in the CNS is affected by ethanol. GSK3β inhibition provides protection against ethanol neurotoxicity, whereas high GSK3β activity/expression sensitizes neuronal cells to ethanol-induced damages. It appears that GSK3β is a converging signaling point that mediates some of ethanol’s neurotoxic effects. PMID:19507062

  20. A Case of Neurotoxicity Following 5-Fluorouracil-based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Seung Seog; Jeong, Jin Mo; Kim, Seong Ho; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Lee, Jin Hyuk; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, You Cheol; Lee, Jhin Oh; Hong, Young Joon

    2002-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent. However, its neurotoxicity is rare and not well recognized. We report a case of 5-FU neurotoxicity with organic brain syndrome and progression to multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a 44-year-old male patient having malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor. 5-FU-induced neurotoxicity should, therefore, be considered as an important differential diagnosis in cancer patients with neurological abnormality and history of chemotherapy. PMID:12014219

  1. The effect of uncouplers on catecholamine incorporation by vesicles of chromaffin granules.

    PubMed Central

    Bashford, C L; Casey, R P; Radda, G K; Ritchie, G A

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that uncouplers inhibit the incorporation of catecholamines by vesicles of chromaffin granules in parallel with their stimulatory effect on the membrane-bound adenosine triphosphatase. PMID:125589

  2. Reversible cardiogenic shock due to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy: a variant of takotsubo?

    PubMed

    Law, Catherine; Khaliq, Asma; Guglin, Maya

    2013-11-01

    Catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, including takotsubo, neurogenic stunned myocardium, and pheochromocytoma-related cardiomyopathy, is a reversible and generally benign condition. We are reporting a case series of young women who had cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema due to severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which completely recovered in the course of 2 to 3 weeks. Both patients had high catecholamine levels, due to pheochromocytoma in the first case and due to intravenous high-dose catecholamines in the second case. We suggest that screening for pheochromocytoma should be considered in patients who present with takotsubo cardiomyopathy without obvious cause. Most importantly, widely used intravenous catecholamines may cause severe transient left ventricular dysfunction, and consideration should be given to noncatecholamine vasopressors. PMID:23810075

  3. Effect of dietary copper and sucrose on catecholamine concentrations in the adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, S.I.; Peterson, D.F.; Mason, P.A. KCOM, Kirksville, MO Air Force/SAM/RZP, Brooks AFB, TX )

    1991-03-11

    The severity of copper (Cu) deficiency in the rat is enhanced by dietary sucrose. Possible interactive effects of Cu status and sucrose on catecholamine concentrations in the adrenal medulla were investigated in Cu deficient rats fed a diet were investigated in Cu deficient rats fed a diet containing either glucose or sucrose, as compared with respective Cu-adequate controls. Catecholamines were analyzed by an HPLC method using 3,4-dihydroxybenxylamine as the internal standard. Cu deficiency caused pronounced decreases in norepinephrine and epinephrine, with no significant effect on dopamine, as expressed in nmoles/mg tissue. Dietary sucrose showed no appreciable effect on catecholamines in the adrenal medulla. The adrenal glands were markedly enlarged in Cu-deficient rats, whether fed glucose or sucrose. Adrenal weights were not affected by dietary sucrose. Data indicate that the increased severity of copper deficiency due to sucrose feeding is not associated with changes in adrenal catecholamine output.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF ATRAZINE IN PC12 CELLS AND MODULATION OF CATECHOLAMINE SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously, we reported that atrazine disrupts ovarian function by altering hypothalamic catecholamine (CA) concentrations and the consequent regulation of pituitary LH release and prolactin secretion in the young female rat. We also showed that atrazine directly interacts with t...

  5. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors for determination of catecholamine neurotransmitters: A review.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, José A; Fernandes, Paula M V; Pereira, Carlos M; Silva, F

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the state of the art of electrochemical devices for the detection of an important class of neurotransmitters: the catecholamines. This class of biogenic amines includes dopamine, noradrenaline (also called norepinephrine) and adrenaline (also called epinephrine). Researchers have focused on the role of catecholamine molecules within the human body because they are involved in many important biological functions and are commonly associated with several diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson. Furthermore, the release of catecholamines as a consequence of induced stimulus is an important indicator of reward-related behaviors, such as food, drink, sex and drug addiction. Thus, the development of simple, fast and sensitive electroanalytical methodologies for the determination of catecholamines is currently needed in clinical and biomedical fields, as they have the potential to serve as clinically relevant biomarkers for specific disease states or to monitor treatment efficacy. Currently, three main strategies have used by researchers to detect catecholamine molecules, namely: the use electrochemical materials in combination with, for example, HPLC or FIA, the incorporation of new materials/layers on the sensor surfaces (Tables 1-7) and in vivo detection, manly by using FSCV at CFMEs (Section 10). The developed methodologies were able not only to accurately detect catecholamines at relevant concentration levels, but to do so in the presence of co-existing interferences in samples detected (ascorbate, for example). This review examines the progress made in electrochemical sensors for the selective detection of catecholamines in the last 15 years, with special focus on highly innovative features introduced by nanotechnology. As the literature in rather extensive, we try to simplify this work by summarizing and grouping electrochemical sensors according to the manner their substrates were chemically modified. We also discuss the current and future

  6. Neurotoxicity and efficacy of arteether related to its exposure times and exposure levels in rodents.

    PubMed

    Li, Q G; Mog, S R; Si, Y Z; Kyle, D E; Gettayacamin, M; Milhous, W K

    2002-05-01

    The neurotoxicity of beta-arteether (AE) is related to drug accumulation in blood due to slow and prolonged absorption from the intramuscular injection sites. In this efficacy and toxicity study of AE, the traditional sesame oil vehicle was replaced with cremophore to decrease the accumulation and toxicity of AE. Dihydroartemisinin (DQHS), a more toxic and active metabolite of AE, was also analyzed. When administered at a daily dosage of 25 mg/kg for seven days, blood accumulation of AE with sesame oil (AESO) was used had a 7.5-fold higher area under the curve (AUC) (on last versus first day dosing), while AE with cremophore (AECM) had only a 1.8-fold higher AUC. Although the accumulation of AECM was greatly reduced, its total exposure level (46.29 microg x h/ml) was 2.7-fold higher than with AESO (16.92 microg x h/ml) due to a higher bioavailability of AECM (74.5%) compared with AESO (20.3%). Total exposure time (calculated at over the minimal detected neurotoxicity level of 41.32 ng/ml) of AECM was 103 hours during the whole treatment period (192 hours), which was more than one-third (37%) less than with AESO (162 hours). Similar pharmacokinetic results were also shown with the active metabolite, DQHS. Anorexia and gastrointestinal toxicity with AESO were significantly more severe than with AECM (P < 0.001). Histopathologic examination of the brain demonstrated neurotoxic changes; the AESO rat group was significantly more severe than the AECM rat group. The brain injury scores with AECM were mild to moderate (2.3-3.0), and with AESO they were moderate to severe (3.0-4.7) on day 7 and day 10, respectively. In addition, the results of a 50% cure dose (CD50) against Plasmodium berghei in mice were 34.1 mg/kg for AESO and 14.2 mg/kg for AECM, indicating a significant higher efficacy was found in the AECM animals. Toxicity and efficacy of DQHS were also dependent on its exposure time and level, which was the same as its parent drug (AE). In conclusion, following the

  7. Simultaneous amperometric measurement of ascorbate and catecholamine secretion from individual bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Cahill, P S; Wightman, R M

    1995-08-01

    Secretion of ascorbate and catecholamines from single bovine adrenal medullary cells has been detected with amperometry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes. Two carbon-fiber electrodes were employed. One was beveled, and voltammograms at this electrode showed overlap of the responses for ascorbate and the catecholamines. The other was beveled and electrochemically oxidized to shift the ascorbate oxidation wave to potentials more negative than that of the catecholamines. Thus, at an applied potential of 0.05 V vs SSCE, ascorbate was selectively oxidized at the treated electrode and both catecholamines and ascorbate were oxidized at an applied potential of 0.65 V at the untreated electrode. Exocytotic release from the cell was stimulated with K+, nicotine, and digitonin. Nicotine and K+ depolarize the cell membrane and elicit vesicular release. Digitonin is a detergent that reacts with cholesterol in the plasma membrane and causes the formation of pores. Ascorbate efflux from individual cells could be induced by digitonin but not by K+ or nicotine and was observed as a single peak with a full width at half-maximum of 4 s. In contrast, catecholamine release was observed as many rapid, sequential current spikes when the cell was exposed to either digitonin, K+, or nicotine. The two different types of release show that ascorbate and catecholamines are being released from two different cellular compartments. The calcium independence of the digitonin-induced ascorbate release provides additional evidence that ascorbate is released by a nonexocytotic process. PMID:8849026

  8. Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers as new sizing agents for fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Jea Uk; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers (polydopamine and polynorepinephrine) were coated on the surface of carbon and glass fibers in order to increase the interfacial shear strength between fibers and polymer matrix, and consequently the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced composites. By utilizing adhesive characteristic of the catecholamine polymer, fiber-reinforced composites can become mechanically stronger than conventional composites. Since the catecholamine polymer is easily constructed on the surface by the simultaneous polymerization of its monomer under a weak basic circumstance, it can be readily coated on micro-fibers by a simple dipping process without any complex chemical treatments. Also, catecholamines can increase the surface free energy of micro-fibers and therefore, can give better wettability to epoxy resin. Therefore, catecholamine polymers can be used as versatile and effective surface modifiers for both carbon and glass fibers. Here, catecholamine-coated carbon and glass fibers exhibited higher interfacial shear strength (37 and 27% increases, respectively) and their plain woven composites showed improved interlaminar shear strength (13 and 9% increases, respectively) compared to non-coated fibers and composites.

  9. A review of pharmacological and toxicological potentials of marine cyanobacterial metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, M; Maruthanayagam, V; Sundararaman, M

    2012-03-01

    Novel toxic metabolites from marine cyanobacteria have been thoroughly explored. Biologically active and chemically diverse compounds that could be hepatotoxic, neurotoxic or cytotoxic, such as cyclic peptides, lipopeptides, fatty acid amides, alkaloids and saccharides, have been produced from marine cyanobacteria. Many reports have revealed that biosynthesis of active metabolites is predominant during cyanobacterial bloom formation. Marine cyanobacterial toxic metabolites exhibit important biological properties, such as interfering in signal transduction either by activation or blockage of sodium channels or by targeting signaling proteins; inducing apoptosis by disrupting cytoskeletal proteins; and inhibiting membrane transporters, receptors, serine proteases and topoisomerases. The pharmacological importance of these metabolites resides in their proliferation and growth-controlling abilities towards cancer cell lines and disease-causing potent microbial agents (bacteria, virus, fungi and protozoa). Besides their toxic and pharmacological potentials, the present review discusses structural and functional resemblance of marine cyanobacterial metabolites to marine algae, sponges and mollusks. PMID:21910132

  10. Valacyclovir and Acyclovir Neurotoxicity With Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Hoskote, Sumedh S; Annapureddy, Narender; Ramesh, Atul K; Rose, Keith; Jones, James P

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 52-year-old man with hypertension, diastolic congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis 3 times a week and a remote history of a hemorrhagic stroke who presented to the emergency department with a vesicular rash on his left arm. The rash was observed to be in a dermatomal distribution, and a diagnosis of herpes zoster was made. The patient was discharged home on valacyclovir 1 g 3 times a day for a duration of 7 days. The patient took 2 doses of valacyclovir before presenting to the hospital again with irritability and hallucinations. Over the next several days, the patient's neurologic status declined and he became disoriented and increasingly somnolent. Because of a concern for varicella zoster virus (VZV) or herpes simplex virus (HSV) meningoencephalitis, acyclovir was initiated intravenously at 600 mg (10 mg/kg) for every 12 hours. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain failed to reveal an acute process. Electroencephalogram was interpreted as seizure activity versus metabolic encephalopathy. Lumbar puncture was not suggestive for meningitis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or HSV/VZV infection. The patient subsequently had a witnessed seizure during dialysis and was felt to have status epilepticus due to acyclovir and valacyclovir neurotoxicity. The patient underwent daily hemodialysis for removal of the drug and eventually made a full neurologic recovery. Our case highlights that acyclovir neurotoxicity can result in status epilepticus, hallucinations, and altered consciousness. Differentiating acyclovir neurotoxicity from HSV or VZV meningoencephalitis is of crucial importance because the symptoms are similar but the management is vastly different. PMID:24368610

  11. Does diisocyanate exposure result in neurotoxicity?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Context Diisocyanates have been associated with respiratory and dermal sensitization. Limited number of case reports, and a few case studies, media, and other references suggest potential neurotoxic effects from exposures to toluene diisocyanate (TDI), 1,6 hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), and methylene diisocyanate (MDI). However, a systematic review of the literature evaluating the causal association on humans does not exist to support this alleged association. Objective To perform systematic review examining the body of epidemiologic evidence and provide assessment of causal association based on principles of the Sir Austin Bradford Hill criteria or considerations for causal analysis. Methods A comprehensive search of public databases for published abstracts, case reports, cross-sectional surveys, and cohort studies using key search terms was conducted. Additional searches included regulatory reviews, EU IUCLID and EU Risk Assessment databases, and unpublished reports in the International Isocyanate Institute database. An expert panel consisting of physicians, toxicologists, and an epidemiologist critically reviewed accepted papers, providing examination of epidemiologic evidence of each report. Finally, the Hill criteria for causation were applied to the summative analysis of identified reports to estimate probability of causal association. Results Twelve papers reporting exposed populations with a variety of neurological symptoms or findings suitable for analysis were identified, including eleven case or case series reports, and one cross-sectional study. Three papers reported on the same population. Each of the papers was limited by paucity of diisocyanate exposure estimates, the presence of confounding exposures to known or suspected neurotoxicants, a lack of objective biological measures of exposure or neurotoxic effects, and lack of relative strength of association measures. Additionally, reported health symptoms and syndromes lacked consistency or

  12. Irrelevant stimulus processing in ADHD: catecholamine dynamics and attentional networks

    PubMed Central

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Ossandón, Tomás; Zamorano, Francisco; Palma, Bárbara; Carrasco, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    A cardinal symptom of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a general distractibility where children and adults shift their attentional focus to stimuli that are irrelevant to the ongoing behavior. This has been attributed to a deficit in dopaminergic signaling in cortico-striatal networks that regulate goal-directed behavior. Furthermore, recent imaging evidence points to an impairment of large scale, antagonistic brain networks that normally contribute to attentional engagement and disengagement, such as the task-positive networks and the default mode network (DMN). Related networks are the ventral attentional network (VAN) involved in attentional shifting, and the salience network (SN) related to task expectancy. Here we discuss the tonic–phasic dynamics of catecholaminergic signaling in the brain, and attempt to provide a link between this and the activities of the large-scale cortical networks that regulate behavior. More specifically, we propose that a disbalance of tonic catecholamine levels during task performance produces an emphasis of phasic signaling and increased excitability of the VAN, yielding distractibility symptoms. Likewise, immaturity of the SN may relate to abnormal tonic signaling and an incapacity to build up a proper executive system during task performance. We discuss different lines of evidence including pharmacology, brain imaging and electrophysiology, that are consistent with our proposal. Finally, restoring the pharmacodynamics of catecholaminergic signaling seems crucial to alleviate ADHD symptoms; however, the possibility is open to explore cognitive rehabilitation strategies to top-down modulate network dynamics compensating the pharmacological deficits. PMID:24723897

  13. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.K.; Cotecchia, S.; Hagen, P.O. )

    1991-08-01

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 {plus minus} 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  14. Role of adrenal catecholamines in cerebrovasodilation evoked from brain stem

    SciTech Connect

    Iadecola, C.; Lacombe, P.M.; Underwood, M.D.; Ishitsuka, T.; Reis, D.J.

    1987-06-01

    The authors studied whether adrenal medullary catecholamines (CAs) contribute to the metabolically linked increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal medullary reticular formation (DMRF). Rats were anesthetized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated. The DMRF was electrically stimulated with intermittent trains of pulses through microelectrodes stereotaxically implanted. Blood gases were controlled and, during stimulation, arterial pressure was maintained within the autoregulated range for rCBF. rCBF and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were determined in homogenates of brain regions by using (/sup 14/C)iodoantipyrine and ..cap alpha..-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), respectively, as tracers. Plasma CAs (epinephrine and norepinephrine) were measured radioenzymatically. DMRF stimulation increased rCBF throughout the brain and elevated plasma CAs substantially. Acute bilateral adrenalectomy abolished the increase in plasma epinephrine, reduced the increases in flow in cerebral cortex, and abolished them elsewhere in brain. They conclude that the increases in rCBF elicited from the DMRF has two components, one dependent on, and the other independent of CAs. Since the BBB is impermeable to CAs and DMRF stimulation fails to open the BBB, the results suggest that DMRF stimulations allows, through a mechanism not yet determined, circulating CAs to act on brain and affect brain function.

  15. GPCRs of adrenal chromaffin cells & catecholamines: The plot thickens.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Brill, Ava; McCrink, Katie A

    2016-08-01

    The circulating catecholamines (CAs) epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) derive from two major sources in the whole organism: the sympathetic nerve endings, which release NE on effector organs, and the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, which are cells that synthesize, store and release Epi (mainly) and NE. All of the Epi in the body and a significant amount of circulating NE derive from the adrenal medulla. The secretion of CAs from adrenal chromaffin cells is regulated in a complex way by a variety of membrane receptors, the vast majority of which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including adrenergic receptors (ARs), which act as "presynaptic autoreceptors" in this regard. There is a plethora of CA-secretagogue signals acting on these receptors but some of them, most notably the α2ARs, inhibit CA secretion. Over the past few years, however, a few new proteins present in chromaffin cells have been uncovered to participate in CA secretion regulation. Most prominent among these are GRK2 and β-arrestin1, which are known to interact with GPCRs regulating receptor signaling and function. The present review will discuss the molecular and signaling mechanisms by which adrenal chromaffin cell-residing GPCRs and their regulatory proteins modulate CA synthesis and secretion. Particular emphasis will be given to the newly discovered roles of GRK2 and β-arrestins in these processes and particular points of focus for future research will be highlighted, as well. PMID:26851510

  16. Prefrontal/accumbal catecholamine system processes high motivational salience

    PubMed Central

    Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    Motivational salience regulates the strength of goal seeking, the amount of risk taken, and the energy invested from mild to extreme. Highly motivational experiences promote highly persistent memories. Although this phenomenon is adaptive in normal conditions, experiences with extremely high levels of motivational salience can promote development of memories that can be re-experienced intrusively for long time resulting in maladaptive outcomes. Neural mechanisms mediating motivational salience attribution are, therefore, very important for individual and species survival and for well-being. However, these neural mechanisms could be implicated in attribution of abnormal motivational salience to different stimuli leading to maladaptive compulsive seeking or avoidance. We have offered the first evidence that prefrontal cortical norepinephrine (NE) transmission is a necessary condition for motivational salience attribution to highly salient stimuli, through modulation of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain area involved in all motivated behaviors. Moreover, we have shown that prefrontal-accumbal catecholamine (CA) system determines approach or avoidance responses to both reward- and aversion-related stimuli only when the salience of the unconditioned stimulus (UCS) is high enough to induce sustained CA activation, thus affirming that this system processes motivational salience attribution selectively to highly salient events. PMID:22754514

  17. Fiber-optic evanescent wave biosensor of catecholamine neurotransmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yexiang; Ran, Yong; Xu, Shunqing

    2001-09-01

    Using quartz fiber-immobilized laccase, detection of catecholamine neurotransmitter is described in this work. Laccase is immobilized on the fiber-optic by means of 3- aminopropyltriethoxysilane/glutaraldehyde method. The oxidation products of adrenalin catalyzed by laccade would absorb the fiber-optic evanescent wave according to the products' concentration. The optimal detection range of this fiber-optic biosensor is between 50-250ng/ml. The minimum detection limit is 10ng/ml. The analysis can provide results in only two minutes to detect one sample. Finally, the specificity of the biosensor is high. The special interference of other substrates of laccase such as o- phyenylenediamine (OPD) and benzenediol can be removed by controlling the pH of the reaction buffer. When the OPD concentration is 100ng/ml, the relative error is only 6.3 percent. On the other hand, the non-special interference is removed by employing double-channel differential method.

  18. Neural correlates of sleepiness induced by catecholamine depletion

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Noah; Fromm, Stephen; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Drevets, Wayne C.; Hasler, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Although extensive indirect evidence exists to suggest that the central dopaminergic system plays a significant role in the modulation of arousal, the functional effect of the dopaminergic influence on the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle remains unclear. Thirteen healthy volunteers and 15 unmedicated subjects with a history of major depressive disorder underwent catecholamine depletion (CD) using oral alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. The main outcome measures in both sessions were sleepiness (Stanford-Sleepiness-Scale), cerebral glucose metabolism (positron emission tomography), and serum prolactin concentration. CD consistently induced clinically relevant sleepiness in both groups (p<0.0001). The CD-induced prolactin increase correlated with CD-induced sleepiness (r=0.71, p<0.0001) but not with CD-induced mood and anxiety symptoms (p≥0.2). CD-induced sleepiness correlated with CD-induced increases in metabolism in the medial and orbital frontal cortex, bilateral superior temporal cortex, left insula, cingulate motor area and in the vicinity of the periaqueductal gray. This study suggests that the association between dopamine depletion and sleepiness is independent of the brain reward system and the risk for depression. The visceromotor system, the cingulate motor area, the periaqueductal gray and the caudal hypothalamus may mediate the impact of the dopaminergic system on regulation of wakefulness and sleep. PMID:21872452

  19. The avian allantois: a depot for stress-released catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Epple, A; Gill, T S; Nibbio, B

    1992-03-01

    Plasma and amniotic and allantoic fluid of 10- and 14-day-old chicken embryos contain free dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (E). Compared with postnatal chickens, concentrations of DA and E in the plasma are very high, and they are even higher in the allantoic fluid. In contrast, the allantoic concentration of NE is below the plasma level. In the amniotic fluid, the concentrations of all three catecholamines (CAs) are below the plasma levels. High concentrations of DA and E in the allantoic fluid after opening of the egg shell decline during the following 24 hr, which indicates that they are due to stress. Asphyxia, handling, disturbance of allantoic fluid, and cooling are also perceived as stress and are followed by immediate accumulation of CAs in the allantoic fluid. DA and E respond to stress in like manner, while NE often responds with an opposite trend. It appears that the avian allantois, in addition to its role in respiration and urea disposal, also serves the instant CA removal from the circulation. Both the amniotic and the allantoic membranes of the chicken should be ideal models for the study of CA transport mechanisms. PMID:1577247

  20. Secretory patterns of catecholamines in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Nozawa, Aoi; Ueda, Keiichi; Bungo, Takashi; Terao, Hiromi; Asahina, Kiyoshi

    2012-05-15

    Catecholamines (CAs), namely adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), and dopamine (DA), are secreted by the sympathoadrenal system and participate in a diverse array of functions, e.g., heat production, cardiovascular regulation, stress response and so on. However, little is known regarding peripheral CA fluctuations in cetaceans; nevertheless aquatic animals like them have needed to modify their physiological response especially for thermoregulation in water and oxygen economy during diving. To understand CA dynamism in cetaceans, diurnal changes in serum A, NA, and DA concentrations were measured during the winter and summer solstices in four Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus). The average serum NA concentration was much higher than the average A and DA concentrations, and all concentrations were higher than those reported in other cetacean species. No distinct diurnal fluctuations were observed in CA concentrations in either solstice, suggesting inhibition of the decrease in CA concentrations during nocturnal periods by the unique sleep pattern of dolphins. All the serum CA concentrations were negatively correlated with water temperature as body temperatures were, indicating that the sympathoadrenal system might be more active during winter than in summer season, suggesting a role of CA in thermoregulation. PMID:22405705

  1. Characterization of the catecholamine uptake system in PC12

    SciTech Connect

    Koide, M.

    1988-01-01

    The catecholamine uptake system of PC12 was characterized. PC12 cells took up both norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) from the external medium. Uptake of both substances had Na/sup +/-dependent and Na/sup +/-independent portions. The Na/sup +/-dependent portion followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For NE the K/sub m/ was 0.5 ..mu..M, and the V/sub max/ was 2.7 pmol min/sup -1/ (mg protein)/sup -1/. For DA the K/sub m/ was 0.2 ..mu..M and the V/sub max/ was 3.8 pmol min/sup -1/ (mg protein)/sup -1/. The uptake of both substances was inhibited by desmethylimipramine with an IC/sub 50/ of 0.01 ..mu..M and by benztropine with an IC/sub 50/ of 1 ..mu..M. These results suggest that NE and DA are transported by the same uptake system. Xylamine (N-2-chloroethyl-N-ethyl-2-methylbenzylamine) irreversibly inhibited the NE uptake (IC/sub 50/ = 15 ..mu..M). This inhibitions was Na/sup +/-dependent and was prevented by the coincubation of xylamine with cocaine or NE during the exposure of the cells to xylamine. These results indicate that xylamine must interact with the functioning NE uptake system to inhibit the uptake. PC12 accumulated (/sup 3/H)xylamine; this uptake had Na/sup +/-dependent and Na/sup +/-independent portions.

  2. Stress, allostatic load, catecholamines, and other neurotransmitters in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S

    2012-07-01

    As populations age, the prevalence of geriatric neurodegenerative diseases will increase. These diseases generally are multifactorial, arising from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities,treatments, and time. This essay provides a concept for the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases such as Parkinson disease, by considering them in the context of allostasis and allostatic load. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple,interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators—"homeostats". Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. "Allostatic load" refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of an idling car, the revolutions per minute of the engine can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states).Just as allostatic load (cumulative wear and tear) reflects design and manufacturing variations, byproducts of combustion,and time, eventually leading to engine breakdown,allostatic load in catecholaminergic neurons might eventually lead to Lewy body diseases. Central to the argument is that catecholaminergic neurons leak vesicular contents into the cytoplasm continuously during life and that catecholaminesin the neuronal cytoplasm are autotoxic. These neurons therefore depend on vesicular sequestration to limit autotoxicity of cytosolic transmitter. Parkinson disease might be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load, which depends on genetic predispositions,environmental exposures, repeated stress-related catecholamine release, and time. PMID:22297542

  3. LONG-LASTING LITHIUM NEUROTOXICITY IN AN ADOLESECENT

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Rakesh; Sethi, Sujata

    1993-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute lithium intoxication is well known. A case of long tasting lithium neurotoxicity in an adolescent male is reported, who showed signs of cerebellar as well as brain stem involvement. Persistent lithium neurotoxicity is discussed and the recommendation made that this condition be considered irreversible only if no substantial recovery occurs in the first six months. PMID:21743620

  4. 40 CFR 795.250 - Developmental neurotoxicity screen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Developmental neurotoxicity screen. 795.250 Section 795.250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROVISIONAL TEST GUIDELINES Provisional Health Effects Guidelines § 795.250 Developmental neurotoxicity screen....

  5. Clinical assessment of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sanjiv B

    2004-10-01

    The clinical assessment of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants remains difficult in the absence of a gestational age-specific total or free (unbound) bilirubin level that predicts bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. Because the total serum bilirubin concentration is an unreliable predictor of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants, alternative mean for predicting bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in jaundiced preterm newborns is needed. Over the last few years, we have witnessed substantial gain in our knowledge involving usefulness of bilirubin-binding variables (total bilirubin, free bilirubin, bilirubin:albumin molar ratio) for clinical assessment of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in preterm infants. The knowledge gained has provided impetus for more clinical studies that are geared toward confirming the usefulness of free bilirubin as a predictor of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity and identifying the gestational age-specific free bilirubin level that may increase the risk of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants. The paper has attempted to provide an overview of bilirubin-induced auditory toxicity along with the existing clinical evidence in favor of free bilirubin assay and usefulness of auditory brainstem evoked response for evaluation of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants. In addition, the author has described findings that suggest an association of apnea, a clinical manifestation, with acute bilirubin encephalopathy in premature infants. PMID:15686265

  6. 40 CFR 799.9620 - TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery... REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9620 TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery. (a) Scope. This... battery consists of a functional observational battery, motor activity, and neuropathology. The...

  7. 40 CFR 799.9620 - TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery... REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9620 TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery. (a) Scope. This... battery consists of a functional observational battery, motor activity, and neuropathology. The...

  8. 40 CFR 799.9620 - TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery... REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9620 TSCA neurotoxicity screening battery. (a) Scope. This... battery consists of a functional observational battery, motor activity, and neuropathology. The...

  9. Current Challenges in Neurotoxicity Risk Assessment [Poster 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxicity risk assessment must continue to evolve in parallel with advances in basic research. Along with this evolution is an expansion in the scope of neurotoxicity assessments of environmental health risks. Examples of this expansion include an increasing emphasis on compl...

  10. USING NEUROBLASTOMA CELL LINES TO EXAMINE ORGANOPHOSPHATE NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The need to deploy IN VITRO models to test neurotoxic scribes the use of by industry and government regulatory agencies. his research describes the neuroblastoma cell lines to address the relationship between esterase inhibition and neurotoxic outcome following exposure to organo...

  11. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (P<0.05 in all cases). The increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (P<0.001) and an elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (P<0.01), the other indices reflecting HF severity. There was a positive relationship between the increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all P<0.05). The association with noradrenaline remained significant also when adjusted for LVEF and plasma BNP, suggesting a significant contribution of adrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF. PMID:25903953

  12. Lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jia

    2010-01-01

    Lithium has long been used as a mood stabilizer in the treatment of manic-depressive (bipolar) disorder. Recent studies suggest that lithium has neuroprotective properties and may be useful in the treatment of acute brain injuries such as ischemia and chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. One of the most important neuroprotective properties of lithium is its anti-apoptotic action. Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are caused by maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy. FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. Ethanol exposure causes neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. Excessive alcohol consumption is also associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and neurodegeneration in the adult brain. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that lithium is able to ameliorate ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis. Lithium is an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) which has recently been identified as a mediator of ethanol neurotoxicity. Lithium's neuroprotection may be mediated by its inhibition of GSK3. In addition, lithium also affects many other signaling proteins and pathways that regulate neuronal survival and differentiation. This review discusses the recent evidence of lithium-mediated protection against ethanol neurotoxicity and potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:20661453

  13. Neurotoxicity of Dietary Supplements from Annonaceae Species.

    PubMed

    Höllerhage, Matthias; Rösler, Thomas W; Berjas, Magda; Luo, Rensheng; Tran, Kevin; Richards, Kristy M; Sabaa-Srur, Armando U; Maia, José Guilherme S; Moraes, Maria Rosa de; Godoy, Helena T; Höglinger, Günter U; Smith, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Dietary supplements containing plant materials of Annonaceae species (Annona muricata L., A. squamosa L., A. mucosa JACQ., A. squamosa × cherimola Mabb.) were extracted by hot, pressurized ethyl acetate and analyzed for their effect in vitro on Lund human mesencephalic neurons. Cell viability was measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and cell death was determined by lactate dehydrogenase levels. Three supplements strongly decreased the cell viability at extract concentrations of 1 µg/mL, of which 1 decreased cell viability at 0.1 µg/µL. Also, strong neuronal toxicities of these supplements were found. Cell death was observed at concentrations of 10 µg/mL. The degree of toxicity was comparable to the ones found in Annonaceous fruit extracts. Two fruit pulps of Annonaceae (A. muricata and A. squamosa) showed a reduction in cell viability at lower concentrations. The fruit pulp extract of A. muricata revealed the strongest neurotoxic effect, with 67% cell death at a concentration of 1 µg/mL. A high reduction in cell viability coupled with pronounced cell death was found at 0.1 µg/mL for an Annonaceous seed extract. These results demonstrate that the intake of dietary supplements containing plant material from Annonaceae may be hazardous to health in terms of neurotoxicity. PMID:26405269

  14. Meeting report: alternatives for developmental neurotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Lein, Pamela; Locke, Paul; Goldberg, Alan

    2007-05-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) is perceived by many stakeholders to be an area in critical need of alternatives to current animal testing protocols and guidelines. To address this need, the Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Toxicology Program are collaborating in a program called TestSmart DNT, the goals of which are to: (a) develop alternative methodologies for identifying and prioritizing chemicals and exposures that may cause developmental neurotoxicity in humans; (b) develop the policies for incorporating DNT alternatives into regulatory decision making; and (c) identify opportunities for reducing, refining, or replacing the use of animals in DNT. The first TestSmart DNT workshop was an open registration meeting held 13-15 March 2006 in Reston, Virginia. The primary objective was to bring together stakeholders (test developers, test users, regulators, and advocates for children's health, animal welfare, and environmental health) and individuals representing diverse disciplines (developmental neurobiology, toxicology, policy, and regulatory science) from around the world to share information and concerns relating to the science and policy of DNT. Individual presentations are available at the CAAT TestSmart website. This report provides a synthesis of workgroup discussions and recommendations for future directions and priorities, which include initiating a systematic evaluation of alternative models and technologies, developing a framework for the creation of an open database to catalog DNT data, and devising a strategy for harmonizing the validation process across international jurisdictional borders. PMID:17520065

  15. Neurotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles from metals.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Sharma, Aruna

    2012-02-01

    Human exposure to metal nanoparticles such as silver (Ag), copper (Cu) or aluminum (Al) is very common at work places involving automobile, aerospace industry, gun factories or defense related explosives making. Additional sources of exposure to engineered nanoparticles affecting human health are chemical, electronics and communication industries. The nanoparticles (ca. 20 to 120 nm) easily enter the body through inhalation and are deposited into various tissues and organs including brain, where they could stay there for long periods of time. However, the pathophysiological reactions of nanoparticles in vivo on brain function are still not well known. Previous observations from our laboratory showed that engineered nanoparticles from Ag, Cu or Al (50-60 nm) when administered through systemic or intracerebral routes in rats or mice induce neurotoxicity depending on their type, dose and duration of the exposure. These nanoparticles also altered sensory, motor and cognitive functions at the time of development of brain pathologies. Thus, neuronal, glial, axonal and endothelial cell damages are most pronounced following Ag and Cu intoxication as compared to Al in identical doses that are more pronounced in mice as compared to rats of similar age group. The functional significance of these findings and the probable mechanisms of metal nanoparticle-induced neurotoxicity are discussed in this review largely based on our own investigations. PMID:22229317

  16. The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale: Validation of a Brief Self-Report Measure of Antiepileptic-Drug-Related Neurotoxicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinsky, Martin C.; Storzbach, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale (PNS) is a brief patient-based survey of neurotoxicity complaints commonly encountered with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors present data on the validity of this scale, particularly when used in longitudinal studies. Participants included 55 healthy controls, 23 epilepsy patient controls, and 86…

  17. Differential expression of the regulated catecholamine secretory pathway in different hereditary forms of pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhofer, Graeme; Huynh, Thanh-Truc; Elkahloun, Abdel; Morris, John C.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Linehan, W. Marston; Zhuang, Zhengping; Balgley, Brian M.; Lee, Cheng S.; Mannelli, Massimo; Lenders, Jacques W. M.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Pacak, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas in patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) differ in the types and amounts of catecholamines produced and the resulting signs and symptoms. We hypothesized the presence of different processes of catecholamine release reflecting differential expression of components of the regulated secretory pathway among the two types of hereditary tumors. Differences in catecholamine secretion from tumors in patients with VHL syndrome (n = 47) and MEN 2 (n = 32) were examined using measurements of catecholamines in tumor tissue, urine, and plasma, the last of which was under baseline conditions in all subjects and in a subgroup of patients who received intravenous glucagon to provoke catecholamine release. Microarray and proteomics analyses, quantitative PCR, and Western blotting were used to assess expression of tumor tissue secretory pathway components. The rate constant for baseline catecholamine secretion was 20-fold higher in VHL than in MEN 2 tumors (0.359 ± 0.094 vs. 0.018 ± 0.009 day−1), but catecholamine release was responsive only to glucagon in MEN 2 tumors. Compared with tumors from MEN 2 patients, those from VHL patients were characterized by reduced expression of numerous components of the regulated secretory pathway (e.g., SNAP25, syntaxin, rabphilin 3A, annexin A7, calcium-dependent secretion activator). The mutation-dependent differences in expression of secretory pathway components indicate a more mature regulated secretory pathway in MEN 2 than VHL tumors. These data provide a unique mechanistic link to explain how variations in the molecular machinery governing exocytosis may contribute to clinical differences in the secretion of neurotransmitters or hormones and the subsequent presentation of a disease. PMID:18854424

  18. Differential expression of the regulated catecholamine secretory pathway in different hereditary forms of pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Eisenhofer, Graeme; Huynh, Thanh-Truc; Elkahloun, Abdel; Morris, John C; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Linehan, W Marston; Zhuang, Zhengping; Balgley, Brian M; Lee, Cheng S; Mannelli, Massimo; Lenders, Jacques W M; Bornstein, Stefan R; Pacak, Karel

    2008-11-01

    Pheochromocytomas in patients with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) differ in the types and amounts of catecholamines produced and the resulting signs and symptoms. We hypothesized the presence of different processes of catecholamine release reflecting differential expression of components of the regulated secretory pathway among the two types of hereditary tumors. Differences in catecholamine secretion from tumors in patients with VHL syndrome (n = 47) and MEN 2 (n = 32) were examined using measurements of catecholamines in tumor tissue, urine, and plasma, the last of which was under baseline conditions in all subjects and in a subgroup of patients who received intravenous glucagon to provoke catecholamine release. Microarray and proteomics analyses, quantitative PCR, and Western blotting were used to assess expression of tumor tissue secretory pathway components. The rate constant for baseline catecholamine secretion was 20-fold higher in VHL than in MEN 2 tumors (0.359 +/- 0.094 vs. 0.018 +/- 0.009 day(-1)), but catecholamine release was responsive only to glucagon in MEN 2 tumors. Compared with tumors from MEN 2 patients, those from VHL patients were characterized by reduced expression of numerous components of the regulated secretory pathway (e.g., SNAP25, syntaxin, rabphilin 3A, annexin A7, calcium-dependent secretion activator). The mutation-dependent differences in expression of secretory pathway components indicate a more mature regulated secretory pathway in MEN 2 than VHL tumors. These data provide a unique mechanistic link to explain how variations in the molecular machinery governing exocytosis may contribute to clinical differences in the secretion of neurotransmitters or hormones and the subsequent presentation of a disease. PMID:18854424

  19. Evaluation of neurotoxic and neuroprotective pathways affected by antiepileptic drugs in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Morte, Maria I; Carreira, Bruno P; Falcão, Maria J; Ambrósio, António F; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Araújo, Inês M; Carvalho, Caetana M

    2013-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the neurotoxicity of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), and of its in vivo metabolites eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) and R-licarbazepine (R-Lic), as compared to the structurally-related compounds carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC), in an in vitro model of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The non-related antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) lamotrigine (LTG) and sodium valproate (VPA) were also studied. We assessed whether AEDs modulate pro-survival/pro-apoptotic pathways, such as extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt and stress activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK). We found that neither ESL nor its metabolites, CBZ or LTG, up to 0.3mM, for 24h of exposure, decreased cell viability. OXC was the most toxic drug decreasing cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, leading to activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. VPA caused the appearance of the apoptotic markers, but did not alter cell viability. ESL, S-Lic and OXC decreased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 and of phospho-Akt, when compared to basal levels, whereas CBZ decreased phospho-SAPK/JNK and phospho-Akt levels. LTG and VPA increased the phosphorylation levels of SAPK/JNK. These results suggest that ESL and its main metabolite S-Lic, as well as CBZ, LTG and VPA, are less toxic to hippocampal neurons than OXC, which was the most toxic agent. PMID:24055897

  20. Individual differences in the motivation to communicate relate to levels of midbrain and striatal catecholamine markers in male European starlings

    PubMed Central

    Heimovics, Sarah A; Salvante, Katrina G; Sockman, Keith W; Riters, Lauren V

    2013-01-01

    Individuals display dramatic differences in social communication even within similar social contexts. Across vertebrates dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and midbrain central gray (GCt) strongly influence motivated, reward-directed behaviors. Norepinephrine is also rich in these areas and may alter dopamine neuronal activity. The present study was designed to provide insight into the roles of dopamine and norepinephrine in VTA and GCt and their efferent striatal target, song control region area X, in the regulation of individual differences in the motivation to sing. We used high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection to measure dopamine, norepinephrine and their metabolites in micropunched samples from VTA, GCt, and area X in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We categorized males as sexually motivated or non-sexually motivated based on individual differences in song produced in response to a female. Dopamine markers and norepinephrine in VTA and dopamine in area X correlated positively with sexually-motivated song. Norepinephrine in area X correlated negatively with non-sexually-motivated song. Dopamine in GCt correlated negatively with sexually-motivated song, and the metabolite DOPAC correlated positively with non-sexually-motivated song. Results highlight a role for evolutionarily conserved dopaminergic projections from VTA to striatum in the motivation to communicate and highlight novel patterns of catecholamine activity in area X, VTA, and GCt associated with individual differences in sexually-motivated and non-sexually-motivated communication. Correlations between dopamine and norepinephrine markers also suggest that norepinephrine may contribute to individual differences in communication by modifying dopamine neuronal activity in VTA and GCt. PMID:21907203

  1. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  2. Plasma catecholamines and renin activity in wrestlers following vigorous swimming.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Celko, J; Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to exercise in a physically fit and an untrained group of young healthy subjects were compared to study the significance of physical fitness for performance in a discipline for which the athletes were not trained. Ten wrestlers of national rank prepared for an international competition (age 18 years) and 9 untrained healthy males (age 21 years). Exercise consisted of 27-min swimming, freestyle, in water of 29 degrees C, with last 3 min increased to maximal effort. The blood pressure, heart rate and sublingual temperature were measured and blood samples were withdrawn before exercise, immediately after and after a 30 min period of rest. Catecholamines were analyzed by radioenzymatic method and plasma renin activity (PRA) using commercial kits. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate after swimming were increased comparably in the two groups, diastolic pressure was unchanged in the controls and decreased in the wrestlers. Plasma cortisol remained unchanged. Plasma glucose tended to increase in the controls and so decrease in wrestlers, with a significant difference between them after swimming (p < 0.05). However, plasma adrenaline was concomitantly increased in both groups (p < 0.01). Noradrenaline and PRA were increased after swimming in both the control and trained group. The increments of noradrenaline and PRA in wrestlers were significantly reduced compared to the control group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). Higher physical fitness in athletes significantly reduced plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin responses to maximal exercise demanding special skill in work performance which had not been included in their training program. Training of wrestlers did not cause an exaggerated plasma adrenaline response to exercise. PMID:9803484

  3. Mithramycin protects against dopaminergic neurotoxicity in the mouse brain after administration of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Hiroko; Iyo, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2009-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of mithramycin, an inhibitor of transcription factor Specificity protein (Sp)-1, on the behavioral changes and dopaminergic neurotoxicity in the mouse striatum after administration of methamphetamine (METH). Pretreatment with mithramycin (75, 150 or 300 microg/kg) did not alter acute hyperlocomotion in mice after a single administration of METH (3 mg/kg). However, the development of behavioral sensitization in mice after repeated administration of METH (3 mg/kg/day, once daily for 5 days) was significantly blocked by pretreatment with mithramycin (300 microg/kg). Furthermore, pretreatment with mithramycin (300 microg/kg) significantly attenuated the hyperthermia in mice after repeated administration of METH (3 mg/kgx3, 3-h intervals). Moreover, the combination of pretreatment and subsequent administration of mithramycin (75, 150 or 300 microg/kg) significantly attenuated the reductions of dopamine (DA), its major metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and DA transporter (DAT) in the striatum after repeated administration of METH (3 mg/kgx3, 3-h intervals), and these attenuations were dose dependent. These findings suggest that mithramycin attenuates the development of behavioral sensitization and dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice after repeated administration of METH. Therefore, mithramycin could have potential for the treatment of METH abusers, particularly since this drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States. In the future, however, another Sp1 inhibitors with fewer side effects might be more appropriate. PMID:19748494

  4. Genetic regulation of catecholamine synthesis, storage and secretion in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    PubMed Central

    Jirout, M.L.; Friese, R.S.; Mahapatra, N.R.; Mahata, M.; Taupenot, L.; Mahata, S.K.; Křen, V.; Zídek, V.; Fischer, J.; Maatz, H.; Ziegler, M.G.; Pravenec, M.; Hubner, N.; Aitman, T.J.; Schork, N.J.; O'Connor, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding catecholamine metabolism is crucial for elucidating the pathogenesis of hereditary hypertension. Here we integrated transcriptional and biochemical profiling with physiologic quantitative trait locus (eQTL and pQTL) mapping in adrenal glands of the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) strains, derived from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and normotensive Brown Norway (BN.Lx). We found simultaneous down-regulation of five heritable transcripts in the catecholaminergic pathway in young (6 weeks) SHRs. We identified cis-acting eQTLs for Dbh, Pnmt (catecholamine biosynthesis) and Vamp1 (catecholamine secretion); enzymatic activities of Dbh and Pnmt paralleled transcripts, with pQTLs for activities mirroring eQTLs. We also detected trans-regulated expression of Vmat1 and Chga (both involved in catecholamine storage), with co-localization of these trans-eQTLs to the Pnmt locus. Pnmt re-sequencing revealed promoter polymorphisms that result in decreased response of the transfected SHR promoter to glucocorticoid, compared with BN.Lx. Of physiological pertinence, Dbh activity negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure in RI strains, whereas Pnmt activity was negatively correlated with heart rate. The finding of such cis- and trans-QTLs at an age before the onset of frank hypertension suggests that these heritable changes in biosynthetic enzyme expression represent primary genetic mechanisms for regulation of catecholamine action and blood pressure control in this widely studied model of hypertension. PMID:20378607

  5. Preparation of Sticky Escherichia coli through Surface Display of an Adhesive Catecholamine Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joseph P.; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  6. Personality traits of aggression-submissiveness and perfectionism associate with ABO blood groups through catecholamine activities.

