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Sample records for neurotransmitters serotonin dopamine

  1. Dissociable effects of dopamine and serotonin on reversal learning.

    PubMed

    den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Daw, Nathaniel D; Fernandez, Guillén; Elshout, Joris A; Rijpkema, Mark; Hoogman, Martine; Franke, Barbara; Cools, Roshan

    2013-11-20

    Serotonin and dopamine are speculated to subserve motivationally opponent functions, but this hypothesis has not been directly tested. We studied the role of these neurotransmitters in probabilistic reversal learning in nearly 700 individuals as a function of two polymorphisms in the genes encoding the serotonin and dopamine transporters (SERT: 5HTTLPR plus rs25531; DAT1 3'UTR VNTR). A double dissociation was observed. The SERT polymorphism altered behavioral adaptation after losses, with increased lose-shift associated with L' homozygosity, while leaving unaffected perseveration after reversal. In contrast, the DAT1 genotype affected the influence of prior choices on perseveration, while leaving lose-shifting unaltered. A model of reinforcement learning captured the dose-dependent effect of DAT1 genotype, such that an increasing number of 9R-alleles resulted in a stronger reliance on previous experience and therefore reluctance to update learned associations. These data provide direct evidence for doubly dissociable effects of serotonin and dopamine systems. PMID:24267657

  2. Optogenetic Control of Serotonin and Dopamine Release in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic control of neurotransmitter release is an elegant method to investigate neurobiological mechanisms with millisecond precision and cell type-specific resolution. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) can be expressed in specific neurons, and blue light used to activate those neurons. Previously, in Drosophila, neurotransmitter release and uptake have been studied after continuous optical illumination. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulsed optical stimulation trains on serotonin or dopamine release in larval ventral nerve cords. In larvae with ChR2 expressed in serotonergic neurons, low-frequency stimulations produced a distinct, steady-state response while high-frequency patterns were peak shaped. Evoked serotonin release increased with increasing stimulation frequency and then plateaued. The steady-state response and the frequency dependence disappeared after administering the uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, indicating that uptake plays a significant role in regulating the extracellular serotonin concentration. Pulsed stimulations were also used to evoke dopamine release in flies expressing ChR2 in dopaminergic neurons and similar frequency dependence was observed. Release due to pulsed optical stimulations was modeled to determine the uptake kinetics. For serotonin, Vmax was 0.54 ± 0.07 ?M/s and Km was 0.61 ± 0.04 ?M; and for dopamine, Vmax was 0.12 ± 0.03 ?M/s and Km was 0.45 ± 0.13 ?M. The amount of serotonin released per stimulation pulse was 4.4 ± 1.0 nM, and the amount of dopamine was 1.6 ± 0.3 nM. Thus, pulsed optical stimulations can be used to mimic neuronal firing patterns and will allow Drosophila to be used as a model system for studying mechanisms underlying neurotransmission. PMID:24849718

  3. 2002 Special issue Opponent interactions between serotonin and dopamine

    E-print Network

    Dayan, Peter

    2002 Special issue Opponent interactions between serotonin and dopamine Nathaniel D. Dawa,*, Sham raphe serotonin system and the ventral tegmental and substantia nigra dopamine system may act as mutual opponents. In the light of the temporal difference model of the involvement of the dopamine system in reward

  4. [Dopamine and depression: the forgotten neurotransmitter].

    PubMed

    Pitchot, W; Scantamburlo, G; Ansseau, M

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a major role for dopamine in the pathophysiology of depression. In particular, affective disorders tend to be associated with a decrease in dopaminergic function. Moreover, some data show that antidepressants increase the activity of dopaminergic synapses at the mesolimbic level. In fact, the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system appears to be an extremely interesting target for the study of the pathophysiology of depression and for the development of antidepressive strategies. Recent developments of molecular biology and new imaging techniques provide interesting perspectives that could bring a better comprehension of the real implication of dopamine in depression. PMID:18669208

  5. Antihistamine effect on synaptosomal uptake of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos, J.

    1980-01-01

    A study on the effects of five H1 and H2 antihistamines on the synaptosomal uptake of serotonin (5HT), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) is presented. Brain homogenates from female rats were incubated in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer solution in the presence of one of three radioactive neurotransmitters, and one of the five antihistamines. Low concentrations of pyrilamine competitively inhibited 5HT uptake, had little effect on NE uptake, and no effect on DA uptake. Promethazine, diphenhydramine, metiamide, and cimetidine had no effect on 5HT or DA uptake at the same concentration. Diphenhydramine had a small inhibitory effect on NE uptake. It is concluded that pyrilamine is a selective and potent competitive inhibitor of 5HT uptake at concentrations between .05 and .5 micromolars.

  6. The Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship of Mixed Serotonin, Norepinephrine and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengming; Yang, Ji; Skolnick, Phil

    The evolution of antidepressants over the past four decades has involved the replacement of drugs with a multiplicity of effects (e.g., TCAs) by those with selective actions (i.e., SSRIs). This strategy was employed to reduce the adverse effects of TCAs, largely by eliminating interactions with certain neurotransmitters or receptors. Although these more selective compounds may be better tolerated by patients, selective drugs, specifically SSRIs, are not superior to older drugs in treating depressed patients as measured by response and remission rates. It may be an advantage to increase synaptic levels of both serotonin and norepinephrine, as in the case of dual uptake inhibitors like duloxetine and venlafaxine. An important recent development has been the emergence of the triple-uptake inhibitors (TUIs/SNDRIs), which inhibit the uptake of the three neurotransmitters most closely linked to depression: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that a drug inhibiting the reuptake of all three of these neurotransmitters could produce more rapid onset of action and greater efficacy than traditional antidepressants. This review will detail the medicinal chemistry involved in the design, synthesis and discovery of mixed serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine transporter uptake inhibitors.

  7. Using the neurotransmitter serotonin to target imaging agents to glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sturzu, Alexander; Sheikh, Sumbla; Klose, Uwe; Echner, Hartmut; Kalbacher, Hubert; Deeg, Martin; Nägele, Thomas; Horger, Marius; Ernemann, Ulrike; Heckl, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is involved in numerous bodily functions via seven different serotonin receptor subfamilies. Serotonin plays a role in gastrointestinal functions like intestinal secretion or peristalsis and neuropsychiatric events like depression or migraine. One of these subtypes has been found on glioblastoma cells, inducing growth promotion. In our study we attempted to target imaging agents to glioblastoma cells via the serotonin receptor. For this we coupled serotonin to the fluorescent dye rhodamine and the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium (Gd)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). The cellular uptake, cytotoxicity and detection sensitivity of the conjugates were evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), cell growth analysis, flow cytometry and magnetic resonance relaxometry on U373 human glioblastoma cells. Receptor-dependency of the uptake was confirmed by competition experiments with excess of unmarked serotonin. Cellular uptake of the conjugates was found in CLSM, magnetic resonance relaxometry and flow cytometry experiments.CLSM revealed the cytoplasmic character of the uptake. In cell growth analysis experiments no adverse effect of either conjugate on the cells was observed. Competition experiments performed with the conjugates and unmarked serotonin showed decreased conjugate uptake compared to the experiments without competition. In conclusion the neurotransmitter serotonin could be successfully used to target imaging agents into human glioblastoma cells. This makes it of interest for future glioblastoma imaging methods. PMID:22212740

  8. Morphology of salivary gland and distribution of dopamine and serotonin on red palm weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayah, A. S. Nurul; Wahida, O. Nurul; Shafinaz, M. N. Norefrina; Idris, A. G.

    2013-11-01

    The Red Palm Weevil (RPW), Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier, 1790) is insect pest to plants of the family Palmaceae. No study has been reported on the digestive mechanism of Red Palm Weevil (RPW). Salivary glands are responsible in the feeding regulation of insect while serotonin and dopamine play a significant role in the regulation of this gland. It is great to see the morphology of the salivary gland and how dopamine and serotonin possibly play their role in this gland. Two variation of RPW, striped and spotted RPW were chosen. The morphology of the gland of both RPW variants examined by using light microscopy was found to be a tubular type. Immunohistochemical analysis conducted showed that serotonin and dopamine in both variations did not innervate the glands suggesting they are not act as neurotransmitter. However, it can be detected on few areas within the glands. This suggests that serotonin and dopamine may act as a hormone because there is no evidence on the nerve fibers. The role of these biogenic amines in the salivary gland of RPW needs further investigation. Hopefully the data would help in understanding the mechanism of salivary glands control by biogenic amines in RPW specifically and insects with sucking mouthpart generally.

  9. Opponent Interactions between Serotonin and Dopamine Nathaniel D Daw Sham Kakade Peter Dayan

    E-print Network

    Dayan, Peter

    Opponent Interactions between Serotonin and Dopamine Nathaniel D Daw #3; Sham Kakade Peter Dayan@cs.cmu.edu 412 268 2582 (phone) 412 268 3608 (fax) Running title: 5HT and Dopamine Opponency Section: Neuroscience and Neuropsychology #12; Opponent Interactions between Serotonin and Dopamine Abstract

  10. A conserved asparagine residue in transmembrane segment 1 (TM1) of serotonin transporter dictates chloride-coupled neurotransmitter transport.

    PubMed

    Henry, L Keith; Iwamoto, Hideki; Field, Julie R; Kaufmann, Kristian; Dawson, Eric S; Jacobs, Miriam T; Adams, Chelsea; Felts, Bruce; Zdravkovic, Igor; Armstrong, Vanessa; Combs, Steven; Solis, Ernesto; Rudnick, Gary; Noskov, Sergei Y; DeFelice, Louis J; Meiler, Jens; Blakely, Randy D

    2011-09-01

    Na(+)- and Cl(-)-dependent uptake of neurotransmitters via transporters of the SLC6 family, including the human serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), is critical for efficient synaptic transmission. Although residues in the human serotonin transporter involved in direct Cl(-) coordination of human serotonin transport have been identified, the role of Cl(-) in the transport mechanism remains unclear. Through a combination of mutagenesis, chemical modification, substrate and charge flux measurements, and molecular modeling studies, we reveal an unexpected role for the highly conserved transmembrane segment 1 residue Asn-101 in coupling Cl(-) binding to concentrative neurotransmitter uptake. PMID:21730057

  11. Quantitation of dopamine, serotonin and adenosine content in a tissue punch from a brain slice using capillary electrophoresis with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry detection

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Huaifang; Pajski, Megan L.; Ross, Ashley E.; Venton, B. Jill

    2013-01-01

    Methods to determine neurochemical concentrations in small samples of tissue are needed to map interactions among neurotransmitters. In particular, correlating physiological measurements of neurotransmitter release and the tissue content in a small region would be valuable. HPLC is the standard method for tissue content analysis but it requires microliter samples and the detector often varies by the class of compound being quantified; thus detecting molecules from different classes can be difficult. In this paper, we develop capillary electrophoresis with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry detection (CE-FSCV) for analysis of dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine content in tissue punches from rat brain slices. Using field-amplified sample stacking, the limit of detection was 5 nM for dopamine, 10 nM for serotonin, and 50 nM for adenosine. Neurotransmitters could be measured from a tissue punch as small as 7 µg (7 nL) of tissue, three orders of magnitude smaller than a typical HPLC sample. Tissue content analysis of punches in successive slices through the striatum revealed higher dopamine but lower adenosine content in the anterior striatum. Stimulated dopamine release was measured in a brain slice, then a tissue punch collected from the recording region. Dopamine content and release had a correlation coefficient of 0.71, which indicates much of the variance in stimulated release is due to variance in tissue content. CE-FSCV should facilitate measurements of tissue content in nanoliter samples, leading to a better understanding of how diseases or drugs affect dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine content. PMID:23795210