    PubMed

    Hobgood, Donna K

    2011-08-01

    Personality trait research has shown associations with many genes, prominently those of the catecholamine metabolism such as dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). Because DBH gene is in linkage disequilibrium with ABO gene, there is reason to think that other catecholamine genes using the same substrate as DBH may also have associations with ABO blood groups, and this paper demonstrates how this may be so. Reasons include similarities in hapmap population frequency distributions, similarities in illness risks between ABO blood groups and DBH activities as well as between ABO blood groups and COMT activities and between ABO blood groups and MAOA activities. If ABO blood groups can be demonstrated to associate with all these catecholamine genes, then the catecholamine personality trait research can be applied to ABO blood groups and tested for confirmation. ABO blood typing is widely available and affords ability to test this hypothesis and thus confirm the possible joint association of personality traits of aggression-submissiveness and perfectionism to catecholamine genes and to ABO blood groups. Clinical applications and implications are discussed. PMID:21601990

  7. Preparation of sticky Escherichia coli through surface display of an adhesive catecholamine moiety.

    PubMed

    Park, Joseph P; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  8. Catecholamine Mediates Psychological Stress-Induced Colitis Through a2-Adrenoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Bai, Aiping; Chen, Jiang; Liao, Wangdi; Lu, Nonghua; Guo, Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Psychological stress has long been reported to be linked with the disease activity of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the mechanisms of psychological stress involved in pathogenesis of IBD are still to be elucidated. We have previously shown that catecholamine participates in progression of acute colitis through a2-adrenoreceptors. The study aimed to explore the pivotal role of catecholamine in psychological stress-induced colitis. The expression of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), the rate-limiting enzyme in regulation of catecholamine synthesis, was induced in colon tissues of mice with restraint stress, indicating the association of catecholamine synthesis with psychological stress. Notably, pretreatment with RX821002, an a2-adrenoceptor antagonist, attenuated inflammatory responses of psychological stress-induced colitis. Intriguingly, DBH levels were elevated in colon tissues of patients with active IBD. The study suggests that a2-adrenoreceptors/catecholamine play pivotal role in psychological stress-induced colitis and might contribute to the development of human IBD. PMID:25867043

  9. Genetic regulation of catecholamine synthesis, storage and secretion in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Jirout, M L; Friese, R S; Mahapatra, N R; Mahata, M; Taupenot, L; Mahata, S K; Kren, V; Zídek, V; Fischer, J; Maatz, H; Ziegler, M G; Pravenec, M; Hubner, N; Aitman, T J; Schork, N J; O'Connor, D T

    2010-07-01

    Understanding catecholamine metabolism is crucial for elucidating the pathogenesis of hereditary hypertension. Here we integrated transcriptional and biochemical profiling with physiologic quantitative trait locus (eQTL and pQTL) mapping in adrenal glands of the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) strains, derived from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and normotensive Brown Norway (BN.Lx). We found simultaneous down-regulation of five heritable transcripts in the catecholaminergic pathway in young (6 weeks) SHRs. We identified cis-acting eQTLs for Dbh, Pnmt (catecholamine biosynthesis) and Vamp1 (catecholamine secretion); enzymatic activities of Dbh and Pnmt paralleled transcripts, with pQTLs for activities mirroring eQTLs. We also detected trans-regulated expression of Vmat1 and Chga (both involved in catecholamine storage), with co-localization of these trans-eQTLs to the Pnmt locus. Pnmt re-sequencing revealed promoter polymorphisms that result in decreased response of the transfected SHR promoter to glucocorticoid, compared with BN.Lx. Of physiological pertinence, Dbh activity negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure in RI strains, whereas Pnmt activity was negatively correlated with heart rate. The finding of such cis- and trans-QTLs at an age before the onset of frank hypertension suggests that these heritable changes in biosynthetic enzyme expression represent primary genetic mechanisms for regulation of catecholamine action and blood pressure control in this widely studied model of hypertension. PMID:20378607

  10. Receptor mechanisms and circuitry underlying NMDA antagonist neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Farber, N B; Kim, S H; Dikranian, K; Jiang, X P; Heinkel, C

    2002-01-01

    NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists are used in clinical anesthesia, and are being developed as therapeutic agents for preventing neurodegeneration in stroke, epilepsy, and brain trauma. However, the ability of these agents to produce neurotoxicity in adult rats and psychosis in adult humans compromises their clinical usefulness. In addition, an NMDA receptor hypofunction (NRHypo) state might play a role in neurodegenerative and psychotic disorders, like Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Thus, understanding the mechanism underlying NRHypo-induced neurotoxicity and psychosis could have significant clinically relevant benefits. NRHypo neurotoxicity can be prevented by several classes of agents (e.g. antimuscarinics, non-NMDA glutamate antagonists, and alpha(2) adrenergic agonists) suggesting that the mechanism of neurotoxicity is complex. In the present study a series of experiments was undertaken to more definitively define the receptors and complex neural circuitry underlying NRHypo neurotoxicity. Injection of either the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine or the non-NMDA antagonist NBQX directly into the cortex prevented NRHypo neurotoxicity. Clonidine, an alpha(2) adrenergic agonist, protected against the neurotoxicity when injected into the basal forebrain. The combined injection of muscarinic and non-NMDA Glu agonists reproduced the neurotoxic reaction. Based on these and other results, we conclude that the mechanism is indirect, and involves a complex network disturbance, whereby blockade of NMDA receptors on inhibitory neurons in multiple subcortical brain regions, disinhibits glutamatergic and cholinergic projections to the cerebral cortex. Simultaneous excitotoxic stimulation of muscarinic (m(3)) and glutamate (AMPA/kainate) receptors on cerebrocortical neurons appears to be the proximal mechanism by which the neurotoxic and psychotomimetic effects of NRHypo are mediated. PMID:11803444

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fanmuyi; Luo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity. PMID:26473940

  12. Orexin-A enhances feeding in male rats by activating hindbrain catecholamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Davis, Hana; Wang, Rong; Ritter, Sue

    2015-08-15

    Both lateral hypothalamic orexinergic neurons and hindbrain catecholaminergic neurons contribute to control of feeding behavior. Orexin fibers and terminals are present in close proximity to hindbrain catecholaminergic neurons, and fourth ventricular (4V) orexin injections that increase food intake also increase c-Fos expression in hindbrain catecholamine neurons, suggesting that orexin neurons may stimulate feeding by activating catecholamine neurons. Here we examine that hypothesis in more detail. We found that 4V injection of orexin-A (0.5 nmol/rat) produced widespread activation of c-Fos in hindbrain catecholamine cell groups. In the A1 and C1 cell groups in the ventrolateral medulla, where most c-Fos-positive neurons were also dopamine β hydroxylase (DBH) positive, direct injections of a lower dose (67 pmol/200 nl) of orexin-A also increased food intake in intact rats. Then, with the use of the retrogradely transported immunotoxin, anti-DBH conjugated to saporin (DSAP), which targets and destroys DBH-expressing catecholamine neurons, we examined the hypothesis that catecholamine neurons are required for orexin-induced feeding. Rats given paraventricular hypothalamic injections of DSAP, or unconjugated saporin (SAP) as control, were implanted with 4V or lateral ventricular (LV) cannulas and tested for feeding in response to ventricular injection of orexin-A (0.5 nmol/rat). Both LV and 4V orexin-A stimulated feeding in SAP controls, but DSAP abolished these responses. These results reveal for the first time that catecholamine neurons are required for feeding induced by injection of orexin-A into either LV or 4V. PMID:26062632

  13. Reactive metabolites and agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, J P

    1996-01-01

    Central to most hypotheses of the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug-induced blood dyscrasias is the involvement of reactive metabolites. In view of the reactive nature of the majority of such metabolites, it is likely that they are formed by, or in close proximity to the blood cells affected. The major oxidative system of neutrophils generates hypochlorous acid. We have demonstrated that the drugs associated with the highest incidence of agranulocytosis are oxidized to reactive metabolites by hypochlorous acid and/or activated neutrophils. There are many mechanisms by which such reactive metabolites could induce agranulocytosis. In the case of aminopyrine-induced agranulocytosis, most cases appear to involve drug-dependent anti-neutrophil antibodies, and these are likely to be induced by cell membrane antigens modified by the reactive metabolite of aminopyrine. The target of agranulocytosis associated with many other drugs is usually neutrophil precursors and may involve cytotoxicity or a cell-mediated immune reaction induced by a reactive metabolite. In the case of aplastic anaemia, there is evidence in some cases for involvement of cytotoxic T cells, which could either be induced by metabolites generated by neutrophils, or more likely, by reactive metabolites generated by stem cells. PMID:8987247

  14. Advances in metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Wishart, David S

    2011-08-01

    One of the central challenges to metabolomics is metabolite identification. Regardless of whether one uses so-called 'targeted' or 'untargeted' metabolomics, eventually all paths lead to the requirement of identifying (and quantifying) certain key metabolites. Indeed, without metabolite identification, the results of any metabolomic analysis are biologically and chemically uninterpretable. Given the chemical diversity of most metabolomes and the character of most metabolomic data, metabolite identification is intrinsically difficult. Consequently a great deal of effort in metabolomics over the past decade has been focused on making metabolite identification better, faster and cheaper. This review describes some of the newly emerging techniques or technologies in metabolomics that are making metabolite identification easier and more robust. In particular, it focuses on advances in metabolite identification that have occurred over the past 2 to 3 years concerning the technologies, methodologies and software as applied to NMR, MS and separation science. The strengths and limitations of some of these approaches are discussed along with some of the important trends in metabolite identification. PMID:21827274

  15. [SKIERS URINARY CATECHOLAMINES EXCRETION AT REST AND BY COMPETITIVE LOADS LENGTH VARIETY].

    PubMed

    Chinkin, A S

    2015-11-01

    While night sleeps urinary noradrenaline excretion of skilled skiers less than their untrained peers, but the difference in excretion of adrenaline is not revealed. By increasing the distance and time to overcome it during skiing catecholamine excretion is increased both - totally and per minute. Most urinary catecholamines detected at a distance of 50 km in low sliding: increased excretion of adrenaline - 84 times, and noradrenaline -95 times. These results shows that high qualificated skier's functional reserve of the sympathoadrenal system, is mobilize at long competitions for ten times higher than in rest. PMID:26995960

  16. Catecholamines and myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia and with an altered thyroid hormone balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruss, G. M.; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Zhilinskaya, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of catecholamine content and myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia were studied in 109 white rats whose motor activity was severely restricted for up to 30 days. During the first five days myocardial catecholamine content, contractile function, and physical load tolerance decreased. Small doses of thyroidin counteracted this tendency. After 15 days, noradrenalin content and other indices approached normal levels and, after 30 days, were the same as control levels, although cardiac functional reserve was decreased. Thyroidin administration after 15 days had no noticeable effect. A detailed table shows changes in 17 indices of myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia.

  17. Effect of. beta. -endorphin on catecholamine levels in rat hypothalamus and cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Slavnov, V.N.; Valueva, G.V.; Markov, V.V.; Luchitskii, E.V.

    1986-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of beta-endorphin on catecholamine concentrations in the hypothalmus and cerebral cortex in rats, as a contribution to the explanation of the mechanism of action of this peptide on certain pituitary trophic functions. Concentrations of dopamine, noradrenalin, and adrenalin were determined by a radioenzymatic method. A Mark 3 scintillation system was used for radiometric investigation of the samples. The results of these experiments indicate that beta-endorphin has a marked effect on brain catecholamine levels mainly in the hypothalamus.

  18. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS FOR NEUROTOXICITY FIELD TESTING: PEARL II AND ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pearl II, a computerized battery of electrophysiological tests designed for neurotoxicity field testing, was developed a decade ago. he battery includes sensory evoked potentials (auditory, somatosensory and visual), event related slow brain potentials (CNV,P30O), and associated ...

  19. Recommendations for Developing Alternative Test Methods for Developmental Neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is great interest in developing alternative methods for developmental neurotoxicity testing (DNT) that are cost-efficient, use fewer animals and are based on current scientific knowledge of the developing nervous system. Alternative methods will require demonstration of the...

  20. TESTING FOR DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY: CURRENT APPROACHES AND FUTURE NEEDS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are many adverse effects on the nervous system following exposure to environmental chemicals during development. In a number of cases (e.g., lead, methyl mercury) the developing nervous system is a highly susceptible. Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing (DNT) guidelines...

  1. ONTOGENY OF PROTEINS FOR USE AS BIOMARKERS OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The developing nervous system can be uniquely susceptible to adverse effects following exposure to environmental chemicals, and several advisory panels (e.g. ILSI, NRC, NAS) have highlighted the need for rapid and sensitive developmental neurotoxicity testing methods. Measurement...

  2. Methamphetamine and MDMA (ecstasy) neurotoxicity: 'of mice and men'.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Yossef; Achat-Mendes, Cindy

    2004-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-meythylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'ecstasy') are currently major drugs of abuse. One of the major concerns of amphetamines abuse is their potential neurotoxic effect on dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons. Although data from human studies are somewhat limited, compelling evidence suggests that these drugs cause neurotoxicity in rodents and primates. Recent studies in transgenic and knockout mice identified the role of dopamine transporters, nitric oxide, apoptotic proteins, and inflammatory cytokines in amphetamines neurotoxicity. Further research into the mechanisms underlying the dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity and the behavioral corollaries of these neuronal insults could facilitate our understanding of the consequences of human abuse of METH and MDMA on cognition, drug-seeking behavior, extinction and relapse. PMID:15370888

  3. Developmental Neurotoxicology: History and Outline of Developmental Neurotoxicity Study Guidelines.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present work provides a brief review of basic concepts in developmental neurotoxicology, as well as current representative testing guidelines for evaluating developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) of xenobiotics. Historically, DNT was initially recognized as a “functional” teratoge...

  4. Neurotoxic effects during vidarabine therapy for herpes zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Burdge, D R; Chow, A W; Sacks, S L

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of neurotoxic effects resulting from therapy with vidarabine are described. Both patients were undergoing treatment for cutaneously disseminated herpes zoster complicating therapy for solid malignant tumours. Both had normal renal function. The serum levels of hepatic enzymes were normal in one patient and slightly elevated in the other. Neurotoxicity was first manifested in both patients by the development of intention tremors that progressed to gross tremors. Obtundation, coma and death ensued in one patient and pain syndromes in the other. Vidarabine-induced neurotoxic effects, which may occur in the absence of hepatic or renal dysfunction or treatment with another drug, may be mild initially but may progress rapidly to more serious, even life-threatening, conditions. Presentation of neurotoxic effects should be considered an indication for withdrawal of vidarabine. PMID:3971255

  5. A DIRECT METHOD TO ASSAY NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct photometric method for assaying neurotoxic esterase (NTE) activity of chicken brain microsomal preparation has been developed using 4-nitrophenyl esters as substrates. Paired samples of the microsomal preparation were preincubated for 20 min. with paraoxon plus either (a...

  6. INTEGRATING EPIDEMIOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY IN NEUROTOXICITY RISK ASSESSMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxicity risk assessments depend on the best available scientific information, including data from animal toxicity, human experimental studies and human epidemiology studies. There are several factors to consider when evaluating the comparability of data from studies. Reg...

  7. (1)H NMR-Based Metabolomics and Neurotoxicity Study of Cerebrum and Cerebellum in Rats Treated with Cinnabar, a Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lai; Xue, Rong; Zhang, Panpan; Wu, Yijie; Li, Xiaojing; Pei, Fengkui

    2015-08-01

    Cinnabar, an important traditional Chinese mineral medicine, has been widely used as a Chinese patent medicine ingredient for sedative therapy. Nevertheless, the neurotoxic effects of cinnabar have also been noted. In this study, (1)H NMR-based metabolomics, combined with multivariate pattern recognition, were applied to investigate the neurotoxic effects of cinnabar after intragastrical administration (dosed at 2 and 5 g/kg body weight) on male Wistar rats. The metabolite variations induced by cinnabar were characterized by increased levels of glutamate, glutamine, myo-inositol, and choline, as well as decreased levels of GABA, taurine, NAA, and NAAG in tissue extracts of the cerebellum and cerebrum. These findings suggested that cinnabar induced glutamate excitotoxicity, neuronal cell loss, osmotic state changes, membrane fluidity disruption, and oxidative injury in the brain. We also show here that there is a dose- and time-dependent neurotoxicity of cinnabar, and that cerebellum was more sensitive to cinnabar induction than cerebrum. This work illustrates the utility and reliability of (1)H NMR-based metabolomics approach for examining the potential neurotoxic effects of cinnabar and other traditional Chinese medicines. PMID:26110755

  8. In vitro techniques for the assessment of neurotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Harry, G J; Billingsley, M; Bruinink, A; Campbell, I L; Classen, W; Dorman, D C; Galli, C; Ray, D; Smith, R A; Tilson, H A

    1998-01-01

    Risk assessment is a process often divided into the following steps: a) hazard identification, b) dose-response assessment, c) exposure assessment, and d) risk characterization. Regulatory toxicity studies usually are aimed at providing data for the first two steps. Human case reports, environmental research, and in vitro studies may also be used to identify or to further characterize a toxic hazard. In this report the strengths and limitations of in vitro techniques are discussed in light of their usefulness to identify neurotoxic hazards, as well as for the subsequent dose-response assessment. Because of the complexity of the nervous system, multiple functions of individual cells, and our limited knowledge of biochemical processes involved in neurotoxicity, it is not known how well any in vitro system would recapitulate the in vivo system. Thus, it would be difficult to design an in vitro test battery to replace in vivo test systems. In vitro systems are well suited to the study of biological processes in a more isolated context and have been most successfully used to elucidate mechanisms of toxicity, identify target cells of neurotoxicity, and delineate the development and intricate cellular changes induced by neurotoxicants. Both biochemical and morphological end points can be used, but many of the end points used can be altered by pharmacological actions as well as toxicity. Therefore, for many of these end points it is difficult or impossible to set a criterion that allows one to differentiate between a pharmacological and a neurotoxic effect. For the process of risk assessment such a discrimination is central. Therefore, end points used to determine potential neurotoxicity of a compound have to be carefully selected and evaluated with respect to their potential to discriminate between an adverse neurotoxic effect and a pharmacologic effect. It is obvious that for in vitro neurotoxicity studies the primary end points that can be used are those affected

  9. Anatomical and pharmacological characterization of catecholamine transients in the medial prefrontal cortex evoked by ventral tegmental area stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shnitko, Tatiana A; Robinson, Donita L

    2014-04-01

    Voltammetric measurements of catecholamines in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are infrequent because of lack of chemical selectivity between dopamine and norepinephrine and their overlapping anatomical inputs. Here, we examined the contribution of norepinephrine to the catecholamine release in the mPFC evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Initially, electrical stimulation was delivered in the midbrain at incremental depths of -5 to -9.4 mm from bregma while catecholamine release was monitored in the mPFC. Although catecholamine release was observed at dorsal stimulation sites that may correspond to the dorsal noradrenergic bundle (DNB, containing noradrenergic axonal projections to the mPFC), maximal release was evoked by stimulation of the VTA (the source of dopaminergic input to the mPFC). Next, VTA-evoked catecholamine release was monitored in the mPFC before and after knife incision of the DNB, and no significant changes in the evoked catecholamine signals were found. These data indicated that DNB fibers did not contribute to the VTA-evoked catecholamine release observed in the mPFC. Finally, while the D2-receptor antagonist raclopride significantly altered VTA-evoked catecholamine release, the α₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist idazoxan did not. Specifically, raclopride reduced catecholamine release in the mPFC, opposite to that observed in the striatum, indicating differential autoreceptor regulation of mesocortical and mesostriatal neurons. Together, these findings suggest that the catecholamine release in the mPFC arising from VTA stimulation was predominately dopaminergic rather than noradrenergic. PMID:24285555

  10. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  11. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  12. Potential developmental neurotoxicity of pesticides used in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Bjørling-Poulsen, Marina; Andersen, Helle Raun; Grandjean, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Pesticides used in agriculture are designed to protect crops against unwanted species, such as weeds, insects, and fungus. Many compounds target the nervous system of insect pests. Because of the similarity in brain biochemistry, such pesticides may also be neurotoxic to humans. Concerns have been raised that the developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to adverse effects of neurotoxic pesticides. Current requirements for safety testing do not include developmental neurotoxicity. We therefore undertook a systematic evaluation of published evidence on neurotoxicity of pesticides in current use, with specific emphasis on risks during early development. Epidemiologic studies show associations with neurodevelopmental deficits, but mainly deal with mixed exposures to pesticides. Laboratory experimental studies using model compounds suggest that many pesticides currently used in Europe – including organophosphates, carbamates, pyrethroids, ethylenebisdithiocarbamates, and chlorophenoxy herbicides – can cause neurodevelopmental toxicity. Adverse effects on brain development can be severe and irreversible. Prevention should therefore be a public health priority. The occurrence of residues in food and other types of human exposures should be prevented with regard to the pesticide groups that are known to be neurotoxic. For other substances, given their widespread use and the unique vulnerability of the developing brain, the general lack of data on developmental neurotoxicity calls for investment in targeted research. While awaiting more definite evidence, existing uncertainties should be considered in light of the need for precautionary action to protect brain development. PMID:18945337

  13. Neurotoxicity in Snakebite—The Limits of Our Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Ranawaka, Udaya K.; Lalloo, David G.; de Silva, H. Janaka

    2013-01-01

    Snakebite is classified by the WHO as a neglected tropical disease. Envenoming is a significant public health problem in tropical and subtropical regions. Neurotoxicity is a key feature of some envenomings, and there are many unanswered questions regarding this manifestation. Acute neuromuscular weakness with respiratory involvement is the most clinically important neurotoxic effect. Data is limited on the many other acute neurotoxic manifestations, and especially delayed neurotoxicity. Symptom evolution and recovery, patterns of weakness, respiratory involvement, and response to antivenom and acetyl cholinesterase inhibitors are variable, and seem to depend on the snake species, type of neurotoxicity, and geographical variations. Recent data have challenged the traditional concepts of neurotoxicity in snake envenoming, and highlight the rich diversity of snake neurotoxins. A uniform system of classification of the pattern of neuromuscular weakness and models for predicting type of toxicity and development of respiratory weakness are still lacking, and would greatly aid clinical decision making and future research. This review attempts to update the reader on the current state of knowledge regarding this important issue. PMID:24130909

  14. The neurotoxicity of amphetamines during the adolescent period.

    PubMed

    Teixeira-Gomes, Armanda; Costa, Vera Marisa; Feio-Azevedo, Rita; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Carvalho, Félix; Capela, João Paulo

    2015-04-01

    Amphetamine-type psychostimulants (ATS), such as amphetamine (AMPH), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and methamphetamine (METH) are psychoactive substances widely abused, due to their powerful central nervous system (CNS) stimulation ability. Young people particularly use ATS as recreational drugs. Moreover, AMPH is used clinically, particularly for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and has the ability to cause structural and functional brain alterations. ATS are known to interact with monoamine transporter sites and easily diffuse across cellular membranes, attaining high levels in several tissues, particularly the brain. Strong evidence suggests that ATS induce neurotoxic effects, raising concerns about the consequences of drug abuse. Considering that many teenagers and young adults commonly use ATS, our main aim was to review the neurotoxic effects of amphetamines, namely AMPH, MDMA, and METH, in the adolescence period of experimental animals. Reports agree that adolescent animals are less susceptible than adult animals to the neurotoxic effects of amphetamines. The susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of ATS seems roughly located in the early adolescent period of animals. Many authors report that the age of exposure to ATS is crucial for the neurotoxic outcome, showing that the stage of brain maturity has a strong importance. Moreover, recent studies have been undertaken in young adults and/or consumers during adolescence that clearly indicate brain or behavioural damage, arguing for long-term neurotoxic effects in humans. There is an urgent need for more studies during the adolescence period, in order to unveil the mechanisms and the brain dysfunctions promoted by ATS. PMID:25482046

  15. SPECIES SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DELAYED TOXIC NEUROPATHY IN RELATION TO IN VIVO INHIBITION OF NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE BY NEUROTOXIC ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ESTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) and O-ethyl O-(4-cyanophenyl) phenylphosphonothioate (cyanofenphos, Surecide) were found to be delayed neurotoxicants. The results suggest that the differences between chickens and mice in susceptibility to neurotoxic organophosphates may be attribut...

  16. Pro-oxidant effects of Ecstasy and its metabolites in mouse brain synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Daniel José; Capela, João Paulo; Oliveira, Jorge MA; Silva, Renata; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Siopa, Filipa; Branco, Paula Sério; Fernandes, Eduarda; Duarte, José Alberto; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Carvalho, Félix

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ‘Ecstasy’) is a worldwide major drug of abuse known to elicit neurotoxic effects. The mechanisms underlying the neurotoxic effects of MDMA are not clear at present, but the metabolism of dopamine and 5-HT by monoamine oxidase (MAO), as well as the hepatic biotransformation of MDMA into pro-oxidant reactive metabolites is thought to contribute to its adverse effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using mouse brain synaptosomes, we evaluated the pro-oxidant effects of MDMA and its metabolites, α-methyldopamine (α-MeDA), N-methyl-α-methyldopamine (N-Me-α-MeDA) and 5-(glutathion-S-yl)-α-methyldopamine [5-(GSH)-α-MeDA], as well as those of 5-HT, dopamine, l-DOPA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). KEY RESULTS 5-HT, dopamine, l-DOPA, DOPAC and MDMA metabolites α-MeDA, N-Me-α-MeDA and 5-(GSH)-α-MeDA, concentration- and time-dependently increased H2O2 production, which was significantly reduced by the antioxidants N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid and melatonin. From experiments with MAO inhibitors, it was observed that H2O2 generation induced by 5-HT was totally dependent on MAO-related metabolism, while for dopamine, it was a minor pathway. The MDMA metabolites, dopamine, l-DOPA and DOPAC concentration-dependently increased quinoproteins formation and, like 5-HT, altered the synaptosomal glutathione status. Finally, none of the compounds modified the number of polarized mitochondria in the synaptosomal preparations, and the compounds’ pro-oxidant effects were unaffected by prior mitochondrial depolarization, excluding a significant role for mitochondrial-dependent mechanisms of toxicity in this experimental model. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MDMA metabolites along with high levels of monoamine neurotransmitters can be major effectors of neurotoxicity induced by Ecstasy. PMID:21506960

  17. Integration of in vitro neurotoxicity data with biokinetic modelling for the estimation of in vivo neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Forsby, Anna; Blaauboer, Bas

    2007-04-01

    Risk assessment of neurotoxicity is mainly based on in vivo exposure, followed by tests on behaviour, physiology and pathology. In this study, an attempt to estimate lowest observed neurotoxic doses after single or repeated dose exposure was performed. Differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to acrylamide, lindane, parathion, paraoxon, phenytoin, diazepam or caffeine for 72 hours. The effects on protein synthesis and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration were studied as physiological endpoints. Voltage operated Ca2+ channel function, acetylcholine receptor function and neurite degenerative effects were investigated as neurospecific endpoints for excitability, cholinergic signal transduction and axonopathy, respectively. The general cytotoxicity, determined as the total cellular protein levels after the 72 hours exposure period, was used for comparison to the specific endpoints and for estimation of acute lethality. The lowest concentration that induced 20% effect (EC20) obtained for each compound, was used as a surrogate for the lowest neurotoxic level (LOEL) at the target site in vivo. The LOELs were integrated with data on adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of the compounds in physiologically-based biokinetic (PBBK) models of the rat and the lowest observed effective doses (LOEDs) were estimated for the test compounds. A good correlation was observed between the estimated LOEDs and experimental LOEDs found in literature for rat for all test compounds, except for diazepam. However, when using in vitro data from the literature on diazepam's effect on gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)A receptor function for the estimation of LOED, the correlation between the estimated and experimental LOEDs was improved from a 10,000-fold to a 10-fold difference. Our results indicate that it is possible to estimate LOEDs by integrating in vitro toxicity data as surrogates for lowest observed target tissue levels with PBBK models, provided that

  18. Catecholamine transport in isolated lung parenchyma of pig

    PubMed Central

    Goldie, Roy G.; Paterson, James W.

    1982-01-01

    1 Lung parenchyma strips of the pig incubated at 37°C with [3H]-(-)-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA) or [3H]-(±)-isoprenaline ([3H]-Iso), accumulated radioactivity via saturable, high affinity uptake processes. Apparent saturation constants (Km) for [3H]-NA and [3H]-Iso were 1.34 × 10-6 M and 1.63 × 10-6 M respectively, while apparent transport maxima (Vmax) were 4.86 and 1.63 × 10-9 mol min-1 g-1 respectively. 2 Cellular accumulation of radioactivity from radiolabelled catecholamines was greatly reduced by lowering the temperature to 7°C, pretreatment with ouabain (100 μM), phentolamine (15 μM) or phenoxybenzamine (80 μM). However, accumulation of radioactivity derived from (3H]-NA was inhibited selectively by cocaine (10 μM) and desipramine (1 μM), while normetanephrine (80 μM) and 3-O-methylisoprenaline (50 μM) caused much greater reductions in cellular radioactivity from [3H]-Iso than from (3H]-NA. Taken together with information from kinetic studies, the results indicate that these amines are transported by separate uptake processes. 3 Cocaine (50 μM) which selectively reduced [3H]-NA transport, had no significant effect on the sensitivity (EC50) of isolated parenchyma lung strips of the pig to the contractile effects of cumulative concentrations of NA. The catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitor, U-0521 (60 μM), also failed to alter the potency of NA, while normetanephrine (80 μM) caused a 2 fold decrease in potency. 4 Phentolamine (15 μM), which reduced the cellular accumulation of radioactivity derived from [3H]-Iso by 64%, caused a small potentiation of Iso-induced relaxations of porcine lung strips. Normetanephrine (80 μM) and 3-O-methylisoprenaline (50 μM), which also depressed the accumulation of cellular radioactivity from [3H]-Iso by > 50%, caused rightward shifts in Iso concentration-effect curves as a result of β-adrenoceptor blockade. In sharp contrast, cortisol (80 μM) and U-0521 (60 μM), which caused smaller reductions in the

  19. Catecholamines and dihydroxyphenylalanine in metamorphosing larvae of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia).

    PubMed

    Pires, A; Coon, S L; Hadfield, M G

    1997-09-01

    The content of catecholamines and dihydroxyphenylalanine in larvae of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Dihydroxyphenylalanine, norepinephrine and dopamine were identified in larvae of all ages examined (5 through 12 days post-fertilization). Dihydroxyphenylalanine could be accurately quantified only in larvae of ages 8 through 12 days, when its average concentration increased from 0.62 to 6.71 x 10(-2) pmol micrograms protein-1. Between ages 5 and 12 days dopamine rose from 0.081 to 0.616 pmol microgram protein-1, and norepinephrine from 0.45 to 2.17 x 10(-2) pmol micrograms protein-1. Dihydroxyphenylalanine, dopamine and norepinephrine were also measured at different stages of metamorphic progress in 10- to 12-day larvae. Dihydroxyphenylalanine increased by a factor of 2.4 between the onset and completion of metamorphosis, but levels of dopamine and norepinephrine remained stable. One millimolar alpha-methyl-DL-m-tyrosine, an inhibitor of catecholamine synthesis, inhibited natural metamorphosis and depleted endogenous norepinephrine and especially dopamine, respectively, to 75% and 35% of control values. The existence of unexpectedly high levels of catecholamines in metamorphically competent larvae, and the association of catecholamine depletion with inhibition of metamorphosis, indicate that these compounds may participate in the control of gastropod development. PMID:9309865

  20. Potentiometric and NMR complexation studies of phenylboronic acid PBA and its aminophosphonate analog with selected catecholamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Tomasz; Młynarz, Piotr; Dobosz, Agnieszka; Rydzewska, Agata; Prokopowicz, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Boronic acids are a class of intensively explored compounds, which according to their specific properties have been intensively explored in last decades. Among them phenylboronic acids and their derivatives are most frequently examined as receptors for diverse carbohydrates. In turn, there is a large gap in basic research concerning complexation of catecholamines by these compounds. Therefore, we decided to undertake studies on interaction of chosen catecholamines, namely: noradrenaline (norephinephrine), dopamine, L-DOPA, DOPA-P (phosphonic analog of L-DOPA) and catechol, with simple phenyl boronic acid PBA by means of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, the binding properties of recently synthesized phenylboronic receptor 1 bearing aminophosphonate function in meta-position were investigated and showed promising ability to bind catecholamines. The protonation and stability constants of PBA and receptor 1 complexes were examined by potentiometry. The obtained results demonstrated that PBA binds the catecholamines with the following affinity order: noradrenaline ⩾ dopamine ≈ L-DOPA > catechol > DOPA-P, while its modified analog 1 reveals slightly different preferences: dopamine > noradrenaline > catechol > L-DOPA > DOPA-P.

  1. Ecological and sociodemographic effects on urinary catecholamine excretion in adult Samoans

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Meredith R.; Steele, Matthew S.; Bereiter, David A.; Viali, Satupaitea; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ecological and sociodemographic correlates of stress may contribute to cardiovascular disease risk in modernizing Samoans. Aim The effects of peri-urban vs rural residence, education, occupation, caffeine intake and cigarette consumption on urinary catecholamine excretion were studied in Samoan adults. Subjects and methods Five hundred and seven participants, aged 29–69 years, were randomly selected from nine villages throughout Samoa. Sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were assessed by questionnaire. Epinephrine and norepinephrine excretion rates were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection in overnight urine samples. Age (≤40 vs >40 years) and gender-specific regression models were estimated to detect associations with BMI-adjusted catecholamine excretion. Results Norepinephrine was significantly higher in peri-urban young men and older women. Epinephrine was significantly higher in peri-urban older men. Adjustment for caffeine attenuated the relationship between residence and norepinephrine in young women. Conclusion General residential exposure to modernization in urban villages is a significant correlate of increased overnight catecholamine excretion rates and is consistent with past studies. Caffeine consumption in younger women plays a complex role in stress-related catecholamine excretion. Further studies of individual level attitudinal and behavioural factors in Samoans are needed to understand psychosocial stress, physiologic arousal and health. PMID:20836724

  2. Hypoxic alligator embryos: chronic hypoxia, catecholamine levels and autonomic responses of in ovo alligators.

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Altimiras, Jordi; Hicks, James W; Crossley, Dane A

    2011-11-01

    Hypoxia is a naturally occurring environmental challenge for embryonic reptiles, and this is the first study to investigate the impact of chronic hypoxia on the in ovo development of autonomic cardiovascular regulation and circulating catecholamine levels in a reptile. We measured heart rate (f(H)) and chorioallantoic arterial blood pressure (MAP) in normoxic ('N21') and hypoxic-incubated ('H10'; 10% O(2)) American alligator embryos (Alligator mississippiensis) at 70, 80 and 90% of development. Embryonic alligator responses to adrenergic blockade with propranolol and phentolamine were very similar to previously reported responses of embryonic chicken, and demonstrated that embryonic alligator has α and β-adrenergic tone over the final third of development. However, adrenergic tone originates entirely from circulating catecholamines and is not altered by chronic hypoxic incubation, as neither cholinergic blockade with atropine nor ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium altered baseline cardiovascular variables in N21 or H10 embryos. In addition, both atropine and hexamethonium injection did not alter the generally depressive effects of acute hypoxia - bradycardia and hypotension. However, H10 embryos showed significantly higher levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline at 70% of development, as well as higher noradrenaline at 80% of development, suggesting that circulating catecholamines reach maximal levels earlier in incubation for H10 embryos, compared to N21 embryos. Chronically elevated levels of catecholamines may alter the normal balance between α and β-adrenoreceptors in H10 alligator embryos, causing chronic bradycardia and hypotension of H10 embryos measured in normoxia. PMID:21798363

  3. The Control of Responsiveness in ADHD by Catecholamines: Evidence for Dopaminergic, Noradrenergic and Interactive Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oades, Robert D.; Sadile, Adolfo G.; Sagvolden, Terje; Viggiano, Davide; Zuddas, Alessandro; Devoto, Paola; Aase, Heidi; Johansen, Espen B.; Ruocco, Lucia A.; Russell, Vivienne A.

    2005-01-01

    We explore the neurobiological bases of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from the viewpoint of the neurochemistry and psychopharmacology of the catecholamine-based behavioural systems. The contributions of dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) neurotransmission to the motor and cognitive symptoms of ADHD (e.g. hyperactivity, variable…

  4. Catecholamine responses to virtual combat: implications for post-traumatic stress and dimensions of functioning

    PubMed Central

    Highland, Krista B.; Costanzo, Michelle E.; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D.; Ndiongue, Rochelle B.; Reinhardt, Brian J.; Rothbaum, Barbara; Rizzo, Albert A.; Roy, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms can result in functional impairment among service members (SMs), even in those without a clinical diagnosis. The variability in outcomes may be related to underlying catecholamine mechanisms. Individuals with PTSD tend to have elevated basal catecholamine levels, though less is known regarding catecholamine responses to trauma-related stimuli. We assessed whether catecholamine responses to a virtual combat environment impact the relationship between PTSD symptom clusters and elements of functioning. Eighty-seven clinically healthy SMs, within 2 months after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan, completed self-report measures, viewed virtual-reality (VR) combat sequences, and had sequential blood draws. Norepinephrine responses to VR combat exposure moderated the relationship between avoidance symptoms and scales of functioning including physical functioning, physical-role functioning, and vitality. Among those with high levels of avoidance, norepinephrine change was inversely associated with functional status, whereas a positive correlation was observed for those with low levels of avoidance. Our findings represent a novel use of a virtual environment to display combat-related stimuli to returning SMs to elucidate mind-body connections inherent in their responses. The insight gained improves our understanding of post-deployment symptoms and quality of life in SMs and may facilitate enhancements in treatment. Further research is needed to validate these findings in other populations and to define the implications for treatment effectiveness. PMID:25852586

  5. Catecholamine responses to virtual combat: implications for post-traumatic stress and dimensions of functioning.

    PubMed

    Highland, Krista B; Costanzo, Michelle E; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D; Ndiongue, Rochelle B; Reinhardt, Brian J; Rothbaum, Barbara; Rizzo, Albert A; Roy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms can result in functional impairment among service members (SMs), even in those without a clinical diagnosis. The variability in outcomes may be related to underlying catecholamine mechanisms. Individuals with PTSD tend to have elevated basal catecholamine levels, though less is known regarding catecholamine responses to trauma-related stimuli. We assessed whether catecholamine responses to a virtual combat environment impact the relationship between PTSD symptom clusters and elements of functioning. Eighty-seven clinically healthy SMs, within 2 months after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan, completed self-report measures, viewed virtual-reality (VR) combat sequences, and had sequential blood draws. Norepinephrine responses to VR combat exposure moderated the relationship between avoidance symptoms and scales of functioning including physical functioning, physical-role functioning, and vitality. Among those with high levels of avoidance, norepinephrine change was inversely associated with functional status, whereas a positive correlation was observed for those with low levels of avoidance. Our findings represent a novel use of a virtual environment to display combat-related stimuli to returning SMs to elucidate mind-body connections inherent in their responses. The insight gained improves our understanding of post-deployment symptoms and quality of life in SMs and may facilitate enhancements in treatment. Further research is needed to validate these findings in other populations and to define the implications for treatment effectiveness. PMID:25852586

  6. Protective Effects of D-Penicillamine on Catecholamine-Induced Myocardial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Říha, Michal; Hašková, Pavlína; Martin, Jan; Filipský, Tomáš; Váňová, Kateřina; Vávrová, Jaroslava; Holečková, Magdalena; Homola, Pavel; Vítek, Libor; Palicka, Vladimír; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2016-01-01

    Iron and copper release participates in the myocardial injury under ischemic conditions and hence protection might be achieved by iron chelators. Data on copper chelation are, however, sparse. The effect of the clinically used copper chelator D-penicillamine in the catecholamine model of acute myocardial injury was tested in cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2 and in Wistar Han rats. D-Penicillamine had a protective effect against catecholamine-induced injury both in vitro and in vivo. It protected H9c2 cells against the catecholamine-induced viability loss in a dose-dependent manner. In animals, both intravenous D-penicillamine doses of 11 (low) and 44 mg/kg (high) decreased the mortality caused by s.c. isoprenaline (100 mg/kg) from 36% to 14% and 22%, respectively. However, whereas the low D-penicillamine dose decreased the release of cardiac troponin T (specific marker of myocardial injury), the high dose resulted in an increase. Interestingly, the high dose led to a marked elevation in plasma vitamin C. This might be related to potentiation of oxidative stress, as suggested by additional in vitro experiments with D-penicillamine (iron reduction and the Fenton reaction). In conclusion, D-penicillamine has protective potential against catecholamine-induced cardiotoxicity; however the optimal dose selection seems to be crucial for further application. PMID:26788248

  7. Fully automated high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the analysis of free catecholamines in urine.

    PubMed

    Said, R; Robinet, D; Barbier, C; Sartre, J; Huguet, C

    1990-08-24

    A totally automated and reliable high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the routine determination of free catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) in urine. The catecholamines were isolated from urine samples using small alumina columns. A standard automated method for pH adjustment of urine before the extraction step has been developed. The extraction was performed on an ASPEC (Automatic Sample Preparation with Extraction Columns, Gilson). The eluate was collected in a separate tube and then automatically injected into the chromatographic column. The catecholamines were separated by reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography and quantified by fluorescence detection. No manual intervention was required during the extraction and separation procedure. One sample may be run every 15 min, ca. 96 samples in 24 h. Analytical recoveries for all three catecholamines are 63-87%, and the detection limits are 0.01, 0.01, and 0.03 microM for norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine, respectively, which is highly satisfactory for urine. Day-to-day coefficients of variation were less than 10%. PMID:2277100

  8. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions. PMID:23747840

  9. POTENTIAL MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR CHLOROTRIAZINE-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CATECHOLAMINES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Potential Mechanisms Responsible for Chlorotriazine-induced Changes in Catecholamine Metabolism in Pheochromocytoma (PC12) Cells*
    PARIKSHIT C. DAS1, WILLIAM K. McELROY2 , AND RALPH L. COOPER2+
    1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chape...

  10. DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CATECHOLAMINES BY CHLOROTRIAZINE HERBICIDES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential modulation of catecholamines by chlorotriazine herbicides in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells in vitro.

    Das PC, McElroy WK, Cooper RL.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599, USA.

    Epidemiological, wildlife, and lab...

  11. Concepts of Scientific Integrative Medicine Applied to the Physiology and Pathophysiology of Catecholamine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2016-01-01

    This review presents concepts of scientific integrative medicine and relates them to the physiology of catecholamine systems and to the pathophysiology of catecholamine-related disorders. The applications to catecholamine systems exemplify how scientific integrative medicine links systems biology with integrative physiology. Concepts of scientific integrative medicine include (i) negative feedback regulation, maintaining stability of the body’s monitored variables; (ii) homeostats, which compare information about monitored variables with algorithms for responding; (iii) multiple effectors, enabling compensatory activation of alternative effectors and primitive specificity of stress response patterns; (iv) effector sharing, accounting for interactions among homeostats and phenomena such as hyperglycemia attending gastrointestinal bleeding and hyponatremia attending congestive heart failure; (v) stress, applying a definition as a state rather than as an environmental stimulus or stereotyped response; (vi) distress, using a noncircular definition that does not presume pathology; (vii) allostasis, corresponding to adaptive plasticity of feedback-regulated systems; and (viii) allostatic load, explaining chronic degenerative diseases in terms of effects of cumulative wear and tear. From computer models one can predict mathematically the effects of stress and allostatic load on the transition from wellness to symptomatic disease. The review describes acute and chronic clinical disorders involving catecholamine systems—especially Parkinson disease—and how these concepts relate to pathophysiology, early detection, and treatment and prevention strategies in the post-genome era. PMID:24265239

  12. Escherichia coli O157:H7 gene expression in the presence of the catecholamine norepinephrine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the effects of the catecholamine norepinephrine (NE) on the expression of virulence factors in Escherichia coli O157:H7, the clinical-type isolate EDL933 (ATCC 43895) was grown in the presence or absence of NE. An in-vitro culture system made up of low initial innocula and a serum-SAPI ba...