  12. Dopamine and serotonin release in the nucleus accumbens during starvation-induced hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Linda A W; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Korte, S Mechiel; Adan, Roger A H

    2009-05-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model for anorexia nervosa (AN). By scheduled feeding and voluntary wheel running, it mimics severe body weight loss and increased physical activity in AN. Pharmacological, genetic and imaging studies implicate dopamine and serotonin in the regulation of feeding behavior, food-anticipatory activity, and food reward. Previous studies propose that the nucleus accumbens (NAc) plays an important role in these food-related processes. Here we determined dopamine and serotonin levels in the NAc upon exposure to the ABA model. Surprisingly, the release of dopamine and serotonin in the NAc were not increased during the initiation of food-anticipatory behavior in ABA rats. Dopamine release in the NAc was increased during feeding behavior in ABA rats. During ABA, levels of serotonin were low and circadian activity is blunted. We conclude that during the early stages of development of food-anticipatory activity, increased dopamine does not trigger hyperactivity. PMID:19181487

  13. Neurotransmitter and psychostimulant recognition by the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kevin H; Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-05-21

    Na(+)/Cl(-)-coupled biogenic amine transporters are the primary targets of therapeutic and abused drugs, ranging from antidepressants to the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines, and to their cognate substrates. Here we determine X-ray crystal structures of the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter (dDAT) bound to its substrate dopamine, a substrate analogue 3,4-dichlorophenethylamine, the psychostimulants d-amphetamine and methamphetamine, or to cocaine and cocaine analogues. All ligands bind to the central binding site, located approximately halfway across the membrane bilayer, in close proximity to bound sodium and chloride ions. The central binding site recognizes three chemically distinct classes of ligands via conformational changes that accommodate varying sizes and shapes, thus illustrating molecular principles that distinguish substrates from inhibitors in biogenic amine transporters. PMID:25970245

  14. Neurotransmitter and psychostimulant recognition by the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kevin H.; Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Na+/Cl?-coupled biogenic amine transporters are the primary targets of therapeutic and abused drugs, ranging from antidepressants to the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines, and to their cognate substrates. Here we determine x-ray crystal structures of the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter (dDAT) bound to its substrate dopamine (DA), a substrate analogue 3,4-dichlorophenethylamine, the psychostimulants D-amphetamine, methamphetamine, or to cocaine and cocaine analogues. All ligands bind to the central binding site, located approximately halfway across the membrane bilayer, in close proximity to bound sodium and chloride ions. The central binding site recognizes three chemically distinct classes of ligands via conformational changes that accommodate varying sizes and shapes, thus illustrating molecular principles that distinguish substrates from inhibitors in biogenic amine transporters. PMID:25970245

  15. The Selective Serotonin-2A Receptor Antagonist M100907 Reverses Behavioral Deficits in Dopamine Transporter

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. MiceThe Selective Serotonin-2A Receptor Antagonist M100907 Reverses Behavioral Deficits in Dopamine transporter (DAT) model behavioral deficits that simulate the above conditions. As novel treatment strategies

  16. Unfaithful neurotransmitter transporters: focus on serotonin uptake and implications for antidepressant efficacy.

    PubMed

    Daws, Lynette C

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic amine transporters for serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine (SERT, NET and DAT respectively), are the key players terminating transmission of these amines in the central nervous system by their high-affinity uptake. They are also major targets for many antidepressant drugs. Interestingly however, drugs targeted to a specific transporter do not appear to be as clinically efficacious as those that block two or all three of these transporters. A growing body of literature, reviewed here, supports the idea that promiscuity among these transporters (the uptake of multiple amines in addition to their "native" transmitter) may account for improved therapeutic effects of dual and triple uptake blockers. However, even these drugs do not provide effective treatment outcomes for all individuals. An emerging literature suggests that "non-traditional" transporters such as organic cation transporters (OCT) and the plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) may contribute to the less than hoped for efficacy of currently prescribed uptake inhibitors. OCT and PMAT are capable of clearing biogenic amines from extracellular fluid and may serve to buffer the effects of frontline antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. In addition, polymorphisms that occur in the genes encoding the transporters can lead to variation in transporter expression and function (e.g. the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region; 5-HTTLPR) and can have profound effects on treatment outcome. This may be accounted for, in part, by compensatory adaptations in other transporters. This review synthesizes the existing literature, focusing on serotonin to illustrate and revive a model for the rationale design of improved antidepressants. PMID:19022290

  17. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  18. Comonitoring of adenosine and dopamine using the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System: proof of principle

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Young-Min; Chang, Su-Youne; Tye, Susannah J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-01-01

    Object The authors of previous studies have demonstrated that local adenosine efflux may contribute to the therapeutic mechanism of action of thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) for essential tremor. Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of DBS-targeted regions may thus advance functional neurosurgical procedures by identifying candidate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators involved in the physiological effects of DBS. This would in turn permit the development of a method of chemically guided placement of DBS electrodes in vivo. Designed in compliance with FDA-recognized standards for medical electrical device safety, the authors report on the utility of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for real-time comonitoring of electrical stimulation–evoked adenosine and dopamine efflux in vivo, utilizing fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a polyacrylonitrile-based (T-650) carbon fiber microelectrode (CFM). Methods The WINCS was used for FSCV, which consisted of a triangle wave scanned between ?0.4 and +1.5 V at a rate of 400 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages applied to the CFM were with respect to an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single T-650 carbon fiber (r = 2.5 ?m) into a glass capillary and pulling to a microscopic tip using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by ? 50 ?m. Proof of principle tests included in vitro measurements of adenosine and dopamine, as well as in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring adenosine and dopamine efflux in the dorsomedial caudate putamen evoked by high-frequency electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra. Results The WINCS provided reliable, high-fidelity measurements of adenosine efflux. Peak oxidative currents appeared at +1.5 V and at +1.0 V for adenosine, separate from the peak oxidative current at +0.6 V for dopamine. The WINCS detected subsecond adenosine and dopamine efflux in the caudate putamen at an implanted CFM during high-frequency stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra. Both in vitro and in vivo testing demonstrated that WINCS can detect adenosine in the presence of other easily oxidizable neurochemicals such as dopamine comparable to the detection abilities of a conventional hardwired electrochemical system for FSCV. Conclusions Altogether, these results demonstrate that WINCS is well suited for wireless monitoring of high-frequency stimulation-evoked changes in brain extracellular concentrations of adenosine. Clinical applications of selective adenosine measurements may prove important to the future development of DBS technology. PMID:19731995

  19. The antipsychotic aripiprazole induces antinociceptive effects: Possible role of peripheral dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Santos, Ana F; Ferreira, Renata C M; Duarte, Igor D; Aguiar, Daniele C; Romero, Thiago R L; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2015-10-15

    Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic that acts by multiple mechanisms, including partial agonism at dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors. Since these neurotransmitters also modulate pain and analgesia, we tested the hypothesis that systemic or local administration of aripiprazole induces antinociceptive responses. Systemic aripiprazole (0.1-10mg/kg; i.p.) injection in mice inhibited formalin-induced paw licking and PGE2-induced hyperalgesia in the paw pressure test. This effect was mimicked by intra-plantar administration (12.5-100µg/paw) in the ipsi, but not contralateral, paw. The peripheral action of aripiprazole (100µg/paw) was reversed by haloperidol (0.1-10µg/paw), suggesting the activation of dopamine receptors as a possible mechanism. Accordingly, quinpirole (25-100µg/paw), a full agonist at D2/D3 receptors, also reduced nociceptive responses.. In line with the partial agoniztic activity of aripiprazole, low dose of this compound inhibited the effect of quinpirole (both at 25µg/paw). Finally, peripheral administration of NAN-190 (0.1-10?g/paw), a 5-HT1A antagonist, also prevented aripiprazole-induced antinociception. In conclusion, systemic or local administration of aripiprazole induces antinociceptive effects. Similar to its antipsychotic activity, the possible peripheral mechanism involves dopamine D2 and serotoninergic 5-HT1A receptors. Aripiprazole and other dopaminergic modulators should be further investigated as new treatments for certain types of pain. PMID:26325094

  20. Understanding the redox coupling between quantum dots and the neurotransmitter dopamine in hybrid self-assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xin; Makarov, Nikolay S.; Wang, Wentao; Palui, Goutam; Robel, Istvan; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2015-03-01

    Interactions between luminescent fluorophores and redox active molecules often involve complex charge transfer processes, and have great ramifications in biology. Dopamine is a redox active neurotransmitter involved in a range of brain activities. We used steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence along with transient absorption bleach measurements, to probe the effects of changing the QD size and valence on the rate of photoluminescence quenching in QD-dopamine conjugates, when the pH of the medium was varied. In particular, we measured substantially larger quenching efficiencies, combined with more pronounced shortening in the PL lifetime decay when smaller size QDs and/or alkaline pH were used. Moreover, we found that changes in the nanocrystal size alter both the electron and hole relaxation of photoexcited QDs but with very different extents. For instance, a more pronounced change in the hole relaxation was recorded in alkaline buffers and for green-emitting QDs compared to their red-emitting counterparts. We attributed these results to the more favorable electron transfer pathway from the reduced form of the complex to the valence band of the QD. This process benefits from the combination of lower oxidation potential and larger energy mismatch in alkaline buffers and for green-emitting QDs. In comparison, the effects on the rate of electron transfer from excited QDs to dopamine are less affected by QD size. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms that drive charge transfer interactions and the ensuing quenching of QD emission in such assemblies.

  1. Implantable Microprobe with Arrayed Microsensors for Combined Amperometric Monitoring of the Neurotransmitters, Glutamate and Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Tina T.-C.