  13. The Janus faces of 3-hydroxykynurenine: dual redox modulatory activity and lack of neurotoxicity in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Maya-López, Marisol; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Ali, Syed F; Chavarría, Anahí; Santamaría, Abel

    2014-11-17

    3-Hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), an intermediate metabolite of the kynurenine pathway, has been largely hypothesized as a neurotoxic molecule contributing to neurodegeneration in several experimental and clinical conditions. Interestingly, the balance in literature points to a dual role of this molecule in the CNS: in vitro studies describe neurotoxic and/or antioxidant properties, whereas in vivo studies suggest a role of this metabolite as a weak neurotoxin. This work was designed to investigate, under different experimental conditions, whether or not 3-HK is toxic to cells, and if the redox activity exerted by this molecule modulates its actions in the rat striatum. In order to evaluate these effects, 3-HK was administered in vitro to isolated striatal slices, and in vivo to the striatum of rats. In striatal slices, 3-HK exerted a concentration- and time-dependent effect on lipid peroxidation, inducing both pro-oxidant actions at low (5-20) micromolar concentrations, and antioxidant activity at a higher concentration (100µM). Interestingly, while 3-HK was unable to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in slices, at the same range of concentrations it prevented the deleterious effects exerted by the neurotoxin and related metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN), the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, and the pro-oxidant compound iron sulfate. These protective actions were related to the stimulation of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. In addition, 3-HK stimulated the protein content of the transcription factor and antioxidant regulator Nrf2, and some of its related proteins. Accordingly, 3-HK, but not QUIN, exhibited reductive properties at high concentrations. The striatal tissue of animals infused with 3-HK exhibited moderate levels of lipid and protein oxidation at short times post-lesion (h), but these endpoints were substantially decreased at longer times (days). These effects were correlated with an early increase in

  14. Neurotoxic Alkaloids: Saxitoxin and Its Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Maria; D’Agostino, Paul M.; Mihali, Troco K.; Moffitt, Michelle C.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and its 57 analogs are a broad group of natural neurotoxic alkaloids, commonly known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs). PSTs are the causative agents of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and are mostly associated with marine dinoflagellates (eukaryotes) and freshwater cyanobacteria (prokaryotes), which form extensive blooms around the world. PST producing dinoflagellates belong to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium and Pyrodinium whilst production has been identified in several cyanobacterial genera including Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, Aphanizomenon Planktothrix and Lyngbya. STX and its analogs can be structurally classified into several classes such as non-sulfated, mono-sulfated, di-sulfated, decarbamoylated and the recently discovered hydrophobic analogs—each with varying levels of toxicity. Biotransformation of the PSTs into other PST analogs has been identified within marine invertebrates, humans and bacteria. An improved understanding of PST transformation into less toxic analogs and degradation, both chemically or enzymatically, will be important for the development of methods for the detoxification of contaminated water supplies and of shellfish destined for consumption. Some PSTs also have demonstrated pharmaceutical potential as a long-term anesthetic in the treatment of anal fissures and for chronic tension-type headache. The recent elucidation of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in cyanobacteria and the identification of new PST analogs will present opportunities to further explore the pharmaceutical potential of these intriguing alkaloids. PMID:20714432

  15. Role of Prion Protein Aggregation in Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Thellung, Stefano; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson, Alzheimer’s, Huntington, and prion diseases, the deposition of aggregated misfolded proteins is believed to be responsible for the neurotoxicity that characterizes these diseases. Prion protein (PrP), the protein responsible of prion diseases, has been deeply studied for the peculiar feature of its misfolded oligomers that are able to propagate within affected brains, inducing the conversion of the natively folded PrP into the pathological conformation. In this review, we summarize the available experimental evidence concerning the relationship between aggregation status of misfolded PrP and neuronal death in the course of prion diseases. In particular, we describe the main findings resulting from the use of different synthetic (mainly PrP106-126) and recombinant PrP-derived peptides, as far as mechanisms of aggregation and amyloid formation, and how these different spatial conformations can affect neuronal death. In particular, most data support the involvement of non-fibrillar oligomers rather than actual amyloid fibers as the determinant of neuronal death. PMID:22942726

  16. Potential neurotoxic effects of polymethylmethacrylate during cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Goldstein, Jacob; Spektor, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Cranioplasty for the surgical correction of cranial defects is often performed using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), or bone cement. Immediately prior to PMMA application, a liquid monomer form (methylacrylate) and a benzoyl peroxide accelerator are mixed resulting in polymerization, an exothermic reaction during which monomer linking and subsequent formation of solid polymer occur. The potential side effects of residual methylacrylate monomer toxicity and thermal damage of neural tissue during PMMA hardening have been described in various in vitro, animal, and cadaveric studies; however, clinically documented in vivo neurotoxicity in humans attributed to either of the above two mechanisms during PMMA cranioplasty is lacking. We present a series of four patients operated for removal of cerebellopontine angle lesions and two operated for the excision of parieto-occipital tumors who sustained cranial neuropathies and encephalopathies with transient or permanent neurological deficits that could not be attributed to surgical manipulation. We hypothesize that these complications most likely occurred due to thermal damage and/or chemical toxicity from exposure to PMMA during cranioplasty. Our case series indicates that even small volumes of PMMA used for cranioplasty may cause severe side effects related to thermal damage or to exposure of neural tissue to methylacrylate monomer. PMID:25085727

  17. Enhanced metabolite generation

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  18. Urinary thrombomodulin and catecholamine levels are interrelated in healthy volunteers immersed in cold and warm water

    PubMed Central

    Pakanen, Lasse; Pääkkönen, Tiina; Ikäheimo, Tiina M; Rintamäki, Hannu; Leppäluoto, Juhani; Kaija, Helena; Kortelainen, Marja-Leena; Rautio, Arja; Porvari, Katja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe hypothermia has been shown to influence the levels of catecholamines and thrombomodulin, an endothelial protein essentially involved in the regulation of haemostasis and inflammation. A link between thrombomodulin and catecholamines during cold exposure has also been previously suggested. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of short-term cold exposure without hypothermia on catecholamines and the circulating and urinary thrombomodulin levels. Seven healthy male subjects were immersed in cold water (+10°C) for 10 minutes followed by a 20-minute immersion in +28°C water. Warm water immersion was performed separately for each subject (+30°C for 30 minutes). Thrombomodulin and catecholamine concentrations were measured from pre- and post-immersion (up to 23 hours) samples. In urine, the thrombomodulin level correlated strongly with adrenaline (ρ = 0.806) and noradrenaline (ρ = 0.760) levels. There were no significant differences in thrombomodulin levels between immersion temperatures. Post-immersion urinary thrombomodulin levels were significantly lower than the pre-immersion level at both immersion temperatures. Median concentrations of plasma noradrenaline and urinary adrenaline were higher after exposure to +10°C than to +30°C. Thus, further evidence of the association between thrombomodulin and catecholamines was gained in a physiologically relevant setting in humans. Additionally, it is evident that a short-term cold exposure was not able to elicit changes in the thrombomodulin levels in a follow-up period of up to 23 hours. These findings provide further understanding of the physiological responses to cold during immersion, and of the potential influence of stress on haemostatic and inflammatory responses.

  19. Increased Catecholamine Secretion from Single Adrenal Chromaffin Cells in DOCA-Salt Hypertension Is Associated with Potassium Channel Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of catecholamine release from single adrenal chromaffin cells isolated from normotensive and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats was investigated. These cells were used as a model for sympathetic nerves to better understand how exocytotic release of catecholamines is altered in this model of hypertension. Catecholamine secretion was evoked by local application of acetylcholine (1 mM) or high K+ (70 mM), and continuous amperometry was used to monitor catecholamine secretion as an oxidative current. The total number of catecholamine molecules secreted from a vesicle, the total number of vesicles fusing and secreting, and the duration of secretion in response to a stimulus were all significantly greater for chromaffin cells from hypertensive rats as compared to normotensive controls. The greater catecholamine secretion from DOCA-salt cells results, at least in part, from functionally impaired large conductance, Ca2+-activated (BK) and ATP-sensitive K+ channels. This work reveals that there is altered vesicular release of catecholamines from these cells (and possibly from perivascular sympathetic nerves) and this may contribute to increased vasomotor tone in DOCA-salt hypertension. PMID:23937098

  20. 2,2',3,3',6,6'-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) is Enantioselectively Oxidized to Hydroxylated Metabolites by Rat Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xianai; Pramanik, Ananya; Duffel, Michael W.; Hrycay, Eugene G.; Bandiera, Stelvio M.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Kania-Korwel, Izabela

    2011-01-01

    Developmental exposure to multiple-ortho substituted polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in laboratory animals and humans by mechanisms involving the sensitization of Ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In the case of PCB 136, the sensitization of RyR is enantiospecific, with only (-)-PCB 136 being active. However, the role of enantioselective metabolism in the developmental neurotoxicity of PCB 136 is poorly understood. The present study employed hepatic microsomes from phenobarbital (PB-), dexamethasone (DEX-) and corn oil (VEH-)treated male Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the hypothesis that PCB 136 atropisomers are enantioselectively metabolized by P450 enzymes to potentially neurotoxic, hydroxylated PCB 136 metabolites. The results demonstrated the time- and isoform-dependent formation of three metabolites, with 5-OH-PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol) being the major metabolite. The formation of 5-OH-PCB 136 increased with the activity of P450 2B enzymes in the microsomal preparation, which is consistent with PCB 136 metabolism by rat P450 2B1. The minor metabolite 4-OH-PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-4-ol) was produced by a currently unidentified P450 enzymes. An enantiomeric enrichment of (-)-PCB 136 was observed in microsomal incubations due to the preferential metabolism of (+)-PCB 136 to the corresponding 5-OH-PCB 136 (2,2',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol) atropisomer. 4-OH-PCB 136 displayed an enrichment of the atropisomer formed from (-)-PCB 136; however, the enrichment of this metabolite atropisomer didn't affect the enantiomeric enrichment of the parent PCB because 4-OH-PCB 136 is only a minor metabolite. Although the formation of 5- and 4-OH-PCB 136 atropisomers increased with time, the enantioselective formation of the OH-PCB metabolites resulted in constant enantiomeric enrichment, especially at later incubation times. These observations not only demonstrate that the chiral signatures of

  1. [Catecholamines and their metabolic enzymes in the rat myocardium after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Kwetncanski, R; Tigranian, R A; Torda, T

    1982-01-01

    In the myocardium of the weightless and centrifuged rats flown for 18.5 days onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-936 the catecholamine concentration and activity of enzymes involved in their synthesis and degradation--dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, monoamine oxidase and catechol-O-methyl transferase--were measured. The catecholamine concentration in the myocardium of both flight groups significantly increased, and the enzyme activity did not change. These results suggest that an exposure to space flight increases the catecholamine concentration and exerts no effect on their synthesis and degradation in the rat myocardium. PMID:7098414

  2. Ethoxyquin provides neuroprotection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Reed, Nicole; Mi, Ruifa; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido; Hoke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Ethoxyquin was recently identified as a neuroprotective compound against toxic neuropathies and efficacy was demonstrated against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. In this study we examined the efficacy of ethoxyquin in preventing neurotoxicity of cisplatin in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and explored its mechanism of action. Ethoxyquin prevented neurotoxicity of cisplatin in vitro in a sensory neuronal cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. In vivo, chronic co-administration of ethoxyquin partially abrogated cisplatin-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological abnormalities. Furthermore, ethoxyquin did not interfere with cisplatin's ability to induce tumor cell death in ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, ethoxyquin reduced the levels of two client proteins (SF3B2 and ataxin-2) of a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) when co-administered with cisplatin in vitro. These results implied that the neuroprotective effect of ethoxyquin is mediated through these two client proteins of Hsp90. In fact, reducing levels of SF3B2 in tissue-cultured neurons was effective against neurotoxicity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that ethoxyquin or other compounds that inhibit chaperone activity of Hsp90 and reduce levels of its client protein, SF3B2 may be developed as an adjuvant therapy to prevent neurotoxicity in cisplatin-based chemotherapy protocols. PMID:27350330

  3. Ethoxyquin provides neuroprotection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Reed, Nicole; Mi, Ruifa; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido; Hoke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Ethoxyquin was recently identified as a neuroprotective compound against toxic neuropathies and efficacy was demonstrated against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. In this study we examined the efficacy of ethoxyquin in preventing neurotoxicity of cisplatin in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and explored its mechanism of action. Ethoxyquin prevented neurotoxicity of cisplatin in vitro in a sensory neuronal cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. In vivo, chronic co-administration of ethoxyquin partially abrogated cisplatin-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological abnormalities. Furthermore, ethoxyquin did not interfere with cisplatin’s ability to induce tumor cell death in ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, ethoxyquin reduced the levels of two client proteins (SF3B2 and ataxin-2) of a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) when co-administered with cisplatin in vitro. These results implied that the neuroprotective effect of ethoxyquin is mediated through these two client proteins of Hsp90. In fact, reducing levels of SF3B2 in tissue-cultured neurons was effective against neurotoxicity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that ethoxyquin or other compounds that inhibit chaperone activity of Hsp90 and reduce levels of its client protein, SF3B2 may be developed as an adjuvant therapy to prevent neurotoxicity in cisplatin-based chemotherapy protocols. PMID:27350330

  4. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-12-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products. PMID:27295259

  5. Unmasking silent neurotoxicity following developmental exposure to environmental toxicants.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Andrew D; Aschner, Michael; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; Bilbo, Staci D; Caudle, W Michael; Makris, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Silent neurotoxicity, a term introduced approximately 25years ago, is defined as a persistent change to the nervous system that does not manifest as overt evidence of toxicity (i.e. it remains clinically unapparent) unless unmasked by experimental or natural processes. Silent neurotoxicants can be challenging for risk assessors, as the multifactorial experiments needed to reveal their effects are seldom conducted, and they are not addressed by current study design guidelines. This topic was the focus of a symposium addressing the interpretation and use of silent neurotoxicity data in human health risk assessments of environmental toxicants at the annual meeting of the Developmental Neurotoxicology Society (previously the Neurobehavioral Teratology Society) on June 30th, 2014. Several factors important to the design and interpretation of studies assessing the potential for silent neurotoxicity were discussed by the panelists and audience members. Silent neurotoxicity was demonstrated to be highly specific to the characteristics of the animals being examined, the unmasking agent tested, and the behavioral endpoint(s) evaluated. Overall, the experimental examples presented highlighted a need to consider common adverse outcomes and common biological targets for chemical and non-chemical stressors, particularly when the exposure and stressors are known to co-occur. Risk assessors could improve the evaluation of silent neurotoxicants in assessments through specific steps from researchers, including experiments to reveal the molecular targets and mechanisms that may result in specific types of silent neurotoxicity, and experiments with complex challenges reminiscent of the human situation. PMID:27049787

  6. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products.

  7. Predicting developmental neurotoxicity in rodents from larval zebrafish - - and vice versa

    EPA Science Inventory

    The complexity of standard mammalian developmental neurotoxicity tests limits evaluation of large numbers of chemicals. Less complex, more rapid assays using larval zebrafish are gaining popularity for evaluating the developmental neurotoxicity of chemicals; there remains, howeve...

  8. A screening approach using zebrafish for the detection and characterization of developmental neurotoxicity.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of chemicals have little or no data to support developmental neurotoxicity risk assessments. Current developmental neurotoxicity guideline studies mandating mammalian model systems are expensive and time consuming. Therefore a rapid, cost-effective method to assess de...

  9. CORRELATION BETWEEN NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE INHIBITION AND MIPAFOX-INDUCED NEUROPATHIC DAMAGE IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The correlation between neuropathic damage and inhibition of neurotoxic esterase or neuropathy target enzyme (NTE) was examined in rats acutely exposed to Mipafox (N, N'-diisopropylphosphorodiamidofluoridate), a neurotoxic organophospate. Brain and spinal cord NTE activities were...

  10. Plasma catecholamines and hyperglycaemia influence thermoregulation in man during prolonged exercise in the heat.

    PubMed

    Mora-Rodríguez, R; González-Alonso, J; Below, P R; Coyle, E F

    1996-03-01

    1. We manipulated plasma catecholamines (combined adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations) to three levels during prolonged exercise to determine their effect on cutaneous and forearm vascular conductance (CVC and FVC), oesophageal temperature (T(oes)) and cardiovascular responses. 2. On three occasions, seven endurance-trained men cycled at 65% VO2, max in the heat (33.1 +/- 0.7 degrees C) for 120-150 min. During the control trial (150 min duration), 0.45% saline was intravenously infused (SI) starting at 30 min, at a rate that replaced a third of the fluid losses. The infusion start time and rate were identical in all three trials. During SI, plasma catecholamine levels increased progressively and were 18.2 +/- 2.7 pmol ml-1 at 150 min. In another trial (120 min duration), adrenaline was infused (AI) at 0.1 microgram kg-1 min-1 and plasma catecholamine levels were elevated 6 pmol ml-1 above SI during the 60-120 min period. In a third trial (150 min duration), an 18% glucose solution was infused (GI) at a rate that maintained plasma glucose levels above 11 mM and plasma catecholamine levels were 5.0-5.5 pmol ml-1 lower (P < 0.05) than SI from 120-150 min. 3. Heat production and sweat rate were not different during the three trials and neither was the decline in stroke volume, cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. 4. Soon after beginning AI, CVC decreased 15%, T(oes) increased by 0.4 +/- 0.1 degree C and heart rate increased by 6 +/- 1 beats min-1; these significant (P < 0.05) differences from SI were maintained throughout the bout. As a result of GI, FVC was 15% higher than SI and T(oes) and heart rate were attenuated by 0.3 +/- 0.1 degree C and 7 +/- 1 beats min-1 at 150 min compared with SI (P < 0.05). 5. In conclusion, large increases in plasma catecholamine levels cause hyperthermia during exercise by vasoconstricting the skin. The mechanisms by which hyperglycaemia (i.e. 11 mM) attenuates hyperthermia are less clear and may be due to others factors

  11. Attenuation of Oxidative Damage by Boerhaavia diffusa L. Against Different Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Homogenate.

    PubMed

    Ayyappan, Prathapan; Palayyan, Salin Raj; Kozhiparambil Gopalan, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high rate of oxidative metabolic activity in the brain, intense production of reactive oxygen metabolite occurs, and the subsequent generation of free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, and ischemia as well as chronic neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, protective effects of polyphenol rich ethanolic extract of Boerhaavia diffusa (BDE), a neuroprotective edible medicinal plant against oxidative stress induced by different neurotoxic agents, were evaluated. BDE was tested against quinolinic acid (QA), 3-nitropropionic acid (NPA), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), and Fe (II)/EDTA complex induced oxidative stress in rat brain homogenates. QA, NPA, SNP, and Fe (II)/EDTA treatment caused an increased level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in brain homogenates along with a decline in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. BDE treatment significantly decreased the production of TBARS (p < .05) and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes like catalase and superoxide dismutase along with increased concentration of non-enzymatic antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). Similarly, BDE caused a significant decrease in the lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the cerebral cortex. Inhibitory potential of BDE against deoxyribose degradation (IC50 value 38.91 ± 0.12 μg/ml) shows that BDE can protect hydroxyl radical induced DNA damage in the tissues. Therefore, B. diffusa had high antioxidant potential that could inhibit the oxidative stress induced by different neurotoxic agents in brain. Since many of the neurological disorders are associated with free radical injury, these data may imply that B. diffusa, functioning as an antioxidant agent, may be beneficial for reducing various neurodegenerative complications. PMID:26268727

  12. Vanadium exposure induces olfactory dysfunction in an animal model of metal neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates chronic environmental exposure to transition metals may play a role in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Chronic inhalation exposure to welding fumes containing metal mixtures may be associated with development of PD. A significant amount of vanadium is present in welding fumes, as vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and incorporation of vanadium in the production of high strength steel has become more common. Despite the increased vanadium use in recent years, the neurotoxicological effects of this metal are not well characterized. Recently, we demonstrated that V2O5 induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase C delta (PKCδ)-dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Since anosmia (inability to perceive odors) and non-motor deficits are considered to be early symptoms of neurological diseases, in the present study, we examined the effect of V2O5 on the olfactory bulb in animal models. To mimic the inhalation exposure, we intranasally administered C57 black mice a low-dose of 182μg of V2O5 three times a week for one month, and behavioral, neurochemical and biochemical studies were performed. Our results revealed a significant decrease in olfactory bulb weights, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and increases in astroglia of the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb in the treatment groups relative to vehicle controls. Neurochemical changes were accompanied by impaired olfaction and locomotion. These findings suggest that nasal exposure to V2O5 adversely affects olfactory bulbs, resulting in neurobehavioral and neurochemical impairments. These results expand our understanding of vanadium neurotoxicity in environmentally-linked neurological conditions. PMID:24362016

  13. Vanadium Exposure Induces Olfactory Dysfunction in an Animal Model of Metal Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates chronic environmental exposure to transition metals may play a role in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). Chronic inhalation exposure to welding fumes containing metal mixtures may be associated with development of PD. A significant amount of vanadium is present in welding fumes, as vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and incorporation of vanadium in the production of high strength steel has become more common. Despite the increased vanadium use in recent years, the neurotoxicological effects of this metal are not well characterized. Recently, we demonstrated that V2O5 induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase C delta (PKCδ)-dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Since anosmia (inability to perceive odors) and non-motor deficits are considered to be early symptoms of neurological diseases, in the present study, we examined the effect of V2O5 on the olfactory bulb in animal models. To mimic the inhalation exposure, we intranasally administered C57 black mice a low-dose of 182 µg of V2O5 three times a week for one month, and behavioral, neurochemical and biochemical studies were performed. Our results revealed a significant decrease in olfactory bulb weights, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and increases in astroglia of the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb in the treatment groups relative to vehicle controls. Neurochemical changes were accompanied by impaired olfaction and locomotion. These findings suggest that nasal exposure to V2O5 adversely affects olfactory bulbs, resulting in neurobehavioral and neurochemical impairments. These results expand our understanding of vanadium neurotoxicity in environmentally-linked neurological conditions. PMID:24362016

  14. Neurotoxic potential and cellular uptake of T-2 toxin in human astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Maria; Lenczyk, Marlies; Schwerdt, Gerald; Gekle, Michael; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-03-18

    The trichothecene mycotoxin T-2 toxin, which is produced by fungi of the Fusarium species, is a worldwide occurring contaminant of cereal based food and feed. The cytotoxic properties of T-2 toxin are already well described with apoptosis being a major mechanism of action in various cell lines as well as in primary cells of different origin. However, only few data on neurotoxic properties of T-2 toxin are reported so far, but in vivo studies showed different effects of T-2 toxin on behavior as well as on levels of brain amines in animals. To further investigate the cytotoxic properties of T-2 toxin on cells derived from brain tissue, normal human astrocytes in primary culture (NHA) were used in this study. Besides studies of cytotoxicity, apoptosis (caspase-3-activation, Annexin V) and necrosis (LDH-release), the cellular uptake and metabolism of T-2 toxin in NHA was analyzed and compared to the uptake in an established human cell line (HT-29). The results show that human astrocytes were highly sensitive to the cytotoxic properties of T-2 toxin, and apoptosis, induced at low concentrations, was identified for the first time as the mechanism of toxic action in NHA. Furthermore, a strong accumulation of T-2 toxin in NHA and HT-29 cells was detected, and T-2 toxin was subjected to metabolism leading to HT-2 toxin, a commonly found metabolite after T-2 toxin incubation in both cell types. This formation seems to occur within the cells since incubations of T-2 toxin with cell depleted culture medium did not lead to any degradation of the parent toxin. The results of this study emphasize the neurotoxic potential of T-2 toxin in human astrocytes at low concentrations after short incubation times. PMID:23363530

  15. The protective effect of Physalis peruviana L. against cadmium-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E; Bauomy, Amira A; Diab, Marwa M S; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M; El-Khadragy, Manal F

    2014-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the protective effect of Physalis peruviana L. (family Solanaceae) against cadmium-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups. Group 1 was used as control. Group 2 was intraperitoneally injected with 6.5 mg/kg bwt of cadmium chloride for 5 days. Group 3 was treated with 200 mg/kg bwt of methanolic extract of Physalis (MEPh). Group 4 was pretreated with MEPh 1 h before cadmium for 5 days. Cadmium treatment induced marked disturbances in neurochemical parameters as indicating by significant (p < 0.05) reduction in dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in cerebellum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex and enhanced significantly (p < 0.05) the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide in the brain. Cadmium treatment also decreased the amount of nonenzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants significantly (p < 0.05). Pretreatment with MEPh resulted in significant (p < 0.05) decreases in lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide levels and restored the amount of glutathione successfully. Although, preadministration of MEPh also brought the activities of cellular antioxidant enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase significantly (p < 0.05) to the control levels, as well as the levels of Ca(2+), Cl(-), DA, 5-HT, and serotonin metabolite, 5-HIAA. These data indicated that Physalis has a beneficial effect in ameliorating the cadmium-induced oxidative neurotoxicity in the brain of rats. PMID:25022246

  16. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin; Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki; Akaike, Akinori; Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  17. Minocycline Attenuates Iron Neurotoxicity in Cortical Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Roetling, Jing; Chen, Lifen; Regan, Raymond F.

    2009-01-01

    Iron neurotoxicity may contribute to the pathogenesis of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The tetracycline derivative minocycline is protective in ICH models, due putatively to inhibition of microglial activation. Although minocycline also chelates iron, its effect on iron neurotoxicity has not been reported, and was examined in this study. Cortical cultures treated with 10 μM ferrous sulfate for 24h sustained loss of most neurons and an increase in malondialdehyde. Minocycline prevented this injury, with near-complete protection at 30 μM. Two other inhibitors of microglial activation, doxycycline and macrophage/microglia inhibitory factor, were ineffective. Oxidation of isolated culture membranes by iron was also inhibited by minocycline. Consistent with prior observations, minocycline chelated iron in a siderophore colorometric assay; at concentrations less than 100 μM, its activity exceeded that of deferoxamine. These results suggest that attenuation of iron neurotoxicity may contribute to the beneficial effect of minocycline in hemorrhagic stroke and other CNS injury models. PMID:19523448

  18. The Potential for Plant Derivatives against Acrylamide Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Adewale, O O; Brimson, J M; Odunola, O A; Gbadegesin, M A; Owumi, S E; Isidoro, C; Tencomnao, T

    2015-07-01

    Certain industrial chemicals and food contaminants have been demonstrated to possess neurotoxic activity and have been suspected to cause brain-related disorders in humans. Acrylamide (ACR), a confirmed neurotoxicant, can be found in trace amount in commonly consumed human aliments as a result of food processing or cooking. This discovery aroused a great concern in the public, and increasing efforts are continuously geared towards the resolution of this serious threat. The broad chemical diversity of plants may offer the resources for novel antidotes against neurotoxicants. With the goal of attenuating neurotoxicity of ACR, several plants extracts or derivatives have been employed. This review presents the plants and their derivatives that have been shown most active against ACR-induced neurotoxicity, with a focus on their origin, pharmacological activity, and antidote effects. PMID:25886076

  19. Manganese-induced Neurotoxicity: From C. elegans to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Peres, Tanara V.; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is one of the most abundant metals on the earth. It is required for normal cellular activities, but overexposure leads to toxicity. Neurons are more susceptible to Mn-induced toxicity than other cells, and accumulation of Mn in the brain results in Manganism that presents with Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms. In the last decade, a number of Mn transporters have been identified, which improves our understanding of Mn transport in and out of cells. However, the mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity is only partially uncovered, with further research needed to explore the whole picture of Mn-induced toxicity. In this review, we will address recent progress in Mn-induced neurotoxicity from C. elegans to humans, and explore future directions that will help understand the mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. PMID:25893090

  20. The use of astrocytes in culture as model systems for evaluating neurotoxic-induced-injury.

    PubMed

    Aschner, M; Kimelberg, H K

    1991-01-01

    The prevailing thought that astrocytes function predominantly as passive metabolic or even physical support for neurons has faded over the last 20 years. Today these stellar shaped cells are credited with an expanded role, playing key functions in CNS development, homeostasis, and pathology. In probing their expanded roles, primary astrocyte culture systems have proven to be an indispensable tool. Astrocytes have been implicated in both a defensive and facilitatory capacity for many toxic injuries. Evidence for a protective role of astrocytes in modulating CNS toxicity is afforded by observations that the toxicity of glutamate to cortical neurons is diminished upon astrocytic enrichment of the cell culture (Rosenberg and Aizenman, 1989). In cultures of rat cerebral cortex in which astrocyte proliferation is stringently suppressed, glutamate neurotoxicity occurs at low glutamate concentrations similar to those which are normally found in the extracellular space in the hippocampus. In the presence of excess astrocytes, concentrations of glutamate one-hundred fold higher are required to produce equivalent neurotoxicity (Rosenberg and Aizenman, 1989). Astrocytes can facilitate the action of neurotoxins via a modulating process which takes place within the astrocyte or by a direct cytotoxic effect. Whereas primary astrocyte cultures remain unaffected by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP; Marini et al., 1989), they function prominently in the selective destruction of dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway in humans, other primates and rodents (Davis et al. 1979; Langston et al., 1983; Burns et al., 1983; Langston et al., 1984; Heikkila et al., 1984; Jarvis and Wagner, 1985). Thus, while MPTP by itself is not toxic to cerebellar cells in co-culture with cerebellar astrocytes, MPTP is toxic to the granule cells (Marini et al, 1989). This is thought to be due to an astrocyte-mediated conversion of MPTP to its highly polar and toxic metabolite, 1

  1. Special Issue: Environmental Chemicals and Neurotoxicity Oxidative stress in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, João B. T.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, several lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress represents a critical event related to the neurotoxic effects elicited by this toxicant. The objective of this review is to summarize and discuss data from experimental and epidemiological studies that have been important in clarifying the molecular events which mediate MeHg-induced oxidative damage and, consequently, toxicity. Although unanswered questions remain, the electrophilic properties of MeHg and its ability to oxidize thiols have been reported to play decisive roles to the oxidative consequences observed after MeHg exposure. However, a close examination of the relationship between low levels of MeHg necessary to induce oxidative stress and the high amounts of sulfhydryl-containing antioxidants in mammalian cells (e.g., glutathione) have led to the hypothesis that nucleophilic groups with extremely high affinities for MeHg (e.g., selenols) might represent primary targets in MeHg-induced oxidative stress. Indeed, the inhibition of antioxidant selenoproteins during MeHg poisoning in experimental animals has corroborated this hypothesis. The levels of different reactive species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide) have been reported to be increased in MeHg-exposed systems, and the mechanisms concerning these increments seem to involve a complex sequence of cascading molecular events, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis and decreased antioxidant capacity. This review also discusses potential therapeutic strategies to counteract MeHg-induced toxicity and oxidative stress, emphasizing the use of organic selenocompounds, which generally present higher affinity for MeHg when compared to the classically

  2. Sertraline-induced potentiation of the CYP3A4-dependent neurotoxicity of carbamazepine: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chaitali; Hossain, Mohammad; Spriggs, Addison; Ghosh, Arnab; Grant, Gerald A.; Marchi, Nicola; Perucca, Emilio; Janigro, Damir

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Drug toxicity is a hurdle to drug development and to clinical translation of basic research. Antiepileptic drugs such as carbamazepine (CBZ) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as sertraline (SRT) are commonly co-prescribed to patients with epilepsy and comorbid depression. Because SRT may interfere with cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activity and CYPs have been implicated in the conversion of CBZ to reactive cytotoxic metabolites, we investigated in vitro models to determine whether SRT affects the neurotoxic potential of CBZ and the mechanisms involved. Methods Human fetal brain-derived dopaminergic neurons, human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), and embryonic kidney (HEK) cells were used to evaluate cytotoxicity of CBZ and SRT individually and in combination. Nitrite and glutathione (GSH) levels were measured with drug exposure. To validate the role of CYP3A4 in causing neurotoxicity, drug metabolism was compared to cell death in HEK CYP3A4 overex-pressed and cells pretreated with the CYP3A4 inhibitor ketoconazole. Results In all cellular systems tested, exposure to CBZ (127 μM) or SRT (5 μM) alone caused negligible cytotoxicity. By contrast CBZ, tested at a much lower concentration (17 μM) in combination with SRT (5 μM), produced prominent cytotoxicity within 15 min exposure. In neurons and HBMECs, cytotoxicity was associated with increased nitrite levels, suggesting involvement of free radicals as a pathogenetic mechanism. Pretreatment of HBMECs with reduced GSH or with the GSH precursor N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevented cytotoxic response. In HEK cells, the cytotoxic response to the CBZ + SRT combination correlated with the rate of CBZ biotransformation and production of 2-hydroxy CBZ, further suggesting a causative role of reactive metabolites. In the same system, cytotoxicity was potentiated by overexpression of CYP3A4, and prevented by CYP3A4 inhibitor. Significance These results demonstrate an unexpected

  3. Cancer Treatment-Induced Neurotoxicity: A Focus on Newer Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jacqueline B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity from traditional chemotherapy and radiotherapy is widely recognized. The adverse effects of newer therapeutics such as biological and immunotherapeutic agents are less familiar and they are also associated with significant neurotoxicity in the central and peripheral nervous systems. This review addresses the main toxicities of cancer treatment by symptom with a focus on the newer therapeutics. Recognition of these patterns of toxicity is important as drug discontinuation or dose adjustment may prevent further neurologic injury. Also, knowledge of these toxicities helps to differentiate treatment-related symptoms from progression of cancer or its involvement of the nervous system. PMID:26391778

  4. Neonatal Anesthesia Neurotoxicity: A Review for Cleft and Craniofacial Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Laub, Donald R; Williams, Robert K

    2015-07-01

    There is growing evidence that the commonly used anesthetic agents cause some degree of damage to the early developing brain. The animal evidence for anesthetic neurotoxicity is compelling. Numerous confounders in human research prevent researchers from drawing definitive conclusions about the degree of risk. For every surgery, it should be assessed whether the benefits of an early surgical procedure justify a potential but unquantifiable risk of neurotoxicity of anesthetic agents. The timing and number of surgeries in our treatment protocols may need to be reevaluated to account for these potential risks. PMID:24941351

  5. Translational Biomarkers of Neurotoxicity: A Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Perspective on The Way Forward

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxicity has been linked to a number of common drugs and chemicals, yet efficient and accurate methods to detect it are lacking. There is a need for more sensitive and specific biomarkers of neurotoxicity that can help diagnose and predict neurotoxicity that are relevant acr...

  6. Stimulation of catecholamine secretion from cultured chromaffin cells by an ionophore-mediated rise in intracellular sodium.

    PubMed

    Suchard, S J; Lattanzio, F A; Rubin, R W; Pressman, B C

    1982-09-01

    The significance of intracellular Na+ concentration in catecholamine secretion of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was investigated using the monovalent carboxylic ionophore monensin. This ionophore, which is known to mediate a one-for-one exchange of intracellular K+ for extracellular Na+, induces a slow, prolonged release of catecholamines which, at 6 h, amounts of 75-90% of the total catecholamines; carbachol induces a rapid pulse of catecholamine secretion of 25-35%. Although secretory granule numbers appear to be qualitatively reduced after carbachol, multiple carbachol, or Ba2+ stimulation, overall granule distribution remains similar to that in untreated cells. Monensin-stimulated catecholamine release requires extracellular Na+ but not Ca2+ whereas carbachol-stimulated catecholamine release requires extracellular Ca2+ and is partially dependent on extracellular Na+. Despite its high selectivity for monovalent ions, monensin is considerably more effective in promoting catecholamine secretion than the divalent ionophores, A23187 and ionomycin, which mediate a more direct entry of extracellular Ca2+ into the cell. We propose that the monensin-stimulated increase in intracellular Na+ levels causes an increase in the availability of intracellular Ca2+ which, in turn, stimulates exocytosis. This hypothesis is supported by the comparable stimulation of catecholamine release by ouabain which inhibits the outwardly directed Na+ pump and thus permits intracellular Na+ to accumulate. The relative magnitudes of the secretion elicited by monensin, carbachol, and the calcium ionophores, are most consistent with the hypothesis that, under normal physiological conditions, Na+ acts by decreasing the propensity of Ca2+-sequestering sites to bind the Ca2+ that enters the cell as a result of acetylcholine stimulation. PMID:7130269

  7. Isomer specific kinetics of dopamine beta-hydroxylase and arylsulfatase towards catecholamine sulfates.

    PubMed

    Strobel, G; Werle, E; Weicker, H

    1990-01-01

    Both isomers of epinephrine sulfate were synthesized, unequivocally identified by 1H-NMR and highly purified from catecholamines (less than 90 ppm). Bacterial as well as pig liver arylsulfatase A and B demonstrated a higher substrate turnover of epinephrine-4-sulfate, norepinephrine-4-sulfate and dopamine-4-sulfate as compared to the 3-sulfate isomers. The arylsulfatase B however, is less important for the deconjugation of these sulfoconjugates than arylsulfatase A. Since arylsulfatase A occurs in most human tissues, it might be of physiological significance in the deconjugation of the catecholamine sulfate isomers. Furthermore the kinetic data at pH 7.4 and 6.9 suggest the increased cleavage of the sulfate group, e.g. during exercise-induced acidosis. In contrast to results reported in the literature, dopamine sulfates were no substrates of dopamine beta-hydroxylase. PMID:2317215

  8. Diagnosis of pheochromocytoma in a hemodialysis patient through measurement of plasma catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Vantomme, Bram; Donck, Jan; van Hooland, Simon; Wauters, Anne; De Clippele, Marc; Neirynck, Valerie; Huysman, Frédérique

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a patient on chronic hemodialysis treatment with paroxysms of severe arterial hypertension accompanied by tachycardia, pallor, sweating and tremor. Measurement of plasma catecholamines revealed norepinephrine level of 4625 pg/mL (reference range 191-225 pg/mL), epinephrine level of 1035 pg/mL (58-76 pg/mL) and dopamine level of 148 pg/mL (50-100 pg/mL). MRI showed a left adrenal mass of 2 cm. After the patient was started on an alpha-1 adrenergic receptor blocker, she underwent a left adrenalectomy. Anatomopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. Although urinary testing is not possible in anuric hemodialysis patients, diagnosis of pheochromocytoma can be made through measurement of plasma free metanephrines and/or plasma catecholamines. PMID:26749316

  9. [Medichronal lowers blood ethanol and acetaldehyde and restores the concentration of catecholamines in rat tissues].

    PubMed

    Bozhko HKZh; Boĭko, T P; Kostiukovs'ka, L S

    1995-01-01

    Variation of ethanol and acetaldehyde concentrations in blood, catecholamines in hypothalamus, brain stem and hemispheres, heart and adrenal glands, serotonin in the same structures of the brain, thin intestine and blood in rats was studied. Isolated action of medichronal during 10 days against the background of prolonged administration of moderate doses of ethanol significantly lowered ethanol and acetaldehyde concentration in the animal blood. Medichronal increased the level of noradrenaline, lowered under the conditions of ethanol intoxication in the hypothalamus, and increased adrenalina level in the heart; noradrenaline level in adrenal glands is restored. The amount of serotonin in the blood and tissues increased under the conditions of ethanol intoxication did not vary under the action of medichronal. The obtained results indicate to pronounced detoxication influence of medichronal. One of the mechanisms of its action is normalizing the catecholamine changes caused by the ethanol intoxication in tissues. PMID:8592777

  10. Effect of consecutive cooling and immobilization on catecholamine metabolism in rat tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlina, E. S.; Waysman, S. M.; Zaydner, I. G.; Kogan, B. M.; Nozdracheva, L. V.

    1979-01-01

    The combined effect of two stressor stimuli--cooling and immobilization--acting successively on the sympathetic-adrenaline system was studied experimentally in rats that were cooled for 8 hours at 7 C on the first day and immobilized for 6 hours on the next day. The biochemical and histochemical methods used and the experimental technique involved are described in detail. The following conclusions were formulated: (1) the successive action of cooling and immobilization results in a stronger decrease in the adrenaline and noradrenaline content in the adrenal gland than that which could be due to a simple summation of the cooling and immobilization effects; (2) successive cooling and immobilization are followed by activation of catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal gland; and (3) 1-DOPA administration (45 mg/kg 3 times in 2 days) intraabdominally activated catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal glands in both the control and test animals.

  11. Postoperative catecholamine response to onychectomy in isoflurane-anesthetized cats. Effects of analgesics.

    PubMed

    Benson, G J; Wheaton, L G; Thurmon, J C; Tranquilli, W J; Olson, W A; Davis, C A

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-four healthy adult cats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. Six cats (group 1) served as controls; onychectomy of the forefeet was performed in the other three groups. Saline was administered intravenously to group 1, and morphine, xylazine, and salicylate were administered to groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Mixed venous blood samples were drawn for catecholamine analysis before induction of anesthesia, after recovery from anesthesia, and 30 minutes and 60 minutes after administration of the analgesic agent. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Isoflurane anesthesia alone induced a transient increase in epinephrine concentration. Norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations increased significantly after onychectomy. Morphine and xylazine significantly decreased postoperative norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations; salicylate did not. PMID:1853554

  12. Toxicological effects of red wine, orange juice, and other dietary SULT1A inhibitors via excess catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Ken

    2012-06-01

    SULT1A enzymes protect humans from catecholamines, but natural substances in many foods have been found to inhibit these enzymes in vitro. Given the hormonal roles of catecholamines, any in vivo SULT1A inhibition could have serious consequences. This paper uses a re-analysis of published data to confirm that SULT1A inhibitors have effect in vivo in at least some patients. Nineteen studies are cited that show ingestion of SULT1A inhibitors leading to catecholamine increases, blood pressure changes, migraine headaches, or atrial fibrillation. SULT1A inhibition does not create the catecholamines, but prevents normal catecholamine deactivation. Susceptible patients probably have lower-activity SULT1A alleles. The paper discusses new hypotheses that SULT1A inhibition can cause "holiday heart" arrhythmias and type 2 diabetes in susceptible patients. Subgroup analysis based on SULT1A alleles, and addition of a catecholamine source, should improve the consistency of results from tests of SULT1A inhibitors. SULT1A inhibition may be a key contributor to cheese-induced migraines (via annatto), false positives in metanephrine testing, and the cardiovascular impacts of recreational alcohols. PMID:22433984

  13. The catecholamine stress hormones norepinephrine and dopamine increase the virulence of pathogenic Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio campbellii.

    PubMed

    Pande, Gde Sasmita J; Suong, Nguyen Thao; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining a better understanding of mechanisms involved in bacterial infections is of paramount importance for the development of novel agents to control disease caused by (antibiotic resistant) pathogens in aquaculture. In this study, we investigated the impact of catecholamine stress hormones on growth and virulence factor production of pathogenic vibrios (i.e. two Vibrio campbellii strains and two Vibrio anguillarum strains). Both norepinephrine and dopamine (at 100 μM) significantly induced growth in media containing serum. The compounds also increased swimming motility of the tested strains, whereas they had no effect on caseinase, chitinase, and hemolysin activities. Further, antagonists for eukaryotic catecholamine receptors were able to neutralize some of the effects of the catecholamines. Indeed, the dopaminergic receptor antagonist chlorpromazine neutralized the effect of dopamine, and the α-adrenergic receptor antagonists phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine neutralized the effect of norepinephrine, whereas the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol had limited to no effect. Finally, pretreatment of pathogenic V. campbellii with catecholamines significantly increased its virulence toward giant freshwater prawn larvae. However, the impact of catecholamine receptor antagonists on in vivo virulence was less clear-cut when compared to the in vitro experiments. In summary, our results show that—similar to enteric pathogens—catecholamines also increase the virulence of vibrios that are pathogenic to aquatic organisms by increasing motility and growth in media containing serum. PMID:25264299

  14. Demonstration of. beta. -adrenergic receptors and catecholamine-mediated effects on cell proliferation in embryonic palatal tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of catecholamines to modulate cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis in other systems, and modulate adenylate cyclase activity in the developing palate during the period of cellular differentiation, made it of interest to determine their involvement in palatal ontogenesis. Catecholamines exert their physiologic effects via interaction with distinct membrane-bound receptors, one class being the B-adrenergic receptors which are coupled to stimulation of adenylate cyclase and the generation of cAMP. A direct radioligand binding technique utilizing the B-adrenergic antagonist (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol ((/sup 3/H)-DHA) was employed in the identification of B-adrenergic receptors in the developing murine secondary palate. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-DHA in embryonic (day 13) palatal tissue homogenates was saturable and of high affinity. The functionality of B-adrenergic receptor binding sites was assessed from the ability of embryonic palate mesenchmyal cells in vitro to respond to catecholamines with elevations of cAMP. Embryonic palate mesenchymal cells responded to various B-adrenergic catecholamine agonists with significant, dose-dependent accumulations of intracellular cAMP. Embryonic (day 13) maxillary tissue homogenates were analyzed for the presence of catecholamines by high performance liquid chromatography and radioenzymatic assay. Since normal palatal and craniofacial morphogenesis depends on proper temporal and spatial patterns of growth, the effect of B-adrenergic catecholamines on embryonic palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was investigated.

  15. Reserpine-induced Reduction in Norepinephrine Transporter Function Requires Catecholamine Storage Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Mandela, Prashant; Chandley, Michelle; Xu, Yao-Yu; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Ordway, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of rats with reserpine, an inhibitor of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), depletes norepinephrine (NE) and regulates NE transporter (NET) expression. The present study examined the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation of the NET by reserpine using cultured cells. Exposure of rat PC12 cells to reserpine for a period as short as 5 min decreased [3H]NE uptake capacity, an effect characterized by a robust decrease in the Vmax of the transport of [3H]NE. As expected, reserpine did not displace the binding of [3H]nisoxetine from the NET in membrane homogenates. The potency of reserpine for reducing [3H]NE uptake was dramatically lower in SK-N-SH cells that have reduced storage capacity for catecholamines. Reserpine had no effect on [3H]NE uptake in HEK-293 cells transfected with the rat NET (293-hNET), cells that lack catecholamine storage vesicles. NET regulation by reserpine was independent of trafficking of the NET from the cell surface. Pre-exposure of cells to inhibitors of several intracellular signaling cascades known to regulate the NET, including Ca2+/Ca2+-calmodulin dependent kinase and protein kinases A, C and G, did not affect the ability of reserpine to reduce [3H]NE uptake. Treatment of PC12 cells with the catecholamine depleting agent, α-methyl-p-tyrosine, increased [3H]NE uptake and eliminated the inhibitory effects of reserpine on [3H]NE uptake. Reserpine non-competitively inhibits NET activity through a Ca2+-independent process that requires catecholamine storage vesicles, revealing a novel pharmacological method to modify NET function. Further characterization of the molecular nature of reserpine's action could lead to the development of alternative therapeutic strategies for treating disorders known to be benefitted by treatment with traditional competitive NET inhibitors. PMID:20176067

  16. Spatial and activity-dependent catecholamine release in rat adrenal medulla under native neuronal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle; Zarkua, Georgy; Chan, Shyue-An; Sridhar, Arun; Smith, Corey

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla in rat receive excitatory synaptic input through anterior and posterior divisions of the sympathetic splanchnic nerve. Upon synaptic stimulation, the adrenal medulla releases the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine into the suprarenal vein for circulation throughout the body. Under sympathetic tone, catecholamine release is modest. However, upon activation of the sympathoadrenal stress reflex, and increased splanchnic firing, adrenal catecholamine output increases dramatically. Moreover, specific stressors can preferentially increase release of either epinephrine (i.e., hypoglycemia) or norepinephrine (i.e., cold stress). The mechanism for this stressor-dependent segregated release of catecholamine species is not yet fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of either division of the splanchnic selects for epinephrine over norepinephrine release. We introduce an ex vivo rat preparation that maintains native splanchnic innervation of the adrenal gland and we document experimental advantages and limitations of this preparation. We utilize fast scanning cyclic voltammetry to detect release of both epinephrine and norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla, and report that epinephrine and norepinephrine release are regulated spatially and in a frequency-dependent manner. We provide data to show that epinephrine is secreted preferentially from the periphery of the medulla and exhibits a higher threshold and steeper stimulus-secretion function than norepinephrine. Elevated stimulation of the whole nerve specifically enhances epinephrine release from the peripheral medulla. Our data further show that elimination of either division from stimulation greatly attenuated epinephrine release under elevated stimulation, while either division alone can largely support norepinephrine release. PMID:27597763

  17. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  18. The Role of BDNF, Leptin, and Catecholamines in Reward Learning in Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Simona; Milos, Gabriella; Schnyder, Ulrich; Eckert, Anne; Lang, Undine; Hasler, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Background: A relationship between bulimia nervosa and reward-related behavior is supported by several lines of evidence. The dopaminergic dysfunctions in the processing of reward-related stimuli have been shown to be modulated by the neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the hormone leptin. Methods: Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, a reward learning task was applied to study the behavior of 20 female subjects with remitted bulimia nervosa and 27 female healthy controls under placebo and catecholamine depletion with alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT). The plasma levels of BDNF and leptin were measured twice during the placebo and the AMPT condition, immediately before and 1 hour after a standardized breakfast. Results: AMPT–induced differences in plasma BDNF levels were positively correlated with the AMPT–induced differences in reward learning in the whole sample (P=.05). Across conditions, plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor levels were higher in remitted bulimia nervosa subjects compared with controls (diagnosis effect; P=.001). Plasma BDNF and leptin levels were higher in the morning before compared with after a standardized breakfast across groups and conditions (time effect; P<.0001). The plasma leptin levels were higher under catecholamine depletion compared with placebo in the whole sample (treatment effect; P=.0004). Conclusions: This study reports on preliminary findings that suggest a catecholamine-dependent association of plasma BDNF and reward learning in subjects with remitted bulimia nervosa and controls. A role of leptin in reward learning is not supported by this study. However, leptin levels were sensitive to a depletion of catecholamine stores in both remitted bulimia nervosa and controls. PMID:25522424

  19. Semiquinone anion radicals of catechol(amine)s, catechol estrogens, and their metal ion complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, B; Felix, C C; Sealy, R C

    1985-01-01

    The characterization and identification of semiquinone radicals from catechol(amine)s and catechol estrogens by electron spin resonance spectroscopy is addressed. The use of diamagnetic metal ions, especially Mg2+ and Zn2+ ions, to detect transient semiquinone radicals in biological systems and to monitor their reactions, is discussed. A brief account of the identification and reactions of quinones is also presented. PMID:3007089

  20. Occupational EMF exposure from radar at X and Ku frequency band and plasma catecholamine levels.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kapoor, Neeru

    2015-09-01

    Workers in certain occupations such as the military may be exposed to technical radiofrequency radiation exposure above current limits, which may pose a health risk. The present investigation intended to find the effect of chronic electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure from radar on plasma catecholamines in the military workforce. In the study, 166 male personnel selected randomly were categorized into three groups: control (n = 68), exposure group-I (X-band, 8-12 GHz, n = 40), and exposure group-II (Ku-band, 12.5-18 GHz, n = 58). The three clusters were further divided into two groups according to their years of service (YOS) (up to 9 years and ≥10 years) to study the effect of years of radar exposure. Enzyme immunoassay was employed to assess catecholamine concentrations. EMF levels were recorded at different occupational distances from radar. Significant adrenaline diminution was registered in exposure group-II with no significant difference in exposure group-I when both groups were weighed against control. Nor-adrenaline and dopamine levels did not vary significantly in both exposure groups when compared to controls. Exposure in terms of YOS also did not yield any significant alteration in any of the catecholamines and in any of the exposure groups when compared with their respective control groups. The shift from baseline catecholamine values due to stress has immense significance for health and well-being. Their continual alteration may prove harmful in due course. Suitable follow-up studies are needed to further strengthen these preliminary observations and for now, exposures should be limited as much as possible with essential safeguards. PMID:26058851

  1. The effects of sleep on circulating catecholamines and aqueous flow in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Maus, T L; McLaren, J W; Shepard, J W; Brubaker, R F

    1996-04-01

    We measured the rate of aqueous flow and analysed its relation to the time of day, the state of wakefulness and the urinary excretion of catecholamines. Two groups of subjects were studied. One group comprised 20 normal subjects who were studied over two 22-hr periods. During one period, the subjects were permitted to sleep during their customary hours of sleep; during the other, they were not permitted to sleep, but remained active for all 22 hr. The other group comprised ten subjects with obstructive sleep apnea who were studied over a 22-hr period and slept during their customary hours of sleep but without the aid of any respiratory device. Aqueous flow was measured with fluorophotometry. Motion of the wrist was monitored by a seismograph (wrist Actigraph) and served as a surrogate of activity and wakefulness. Urinary catecholamine excretion was measured during different periods of the wake/sleep cycle. Both groups exhibited the normal nocturnal suppression of flow (59% lower compared to morning in the normal group; 56% lower compared to morning in the apneic group). During sleep deprivation, the rate of flow at night in normal subjects was 30% lower than during the morning (P < 0.001) and 60% higher than during sleep (P < 0.001). Lid closure during sleep deprivation had no effect on the results. Aqueous flow correlated with a 'catecholamine index', derived from the combined excretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine. Flow also correlated with an 'activity index', and 'sleep efficiency', indices derived from motion of the wrist. We conclude that the day-night difference of aqueous humor flow as measured by clearance of fluorescein from the human eye is driven partly by a factor that has a circadian rhythm and partly by a factor that depends on the activity of the subject. We hypothesize that these factors are the catecholamines, epinephrine and norepinephrine. PMID:8795453

  2. Loss of SDHB Elevates Catecholamine Synthesis and Secretion Depending on ROS Production and HIF Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuria; Ishii, Kiyo-Aki; Aita, Yuichi; Ikeda, Tatsuhiko; Kawakami, Yasushi; Shimano, Hitoshi; Hara, Hisato; Takekoshi, Kazuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Germline mutations in genes encoding succinate dehydrogenase subunits are associated with the development of familial pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas [hereditary paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma syndrome (HPPS)]. In particular, a mutation in succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) is highly associated with abdominal paraganglioma and subsequent distant metastasis (malignant paraganglioma), indicating the importance of SDHB genetic testing. The discovery of HPPS suggests an association among genetic mitochondrial defects, tumor development, and catecholamine oversecretion. To investigate this association, we transfected pheochromocytoma cells (PC12) with SDHB-specific siRNA. SDHB silencing virtually abolished complex II activity, demonstrating the utility of this in vitro model for investigating the pseudo-hypoxic drive hypothesis. Lack of complex II activity resulting from RNA interference of SDHB increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis) activity and catecholamine secretion. Reduced apoptosis was observed accompanied by Bcl-2 accumulation in PC12 cells, consistent with the phenotypes of paragangliomas with SDHB mutations. In addition, SDHB silencing increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and nuclear HIF1α stabilization under normoxic conditions. Furthermore, phenotypes induced by complex II activity knockdown were abolished by pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine (an ROS scavenger) and by prior HIF1α knockdown, indicating an ROS- and HIF1α-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that increased ROS may act as signal transduction messengers that induce HIF1α stabilization and may be necessary for the pseudo-hypoxic states observed in our experimental model. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that pseudo-hypoxic states resulting from SDHB knockdown are associated with increased TH activity and catecholamine oversecretion. PMID:26620190

  3. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    PubMed

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. PMID:25975187

  4. Transmyocardial Revascularization Ameliorates Ischemia by Attenuating Paradoxical Catecholamine-Induced Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Le, D. Elizabeth; Powers, Eric R.; Bin, Jian-Ping; Leong-Poi, Howard; Goodman, N. Craig; Kaul, Sanjiv

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism by which transmyocardial revascularization (TMR) offers clinical benefit is controversial. We hypothesized that TMR ameliorates ischemia by reversing paradoxical catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction. Chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy was created in 11 dogs by placing ameroid constrictors on the proximal coronary arteries and their major branches. Six weeks later, 35 channels were created percutaneously in the left circumflex artery (LCx) region with the left anterior descending artery (LAD) region serving as control. At rest, wall thickening (WT) and myocardial blood flow (MBF) did not change in the treated region, while they deteriorated in the control bed. Contractile and MBF reserve increased in the treated region but deteriorated in the control region. There was diminished 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake and significant reduction in noradrenergic nerves in the treated region compared to control region, with corresponding reduction in tissue tyrosine hydroxylase activity. We conclude that the absence of catecholamine-induced reduction in MBF reserve and contractile reserve in the TMR treated region with associated evidence of neuronal injury indicates that the relief of exercise-induced ischemia after TMR is most likely due to reversal of paradoxical catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction. These findings may have implications in selecting patients who would benefit from TMR. PMID:17386383

  5. Adipocyte ALK7 links nutrient overload to catecholamine resistance in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingqing; Marmol, Patricia; Moliner, Annalena; Björnholm, Marie; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M; Ibanez, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with blunted β-adrenoreceptor (β-AR)-mediated lipolysis and lipid oxidation in adipose tissue, but the mechanisms linking nutrient overload to catecholamine resistance are poorly understood. We report that targeted disruption of TGF-β superfamily receptor ALK7 alleviates diet-induced catecholamine resistance in adipose tissue, thereby reducing obesity in mice. Global and fat-specific Alk7 knock-out enhanced adipose β-AR expression, β-adrenergic signaling, mitochondrial biogenesis, lipid oxidation, and lipolysis under a high fat diet, leading to elevated energy expenditure, decreased fat mass, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Conversely, activation of ALK7 reduced β-AR-mediated signaling and lipolysis cell-autonomously in both mouse and human adipocytes. Acute inhibition of ALK7 in adult mice by a chemical-genetic approach reduced diet-induced weight gain, fat accumulation, and adipocyte size, and enhanced adipocyte lipolysis and β-adrenergic signaling. We propose that ALK7 signaling contributes to diet-induced catecholamine resistance in adipose tissue, and suggest that ALK7 inhibitors may have therapeutic value in human obesity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03245.001 PMID:25161195

  6. Decreased catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medullae of chronically diabetic BB-Wistar rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Lelkes, P. I.; Hillard, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Many humans with IDDM eventually lose the capacity to secrete epinephrine from their adrenal medullae. The mechanism for this pathological change is unknown. We hypothesized that this abnormality is attributable to neuropathic changes in the greater splanchnic nerves or in the chromaffin cells that they innervate. To study this hypothesis, we isolated rat adrenal glands, perfused them ex vivo, and measured the epinephrine content of the perfusate under various conditions of stimulation. We used transmural electrical stimulation (20-80 V, at 10 Hz) to induce epinephrine secretion indirectly by selectively activating residual splanchnic nerve terminals within the isolated glands. Under these conditions, epinephrine secretion was severely attenuated in glands from female BB-Wistar rats with diabetes of 4 mo duration compared with their age-matched, nondiabetic controls. These perfused diabetic adrenal medullae also demonstrated decreased catecholamine release in response to direct chromaffin cell depolarization with 20 mM K+, evidence that a functional alteration exists within the chromaffin cells themselves. Nonetheless, total catecholamine content of adrenal medullae from these diabetic rats was not significantly different from controls, indicating that the secretory defect was not simply attributable to a difference in the amount of catecholamines stored and available for release. Herein, we also provide histological evidence of degenerative changes within the cholinergic nerve terminals that innervate these glands.

  7. Dietary unsaturated fatty acids differently affect catecholamine handling by adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Andreia; Correia, Gustavo; Coelho, Marisa; Araújo, João Ricardo; Pinho, Maria João; Teixeira, Ana Luisa; Medeiros, Rui; Ribeiro, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Catecholamines (CA) play an important role in cardiovascular (CDV) disease risk. Namely, noradrenaline (NA) levels positively correlate whereas adrenaline (AD) levels negatively correlate with obesity and/or CDV disease. Western diets, which are tipically rich in Ω-6 fatty acids (FAs) and deficient in Ω-3 FAs, may contribute to the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes and/or coronary artery disease. Taking this into consideration and the fact that our group has already described that saturated FAs affect catecholamine handling by adrenal chromaffin cells, this work aimed to investigate the effect of unsaturated FAs upon catecholamine handling in the same model. Our results showed that chronic exposure to unsaturated FAs differently modulated CA cellular content and release, regardless of both FA series and number of carbon atoms. Namely, the Ω-6 arachidonic and linoleic acids, based on their effect on CA release and cellular content, seemed to impair NA and AD vesicular transport, whereas γ-linolenic acid selectively impaired AD synthesis and release. Within the Ω-9 FAs, oleic acid was devoid of effect, and elaidic acid behaved similarly to γ-linolenic acid. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (Ω-3 series) impaired the synthesis and release of both NA and AD. These results deserve attention and future development, namely, in what concerns the mechanisms involved and correlative effects in vivo. PMID:25727966

  8. Multifunctional Polyphenols- and Catecholamines-Based Self-Defensive Films for Health Care Applications.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Chetna; Harini, Sriram; Venkatesh, Mayandi; Dwivedi, Neeraj; Ng, Alice; Liu, Shouping; Verma, Navin Kumar; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Beuerman, Roger W; Loh, Xian Jun; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani

    2016-01-20

    In an era of relentless evolution of antimicrobial resistance, there is an increasing demand for the development of efficient antimicrobial coatings or surfaces for food, biomedical, and industrial applications. This study reports the laccase-catalyzed room-temperature synthesis of mechanically robust, thermally stable, broad spectrum antimicrobial films employing interfacial interactions between poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA, and 14 naturally occurring catecholamines and polyphenols. The oxidative products of catecholamines and polyphenols reinforce the PVA films and also alter their surface and bulk properties. Among the catecholamines-reinforced films, optimum surface and bulk properties can be achieved by the oxidative products of epinephrine. For polyphenols, structure-property correlation reveals an increase in surface roughness and elasticity of PVA films with increasing number of phenolic groups in the precursors. Interestingly, PVA films reinforced with oxidized/polymerized products of pyrogallol (PG) and epinephrine (EP) display potent antimicrobial activity against pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains, whereas hydroquinone (HQ)-reinforced PVA films display excellent antimicrobial properties against Gram-positive bacteria only. We further demonstrate that HQ and PG films retain their antimicrobial efficacy after steam sterilization. With an increasing trend of giving value to natural and renewable resources, our results have the potential as durable self-defensive antimicrobial surfaces/films for advanced healthcare and industrial applications. PMID:26709441

  9. Mobilization of NK cells by exercise: downmodulation of adhesion molecules on NK cells by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Nagao, F; Suzui, M; Takeda, K; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    2000-10-01

    The change of plasma catecholamine concentration correlates with the change of natural killer (NK) activity and NK cell number in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) during and after moderate exercise. We studied the causal relation between exercise-induced catecholamine and expression of adhesion molecules on NK cells during and after exercise. The expression of CD44 and CD18 on CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was significantly reduced during exercise (P < 0.01). When PBMC were stimulated with 10(-8)M norepinephrine in vitro, the expression of these adhesion molecules on CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was downmodulated within 30 min. The binding capacity of NK cells to a CD44 ligand, hyaluronate, was reduced by the stimulation with norepinephrine (P < 0.01). The intravenous injection of norepinephrine in mice decreased the expression of CD44 and CD18 on CD3(-)NK1.1(+) cells (P < 0.01) and increased the number of CD3(-)NK1.1(+) cells in PBMC (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that exercise-induced catecholamines modulate the expression of adhesion molecules on NK cells, resulting in the mobilization of NK cells into the circulation. PMID:11003990

  10. Neuroanatomical association of hypothalamic HSD2-containing neurons with ERα, catecholamines, or oxytocin: implications for feeding?

    PubMed Central

    Askew, Maegan L.; Muckelrath, Halie D.; Johnston, Jonathon R.; Curtis, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    This study used immunohistochemical methods to investigate the possibility that hypothalamic neurons that contain 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD2) are involved in the control of feeding by rats via neuroanatomical associations with the α subtype of estrogen receptor (ERα), catecholamines, and/or oxytocin (OT). An aggregate of HSD2-containing neurons is located laterally in the hypothalamus, and the numbers of these neurons were greatly increased by estradiol treatment in ovariectomized (OVX) rats compared to numbers in male rats and in OVX rats that were not given estradiol. However, HSD2-containing neurons were anatomically segregated from ERα-containing neurons in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus and the Arcuate Nucleus. There was an absence of OT-immunolabeled fibers in the area of HSD2-labeled neurons. Taken together, these findings provide no support for direct associations between hypothalamic HSD2 and ERα or OT neurons in the control of feeding. In contrast, there was catecholamine-fiber labeling in the area of HSD2-labeled neurons, and these fibers occasionally were in close apposition to HSD2-labeled neurons. Therefore, we cannot rule out interactions between HSD2 and catecholamines in the control of feeding; however, given the relative sparseness of the appositions, any such interaction would appear to be modest. Thus, these studies do not conclusively identify a neuroanatomical substrate by which HSD2-containing neurons in the hypothalamus may alter feeding, and leave the functional role of hypothalamic HSD2-containing neurons subject to further investigation. PMID:26124709

  11. Catechol-O-methyltransferase-deficient mice exhibit sexually dimorphic changes in catecholamine levels and behavior.

    PubMed

    Gogos, J A; Morgan, M; Luine, V; Santha, M; Ogawa, S; Pfaff, D; Karayiorgou, M

    1998-08-18

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is one of the major mammalian enzymes involved in the metabolic degradation of catecholamines and is considered a candidate for several psychiatric disorders and symptoms, including the psychopathology associated with the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome. By means of homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells, a strain of mice in which the gene encoding the COMT enzyme has been disrupted was produced. The basal concentrations of brain catecholamines were measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, and hypothalamus of adult male and female mutants. Locomotor activity, anxiety-like behaviors, sensorimotor gating, and aggressive behavior also were analyzed. Mutant mice demonstrated sexually dimorphic and region-specific changes of dopamine levels, notably in the frontal cortex. In addition, homozygous COMT-deficient female (but not male) mice displayed impairment in emotional reactivity in the dark/light exploratory model of anxiety. Furthermore, heterozygous COMT-deficient male mice exhibited increased aggressive behavior. Our results provide conclusive evidence for an important sex- and region-specific contribution of COMT in the maintenance of steady-state levels of catecholamines in the brain and suggest a role for COMT in some aspects of emotional and social behavior in mice. PMID:9707588

  12. Insulin, catecholamines, glucose and antioxidant enzymes in oxidative damage during different loads in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Koska, J; Blazícek, P; Marko, M; Grna, J D; Kvetnanský, R; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Exercise, insulin-induced hypoglycemia and oral glucose loads (50 g and 100 g) were used to compare the production of malondialdehyde and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in healthy subjects. Twenty male volunteers participated in the study. Exercise consisted of three consecutive work loads on a bicycle ergometer of graded intensity (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 W/kg, 6 min each). Hypoglycemia was induced by insulin (Actrapid MC Novo, 0.1 IU/kg, i.v.). Oral administration of 50 g and 100 g of glucose was given to elevate plasma glucose. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was determined in red blood cells, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was measured in whole blood. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) was determined by HPLC, catecholamines were assessed radioenzymatically and glucose was measured by the glucose-oxidase method. Exercise increased MDA concentrations, GSH-Px and SOD activities as well as plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Insulin hypoglycemia increased plasma adrenaline levels, but the concentrations of MDA and the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were decreased. Hyperglycemia increased plasma MDA concentrations, but the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were significantly higher after a larger dose of glucose only. Plasma catecholamines were unchanged. These results indicate that the transient increase of plasma catecholamine and insulin concentrations did not induce oxidative damage, while glucose already in the low dose was an important triggering factor for oxidative stress. PMID:10984077

  13. Serotonin versus catecholamine deficiency: behavioral and neural effects of experimental depletion in remitted depression

    PubMed Central

    Homan, P; Neumeister, A; Nugent, A C; Charney, D S; Drevets, W C; Hasler, G

    2015-01-01

    Despite immense efforts into development of new antidepressant drugs, the increases of serotoninergic and catecholaminergic neurotransmission have remained the two major pharmacodynamic principles of current drug treatments for depression. Consequently, psychopathological or biological markers that predict response to drugs that selectively increase serotonin and/or catecholamine neurotransmission hold the potential to optimize the prescriber's selection among currently available treatment options. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential symptomatology and neurophysiology in response to reductions in serotonergic versus catecholaminergic neurotransmission in subjects at high risk of depression recurrence. Using identical neuroimaging procedures with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography after tryptophan depletion (TD) and catecholamine depletion (CD), subjects with remitted depression were compared with healthy controls in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Although TD induced significantly more depressed mood, sadness and hopelessness than CD, CD induced more inactivity, concentration difficulties, lassitude and somatic anxiety than TD. CD specifically increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral ventral striatum and decreased glucose metabolism in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, whereas TD specifically increased metabolism in the right prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex. Although we found direct associations between changes in brain metabolism and induced depressive symptoms following CD, the relationship between neural activity and symptoms was less clear after TD. In conclusion, this study showed that serotonin and catecholamines have common and differential roles in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:25781231

  14. [A case of catecholamine-secreting glomus jugulare tumor: treatment strategy and perioperative management].

    PubMed

    Motegi, Hiroaki; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2008-11-01

    Advances of neuroimaging, skull base technique and embolization improved outcome in patients who present with tumor of the glomus jugulare. Catecholamine secreting subgroup, however, is considered to be extremely high risk because of potentially serious complication of an intra- and perioperative hypertension crisis. The authors present detailed description of treatment strategies and perioperative management with a catecholamine secreting glomus jugulare. A 57-year-old woman, in whom the noradrenaline level in plasma was twenty times higher than normal, presented with uncontrolled labile hypertension and carcinoid syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scan depicted the tumor as originating from the jugular foramen extending to the infratemporal fossa. Alpha catecholamine blocker and magnesium sulfate treatment was commenced prior to embolization and surgery. Under cranial nerve and hemodynamic monitoring, tumor resection via the infratemporal fossa type A was performed. The patient remained hemodynamically stable and the lower cranial nerve injury was able to be avoided. The plasma noradrenaline level decreased and hypertension became normalized. We emphasize treatment strategy, intra- and perioperative management of this rare entity. PMID:19048923

  15. INTEGRATING EPIDEMIOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY IN NEUROTOXICITY RISK ASSESSMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript provides an overview of the use of data from toxicology and epidemiology studies for neurotoxicity risk assessment. Parameters such as the use of subjects, study designs, exposures, and measured outcomes are compared and contrasted. The main concern for use of d...

  16. Zebrafish as a systems toxicology model for developmental neurotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yuhei; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Umemoto, Noriko; Shimada, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Toshio

    2015-02-01

    The developing brain is extremely sensitive to many chemicals. Exposure to neurotoxicants during development has been implicated in various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Although rodents have been widely used for developmental neurotoxicity testing, experiments using large numbers of rodents are time-consuming, expensive, and raise ethical concerns. Using alternative non-mammalian animal models may relieve some of these pressures by allowing testing of large numbers of subjects while reducing expenses and minimizing the use of mammalian subjects. In this review, we discuss some of the advantages of using zebrafish in developmental neurotoxicity testing, focusing on central nervous system development, neurobehavior, toxicokinetics, and toxicodynamics in this species. We also describe some important examples of developmental neurotoxicity testing using zebrafish combined with gene expression profiling, neuroimaging, or neurobehavioral assessment. Zebrafish may be a systems toxicology model that has the potential to reveal the pathways of developmental neurotoxicity and to provide a sound basis for human risk assessments. PMID:25109898

  17. UNREGULATED DRINKING WATER CONTAMINANTS AND INNOVATIVE APPROACHES FOR DETERMINING NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Water (OW) is concerned about potential neurotoxicity of monomethyl, dimethyl, monobutyl, and dibutyl organotins that can leach into drinking water from PVC pipe. NTD’s evaluation of these organotins indicated that they were not likely to be a significant risk at ...

  18. Berberine Reduces Neurotoxicity Related to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghareeb, Doaa A.; Khalil, Sofia; Hafez, Hani S.; Bajorath, Jürgen; Ahmed, Hany E. A.; Sarhan, Eman; Elwakeel, Eiman; El-Demellawy, Maha A.

    2015-01-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid that has several pharmacological effects such as antioxidant, antilipidemic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) triggers different aspects of disorders such as impaired endogenous lipid metabolism, hypercholesterolemia, oxidative stress, and neurotoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which NASH induces neurotoxicity and the protective effect of berberine against both NASH and its associated neurotoxicity. NASH induced rats showed significant impairments in lipid metabolism with increased serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The NASH induced group also demonstrated a significant oxidative stress which is characterized by increased TBARs level and decreased antioxidant capacity such as GSH and SOD levels. Moreover, the NASH induction was associated with inflammation which was demonstrated by increased TNFα and nitric oxide levels. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were observed in the NASH induced group. Also, our results showed a significant increase in the expression of the acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP). These changes were significantly correlated with decreased insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) and beta-amyloid40 (Aβ40) and increased beta-amyloid42 (Aβ42) in the hippocampal region. Daily administration of berberine (50 mg/kg) for three weeks ameliorated oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and the observed neurotoxicity. PMID:26576191

  19. NEUROTOXICITY OF PARATHION-INDUCED ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE INHIBITION IN NEONATAL RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biochemical and morphological neurotoxic effects of postnatal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition were examined in rat pups dosed with parathion, at time points critical to hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis (i.e., D5-20). ippocampal cytopathology as assessed by l...

  20. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY TESTING GUIDELINES: VARIABILITY IN MORPHOMETRIC ASSESSMENTS OF NEUROPATHOLOGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Study Test Guideline (OPPTS 870.6300) calls for neuropathological and morphometric assessments of rat pups on postnatal day (PND) 11 and at study termination (after PND 60). In recent discussions about conducting these studies on pesti...

  1. Neurotoxicity in Aquatic Systems: Evaluation of Anthropogenic Trace Substances

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating methods to screen and prioritize large numbers of chemicals for developmental toxicity, as well as acute and developmental neurotoxicity. In this endeavor, one of our focuses is on contaminants found in drinking water. To exp...

  2. Valacyclovir-associated neurotoxicity in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Dhara; Ginn, David

    2014-01-01

    Valacyclovir is an oral antiviral agent being used more frequently than acyclovir because of the ease of administration and efficacy. Serious neuropsychiatric side effects have been demonstrated with the use of valacyclovir in renal failure patients. We report a case of valacyclovir neurotoxicity to emphasis the importance of dose adjustment in patients with chronic kidney disease and on dialysis. PMID:23528373

  3. The use of glial data in neurotoxicity risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) glia (i.e., astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes) are essential for normal brain function, and they orchestrate the CNS response to injury. While effects on glia are important to consider when evaluating the neurotoxicity risk of exposure to xe...

  4. Mental retardation and developmental disabilities influenced by environmental neurotoxic insults.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, S R

    2000-01-01

    This paper sets a framework for the discussion of neurotoxicity as a potentially major contributor to the etiology of many types of mental retardation and developmental disabilities. In the past the literatures on developmental neurotoxicology and on mental retardation have evolved independently, yet we know that the developing brain is a target for neurotoxicity in the developing central nervous system through many stages of pregnancy as well as during infancy and early childhood. Our definitions and theories of mental retardation and developmental disabilities affect the models of neurotoxicity we espouse. For instance, models of developmental risk in neurotoxicology have guided environmental regulation to reduce the likelihood of neurotoxic effects. On the other hand, models of developmental risk for mental retardation aim not only at primary prevention,but also at secondary and tertiary prevention through early intervention. In the future, dynamic models of neuroplasticity based on the study of gene-brain-behavior relationships are likely to guide our views of developmental neurotoxicology and prevention of mental retardation and other disabilities. PMID:10852834

  5. IN VITRO COMPARISON OF RAT AND CHICKEN BRAIN NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterased showed that rat esterases we...

  6. Charge to the Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) Neurotoxicity Expert Panel

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today NCEA is posting the charge which will be discussed at the expert panel meeting on neurotoxicity issues associated with exposure to tetrachlroroethylene. This charge is to be the main agenda topic for the meeting. The time and place of the meeting will be announced in a fu...

  7. 40 CFR 799.9630 - TSCA developmental neurotoxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... change across several repeated learning trials or sessions, or, in tests involving a single trial, with... measured. (E) Appropriate data for each repeated trial (or session) showing acquisition and retention... Clinical Pathology 81:25-29 (1984). (7) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Neurotoxicity...

  8. Donepezil markedly potentiates memantine neurotoxicity in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Creeley, Catherine E; Wozniak, David F; Nardi, Anthony; Farber, Nuri B; Olney, John W

    2008-02-01

    The NMDA antagonist, memantine (Namenda), and the cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil (Aricept), are currently being used widely, either individually or in combination, for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). NMDA antagonists have both neuroprotective and neurotoxic properties; the latter is augmented by drugs, such as pilocarpine, that increase cholinergic activity. Whether donepezil, by increasing cholinergic activity, might augment memantine's neurotoxic potential has not been investigated. In the present study, we determined that a dose of memantine (20mg/kg, i.p.), considered to be in the therapeutic (neuroprotective) range for rats, causes a mild neurotoxic reaction in the adult rat brain. Co-administration of memantine (20 or 30 mg/kg) with donepezil (2.5-10mg/kg) markedly potentiated this neurotoxic reaction, causing neuronal injury at lower doses of memantine, and causing the toxic reaction to become disseminated and lethal to neurons throughout many brain regions. These findings raise questions about using this drug combination in AD, especially in the absence of evidence that the combination is beneficial, or that either drug arrests or reverses the disease process. PMID:17112636

  9. GLUTAMATE NEUROTOXICITY IN RAT AUDITORY SYSTEM: COCHLEAR NUCLEAR COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    In other systems such as the hypothalamus and hippocampus, it has been shown that cells postsynaptic with respect to glutamatergic inputs degenerate when exposed to large doses of glutamate ("glutamate neurotoxicity"). e have shown that large doses of glutamate administered intra...

  10. Neurotoxicity of Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-081 and JWH-210

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hye Jin; Seong, Yeon-Hee; Song, Min-Ji; Jeong, Ho-Sang; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kang, Hoil; Kim, Hyoung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-250 in ‘herbal incense’ also called ‘spice’ were first introduced in many countries. Numerous synthetic cannabinoids with similar chemical structures emerged simultaneously and suddenly. Currently there are not sufficient data on their adverse effects including neurotoxicity. There are only anecdotal reports that suggest their toxicity. In the present study, we evaluated the neurotoxicity of two synthetic cannabinoids (JWH-081 and JWH-210) through observation of various behavioral changes and analysis of histopathological changes using experimental mice with various doses (0.1, 1, 5 mg/kg). In functional observation battery (FOB) test, animals treated with 5 mg/kg of JWH-081 or JWH-210 showed traction and tremor. Their locomotor activities and rotarod retention time were significantly (p<0.05) decreased. However, no significant change was observed in learning or memory function. In histopathological analysis, neural cells of the animals treated with the high dose (5 mg/kg) of JWH-081 or JWH-210 showed distorted nuclei and nucleus membranes in the core shell of nucleus accumbens, suggesting neurotoxicity. Our results suggest that JWH-081 and JWH-210 may be neurotoxic substances through changing neuronal cell damages, especially in the core shell part of nucleus accumbens. To confirm our findings, further studies are needed in the future. PMID:26535086

  11. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  12. Understanding and Classifying Metabolite Space and Metabolite-Likeness

    PubMed Central

    Peironcely, Julio E.; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Bender, Andreas; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    While the entirety of ‘Chemical Space’ is huge (and assumed to contain between 1063 and 10200 ‘small molecules’), distinct subsets of this space can nonetheless be defined according to certain structural parameters. An example of such a subspace is the chemical space spanned by endogenous metabolites, defined as ‘naturally occurring’ products of an organisms' metabolism. In order to understand this part of chemical space in more detail, we analyzed the chemical space populated by human metabolites in two ways. Firstly, in order to understand metabolite space better, we performed Principal Component Analysis (PCA), hierarchical clustering and scaffold analysis of metabolites and non-metabolites in order to analyze which chemical features are characteristic for both classes of compounds. Here we found that heteroatom (both oxygen and nitrogen) content, as well as the presence of particular ring systems was able to distinguish both groups of compounds. Secondly, we established which molecular descriptors and classifiers are capable of distinguishing metabolites from non-metabolites, by assigning a ‘metabolite-likeness’ score. It was found that the combination of MDL Public Keys and Random Forest exhibited best overall classification performance with an AUC value of 99.13%, a specificity of 99.84% and a selectivity of 88.79%. This performance is slightly better than previous classifiers; and interestingly we found that drugs occupy two distinct areas of metabolite-likeness, the one being more ‘synthetic’ and the other being more ‘metabolite-like’. Also, on a truly prospective dataset of 457 compounds, 95.84% correct classification was achieved. Overall, we are confident that we contributed to the tasks of classifying metabolites, as well as to understanding metabolite chemical space better. This knowledge can now be used in the development of new drugs that need to resemble metabolites, and in our work particularly for assessing the metabolite

  13. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well. PMID:8905087

  14. Studies on the potential neurotoxic and convulsant effects of increased blood levels of quinolinic acid in rats with altered blood-brain barrier permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Vezzani, A.; Stasi, M.A.; Wu, H.Q.; Castiglioni, M.; Weckermann, B.; Samanin, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Intravenous injection of 450 mg/kg quinolinic acid (Quin), an endogenous kynurenine metabolite with excitotoxic properties, induced only minor electroencephalographic (EEG) modifications and no neurotoxicity in rats with a mature blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB permeability was altered in rats by focal unilateral irradiation of the cortex (7 mm in diameter and 5 mm in depth) with protons (60 Gy, 9 Gy/min). Three days after irradiation, Evans blue dye staining showed BBB breakdown in the dorsal hippocampus of the irradiated hemisphere. No neurotoxic or convulsant effects were observed as a consequence of the radiation itself. When BBB-lesioned rats were challenged with 225 mg/kg Quin iv, epileptiform activity was observed on EEG analysis. Tonic-clonic seizures were induced by 225-450 mg/kg Quin. Light microscopic analysis showed a dose-related excitotoxic type of lesion restricted to the hippocampus ipsilateral to the irradiated side. Neuro-degeneration was prevented by local injection of 120 nmol D(-)2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, a selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist. No lesions or EEG or behavioral modifications occurred after 450 mg/kg nicotinic acid, an inactive analog of Quin. The potential neurotoxic and convulsant effects of increased blood levels of Quin under conditions of altered BBB permeability are discussed.

  15. Definition of a molecular pathway mediating α-synuclein neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Burré, Jacqueline; Sharma, Manu; Südhof, Thomas C

    2015-04-01

    α-Synuclein physiologically chaperones SNARE-complex assembly at the synapse but pathologically misfolds into neurotoxic aggregates that are characteristic for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, and that may spread from one neuron to the next throughout the brain during Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. In normal nerve terminals, α-synuclein is present in an equilibrium between a cytosolic form that is natively unfolded and monomeric and a membrane-bound form that is composed of an α-helical multimeric species that chaperones SNARE-complex assembly. Although the neurotoxicity of α-synuclein is well established, the relationship between the native conformations of α-synuclein and its pathological aggregation remain incompletely understood; most importantly, it is unclear whether α-synuclein aggregation originates from its monomeric cytosolic or oligomeric membrane-bound form. Here, we address this question by introducing into α-synuclein point mutations that block membrane binding and by then assessing the effect of blocking membrane binding on α-synuclein aggregation and neurotoxicity. We show that membrane binding inhibits α-synuclein aggregation; conversely, blocking membrane binding enhances α-synuclein aggregation. Stereotactic viral expression of wild-type and mutant α-synuclein in the substantia nigra of mice demonstrated that blocking α-synuclein membrane binding significantly enhanced its neurotoxicity in vivo. Our data delineate a folding pathway for α-synuclein that ranges from a physiological multimeric, α-helical, and membrane-bound species that acts as a SNARE-complex chaperone over a monomeric, natively unfolded form to an amyloid-like aggregate that is neurotoxic in vivo. PMID:25834048

  16. A novel nicotinic mechanism underlies β-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Xie, Xitao; Emadi, Sharareh; Sierks, Michael R; Wu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN) correlates with cognitive deficits in Alzheimer disease (AD). Our recent evidence suggests that chronic exposure to Aβ up-regulated neuronal α7-nAChRs and increased neuronal excitability in cultured hippocampal neurons. However, the impact of the up-regulated α7-nAChRs on Aβ-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of α7-nAChRs in the mediation of Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of Aβ exposure on α7-nAChRs and cytotoxicity were examined using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging, immunoprecipitation, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay in primary cultured hippocampal neurons as well as differentiated human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells with cholinergic characteristics. We found that α7-nAChRs are necessary for Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons because chronic Aβ significantly increased LDH level in hippocampal cultures, which was prevented by either α7-nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or by α7 subunit gene deletion (cultures prepared from nAChR α7 subunit KO mice), whereas β2-containing nAChR antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine, DhβE) or the genetic deletion of nAChR β2 subunit (cultures prepared from β2 KO mice) failed to prevent Aβ-induced toxicity. In SH-SY5Y cells, larger aggregates of Aβ preferentially up-regulated α7-nAChR expression and function accompanied by a significant decrease in cell viability. Co-treatment MLA, but not mecamylamine (MEC), prevented Aβ exposure-induced neurotoxicity. Our results suggest a detrimental role of upregulated α7-nAChRs in the mediation of Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25959067

  17. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  18. IN VIVO INHIBITION OF CHICKEN BRAIN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE AND NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE IN RELATION TO THE DELAYED NEUROTOXICITY OF LEPTOPHOS AND CYANOFENPHOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An equimolal single dose (1 mmole/kg) of leptophos or cyanofenphos was given orally to chickens to assay the clinical and biochemical neurotoxic effects of these two organophosphorus insecticides. Parathion and TOCP at 2 and 1000 mg/kg of chicken body weight were tested in the sa...

  19. ROLE OF NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE (NTE) IN THE PREVENTION AND POTENTIATION OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS-INDUCED DELAYED NEUROTOXICITY (OPIDN)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first step in the initiation of organophosphorus-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is proposed to be the phosphorylation of an enzyme found in the nervous system called neurotoxic esterase (neuropathy target esterase, NTE). t has been known for over twenty years that non-neu...

  20. Striatal dopamine release in vivo following neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine and effect of the neuroprotective drugs, chlormethiazole and dizocilpine.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, H. A.; Colado, M. I.; Murray, T. K.; De Souza, R. J.; Green, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. Administration to rats of methamphetamine (15 mg kg-1, i.p.) every 2 h to a total of 4 doses resulted in a neurotoxic loss of striatal dopamine of 36% and of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the cortex (43%) and hippocampus (47%) 3 days later. 2. Administration of chlormethiazole (50 mg kg-1, i.p.) 15 min before each dose of methamphetamine provided complete protection against the neurotoxic loss of monoamines while administration of dizocilpine (1 mg kg-1, i.p.) using the same dose schedule provided substantial protection. 3. Measurement of dopamine release in the striatum by in vivo microdialysis revealed that methamphetamine produced an approximate 7000% increase in dopamine release after the first injection. The enhanced release response was somewhat diminished after the third injection but still around 4000% above baseline. Dizocilpine (1 mg kg-1, i.p.) did not alter this response but chlormethiazole (50 mg kg-1, i.p.) attenuated the methamphetamine-induced release by approximately 40%. 4. Dizocilpine pretreatment did not influence the decrease in the dialysate concentration of the dopamine metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) produced by administration of methamphetamine while chlormethiazole pretreatment decreased the dialysate concentration of these metabolites still further. 5. The concentration of dopamine in the dialysate during basal conditions increased modestly during the course of the experiment. This increase did not occur in chlormethiazole-treated rats. HVA concentrations were unaltered by chlormethiazole administration. 6. Chlormethiazole (100-1000 microM) did not alter methamphetamine (100 microM) or K+ (35 mM)-evoked release of endogenous dopamine from striatal prisms in vitro.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8467354

  1. The content of catecholamines in the adrenal glands and sections of the brain under hypokinesia and injection of some neurotropic agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnik, B. E.; Paladiy, E. S.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of catecholamine content were studied in the adrenal glands and in various region of the brain of white rats under hypokinesia and injections of neurotropic agents. Profound changes in body catecholamine balance occured as a result of prolonged acute restriction of motor activity. Adrenalin retention increased and noradrenanalin retention decreased in the adrenal glands, hypothalamus, cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum and medulla oblongata. Observed alterations in catecholamine retention varied depending upon the type of neurotropic substance utilized. Mellipramine increased catecholamine retention in the tissues under observation while spasmolytin brought about an increase in adrenalin concentration in the adrenals and a decrease in the brain.

  2. Characterization and quantitation of urinary metabolites of [1,2,3-13C]acrylamide in rats and mice using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sumner, S C; MacNeela, J P; Fennell, T R

    1992-01-01

    Acrylamide, widely used for the production of polymers and as a grouting agent, causes neurotoxic effects in humans and neurotoxic, genotoxic, reproductive, and carcinogenic effects in laboratory animals. In this study, 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to detect metabolites of acrylamide directly in the urine of rats and mice following administration of [1,2,3-13C]acrylamide (50 mg/kg po). Two-dimensional NMR experiments were used to correlate carbon signals for each metabolite in the urine samples and to determine the number of hydrogens attached to each carbon. Metabolite structures were identified from the NMR data together with calculated values of shift for biochemically feasible metabolites and by comparison with standards. The metabolites assigned in rat and mouse urine are N-acetyl-S-(3-amino-3-oxopropyl)cysteine, N-acetyl-S-(3-amino-2-hydroxy-3-oxopropyl)cysteine, N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxy-ethyl)cysteine, glycidamide, and 2,3-dihydroxypropionamide. These metabolites arise from direct conjugation of acrylamide with glutathione or from oxidation to the epoxide, glycidamide, and further metabolism. Acrylamide was also detected in the urine. Quantitation was carried out by integrating the metabolite carbon signals with respect to that of dioxane added at a known concentration. The major metabolite for both the rat (70% of total metabolites excreted) and the mouse (40%) was formed from direct conjugation of acrylamide with glutathione. The remaining metabolites for the rat (30%) and mouse (60%) are derived from glycidamide. The species differences in extent of metabolism through glycidamide may have important consequences for the toxic and carcinogenic effects of acrylamide. PMID:1581543

  3. Mitochondria Targeted Peptides Protect Against 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichuan; Zhao, Kesheng; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Luo, Guoxiong; Szeto, Hazel H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A large body of evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage play a role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). A number of antioxidants have been effective in animal models of PD. We have developed a family of mitochondria-targeted peptides that can protect against mitochondrial swelling and apoptosis (SS peptides). In this study, we examined the ability of two peptides, SS-31 and SS-20, to protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity in mice. SS-31 produced dose-dependent complete protection against loss of dopamine and its metabolites in striatum, as well as loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. SS-20, which does not possess intrinsic ability in scavenging reactive oxygen species, also demonstrated significant neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons of MPTP-treated mice. Both SS-31 and SS-20 were very potent (nM) in preventing MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium)-induced cell death in cultured dopamine cells (SN4741). Studies with isolated mitochondria showed that both SS-31 and SS-20 prevented MPP+-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and ATP production, and mitochondrial swelling. These findings provide strong evidence that these neuroprotective peptides, which target both mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage, are a promising approach for the treatment of PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 2095–2104. PMID:19203217

  4. Non-traditional cytokines: How catecholamines and adipokines influence macrophages in immunity, metabolism and the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Mark A.; Carson, Monica J.; Nair, Meera G.