    2012-01-01

    An implantable, micromachined microprobe with a microsensor array for combined monitoring of the neurotransmitters, glutamate (Glut) and dopamine (DA), by constant potential amperometry has been created and characterized. Microprobe studies in vitro revealed Glut and DA microsensor sensitivities of 126±5 nA·?M?1·cm?2 and 3250±50 nA·?M?1·cm?2, respectively, with corresponding detection limits of 2.1±0.2 ?M and 62±8 nM, both at comparable ~1 sec response times. No diffusional interaction of H2O2 among arrayed microelectrodes was observed. Also, no responses from the electroactive interferents, ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), DOPA (a DA catabolite) or DOPAC (a DA precursor), over their respective physiological concentration ranges, were detected. The dual sensing microbe attributes of size, detection limit, sensitivity, response time and selectivity make it attractive for combined sensing of Glut and DA in vivo. PMID:23139647

  2. A role for Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 as integrators of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission in mental health.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2012-01-01

    Mental illnesses, such as bipolar disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, depression and schizophrenia are a major public health concern worldwide. Several pharmacologic agents acting on monoamine neurotransmission are used for the management of these disorders. However, there is still little understanding of the ultimate molecular mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effects of these drugs or their relations with disease etiology. Here I provide an overview of recent advances on the involvement of the signalling molecules Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) in the regulation of behaviour by the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT). I examine the possible participation of these signalling molecules to the effects of antidepressants, lithium and antipsychotics, as well as their possible contribution to mental disorders. Regulation of Akt and GSK3 may constitute an important signalling hub in the subcellular integration of 5-HT and DA neurotransmission. It may also provide a link between the action of these neurotransmitters and gene products, like disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and neuregulin (NRG), that are associated with increased risk for mental disorders. However, changes in Akt and GSK3 signalling are not restricted to a single disorder, and their contribution to specific behavioural symptoms or therapeutic effects may be modulated by broader changes in biologic contexts or signalling landscapes. Understanding these interactions may provide a better understanding of mental illnesses, leading to better efficacy of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:21711983

  3. Sexual side effects of serotonergic antidepressants: mediated by inhibition of serotonin on central dopamine release?

    PubMed

    Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Chan, Johnny S W; Olivier, Berend; Veening, Jan G; Millan, Mark J; Waldinger, Marcel D; Oosting, Ronald S

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction adversely affects the quality of life of antidepressant users and reduces compliance with treatment. Animal models provide an instructive approach for examining potential sexual side effects of novel drugs. This review discusses the stability and reproducibility of our standardized test procedure that assesses the acute, subchronic and chronic effects of psychoactive compounds in a 30 minute mating test. In addition, we present an overview of the effects of several different (putative) antidepressants on male rat sexual behavior, as tested in our standardized test procedure. By comparing the effects of these mechanistically distinct antidepressants (paroxetine, venlafaxine, bupropion, buspirone, DOV 216,303 and S32006), this review discusses the putative mechanism underlying sexual side effects of antidepressants and their normalization. This review shows that sexual behavior is mainly inhibited by antidepressants that increase serotonin neurotransmission via blockade of serotonin transporters, while those that mainly increase the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline are devoid of sexual side effects. Those sexual disturbances cannot be normalized by simultaneously increasing noradrenaline neurotransmission, but are normalized by increasing both noradrenaline and dopamine neurotransmission. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the sexual side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be mediated by their inhibitory effects on dopamine signaling in sex brain circuits. Clinical development of novel antidepressants should therefore focus on compounds that simultaneously increase both serotonin and dopamine signaling. PMID:24128918

  4. Dopamine and serotonin metabolism in response to chronic administration of fluvoxamine and haloperidol combined treatment.

    PubMed

    Chertkow, Y; Weinreb, O; Youdim, M B H; Silver, H

    2007-01-01

    Treating primary 'negative symptoms' of schizophrenia with a combination of a typical antipsychotic and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is more effective than with antipsychotic alone and is similar to the effect of the atypical antipsychotic, clozapine. The mechanism of this treatment combination is unknown and may involve changes in dopaminergic and serotonin systems. We studied dopamine and serotonin metabolism in different rat brain areas at 1.5 and 24 h after the last dosage of chronic treatment (30 days), with haloperidol plus fluvoxamine, each drug alone, and clozapine. Haloperidol-fluvoxamine combination, haloperidol, and clozapine treatments increased striatal and frontal cortex dopamine turnover and reduced striatal tyrosine hydroxylase activity at 1.5 h. At 24 h both dopamine turnover and tyrosine hydroxylase activity were reduced. Thus, in chronically treated animals, release of striatal dopamine increases following a drug pulse and returns to baseline by 24 h. Serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations were decreased at 1.5 h in haloperidol-fluvoxamine and clozapine groups and returned to normal levels by 24 h. A limited behavioral assessment showed that treatment with haloperidol plus fluvoxamine reduced motor activity compared to haloperidol, and increased sniffing compared to haloperidol, fluvoxamine and clozapine. These findings indicate that combining antipsychotic with SSRI results in specific changes in dopaminergic and serotonergic systems and in behavior. The possibility that these may be relevant to the mechanism underlying the clinical effectiveness of augmentation treatment warrant further study. PMID:17576515

  5. Focus on: neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, C Fernando; Puglia, Michael P; Zucca, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Neurotransmitter systems have been long recognized as important targets of the developmental actions of alcohol (i.e., ethanol). Short- and long-term effects of ethanol on amino acid (e.g., ?-aminobutyric acid and glutamate) and biogenic amine (e.g., serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmitters have been demonstrated in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Researchers have detected ethanol effects after exposure during developmental periods equivalent to the first, second, and third trimesters of human pregnancy. Results support the recommendation that pregnant women should abstain from drinking-even small quantities-as effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter systems have been detected at low levels of exposure. Recent studies have elucidated new mechanisms and/or consequences of the actions of ethanol on amino acid and biogenic amine neuro-transmitter systems. Alterations in these neurotransmitter systems could, in part, be responsible for many of the conditions associated with FASD, including (1) learning, memory, and attention deficits; (2) motor coordination impairments; (3) abnormal responsiveness to stress; and (4) increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as substance abuse and depression, and also neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and sudden infant death syndrome. However, future research is needed to conclusively establish a causal relationship between these conditions and developmental dysfunctions in neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23580048

  6. Enhanced serotonin and mesolimbic dopamine transmissions in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Sagheddu, Claudia; Aroni, Sonia; De Felice, Marta; Lecca, Salvatore; Luchicchi, Antonio; Melis, Miriam; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Romano, Rosaria; Palazzo, Enza; Guida, Francesca; Maione, Sabatino; Pistis, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In humans, affective consequences of neuropathic pain, ranging from depression to anxiety and anhedonia, severely impair quality of life and are a major disease burden, often requiring specific medications. Depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors have also been observed in animal models of peripheral nerve injury. Dysfunctions in central nervous system monoamine transmission have been hypothesized to underlie depressive and anxiety disorders in neuropathic pain. To assess whether these neurons display early changes in their activity that in the long-term might lead to chronicization, maladaptive plasticity and affective consequences, we carried out in vivo extracellular single unit recordings from serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and from dopamine neurons in ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain in rats. Extracellular dopamine levels and the expression of dopamine D1, D2 receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were measured in the nucleus accumbens. We report that, two weeks following peripheral nerve injury, discharge rate of serotonin DRN neurons and burst firing of VTA dopamine cells are enhanced, when compared with sham-operated animals. We also observed higher extracellular dopamine levels and reduced expression of D2, but not D1, receptors and TH in the nucleus accumbens. Our study confirms that peripheral neuropathy induces changes in the serotonin and dopamine systems that might be the early result of chronic maladaptation to persistent pain. The allostatic activation of these neural systems, which mirrors that already described as a consequence of stress, might lead to depression and anxiety previously observed in neuropathic animals but also an attempt to cope positively with the negative experience. PMID:26113399

  7. Radioenzymatic analysis of neurotransmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, S.R.

    1987-08-17

    Since the late 1960's, radioenzymatic assays have gradually come to replace the less sensitive and less specific spectrofluorometric and bioassay procedures previously used to determine many of the neurotransmitters. These assays provide the means to measure picogram quantities of most of these substances, and have enabled determinations to be made in very small volumes of body fluids, in brain perfusates and individual brain nuclei, and in large individual cells of some simple animals. This paper reviews briefly some of the radioenzymatic techniques presently available for assaying norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), dopamine (DA), serotonin, and the trace amines octopamine (OA), phenylethanolamine (PEOHA), phenylethylamine (PEA), tyramine (TA) and tryptamine (T).

  8. Dramatically decreased cocaine self-administration in dopamine but not serotonin transporter knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Morgane; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Caine, S. Barak

    2009-01-01

    There has been much interest in the relative importance of dopamine and serotonin transporters in the abuse-related-effects of cocaine. We tested the hypotheses that mice lacking the dopamine transporter (DAT?/?), the serotonin transporter (SERT?/?), or both (DAT?/?SERT?/?) exhibit decreased reinforcing effects of cocaine. We also assessed whether observed effects on self-administration are specific to cocaine or if operant behavior maintained by food or a direct dopamine agonist are similarly affected. We used a broad range of experimental conditions that included acquisition without prior training, behavior established with food training and subsequent testing with food, cocaine or a direct dopamine agonist as reinforcers, fixed ratio and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement, and a reversal procedure. Wild-type mice readily acquired cocaine self-administration and showed dose-response curves characteristic of the schedule of reinforcement that was employed. While some DAT?/? mice appeared to acquire cocaine self-administration transiently, almost all DAT?/? mice failed to self-administer cocaine reliably. Food-maintained behaviors were not decreased by the DAT mutation, and IV self-administration of a direct dopamine agonist was robust in the DAT?/? mice. In contrast to those mice, cocaine's reinforcing effects were not diminished in SERT?/? mice under any of the conditions tested, except for impaired initial acquisition of both food- and cocaine-maintained behavior. These findings support the notion that the DAT, but not the SERT, is critical in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. PMID:19176817

  9. Dramatically decreased cocaine self-administration in dopamine but not serotonin transporter knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Caine, S Barak

    2009-01-28

    There has been much interest in the relative importance of dopamine and serotonin transporters in the abuse-related-effects of cocaine. We tested the hypotheses that mice lacking the dopamine transporter (DAT(-/-)), the serotonin transporter (SERT(-/-)), or both (DAT(-/-)SERT(-/-)) exhibit decreased reinforcing effects of cocaine. We also assessed whether observed effects on self-administration are specific to cocaine or if operant behavior maintained by food or a direct dopamine agonist are similarly affected. We used a broad range of experimental conditions that included acquisition without previous training, behavior established with food training and subsequent testing with food, cocaine or a direct dopamine agonist as reinforcers, fixed ratio and progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement, and a reversal procedure. Wild-type mice readily acquired cocaine self-administration and showed dose-response curves characteristic of the schedule of reinforcement that was used. While some DAT(-/-) mice appeared to acquire cocaine self-administration transiently, almost all DAT(-/-) mice failed to self-administer cocaine reliably. Food-maintained behaviors were not decreased by the DAT mutation, and IV self-administration of a direct dopamine agonist was robust in the DAT(-/-) mice. In contrast to those mice, cocaine's reinforcing effects were not diminished in SERT(-/-) mice under any of the conditions tested, except for impaired initial acquisition of both food- and cocaine-maintained behavior. These findings support the notion that the DAT, but not the SERT, is critical in mediating the reinforcing effects of cocaine. PMID:19176817

  10. Serotonin and Dopamine Transporter Binding in Children with Autism Determined by SPECT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makkonen, Ismo; Riikonen, Raili; Kokki, Hannu; Airaksinen, Mauno M.; Kuikka, Jyrki T.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in the serotonergic system have been recognized in autism. To investigate the association between serotonin and dopamine transporters and autism, we studied 15 children (14 males, one female; mean age 8y 8mo [SD 3y 10mo]) with autism and 10 non-autistic comparison children (five males, five females; mean age 9y 10mo [SD 2y 8mo]) using…