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines and adipokines function as hormones; catecholamines as neurotransmitters in the sympathetic nervous system, and adipokines as mediators of metabolic processes. It has become increasingly clear, however, that both also function as immunomodulators of innate and adaptive immune cells, including macrophages. Macrophages can respond to, as well as produce their own catecholamines. Dopamine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline are the most abundant catecholamines in the body, and can induce both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory immune responses in macrophages, as well as non-immune processes such as thermogenesis. Though they are responsive to adipokines, particularly lipoproteins, leptin, and adiponectin, macrophages generally do synthesize their own adipokines, with the exception being resistin-like molecules. Adipokines contribute to adverse metabolic and immune response by stimulating lipid accumulation, foam cell formation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Adipokines can also promote balance or resolution during metabolic and immune processes by promoting reverse lipid transport and expression of Th2 cytokines. This review will explore the mechanisms by which catecholamines and adipokines influence macrophage function in neural pathways, immunity and metabolism. PMID:25703786

  5. Profiles of secreted neuropeptides and catecholamines illustrate similarities and differences in response to stimulation by distinct secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Podvin, Sonia; Bundey, Richard; Toneff, Thomas; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to define profiles of secreted neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that undergo co-release from sympathoadrenal chromaffin cells upon stimulation by distinct secretagogues. Chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla participate in the dynamic responses to stress, especially that of 'fight and flight', and, thus, analyses of the co-release of multiple neurotransmitters is necessary to gain knowledge of how the stress response regulates cell-cell communication among physiological systems. Results of this study demonstrated that six different secretagogues stimulated the co-release of the neuropeptides Met-enkephalin, galanin, NPY, and VIP with the catecholamines dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Importantly, the quantitative profiles of the secreted neurotransmitters showed similarities and differences upon stimulation by the different secretagogues evaluated, composed of KCl depolarization, nicotine, carbachol, PACAP, bradykinin, and histamine. The rank-orders of the secreted profiles of the neurotransmitters were generally similar among these secretagogues, but differences in the secreted amounts of each neurotransmitter occurred with different secretagogues. Epinephrine among the catecholamines showed the highest level of secretion. (Met)enkephalin showed the largest levels of secretion compared to the other neuropeptides examined. Levels of secreted catecholamines were greater than that of the neuropeptides. These data support the hypothesis that profiles of secreted neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters show similarities and differences upon stimulation by distinct secretagogues. These results illustrate the co-release of concerted neurotransmitter profiles that participate in the stress response of the sympathoadrenal nervous system. PMID:26092702

  6. The neurotoxic effect of clindamycin - induced gut bacterial imbalance and orally administered propionic acid on DNA damage assessed by the comet assay: protective potency of carnosine and carnitine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Comet assay is a quick method for assessing DNA damage in individual cells. It allows the detection of single and double DNA strand breaks, which represent the direct effect of some damaging agents. This study uses standard comet quantification models to compare the neurotoxic effect of orally administered propionic acid (PA) to that produced as a metabolite of bacterial overgrowth induced by clindamycin. Additionally, the protective effect of carnosine and carnitine as natural dietary supplements is assessed. Methods Single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assays) were performed on brain cortex and medulla samples after removal from nine groups of hamsters including: a control (untreated) group; PA-intoxicated group; clindamycin treated group; clindamycin-carnosine group and; clindamycin-carnitine group. Results There were significant double strand breaks recorded as tail length, tail moment and % DNA damage in PA and clindamycin-treated groups for the cortex and medulla compared to the control group. Neuroprotective effects of carnosine and carnitine were observed. Receiver Operating Characteristics curve (ROC) analysis showed satisfactory values of sensitivity and specificity of the comet assay parameters. Conclusion Percentage DNA damage, tail length, and tail moment are adequate biomarkers of PA neurotoxicity due to oral administration or as a metabolite of induced enteric bacterial overgrowth. Establishing biomarkers of these two exposures is important for protecting children’s health by documenting the role of the imbalance in gut microbiota in the etiology of autism through the gut-brain axis. These outcomes will help efforts directed at controlling the prevalence of autism, a disorder recently related to PA neurotoxicity. PMID:23587115

  7. Effects of lactic acid and catecholamines on contractility in fast-twitch muscles exposed to hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders Krogh; Clausen, Torben; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2005-07-01

    Intensive exercise is associated with a pronounced increase in extracellular K+ ([K+]o). Because of the ensuing depolarization and loss of excitability, this contributes to muscle fatigue. Intensive exercise also increases the level of circulating catecholamines and lactic acid, which both have been shown to alleviate the depressing effect of hyperkalemia in slow-twitch muscles. Because of their larger exercise-induced loss of K+, fast-twitch muscles are more prone to fatigue caused by increased [K+]o than slow-twitch muscles. Fast-twitch muscles also produce more lactic acid. We therefore compared the effects of catecholamines and lactic acid on the maintenance of contractility in rat fast-twitch [extensor digitorum longus (EDL)] and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles. Intact muscles were mounted on force transducers and stimulated electrically to evoke short isometric tetani. Elevated [K+]o (11 and 13 mM) was used to reduce force to approximately 20% of control force at 4 mM K+. In EDL, the beta2-agonist salbutamol (10(-5) M) restored tetanic force to 83 +/- 2% of control force, whereas in soleus salbutamol restored tetanic force to 93 +/- 1%. In both muscles, salbutamol induced hyperpolarization (5-8 mV), reduced intracellular Na+ content and increased Na+-K+ pump activity, leading to an increased K+ tolerance. Lactic acid (24 mM) restored force from 22 +/- 4% to 58 +/- 2% of control force in EDL, an effect that was significantly lower than in soleus muscle. These results amplify and generalize the concept that the exercise-induced acidification and increase in plasma catecholamines counterbalance fatigue arising from rundown of Na+ and K+ gradients. PMID:15743886

  8. [The basics of catecholamine therapy. 2. A guide to clinical use].

    PubMed

    Gauss, A; Anhäupl, T; Schütz, W

    2000-03-01

    Myocardial function is determined by preload, afterload, contractility and heart rate. Pathologic changes of these variables may result in decrease of blood pressure, acute heart failure or cardiogenic shock. Hyperdynamic septic shock is associated with systemic hypotension despite increased cardiac output. Mediators of sepsis induce both myocardial depression and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Moreover, sepsis is characterized by microcirculatory disturbances and dysbalance in regional oxygen delivery and consumption. Severe systemic hypotension is a symptom often requiring catecholamine therapy to restore systemic circulation and to avoid organ damage. As the use of catecholamines is not a causal therapy administration should be limited to an initial measure until correction of the underlying abnormalities can be achieved. Different etiologies of shock as well as diseases requiring specific interventions as pulmonary embolectomy, systemic lysis or coronary angioplasty have to be considered. First line intervention consists of optimizing preload by fluid resuscitation as appropriate and use of dopamine (4-12 micrograms/kg.min) as primary catecholamine to increase contractility and blood pressure. In acute left heart failure inotropic support with dobutamine (4-12 micrograms/kg.min) or epinephrine (0.05-1 microgram/kg.min) may be necessary, frequently combined with a vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside 0.2-5 micrograms/kg.min or nitroglycerine 0.5-2.5 micrograms/kg.min) or phosphodiesterase-III-inhibitor (milrinone 0.3-0.8 microgram/kg.min). In right heart failure norepinephrine is preferred to increase coronary perfusion pressure. Hyperdynamic septic shock with decreased vascular resistance is treated with norepinephrine to restore mean arterial pressure and to improve right ventricular dysfunction induced by pulmonary hypertension. PMID:10768049

  9. The Bordetella Bfe System: Growth and Transcriptional Response to Siderophores, Catechols, and Neuroendocrine Catecholamines

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark T.; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    2006-01-01

    Ferric enterobactin utilization by Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis requires the BfeA outer membrane receptor. Under iron-depleted growth conditions, transcription of bfeA is activated by the BfeR regulator by a mechanism requiring the siderophore enterobactin. In this study, enterobactin-inducible bfeA transcription was shown to be TonB independent. To determine whether other siderophores or nonsiderophore catechols could be utilized by the Bfe system, various compounds were tested for the abilities to promote the growth of iron-starved B. bronchiseptica and induce bfeA transcription. The BfeA receptor transported ferric salmochelin, corynebactin, and the synthetic siderophores TRENCAM and MECAM. Salmochelin and MECAM induced bfeA transcription in iron-starved Bordetella cells, but induction by corynebactin and TRENCAM was minimal. The neuroendocrine catecholamines epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine exhibited a remarkable capacity to induce transcription of bfeA. Norepinephrine treatment of B. bronchiseptica resulted in BfeR-dependent bfeA transcription, elevated BfeA receptor production, and growth stimulation. Pyrocatechol, carbidopa, and isoproterenol were similarly strong inducers of bfeA transcription, whereas tyramine and 3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid demonstrated low inducing activity. The results indicate that the inducer structure requires a catechol group for function and that the ability to induce bfeA transcription does not necessarily correlate with the ability to stimulate bacterial growth. The expanded range of catechol siderophores transported by the BfeA receptor demonstrates the potential versatility of the Bordetella Bfe iron retrieval system. The finding that catecholamine neurotransmitters activate bfeA transcription and promote growth suggests that Bordetella cells can perceive and may benefit from neuroendocrine catecholamines on the respiratory epithelium. PMID:16885441

  10. The effects of catecholamine depletion on the neural response to fearful faces in remitted depression.

    PubMed

    Homan, Philipp; Drevets, Wayne C; Hasler, Gregor

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that increased psychophysiological response to negatively valenced emotional stimuli found in major depressive disorder (MDD) may be associated with reduced catecholaminergic neurotransmission. Fourteen unmedicated, remitted subjects with MDD (RMDD) and 13 healthy control subjects underwent catecholamine depletion with oral α-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial. Subjects were exposed to fearful (FF) and neutral faces (NF) during a scan with [15O]H2O positron emission tomography to assess the brain-catecholamine interaction in brain regions previously associated with emotional face processing. Treatment with AMPT resulted in significantly increased, normalized cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the left inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) and significantly decreased CBF in the right cerebellum across conditions and groups. In RMDD, flow in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) increased significantly in the FF compared to the NF condition after AMPT, but remained unchanged after placebo, whereas healthy controls showed a significant increase under placebo and a significant decrease under AMPT in this brain region. In the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), flow decreased significantly in the FF compared to the NF condition under AMPT, and increased significantly under placebo in RMDD, whereas healthy controls showed no significant differences. Differences between AMPT and placebo of within-session changes in worry-symptoms were positively correlated with the corresponding changes in CBF in the right subgenual prefrontal cortex in RMDD. In conclusion, this study provided evidence for a catecholamine-related modulation of the neural responses to FF expressions in the left PCC and the left DLPFC in subjects with RMDD that might constitute a persistent, trait-like abnormality in MDD. PMID:24725805

  11. Behavioral and Perceived Stressor Effects on Urinary Catecholamine Excretion in Adult Samoans

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Meredith R.; Steele, Matthew S.; Bereiter, David A.; Viali, Satupaitea; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The effects of perceptions and behaviors related to culturally-patterned socioeconomic obligations on catecholamine excretion rates were studied in a cross-sectional sample of Samoan adults. Methods 378 participants, ages 29-62 years, from 9 villages throughout Samoa, provided timed overnight urine specimens, and self-reported perceptions and behaviors associated with contributions to one's family, aiga, and chief, matai, and communal gift exchanges, fa'alavelave. Urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine excretion rates were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Age (≤40 vs. >40 years) and gender-specific regression models were estimated to detect associations with catecholamine excretion. Results Young women who contribute more to their matai, who consider fa'alavelave to be a financial strain, and who view their contribution to their matai to be ‘just right’, had significantly higher residence-adjusted norepinephrine excretion. Young women who contribute more to their matai, who consider fa'alavelave to be a financial strain, and who consider their contribution to their aiga not to be a burden, had higher epinephrine excretion. Older men who contribute more to their aiga and who perceive their contribution to their aiga to be ‘just right’ had increased residence-adjusted epinephrine excretion. Conclusions Individual-level perceptions and behaviors related to traditional socioeconomic obligations are a significant correlate of increased overnight catecholamine excretion rates. Higher excretion rates may be attributed to psychosocial stress arousal associated with a discordance between personal desires for upward social mobility, and family and community-based socioeconomic obligations. Changes in patterns of individual-level psychosocial stress arousal may contribute to cardiovascular disease risk in modernizing Samoans. PMID:21793091

  12. Temporal and periovulatory changes in ovarian catecholamines in the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Singh, V; Chaube, R; Chourasia, T K; Joy, K P

    2010-08-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection method was employed to demonstrate temporal and periovulatory changes in ovarian catecholamines in the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis. Tyrosine, L-DOPA, dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine showed significant seasonal and diurnal changes during the reproductive cycle. A high concentration of tyrosine was detected, the values increased in day and decreased in night during recrudescence from preparatory to spawning phases. Similarly, L-DOPA increased during the breeding phase giving the day value concentration peak in the spawning phase and the night value peak in the postspawning phase. DA activity or turnover index (calculated as a ratio of DA to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC) showed a bimodal pattern with the major activity peak in the postspawning phase and the minor one in the prespawning phase, the spawning phase registered the lowest activity. NE activity or turnover index (ratio of NE to normetanephrine, NME) increased during the recrudescent phase to give the peak in the spawning phase and decreased in the quiescent phase. Epinephrine elicited an inverse relationship in the day-night pattern, the day values increased to the peak in the spawning phase. All the study correlates showed significant periovulatory changes after hCG treatment. DA activity dropped to the nadir at 8h but recovered at 16 and 24h. NE activity showed only a marginal decrease up to 16h but decreased drastically at 24h. Epinephrine levels remained unchanged but only to increase at 24h. The seasonal patterns and periovulatory changes strongly point to important functions for catecholamines in the ovary. The occurrence of tyramine (an invertebrate neurotransmitter) suggests the presence of alternate catecholamine pathway in fish ovary. PMID:20399782

  13. Neurocircuitry Underlying the Preferential Sensitivity of Prefrontal Catecholamines to Low-Dose Psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Schmeichel, Brooke E; Berridge, Craig W

    2013-01-01

    Low doses of psychostimulants, including methylphenidate (MPH), are highly effective in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). At these doses, psychostimulants improve prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent function. Recent evidence indicates that low and clinically relevant doses of psychostimulants target norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) signaling preferentially in the PFC. To better understand the neural mechanisms responsible for the regional selectivity of low-dose psychostimulant action, it is important to first identify the underlying neurocircuitry. The current study used reverse microdialysis to test the hypothesis that the preferential targeting of PFC catecholamines by low-dose psychostimulants involves direct action within the PFC, reflecting an intrinsic property of this region. For these studies, the effects of varying concentrations of MPH (0.25, 1.0, and 4.0 μM) on NE and DA efflux were examined within the PFC and select subcortical fields in unanesthetized rats. Low concentrations of MPH elicited significantly larger increases in extracellular levels of NE and DA in the PFC than in subcortical regions linked to motor-activating and arousal-promoting actions of psychostimulants (nucleus accumbens and medial septal area, respectively). The differential action of MPH across regions disappeared at higher concentrations. The enhanced sensitivity of PFC catecholamines to low and clinically relevant doses of psychostimulants, at least in part, reflects a unique sensitivity of this region to NE/DA transporter blockade. Available evidence suggests that the increased sensitivity of PFC catecholamines likely involves DA clearance through the NE transporter within the PFC. PMID:23303075

  14. Chronic social isolation during adolescence augments catecholamine response to acute ethanol in the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Karkhanis, Anushree N; Alexander, Nancy J; McCool, Brian A; Weiner, Jeffrey L; Jones, Sara R

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent social isolation (SI) results in numerous behavioral alterations associated with increased risk of alcoholism. Notably, many of these changes involve the basolateral amygdala (BLA), including increased alcohol seeking. The BLA sends a strong glutamatergic projection to the nucleus accumbens and activation of this pathway potentiates reward-seeking behavior. Dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) exert powerful excitatory and inhibitory effects on BLA activity and chronic stress can disrupt the excitation-inhibition balance maintained by these catecholamines. Notably, the impact of SI on BLA DA and NE neurotransmission is unknown. Thus the aim of this study was to characterize SI-mediated catecholamine alterations in the BLA. Male Long Evans rats were housed in groups of four (GH) or in SI for 6 weeks during adolescence. DA and NE transporter levels were then measured using Western blot hybridization and baseline and ethanol-stimulated DA and NE levels were quantified using microdialysis. DA transporter levels were increased and baseline DA levels were decreased in SI compared to GH rats. SI also increased DA responses to an acute ethanol (2 g kg(-1)) challenge. While no group differences were noted in NE transporter or baseline NE levels, acute ethanol (2 g kg(-1)) only significantly increased NE levels in SI animals. Collectively, these SI-dependent changes in BLA catecholamine signaling may lead to an increase in BLA excitability and a strengthening of the glutamatergic projection between the BLA and NAc. Such changes may promote the elevated ethanol drinking behavior observed in rats subjected to chronic adolescent stress. PMID:25963724

  15. Catecholamine-induced interleukin-10 release: a key mechanism in systemic immunodepression after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Woiciechowsky, Christian; Schöning, Britta; Lanksch, Wolfgang R; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Döcke, Wolf-Dietrich

    1999-01-01

    Background: Infections after severe brain injury or polytrauma are still a problem, and may be the result of a brain-mediated disturbed systemic immunoreactivity. The mechanism that connects initial brain affection and systemic immunodepression, however, is still poorly understood. Review: In order to analyze the influence of the sympathetic nervous system in the context of brain injury on systemic immune functions, we performed various in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. We were able to demonstrate that catecholamines trigger the release of the strong anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocytes. In animal models we were able to show that increased intracranial pressure as well as intracerebral proinflammatory cytokines (eg IL-1β) produce a rapid systemic IL-10 release through sympathetic activation. Thus, in both models, the predominant role of catecholamines for this effect was confirmed by the complete prevention of IL-10 increase after β-adrenoreceptor blockade. Moreover, in clinical studies we clearly demonstrated that neurosurgical procedures involving brain-stem manipulation invoke sympathetic activation and a rapid systemic IL-10 release. Remarkably, this was associated with monocytic deactivation – a sign of systemic immunodepression and a high risk of infectious complications.Finally, these data were validated in patients with accidental brain injury, in whom we demonstrated a correlation between the severity of injury, sympathetic activation, IL-10 plasma levels and the incidence of infectious complications. Conclusion: In summary, we suppose that activation of inhibitory neuroimmune pathways like the sympathetic nervous system, but also the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, may trigger a systemic anti-inflammatory response syndrome that leads to systemic immunodepression. In this process the catecholamine-mediated systemic IL-10 release that causes monocytic deactivation may be a key

  16. Catecholamine-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction and mPTP opening: protective effect of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Izem-Meziane, Malika; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Rimbaud, Stephanie; Caffin, Fanny; Fortin, Dominique; Garnier, Anne; Veksler, Vladimir; Joubert, Frederic; Ventura-Clapier, Renee

    2012-02-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the mitochondrial dysfunction induced by catecholamines and to investigate whether curcumin, a natural antioxidant, induces cardioprotective effects against catecholamine-induced cardiotoxicity by preserving mitochondrial function. Because mitochondria play a central role in ischemia and oxidative stress, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in catecholamine toxicity and in the potential protective effects of curcumin. Male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injection of 150 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) isoprenaline (ISO) for two consecutive days with or without pretreatment with 60 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) curcumin. Twenty four hours after, cardiac tissues were examined for apoptosis and oxidative stress. Expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Isolated mitochondria and permeabilized cardiac fibers were used for swelling and mitochondrial function experiments, respectively. Mitochondrial morphology and permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening were assessed by fluorescence in isolated cardiomyocytes. ISO treatment induced cell damage, oxidative stress, and apoptosis that were prevented by curcumin. Moreover, mitochondria seem to play an important role in these effects as respiration and mitochondrial swelling were increased following ISO treatment, these effects being again prevented by curcumin. Importantly, curcumin completely prevented the ISO-induced increase in mPTP calcium susceptibility in isolated cardiomyocytes without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial network dynamic. The results unravel the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in isoprenaline-induced cardiotoxicity as well as a new cardioprotective effect of curcumin through prevention of mitochondrial damage and mPTP opening. PMID:22101527

  17. Persistent neurotoxicity from a battery fire: is cadmium the culprit?

    PubMed

    Kilburn, K H; McKinley, K L

    1996-07-01

    Two train conductors had chest tightness, painful breathing, muscle cramps, and nausea after fighting a fire in a battery box under a passenger coach. Shortly thereafter, they became anosmic and had excessive fatigue, persistent headaches, sleep disturbances, irritability, unstable moods, and hypertension. Urinary cadmium and nickel levels were elevated. Neurobehavioral testing showed, in comparison to referents, prolonged reaction times, abnormal balance, prolonged blink reflex latency, severely constricted visual fields, and decreased vibration sense. Test scores showed that immediate verbal and visual recall were normal but delayed recall was reduced. Scores on overlearned information were normal. Tests measuring dexterity, coordination, decision making, and peripheral sensation and discrimination revealed abnormalities. Repeat testing 6 and 12 months after exposure showed persistent abnormalities. Cadmium and vinyl chloride are the most plausible causes of the neurotoxicity, but fumes from the fire may have contained other neurotoxic chemicals. PMID:8685756

  18. The double-edged sword: Neurotoxicity of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Magge, Rajiv S; DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The number of available therapies for hematologic malignancies continues to grow at a rapid pace. Unfortunately, many of these treatments carry both central and peripheral nervous system toxicities, potentially limiting a patient's ability to tolerate a full course of treatment. Neurotoxicity with chemotherapy is common and second only to myelosuppression as a reason to limit dosing. This review addresses the neurotoxicity of newly available therapeutic agents including brentuximab vedotin and blinatumomab as well as classic ones such as methotrexate, vinca alkaloids and platinums. Although peripheral neuropathy is common with many drugs, other complications such as seizures and encephalopathy may require more immediate attention. Rapid recognition of adverse neurologic effects may lead to earlier treatment and appropriate adjustment of dosing regimens. In addition, knowledge of common toxicities may help differentiate chemotherapy-related symptoms from actual progression of cancer into the CNS. PMID:25445718

  19. Catecholamines of the adrenal medula and their morphological changes during adaptation to repeated immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Mitro, A.; Mikulaj, L.; Hocman, G.

    1980-01-01

    Changes of the adrenal medulla of rats were studied in the course of adaptation to repeated immobilization stress. An increase in the number of cells in the adrenal medulla was found in the adapted animals; this increase was confirmed by weight indices of the medulla and by cell counts per surface unit. Simultaneous karyometric measurements of the nuclei of adrenal medulla cells and an analysis of the catecholamine contents in the adrenals explain the increased activity of the adrenal medulla in the course of adaptation.

  20. Catecholamines and opioid peptides increase in plasma in humans during possession trances.

    PubMed

    Kawai, N; Honda, M; Nakamura, S; Samatra, P; Sukardika, K; Nakatani, Y; Shimojo, N; Oohashi, T

    2001-11-16

    Naturally induced possession trances have been observed in healthy people of many societies. The neurophysiological basis of this phenomenon remains unknown, however, because of the difficulty in accessing subjects in trances due to their sacred context. In the present study, we measured the plasma levels of several neuroactive substances from subjects exhibiting or lacking possession trance characteristics during Balinese dedicatory dramas under natural conditions. The trance group exhibited significant increases in plasma concentrations of noradrenaline, dopamine and beta-endorphin, compared with controls who performed the same actions as the trance group. The present finding suggests that catecholamines and opioid peptides are involved in possession trances. PMID:11733683

  1. A new type of prodrug of catecholamines: an opportunity to improve the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Venhuis, Bastiaan J; Rodenhuis, Nienke; Wikström, Håkan V; Wustrow, David; Meltzer, Leonard T; Wise, Lawrence D; Johnson, Stephen J; Pugsley, Thomas A; Sundell, Staffan; Dijkstra, Durk

    2002-06-01

    After decades of research around dopamine agonists, we have found a promising compound in S-PD148903 that represents a new type of prodrug, which in the rat is bioactivated to the catecholamine S-5,6-diOH-DPAT, known to display mixed dopamine D(1)/D(2) receptor agonist properties just like apomorphine. This prodrug has an enone structure which by an oxidative bioactivation mechanism is converted to the corresponding catechol and is delivered enantioselectively into the CNS. This novel concept has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of Parkinson's disease by competing with L-DOPA, the current treatment of choice. PMID:12036342

  2. Potentiation of K+-evoked catecholamine release in the cat adrenal gland treated with ouabain.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, A. G.; Garcia-Lopez, E.; Horga, J. F.; Kirpekar, S. M.; Montiel, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, P.

    1981-01-01

    1 A vigorous catecholamine secretory response was evoked by small increments (2-10 mM) of the extracellular concentration of K+ ([K+])o) in cat adrenal glands treated with ouabain (10(-4) M), and perfused with Krebs-bicarbonate solution at room temperature. 2 The secretory response depends on [K+]o; increments of [K+]o as small as 2 mM for 2 min evoked a clear secretory response; at 10-17.7 mM K+, the maximal secretory response was observed. In normal glands, not treated with ouabain, no increase of the rate of catecholamine output was observed by raising [K+]o up to 17.7 mM for 2 min. 3 The K+ secretory response was time-dependent, requiring at least 1 min to be initiated; on continued exposure to 10 mM [K+]o, the enhanced response remained for at least 1 h. 4 In low [Na+]o, the K+-secretory response was unchanged. However, in 0-Ca2+, high-Mg2+ solutions, or in the presence of D600, an organic Ca2+ antagonist, it was abolished. 5 The K+-induced secretory response was not altered in the presence of tetrodoxin or tetraethylammonium. 6 It is concluded that ouabain potentiated the catecholamine secretory response to raised [K+]o by increasing the amount of Ca2+ available to the secretory machinery through (a) mobilization of an enhanced pool of membrane-bound Ca2+, (b) activation of membrane Ca2+ inward current; or (c) decrease of intracellular Ca2+ buffering systems. The activation by ouabain of a membrane Na+-Ca2+ exchange system is not involved in this K+-secretory response. It is suggested that the plasma membrane ATPase enzyme system, by changing the affinity of its Ca2+ binding sites, might control the availability of this cation to the secretory machinery and, therefore, modulate catecholamine secretion in the adrenal gland. PMID:7296168

  3. Use of methylene blue for catecholamine-refractory vasoplegia from protamine and aprotinin.

    PubMed

    Del Duca, Danny; Sheth, Shashank S; Clarke, Ann E; Lachapelle, Kevin J; Ergina, Patrick L

    2009-02-01

    We present two cases of catecholamine-refractory and vasopressin-refractory vasoplegic syndrome associated with intraoperative anaphylaxis during cardiac surgery. One case was related to the administration of protamine and the other case to the administration of aprotinin. Both cases were successfully managed using intravenous methylene blue. The use of methylene blue blocks accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate by competitively inhibiting the enzyme guanylate cyclase. This results in reduced responsiveness of the vasculature to cyclic guanosine monophosphate-mediated vasodilators, such as nitric oxide. This report provides a description of severe anaphylaxis induced by different agents, in which the use of methylene blue was associated with a significant clinical response. PMID:19161806

  4. Neurotoxicity related to lithium and neuroleptic combinations? A retrospective review.

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, J B; Verghese, C; Simpson, G M

    1992-01-01

    The question of toxic interactions resulting from combinations of lithium and neuroleptic drugs is largely based on anecdotal reports. We replicated the methods of Miller and Menninger (1987) who reported that 27% of manic patients on treatment with lithium and neuroleptics developed toxicity. We found no cases of neurotoxicity as defined in the earlier report. Pharmacologic mechanisms and differences in the clinical findings of the two studies are discussed. PMID:1349826

  5. Bilirubin Neurotoxicity in Preterm Infants: Risk and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Vinod K.; Wong, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic conditions in preterm neonates, including Rhesus (Rh) disease, can lead to mortality and long-term impairments due to bilirubin neurotoxicity. Universal access to Rh immunoprophylaxis, coordinated perinatal-neonatal care, and effective phototherapy has virtually eliminated the risk of kernicterus in many countries. In the absence of jaundice due to isoimmunization and without access to phototherapy or exchange transfusion (in 1955), kernicterus was reported at 10.1%, 5.5%, and 1.2% in babies <30, 31-32, and 33-34 wks gestational age, respectively. Phototherapy initiated at 24±12 hr effectively prevented hyperbilirubinemia in infants <2,000 g even in the presence of hemolysis. This approach (in 1985) reduced exchange transfusions from 23.9% to 4.8%. Now with 3 decades of experience in implementing effective phototherapy, the need for exchange transfusions has virtually been eliminated. However, bilirubin neurotoxicity continues to be associated with prematurity alone. The ability to better predict this risk, other than birthweight and gestation, has been elusive. Objective tests such as total bilirubin, unbound or free bilirubin, albumin levels, and albumin-bilirubin binding, together with observations of concurrent hemolysis, sepsis, and rapid rate of bilirubin rise have been considered, but their individual or combined predictive utility has yet to be refined. The disruptive effects of immaturity, concurrent neonatal disease, cholestasis, use of total parenteral nutrition or drugs that alter bilirubin-binding abilities augment the clinical risk of neurotoxicity. Current management options rely on the “fine-tuning” of each infant's exposure to beneficial antioxidants and avoidance of silent neurotoxic properties of bilirubin navigated within the safe spectrum of operational thresholds demarcated by experts. PMID:24049745

  6. The dopamine transporter: role in neurotoxicity and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bannon, Michael J. . E-mail: mbannon@med.wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane transport protein expressed exclusively within a small subset of CNS neurons. It plays a crucial role in controlling dopamine-mediated neurotransmission and a number of associated behaviors. This review focuses on recent data elucidating the role of the dopamine transporter in neurotoxicity and a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson disease, drug abuse, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  7. Manganese: Recent advances in understanding its transport and neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Aschner, Michael . E-mail: Michael.Aschner@vanderbilt.edu; Guilarte, Tomas R.; Schneider, Jay S.; Zheng Wei

    2007-06-01

    The present review is based on presentations from the meeting of the Society of Toxicology in San Diego, CA (March 2006). It addresses recent developments in the understanding of the transport of manganese (Mn) into the central nervous system (CNS), as well as brain imaging and neurocognitive studies in non-human primates aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanisms of Mn neurotoxicity. Finally, we discuss potential therapeutic modalities for treating Mn intoxication in humans.

  8. Anthocyanins: are they beneficial in treating ethanol neurotoxicity?

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Luo, Jia

    2010-01-01

    Heavy alcohol exposure produces profound damage to the developing central nervous system (CNS) as well as the adult brain. Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) have a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and neurological impairments. FASD currently represents the leading cause of mental retardation. Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) and neurodegeneration in the adult brain. Although the cellular/molecular mechanism underlying ethanol's neurotoxicity has not been fully understood, it is generally believed that oxidative stress plays an important role. Identification of neuroprotective agents that can ameliorate ethanol neurotoxicity is an important step for developing preventive/therapeutic strategies. Targeting ethanol-induced oxidative stress using natural antioxidants is an attractive approach. Anthocyanins, a large subgroup of flavonoids present in many vegetables and fruits, are safe and potent antioxidants. They exhibit diverse potential health benefits including cardioprotection, anti-atherosclerotic activity, anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammation properties. Anthocyanins can cross the blood-brain barrier and distribute in the CNS. Recent studies indicate that anthocyanins represent novel neuroprotective agents and may be beneficial in ameliorating ethanol neurotoxicity. In this review, we discuss the evidence and potential of anthocyanins in alleviating ethanol-induced damage to the CNS. Furthermore, we discuss possible underlying mechanisms as well as future research approaches necessary to establish the therapeutic role of anthocyanins. PMID:19590929

  9. Resveratrol attenuates hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity through inhibiting microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Qingrui; Gao, Yan; Liu, Guangheng; Xiu, Meng; Wei, Xiang; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Dexiang

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol enriched in Polygonum cuspidatum and has been found to afford neuroprotective effects against neuroinflammation in the brain. Activated microglia can secrete various pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic mediators, which may contribute to hypoxic brain injuries. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential role of resveratrol in attenuating hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity via its anti-inflammatory actions through in vitro models of the BV-2 microglial cell line and primary microglia. We found that resveratrol significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced microglial activation and reduced subsequent release of pro-inflammatory factors. In addition, resveratrol inhibited the hypoxia-induced degradation of IκB-alpha and phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB protein. Hypoxia-induced ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation was also strongly inhibited by resveratrol, whereas resveratrol had no effect on hypoxia-stimulated p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Importantly, treating primary cortical neurons with conditioned medium (CM) from hypoxia-stimulated microglia induced neuronal apoptosis, which was reversed by CM co-treated with resveratrol. Taken together, resveratrol exerts neuroprotection against hypoxia-induced neurotoxicity through its anti-inflammatory effects in microglia. These effects were mediated, at least in part, by suppressing the activation of NF-ĸB, ERK and JNK MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26225925

  10. Peripheral Ammonia as a Mediator of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, Laura E.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia is metabolized by the liver and has established neurological effects. The current study examined the possibility that ammonia contributes to the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH). The results show that a binge dosing regimen of METH to the rat increased plasma and brain ammonia concentrations that were paralleled by evidence of hepatotoxicity. The role of peripheral ammonia in the neurotoxic effects of METH was further substantiated by the demonstration that the enhancement of peripheral ammonia excretion blocked the increases in brain and plasma ammonia and attenuated the long term depletions of dopamine and serotonin typically produced by METH. Conversely, the localized perfusion of ammonia in combination with METH, but not METH alone or ammonia alone, into the striatum recapitulated the neuronal damage produced by the systemic administration of METH. Furthermore, this damage produced by the local administration of ammonia and METH was blocked by the GYKI 52466, an AMPA receptor antagonist. These findings highlight the importance of ammonia derived from the periphery as a small molecule mediator of METH neurotoxicity and more broadly emphasize the importance of peripheral organ damage as a possible mechanism that mediates the neuropathology produced by drugs of abuse and other neuroactive molecules. PMID:22993432

  11. In vitro neurotoxic hazard characterisation of dinitrophenolic herbicides.

    PubMed

    Heusinkveld, Harm J; van Vliet, Arie C; Nijssen, Peter C G; Westerink, Remco H S

    2016-06-11

    Dinitrophenolic compounds are powerful toxicants with a long history of use in agriculture and industry. While (high) human exposure levels are not uncommon, in particular for agricultural workers during the spraying season, the neurotoxic mechanism(s) that underlie the human health effects are largely unknown. We therefore investigated the in vitro effects of two dinitrophenolic herbicides (DNOC and dinoseb) on a battery of neurotoxicity endpoints in (dopaminergic) rat PC12 cells. Cell viability, mitochondrial activity, oxidative stress and caspase activation were assessed using fluorescence-based bioassays (CFDA, alamar Blue, H2DCFDA and Ac-DEVD-AMC, respectively), whereas changes in intracellular [Ca(2+)]i were assessed using single-cell fluorescence microscopy with Fura-2AM. The combined results demonstrate that exposure to both DNOC and dinoseb is linked to calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum and activation of caspase-mediated apoptotic pathways. In subsequent experiments, immunofluorescent labelling with specific antibodies was used to determine changes in intracellular α-synuclein levels, demonstrating that both DNOC and dinoseb increase levels of intracellular α-synuclein. The combined results indicate that in vitro exposure to DNOC and dinoseb activates pathways that are not only involved in acute neurotoxicity but also in long-term effects as seen in neurodegeneration. PMID:27106277

  12. Developmental neurotoxic effects of Malathion on 3D neurosphere system

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Mohamed; Lotfy, Ahmed; Fathy, Khaled; Makar, Maria; El-emam, Mona; El-gamal, Aya; El-gamal, Mohamed; Badawy, Ahmad; Mohamed, Wael M.Y.; Sobh, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) refers to the toxic effects induced by various chemicals on brain during the early childhood period. As human brains are vulnerable during this period, various chemicals would have significant effects on brains during early childhood. Some toxicants have been confirmed to induce developmental toxic effects on CNS; however, most of agents cannot be identified with certainty. This is because available animal models do not cover the whole spectrum of CNS developmental periods. A novel alternative method that can overcome most of the limitations of the conventional techniques is the use of 3D neurosphere system. This in-vitro system can recapitulate many of the changes during the period of brain development making it an ideal model for predicting developmental neurotoxic effects. In the present study we verified the possible DNT of Malathion, which is one of organophosphate pesticides with suggested possible neurotoxic effects on nursing children. Three doses of Malathion (0.25 μM, 1 μM and 10 μM) were used in cultured neurospheres for a period of 14 days. Malathion was found to affect proliferation, differentiation and viability of neurospheres, these effects were positively correlated to doses and time progress. This study confirms the DNT effects of Malathion on 3D neurosphere model. Further epidemiological studies will be needed to link these results to human exposure and effects data. PMID:27054080

  13. Glial Reactivity in Resistance to Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine (METH) result in reactive microglia and astrocytes in striatum. Prior data indicate that rats with partial dopamine (DA) loss resulting from prior exposure to METH are resistant to further decreases in striatal DA when re-exposed to METH 30 days later. Such resistant animals also do not show an activated microglia phenotype, suggesting a relation between microglial activation and METH-induced neurotoxicity. To date, the astrocyte response in such resistance has not been examined. Thus, this study examined glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD11b protein expression in striata of animals administered saline or a neurotoxic regimen of METH on postnatal days 60 and/or 90 (Saline:Saline, Saline:METH, METH:Saline, METH:METH). Consistent with previous work, animals experiencing acute toxicity (Saline:METH) showed both activated microglia and astocytes, whereas those resistant to the acute toxicity (METH:METH) did not show activated microglia. Interestingly, GFAP expression remained elevated in rats exposed to METH at PND60 (METH:Saline), and was not elevated further in resistant rats treated for the second time with METH (METH:METH). These data suggest that astrocytes remain reactive up to 30 days post-METH exposure. Additionally, these data indicate that astrocyte reactivity does not reflect acute, METH-induced DA terminal toxicity, whereas microglial reactivity does. PMID:23414433

  14. Synergistic neurotoxicity induced by methylmercury and quercetin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Roberta de P.; Braga, Hugo de C.; da Silva, Aline P.; Dalmarco, Juliana B.; de Bem, Andreza F.; dos Santos, Adair Roberto S.; Dafre, Alcir L.; Pizzolatti, Moacir G.; Latini, Alexandra; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a highly neurotoxic pollutant, whose mechanisms of toxicity are related to its pro-oxidative properties. A previous report showed under in vivo conditions the neuroprotective effects of plants of the genus Polygala against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, the flavonoid quercetin, isolated from Polygala sabulosa, displayed beneficial effects against MeHg-induced oxidative damage under in vitro conditions. In this study, we sought for potential beneficial effects of quercetin against the neurotoxicity induced by MeHg in Swiss female mice. Animals were divided into six experimental groups: control, quercetin low dose (5 mg/Kg), quercetin high dose (50 mg/Kg), MeHg (40 mg/L, in tap water), MeHg + quercetin low dose, and MeHg + quercetin high dose. After the treatment (21 days), a significant motor deficit was observed in MeHg + quercetin groups. Biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress showed that the simultaneous treatment with quercetin and MeHg caused a higher cerebellar oxidative damage when compared to the individual exposures. MeHg plus quercetin elicited a higher cerebellar lipid peroxidation than MeHg or quercetin alone. The present results indicate that under in vivo conditions quercetin and MeHg cause additive pro-oxidative effects toward the mice cerebellum and that such phenomenon is associated with the observed motor deficit. PMID:19141311

  15. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  16. Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in yeast cells expressing neurotoxic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Ralf J.

    2015-01-01

    Critically impaired protein degradation is discussed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and motor neuron diseases. Misfolded, aggregated, or surplus proteins are efficiently degraded via distinct protein degradation pathways, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, autophagy, and vesicular trafficking. These pathways are regulated by covalent modification of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and are evolutionary highly conserved from humans to yeast. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mechanisms of protein degradation, and for the elucidation of pathways underlying programmed cell death. The expression of human neurotoxic proteins triggers cell death in yeast, with neurotoxic protein-specific differences. Therefore, yeast cell death models are suitable for analyzing the role of protein degradation pathways in modulating cell death upon expression of disease-causing proteins. This review summarizes which protein degradation pathways are affected in these yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic models, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of human disorders. PMID:25814926

  17. Phthalates and neurotoxic effects on hippocampal network plasticity.

    PubMed

    Holahan, Matthew R; Smith, Catherine A

    2015-05-01

    Phthalates are synthetically derived chemicals used as plasticizers in a variety of common household products. They are not chemically bound to plastic polymers and over time, easily migrate out of these products and into the environment. Experimental investigations evaluating the biological impact of phthalate exposure on developing organisms are critical given that estimates of phthalate exposure are considerably higher in infants and children compared to adults. Extensive growth and re-organization of neurocircuitry occurs during development leaving the brain highly susceptible to environmental insults. This review summarizes the effects of phthalate exposure on brain structure and function with particular emphasis on developmental aspects of hippocampal structural and functional plasticity. In general, it appears that widespread disruptions in hippocampal functional and structural plasticity occur following developmental (pre-, peri- and post-natal) exposure to phthalates. Whether these changes occur as a direct neurotoxic effect of phthalates or an indirect effect through disruption of endogenous endocrine functions is not fully understood. Comprehensive investigations that simultaneously assess the neurodevelopmental, neurotoxic, neuroendocrine and behavioral correlates of phthalate exposure are needed to provide an opportunity to thoroughly evaluate the neurotoxic potential of phthalates throughout the lifespan. PMID:25749100

  18. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  19. The WD40 Domain Is Required for LRRK2 Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Nathan D.; Peng, Yong; Ho, Cherry C.-Y.; Rideout, Hardy J.; Petrey, Donald; Liu, Peng; Dauer, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson disease (PD). LRRK2 contains an “enzymatic core” composed of GTPase and kinase domains that is flanked by leucine-rich repeat (LRR) and WD40 protein-protein interaction domains. While kinase activity and GTP-binding have both been implicated in LRRK2 neurotoxicity, the potential role of other LRRK2 domains has not been as extensively explored. Principal Findings We demonstrate that LRRK2 normally exists in a dimeric complex, and that removing the WD40 domain prevents complex formation and autophosphorylation. Moreover, loss of the WD40 domain completely blocks the neurotoxicity of multiple LRRK2 PD mutations. Conclusion These findings suggest that LRRK2 dimerization and autophosphorylation may be required for the neurotoxicity of LRRK2 PD mutations and highlight a potential role for the WD40 domain in the mechanism of LRRK2-mediated cell death. PMID:20041156

  20. A neurotoxic alcohol exposure paradigm does not induce hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Joel G; Wiren, Kristine M; Wilhelm, Clare J

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with neurological dysfunction, brain morphological deficits and frank neurotoxicity. Although these disruptions may be a secondary effect due to hepatic encephalopathy, no clear evidence of causality is available. This study examined whether a 72h period of alcohol intoxication known to induce physical dependence, followed by a single withdrawal, was sufficient to induce signs of hepatic encephalopathy in male and female mice. Animals were continuously intoxicated via alcohol vapor inhalation, a procedure previously shown to induce significant neurotoxicity in female mice. At peak synchronized withdrawal (8h following the end of alcohol exposure), blood samples were taken and levels of several liver-regulated markers and brain swelling were characterized. Glutathione levels were also determined in the medial frontal cortex (mFC) and hippocampus. Results revealed elevated levels of cholesterol, albumin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and decreased levels of blood urea nitrogen and total bilirubin in alcohol-exposed male and female groups compared to controls. Brain water weight was not affected by alcohol exposure, though males tended to have slightly more water weight overall. Alcohol exposure led to reductions in tissue levels of glutathione in both the hippocampus and mFC which may indicate increased oxidative stress. Combined, these results suggest that hepatic encephalopathy does not appear to play a significant role in the neurotoxicity observed following alcohol exposure in this model. PMID:27268733

  1. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    PubMed

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity. PMID:25975107

  2. The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale: validation of a brief self-report measure of antiepileptic-drug-related neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Salinsky, Martin C; Storzbach, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    The Portland Neurotoxicity Scale (PNS) is a brief patient-based survey of neurotoxicity complaints commonly encountered with the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The authors present data on the validity of this scale, particularly when used in longitudinal studies. Participants included 55 healthy controls, 23 epilepsy patient controls, and 86 healthy volunteers who took various AEDs or placebos for 12 weeks as part of randomized, double-blind studies of AED effects on cognitive abilities. Test-retest reliability in the control groups averaged .80 (total score). Test-retest changes in the PNS were sensitive to AED usage in general (p < .001) and to each of the five AEDs tested but not to placebo. Test-retest changes in the PNS were strongly correlated with several scales of the Profile of Mood States but only weakly correlated with objective cognitive test measures. The PNS has satisfactory psychometric properties and is sensitive to AED usage in test-retest studies. PMID:15695749

  3. [Catecholamines and their metabolic enzymes in the hypothalamus of rats after a flight on the Kosmos-782 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Kvetnanský, R; Tigranian, R A; Torda, T; Babusiková, D; Jahnová, E

    1979-01-01

    The concentration of catecholamines, and activity of enzymes involved in their synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase) and degradation (monoamine oxidase) were measured in the hypothalamus of rats flown for 19.5 days aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-782, synchronous and vivarium controls sacrificed on R+O and R+25 days. No significant changes in the above parameters of the flight rats were found. The findings give evidence that a prolonged space flight induces no changes in the content, synthesis or degradation of catecholamines in the rat hypothalamus. This seems to indicate that weightlessness does not act as an acute stressor. PMID:36499

  4. TaClo as a neurotoxic lead: improved synthesis, stereochemical analysis, and inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    Bringmann, G; God, R; Feineis, D; Janetzky, B; Reichmann, H

    1995-01-01

    "TaClo", a highly halogenated tetrahydro-beta-carboline derived from the biogenic amine tryptamine ("Ta") and the synthetic hypnotic chloral ("Clo"), has to be considered as a dopaminergic neurotoxin potentially occurring in vivo. For the preparation of TaClo on a large scale, an improved synthetic pathway was elaborated. The distinct neurotoxic activity of TaClo warrants its intensive study also under stereochemical aspects. For this reason, an analytic device for the separation and stereochemical attribution of its two enantiomers, (R)-TaClo and (S)-TaClo, was developed, based on chromatography on a chiral HPLC phase. Elucidation of the absolute configuration was achieved by CD spectroscopy and confirmed by X-ray crystallography. TaClo exhibits highly selective in vitro inhibition of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, the required concentrations being much lower than those needed for related halogen-free beta-carbolines or for MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium ion), the active metabolite of MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine). Furthermore, TaClo as a novel lead structure stimulated chemical and neuropharmacological investigations also on related highly halogenated beta-carbolines. Thus, some of the tested compounds--both potential TaClo metabolites and unnatural derivatives--showed even an enhanced inhibition of the mitochondrial respiration in vitro. PMID:8821061

  5. Isoprenaline as an aid to the induction of catecholamine dependent supraventricular tachycardias during programmed stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Brembilla-Perrot, B; Terrier de la Chaise, A; Pichené, M; Aliot, E; Cherrier, F; Pernot, C

    1989-01-01

    The effects of isoprenaline on the induction of supraventricular tachycardia by programmed stimulation were studied in 67 patients to see whether they correlated with spontaneous catecholamine mediated symptoms during exercise testing and Holter monitoring. Thirty seven control patients (group 1) did not have spontaneous arrhythmias either during exercise testing or Holter monitoring. Thirty patients (group 2) had documented exercise or stress related supraventricular tachycardias--that is paroxysmal junctional tachycardia (24) or atrial arrhythmia (6). Programmed electrical stimulation was performed before and during the infusion of isoprenaline. No group 1 patient developed sustained supraventricular tachycardia during isoprenaline infusion. In 21 patients with paroxysmal junctional tachycardia and all the patients with atrial arrhythmias electrical stimulation during isoprenaline infusion produced the same tachycardia that had been seen during exercise testing and Holter monitoring. Changes in electrophysiological variables and the concentrations of serum potassium were not associated with the induction of supraventricular tachycardia by isoprenaline. Infusion of isoprenaline safely facilitated the induction of supraventricular tachycardia by programmed stimulation in patients who had spontaneously occurring catecholamine mediated symptoms. PMID:2713190

  6. Methenyltetrahydrofolate Synthetase is a High-Affinity Catecholamine-Binding Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Anguera, Montserrat C.; Stover, Patrick J.

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant mouse 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (MTHFS) was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to co-purify with a chromophore that had a λmax at 320 nm. The chromophore remained bound to MTHFS during extensive dialysis, but dissociated from MTHFS when its substrate, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, was bound. The chromophore was identified as an oxidized catecholamine by mass spectrometry and absorption spectroscopy. Purified recombinant mouse MTHFS and rabbit liver MTHFS proteins were shown to bind oxidized N-acetyldopamine (NADA) tightly. The addition of NADA to cell culture medium accelerated markedly folate turnover and decreased both folate accumulation and total cellular folate concentrations in MCF-7 cells. Expression of the MTHFS cDNA in MCF-7 cells increased the concentration of NADA required to deplete cellular folate. The results of this study are the first to identify a link between catecholamines and one-carbon metabolism and demonstrate that NADA accelerates folate turnover and impairs cellular folate accumulation in MCF-7 cells. PMID:17055997

  7. Arrhythmias, elicited by catecholamines and serotonin, vanish in human chronic atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Torsten; Rozmaritsa, Nadiia; Engel, Andreas; Berk, Emanuel; Knaut, Michael; Metzner, Katharina; Canteras, Manuel; Ravens, Ursula; Kaumann, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Transient postoperative AF can be elicited by high sympathetic nervous system activity. Catecholamines and serotonin cause arrhythmias in atrial trabeculae from patients with sinus rhythm (SR), but whether these arrhythmias occur in patients with chronic AF is unknown. We compared the incidence of arrhythmic contractions caused by norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin, and forskolin in atrial trabeculae from patients with SR and patients with AF. In the patients with AF, arrhythmias were markedly reduced for the agonists and abolished for forskolin, whereas maximum inotropic responses were markedly blunted only for serotonin. Serotonin and forskolin produced spontaneous diastolic Ca2+ releases in atrial myocytes from the patients with SR that were abolished or reduced in myocytes from the patients with AF. For matching L-type Ca2+-current (ICa,L) responses, serotonin required and produced ∼100-fold less cAMP/PKA at the Ca2+ channel domain compared with the catecholamines and forskolin. Norepinephrine-evoked ICa,L responses were decreased by inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) in myocytes from patients with SR, but not in those from patients with AF. Agonist-evoked phosphorylation by CaMKII at phospholamban (Thr-17), but not of ryanodine2 (Ser-2814), was reduced in trabeculae from patients with AF. The decreased CaMKII activity may contribute to the blunting of agonist-evoked arrhythmias in the atrial myocardium of patients with AF. PMID:25024212

  8. Effects of acute catecholamine depletion on cardiac function in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sellke, F.; Sadri, F.; Ely, D.

    1986-03-01

    Reserpine(6mg/Kg) was injected IP in Wistar (n = 5, age 10 wks.) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats (n = 5, age 16 wks.). After 4 hours the hearts were isolated (Langendorff), perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution and paced at 240/min. Non-injected Wistar (N = 5) and SHR (n = 6) rats were used for controls. Myocardial levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) were determined with radioenzymatic assay. Left ventricular systolic and distolic pressures were recorded for left ventricular end diastolic volumes (LVEDV) .05 to .40 ml. Despite a marked decrease in tissue levels of NE and E, peak systolic pressure (PSP) increased in reserpine treated normotensive and SHR rats. In isolated control SHR rat hearts (LVEDV = .20 ml), PSP was related to NE by PSP = .0145 (NE) + 93 (r = .819, p < .01). In conclusion, cardiac performance and tissue levels of myocardial catecholamines are correlated in control rats. However, rapid depletion of myocardial catecholamines may result in increased cardiac performance.

  9. An Adrenal Mass and Increased Catecholamines: Monoamine Oxidase or Pheochromocytoma Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Bosscher, Marianne R. F.; Wentholt, Iris M.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Nieveen van Dijkum, Els J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Hormonal evaluation in patients with an adrenal incidentaloma can be difficult in patients with comorbidities or in patients using interfering drugs. We present a case of a 54-year-old man who was evaluated for an adrenal mass. The medical history reported treatment with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor for recurrent psychoses. Hormonal screening showed elevated levels of normetanephrine and metanephrine in plasma and urine, suggesting a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma (PHEO), and an adrenalectomy was performed. Histologic examination showed that the tumor had an origin of the adrenal cortex. MAO inhibitors are also known to cause elevated levels of catecholamines. In this case, a PHEO seemed more likely the cause due to repeatedly elevated levels of metanephrines and normal levels of catecholamines. Since the tumor had an origin of the adrenal cortex, the use of MAO inhibitors was the most likely explanation for the elevated levels of metanephrines. This case illustrated the difficulties in diagnosing PHEO, especially in patients with comorbidities and interfering drugs. PMID:25584109

  10. Differential effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Supplementation of minimal medium inoculated with bacterial cultures with norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine, or isoproterenol resulted in marked increases in growth compared to controls. Norepinephrine and dopamine had the greatest enhancing effects on growth of cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, while epinephrine and isoproterenol also enhanced growth to a lesser extent. The growth of Escherichia coli in the presence of norepinephrine was greater than growth in the presence of the three other neurochemicals used in the study. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus was also enhanced in the presence of norepinephrine, but not to the same degree as was the growth of gram negative bacteria. Addition of culture supernatants from E. coli cultures that had been grown in the presence of norepinephrine was able to enhance the growth of K. pneumoniae. Addition of the culture supernatant fluid culture from E. coli cultures that had been grown in the presence of norepinephrine did not enhance growth of P. aeruginosa or S. aureus. Culture supernatant fluids from bacteria other than E. coli grown in the presence of norepinephrine were not able to enhance the growth of any bacteria tested. The results suggest that catecholamines can enhance growth of pathogenic bacteria, which may contribute to development of pathogenesis; however, there is no uniform effect of catecholamines on bacterial growth.

  11. Red blood cell catecholamine levels in normotensive and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bouvier, M.; Farley, L.; de Champlain, J.

    1987-08-01

    Under basal conditions in anesthetized rats, significant concentrations of free norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), and dopamine (DA) were detected in red blood cell (RBC) lysate. These concentrations were not proportional to their respective plasma concentrations and thus RBC-to-plasma concentration ratios were different for each catecholamine (CA). DA was by far the most concentrated amine inside the RBC. An acute increase in plasma NE and E levels, induced by hemorrhagic hypotension in normotensive (NT) rats, did not result in any modification of the RBC CA content. However, chronic elevation of the NE plasma levels in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats and in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats (DOCA-salt HT) were associated with increased NE levels in the RBC. In addition, the large elevation in plasma E concentrations following hemorrhagic hypotension in DOCA-salt HT rats, as well as the greater plasma NE response to hypotension in adrenalectomized animals, were accompanied by increases in the respective RBC amine concentrations. During a steady-state intravenous infusion of tritiated NE, we observed a slow accumulation of radioactivity inside the RBC, indicating that CA can enter the RBC from the plasma. Moreover, catechol methyltransferase activity was measured in the cytosolic fraction of the RBC of both NT and DOCA-salt HT rats suggesting that, once inside the RBC, the catecholamines can be metabolized.

  12. Involvement of brain catecholamines and acetylcholine in growth hormone hypersecretory states. Pathophysiological, diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Müller, E E; Rolla, M; Ghigo, E; Belliti, D; Arvat, E; Andreoni, A; Torsello, A; Locatelli, V; Camanni, F

    1995-11-01

    Secretion of growth hormone (GH) is excessive in acromegaly, but also in a number of other pathological states such as anorexia nervosa, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), liver cirrhosis, depression, renal failure and GH-insensitivity syndrome. Abnormalities in the neuroendocrine control of GH secretion and/or a state of insensitivity to GH contribute to hypersecretion of GH in these states, with the possible exception of acromegaly, which appears to be a primary pituitary disease. GH hypersecretion may also occur in neonates or adolescents with tall stature, thus reflecting particular physiological or paraphysiological conditions. In the cohort of brain neurotransmitters, catecholamines and acetylcholine reportedly play a major role in the control of neurosecretory GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS)-producing neurons, and hence GH secretion. Activation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors or of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the hypothalamus stimulates GH release, probably through stimulation of GHRH and inhibition of SS release, respectively. Activation of dopamine receptors likewise stimulates GH release, while activation of beta-receptors inhibits GH release through stimulation of hypothalamic SS function. This review discusses the involvement of brain catecholamines and acetylcholine in GH hypersecretory states, including anorexia nervosa, acromegaly, IDDM, liver cirrhosis, depression, renal failure and GH insensitivity syndrome, with a view to providing a fuller understanding of their pathophysiology and, whenever possible, diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:8586028

  13. Phenylpropanoyl esters from Horseweed (Conyza canadensis) and their inhibitory effects on catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuexu; Su, Yanfang; Guo, Hao; Yang, Fan; Mao, Haoping; Gao, Xiumei; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Tu, Guangzhong

    2010-02-26

    Three unique phenylpropanoyl 2,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-2-octulosonic acid derivatives were isolated from Conyza canadensis (horseweed). Their structures were defined as rel-(1S,2R,3R,5S,7R)-methyl 7-caffeoyloxymethyl-2-hydroxy-3-feruloyloxy-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-5-carboxylate (1), rel-(1S,2R,3R,5S,7R)-methyl 7-feruloyloxymethyl-2-hydroxy-3-feruloyloxy-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-5-carboxylate (2), and rel-(1R,2R,3R,5S,7R)-methyl 7-feruloyloxymethyl-2-feruloyloxy-3-hydroxy-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-5-carboxylate (3). Compound 1 and a 5:3 mixture of compounds 2 and 3 were demonstrated to inhibit the catecholamine secretion induced by acetylcholine with IC(50) values of 94.65 and 42.35 microM, respectively, and to inhibit the catecholamine secretion induced by veratridine and high [K(+)] at a dose of 100 microM in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. PMID:20121251

  14. Sustained exposure to catecholamines affects cAMP/PKA compartmentalised signalling in adult rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Fields, Laura A; Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2016-07-01

    In the heart compartmentalisation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signalling is necessary to achieve a specific functional outcome in response to different hormonal stimuli. Chronic exposure to catecholamines is known to be detrimental to the heart and disrupted compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling has been associated to heart disease. However, in most cases it remains unclear whether altered local cAMP signalling is an adaptive response, a consequence of the disease or whether it contributes to the pathogenetic process. We have previously demonstrated that isoforms of PKA expressed in cardiac myocytes, PKA-I and PKA-II, localise to different subcellular compartments and are selectively activated by spatially confined pools of cAMP, resulting in phosphorylation of distinct downstream targets. Here we investigate cAMP signalling in an in vitro model of hypertrophy in primary adult rat ventricular myocytes. By using a real time imaging approach and targeted reporters we find that that sustained exposure to catecholamines can directly affect cAMP/PKA compartmentalisation. This appears to involve a complex mechanism including both changes in the subcellular localisation of individual phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms as well as the relocalisation of PKA isoforms. As a result, the preferential coupling of PKA subsets with different PDEs is altered resulting in a significant difference in the level of cAMP the kinase is exposed to, with potential impact on phosphorylation of downstream targets. PMID:26475678

  15. Resting-State Peripheral Catecholamine and Anxiety Levels in Korean Male Adolescents with Internet Game Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nahyun; Hughes, Tonda L.; Park, Chang G.; Quinn, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the resting-state plasma catecholamine and anxiety levels of Korean male adolescents with Internet game addiction (IGA) and those without IGA. This cross-sectional comparative study was conducted with 230 male high school students in a South Korean city. Convenience and snowball sampling methods were employed, and data were collected using (1) participant blood samples analyzed for dopamine (DA), epinephrine (Epi), and norepinephrine (NE) and (2) two questionnaires to assess IGA and anxiety levels. Using SPSS 15.0, data were analyzed by descriptive analysis, χ2-tests, t-tests, and Pearson's correlation tests. The plasma Epi (t = 1.962, p < 0.050) and NE (t = 2.003, p = 0.046) levels were significantly lower in the IGA group than in the non-IGA group; DA levels did not significantly differ between the groups. The mean anxiety level of the IGA group was significantly higher compared with the non-IGA group (t =−6.193, p < 0.001). No significant correlations were found between catecholamine and anxiety levels. These results showed that excessive Internet gaming over time induced decreased peripheral Epi and NE levels, thus altering autonomic regulation, and increasing anxiety levels in male high school students. Based on these physiological and psychological effects, interventions intended to prevent and treat IGA should include stabilizing Epi, NE, and anxiety levels in adolescents. PMID:26849530

  16. Neuroanatomical Evidence for Catecholamines as Modulators of Audition and Acoustic Behavior in a Vocal Teleost.

    PubMed

    Forlano, Paul M; Sisneros, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    The plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) is a well-studied model to understand the neural and endocrine mechanisms underlying vocal-acoustic communication across vertebrates. It is well established that steroid hormones such as estrogen drive seasonal peripheral auditory plasticity in female Porichthys in order to better encode the male's advertisement call. However, little is known of the neural substrates that underlie the motivation and coordinated behavioral response to auditory social signals. Catecholamines, which include dopamine and noradrenaline, are good candidates for this function, as they are thought to modulate the salience of and reinforce appropriate behavior to socially relevant stimuli. This chapter summarizes our recent studies which aimed to characterize catecholamine innervation in the central and peripheral auditory system of Porichthys as well as test the hypotheses that innervation of the auditory system is seasonally plastic and catecholaminergic neurons are activated in response to conspecific vocalizations. Of particular significance is the discovery of direct dopaminergic innervation of the saccule, the main hearing end organ, by neurons in the diencephalon, which also robustly innervate the cholinergic auditory efferent nucleus in the hindbrain. Seasonal changes in dopamine innervation in both these areas appear dependent on reproductive state in females and may ultimately function to modulate the sensitivity of the peripheral auditory system as an adaptation to the seasonally changing soundscape. Diencephalic dopaminergic neurons are indeed active in response to exposure to midshipman vocalizations and are in a perfect position to integrate the detection and appropriate motor response to conspecific acoustic signals for successful reproduction. PMID:26515325

  17. Catecholamine-Directed Epithelial Cell Interactions with Bacteria in the Intestinal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Brown, David R

    2016-01-01

    The catecholamines epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine are present in or have access to mucous membranes in the digestive, respiratory and genitourinary tracts, which represent the first sites of microbial colonization and infection within the body. Epithelial cells at mucosal surfaces establish and maintain symbiotic microbial communities and serve as the initial cellular point of contact for pathogens with the animal host. These cells express receptors that are capable of detecting and responding to microbe-associated molecular patterns and in most host species express G protein-coupled receptors for catecholamines. Although it is increasingly recognized that substances produced and released from nerves and endocrine cells can exert immuno-modulatory actions at mucosal sites, there have been few investigations focused specifically on the catecholaminergic modulation of interactions between the mucosal epithelium and bacteria or other mucosa-associated microorganisms. The potential biomedical importance of this phenomenon cannot be understated. For example, psychological stress or other conditions that activate the sympathetic nervous system to release epinephrine and norepinephrine may act to produce short-term changes in luminal and mucosal microbial communities or alter the course of a bacterial infection. This chapter will briefly review this developing and important research area of mucosa-microbe interactions with a focus on intestinal host defense. PMID:26589214

  18. Resting-State Peripheral Catecholamine and Anxiety Levels in Korean Male Adolescents with Internet Game Addiction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nahyun; Hughes, Tonda L; Park, Chang G; Quinn, Laurie; Kong, In Deok

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the resting-state plasma catecholamine and anxiety levels of Korean male adolescents with Internet game addiction (IGA) and those without IGA. This cross-sectional comparative study was conducted with 230 male high school students in a South Korean city. Convenience and snowball sampling methods were employed, and data were collected using (1) participant blood samples analyzed for dopamine (DA), epinephrine (Epi), and norepinephrine (NE) and (2) two questionnaires to assess IGA and anxiety levels. Using SPSS 15.0, data were analyzed by descriptive analysis, χ(2)-tests, t-tests, and Pearson's correlation tests. The plasma Epi (t = 1.962, p < 0.050) and NE (t = 2.003, p = 0.046) levels were significantly lower in the IGA group than in the non-IGA group; DA levels did not significantly differ between the groups. The mean anxiety level of the IGA group was significantly higher compared with the non-IGA group (t = -6.193, p < 0.001). No significant correlations were found between catecholamine and anxiety levels. These results showed that excessive Internet gaming over time induced decreased peripheral Epi and NE levels, thus altering autonomic regulation, and increasing anxiety levels in male high school students. Based on these physiological and psychological effects, interventions intended to prevent and treat IGA should include stabilizing Epi, NE, and anxiety levels in adolescents. PMID:26849530

  19. Catecholamines-evoked cytosolic Ca2+ rise in endothelial cells from bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Vinet, R; Rojas, F; Luxoro, M; Vargas, F; Cortés, M

    2000-01-01

    The effects of catecholamines on intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in single acutely dissociated bovine adrenal medulla endothelial cells (BAMECs) were measured using the intracellular fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM. 100 microm epinephrine or norepinephrine induced a biphasic [Ca2+]i rise with an initial peak followed by a delayed phase. 10 microm phenylephrine (alpha1-adrenergic agonist) caused a [Ca2+]i rise similar to that evoked by catecholamines. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by 10 microm phenylephrine was reverted by 10 microm phenoxybenzamine (alpha-adrenergic antagonist). Neither isoproterenol (beta-adrenergic agonist) nor clonidine (alpha2-adrenergic agonist) induced [Ca2+]i rise. The initial peak was insensitive to zero external Ca2+ and it was abolished after Ca2+ internal storages were emptied by 10 mM caffeine. The delayed phase was reduced to near zero by external Ca2+ removal. These results indicate that BAMECs possess alpha1-adrenergic receptors associated to both the release of caffeine-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores and the entry of extracellular Ca2+. We suggest that chromaffin cell secretion may activate BAMECs in vivo through an increase in [Ca2+]i which could induce the secretion of vasoactive factors allowing a rapid entry of hormones into the circulation. PMID:10724332

  20. Immuno cross-reactivity suggests that catecholamine biosynthesis enzymes and beta adrenergic receptors may be related

    SciTech Connect

    Shorr, R.G.L.; Minnich, M.D.; Varrichio, A.; Strohsacker, M.W.; Gotlib, L.; Kruse, L.I.; DeWolf, W.E. Jr.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Turkey red blood cell (RBC), Beta/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors (Bar) were prepared to electrophoretic homogeneity and denatured protein used to prepare rabbit anti-Bar antibodies. Anti-Bar activity was confirmed by immuno-adsorption of (/sup 125/I) cyanopindolol (CYP) labeled Bar. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) was purified from bovine adrenal medullae chromaffin vesicles by ion exchange, size exclusion and concanavalin-A-Sepharose chromatography. Final DBH specific activities were 42 +/- 4 U/mg protein. Homogeneity was confirmed by non-denaturing PAGE. Bar was compared to DBH by anti-Bar antibody cross-reactivity. DBH and Bar were recognized by anti-Bar antibodies on immunoblotting. No interactions were observed with preimmune controls. Similar results were obtained with glycosylated and deglycosylated DBH suggesting that the antibodies recognize DBH amino acid sequence and not associated carbohydrate. Cross-reactive antibodies were purified by affinity chromatography using immobilized DBH and shown to immuno-adsorb (/sup 125/I)CYP labeled Bar. These results suggest that the catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme DBH and Bar may be related in structure.

  1. Cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia aggravates peripheral sensory neurotoxicity caused by oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Kono, Toru; Satomi, Machiko; Asama, Toshiyuki; Ebisawa, Yoshiaki; Chisato, Naoyuki; Suno, Manabu; Karasaki, Hidenori; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    Calcium and magnesium replacement is effective in reducing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. However, cetuximab treatment has been associated with severe hypomagnesaemia. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated whether cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Six patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were previously treated with oxaliplatin-fluorouracil combination therapy were administered cetuximab in combination with irinotecan alone or irinotecan and fluorouracil as a second-line treatment. All patients had normal magnesium levels before receiving cetuximab. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to evaluate the grade of neurotoxicity, hypomagnesaemia, hypocalcaemia, and hypokalemia every week. All six patients had grade 1 or higher hypomagnesaemia after starting cetuximab therapy. The serum calcium and potassium levels were within the normal range at the onset of hypomagnesaemia. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity occurred in all patients at the beginning of cetuximab therapy, with grade 1 neurotoxicity in five patients and grade 2 in one patient. After cetuximab administration, the neurotoxicity worsened in all six patients, and three progressed to grade 3. Among the three patients with grade 3 neurotoxicity, two required a dose reduction and one had to discontinue cetuximab therapy. A discontinuation or dose reduction in cetuximab therapy was associated with exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity due to cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia in half of patients who had previously received oxaliplatin. Therefore, when administering cetuximab after oxaliplatin therapy, we suggest serially evaluating serum magnesium levels and neurotoxicity. PMID:22811813

  2. Cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia aggravates peripheral sensory neurotoxicity caused by oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Satomi, Machiko; Asama, Toshiyuki; Ebisawa, Yoshiaki; Chisato, Naoyuki; Suno, Manabu; Karasaki, Hidenori; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Calcium and magnesium replacement is effective in reducing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. However, cetuximab treatment has been associated with severe hypomagnesaemia. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated whether cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Six patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were previously treated with oxaliplatin-fluorouracil combination therapy were administered cetuximab in combination with irinotecan alone or irinotecan and fluorouracil as a second-line treatment. All patients had normal magnesium levels before receiving cetuximab. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to evaluate the grade of neurotoxicity, hypomagnesaemia, hypocalcaemia, and hypokalemia every week. All six patients had grade 1 or higher hypomagnesaemia after starting cetuximab therapy. The serum calcium and potassium levels were within the normal range at the onset of hypomagnesaemia. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity occurred in all patients at the beginning of cetuximab therapy, with grade 1 neurotoxicity in five patients and grade 2 in one patient. After cetuximab administration, the neurotoxicity worsened in all six patients, and three progressed to grade 3. Among the three patients with grade 3 neurotoxicity, two required a dose reduction and one had to discontinue cetuximab therapy. A discontinuation or dose reduction in cetuximab therapy was associated with exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity due to cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia in half of patients who had previously received oxaliplatin. Therefore, when administering cetuximab after oxaliplatin therapy, we suggest serially evaluating serum magnesium levels and neurotoxicity. PMID:22811813

  3. Catecholamines - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... neoplasia (MEN) II Neuroblastoma Pheochromocytoma Stress and your health Update Date 5/3/2015 Updated by: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. ...

  4. Sun, shade, and secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    My research program focuses on understanding plant primary and secondary metabolites. Grape secondary metabolites, such as phenolics, have long been valuable for the organoleptic properties they impart to fruit and wine, and, more recently, for their possible health benefits. These compounds develop...

  5. PACAP Controls Adrenomedullary Catecholamine Secretion and Expression of Catecholamine Biosynthetic Enzymes at High Splanchnic Nerve Firing Rates Characteristic of Stress Transduction in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stroth, N.; Kuri, B. A.; Mustafa, T.; Chan, S.-A.

    2013-01-01

    The neuropeptide PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide) is a cotransmitter of acetylcholine at the adrenomedullary synapse, where autonomic regulation of hormone secretion occurs. We have previously reported that survival of prolonged metabolic stress in mice requires PACAP-dependent biosynthesis and secretion of adrenomedullary catecholamines (CAs). In the present experiments, we show that CA secretion evoked by direct high-frequency stimulation of the splanchnic nerve is abolished in native adrenal slices from male PACAP-deficient mice. Further, we demonstrate that PACAP is both necessary and sufficient for CA secretion ex vivo during stimulation protocols designed to mimic stress. In vivo, up-regulation of transcripts encoding adrenomedullary CA-synthesizing enzymes (tyrosine hydroxylase, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase) in response to both psychogenic and metabolic stressors (restraint and hypoglycemia) is PACAP-dependent. Stressor-induced alteration of the adrenomedullary secretory cocktail also appears to require PACAP, because up-regulation of galanin mRNA is abrogated in male PACAP-deficient mice. We further show that hypoglycemia-induced corticosterone secretion is not PACAP-dependent, ruling out the possibility that glucocorticoids are the main mediators of the aforementioned effects. Instead, experiments with bovine chromaffin cells suggest that PACAP acts directly at the level of the adrenal medulla. By integrating prolonged CA secretion, expression of biosynthetic enzymes and production of modulatory neuropeptides such as galanin, PACAP is crucial for adrenomedullary function. Importantly, our results show that PACAP is the dominant adrenomedullary neurotransmitter during conditions of enhanced secretory demand. PMID:23221599

  6. Methotrexate-induced myelopathy responsive to substitution of multiple folate metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, R; Semmler, A; Maurer, G D; Hattingen, E; Fornoff, F; Steinbach, J P; Linnebank, M

    2010-05-01

    Methotrexate (MTX)-associated myelopathy is a rare but serious subacute complication of MTX-based chemotherapy. We report the case of a woman with breast cancer and meningeal carcinomatosis who developed severe progressive myelopathy after four cycles of intrathecal MTX administration. We substituted high doses of the key metabolites of the methyl-transfer pathway: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), 200 mg three times daily i.v.; folinate, 20 mg four times daily i.v.; cyanocobalamin, 100 microg once daily i.v.; and methionine, 5 g daily p.o. The patient's paraparesis improved rapidly thereafter, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed resolution of the intramedullary lesions. Genetic analyses revealed homozygosity for the A allele of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) c.1298A>C (p.E429A), whereas other genetic variants of folate/methionine metabolism associated with MTX neurotoxicity were not present. Substitution with multiple folate metabolites may be a promising strategy for the treatment of MTX-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:19821069

  7. Molecular profiling: Catecholamine modulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium have demonstrated that these bacterial pathogens can respond to the presence of catecholamines including norepinephrine and/or epinephrine in their environment by modulating gene expression and exhibiting various ...

  8. Molecular Docking Study of Catecholamines and [4-(Propan-2-yl) Phenyl]Carbamic acid with Tyrosine Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Zahida; Nawaz, Muhammad Sulaman; Shakil, Shazi; Greig, Nigel H.; Kamal, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a major age-related neurodegenerative disorder. As the classical disease-related motor symptoms are associated with the loss of dopamine-generating cells within the substantia nigra, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamines has become an important target in the development of Parkinson’s disease drug candidates, with the focus to augment TH levels or its activity. By contrast, TH inhibitors are of relevance in the treatment of conditions associated with catecholamine over-production, as occurs in pheochromocytomas. To aid characterizing new drug candidates, a molecular docking study of catecholamines and a novel hypothetical compound [4-(propan-2-yl) phenyl]carbamic acid (PPCA) with TH is described. Docking was performed using Autodock4.2 and results were analyzed using Chimera1.5.2. All the studied ligands were found to bind within a deep narrow groove lined with polar aromatic and acidic residues within TH. Our results corroborated a ‘hexa interacting amino acids unit’ located in this deep narrow groove crucial to the interaction of PPCA and the studied catecholamines with TH, whereby the ‘His361-His336 dyad’ was found to be even more crucial to these binding interactions. PPCA displayed a binding interaction with human TH that was comparable to the original TH substrate, L-tyrosine. Hence PPCA may warrant in vitro and in vivo characterization with TH to assess its potential as a candidate therapeutic. PMID:22583429

  9. In vitro effects of catecholamines and catecholestrogens on brain tyrosine hydroxylase activity and kinetics in the female catfish Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Chaube, R; Joy, K P

    2003-03-01

    Effects of catecholamines and catecholestrogens on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and kinetics were investigated in the telencephalon and hypothalamus of female Heteropneustes fossilis in gonad quiescent (resting) and recrudescent (preparatory) phases. Dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline and the catecholestrogen, 2-hydroxyestradiol-17 beta inhibited TH activity in a concentration-dependent manner in both resting and preparatory phases, with a higher effect in the resting phase. Two- methoxyestradiol-17 beta did not alter TH activity in any season. The catecholamines inhibited TH in a competitive manner increasing apparent K(m) values significantly without altering the apparent V(max). Two-hydroxyestradiol-17 beta inhibited significantly the enzyme in a noncompetitive manner and decreased apparent V(max) without altering apparent K(m) values. The apparent K(i) is higher for dopamine than noradrenaline or adrenaline. The apparent K(i) for 2-hydroxyestradiol-17 beta is not significantly different from that of noradrenaline. The present results suggest an interaction between oestradiol-17beta (E2) and catecholamine metabolism at the level of tyrosine hydroxylation and E2 effects on catecholamines may be mediated through its 2-hydroxylation. PMID:12588516

  10. Opioids inhibit visceral afferent activation of catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cui, R J; Roberts, B L; Zhao, H; Andresen, M C; Appleyard, S M

    2012-10-11

    Brainstem A2/C2 catecholamine (CA) neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) influence many homeostatic functions, including food intake, stress, respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. They also play a role in both opioid reward and withdrawal. Injections of opioids into the NTS modulate many autonomic functions influenced by catecholamine neurons including food intake and cardiac function. We recently showed that NTS-CA neurons are directly activated by incoming visceral afferent inputs. Here we determined whether opioid agonists modulate afferent activation of NTS-CA neurons using transgenic mice with EGFP expressed under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. The opioid agonist Met-enkephalin (Met-Enk) significantly attenuated solitary tract-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (ST-EPSCs) in NTS TH-EGFP neurons by 80%, an effect reversed by wash or the mu opioid receptor-specific antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTOP). Met-Enk had a significantly greater effect to inhibit afferent inputs onto TH-EGFP-positive neurons than EGFP-negative neurons, which were only inhibited by 50%. The mu agonist, DAMGO, also inhibited the ST-EPSC in TH-EGFP neurons in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, neither the delta agonist DPDPE, nor the kappa agonist, U69,593, consistently inhibited the ST-EPSC amplitude. Met-Enk and DAMGO increased the paired pulse ratio, decreased the frequency, but not amplitude, of mini-EPSCs and had no effect on holding current, input resistance or current-voltage relationships in TH-EGFP neurons, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action on afferent terminals. Met-Enk significantly reduced both the basal firing rate of NTS TH-EGFP neurons and the ability of afferent stimulation to evoke an action potential. These results suggest that opioids inhibit NTS-CA neurons by reducing an excitatory afferent drive onto these neurons through presynaptic inhibition of

  11. Circulating renalase, catecholamines, and vascular adhesion protein 1 in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Maciorkowska, Dominika; Zbroch, Edyta; Malyszko, Jolanta

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate and correlate circulating levels of renalase, vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), catecholamines in patients with primary hypertension. The renalase, VAP-1, and catecholamines concentration was estimated in 121 hypertensive patients. The correlation between renalase, VAP-1 levels and catecholamine concentration in blood, blood pressure control, pharmacological therapy, and medical history were taken in to consideration. The median office blood pressure was 145.5/86 mm Hg and was significantly higher than the median home blood pressure measurement value, which was 135/80 mm Hg, P < .05. Circulating renalase and VAP-1 (Me 9.57 μg/mL and Me = 326.7 ng/mL) levels were significantly higher in patients with hypertension comparing to healthy individuals (3.83 μg/mL and 248.37 ng/mL, P < .05). The correlation between renalase and noradrenalin concentration in blood was observed (r = 0.549; P < .05), also the correlation between VAP-1 and noradrenaline was noticed (r = 0.21, P = .029). Renalase level was higher in patients with coronary artery disease and correlated with decreased ejection fraction. VAP-1 concentration correlated also with left ventricular ejection fraction (r = -0.23, P = .013). Hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus had almost statistically significant higher VAP-1 concentration compared with hypertensive patients without diabetes mellitus (Me = 403.22 ng/mL vs. Me = 326,68 ng/mL, P = .064). In multiple regression analysis, renalase was predicted by plasma dopamine and norepinephrine as also diastolic office blood pressure and left ventricle ejection fraction. Circulating renalase and VAP-1 levels are elevated in patients with poor blood pressure control. Its correlation with noradrenalin concentration need further studies to find out the role of renalase as also VAP-1 in pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension. PMID:26403854

  12. Bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol, an estrogenic-like compound, on catecholamine secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Haoping; Wang, Hong; Ma, Shangwei; Xu, Yantong; Zhang, Han; Wang, Yuefei; Niu, Zichang; Fan, Guanwei; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiu Mei

    2014-01-01

    Excess or deficiency of catecholamine (CA) secretion was related with several diseases. Recently, estrogen and phytoestrogens were reported to regulate the activity of CA system. Bakuchiol is a phytoestrogen isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Leguminosae) which has been used in Traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic or aphrodisiac. In the present study, bovine adrenal medullary cells were employed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of bakuchiol on the regulation of CA secretion. Further, its anti-depressant like and anti-stress effects were evaluated by using behavioral despair and chronic immobilization stress models. Our results indicated that bakuchiol showed bidirectional regulation on CA secretion. It stimulated basal CA secretion in a concentration dependent manner (p < 0.01), while it reduced 300 μM acetylcholine (ACh) (p < 0.01), 100 μM veratridine (Ver) (p < 0.01) and 56 mM K{sup +} (p < 0.05) induced CA secretion, respectively. We also found that the stimulation of basal CA secretion by bakuchiol may act through estrogen-like effect and the JNK pathway in an extra-cellular calcium independent manner. Further, bakuchiol elevated tyrosine hydroxylase Ser40 and Ser31 phosphorylation (p < 0.01) through the PKA and ERK1/2 pathways, respectively. Bakuchiol inhibited ACh, Ver and 56 mM K{sup +} induced CA secretion was related with reduction of intracellular calcium rise. In vivo experiments, we found that bakuchiol significantly reduced immobilization time in behavioral despair mouse (p < 0.05 or 0.01), and plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in chronic immobilization stress (p < 0.05). Overall, these results present a bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol on CA secretion which indicated that bakuchiol may exert anti-stress and the potential anti-depressant-like effects. - Highlights: • Bakuchiol stimulated basal catecholamine secretion. • Bakuchiol inhibited various secretagogues induced catecholamine secretion

  13. Effect of eprosartan on catecholamines and peripheral haemodynamics in subjects with insulin-induced hypoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Marina; Ibsen, Hans; Worck, René

    2005-02-01

    ANG II (angiotensin II) facilitates catecholamine release from the adrenal medulla and neuronal NE (noradrenaline) release. Since animal experiments point to specific sympatho-inhibitory properties of the AT1 (ANG II type 1)-receptor blocker EPRO (eprosartan), the primary aim of this study was to clarify if EPRO inhibits sympathetic reactivity in humans as determined by the effect of EPRO on insulin-induced catecholamine release. Sixteen healthy male volunteers were randomized in a double-blind cross-over study to receive a single dose of EPRO (600 mg) compared with placebo, followed by insulin-induced hypoglycaemia [0.15 IU (international unit)/kg of body weight; intravenous bolus] on two study days 1 week apart. From baseline to the end of hypoglycaemia (170 min), the sympatho-adrenal reactivity was mapped by invasive continuous blood pressure monitoring and repeated measurements of FBF (forearm blood flow), arterial and venous concentrations of glucose, catecholamines [EPI (adrenaline) and NE (noradrenaline)], renin, ANG II and aldosterone. EPRO induced an 8-10-fold increase in plasma renin and ANG II concentrations compared with placebo. Plasma glucose decreased equally during placebo and EPRO from baseline 5.9 mmol/l to 1.9 mmol/l and 2.1 mmol/l respectively, inducing a 17-fold increase in arterial EPI concentration at peak. The AUC (area under the curve) during hypoglycaemia for arterial EPI concentrations was 314+/-48 nmol.min.l-1 in placebo compared with 254+/-26 nmol.min.l-1 following EPRO treatment (P=0.14). EPRO attenuated the corresponding AUC for the EPI-induced pulse pressure response (4670+/-219 mmHg.min in EPRO compared with 5004+/-266 mmHg.min in placebo; P=0.02). Moreover, EPRO caused a less pronounced increase in FBF compared with placebo (402+/-30 compared with 479+/-46 ml.100 g-1 of body weight; P=0.04). Musculocutaneous NE release was not affected by EPRO and the AUC for NE release was 51.69+/-15.5 pmol.min-1.100 g-1 of body weight in placebo

  14. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHER (PBDE) FLAME RETARDANTS

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lucio G.; Giordano, Gennaro

    2007-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame retardants used in a variety of consumer products. In the past 25 years, PBDEs have become ubiquitous environmental contaminants. They have been detected in soil, air, sediments, birds, marine species, fish, house dust, and human tissues, blood and breast milk. Diet and house dust appear to be the major sources of PBDE exposure in the general population, though occupational exposure can also occur. Levels of PBDEs in human tissues are particularly high in North America, compared to Asian and European countries, and have been increasing in the past 30 years. Concentrations of PBDEs are particularly high in breast milk, resulting in high exposure of infants. In addition, for toddlers, dust has been estimated to account for a large percentage of exposure. PBDEs can also cross the placenta, as they have been detected in fetal blood and liver. Tetra-, penta- and hexa BDEs are most commonly present in human tissues. The current greatest concern for potential adverse effects of PBDEs relates to their developmental neurotoxicity. Pre- or postnatal exposure of mice or rats to various PBDEs has been shown to cause long-lasting changes in spontaneous motor activity, mostly characterized as hyperactivity or decreased habituation, and to disrupt performance in learning and memory tests. While a reduction in circulating thyroid hormone (T4) may contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of PBDEs, direct effects on the developing brain have also been reported. Among these, PBDEs have been shown to affect signal transduction pathways and to cause oxidative stress. Levels of PBDEs causing developmental neurotoxicity in animals are not much dissimilar from levels found in highly exposed infants and toddlers. PMID:17904639

  15. Neuroimmunotoxicology: humoral assessment of neurotoxicity and autoimmune mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    El-Fawal, H A; Waterman, S J; De Feo, A; Shamy, M Y

    1999-01-01

    The interactions between the nervous and immune systems have been recognized in the development of neurodegenerative disease. This can be exploited through detection of the immune response to autoantigens in assessing the neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. To test this hypothesis, the following questions were addressed. a) Are autoantibodies to nervous system (NS) antigens detected in populations exposed to environmental or occupational chemicals? In sera of male workers exposed to lead or mercury, autoantibodies, primarily IgG, to neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, neurofilaments (NFs), and myelin basic protein (MBP) were prevalent. These findings were confirmed in mice and rats exposed to either metal. b) Do autoantibodies to NS antigens relate to indices of exposure? In humans exposed to either metal, and similarly in exposed rats, titers of IgG against NFs and MBP significantly correlated with blood lead or urinary mercury, the typical indices of exposure. c) Do autoantibodies correlate with sensorimotor deficits? In workers exposed to lead or mercury, a significant correlation was observed between IgG titers and subclinical deficits. Doses of metals used in rat exposures were subclinical, suggesting that autoantibodies may be predictive of neurotoxicity. d) Is the detection indicative of nervous system pathology? In rats exposed to metals, histopathology indicated central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) damage. In addition there was evidence of astrogliosis, which is indicative of neuronal damage in the CNS, and the presence of IgG concentrated along the blood-brain barrier, as indicated by immunostaining for antibodies. e) Are immune responses to NS antigens pathogenic? Immunoglobulin fractions from rat and human sera interfered with neuromuscular function. These studies suggest that the detection of autoantibodies to NS-specific antigens may be used to monitor the development of neurotoxicity to environmental chemicals and that

  16. Nucleolar damage correlates with neurotoxicity induced by different platinum drugs

    PubMed Central

    McKeage, M J; Hsu, T; Screnci, D; Haddad, G; Baguley, B C

    2001-01-01

    Platinum-based drugs are very useful in cancer therapy but are associated with neurotoxicity in the clinic. To investigate the mechanism of neurotoxicity, dorsal root ganglia of rats treated with various platinum drugs were studied. Cell body, nuclear and nucleolar dimensions of dorsal root ganglia sensory nerve cells were measured to determine morphological toxicity. Sensory nerve conduction velocity was measured to determine functional toxicity. After a single dose of oxaliplatin (10 mg kg−1), no significant change in nuclear and cell body diameter was seen but decreased nucleolar size was apparent within a few hours of treatment. Changes in nucleolar size were maximal at 24 hours, recovered very slowly and showed a non-linear dependence on oxaliplatin dose (r2= 0.99). Functional toxicity was delayed in onset until 14 days after a single dose of oxaliplatin but eventually recovered 3 months after treatment. Multiple doses of cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin, R, R -ormaplatin and S, S -ormaplatin were also associated with time-dependent reduction in nucleolar size. A linear correlation was obtained between the rate of change in nucleolar size during multiple dose treatment with the series of platinum drugs and the time taken for the development of altered sensory nerve conduction velocity (r2= 0.86;P< 0.024). Damage to the nucleolus of ganglionic sensory neurons is therefore linked to the neurotoxicity of platinum-based drugs, possibly through mechanisms resulting in the inhibition of rRNA synthesis. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710838

  17. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  18. Prolactin is a peripheral marker of manganese neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marreilha dos Santos, AP; Lopes Santos, M; BatorÉu, Maria C; Aschner, M

    2011-01-01

    Excessive exposure to Mn induces neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism. Exposure assessment relies on Mn blood and urine analyses, both of which show poor correlation to exposure. Accordingly, there is a critical need for better surrogate biomarkers of Mn exposure. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between Mn exposure and early indicators of neurotoxicity, with particular emphasis on peripheral biomarkers. Male Wistar rats (180–200 g) were injected intraperitoneally with 4 or 8 doses of Mn (10 mg/kg). Mn exposure was evaluated by analysis of Mn levels in brain and blood along with biochemical end-points (see below). Results Brain Mn levels were significantly increased both after 4 and 8 doses of Mn compared with controls (p<0.001). Blood levels failed to reflect a dose-dependent increase in brain Mn, with only the 8-dose treated group showing significant differences (p<0.001). Brain glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly decreased in the 8-dose-treated animals (p<0.001). A significant and dose-dependent increase in prolactin levels was found for both treated groups (p<0.001) compared to controls. In addition, a decrease in motor activity was observed in the 8-dose-treated group compared to controls. Conclusions 1) The present study demonstrates that peripheral blood level is a poor indicator of Mn brain accumulation and exposure; 2) Mn reduces GSH brain levels, likely reflecting oxidative stress; 3) Mn increases blood prolactin levels, indicating changes in the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Taken together these results suggest that peripheral prolactin levels may serve as reliable predictive biomarkers of Mn neurotoxicity. PMID:21262206

  19. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vilela, Luciano R.; Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G.; Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Doria, Juliana G.; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C.; Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R.; Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de; Moraes, Marcio F.D.; Moreira, Fabricio A.

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis

  20. BIOCHEMICAL, FUNCTIONAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF NEUROTOXICITY: EFFECTS OF ACUTE ADMINISTRATION OF TRIMETHYLTIN TO THE DEVELOPING RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The neurotoxic organometal, trimethyltin (TMT), was administered to rats on postnatal day (PND)5. Neurotoxicity was assessed throughout subsequent development using morphological, biochemical and functional endpoints. These consisted of brain weight measures and histology (morpho...

  1. In Vitro Assessment of Developmental Neurotoxicity: Use of Microelectrode Arrays to Measure Functional Changes in Neuronal Network Ontogeny*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing Guidelines require large numbers of animals and is expensive, development of in vitro approaches to screen chemicals for potential developmental neurotoxicity is a high priority. Many proposed approaches for screening are biochemica...

  2. IN VITRO ASSESSMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY: USE OF MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS TO MEASURE FUNCTIONAL CHANGES IN NEURONAL NETWORK ONTOGENY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the Developmental Neurotoxicity Testing Battery requires large numbers of animals and is expensive, development of in vitro approaches to screen chemicals for potential developmental neurotoxicity is a high priority. Many proposed approaches for screening are biochemical,...

  3. Bilirubin-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Preterm Neonate.

    PubMed

    Watchko, Jon F

    2016-06-01

    Bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in preterm neonates remains a clinical concern. Multiple cellular and molecular cascades likely underlie bilirubin-induced neuronal injury, including plasma membrane perturbations, excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle arrest. Preterm newborns are particularly vulnerable secondary to central nervous system immaturity and concurrent adverse clinical conditions that may potentiate bilirubin toxicity. Acute bilirubin encephalopathy in preterm neonates may be subtle and manifest primarily as recurrent symptomatic apneic events. Low-bilirubin kernicterus continues to be reported in preterm neonates, and although multifactorial in nature, is often associated with marked hypoalbuminemia. PMID:27235209

  4. RAGE and amyloid-beta peptide neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yan, S D; Chen, X; Fu, J; Chen, M; Zhu, H; Roher, A; Slattery, T; Zhao, L; Nagashima, M; Morser, J; Migheli, A; Nawroth, P; Stern, D; Schmidt, A M

    1996-08-22

    Amyloid-beta peptide is central to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, because it is neurotoxic--directly by inducing oxidant stress, and indirectly by activating microglia. A specific cell-surface acceptor site that could focus its effects on target cells has been postulated but not identified. Here we present evidence that the 'receptor for advanced glycation end products' (RAGE) is such a receptor, and that it mediates effects of the peptide on neurons and microglia. Increased expressing of RAGE in Alzheimer's disease brain indicates that it is relevant to the pathogenesis of neuronal dysfunction and death. PMID:8751438

  5. Federal regulatory response to the problem of neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Courteau, J.B.; Young, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of the chapter is to examine the Federal regulatory response to the control of neurotoxicants. The first section presents an overview of legislation and regulations designed to protect the public from toxic substances and of the specific ways in which the statutes and regulations apply to controlling neurotoxic chemicals. Subsequent sections present the regulatory process in greater detail, describing how information on toxic effects is gathered and evaluated, and outlining some new initiatives in regulating neurotoxins. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the consistency and adequacy of the Federal regulatory framework.