  11. Serotonin and dopamine independently regulate pituitary beta-endorphin release in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sapun-Malcolm, D; Farah, J M; Mueller, G P

    1986-01-01

    Serotonin and dopamine neurons have been shown to exert a stimulatory and inhibitory control, respectively, over pituitary release of beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (beta-END-LI). In the present study we sought to determine whether an interaction exists between these two reciprocal mechanisms regulating beta-END-LI in the rat. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 5 mg/kg quipazine, a serotonin receptor agonist, or 2.5 mg/kg haloperidol, a dopamine receptor antagonist, each elevated circulating levels by beta-END-LI 5-fold over control levels by 30 min post-injection. Pretreatment (1 h) with 5 mg/kg, i.p., cinanserin, a serotonin receptor antagonist, completely blocked the quipazine-induced rise in beta-END-LI without affecting the elevated levels of beta-END-LI in haloperidol-treated animals. Conversely, pretreatment (2 h) with 1 mg/kg, i.p., bromocriptine, a dopamine receptor agonist, had no effect on quipazine-induced release of beta-END-LI but did completely prevent the rise in plasma beta-END-LI due to haloperidol treatment. Gel filtration chromatography revealed that quipazine and haloperidol treatments elevated plasma levels of both beta-END-size immunoreactivity and beta-lipotropin (beta-LPH)-sized immunoreactivity though to different relative degrees. However, since circulating levels of beta-LPH serve as a marker for anterior lobe (AL) beta-END-LI secretion, serotonin and dopamine appear to exert stimulatory and inhibitory control, respectively, over AL beta-END-LI release. Further, the quipazine-induced rise in total plasma beta-END-LI primarily resembled beta-LPH in size and was blocked by cinanserin but not bromocriptine pretreatment. And conversely, bromocriptine but not cinanserin prevented the haloperidol-induced rise in circulating beta-END-LI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3005900

  12. Analysis of microdialysate monoamines, including noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin, using capillary ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Barbara; Gifu, Elena-Patricia; Sandu, Ioana; Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical methods are very often used to detect catecholamine and indolamine neurotransmitters separated by conventional reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present paper presents the development of a chromatographic method to detect monoamines present in low-volume brain dialysis samples using a capillary column filled with sub-2?m particles. Several parameters (repeatability, linearity, accuracy, limit of detection) for this new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method with electrochemical detection were examined after optimization of the analytical conditions. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine were separated in 1?L of injected sample volume; they were detected above concentrations of 0.5-1nmol/L, with 2.1-9.5% accuracy and intra-assay repeatability equal to or less than 6%. The final method was applied to very low volume dialysates from rat brain containing monoamine traces. The study demonstrates that capillary UHPLC with electrochemical detection is suitable for monitoring dialysate monoamines collected at high sampling rate. PMID:24508677

  13. Reassessment of the antioxidative mixture for the challenging electrochemical determination of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in microdialysis samples.

    PubMed

    Van Schoors, Jolien; Lens, Charlotte; Maes, Katrien; Michotte, Yvette; Smolders, Ilse; Van Eeckhaut, Ann

    2015-08-15

    In recent years, the simultaneous monitoring of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in vivo is advancing due to innovations in miniaturized and fast chromatographic techniques. However, the determination of the most hydrophilic compound, noradrenaline, in microdialysis samples by (ultra-)high performance liquid chromatography ((U)HPLC) with electrochemical detection (ECD) is impeded by a broad solvent front, caused by the addition of antioxidative agents. Hence, an elaborate reassessment of currently used antioxidative mixtures is necessary for further analytical improvements. The proposed mixture, containing 100mM acetic acid, 0.27mM Na2EDTA and 12.5?M ascorbic acid (pH 3.2), is less complex than previously described mixtures and shows minimal ECD interference. It stabilizes the three monoamines in standard solutions and in microdialysis samples, considering both autosampler stability at 4°C for 48h and long term stability at -20°C for a duration of six months. An in vivo microdialysis experiment demonstrates the possibility to monitor changes in extracellular levels of the three monoamines simultaneously in the rat hippocampus with UHPLC-ECD using the optimized antioxidative mixture. PMID:26177328

  14. In vivo assessment of dopamine D-2 and serotonin S-2 receptors measured by C-11 N-methylspiperone (NMSP) in manic-depressive illness

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Pearlson, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Dannals, R.F.; Suneja, S.; Bjorgvinsson, E.; Links, J.M.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Schaerf, F.

    1985-05-01

    The hypothesis has been suggested that either the dopaminergic or serotonergic neurotransmitter systems may be involved in manic-depressive illness (MD). The authors have studied 16 subjects with C-11 NMSP PET imaging. Two had never received neuroleptics; 4 were drug free for 1 month at the time of scanning; of these 3 were acutely manic; the rest were on stable lithium treatment. The dopamine and serotonin binding was estimated by the 43 min. caudate/cerebellum (Ca/Cb) and frontal/cerebellum (FC/Cb) ratios, respectively. No statistically significant difference was detected when compared to 44 age and sex matched controls. Based upon the variance in the normal data and the average age of the patient group studied, the probability of detecting a difference of >30% between patients and normals is >0.8. Hence, identification of receptor abnormalities if present will be improved with increased sample size of both normals and patients.

  15. Clinical features and pharmacotherapy of childhood monoamine neurotransmitter disorders.

    PubMed

    Ng, J; Heales, S J R; Kurian, M A

    2014-08-01

    Childhood neurotransmitter disorders are increasingly recognised as an expanding group of inherited neurometabolic syndromes. They are caused by disturbance in synthesis, metabolism, and homeostasis of the monoamine neurotransmitters, including the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine) and serotonin. Disturbances in monoamine neurotransmission will lead to neurological symptoms that often overlap with clinical features of other childhood neurological disorders (such as hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, cerebral palsy, other movement disorders, and paroxysmal conditions); consequently, neurotransmitter disorders are frequently misdiagnosed. The diagnosis of neurotransmitter disorders is made through detailed clinical assessment, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitters, and further supportive diagnostic investigations. Early and accurate diagnosis of neurotransmitter disorders is important, as many are amenable to therapeutic intervention. The principles of treatment for monoamine neurotransmitter disorders are mainly directly derived from understanding these metabolic pathways. In disorders characterized by enzyme deficiency, we aim to increase monoamine substrate availability, boost enzyme co-factor levels, reduce monoamine breakdown, and replace depleted levels of monoamines with pharmacological analogs as clinically indicated. Most monoamine neurotransmitter disorders lead to reduced levels of central dopamine and/or serotonin. Complete amelioration of motor symptoms is achievable in some disorders, such as Segawa's syndrome, and, in other conditions, significant improvement in quality of life can be attained with pharmacotherapy. In this review, we provide an overview of the clinical features and current treatment strategies for childhood monoamine neurotransmitter disorders. PMID:25011953

  16. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System–based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J.; Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Sieck, Gary C.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Garris, Paul A.; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2009-01-01

    Object In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. Methods The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal model, the pig. Results The WINCS, which is designed in compliance with FDA-recognized consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, successfully measured dopamine, glutamate, and adenosine, both in vitro and in vivo. The WINCS detected striatal dopamine release at the implanted CFM during DBS of the MFB. The DBS-evoked adenosine release in the rat thalamus and MCS-evoked glutamate release in the pig cortex were also successfully measured. Overall, in vitro and in vivo testing demonstrated signals comparable to a commercial hardwired electrochemical system for FPA. Conclusions By incorporating FPA, the chemical repertoire of WINCS-measurable neurotransmitters is expanded to include glutamate and other nonelectroactive species for which the evolving field of enzyme-linked biosensors exists. Because many neurotransmitters are not electrochemically active, FPA in combination with enzyme-linked microelectrodes represents a powerful intraoperative tool for rapid and selective neurochemical sampling in important anatomical targets during functional neurosurgery. PMID:19425899

  17. Mimicking maternal smoking and pharmacotherapy of preterm labor: interactions of fetal nicotine and dexamethasone on serotonin and dopamine synaptic function in adolescence and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2010-04-29

    Fetal coexposure to nicotine and dexamethasone is common: maternal smoking increases the incidence of preterm delivery and glucocorticoids are the consensus treatment for prematurity. We gave pregnant rats 3mg/kg/day of nicotine throughout gestation, a regimen that reproduces smokers' plasma levels, and then on gestational days 17, 18 and 19, we administered 0.2mg/kg of dexamethasone. We evaluated developmental indices for serotonin (5HT) and dopamine synaptic function throughout adolescence, young adulthood and later adulthood, assessing the brain regions possessing major 5HT and dopamine projections and cell bodies. Males displayed persistent upregulation of 5HT(1A) and 5HT(2) receptors and the 5HT transporter, with a distinct hierarchy of effects: nicotinedopamine pathways as evidenced by increased neurotransmitter turnover. Superimposed on these overall effects, there were significant differences in temporal and regional relationships among the different treatments, often involving effects that emerged later in life, after a period of apparent normality. This indicates that nicotine and dexamethasone do not simply produce an initial neuronal injury that persists throughout the lifespan but rather, they alter the developmental trajectory of synaptic function. The fact that the combined treatment produced greater effects for many parameters points to potentially worse neurobehavioral outcomes after pharmacotherapy of preterm labor in the offspring of smokers. PMID:20211707

  18. Dissociable Effects of Serotonin and Dopamine on the Valuation of Harm in Moral Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Molly J.; Siegel, Jenifer Z.; Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Ousdal, Olga T.; Story, Giles; Frieband, Carolyn; Grosse-Rueskamp, Johanna M.; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary An aversion to harming others is a core component of human morality and is disturbed in antisocial behavior [1–4]. Deficient harm aversion may underlie instrumental and reactive aggression, which both feature in psychopathy [5]. Past work has highlighted monoaminergic influences on aggression [6–11], but a mechanistic account of how monoamines regulate antisocial motives remains elusive. We previously observed that most people show a greater aversion to inflicting pain on others than themselves [12]. Here, we investigated whether this hyperaltruistic disposition is susceptible to monoaminergic control. We observed dissociable effects of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram and the dopamine precursor levodopa on decisions to inflict pain on oneself and others for financial gain. Computational models of choice behavior showed that citalopram increased harm aversion for both self and others, while levodopa reduced hyperaltruism. The effects of citalopram were stronger than those of levodopa. Crucially, neither drug influenced the physical perception of pain or other components of choice such as motor impulsivity or loss aversion [13, 14], suggesting a direct and specific influence of serotonin and dopamine on the valuation of harm. We also found evidence for dose dependency of these effects. Finally, the drugs had dissociable effects on response times, with citalopram enhancing behavioral inhibition and levodopa reducing slowing related to being responsible for another’s fate. These distinct roles of serotonin and dopamine in modulating moral behavior have implications for potential treatments of social dysfunction that is a common feature as well as a risk factor for many psychiatric disorders. PMID:26144968

  19. Changes in sensitivity of brain dopamine and serotonin receptors during long-term treatment with carbidine

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Allikmets, L.K.; Chereshka, K.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1986-04-01

    The authors study the state of the dopamine and serotonin receptors of the brain during chronic administration of carbidine to animals. Parts of the brain from two rats were pooled and binding of tritium-spiperone and tritium-LSD was determined. Statistical analysis of the data for apomorphine sterotypy was carried out and the Student's test was used for analysis of the remaining data. It is shown that after discontinuation of carbidine binding of tritium-spiperone and tritium-LSD in the cortex was reduced.