  6. The autonomic nervous system and chromaffin tissue: neuroendocrine regulation of catecholamine secretion in non-mammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Perry, Steve F; Capaldo, Anna

    2011-11-16

    If severe enough, periods of acute stress in animals may be associated with the release of catecholamine hormones (noradrenaline and adrenaline) into the circulation; a response termed the acute humoral adrenergic stress response. The release of catecholamines from the sites of storage, the chromaffin cells, is under neuroendocrine control, the complexity of which appears to increase through phylogeny. In the agnathans, the earliest branching vertebrates, the chromaffin cells which are localized predominantly within the heart, lack neuronal innervation and thus catecholamine secretion in these animals is initiated solely by humoral mechanisms. In the more advanced teleost fish, the chromaffin cells are largely confined to the walls of the posterior cardinal vein at the level of the head kidney where they are intermingled with the steroidogenic interrenal cells. Catecholamine secretion from teleost chromaffin cells is regulated by a host of cholinergic and non-cholinergic pathways that ensure sufficient redundancy and flexibility in the secretion process to permit synchronized responses to a myriad of stressors. The complexity of catecholamine secretion control mechanisms continues through the amphibians, reptiles and birds although neural (cholinergic) regulation may become increasingly important in birds. Discrete adrenal glands are present in the non-mammalian tetrapods but unlike in mammals, there is no clear division of a steroidogenic cortex and a chromaffin cell enriched medulla. However, in all groups, there is an obvious intermingling of chromaffin and steroiodogenic cells. The association of the two cell types may be particularly important in the amphibians and birds because like in mammals, the enzyme catalysing the methylation of noradrenaline to adrenaline, PNMT, is under the control of the steroid cortisol. PMID:20547474

  7. Relationship between waking–sleep blood pressure and catecholamine changes in African–American and European–American women

    PubMed Central

    van Berge-Landry, Helene M.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; James, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Background A blunted decline in waking to sleep blood pressure (BP) is more common in African–American (AA) than European–American (EA) women. The causes of reduced BP ‘dipping’ in AA women are not known, although several factors including ethnic differences in catecholamine sensitivity have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible contribution of catecholamine influences on BP to ethnic differences in BP dipping in a sample of working women. Participants and methods Healthy female participants wore ambulatory BP monitors over the course of 1 work day and night. Urine samples for assay of epinephrine and norepinephrine were collected at work (approximately 11.00–15.00 h), home (approximately 06.00–22.00 h) and during sleep (approximately 22.00–06.00 h). Analysis of covariance was used to assess the relationships between changes in BP and the catecholamines by ethnicity. Results AA women (n= 51; age = 38.9 ± 8.5 years) had smaller proportional BP changes from work to sleep and home to sleep than EA women (n =110; age = 37.1 ±9.2 years). Overall, the work to sleep change in epinephrine excretion was positively associated with changes in both SBP (P <0.003) and DBP (P < 0.001); however, there was an ethnic difference in the epinephrine–BP relationship. For AA women, these associations were highly positive and significant, but for EA women, there was little correlation. Nonetheless, the analysis also revealed that overall, the work to sleep BP changes were not directly related to ethnic differences in catecholamine variation. Conclusion The AA–EA difference in waking–sleep BP changes (dipping) is not directly related to ethnic differences in catecholamine variation; however, AA seem to have a greater BP sensitivity to epinephrine. PMID:18799950

  8. 40 CFR 798.6560 - Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances. 798.6560 Section 798.6560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Neurotoxicity § 798.6560 Subchronic...

  9. 40 CFR 798.6560 - Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Subchronic delayed neuro-toxicity of organophosphorus substances. 798.6560 Section 798.6560 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Neurotoxicity § 798.6560 Subchronic...

  10. Stress hyperglycaemia as a result of a catecholamine producing tumour in an infant.

    PubMed

    de Grauw, Anne Mariëtte; Mul, Dick; van Noesel, Max M; Buddingh, Emilie P

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia commonly occurs in children presenting at the emergency department. In the absence of diabetic symptoms, this stress-related hyperglycaemia is considered a benign condition. We present a malignant cause of hyperglycaemia in an 11-month-old girl with concomitant symptoms of a neuroendocrine malignancy. One month earlier, she had undergone an episode of stress-related hyperglycaemia concurrent with fever during an upper respiratory tract infection. Current glucose level was 234 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and the glycosylated haemoglobin level was 44 mmol/mol (6.2%) without metabolic acidosis. We observed periods of hyperglycaemia, sweating, flushing, hypertension and tachypnoea. Urinalysis showed high amounts of catecholamine intermediates. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a mass originating in the right adrenal gland. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of neuroblastoma. Hyperglycaemia in this patient was the first presenting symptom of a metabolically active neuroblastoma. PMID:26341160

  11. Adrenocortical hemorrhagic necrosis: the role of catecholamines and retrograde medullary-cell embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; McComb, D.J.; Kovacs, K.; Huettner, I.

    1981-10-01

    We investigated the pathogenesis of adrenal necrosis using animal models of the disease (induced by administration of acrylonitrile, cysteamine, or pyrazole) and human cases. Results of electron-microscopic and histochemical time-response studies with rat models revealed an early, retrograde embolization of medullary cells and cell fragments in the cortical capillaries that showed prominent endothelial injury. The experimental adrenal lesions were prevented by surgical removal of the medulla one month before administration of adrenocorticolytic chemicals, or by the administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride. Histochemical staining for medullary (argyrophil) granules in human cases of adrenal necrosis demonstrated tissue fragments that stained positively for silver in vascular cortical spaces in nine of ten autopsy specimens and in all four surgical cases we reviewed. Thus, catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla and from the retrograde medullary emboli in the cortex may have a role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical necrosis.

  12. Esmolol in a case of severe tetanus. Adequate haemodynamic control achieved despite markedly elevated catecholamine levels.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Lipman, J; Bothma, P A; Joynt, G M

    1994-03-01

    A patient with severe tetanus, who had a sympathetic crisis while sedated with 30 mg/h diazepam and 30 mg/h morphine, is described. Satisfactory control of the haemodynamic crisis was achieved with bolus doses of esmolol to a total of 180 mg. A disturbing finding was that although there was adequate control of the tachycardia and hypertension, arterial catecholamine levels remained markedly elevated. Adrenaline levels of 531 pg/ml (normal 10-110 pg/ml) and noradrenaline levels of 1,036 pg/ml (normal 100-500 pg/ml) were recorded when the patient had a systolic arterial pressure of 110 mmHg and a heart rate of 97/min. The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:11218441

  13. [The action of catecholamine-synthesis inhibitors and of spiperone on sea urchin and mouse embryos].

    PubMed

    Markova, L N; Sakharova, N Iu; Bezuglov, V V

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effects of three inhibitors of catecholamine synthesis on the development of sea urchins Sphaerechinus granularis and Paracentrotus lividus. These drugs affected the early embryogenesis, which was expressed in inhibition of the cleavage divisions, appearance of abnormal embryos, and developmental arrest. The addition of arachidonic acid amide and dopamine to the incubation medium weakened the effects of the inhibitors. Spiperone induced developmental defects in preimplantation mouse embryos and sea urchin embryos. Arachidonic acid amide with dopamine exerted a protective effect against spiperone when introduced to sea urchin embryos at the blastula or late gastrula stages, rather than after fertilization. In murine embryos, this amide induced developmental defects and arrest itself and its effect was reversible. Possible mechanisms underlying the effects of these drugs are discussed. PMID:10732361

  14. Mechanisms of radio-protection by catecholamines in the hamster /Mesocricetus auratus/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewitt, R. L.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on normal and splenectomized male and female hamsters between 2 and 3 months old subjected to a whole-body exposure of 1000 or 2000 rads in a Co-60 source with a view toward evaluating their radio-protection by norepinephrine, isoproterenol, and phenylephrine. Vasoconstriction hypoxia mechanism of radio-protection is examined along with the hypothesis that isoproterenol protects by hypercalcemia-induced cell proliferation. Radiation experiment results are found to be consistent with the hypothesis that stimulation of alpha receptors results in radio-protection through a tissue hypoxia mechanism. Beta agonists seem to protect by a hypotensive-hypoxia mechanism. The catecholamines protect against the hematopoietic syndrome, but show no evidence of protection against the gastrointestinal syndrome.

  15. Piezoelectric detection of ion pairs between sulphonate and catecholamines for flow injection analysis of pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Mo, Z; Long, X; Zhang, M

    1999-03-01

    Fundamentals of ion-pair flow injection with piezoelectric detection were investigated experimentally and theoretically for the adsorption of dodecyl phenylsulfonate and interfacial ion-pair formation with epinephrine and l-dopa on silver electrode of quartz crystal microbalance. The influences of sulfonate concentration and operating parameters on the frequency response were demonstrated and provided the possibility for the discriminating determination of mixtures. The selected system of ion-pair flow injection with piezoelectric detection was applied to the determination of epinephrine and l-dopa. Calibration curves were linear in ranges 4.00-850 and 3.50-730 mug ml(-1), with detection limits of 1.22 and 1.05 mug ml(-1) and sampling frequencies of 120 samples h(-1), for epinephrine and l-dopa, respectively. The method has been satisfactorily applied to the determination of catecholamines in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:18967504

  16. Effects of verapamil, dantrolene and lanthanum on catecholamine release from rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J; Gutman, Y

    1979-01-01

    1. The release of catecholamines (CA) from rat adrenal incubated in vivo in Locke solution was studied. 2. Acetylcholine-induced release of CA and CA release by 56 mM KCl were inhibited by verapamil and lanthanum chloride which block calcium permeability. 3. CA secretion induced by salbutamol or by theophylline was unaffected by either verapamil or lanthanum chloride. 4. Dantrolene-sodium inhibited the CA secretion induced by theophylline but only partially reduced potassium-induced release of CA. 5. Verapamil enhanced the secretion of CA induced by salbutamol (in a calcium-free medium). 6. Tyramine-induced secretion of CA was unaffected by lanthanum chloride, verapamil or dantrolene-sodium. 7. It is suggested that cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate-mediated CA secretion (induced by theophylline or salbutamol) depends on release of calcium from intracellular stores, and that CA secretion induced by tyramine is independent of intra- or extracellular calcium. PMID:435689

  17. The sympathetic nervous system and catecholamines metabolism in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Bisogni, Valeria; Pengo, Martino F.; Maiolino, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder of breathing in middle-aged and overweight subjects. It features recurrent episodes of upper airway total (apnoea) o partial (hypopnea) collapse during sleep, which are associated with a reduction in blood oxygen saturation and with arousal from sleep to re-establish airway patency. An association of OSA with dysregulation of the autonomous nervous system (ANS) and altered catecholamines (CAs) metabolism has been contended for years. However, the pathophysiology mechanisms underlying these alterations remain to be fully clarified. Nonetheless, these alterations are deemed to play a key pathogenic role in the established association of OSA with several conditions besides arterial hypertension (HT), including coronary artery disease, stroke, and, more in general, with increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) events. Hence, in this review we will analyse the relationship between the sleep disturbances associated with OSA and the altered function of the ANS, including CAs metabolism. PMID:26904265

  18. Enhanced BDNF signalling following chronic hypoxia potentiates catecholamine release from cultured rat adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela L; Zhang, Min; Nurse, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stressors, including chronic hypoxia, enhance the ability of adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) to secrete catecholamines; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in rat AMCs exposed to chronic hypoxia. In rat adrenal glands, BDNF and its tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor are highly expressed in the cortex and medulla, respectively. Exposure of AMCs to chronic hypoxia (2% O2; 48 h) in vitro caused a significant increase to TrkB mRNA expression. A similar increase was observed in an immortalized chromaffin cell line (MAH cells); however, it was absent in MAH cells deficient in the transcription factor HIF-2α. A specific TrkB agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), stimulated quantal catecholamine secretion from chronically hypoxic (CHox; 2% O2) AMCs to a greater extent than normoxic (Nox; 21% O2) controls. Activation of TrkB by BDNF or 7,8-DHF increased intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), an effect that was significantly larger in CHox cells. The 7,8-DHF-induced [Ca2+]i rise was sensitive to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a and nickel (2 mm), but not the Ca2+ store-depleting agent cyclopiazonic acid. Blockade of T-type calcium channels with TTA-P2 (1 μm) or voltage-gated Na+ channels with TTX inhibited BDNF-induced [Ca2+]i increases. BDNF also induced a dose-dependent enhancement of action potential firing in CHox cells. These data demonstrate that during chronic hypoxia, enhancement of BDNF-TrkB signalling increases voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx and catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells, and that T-type Ca2+ channels play a key role in the signalling pathway. Key points We investigated the role of the neurotrophin BDNF signalling via the TrkB receptor in rat adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) exposed to normoxia (Nox; 21% O2) and chronic hypoxia (CHox; 2% O2) in vitro for ∼48 h. TrkB receptor expression was

  19. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  20. Conformationally restrained analogs of sympathomimetic catecholamines. Synthesis, conformational analysis, and adrenergic activity of isochroman derivatives.

    PubMed

    Macchia, B; Balsamo, A; Breschi, M C; Chiellini, G; Lapucci, A; Macchia, M; Manera, C; Martinelli, A; Martini, C; Scatizzi, R

    1993-10-15

    In previous papers dealing with the study of the conformations and the biopharmacological activity of conformationally restrained analogs of sympathomimetic catecholamines (NE and ISO), proposals were advanced for the three-dimensional molecular models A, B, and C; these models provided information about the steric requirements for the direct activation of alpha 1, alpha 2,beta 1, and beta 2 adrenoceptors, respectively. The 1-(aminomethyl)-6,7-dihydroxyisochromans 11 and 12 and the 1-(aminomethyl)-5,6-dihydroxyisochromans 13 and 14 (1-AMDICs) are two different types of semirigid analogs of NE and ISO. The alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1, and beta 2 adrenergic properties of the 1-AMDICs 11-14 were evaluated in vitro, both by radioligand binding assays and by functional tests on isolated preparations, and were compared with those of their parent compounds (NE and ISO). The results of a conformational study carried out by means of both 1H NMR spectrometry and theoretical calculations indicated that, in these 1-AMDICs, the presumed active groups (aryl moiety, amine nitrogen and benzylic ethereal oxygen) are in a spatial relationship corresponding to the one found for NE and ISO in their preferred conformations, which also proved to be the pharmacophoric conformation in the models A-C. By means of a comparison of the stereostructures of the 1-AMDICs 11-14 with their biopharmacological properties, it was possible to obtain a further definition of the model B with respect to the activation of the alpha 2 adrenoceptors; the superimposition of the 1-AMDICs 11 and 12 with the molecular model C made it possible to detect an area of the beta-adrenergic receptors which might hinder the fit of adrenergic drugs that are analogs of catecholamines with these receptors. PMID:8230093

  1. A catecholamine transporter from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni with low affinity for psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Mads B.; Fontana, Andréia C. K.; Magalhães, Lizandra G.; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Mortensen, Ole V.

    2011-01-01

    The trematode Schistosoma mansoni is the primary cause of schistosomiasis, a devastating neglected tropical disease that affects 200 million individuals. Identifying novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of schistosomiasis is therefore of great public interest. The catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) are essential for the survival of the parasite as they cause muscular relaxation and a lengthening in the parasite and thereby control movement. Here we characterize a novel dopamine/norepinephrine transporter (SmDAT) gene transcript, from Schistosoma mansoni. The SmDAT is expressed in the adult form and in the sporocyst form (infected snails) of the parasite, and also in the egg and miracidium stage. It is absent in the cercaria stage but curiously a transcript missing the exon encoding transmembrane domain 8 was identified in this stage. Heterologous expression of the cDNA in mammalian cells resulted in saturable, dopamine transport activity with an apparent affinity for dopamine comparable to that of the human dopamine transporter. Efflux experiments reveal notably higher substrate selectivity compared with its mammalian counterparts as amphetamine is a much less potent efflux elicitor against SmDAT compared to the human DAT. Pharmacological characterization of the SmDAT revealed that most human DAT inhibitors including psychostimulants such as cocaine were significantly less potent in inhibiting SmDAT. Like DATs from other simpler organisms the pharmacology for SmDAT was more similar to the human norepinephrine transporter. We were not able to identify other dopamine transporting carriers within the completed parasite genome and we hypothesize that the SmDAT is the only catecholamine transporter in the parasite and could be responsible for not only clearing DA but also NE. PMID:21251927

  2. Catecholamines and their enzymes in discrete brain areas of rats after space flight on biosatellites Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvetǹanskỳ, R.; Čulman, J.; Serova, L. V.; Tigranjan, R. A.; Torda, T.; Macho, L.

    The activity of the catecholaminergic system was measured in the hypothalamus of rats which had experienced an 18.5-19.5-day-long stay in the state of weightlessness during space flights on board Soviet biosatellites of the type Cosmos. In the first two experiments, Cosmos 782 and 936, the concentration of norepinephrine and the activities of synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-β-hydroxylase and of the degrading enzyme monoamine oxidase were measured in the total hypothalamus. None of the given parameters was changed after space flight. In the light of the changes of these parameters recorded after exposure to acute stress on Earth, this finding indicates that long-term state of weightlessness does not represent an intensive stressogenic stimulus for the system studied. In the space experiment Cosmos 1129, the concentration of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine was studied in isolated nuclei of the hypothalamus of rats within 6-10 hr following return from space. Norepinephrine was found to be significantly reduced in the arcuate nucleus, median eminence and periventricular nucleus, epinephrine in the median eminence, periventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, whereas dopamine was not significantly changed after space flight. The decreased catecholamine levels found in some hypothalamic nuclei of rats which had undergone space flight indicate that no chronic intensive stressor could have acted during the flight, otherwise the catecholamine concentration would have been increased in the nuclei. The decreased levels must have been induced by the effect of a stressogenic factor acting for a short time only, and that either during the landing maneuver or immediately after landing. Thus long-term exposure of the organism to the state of weightlessness does not represent a stressogenic stimulus for the catecholaminergic system in the hypothalamus, which is one of the regulators of the activation of neuroendocrine reactions under stress.

  3. Gintonin enhances performance of mice in rotarod test: Involvement of lysophosphatidic acid receptors and catecholamine release.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Jisu; Lee, Ra Mi; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Lee, Myung Koo; Bae, Chun-Sik; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Rhim, Hyewon; Lim, Kiwon; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2016-01-26

    Ginseng has a long history of use as a tonic for restoration of vigor. One example of ginseng-derived tonic effect is that it can improve physical stamina under conditions of stress. However, the active ingredient and the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the ergogenic effect are unknown. Recent studies show that ginseng contains a novel ingredient, gintonin, which consists of a unique class of herbal-medicine lysophosphatidic acids (LPAs). Gintonin activates G protein-coupled LPA receptors to produce a transient [Ca(2+)]i signal, which is coupled to diverse intra- and inter-cellular signal transduction pathways that stimulate hormone or neurotransmitter release. However, relatively little is known about how gintonin-mediated cellular modulation is linked to physical endurance. In the present study, systemic administration of gintonin, but not ginsenosides, in fasted mice increased blood glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. Gintonin treatment elevated blood glucose to a maximum level after 30min. This elevation in blood glucose level could be abrogated by the LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, Ki16425, or the β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Furthermore, gintonin-dependent enhanced performance of fasted mice in rotarod test was likewise abrogated by Ki16425. Gintonin also elevated plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations. The present study shows that gintonin mediates catecholamine release through activation of the LPA receptor and that activation of the β-adrenergic receptor is coupled to liver glycogenolysis, thereby increasing the supply of glucose and enhancing performance in the rotarod test. Thus, gintonin acts via the LPA-catecholamine-glycogenolysis axis, representing a candidate mechanism that can explain how ginseng treatment enhances physical stamina. PMID:26706688

  4. Catecholamine Metabolism in Paraganglioma and Pheochromocytoma: Similar Tumors in Different Sites?

    PubMed Central

    Grouzmann, Eric; Tschopp, Oliver; Triponez, Frédéric; Matter, Maurice; Bilz, Stefan; Brändle, Michael; Drechser, Tilman; Sigrist, Sarah; Zulewski, Henryk; Henzen, Christoph; Fischli, Stefan; Abid, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL) are catecholamine-producing neuroendocrine tumors that arise respectively inside or outside the adrenal medulla. Several reports have shown that adrenal glucocorticoids (GC) play an important regulatory role on the genes encoding the main enzymes involved in catecholamine (CAT) synthesis i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT). To assess the influence of tumor location on CAT metabolism, 66 tissue samples (53 PHEO, 13 PGL) and 73 plasma samples (50 PHEO, 23 PGL) were studied. Western blot and qPCR were performed for TH, DBH and PNMT expression. We found a significantly lower intra-tumoral concentration of CAT and metanephrines (MNs) in PGL along with a downregulation of TH and PNMT at both mRNA and protein level compared with PHEO. However, when PHEO were partitioned into noradrenergic (NorAd) and mixed tumors based on an intra-tumoral CAT ratio (NE/E >90%), PGL and NorAd PHEO sustained similar TH, DBH and PNMT gene and protein expression. CAT concentration and composition were also similar between NorAd PHEO and PGL, excluding the use of CAT or MNs to discriminate between PGL and PHEO on the basis of biochemical tests. We observed an increase of TH mRNA concentration without correlation with TH protein expression in primary cell culture of PHEO and PGL incubated with dexamethasone during 24 hours; no changes were monitored for PNMT and DBH at both mRNA and protein level in PHEO and PGL. Altogether, these results indicate that long term CAT synthesis is not driven by the close environment where the tumor develops and suggest that GC alone is not sufficient to regulate CAT synthesis pathway in PHEO/PGL. PMID:25946206

  5. Influence of anesthetic regimens on the perioperative catecholamine response associated with onychectomy in cats.

    PubMed

    Lin, H C; Benson, G J; Thurmon, J C; Tranquilli, W J; Olson, W A; Bevill, R F

    1993-10-01

    Plasma catecholamine concentrations in response to onychectomy were examined in 27 cats receiving different anesthetic regimens. Each cat was anesthetized with a dissociative-tranquilizer combination, and onychectomy was performed on 1 forefoot. One week later, each cat was anesthetized with the same dissociative-tranquilizer combination plus either butorphanol or oxymorphone, and onychectomy was performed on the other forefoot. Four treatment groups were studied: tiletamine-zolazepam and tiletamine-zolazepam-butorphanol combinations were administered to group-1 cats, ketamine-acepromazine and ketamine-acepromazine-butorphanol combinations were administered to group-2 cats, tiletamine-zolazepam and tiletamine-zolazepam-oxymorphone combinations were administered to group-3 cats, and ketamine-acepromazine and ketamine-acepromazine-oxymorphone combinations were administered to group-4 cats. All drug combinations were administered IM. Central venous blood samples were drawn for catecholamine analysis after injection of drug(s), after onychectomy, and 1, 2, and 4 hours after injection. Tiletamine-zolazepam alone or tiletamine-zolazepam-butorphanol prevented epinephrine release for 2 hours after injection of drug(s). Norepinephrine concentration increased significantly (P < 0.05) from baseline after onychectomy for tiletamine-zolazepam-butorphanol and at 4 hours for tiletamine-zolazepam and tiletamine-zolazepam-butorphanol. After onychectomy, there was no difference in epinephrine values between tiletamine-zolazepam and tiletamine-zolazepam-oxymorphone. Ketamine-acepromazine prevented increases in norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations for up to 2 hours after surgery. Addition of butorphanol to ketamine-acepromazine decreased norepinephrine values immediately after onychectomy. Addition of oxymorphone to ketamine-acepromazine resulted in lower epinephrine values 4 hours after surgery. PMID:8250399

  6. Repeated stress-induced stimulation of catecholamine response is not followed by altered immune cell redistribution.

    PubMed

    Imrich, Richard; Tibenska, Elena; Koska, Juraj; Ksinantova, Lucia; Kvetnansky, Richard; Bergendiova-Sedlackova, Katarina; Blazicek, Pavol; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    Stress response is considered an important factor in the modulation of immune function. Neuroendocrine hormones, including catecholamines, affect the process of immune cell redistribution, important for cell-mediated immunity. This longitudinal investigation was aimed at evaluating the effect of repeated stress-induced elevation of catecholamines on immune cell redistribution and expression of adhesive molecules. We assessed the responses of epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine (NE), cortisol, changes in lymphocytes subpopulations, and percentages of CD11a+, CD11b+, and CD62L+ lymphocytes to a 20-min treadmill exercise of an intensity equal to 80% of the individual's Vo(2)max. The exercise was performed before and after 6 weeks of endurance training consisting of a 1-h run 4 times a week (ET) and after 5 days of bed rest (HDBR) in 10 healthy males. We did not observe any significant changes in the basal levels of EPI, NE, and cortisol in the plasma, nor in the immune parameters after ET and HDBR. The exercise test led to a significant (P <.001) elevation of EPI and NE levels after both ET and HDBR, a significant elevation (P <.01) of cortisol after HDBR, an increase in the absolute numbers of leukocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ lymphocytes, percentage of CD11a+ and CD11b+ lymphocytes, and to a decrease of CD62L1 before, after ET, and after HDBR. We found comparable changes in all measured immune parameters after ET and HDBR. In conclusion, repeated stress-induced elevation of EPI and NE was not associated with an alteration in immune cell redistribution found in response to the single bout of exercise. PMID:15240377

  7. Catecholamine metabolism in paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma: similar tumors in different sites?

    PubMed

    Grouzmann, Eric; Tschopp, Oliver; Triponez, Frédéric; Matter, Maurice; Bilz, Stefan; Brändle, Michael; Drechser, Tilman; Sigrist, Sarah; Zulewski, Henryk; Henzen, Christoph; Fischli, Stefan; Abid, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL) are catecholamine-producing neuroendocrine tumors that arise respectively inside or outside the adrenal medulla. Several reports have shown that adrenal glucocorticoids (GC) play an important regulatory role on the genes encoding the main enzymes involved in catecholamine (CAT) synthesis i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT). To assess the influence of tumor location on CAT metabolism, 66 tissue samples (53 PHEO, 13 PGL) and 73 plasma samples (50 PHEO, 23 PGL) were studied. Western blot and qPCR were performed for TH, DBH and PNMT expression. We found a significantly lower intra-tumoral concentration of CAT and metanephrines (MNs) in PGL along with a downregulation of TH and PNMT at both mRNA and protein level compared with PHEO. However, when PHEO were partitioned into noradrenergic (NorAd) and mixed tumors based on an intra-tumoral CAT ratio (NE/E >90%), PGL and NorAd PHEO sustained similar TH, DBH and PNMT gene and protein expression. CAT concentration and composition were also similar between NorAd PHEO and PGL, excluding the use of CAT or MNs to discriminate between PGL and PHEO on the basis of biochemical tests. We observed an increase of TH mRNA concentration without correlation with TH protein expression in primary cell culture of PHEO and PGL incubated with dexamethasone during 24 hours; no changes were monitored for PNMT and DBH at both mRNA and protein level in PHEO and PGL. Altogether, these results indicate that long term CAT synthesis is not driven by the close environment where the tumor develops and suggest that GC alone is not sufficient to regulate CAT synthesis pathway in PHEO/PGL. PMID:25946206

  8. Endogenous angiotensins and catecholamines do not reduce skin blood flow or prevent hypotension in preterm piglets

    PubMed Central

    Eiby, Yvonne A.; Lumbers, Eugenie R.; Staunton, Michael P.; Wright, Layne L.; Colditz, Paul B.; Wright, Ian M.R.; Lingwood, Barbara E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endocrine control of cardiovascular function is probably immature in the preterm infant; thus, it may contribute to the relative ineffectiveness of current adrenergic treatments for preterm cardiovascular compromise. This study aimed to determine the cardiovascular and hormonal responses to stress in the preterm piglet. Piglets were delivered by cesarean section either preterm (97 of 115 days) or at term (113 days). An additional group of preterm piglets received maternal glucocorticoids as used clinically. Piglets were sedated and underwent hypoxia (4% FiO2 for 20 min) to stimulate a cardiovascular response. Arterial blood pressure, skin blood flow, heart rate and plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, angiotensin II (Ang II), angiotensin‐(1–7) (Ang‐(1‐7)), and cortisol were measured. Term piglets responded to hypoxia with vasoconstriction; preterm piglets had a lesser response. Preterm piglets had lower blood pressures throughout, with a delayed blood pressure response to the hypoxic stress compared with term piglets. This immature response occurred despite similar high levels of circulating catecholamines, and higher levels of Ang II compared with term animals. Prenatal exposure to glucocorticoids increased the ratio of Ang‐(1‐7):Ang II. Preterm piglets, in contrast to term piglets, had no increase in cortisol levels in response to hypoxia. Preterm piglets have immature physiological responses to a hypoxic stress but no deficit of circulating catecholamines. Reduced vasoconstriction in preterm piglets could result from vasodilator actions of Ang II. In glucocorticoid exposed preterm piglets, further inhibition of vasoconstriction may occur because of an increased conversion of Ang II to Ang‐(1‐7). PMID:25538149

  9. Functional brown adipose tissue limits cardiomyocyte injury and adverse remodeling in catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Ernande, Laura; Cheng, Juan; Nagasaka, Yasuko; Yao, Vincent; Miranda-Bezerra, Alexandre; Chen, Chan; Chao, Wei; Panagia, Marcello; Sosnovik, David E; Puppala, Dheeraj; Armoundas, Antonis A; Hindle, Allyson; Bloch, Kenneth D; Buys, Emmanuel S; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2015-07-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has well recognized thermogenic properties mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1); more recently, BAT has been demonstrated to modulate cardiovascular risk factors. To investigate whether BAT also affects myocardial injury and remodeling, UCP1-deficient (UCP1(-/-)) mice, which have dysfunctional BAT, were subjected to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. At baseline, there were no differences in echocardiographic parameters, plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or myocardial fibrosis between wild-type (WT) and UCP1(-/-) mice. Isoproterenol infusion increased cTnI and myocardial fibrosis and induced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in both WT and UCP1(-/-) mice. UCP1(-/-) mice also demonstrated exaggerated myocardial injury, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling, as well as decreased survival. Transplantation of WT BAT to UCP1(-/-) mice prevented the isoproterenol-induced cTnI increase and improved survival, whereas UCP1(-/-) BAT transplanted to either UCP1(-/-) or WT mice had no effect on cTnI release. After 3 days of isoproterenol treatment, phosphorylated AKT and ERK were lower in the LV's of UCP1(-/-) mice than in those of WT mice. Activation of BAT was also noted in a model of chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, and was correlated to LV dysfunction. Deficiency in UCP1, and accompanying BAT dysfunction, increases cardiomyocyte injury and adverse LV remodeling, and decreases survival in a mouse model of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. Myocardial injury and decreased survival are rescued by transplantation of functional BAT to UCP1(-/-) mice, suggesting a systemic cardioprotective role of functional BAT. BAT is also activated in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25968336

  10. [CO2-stunning of slaughter pigs: effects on EEG, catecholamines and clinical reflexes].

    PubMed

    Hartung, J; Nowak, B; Waldmann, K H; Ellerbrock, S

    2002-03-01

    Investigations were carried out on the response of slaughter pigs to CO2 stunning with two different gas concentrations (80 vol%, 90 vol%, 73 s) under practical conditions in a one gondola-dip-lift system. EEG measurements were performed and blood constituents such as catecholamines (adrenaline, nor-adrenaline) and lactate as well as clinical reactions (nasal septum and corneal reflex, heart beats) investigated. Special EEG-electrodes were adapted for the measurement on pigs and a mobile data logger was prepared for the use in the lairage of the slaughter house and in the stunning unit. The CO2 concentrations were measured continuously close to the head of the pigs when transported up and down in the stunning gondola. The results show that the technique is suited to monitor the effects of different CO2 gas concentrations on the EEG of the pigs under practical conditions. There is strong evidence that CO2 concentrations of 80 vol% applied over 70 s as required by law are not sufficient to stun pigs properly. A large part of the animals still showed typical reflexes when leaving the stunning pit. When an atmosphere of 90 vol% CO2 is applied, most animals are already dead before bleeding commences. This may create problems in respect to meat hygiene. The blood analysis revealed very high concentrations of catecholamines after stunning. The values for adrenaline and nor-adrenaline in the sticking blood rose by a factor of about 1000 as compared to the concentrations in blood samples taken in the lairage before stunning. It seems necessary to revise the current legislation on gas stunning and to look in greater detail in the effects of CO2 stunning on the welfare of slaughter pigs. PMID:11963365

  11. Paclitaxel- and/or cisplatin-induced ocular neurotoxicity: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Li, Yanping; Li, Junyu; Pi, Guoliang; Tan, Wenyong

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) and/or cisplatin (CDDP), as important cytotoxic anti-cancer agents, are widely used to treat various solid tumors. Both may cause moderate or severe neurotoxicity, but ocular neurotoxicity is also occasionally reported. A patient diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer suffering acute ocular neurotoxicity 10 days after paclitaxel and CDDP administration at the recommended dose is described in the present case report, and PTX- and/or CDDP-induced ocular neurotoxicity are summarized according to previous reports. Possible mechanisms and the potential diagnostic, therapeutic and predictive strategies of PTX- and/or CDDP-induced ocular neurotoxicity are reviewed, to help the oncologist to take the infrequent toxicity of cytotoxic drugs into account and improve patient safety during anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25114574

  12. Kinetic Study of Aroxyl-Radical-Scavenging and α-Tocopherol-Regeneration Rates of Five Catecholamines in Solution: Synergistic Effect of α-Tocopherol and Catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Nagai, Kanae; Egawa, Yoshifumi; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-Ichi

    2016-07-28

    Detailed kinetic studies have been performed for reactions of aroxyl (ArO(•)) and α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc(•)) radicals with five catecholamines (CAs) (dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EN), and 5- and 6-hydroxydopamine (5- and 6-OHDA)) and two catechins (epicatechin (EC) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)) to clarify the free-radical-scavenging activity of CAs. Second-order rate constants (ks and kr) for reactions of ArO(•) and α-Toc(•) radicals with the above antioxidants were measured in 2-propanol/water (5:1, v/v) solution at 25.0 °C, using single- and double-mixing stopped-flow spectrophotometries, respectively. Both the rate constants (ks and kr) increased in the order NE < EN < DA < EC < 5-OHDA < EGCG < 6-OHDA. The ks and kr values of 6-OHDA are large and comparable to the corresponding values of ubiquinol-10 and sodium ascorbate, which show high free-radical-scavenging activity. The ultraviolet-visible absorption of α-Toc(•) (λmax = 428 nm), which was produced by the reaction of α-tocopherol (α-TocH) with ArO(•), disappeared under the coexistence of CAs due to the α-TocH-regeneration reaction. The results suggest that the CAs may contribute to the protection from oxidative damage in nervous systems, by scavenging free radicals (such as lipid peroxyl radical) and regenerating α-TocH from the α-Toc(•) radical. PMID:27346174

  13. A Threshold Neurotoxic Amphetamine Exposure Inhibits Parietal Cortex Expression of Synaptic Plasticity-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bowyer, John F.; Pogge, Amy R.; Delongchamp, Robert R.; O'Callaghan, James P.; Patel, Kruti M.; Vrana, Kent E.; Freeman, Willard M.

    2007-01-01

    Compulsive drug abuse has been conceptualized as a behavioral state where behavioral stimuli override normal decision making. Clinical studies of methamphetamine users have detailed decision making changes and imaging studies have found altered metabolism and activation in the parietal cortex. To examine the molecular effects of amphetamine on the parietal cortex, gene expression responses to amphetamine challenge (7.5mg/kg) were examined in the parietal cortex of rats pretreated for nine days with either saline, non-neurotoxic AMPH, or neurotoxic AMPH dosing regimens. The neurotoxic AMPH exposure [3 doses of 7.5 mg/kg/day AMPH (6 hr between doses), for nine days] produced histological signs of neurotoxicity in the parietal cortex while a non-neurotoxic dosing regimen (2.0 mg/kg/day × 3) did not. Neurotoxic AMPH pretreatment resulted in significantly diminished AMPH challenge-induced mRNA increases of activity-regulated cytoskeletal protein (ARC), nerve growth-factor inducible protein A (NGFI-A), and nerve growth-factor inducible protein B (NGFI-B) in the parietal cortex while neither saline pretreatment nor non-neurotoxic AMPH pretreatment did. This effect was specific to these genes as tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and c-jun expression in response to AMPH challenge was unaltered or enhanced by amphetamine pretreatements. In the striatum, there were no differences between saline, neurotoxic AMPH, and non-neurotoxic AMPH pretreatments on ARC, NGFI-A or NGFI-B expression elicited by the AMPH challenge. These data indicate that the responsiveness of synaptic plasticity related genes are sensitive to disruption specifically in the parietal cortex by threshold neurotoxic AMPH exposures. PMID:17049170

  14. Neurotoxicity of Adjuvants used in Perineural Anesthesia and Analgesia in Comparison with Ropivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brian A.; Hough, Karen A.; Tsui, Becky Y. K.; Ibinson, James W.; Gold, Michael S.; Gebhart, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Clonidine, buprenorphine, dexamethasone, and midazolam (C,B,D,M) have been used to prolong perineural local anesthesia in the absence of data on the influence of these adjuvants on local anesthetic (LA)-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, the impact of these adjuvants on ropivacaine (R)-induced death of isolated sensory neurons was assessed. Methods The trypan blue exclusion assay was used to assess death of sensory neurons isolated from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Drugs were applied, alone or in combination, for 2 or 24 hrs at 37°C. Results Neuronal viability was halved by 24 hr exposure to R (2.5 mg/mL), far exceeding the neurotoxicity of C, B, D, or M (at 2–100 times estimated clinical concentrations). Plain M at twice the estimated clinical concentration produced a small but significant increase in neurotoxicity at 24 hr. After 2 hr exposure, high concentrations of B, C, and M increased the neurotoxicity of R; the combination of R+M killed over 90% of neurons. Estimated clinical concentrations of C+B (plus 66 µg/mL D) had no influence on (i) R-induced neurotoxicity, (ii) the increased neurotoxicity associated with the combination of R+M, or (iii) the neurotoxicity associated with estimated clinical concentrations of M. There was dose-response neurotoxicity with 133 µg/mL D combined with R+C+B Conclusions Results with R re-affirm the need to identify ways to mitigate LA-induced neurotoxicity. While having no protective effect on R-induced neurotoxicity in vitro, future research with adjuvants should address if the C+B+D combination can enable reducing R concentrations needed to achieve equi-analgesia (and/or provide equal or superior duration, in preclinical in vivo models). PMID:21519308

  15. Neurotoxic Effects and Biomarkers of Lead Exposure: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Talia; Liu, Yiming; Buchner, Virginia; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Biological monitoring techniques are useful for risk assessment of toxic agents in the field of environmental health. Lead, a systemic toxicant affecting virtually every organ system, primarily affects the central nervous system, particularly the developing brain. Consequently, children are at a greater risk than adults of suffering from the neurotoxic effects of lead. The ability of lead to pass through the blood-brain barrier is due in large part to its ability to substitute for calcium ions. Within the brain, lead-induced damage in the prefrontal cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum can lead to a variety of neurological disorders, such as brain damage, mental retardation, behavioral problems, nerve damage, and possibly Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and schizophrenia. At the molecular level, lead interferes with the regulatory action of calcium on cell functions and disrupts many intracellular biological activities. Experimental studies have also shown that lead exposure may have genotoxic effects, especially in the brain, bone marrow, liver, and lung cells. This paper presents an overview of biomarkers of lead exposure and discusses the neurotoxic effects of lead with regard to children, adults, and experimental animals, updated to January 2009. PMID:19476290

  16. Effects of rutin on acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rutin is an important flavonoid that is consumed in the daily diet. The cytoprotective effects of rutin, including antioxidative, and neuroprotective have been shown in several studies. Neurotoxic effects of acrylamide (ACR) have been established in humans and animals. In this study, the protective effects of rutin in prevention and treatment of neural toxicity of ACR were studied. Results Rutin significantly reduced cell death induced by ACR (5.46 mM) in time- and dose-dependent manners. Rutin treatment decreased the ACR-induced cytotoxicity significantly in comparison to control (P <0.01, P < 0.001). Rutin (100 and 200 mg/kg) could prevent decrease of body weight in rats. In combination treatments with rutin (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg), vitamin E (200 mg/kg) and ACR, gait abnormalities significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). The level of malondialdehyde significantly decreased in the brain tissue of rats in both preventive and therapeutic groups that received rutin (100 and 200 mg/kg). Conclusion It seems that rutin could be effective in reducing neurotoxicity and the neuroprotective effect of it might be mediated via antioxidant activity. PMID:24524427

  17. Lithium Protects Against Anaesthesia Neurotoxicity In The Infant Primate Brain

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kevin K.; Johnson, Stephen A.; Kristich, Lauren E.; Martin, Lauren D.; Dissen, Gregory A.; Olsen, Emily A.; Olney, John W.; Brambrink, Ansgar M.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of infant animals, including non-human primates (NHPs), to anaesthetic drugs causes apoptotic death of neurons and oligodendrocytes (oligos) and results in long-term neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). Moreover, retrospective clinical studies document an association between anaesthesia exposure of human infants and significant increase in NDI. These findings pose a potentially serious dilemma because millions of human infants are exposed to anaesthetic drugs every year as part of routine medical care. Lithium (Li) at clinically established doses is neuroprotective in various cerebral injury models. We therefore investigated whether Li also protects against anaesthesia neurotoxicity in infant NHPs. On postnatal day 6 NHPs were anaesthetized with the widely used anaesthetic isoflurane (ISO) for 5 h employing the same standards as in a human pediatric surgery setting. Co-administration of Li completely prevented the acute ISO-induced neuroapoptosis and significantly reduced ISO-induced apoptosis of oligodendroglia. Our findings are highly encouraging as they suggest that a relatively simple pharmacological manipulation might protect the developing primate brain against the neurotoxic action of anaesthetic drugs while not interfering with the beneficial actions of these drugs. Further research is needed to determine Li’s potential to prevent long-term NDI resulting from ISO anaesthesia, and to establish its safety in human infants. PMID:26951756

  18. Lithium Protects Against Anaesthesia Neurotoxicity In The Infant Primate Brain.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kevin K; Johnson, Stephen A; Kristich, Lauren E; Martin, Lauren D; Dissen, Gregory A; Olsen, Emily A; Olney, John W; Brambrink, Ansgar M

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of infant animals, including non-human primates (NHPs), to anaesthetic drugs causes apoptotic death of neurons and oligodendrocytes (oligos) and results in long-term neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI). Moreover, retrospective clinical studies document an association between anaesthesia exposure of human infants and significant increase in NDI. These findings pose a potentially serious dilemma because millions of human infants are exposed to anaesthetic drugs every year as part of routine medical care. Lithium (Li) at clinically established doses is neuroprotective in various cerebral injury models. We therefore investigated whether Li also protects against anaesthesia neurotoxicity in infant NHPs. On postnatal day 6 NHPs were anaesthetized with the widely used anaesthetic isoflurane (ISO) for 5 h employing the same standards as in a human pediatric surgery setting. Co-administration of Li completely prevented the acute ISO-induced neuroapoptosis and significantly reduced ISO-induced apoptosis of oligodendroglia. Our findings are highly encouraging as they suggest that a relatively simple pharmacological manipulation might protect the developing primate brain against the neurotoxic action of anaesthetic drugs while not interfering with the beneficial actions of these drugs. Further research is needed to determine Li's potential to prevent long-term NDI resulting from ISO anaesthesia, and to establish its safety in human infants. PMID:26951756

  19. Mitochondria: key players in the neurotoxic effects of amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Daniel José; Capela, João Paulo; Feio-Azevedo, Rita; Teixeira-Gomes, Armanda; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Carvalho, Félix

    2015-10-01

    Amphetamines are a class of psychotropic drugs with high abuse potential, as a result of their stimulant, euphoric, emphathogenic, entactogenic, and hallucinogenic properties. Although most amphetamines are synthetic drugs, of which methamphetamine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ("ecstasy") represent well-recognized examples, the use of natural related compounds, namely cathinone and ephedrine, has been part of the history of humankind for thousands of years. Resulting from their amphiphilic nature, these drugs can easily cross the blood-brain barrier and elicit their well-known psychotropic effects. In the field of amphetamines' research, there is a general consensus that mitochondrial-dependent pathways can provide a major understanding concerning pathological processes underlying the neurotoxicity of these drugs. These events include alterations on tricarboxylic acid cycle's enzymes functioning, inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain's complexes, perturbations of mitochondrial clearance mechanisms, interference with mitochondrial dynamics, as well as oxidative modifications in mitochondrial macromolecules. Additionally, other studies indicate that amphetamines-induced neuronal toxicity is closely regulated by B cell lymphoma 2 superfamily of proteins with consequent activation of caspase-mediated downstream cell death pathway. Understanding the molecular mechanisms at mitochondrial level involved in amphetamines' neurotoxicity can help in defining target pathways or molecules mediating these effects, as well as in developing putative therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat the acute- or long-lasting neuropsychiatric complications seen in human abusers. PMID:25743372

  20. Involvement of Sphingolipids in Ethanol Neurotoxicity in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mariko; Saito, Mitsuo

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol-induced neuronal death during a sensitive period of brain development is considered one of the significant causes of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). In rodent models, ethanol triggers robust apoptotic neurodegeneration during a period of active synaptogenesis that occurs around the first two postnatal weeks, equivalent to the third trimester in human fetuses. The ethanol-induced apoptosis is mitochondria-dependent, involving Bax and caspase-3 activation. Such apoptotic pathways are often mediated by sphingolipids, a class of bioactive lipids ubiquitously present in eukaryotic cellular membranes. While the central role of lipids in ethanol liver toxicity is well recognized, the involvement of sphingolipids in ethanol neurotoxicity is less explored despite mounting evidence of their importance in neuronal apoptosis. Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis in animal models of FASD is mediated or regulated by cellular sphingolipids, including via the pro-apoptotic action of ceramide and through the neuroprotective action of GM1 ganglioside. Such sphingolipid involvement in ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing brain may provide unique targets for therapeutic applications against FASD. Here we summarize findings describing the involvement of sphingolipids in ethanol-induced apoptosis and discuss the possibility that the combined action of various sphingolipids in mitochondria may control neuronal cell fate. PMID:24961420

  1. Subchronic organophosphorus ester-induced delayed neurotoxicity in mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sileo, L.; Murray, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen-week-old mallard hens received 0, 10, 30, 90, or 270 ppm technical grade EPN (phenylphosphonothioic acid O-ethyl-O-4-nitrophenyl ester) in the diet for 90 days. Ataxia was first observed in the 270-ppm group after 16 days, in the 90-ppm group after 20 days, in the 30-ppm group after 38 days; 10 ppm failed to produce ataxia. By the end of 90 days all 6 birds in the 270-ppm group exhibited ataxia or paralysis whereas 5 of 6 birds in the 90-ppm group and 2 of 6 birds in the 30-ppm group were visibly affected. Treatment with 30 ppm or more resulted in a significant reduction in body weight. Brain neurotoxic esterase activity was inhibited by averages of 16, 69, 73, and 74% in the 10-, 30-, 90-, and 270-ppm groups, respectively. Brain acetylcholinesterase, plasma cholinesterase, and plasma alkaline phosphatase were significantly inhibited as well. Distinct histopathological effects were seen in the 30-, 90-, and 270-ppm groups which included demyelination and degeneration of axons of the spinal cord. Additional ducks were exposed in a similar manner to 60-, 270-, or 540-ppm leptophos (phosphonothioic acid O-4-bromo-2,5-dichlorophenyl-O-methylphenyl ester) which resulted in similar behavioral, biochemical, and histopathological alterations. These findings indicate that adult mallards are probably somewhat less sensitive than chickens to subchronic dietary exposure to organophosphorus insecticides that induce delayed neurotoxicity.

  2. A mechanistic view of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) developmental neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Lucio G.; de Laat, Rian; Tagliaferri, Sara; Pellacani, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), extensively used in the past few decades as flame retardants in a variety of consumer products, have become world-wide persistent environmental pollutants. Levels in North America are usually higher than those in Europe and Asia, and body burden is 3 to 9-fold higher in infants and toddlers than in adults. The latter has raised concern for potential developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity of PBDEs. Experimental studies in animals and epidemiological observations in humans suggest that PBDEs may be developmental neurotoxicants. Pre- and/or post-natal exposure to PBDEs may cause long-lasting behavioral abnormalities, particularly in the domains of motor activity and cognition. The mechanisms underlying the developmental neurotoxic effects of PBDEs are not known, though several hypotheses have been put forward. One general mode of action relates to the ability of PBDEs to impair thyroid hormone homeostasis, thus indirectly affecting the developing brain. An alternative or additional mode of action involves a direct effect of PBDEs on nervous system cells; PBDEs can cause oxidative stress-related damage (DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis), and interfere with signal transduction (particularly calcium signaling), and with neurotransmitter systems. Important issues such as bioavailability and metabolism of PBDEs, extrapolation of results to low level of exposures, and the potential effects of interactions among PBDE congeners and between PBDEs and other contaminants also need to be taken into account. PMID:24270005

  3. Evidence for neurotoxicity associated with amoxicillin in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Atli, O; Demir-Ozkay, U; Ilgin, S; Aydin, T H; Akbulut, E N; Sener, E

    2016-08-01

    Amoxicillin (AMX) is one of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics for children, and childhood is the period to have the highest risk for toxicity cases including drug-induced adverse reactions. Some neurological adverse effects (anxiety, hyperactivity, confusion, convulsions, and behavioral changes) have been reported related to AMX treatment. In the present study, we aimed to determine the neurotoxic effects of AMX administration at clinically relevant doses in female juvenile rats. AMX was administered in single oral daily doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for 14 days. According to our results, while AMX administration caused a significant increase in the immobility time of animals, swimming time of these animals significantly decreased. AMX administration significantly reduced the onset of pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions. The serotonin levels of brain tissues in the AMX-administered groups were decreased significantly, which is thought to be related to depression. The glutamate levels in brain tissues increased significantly in AMX-administered groups, which is thought to be related to convulsion. Otherwise, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were significantly decreased in brain tissues of AMX-administered groups. In conclusion, AMX administration triggered depression and shortened the time of the appearance of first seizure in juvenile rats. Also, altered brain neurotransmitter levels and increased oxidative stress observed in our study were thought to be the possible underlying mechanisms of AMX-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26429924

  4. Signaling mechanisms and disrupted cytoskeleton in the diphenyl ditelluride neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pessoa-Pureur, Regina; Heimfarth, Luana; Rocha, João B

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from our group supports that diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2 neurotoxicity depends on modulation of signaling pathways initiated at the plasma membrane. The (PhTe)2-evoked signal is transduced downstream of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCC), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA), or metabotropic glutamate receptors activation via different kinase pathways (protein kinase A, phospholipase C/protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt signaling pathway). Among the most relevant cues of misregulated signaling mechanisms evoked by (PhTe)2 is the cytoskeleton of neural cells. The in vivo and in vitro exposure to (PhTe)2 induce hyperphosphorylation/hypophosphorylation of neuronal and glial intermediate filament (IF) proteins (neurofilaments and glial fibrillary acidic protein, resp.) in different brain structures of young rats. Phosphorylation of IFs at specific sites modulates their association/disassociation and interferes with important physiological roles, such as axonal transport. Disrupted cytoskeleton is a crucial marker of neurodegeneration and is associated with reactive astrogliosis and apoptotic cell death. This review focuses the current knowledge and important results on the mechanisms of (PhTe)2 neurotoxicity with special emphasis on the cytoskeletal proteins and their differential regulation by kinases/phosphatases and Ca(2+)-mediated mechanisms in developmental rat brain. We propose that the disrupted cytoskeletal homeostasis could support brain damage provoked by this neurotoxicant. PMID:25050142

  5. A mechanistic view of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) developmental neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G; de Laat, Rian; Tagliaferri, Sara; Pellacani, Claudia

    2014-10-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), extensively used in the past few decades as flame retardants in a variety of consumer products, have become world-wide persistent environmental pollutants. Levels in North America are usually higher than those in Europe and Asia, and body burden is 3-to-9-fold higher in infants and toddlers than in adults. The latter has raised concern for potential developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity of PBDEs. Experimental studies in animals and epidemiological observations in humans suggest that PBDEs may be developmental neurotoxicants. Pre- and/or post-natal exposure to PBDEs may cause long-lasting behavioral abnormalities, particularly in the domains of motor activity and cognition. The mechanisms underlying the developmental neurotoxic effects of PBDEs are not known, though several hypotheses have been put forward. One general mode of action relates to the ability of PBDEs to impair thyroid hormone homeostasis, thus indirectly affecting the developing brain. An alternative or additional mode of action involves a direct effect of PBDEs on nervous system cells; PBDEs can cause oxidative stress-related damage (DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis), and interfere with signal transduction (particularly calcium signaling), and with neurotransmitter systems. Important issues such as bioavailability and metabolism of PBDEs, extrapolation of results to low level of exposures, and the potential effects of interactions among PBDE congeners and between PBDEs and other contaminants also need to be taken into account. PMID:24270005

  6. Twenty-first century challenges for in vitro neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    During the last 40 years, studies incorporating in vitro methodologies have greatly advanced our understanding of human nerve cell biology. Attempts have been made to apply these to investigations of neurotoxicity. Due to the complexity of the nervous system, underpinned by an array of integrated interactions between a host of cell types, it is concluded that, at present, alternative neural models are most successful in determining the underlying mechanisms which can cause perturbation of normal functioning of the nervous system, both in adults and during the embryonic period. The use of tiered batteries of test models has been proposed in screening programmes for neurotoxicity, with the generation of much encouraging data in laboratories across the globe. This review aims to discuss the development of neural alternatives, considers the various model systems available, and highlights specific neuronal endpoints which can be tested, in addition to the cytotoxic evaluation of neuronal viability. Developments in molecular and stem cell biology, which are appropriate to neural tissue, and which offer the prospect of exciting advances for the next decade, are cited. PMID:19807209

  7. Drugs That Bind to α-Synuclein: Neuroprotective or Neurotoxic?

    PubMed

    Kakish, Joe; Lee, Dongsoo; Lee, Jeremy S

    2015-12-16

    The misfolding of α-synuclein is a critical event in the death of dopaminergic neurons and the progression of Parkinson's disease. Drugs that bind to α-synuclein and form a loop structure between the N- and C-terminus tend to be neuroprotective, whereas others that cause a more compact structure tend to be neurotoxic. The binding of several natural products and other drugs that are involved in dopamine metabolism were investigated by nanopore analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The antinausea drugs, cinnarizine and metoclopramide, do not bind to α-synuclein, whereas amphetamine and the herbicides, paraquat and rotenone, bind tightly and cause α-synuclein to adopt a more compact conformation. The recreational drug, cocaine, binds to α-synuclein, whereas heroin and methadone do not. Metformin, which is prescribed for diabetes and is neuroprotective, binds well without causing α-synuclein to adopt a more compact conformation. Methylphenidate (ritalin) binds to sites in both the N- and C-terminus and causes α-synuclein to adopt a loop conformation. In contrast, amphetamine only binds to the N-terminus. Except for cinnarizine and metoclopramide, there is a good correlation between the mode of binding to α-synuclein and whether a drug is neuroprotective or neurotoxic. PMID:26378986

  8. Amyloid Oligomer Neurotoxicity, Calcium Dysregulation, and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Frank, Claudio; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid proteins constitute a chemically heterogeneous group of proteins, which share some biophysical and biological characteristics, the principal of which are the high propensity to acquire an incorrect folding and the tendency to aggregate. A number of diseases are associated with misfolding and aggregation of proteins, although only in some of them—most notably Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs)—a pathogenetic link with misfolded proteins is now widely recognized. Lipid rafts (LRs) have been involved in the pathophysiology of diseases associated with protein misfolding at several levels, including aggregation of misfolded proteins, amyloidogenic processing, and neurotoxicity. Among the pathogenic misfolded proteins, the AD-related protein amyloid β (Aβ) is by far the most studied protein, and a large body of evidence has been gathered on the role played by LRs in Aβ pathogenicity. However, significant amount of data has also been collected for several other amyloid proteins, so that their ability to interact with LRs can be considered an additional, shared feature characterizing the amyloid protein family. In this paper, we will review the evidence on the role of LRs in the neurotoxicity of huntingtin, α-synuclein, prion protein, and calcitonin. PMID:21331330

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Pyrethroid Insecticide Neurotoxicity: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic pyrethroid insecticides were introduced into widespread use for the control of insect pests and disease vectors more than three decades ago. In addition to their value in controlling agricultural pests, pyrethroids are at the forefront of efforts to combat malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases and are also common ingredients of household insecticide and companion animal ectoparasite control products. The abundance and variety of pyrethroid uses contribute to the risk of exposure and adverse effects in the general population. The insecticidal actions of pyrethroids depend on their ability to bind to and disrupt voltage-gated sodium channels of insect nerves. Sodium channels are also important targets for the neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids in mammals but other targets, particularly voltage-gated calcium and chloride channels, have been implicated as alternative or secondary sites of action for a subset of pyrethroids. This review summarizes information published during the past decade on the action of pyrethroids on voltage-gated sodium channels as well as on voltage-gated calcium and chloride channels and provides a critical re-evaluation of the role of these three targets in pyrethroid neurotoxicity based on this information. PMID:21710279

  10. Signaling Mechanisms and Disrupted Cytoskeleton in the Diphenyl Ditelluride Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa-Pureur, Regina; Heimfarth, Luana; Rocha, João B.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from our group supports that diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2 neurotoxicity depends on modulation of signaling pathways initiated at the plasma membrane. The (PhTe)2-evoked signal is transduced downstream of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCC), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA), or metabotropic glutamate receptors activation via different kinase pathways (protein kinase A, phospholipase C/protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt signaling pathway). Among the most relevant cues of misregulated signaling mechanisms evoked by (PhTe)2 is the cytoskeleton of neural cells. The in vivo and in vitro exposure to (PhTe)2 induce hyperphosphorylation/hypophosphorylation of neuronal and glial intermediate filament (IF) proteins (neurofilaments and glial fibrillary acidic protein, resp.) in different brain structures of young rats. Phosphorylation of IFs at specific sites modulates their association/disassociation and interferes with important physiological roles, such as axonal transport. Disrupted cytoskeleton is a crucial marker of neurodegeneration and is associated with reactive astrogliosis and apoptotic cell death. This review focuses the current knowledge and important results on the mechanisms of (PhTe)2 neurotoxicity with special emphasis on the cytoskeletal proteins and their differential regulation by kinases/phosphatases and Ca2+-mediated mechanisms in developmental rat brain. We propose that the disrupted cytoskeletal homeostasis could support brain damage provoked by this neurotoxicant. PMID:25050142

  11. Inhibition of hen brain acetylcholinesterase and neurotoxic esterase by chlorpyrifos in vivo and kinetics of inhibition by chlorpyrifos oxon in vitro: application to assessment of neuropathic risk.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R J; Moore, T B; Kayyali, U S; Fowke, J H; Randall, J C

    1993-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPS; O,O-diethyl 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl phosphorothionate; Dursban) is a widely used broad-spectrum organophosphorus (OP) insecticide. Because some OP compounds can cause a sensory-motor distal axonopathy called OP compound-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN), CPS has been evaluated for this paralytic effect. Early studies of the neurotoxicity of CPS in young and adult hens reported reversible leg weakness but failed to detect OPIDN. More recently, a human case of mild OPIDN was reported to result from ingestion of a massive dose (about 300 mg/kg) in a suicide attempt. Subsequent experiments in adult hens (the currently accepted animal model of choice for studies of OPIDN) showed that doses of CPS in excess of the LD50 in atropine-treated animals inhibited brain neurotoxic esterase (NTE) and produced mild to moderate ataxia. Considering the extensive use of CPS and its demonstrated potential for causing OPIDN at supralethal doses, additional data are needed to enable quantitative estimates to be made of the neuropathic risk of this compound. Previous work has shown that the ability of OP insecticides to cause acute cholinergic toxicity versus OPIDN can be predicted from their relative tendency to inhibit the intended target, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), versus the putative neuropathic target, NTE, in brain tissue. The present study was designed to clarify the magnitude of neuropathic risk associated with CPS exposures by measuring hen brain AChE and NTE inhibition following dosing in vivo and determining the bimolecular rate constant of inhibition (ki) for each enzyme by the active metabolite, CPS oxon (CPO), in vitro.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7684990

  12. Neurotoxicity of Brominated Flame Retardants: (In)direct Effects of Parent and Hydroxylated Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers on the (Developing) Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their hydroxylated (OH-) or methoxylated forms have been detected in humans. Because this raises concern about adverse effects on the developing brain, we reviewed the scientific literature on these mechanisms. Data synthesis: Many rodent studies reported behavioral changes after developmental, neonatal, or adult exposure to PBDEs, and other studies documented subtle structural and functional alterations in brains of PBDE-exposed animals. Functional effects have been observed on synaptic plasticity and the glutamate–nitric oxide–cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. In the brain, changes have been observed in the expression of genes and proteins involved in synapse and axon formation, neuronal morphology, cell migration, synaptic plasticity, ion channels, and vesicular neurotransmitter release. Cellular and molecular mechanisms include effects on neuronal viability 
(via apoptosis and oxidative stress), neuronal differentiation and migration, neurotransmitter release/uptake, neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis, and intracellular signaling pathways. Discussion: Bioactivation of PBDEs by hydroxylation has been observed for several endocrine end points. This has also been observed for mechanisms related to neurodevelopment, including binding to thyroid hormone receptors and transport proteins, disruption of Ca2+ homeostasis, and modulation of GABA and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function. Conclusions: The increased hazard for developmental neurotoxicity by hydroxylated (OH-)PBDEs compared with their parent congeners via direct neurotoxicity and thyroid disruption clearly warrants further investigation into a) the role of oxidative metabolism in producing active metabolites of PBDEs and their impact on brain development; b) concentrations of parent and OH-PBDEs in the brain; and c) interactions between different environmental contaminants during exposure to

  13. Modulation of benzo[a]pyrene induced neurotoxicity in female mice actively immunized with a B[a]P–diphtheria toxoid conjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberger, Mario T.; Grova, Nathalie; Farinelle, Sophie; Willième, Stéphanie; Muller, Claude P.

    2013-09-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a small molecular weight carcinogen and the prototype of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). While these compounds are primarily known for their carcinogenicity, B[a]P and its metabolites are also neurotoxic for mammalian species. To develop a prophylactic immune strategy against detrimental effects of B[a]P, female Balb/c mice immunized with a B[a]P–diphtheria toxoid (B[a]P–DT) conjugate vaccine were sub-acutely exposed to 2 mg/kg B[a]P and behavioral performances were monitored in tests related to learning and memory, anxiety and motor coordination. mRNA expression of the NMDA receptor (NR1, 2A and 2B subunits) involved in the above behavioral functions was measured in 5 brain regions. B[a]P induced NMDA1 expression in three (hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum) of five brain regions investigated, and modulated NMDA2 in two of the five brain regions (frontal cortex and cerebellum). Each one of these B[a]P-effects was reversed in mice that were immunized against this PAH, with measurable consequences on behavior such as anxiety, short term learning and memory. Thus active immunization against B[a]P with a B[a]P–DT conjugate vaccine had a protective effect and attenuated the pharmacological and neurotoxic effects even of high concentrations of B[a]P. - Highlights: • B[a]P-antibodies attenuated B[a]P induced NMDA expression in several brain regions. • B[a]P had measurable consequences on anxiety, short term learning and memory. • B[a]P immunization attenuated the pharmacological and neurotoxic effects of B[a]P. • Vaccination may also provide some protection against chemical carcinogenesis.

  14. Catecholamine-induced changes in ion transport in short-circuited frog skin and the effect of beta-blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, R W; Wood, A W

    1976-01-01

    1. A method for measuring bidirectional Cl fluxes has been used to estimate net Cl movements in short-circuited frog skin and to compare these with the short-circuit current (Isc) and Na fluxes. 2. In some experiments bidirectional fluxes of both Na and Cl were measured simultaneously. It was found that the algebraic sum of the net fluxes of these two ions did not differ significantly from the values of Isc, either in untreated or catecholamine-treated skins, except for the half-hour period immediately after catecholamine addition. 3. The net effluxes of Cl produced by noradrenaline (1-6 X 10(-5)M), isoprenaline (8 X 10(-7)M) and adrenaline (6 and 15 X 10(-6)M) were of similar magnitude for each catecholamine. The magnitude of the Cl response measured as a flux ratio was related to a certain extent to the precatecholamine Cl conductance. 4. The net Na influx was increased by isoprenaline and reduced by noradrenaline. 5. Addition of the beta-adrenergic blocking agent oxprenolol (4-5 X 10(-5)M) to skins stimulated by catecholamine resulted in the disappearance of the net Cl movement and fall in skin conductance and Isc. This fall was similar in magnitude to, and correlated with the mean rise in Isc produced by isoprenaline, but of significantly greater magnitude in the case of noradrenaline. 6. The changes in Na influx were strongly associated with the changes in Isc following catecholamine addition. Similarly, the changes in Na efflux and Cl efflux were correlated, suggesting the Na fluxes to be dissociated, influx and efflux changes perhaps taking place at different loci. 7. Acetazolamide (1-2 X 10(-4)M), added either before or during the noradrenaline stimulation, had no effect on the Cl efflux response. 8. The tissue exchange of Cl from the outside bathing medium after 4 hr was greater in catecholamine-stimulated skins than in those in which the response had been blocked by oxprenolol. 9. These findings were taken to support a model entailing a neutral NaCl pump

  15. Modulation of benzo[a]pyrene induced neurotoxicity in female mice actively immunized with a B[a]P-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Mario T; Grova, Nathalie; Farinelle, Sophie; Willième, Stéphanie; Schroeder, Henri; Muller, Claude P

    2013-09-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a small molecular weight carcinogen and the prototype of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). While these compounds are primarily known for their carcinogenicity, B[a]P and its metabolites are also neurotoxic for mammalian species. To develop a prophylactic immune strategy against detrimental effects of B[a]P, female Balb/c mice immunized with a B[a]P-diphtheria toxoid (B[a]P-DT) conjugate vaccine were sub-acutely exposed to 2mg/kg B[a]P and behavioral performances were monitored in tests related to learning and memory, anxiety and motor coordination. mRNA expression of the NMDA receptor (NR1, 2A and 2B subunits) involved in the above behavioral functions was measured in 5 brain regions. B[a]P induced NMDA1 expression in three (hippocampus, amygdala and cerebellum) of five brain regions investigated, and modulated NMDA2 in two of the five brain regions (frontal cortex and cerebellum). Each one of these B[a]P-effects was reversed in mice that were immunized against this PAH, with measurable consequences on behavior such as anxiety, short term learning and memory. Thus active immunization against B[a]P with a B[a]P-DT conjugate vaccine had a protective effect and attenuated the pharmacological and neurotoxic effects even of high concentrations of B[a]P. PMID:23684556

  16. Serum metabolites from walnut-fed aged rats attenuate stress-induced neurotoxicity in BV-2 microglial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The shift in equilibrium towards excess reactive oxygen or nitrogen species production from innate antioxidant defenses in brain is a critical factor in the declining neural function and cognitive deficit accompanying age. Previous studies from our laboratory have reported that walnuts, rich in poly...

  17. Serum metabolites from walnut-fed aged rats attenuate stress-induced neurotoxicity in brain cells in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The shift in equilibrium towards excess reactive oxygen or nitrogen species production from innate antioxidant defense in brain is a critical factor in the declining neural functions and cognitive deficits accompanying age. In aging, there are noticeable alterations in the membrane microenvironment,...

  18. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Prevents Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, M. Paola; Casu, Angelo; Casti, Paola; Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Ennas, M. Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC) and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of cerebral damage. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Δ9-THC on METH-induced neurotoxicity by examining its ability to reduce astrocyte activation and nNOS overexpression in selected brain areas. Rats exposed to a METH neurotoxic regimen (4×10 mg/kg, 2 hours apart) were pre- or post-treated with Δ9-THC (1 or 3 mg/kg) and sacrificed 3 days after the last METH administration. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against nNOS and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP). Results showed that, as compared to corresponding controls (i) METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the caudate-putamen (CPu) was significantly attenuated by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (−19% and −28% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; −25% and −21% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals); (ii) METH-induced GFAP-immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly reduced in the CPu by post-treatment with 1 mg/kg Δ9-THC1 (−50%) and by pre-treatment with 3 mg/kg Δ9-THC (−53%); (iii) METH-induced GFAP-IR was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (−34% and −47% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; −37% and −29% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the CPu, but failed to counteract the Δ9-THC-mediated reduction of METH-induced GFAP-IR both in the

  19. Inhibitory effect of acteoside on melittin-induced catecholamine exocytosis through inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A2 and extracellular Ca(2+) influx in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ho Sun; Ko, Myung Soo; Jo, Young Soo; Whang, Wan Kyunn; Sim, Sang Soo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of acteoside on the process of exocytosis induced by melittin, we measured Ca(2+) mobilization, arachidonic acid (AA) release and catecholamine exocytosis in PC12 chromaffin cells. Melittin significantly increased the intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization via receptor-operated calcium channel but not the intracellular Ca(2+) release. It caused AA release via activation of Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and catecholamine secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Acteoside dose-dependently inhibited the release of AA and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization induced by melittin. Acteoside reduced the catecholamine release and raised the amount of intracellular chromogranin A which is co-released with catecholamine from melittin-stimulated PC12 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that acteoside could suppress the exocytosis via inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent PLA2 and extracellular Ca(2+) influx in PC12 cells stimulated by melittin. PMID:25899996

  20. The hypoxia-responsive transcription factor EPAS1 is essential for catecholamine homeostasis and protection against heart failure during embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hui; Hammer, Robert E.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Russell, David W.; McKnight, Steven L.

    1998-01-01

    Mice lacking the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor EPAS1 die at mid-gestation. Despite normal morphological development of the circulatory system, EPAS1-deficient mice display pronounced bradycardia. In addition to the vascular endothelium, EPAS1 is expressed intensively in the organ of Zuckerkandl (OZ), the principle source of catecholamine production in mammalian embryos. EPAS1-deficient embryos contained substantially reduced catecholamine levels. Mid-gestational lethality was rescued by administration of the catecholamine precursor DOPS to pregnant females. We hypothesize that EPAS1 expressed in the OZ senses hypoxia during mid-gestational development and translates this signal into an altered pattern of gene expression, leading to increases in circulating catecholamine levels and proper cardiac function. PMID:9808618

  1. Cyanobacterial xenobiotics as evaluated by a Caenorhabditis elegans neurotoxicity screening test.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingjuan; Saul, Nadine; Kochan, Cindy; Putschew, Anke; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2014-05-01

    In fresh waters cyanobacterial blooms can produce a variety of toxins, such as microcystin variants (MCs) and anatoxin-a (ANA). ANA is a well-known neurotoxin, whereas MCs are hepatotoxic and, to a lesser degree, also neurotoxic. Neurotoxicity applies especially to invertebrates lacking livers. Current standardized neurotoxicity screening methods use rats or mice. However, in order to minimize vertebrate animal experiments as well as experimental time and effort, many investigators have proposed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an appropriate invertebrate model. Therefore, four known neurotoxic compounds (positive compounds: chlorpyrifos, abamectin, atropine, and acrylamide) were chosen to verify the expected impacts on autonomic (locomotion, feeding, defecation) and sensory (thermal, chemical, and mechanical sensory perception) functions in C. elegans. This study is another step towards successfully establishing C. elegans as an alternative neurotoxicity model. By using this protocol, anatoxin-a adversely affected locomotive behavior and pharyngeal pumping frequency and, most strongly, chemotactic and thermotactic behavior, whereas MC-LR impacted locomotion, pumping, and mechanical behavior, but not chemical sensory behavior. Environmental samples can also be screened in this simple and fast way for neurotoxic characteristics. The filtrate of a Microcystis aeruginosa culture, known for its hepatotoxicity, also displayed mild neurotoxicity (modulated short-term thermotaxis). These results show the suitability of this assay for environmental cyanotoxin-containing samples. PMID:24776722

  2. Cyanobacterial Xenobiotics as Evaluated by a Caenorhabditis elegans Neurotoxicity Screening Test

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jingjuan; Saul, Nadine; Kochan, Cindy; Putschew, Anke; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong; Steinberg, Christian E. W.

    2014-01-01

    In fresh waters cyanobacterial blooms can produce a variety of toxins, such as microcystin variants (MCs) and anatoxin-a (ANA). ANA is a well-known neurotoxin, whereas MCs are hepatotoxic and, to a lesser degree, also neurotoxic. Neurotoxicity applies especially to invertebrates lacking livers. Current standardized neurotoxicity screening methods use rats or mice. However, in order to minimize vertebrate animal experiments as well as experimental time and effort, many investigators have proposed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an appropriate invertebrate model. Therefore, four known neurotoxic compounds (positive compounds: chlorpyrifos, abamectin, atropine, and acrylamide) were chosen to verify the expected impacts on autonomic (locomotion, feeding, defecation) and sensory (thermal, chemical, and mechanical sensory perception) functions in C. elegans. This study is another step towards successfully establishing C. elegans as an alternative neurotoxicity model. By using this protocol, anatoxin-a adversely affected locomotive behavior and pharyngeal pumping frequency and, most strongly, chemotactic and thermotactic behavior, whereas MC-LR impacted locomotion, pumping, and mechanical behavior, but not chemical sensory behavior. Environmental samples can also be screened in this simple and fast way for neurotoxic characteristics. The filtrate of a Microcystis aeruginosa culture, known for its hepatotoxicity, also displayed mild neurotoxicity (modulated short-term thermotaxis). These results show the suitability of this assay for environmental cyanotoxin-containing samples. PMID:24776722

  3. Predicting the acute neurotoxicity of diverse organic solvents using probabilistic neural networks based QSTR modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Basant, Nikita; Gupta, Shikha; Singh, Kunwar P

    2016-03-01

    Organic solvents are widely used chemicals and the neurotoxic properties of some are well established. In this study, we established nonlinear qualitative and quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (STR) models for predicting neurotoxic classes and neurotoxicity of structurally diverse solvents in rodent test species following OECD guideline principles for model development. Probabilistic neural network (PNN) based qualitative and generalized regression neural network (GRNN) based quantitative STR models were constructed using neurotoxicity data from rat and mouse studies. Further, interspecies correlation based quantitative activity-activity relationship (QAAR) and global QSTR models were also developed using the combined data set of both rodent species for predicting the neurotoxicity of solvents. The constructed models were validated through deriving several statistical coefficients for the test data and the prediction and generalization abilities of these models were evaluated. The qualitative STR models (rat and mouse) yielded classification accuracies of 92.86% in the test data sets, whereas, the quantitative STRs yielded correlation (R(2)) of >0.93 between the measured and model predicted toxicity values in both the test data (rat and mouse). The prediction accuracies of the QAAR (R(2) 0.859) and global STR (R(2) 0.945) models were comparable to those of the independent local STR models. The results suggest the ability of the developed QSTR models to reliably predict binary neurotoxicity classes and the endpoint neurotoxicities of the structurally diverse organic solvents. PMID:26721664

  4. The newly synthesized pool of dopamine determines the severity of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David M.; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has long been implicated as a participant in the neurotoxicity caused by methamphetamine (METH), yet, its mechanism of action in this regard is not fully understood. Treatment of mice with the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) inhibitor α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) lowers striatal cytoplasmic DA content by 55% and completely protects against METH-induced damage to DA nerve terminals. Reserpine, by disrupting vesicle amine storage, depletes striatal DA by more than 95% and accentuates METH-induced neurotoxicity. L-DOPA reverses the protective effect of AMPT against METH and enhances neurotoxicity in animals with intact TH. Inhibition of MAO-A by clorgyline increases pre-synaptic DA content and enhances METH striatal neurotoxicity. In all conditions of altered pre-synaptic DA homeostasis, increases or decreases in METH neurotoxicity paralleled changes in striatal microglial activation. Mice treated with AMPT, L-DOPA, or clorgyline + METH developed hyperthermia to the same extent as animals treated with METH alone, whereas mice treated with reserpine + METH were hypothermic, suggesting that the effects of alterations in cytoplasmic DA on METH neurotoxicity were not strictly mediated by changes in core body temperature. Taken together, the present data reinforce the notion that METH-induced release of DA from the newly synthesized pool of transmitter into the extracellular space plays an essential role in drug-induced striatal neurotoxicity and microglial activation. Subtle alterations in intracellular DA content can lead to significant enhancement of METH neurotoxicity. Our results also suggest that reactants derived from METH-induced oxidation of released DA may serve as neuronal signals that lead to microglial activation early in the neurotoxic process associated with METH. PMID:18088364

  5. (/sup 3/H)-dihydrotestosterone in catecholamine neurons of rat brain stem: combined localization by autoradiography and formaldehyde-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Heritage, A.S.; Stumpf, W.E.; Sar, M.; Grant, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    A combined formaldehyde-induced fluorescence (FIF)-autoradiography procedure was used to determine how and where the androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), is associated with catecholamine systems in the rat brain. With this dual localization method, (/sup 3/H)-DHT target sites can be visualized in relation to catecholamine perikarya and terminals. In the hindbrain, catecholamine neurons adjacent to the fourth ventricle (group A4), the nucleus (n.) olivaris superior (group A5), the n. parabranchialis medialis (group A7), and in the locus coeruleus (group A6) and subcoeruleal regions, as well as in the substantia grisea centralis, concentrate (/sup 3/H)-DHT in their nuclei. (/sup 3/H)-DHT target neurons appear to be innervated by numerous catecholamine terminals in the following hindbrain regions: n. motorius dorsalis nervi vagi, n. tractus solitarii, n. commissuralis, n. raphe pallidus, n. olivaris inferior, the ventrolateral portion of the substantia grisea centralis, n. cuneiformis, and the ventrolateral reticular formation in the caudal mesencephalon. In the forebrain, (/sup 3/H)-DHT concentrates in nuclei of catecholamine neurons located in the n. arcuatus and n. periventricularis (group A12). In addition, (/sup 3/H)-DHT target neurons appear to be innervated by numerous catecholamine terminals in the following forebrain regions: n. periventricularis rotundocellularis, n. paraventricularis, n. dorsomedialis, n. periventricularis, area retrochiasmatica, n. interstititalis striae terminalis (ventral portion), and n. amygdaloideus centralis. The disclosure of a morphologic association between (/sup 3/H)-DHT target sites and certain brain catecholamine systems suggests a close functional interdependence between androgens and catecholamines.

  6. [The characteristics of the effect of catecholamines on the relaxation of ventricular myocardium in warm-blooded and cold-blooded animals].

    PubMed

    Bliakhman, F A; Izakov, V Ia; Shkliar, T F

    1989-12-01

    The relaxation of the frog myocardium is decelerated by addition of adrenaline (10(-8)-10(-6) M) into the perfusion solution. The catecholamines in low concentrations up to 5.10(-8) M decelerate the relaxation, and in higher concentrations accelerate the drop of mechanical tension in capillary muscles of the cat ventricular myocardium. The catecholamines effects exerted upon the relaxation of myocardium seem to depend on a cooperative interaction among the calcium-troponine complexes at the actine filaments. PMID:2628029

  7. Real-time monitoring of electrically evoked catecholamine signals in the songbird striatum using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amanda R.; Garris, Paul A.; Casto, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry is a powerful technique for monitoring rapid changes in extracellular neurotransmitter levels in the brain. In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry has been used extensively in mammalian models to characterize dopamine signals in both anesthetized and awake preparations, but has yet to be applied to a non-mammalian vertebrate. The goal of this study was to establish in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a songbird, the European starling, to facilitate real-time measurements of extracellular catecholamine levels in the avian striatum. In urethane-anesthetized starlings, changes in catecholamine levels were evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and measured at carbon-fiber microelectrodes positioned in the medial and lateral striata. Catecholamines were elicited by different stimulations, including trains related to phasic dopamine signaling in the rat, and were analyzed to quantify presynaptic mechanisms governing exocytotic release and neuronal uptake. Evoked extracellular catecholamine dynamics, maximal amplitude of the evoked catecholamine signal, and parameters for catecholamine release and uptake did not differ between striatal regions and were similar to those determined for dopamine in the rat dorsomedial striatum under similar conditions. Chemical identification of measured catecholamine by its voltammogram was consistent with the presence of both dopamine and norepinephrine in striatal tissue content. However, the high ratio of dopamine to norepinephrine in tissue content and the greater sensitivity of the carbon-fiber microelectrode to dopamine compared to norepinephrine favored the measurement of dopamine. Thus, converging evidence suggests that dopamine was the predominate analyte of the electrically evoked catecholamine signal measured in the striatum by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Overall, comparisons between the characteristics of these evoked signals suggested a similar presynaptic regulation of

  8. Real-time monitoring of electrically evoked catecholamine signals in the songbird striatum using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda R; Garris, Paul A; Casto, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry is a powerful technique for monitoring rapid changes in extracellular neurotransmitter levels in the brain. In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry has been used extensively in mammalian models to characterize dopamine signals in both anesthetized and awake preparations, but has yet to be applied to a non-mammalian vertebrate. The goal of this study was to establish in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a songbird, the European starling, to facilitate real-time measurements of extracellular catecholamine levels in the avian striatum. In urethane-anesthetized starlings, changes in catecholamine levels were evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and measured at carbon-fiber microelectrodes positioned in the medial and lateral striata. Catecholamines were elicited by different stimulations, including trains related to phasic dopamine signaling in the rat, and were analyzed to quantify presynaptic mechanisms governing exocytotic release and neuronal uptake. Evoked extracellular catecholamine dynamics, maximal amplitude of the evoked catecholamine signal, and parameters for catecholamine release and uptake did not differ between striatal regions and were similar to those determined for dopamine in the rat dorsomedial striatum under similar conditions. Chemical identification of measured catecholamine by its voltammogram was consistent with the presence of both dopamine and norepinephrine in striatal tissue content. However, the high ratio of dopamine to norepinephrine in tissue content and the greater sensitivity of the carbon-fiber microelectrode to dopamine compared to norepinephrine favored the measurement of dopamine. Thus, converging evidence suggests that dopamine was the predominate analyte of the electrically evoked catecholamine signal measured in the striatum by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Overall, comparisons between the characteristics of these evoked signals suggested a similar presynaptic regulation of

  9. Effects of psychological and physical covariates on plasma catecholamines in borderline hypertensives and offspring of hypertensive parents.

    PubMed

    Perini, C; Müller, F B; Rauchfleisch, U; Battegay, R; Bühler, F R

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of plasma catecholamine measurements may be influenced by psychological and physical factors. Therefore, catecholamine concentrations were adjusted for between-subject differences by the following possible confounding factors, i.e. body-mass index, individual maximal physical work capacity, urinary sodium excretion rates and anxiety score. Subjects were 24 borderline essential hypertensives, aged 18-24 years, 50 age-matched normotensive offspring of hypertensive parents and 49 controls with no family history of hypertension studied at rest and during mental stressors (Stroop colour-word conflict test, mental arithmetic). Borderline hypertensives had consistently higher adjusted venous noradrenaline concentrations than control subjects (p less than 0.05). Adjusted plasma adrenaline concentrations were higher in borderline hypertensive subjects than in offspring of hypertensive parents during supine rest. Despite its limitations, venous plasma noradrenaline concentrations when adjusted for work capacity, body-mass, sodium excretion and anxiety suggest enhanced sympatho-neural activity in young borderline essential hypertensives. PMID:2347092

  10. Integration of a contactless conductivity detector into a commercial capillary cassette. Detection of inorganic cations and catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Pasi S; Jussila, Matti; Sirén, Heli; Palonen, Sami; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2003-03-21

    A contactless conductivity detector integrated into the capillary cassette of Agilent (3D)CE equipment is described. The detector is user-friendly, compact and easily modified. The UV detector of the (3D)CE equipment is available parallel with the contactless conductivity detector increasing the detection power. Two electrolyte solutions, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid-histidine solution (20 mM, pH 6.0) and ammonium acetate (10 mM, pH 4.0), were used as the separation media for inorganic cations and organic catecholamines, respectively. The detection limit for all metal cations except barium was under 0.5 mg/l, and that for four catecholamines was ca. 10 mg/l. This last value was the same order of magnitude as achieved with parallel UV detection. PMID:12685582

  11. Reversible neurotoxicity following hyperfractionated radiation therapy of brain stem glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Griebel, M.; Friedman, H.S.; Halperin, E.C.; Wiener, M.D.; Marks, L.; Oakes, W.J.; Hoffman, J.M.; DeLong, G.R.; Schold, S.C.; Hockenberger, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Two patients with brain stem gliomas were treated with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFR) (7,020 and 7,560 cGy, respectively). Despite initial clinical improvement during irradiation, both patients demonstrated clinical deterioration approximately 3 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a progressive increase in distribution of abnormal brain stem signal consistent with either tumor or edema. {sup 18}FDG positron emission tomography (PET) was obtained in one patient and demonstrated a hypermetabolic lesion at diagnosis and a hypometabolic lesion at the time of clinical deterioration postirradiation. Management with a tapering dose of dexamethasone alone resulted in marked clinical (both patients) and radiographic (one patient) improvement, allowing reduction or discontinuation of this medication. These results suggest that patients with brain stem tumors demonstrating clinical and radiographic evidence of progressive tumor shortly after completion of HFR should be initially managed conservatively with dexamethasone, since these findings may be manifestations of reversible radiation-related neurotoxicity.

  12. Hemicholinium mustard derivatives: preliminary assessment of cholinergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tagari, P C; Maysinger, D; Cuello, A C

    1986-07-01

    We have attempted to design novel neurotoxins based on the use of hemicholinium derivatives. Three compounds were tested for their neurochemical effects on cholinergic, gabaergic and catecholaminergic markers in the hippocampus, striatum and cortex following intracerebroventricular administration. The effects were compared with those of the non-specific alkylating agent (nitrogen mustard) and the previously reported ethylcholine mustard aziridinium ion (AF 64A). The results indicate that only one of these derivatives (HcM-9) exhibits comparable neurotoxic effects on cholinergic markers with a similar pattern of specificity to that of AF 64A. In addition, HcM-9 showed less overall toxicity, this being reflected in a higher survival rate. The present results indicate that hemicholinium derivatives could be good substrates for further molecular modifications, thus a step towards the design of a more specific cholinergic neurotoxin. PMID:3748277

  13. A plastic stabilizer dibutyltin dilaurate induces subchronic neurotoxicity in rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Minghua; Song, Peilin; Li, Na; Li, Xuejun; Chen, Jiajun

    2012-01-01

    Dibutyltin dilaurate functions as a stabilizer for polyvinyl chloride. In this study, experimental rats were intragastrically administered 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg dibutyltin dilaurate to model sub-chronic poisoning. After exposure, our results showed the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase decreased in rat brain tissue, while the malondialdehyde and nitric oxide content, as well as nitric oxide synthase activity in rat brain tissue increased. The cell cycle in the right parietal cortex was disordered and the rate of apoptosis increased. DNA damage was aggravated in the cerebral cortex, and the ultrastructure of the right parietal cortex tissues was altered. The above changes became more apparent with exposure to increasing doses of dibutyltin dilaurate. Our experimental findings confirmed the neurotoxicity of dibutyltin dilaurate in rat brain tissues, and demonstrated that the poisoning was dose-dependent. PMID:25538742

  14. The neurotoxicity of environmental aluminum is still an issue.

    PubMed

    Bondy, Stephen C

    2010-09-01

    Evidence for the neurotoxicity of extended exposure to low levels of aluminum salts is described using an animal model treated with aluminum at low levels reflecting those found in some water supplies. Emphasis is given to the potential role of aluminum in acceleration and promotion of some indices characteristic of brain aging. These hallmarks include the appearance of excess levels of inflammation in specific brain areas. Aluminum salts can increase levels of glial activation, inflammatory cytokines and amyloid precursor protein within the brain. Both normal brain aging and to a greater extent, Alzheimer's disease are associated with elevated basal levels of markers for inflammation. These are not attributable to obvious exogenous stimuli and may reflect the lifespan history of the organism's immune responses. It is possible that aluminum salts can act as a subtle promoter of such apparently unprovoked responses. PMID:20553758

  15. Assessment of Adolescent Neurotoxicity: Rationale and Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Linda Patia

    2007-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue of Neurotoxicology and Teratology on “Risk of neurobehavioral toxicity in adolescence” begins by broadly considering the ontogeny and phylogeny of adolescence, and the potential value of animal models of adolescence. Major findings from the emerging neuroscience of adolescence are then highlighted to establish the importance of studies of adolescent neurotoxicity. A variety of methodological issues that are of particular relevance to adolescent exposures are then discussed. These include consideration of pharmacokinetic factors, inclusion of other-aged comparison group(s), and issues involving timing, route of administration, and exposure-induced alterations in growth rate. Despite such methodological challenges, research to determine whether adolescence is a time of increased vulnerability (or greater resiliency) to specific drugs and environmental toxicants is progressing rapidly, as exemplified by the work presented in the articles of this special issue. PMID:17222532

  16. In vitro oxidation of MPTP by primate neural tissue: A potential model of MPTP neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, J N; Kelner, L; Hanselman, D; Shih, M C; Markey, S P

    1985-01-01

    The compound 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) produces a parkinsonian syndrome in humans and primates. We have previously found that metabolism of MPTP to a quaternary species is necessary for the expression of its neurotoxic effects. We now report that the metabolism of MPTP occurs in primate brain tissue in vitro , and present a model of MPTP neurotoxicity which incorporates our findings to date. Since the toxicity of MPTP is metabolism dependent, we propose that the in vitro metabolism of MPTP by brain tissue should provide a useful model for studying selected aspects of MPTP neurotoxicity. PMID:20492913

  17. A review on potential neurotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bin; Liu, Jia; Feng, Xiaoli; Wei, Limin; Shao, Longquan

    2015-08-01

    As the rapid development of nanotechnology in the past three decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), for their peculiar physicochemical properties, are widely applied in consumer products, food additives, cosmetics, drug carriers, and so on. However, little is known about their potential exposure and neurotoxic effects. Once NPs are unintentionally exposed to human beings, they could be absorbed, and then accumulated in the brain regions by passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or through the nose-to-brain pathway, potentially leading to dysfunctions of central nerve system (CNS). Besides, NPs may affect the brain development of embryo by crossing the placental barrier. A few in vivo and in vitro researches have demonstrated that the morphology and function of neuronal or glial cells could be impaired by TiO2 NPs which might induce cell necrosis. Cellular components, such as mitochondrial, lysosome, and cytoskeleton, could also be influenced as well. The recognition ability, spatial memory, and learning ability of TiO2 NPs-treated rodents were significantly impaired, which meant that accumulation of TiO2 NPs in the brain could lead to neurodegeneration. However, conclusions obtained from those studies were not consistent with each other as researchers may choose different exp