  20. Distribution of serotonin- and dopamine-immunoreactivity in the brain of the teleost Clarias gariepinus.

    PubMed

    Corio, M; Peute, J; Steinbusch, H W

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of serotonergic and dopaminergic cell bodies and varicose fibres in the brain of the teleost Clarias gariepinus was studied immunohistochemically using antisera against formaldehyde-conjugated serotonin and dopamine. Many serotonergic and dopaminergic fibres innervated the areas dorsalis telencephali pars medialis and pars lateralis dorsalis, as well as the area ventralis telencephali pars ventralis. In the diencephalon, a large number of serotonergic and some dopaminergic fibres were found in the preoptic nucleus, innervating the cells of this nucleus. In addition, serotonergic and dopaminergic fibres were observed in the pituitary stalk and in all regions of the pituitary gland. Moreover, the diencephalon contained the highest number of serotonin- or dopamine-immunoreactive cell bodies. These cells were confined to the same periventricular nuclei as the nucleus ventromedialis thalami, the nucleus posterior periventricularis, the nucleus lateralis tuberis, the nuclei recessus lateralis and recessus posterioris. Most cells of these nuclei were in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid of the third ventricle. The brainstem contained serotonergic cell bodies in the raphe nuclei and a few serotonergic and dopaminergic fibres. The torus semicircularis was densely innervated by serotonergic fibres and, to a lesser extent, dopaminergic fibres. In the midbrain of Clarias gariepinus, no dopaminergic homologue of the substantia nigra was observed. The results are discussed both in a comparative and a physiological context. In this regard, special attention has been paid to the contribution of hypothalamic monoamines in the regulation of gonadotropin secretion as an essential step in the neuro-endocrine control of reproduction. PMID:2059346

  1. The serotonin-dopamine interaction measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and C-11 raclopride in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.S.; Dewey, S.L.; Logan, J.

    1994-05-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the interaction between serotonin and dopamine can be measured with C-11 raclopride and PET in the baboon brain. A series of studies was undertaken to extend dim findings to the normal human brain. PET studies were conducted in male control subjects (n=8) using the CTI 931 tomograph. Two C-11 raclopride scans were performed, prior to and 180 minutes following administration of the selective serotonin releasing agent, fenfluramine (60mg/PO). The neuroendocrine response to fenfluramine challenge is commonly used in psychiatric research as an index of serotonin activity. The C-11 raclopride data were analyzed with the distribution volume method. For the group of subjects, an increase was observed in the striatum to cerebellum ratio (specific to non-specific binding ratio), in excess of the test-retest variability of the ligand. Variability in response was observed across subjects. These results are consistent with our previous findings in the baboon that citalopram administration increased C-11 raclopride binding, consistent with a decrease in endogenous dopamine. In vivo microdialysis studies in freely moving rats confirmed that citalopram produces a time-dependent decrease in extracellular dopamine levels, consistent with the PET results. In vivo PET studies of the serotonin-dopamine interaction are relevant to the evaluation of etiologic and therapeutic mechanisms in schizophrenia and affective disorder.

  2. Genetic Susceptibility and Neurotransmitters in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Paschou, Peristera; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Sharp, Frank; Heiman, Gary A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2015-01-01

    Family studies have consistently shown that Tourette syndrome (TS) is a familial disorder and twin studies have clearly indicated a genetic contribution in the etiology of TS. Whereas early segregation studies of TS suggested a single-gene autosomal dominant disorder, later studies have pointed to more complex models including additive and multifactorial inheritance and likely interaction with genetic factors. While the exact cellular and molecular base of TS is as yet elusive, neuroanatomical and neurophysiological studies have pointed to the involvement of cortico-striato-thalamocortical circuits and abnormalities in dopamine, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and serotonin neurotransmitter systems, with the most consistent evidence being available for involvement of dopamine-related abnormalities, that is, a reduction in tonic extracellular dopamine levels along with hyperresponsive spike-dependent dopamine release, following stimulation. Genetic and gene expression findings are very much supportive of involvement of these neurotransmitter systems. Moreover, intriguingly, genetic work on a two-generation pedigree has opened new research pointing to a role for histamine, a so far rather neglected neurotransmitter, with the potential of the development of new treatment options. Future studies should be aimed at directly linking neurotransmitter-related genetic and gene expression findings to imaging studies (imaging genetics), which enables a better understanding of the pathways and mechanisms through which the dynamic interplay of genes, brain, and environment shapes the TS phenotype. PMID:24295621

  3. Cloning of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin transporters from monkey brain: relevance to cocaine sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, G M; Yatin, S M; De La Garza, R; Goulet, M; Madras, B K

    2001-02-19

    We used RT-PCR to clone monoamine transporters from Macaca mulatta, Macaca fasicularis and Saimiri sciureus (dopamine transporter; DAT) and Macaca mulatta (norepinephrine transporter; NET and serotonin transporter; SERT). Monkey DAT, NET and SERT proteins were >98% homologous to human and, when expressed in HEK-293 cells, displayed drug affinities and uptake kinetics that were highly correlated with monkey brain or human monoamine transporters. In contrast to reports of other species, we discovered double (leucine for phenylalanine 143 and arginine for glutamine 509; Variant I) and single (proline for leucine 355; Variant II) amino acid variants of DAT. Variant I displayed dopamine transport kinetics and binding affinities for various DAT blockers (including cocaine) versus [3H] CFT (WIN 35, 428) that were identical to wild-type DAT (n=7 drugs; r(2)=0.991). However, we detected a six-fold difference in the affinity of cocaine versus [3H] cocaine between Variant I (IC(50): 488+/-102 nM, SEM, n=3) and wild-type DAT (IC(50): 79+/-8.2 nM, n=3, P<0.05). Variant II was localized intracellularly in HEK-293 cells, as detected by confocal microscopy, and had very low levels of binding and dopamine transport. Also discovered was a novel exon 5 splice variant of NET that displayed very low levels of transport and did not bind cocaine. With NetPhos analysis, we detected a number of highly conserved putative phosphorylation sites on extracellular as well as intracellular loops of the DAT, NET, and SERT, which may be functional for internalized transporters. The homology and functional similarity of human and monkey monoamine transporters further support the value of primates in investigating the role of monoamine transporters in substance abuse mechanisms, neuropsychiatric disorders and development of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. PMID:11223167

  4. Human genetics and pharmacology of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Madras, B K

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic amine neurotransmitters are released from nerve terminals and activate pre- and postsynaptic receptors. Released neurotransmitters are sequestered by transporters into presynaptic neurons, a major mode of their inactivation in the brain. Genetic studies of human biogenic amine transporter genes, including the dopamine transporter (hDAT; SLC6A3), the serotonin transporter (hSERT; SLC6A4), and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET; SLC6A2) have provided insight into how genomic variations in these transporter genes influence pharmacology and brain physiology. Genetic variants can influence transporter function by various mechanisms, including substrate affinities, transport velocity, transporter expression levels (density), extracellular membrane expression, trafficking and turnover, and neurotransmitter release. It is increasingly apparent that genetic variants of monoamine transporters also contribute to individual differences in behavior and neuropsychiatric disorders. This chapter summarizes current knowledge of transporters with a focus on genomic variations, expression variations, pharmacology of protein variants, and known association with human diseases. PMID:16722243

  5. Dopamine in the auditory brainstem and midbrain: co-localization with amino acid neurotransmitters and gene expression following cochlear trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fyk-Kolodziej, Bozena E.; Shimano, Takashi; Gafoor, Dana; Mirza, Najab; Griffith, Ronald D.; Gong, Tzy-Wen; Holt, Avril Genene

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) modulates the effects of amino acid neurotransmitters (AANs), including GABA and glutamate, in motor, visual, olfactory, and reward systems (Hnasko et al., 2010; Stuber et al., 2010; Hnasko and Edwards, 2012). The results suggest that DA may play a similar modulatory role in the auditory pathways. Previous studies have shown that deafness results in decreased GABA release, changes in excitatory neurotransmitter levels, and increased spontaneous neuronal activity within brainstem regions related to auditory function. Modulation of the expression and localization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; the rate limiting enzyme in the production of DA) in the IC following cochlear trauma has been previously reported (Tong et al., 2005). In the current study the possibility of co-localization of TH with AANs was examined. Changes in the gene expression of TH were compared with changes in the gene expression of markers for AANs in the cochlear nucleus (CN) and inferior colliculus (IC) to determine whether those deafness related changes occur concurrently. The results indicate that bilateral cochlear ablation significantly reduced TH gene expression in the CN after 2 months while in the IC the reduction in TH was observed at both 3 days and 2 months following ablation. Furthermore, in the CN, glycine transporter 2 (GLYT2) and the GABA transporter (GABAtp) were also significantly reduced only after 2 months. However, in the IC, DA receptor 1 (DRDA1), vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3 (VGLUT2, VGLUT3), GABAtp and GAD67 were reduced in expression both at the 3 days and 2 months time points. A close relationship between the distribution of TH and several of the AANs was determined in both the CN and the IC. In addition, GLYT2 and VGLUT3 each co-localized with TH within IC somata and dendrites. Therefore, the results of the current study suggest that DA is spatially well positioned to influence the effects of AANs on auditory neurons. PMID:26257610

  6. Effect of champagne compared to still white wine on peripheral neurotransmitter concentrations.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Bancel, Etiennette; Perray, Pascale Fabbro; Pouderoux, Philippe; Balmes, Jean-Louis; Bali, Jean-Pierre

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate how the peripheral release of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, cholecystokinin, and beta-endorphin is involved in drinking behavior, blood concentrations of these neurotransmitters were followed in 40 healthy young volunteers during the first hour after ingestion of a moderate dose of some common alcoholic beverages (champagne, still white wine) as compared to water. Concerning serotonin levels, two groups of subjects are statistically distinct: one with low basal serotonin levels (< 620 nmol/L) which responded with an increase in serotonin (52% in 10 minutes), and a second group with higher basal serotonin levels (> 620 nmol/L) which responded with a decrease ( 190% in 60 minutes). Variations in serotonin concentrations appear to depend upon the alcoholic content of the beverage. A rapid increase in plasma dopamine concentrations after consumption of champagne seems to be due to the nonalcoholic content of the beverage. Cholecystokinin values were not significantly different between the three beverages: the observed increase can be explained by a moderate gastric distention. Beta-endorphin levels didn't change significantly after drinking. In conclusion, some significant blood variations of serotonin and dopamine appeared even after moderately dose of champagne or still white wine. These changes might be partially responsible for the different drinking behavior. PMID:15628669

  7. Risk neurogenes for long-term spaceflight: dopamine and serotonin brain system.

    PubMed

    Popova, N K; Kulikov, A V; Kondaurova, E M; Tsybko, A S; Kulikova, E A; Krasnov, I B; Shenkman, B S; Bazhenova, E Yu; Sinyakova, N A; Naumenko, V S

    2015-06-01

    Mice were exposed to 1 month of spaceflight on Russian biosatellite BION-M1 to determine its effect on the expression of key genes in the brain dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) systems. Spaceflight decreased the expression of crucial genes involved in DA synthesis and degradation, as well as the D1 receptor. However, spaceflight failed to alter the expression of tryptophan hydroxylase-2, 5-HT transporter, 5-HT1A, and 5-HT3 receptor genes, though it reduced 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the hypothalamus. We revealed risk DA and 5-HT neurogenes for long-term spaceflight for the first time, as well as microgravity-responsive genes (tyrosine hydroxylase, catechol-O-methyltransferase, and D1 receptor in the nigrostriatal system; D1 and 5-HT2A receptors in the hypothalamus; and monoamine oxidase A (MAO A) in the frontal cortex). Decreased genetic control of the DA system may contribute to the spaceflight-induced locomotor impairment and dyskinesia described for both humans and rats. PMID:25084757

  8. Novel receptor site involved in enhancement of stimulus-induced acetylcholine, dopamine, and serotonin release

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; Rominger, D.; Nickolson, V.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The cognitive enhancer DuP 996 (3,3-bis(4-pyrindinylmethyl)-1-phenylindolin-2-one) and its structural analogs enhance the K(+)-stimulated release of acetylcholine, dopamine, and serotonin in brain slices, without effect on basal release. A novel receptor site labeled by (3H)DuP 996 has been identified. The (3H)DuP 996 binding site has a Kd of 19 nM and a Bmax of 102 fmol/mg of protein. Binding to this site is specific, saturable, reversible, and time, pH, and temperature dependent. Specific binding is decreased by treatment with trypsin and not affected by phospholipase C. Specific binding is inhibited by Ca2+ and increased by Mn2+ but not affected by Na+, K+, or Mg2+. The (3H)DuP 996 binding sites are heterogeneously distributed in brain, with striatum and hypothalamus having highest density and cerebellum lowest. The (3H)DuP 996 binding site does not belong to any known class of receptor site, because (3H)DuP 996 binding could not be displaced by a broad variety of standard pharmacological agents and neuropeptides. Physiological significance of this binding site is suggested by the excellent correlation between the binding affinity for this site and the potency to enhance K(+)-stimulated release of acetylcholine for a series of DuP 996 analogs. Ligands for this receptor site may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of cognitive deficits and neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Altered Serotonin, Dopamine and Norepinepherine Levels in 15q Duplication and Angelman Syndrome Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Farook, M. Febin; DeCuypere, Michael; Hyland, Keith; Takumi, Toru; LeDoux, Mark S.; Reiter, Lawrence T.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood neurodevelopmental disorders like Angelman syndrome and autism may be the result of underlying defects in neuronal plasticity and ongoing problems with synaptic signaling. Some of these defects may be due to abnormal monoamine levels in different regions of the brain. Ube3a, a gene that causes Angelman syndrome (AS) when maternally deleted and is associated with autism when maternally duplicated has recently been shown to regulate monoamine synthesis in the Drosophila brain. Therefore, we examined monoamine levels in striatum, ventral midbrain, frontal cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and hippocampus in Ube3a deficient and Ube3a duplication animals. We found that serotonin (5HT), a monoamine affected in autism, was elevated in the striatum and cortex of AS mice. Dopamine levels were almost uniformly elevated compared to control littermates in the striatum, midbrain and frontal cortex regardless of genotype in Ube3a deficient and Ube3a duplication animals. In the duplication 15q autism mouse model, paternal but not maternal duplication animals showed a decrease in 5HT levels when compared to their wild type littermates, in accordance with previously published data. However, maternal duplication animals show no significant changes in 5HT levels throughout the brain. These abnormal monoamine levels could be responsible for many of the behavioral abnormalities observed in both AS and autism, but further investigation is required to determine if any of these changes are purely dependent on Ube3a levels in the brain. PMID:22916201

  10. Aniracetam enhances cortical dopamine and serotonin release via cholinergic and glutamatergic mechanisms in SHRSP.

    PubMed

    Shirane, M; Nakamura, K

    2001-10-19

    Aniracetam, a cognition enhancer, has been recently found to preferentially increase extracellular levels of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), basolateral amygdala and dorsal hippocampus of the mesocorticolimbic system in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats. In the present study, we aimed to identify actually active substances among aniracetam and its major metabolites and to clarify the mode of action in DA and 5-HT release in the PFC. Local perfusion of mecamylamine, a nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) completely blocked DA and 5-HT release, respectively, in the PFC elicited by orally administered aniracetam. The effects of aniracetam were mimicked by local perfusion of N-anisoyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid [corrected] (N-anisoyl-GABA), one of the major metabolites of aniracetam, into the VTA and DRN. The cortical DA release induced by N-anisoyl-GABA applied to the VTA was also completely abolished by co-perfusion of mecamylamine. Additionally, when p-anisic acid, another metabolite of aniracetam, and N-anisoyl-GABA were locally perfused into the PFC, they induced DA and 5-HT release in the same region, respectively. These results indicate that aniracetam enhances DA and 5-HT release by mainly mediating the action of N-anisoyl-GABA that targets not only somatodendritic nACh and NMDA receptors but also presynaptic nACh receptors. PMID:11597608

  11. Dual Dopamine/Serotonin Releasers: Potential Treatment Agents for Stimulant Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Richard B.; Blough, Bruce E.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    “Agonist therapy” for cocaine and methamphetamine addiction involves administration of stimulant-like medications (e.g., monoamine releasers) to reduce withdrawal symptoms and prevent relapse. A significant problem with this strategy is that many candidate medications possess abuse liability because of activation of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) neurons in the brain. One way to reduce DA-mediated abuse liability of candidate drugs is to add in serotonin (5-HT) releasing properties, since substantial evidence shows that 5-HT neurons provide an inhibitory influence over mesolimbic DA neurons. This article addresses several key issues related to the development of dual DA/5-HT releasers for the treatment of substance use disorders. First, the authors briefly summarize the evidence supporting a dual deficit in DA and 5-HT function during withdrawal from chronic cocaine or alcohol abuse. Second, the authors discuss data demonstrating that 5HT release can dampen DA-mediated stimulant effects, and the “antistimulant” role of 5-HT2C receptors is considered. Next, the mechanisms underlying potential adverse effects of 5-HT releasers are described. Finally, the authors discuss recently published data with PAL-287, a novel nonamphetamine DA/5-HT releasing agent that suppresses cocaine self-administration but lacks positive reinforcing properties. It is concluded that DA/5-HT releasers could be useful therapeutic adjuncts for the treatment of cocaine and alcohol addictions, as well as for obesity, attention-deficit disorder, and depression. PMID:19086767

  12. Highly sensitive isotope-dilution liquid-chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem-mass spectrometry approach to study the drug-mediated modulation of dopamine and serotonin levels in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fabian; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Kleuser, Burkhard; Gulbins, Erich; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Aschner, Michael; Bornhorst, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (SRT) are monoamine neurotransmitters that play a key role in regulating the central and peripheral nervous system. Their impaired metabolism has been implicated in several neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and depression. Consequently, it is imperative to monitor changes in levels of these low-abundant neurotransmitters and their role in mediating disease. For the first time, a rapid, specific and sensitive isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of DA and SRT in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). This model organism offers a unique approach for studying the effect of various drugs and environmental conditions on neurotransmitter levels, given by the conserved DA and SRT biology, including synaptic release, trafficking and formation. We introduce a novel sample preparation protocol incorporating the usage of sodium thiosulfate in perchloric acid as extraction medium that assures high recovery of the relatively unstable neurotransmitters monitored. Moreover, the use of both deuterated internal standards and the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique allows for unequivocal quantification. Thereby, to the best of our knowledge, we achieve a detection sensitivity that clearly exceeds those of published DA and SRT quantification methods in various matrices. We are the first to show that exposure of C. elegans to the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitor selegiline or the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitor tolcapone, in order to block DA and SRT degradation, resulted in accumulation of the respective neurotransmitter. Assessment of a behavioral output of the dopaminergic system (basal slowing response) corroborated the analytical LC-MS/MS data. Thus, utilization of the C. elegans model system in conjunction with our analytical method is well-suited to investigate drug-mediated modulation of the DA and SRT system in order to identify compounds with neuroprotective or regenerative properties. PMID:26452793

  13. A Nonoxidative Electrochemical Sensor Based on a Self-Doped Polyaniline/Carbon Nanotube Composite for Sensitive and Selective Detection of the Neurotransmitter Dopamine: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shah R.; Parajuli, Rishi R.; Balogun, Yetunde; Ma, Yufeng; He, Huixin

    2008-01-01

    Most of the current techniques for in vivo detection of dopamine exploit the ease of oxidation of this compound. The major problem during the detection is the presence of a high concentration of ascorbic acid that is oxidized at nearly the same potential as dopamine on bare electrodes. Furthermore, the oxidation product of dopamine reacts with ascorbic acid present in samples and regenerates dopamine again, which severely limits the accuracy of the detection. Meanwhile, the product could also form a melanin-like insulating film on the electrode surface, which decreases the sensitivity of the electrode. Various surface modifications on the electrode, new materials for making the electrodes, and new electrochemical techniques have been exploited to solve these problems. Recently we developed a new electrochemical detection method that did not rely on direct oxidation of dopamine on electrodes, which may naturally solve these problems. This approach takes advantage of the high performance of our newly developed poly(anilineboronic acid)/carbon nanotube composite and the excellent permselectivity of the ion-exchange polymer Nafion. The high affinity binding of dopamine to the boronic acid groups of the polymer affects the electrochemical properties of the polyaniline backbone, which act as the basis for the transduction mechanism of this non-oxidative dopamine sensor. The unique reduction capability and high conductivity of single-stranded DNA functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes greatly improved the electrochemical activity of the polymer in a physiologically-relevant buffer, and the large surface area of the carbon nanotubes increased the density of the boronic acid receptors. The high sensitivity and selectivity of the sensor show excellent promise toward molecular diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. In this review, we will focus on the discussion of this novel detection approach, the new interferences in this detection approach, and how to eliminate these interferences toward in vivo and in vitro detection of the neurotransmitter dopamine.

  14. Cloning of the cocaine-sensitive bovine dopamine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Usdin, T.B.; Chen, C.; Brownstein, M.J.; Hoffman, B.J. ); Mezey, E. )

    1991-12-15

    A cDNA encoding the dopamine transporter from bovine brain substantia nigra was identified on the basis of its structural homology to other, recently cloned, neurotransmitter transporters. The sequence of the 693-amino acid protein is quite similar to those of the rat {gamma}-aminobutyric acid, human norepinephrine, and rat serotonin transporters. Dopamine transporter mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the substantia nigra but not in the locus coeruleus, raphe, caudate, or other brain areas. ({sup 3}H)Dopamine accumulation in tissue culture cells transfected with the cDNA was inhibited by amphetamine, cocaine, and specific inhibitors of dopamine transports, including GBR12909.

  15. A Bacoside containing Bacopa monnieri extract reduces both morphine hyperactivity plus the elevated striatal dopamine and serotonin turnover.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Khalid; Subhan, Fazal; Sewell, Robert D E

    2012-05-01

    Bacopa monnieri (BM) has been used in Ayurvedic medicine as a nootropic, anxiolytic, antiepileptic and antidepressant. An n-butanol extract of the plant (nBt-ext BM) was analysed and found to contain Bacoside A (Bacoside A3, Bacopaside II and Bacopasaponin C). The effects of the BM extract were then studied on morphine-induced hyperactivity as well as dopamine and serotonin turnover in the striatum since these parameters have a role in opioid sensitivity and dependence. Mice were pretreated with saline or nBt-ext BM (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg, orally), 60 min before morphine administration and locomotor activity was subsequently recorded. Immediately after testing, striatal tissues were analysed for dopamine (DA), serotonin (5HT) and their metabolites using HPLC coupled with electrochemical detection. The results indicated that nBt-ext BM significantly (p < 0.001) decreased locomotor activity in both the saline and morphine treated groups. Additionally, nBt-ext BM significantly lowered morphine-induced dopamine (DA), dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-H1AA) upsurges in the striatum but failed to affect DA, 5-HT and their metabolites in the saline treated group. These findings suggest that nBt-ext BM has an antidopaminergic/serotonergic effect and may have potential beneficial effects in the treatment of morphine dependence. PMID:22105846

  16. Methylone-induced hyperthermia and lethal toxicity: role of the dopamine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Piao, Ying-Shan; Hall, Frank Scott; Moriya, Yuki; Ito, Miki; Ohara, Arihisa; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-06-01

    Methylone (2-methylamino-1-[3,4-methylenedioxy-phenyl]propan-1-one), an amphetamine analog, has emerged as a popular drug of abuse worldwide. Methylone induces hyperthermia, which is thought to contribute toward the lethal consequences of methylone overdose. Methylone has been assumed to induce hyperthermic effects through inhibition of serotonin and/or dopamine transporters (SERT and DAT, respectively). To examine the roles of each of these proteins in methylone-induced toxic effects, we used SERT and DAT knockout (KO) mice and assessed the hyperthermic and lethal effects caused by a single administration of methylone. Methylone produced higher rates of lethal toxicity compared with other amphetamine analogs in wild-type mice. Compared with wild-type mice, lethality was significantly lower in DAT KO mice, but not in SERT KO mice. By contrast, only a slight diminution in the hyperthermic effects of methylone was observed in DAT KO mice, whereas a slight enhancement of these effects was observed in SERT KO mice. Administration of the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 and the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride reduced methylone-induced hyperthermia, but these drugs also had hypothermic effects in saline-treated mice, albeit to a smaller extent than the effects observed in methylone-treated mice. In contradistinction to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, which induces its toxicity through SERT and DAT, these data indicate that DAT, but not SERT, is strongly associated with the lethal toxicity produced by methylone, which did not seem to be dependent on the hyperthermic effects of methylone. DAT is therefore a strong candidate molecule for interventions aimed at preventing acute neurotoxic and lethal effects of methylone. PMID:25794333

  17. Positive and negative feedback learning and associated dopamine and serotonin transporter binding after methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; O’Dell, Steve J.; Marshall, John F.; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Learning from mistakes and prospectively adjusting behavior in response to reward feedback is an important facet of performance monitoring. Dopamine (DA) pathways play an important role in feedback learning and a growing literature has also emerged on the importance of serotonin (5HT) in reward learning, particularly during punishment or reward omission (negative feedback). Cognitive impairments resulting from psychostimulant exposure may arise from altered patterns in feedback learning, which in turn may be modulated by DA and 5HT transmission. We analyzed long-term, off-drug changes in learning from positive and negative feedback and associated striatal DA transporter (DAT) and frontocortical 5HT transporter (SERT) binding in rats pretreated with methamphetamine (mAMPH). Specifically, we assessed the reversal phase of pairwise visual discrimination learning in rats receiving single dose- (mAMPHsingle) vs. escalating-dose exposure (mAMPHescal). Using fine-grained trial-by-trial analyses, we found increased sensitivity to and reliance on positive feedback in mAMPH-pretreated animals, with the mAMPHsingle group showing more pronounced use of this type of feedback. In contrast, overall negative feedback sensitivity was not altered following any mAMPH treatment. In addition to validating the enduring effects of mAMPH on early reversal learning, we found more consecutive error commissions before the first correct response in mAMPH-pretreated rats. This behavioral rigidity was negatively correlated with subregional frontocortical SERT whereas positive feedback sensitivity negatively correlated with striatal DAT binding. These results provide new evidence for the overlapping, yet dissociable roles of DA and 5HT systems in overcoming perseveration and in learning new reward rules. PMID:24959862

  18. Lack of evidence for reduced prefrontal cortical serotonin and dopamine efflux after acute tryptophan depletion

    PubMed Central

    Meerkerk, Dorie (T). J.; Lieben, Cindy K. J.; Blokland, Arjan; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is a widely used method to study the role of serotonin (5-HT) in affect and cognition. ATD results in a strong but transient decrease in plasma tryptophan and central 5-HT synthesis and availability. Although its use is widespread, the evidence that the numerous functional effects of ATD are caused by actual changes in 5-HT neuronal release is not very strong. Thus far, decreases in 5-HT efflux (thought to reflect synaptic release) were only reported after chronic tryptophan depletion or when ATD was combined with blockade of 5-HT reuptake. Objective With the current experiment, we aimed to study the validity of the method of ATD by measuring the extent to which it reduces the efflux of 5-HT (and dopamine) in the prefrontal cortex in the absence of reuptake blockage. Materials and methods We simultaneously measured in freely moving animals plasma tryptophan via a catheter in the jugular vein and 5-HT and DA efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex through microdialysis after ATD treatment. Results ATD reduced plasma tryptophan to less than 30% of control, without affecting 5-HT or DA efflux in the prefrontal cortex, indicating that even strong reductions of plasma tryptophan do not necessarily result in decreases in central 5-HT efflux. Conclusion The present experiment showed that reductions in plasma tryptophan, similar to values associated with behavioural effects, do not necessarily reduce 5-HT efflux and suggest that the cognitive and behavioural effects of ATD may not be (exclusively) due to alterations in 5-HT release. PMID:17713760

  19. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Analysis of Serotonin, Adrenergic, Muscarinic, and Dopamine Receptor Dimerization: The Oligomer Number Puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Grinde, Ellinor; Cowan, Ann; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    The issue of G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomer status has not been resolved. Although many studies have provided evidence in favor of receptor-receptor interactions, there is no consensus as to the exact oligomer size of class A GPCRs. Previous studies have reported monomers, dimers, tetramers, and higher-order oligomers. In the present study, this issue was examined using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with photon counting histogram (PCH) analysis, a sensitive method for monitoring diffusion and oligomer size of plasma membrane proteins. Six different class A GPCRs were selected from the serotonin (5-HT2A), adrenergic (?1b-AR and ?2-AR), muscarinic (M1 and M2), and dopamine (D1) receptor families. Each GPCR was C-terminally labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. FCS provided plasma membrane diffusion coefficients on the order of 7.5 × 10?9 cm2/s. PCH molecular brightness analysis was used to determine the GPCR oligomer size. Known monomeric (CD-86) and dimeric (CD-28) receptors with GFP and YFP tags were used as controls to determine the molecular brightness of monomers and dimers. PCH analysis of fluorescence-tagged GPCRs revealed molecular brightness values that were twice the monomeric controls and similar to the dimeric controls. Reduced ?2 analyses of the PCH data best fit a model for a homogeneous population of homodimers, without tetramers or higher-order oligomers. The homodimer configuration was unaltered by agonist treatment and was stable over a 10-fold range of receptor expression level. The results of this study demonstrate that biogenic amine receptors freely diffusing within the plasma membrane are predominantly homodimers. PMID:23907214

  20. Positive and negative feedback learning and associated dopamine and serotonin transporter binding after methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; O'Dell, Steve J; Marshall, John F; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2014-09-01

    Learning from mistakes and prospectively adjusting behavior in response to reward feedback is an important facet of performance monitoring. Dopamine (DA) pathways play an important role in feedback learning and a growing literature has also emerged on the importance of serotonin (5HT) in reward learning, particularly during punishment or reward omission (negative feedback). Cognitive impairments resulting from psychostimulant exposure may arise from altered patterns in feedback learning, which in turn may be modulated by DA and 5HT transmission. We analyzed long-term, off-drug changes in learning from positive and negative feedback and associated striatal DA transporter (DAT) and frontocortical 5HT transporter (SERT) binding in rats pretreated with methamphetamine (mAMPH). Specifically, we assessed the reversal phase of pairwise visual discrimination learning in rats receiving single dose- (mAMPHsingle) vs. escalating-dose exposure (mAMPHescal). Using fine-grained trial-by-trial analyses, we found increased sensitivity to and reliance on positive feedback in mAMPH-pretreated animals, with the mAMPHsingle group showing more pronounced use of this type of feedback. In contrast, overall negative feedback sensitivity was not altered following any mAMPH treatment. In addition to validating the enduring effects of mAMPH on early reversal learning, we found more consecutive error commissions before the first correct response in mAMPH-pretreated rats. This behavioral rigidity was negatively correlated with subregional frontocortical SERT whereas positive feedback sensitivity negatively correlated with striatal DAT binding. These results provide new evidence for the overlapping, yet dissociable roles of DA and 5HT systems in overcoming perseveration and in learning new reward rules. PMID:24959862

  1. Impact of Serotonin 2C Receptor Null Mutation on Physiology and Behavior Associated with Nigrostriatal Dopamine Pathway Function

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Luna; Bonasera, Stephen J.; Hopf, F. Woodward; O’Dell, Laura; Giorgetti, Marco; Jongsma, Minke; Carra, Scott; Pierucci, Massimo; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Esposito, Ennio; Parsons, Loren H.; Bonci, Antonello; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of serotonergic neurotransmission on brain dopaminergic pathways has substantial relevance to many neuropsychiatric disorders. A particularly prominent role has been ascribed to the inhibitory effects of serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) activation on physiology and behavior mediated by the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway, particularly in the terminal region of the nucleus accumbens. The influence of this receptor subtype on functions mediated by the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway is less clear. Here we report that a null mutation eliminating expression of 5-HT2CRs produces marked alterations in the activity and functional output of this pathway. 5-HT2CR mutant mice displayed increased activity of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) dopaminergic neurons, elevated baseline extracellular dopamine concentrations in the dorsal striatum (DSt), alterations in grooming behavior, and enhanced sensitivity to the stereotypic behavioral effects of D-amphetamine and GBR 12909. These psychostimulant responses occurred in the absence of phenotypic differences in drug-induced extracellular dopamine concentration, suggesting a phenotypic alteration in behavioral responses to released dopamine. This was further suggested by enhanced behavioral responses of mutant mice to the D1 receptor agonist SKF 81297. Differences in DSt D1 or D2 receptor expression were not found, nor were differences in medium spiny neuron firing patterns or intrinsic membrane properties following dopamine stimulation. We conclude that 5-HT2CRs regulate nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity and function both at SNc dopaminergic neurons and at a locus downstream of the DSt. PMID:19553455

  2. Dopamine and serotonin receptors measured in vivo in Huntington's Disease with C-11 n-methylspiperone PET imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Wanger, H.N. Jr.; Folstein, S.E.; Suneja, S.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Tune, L.E.; Pearlson, G.

    1985-05-01

    Thirteen patients with the clinical diagnosis of Huntington's Disease (HD) and nine persons at risk to develop the disease were studied by positron emission tomography (PET) after administration of /sup 11/C-n-methylspiperone (NMSP), a tracer with a high affinity for D2 dopamine and, to a lesser degree, for S2 serotonin receptors. All subjects had an X-ray CT scan for positioning and to assess caudate size. Dopamine and serotonin receptor binding (D2 and S2) were estimated by the caudate/cerebellum activity ratio at 43 min. post injection (CA/CB), and frontal cortex/cerebellum (FR/CB), respectively. CA/CB's of HD pts. were lower than age and sex matched controls. However, when corrected by recovery coefficients (RC) for our PET using CT dimensions of the caudate, CA/CB's were higher than normal. The relative total number of D2 receptors (estimated by CA/CB x CT caudate volume) was lower than the controls without or with RC correction.

  3. Role of prenatal undernutrition in the expression of serotonin, dopamine and leptin receptors in adult mice: Implications of food intake

    PubMed Central

    MANUEL-APOLINAR, LETICIA; ROCHA, LUISA; DAMASIO, LETICIA; TESORO-CRUZ, EMILIANO; ZARATE, ARTURO

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations in the levels of serotonin expression have a significant impact on behavior and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety, mood and appetite. Fetal programming is a risk factor for the development of metabolic diseases during adulthood. Moreover, previous studies have shown that serotonin (5-HT), dopamine and leptin are important in energy balance. In the present study, the impact of maternal malnutrition-induced prenatal undernutrition (UN) was investigated in mice and the expression of 5-HT1A, dopamine (D)1, D2 and Ob-Rb receptors was analyzed in the hypothalamus during adulthood. The UN group showed a low birth weight compared with the control group. With regard to receptor expression, 5-HT1A in the UN group was increased in the hypothalamus and D1 was reduced, whereas D2 showed an increase from postnatal day (P)14 in the arcuate nucleus. Ob-Rb receptor expression was increased in the hypothalamus at P14 and P90. These observations indicated that maternal caloric restriction programs a postnatal body weight gain in offspring with an increased food intake in early postnatal life which continues into adulthood. In addition, UN in mice was found to be affected by Ob-Rb, 5-HT1A and D1/2 receptor expression, indicating that these observations may be associated with hyperphagia and obesity. PMID:24337628

  4. Role of prenatal undernutrition in the expression of serotonin, dopamine and leptin receptors in adult mice: implications of food intake.

    PubMed

    Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Rocha, Luisa; Damasio, Leticia; Tesoro-Cruz, Emiliano; Zarate, Arturo

    2014-02-01

    Perturbations in the levels of serotonin expression have a significant impact on behavior and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety, mood and appetite. Fetal programming is a risk factor for the development of metabolic diseases during adulthood. Moreover, previous studies have shown that serotonin (5?HT), dopamine and leptin are important in energy balance. In the present study, the impact of maternal malnutrition?induced prenatal undernutrition (UN) was investigated in mice and the expression of 5?HT1A, dopamine (D)1, D2 and Ob?Rb receptors was analyzed in the hypothalamus during adulthood. The UN group showed a low birth weight compared with the control group. With regard to receptor expression, 5?HT1A in the UN group was increased in the hypothalamus and D1 was reduced, whereas D2 showed an increase from postnatal day (P)14 in the arcuate nucleus. Ob?Rb receptor expression was increased in the hypothalamus at P14 and P90. These observations indicated that maternal caloric restriction programs a postnatal body weight gain in offspring with an increased food intake in early postnatal life which continues into adulthood. In addition, UN in mice was found to be affected by Ob?Rb, 5?HT1A and D1/2 receptor expression, indicating that these observations may be associated with hyperphagia and obesity. PMID:24337628

  5. Effects of acute tryptophan depletion on brain serotonin function and concentrations of dopamine and norepinephrine in C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice.

    PubMed

    Biskup, Caroline Sarah; Sánchez, Cristina L; Arrant, Andrew; Van Swearingen, Amanda E D; Kuhn, Cynthia; Zepf, Florian Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is a method of lowering brain serotonin (5-HT). Administration of large neutral amino acids (LNAA) limits the transport of endogenous tryptophan (TRP) across the blood brain barrier by competition with other LNAAs and subsequently decreases serotonergic neurotransmission. A recent discussion on the specificity and efficacy of the ATD paradigm for inhibition of central nervous 5-HT has arisen. Moreover, side effects such as vomiting and nausea after intake of amino acids (AA) still limit its use. ATD Moja-De is a revised mixture of AAs which is less nauseating than conventional protocols. It has been used in preliminary clinical studies but its effects on central 5-HT mechanisms and other neurotransmitter systems have not been validated in an animal model. We tested ATD Moja-De (TRP-) in two strains of mice: C57BL/6J, and BALB/cJ, which are reported to have impaired 5-HT synthesis and a more anxious phenotype relative to other strains of mice. ATD Moja-De lowered brain TRP, significantly decreased 5-HT synthesis as indexed by 5-HTP levels after decarboxlyase inhibition, and lowered 5-HT and 5-HIAA in both strains of mice, however more so in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ. Dopamine and its metabolites as well as norepinephrine were not affected. A balanced (TRP+) control mixture did not raise 5-HT or 5-HIAA. The present findings suggest that ATD Moja-De effectively and specifically suppresses central serotonergic function. These results also demonstrate a strain-specific effect of ATD Moja-De on anxiety-like behavior. PMID:22629305

  6. Effects of Acute Tryptophan Depletion on Brain Serotonin Function and Concentrations of Dopamine and Norepinephrine in C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Biskup, Caroline Sarah; Sánchez, Cristina L.; Arrant, Andrew; Van Swearingen, Amanda E. D.; Kuhn, Cynthia; Zepf, Florian Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) is a method of lowering brain serotonin (5-HT). Administration of large neutral amino acids (LNAA) limits the transport of endogenous tryptophan (TRP) across the blood brain barrier by competition with other LNAAs and subsequently decreases serotonergic neurotransmission. A recent discussion on the specificity and efficacy of the ATD paradigm for inhibition of central nervous 5-HT has arisen. Moreover, side effects such as vomiting and nausea after intake of amino acids (AA) still limit its use. ATD Moja-De is a revised mixture of AAs which is less nauseating than conventional protocols. It has been used in preliminary clinical studies but its effects on central 5-HT mechanisms and other neurotransmitter systems have not been validated in an animal model. We tested ATD Moja-De (TRP?) in two strains of mice: C57BL/6J, and BALB/cJ, which are reported to have impaired 5-HT synthesis and a more anxious phenotype relative to other strains of mice. ATD Moja-De lowered brain TRP, significantly decreased 5-HT synthesis as indexed by 5-HTP levels after decarboxlyase inhibition, and lowered 5-HT and 5-HIAA in both strains of mice, however more so in C57BL/6J than in BALB/cJ. Dopamine and its metabolites as well as norepinephrine were not affected. A balanced (TRP+) control mixture did not raise 5-HT or 5-HIAA. The present findings suggest that ATD Moja-De effectively and specifically suppresses central serotonergic function. These results also demonstrate a strain- specific effect of ATD Moja-De on anxiety-like behavior. PMID:22629305

  7. Neurotransmitter transporters and their impact on the development of psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    The synaptic actions of most neurotransmitters are inactivated by reuptake into the nerve terminals from which they are released, or by uptake into adjacent cells. A family of more than 20 transporter proteins is involved. In addition to the plasma membrane transporters, vesicular transporters in the membranes of neurotransmitter storage vesicles are responsible for maintaining vesicle stores and facilitating exocytotic neurotransmitter release. The cell membrane monoamine transporters are important targets for CNS drugs. The transporters for noradrenaline and serotonin are key targets for antidepressant drugs. Both noradrenaline-selective and serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors are effective against major depression and a range of other psychiatric illnesses. As the newer drugs are safer in overdose than the first-generation tricyclic antidepressants, their use has greatly expanded. The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a key target for amphetamine and methylphenidate, used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Psychostimulant drugs of abuse (amphetamines and cocaine) also target DAT. The amino-acid neurotransmitters are inactivated by other families of neurotransmitter transporters, mainly located on astrocytes and other non-neural cells. Although there are many different transporters involved (four for GABA; two for glycine/D-serine; five for L-glutamate), pharmacology is less well developed in this area. So far, only one new amino-acid transporter-related drug has become available: the GABA uptake inhibitor tiagabine as a novel antiepileptic agent. PMID:16402124

  8. The role of neurotransmitters in alcohol dependence: animal research.

    PubMed

    De Witte, P

    1996-03-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that alcohol changes neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. These changes in levels of dopamine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), endogenous opioid peptides, and noradrenaline are associated with activation of reward centres in the brain. It is this property of alcohol that is believed to be responsible for the reinforcing effect of alcohol consumption in rats. One class of neurotransmitters, the endogenous opioid peptides, are believed to play an important role in alcohol reinforcement. This view is supported by the reduced preference for alcohol consumption found in rats given an opiate agonist. The widely distributed inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is also believed to play a fundamental role in mediating the effects of alcohol. A better understanding of the mechanisms that support alcohol dependence in animals offers hope for the development of pharmacological interventions to block these mechanisms, an approach that is now being explored in humans. PMID:9845033

  9. Polyethylenimine Carbon Nanotube Fiber Electrodes for Enhanced Detection of Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based microelectrodes have been investigated as alternatives to carbon-fiber microelectrodes for the detection of neurotransmitters because they are sensitive, exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, and are more resistant to surface fouling. Wet spinning CNTs into fibers using a coagulating polymer produces a thin, uniform fiber that can be fabricated into an electrode. CNT fibers formed in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) have been used as microelectrodes to detect dopamine, serotonin, and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we characterize microelectrodes with CNT fibers made in polyethylenimine (PEI), which have much higher conductivity than PVA-CNT fibers. PEI-CNT fibers have lower overpotentials and higher sensitivities than PVA-CNT fiber microelectrodes, with a limit of detection of 5 nM for dopamine. The currents for dopamine were adsorption controlled at PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes, independent of scan repetition frequency, and stable for over 10 h. PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes were resistant to surface fouling by serotonin and the metabolite interferant 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No change in sensitivity was observed for detection of serotonin after 30 flow injection experiments or after 2 h in 5-HIAA for PEI-CNT electrodes. The antifouling properties were maintained in brain slices when serotonin was exogenously applied multiple times or after bathing the slice in 5-HIAA. Thus, PEI-CNT fiber electrodes could be useful for the in vivo monitoring of neurochemicals. PMID:25117550

  10. Polyethylenimine carbon nanotube fiber electrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Jacobs, Christopher B; Trikantzopoulos, Elefterios; Ross, Ashley E; Venton, B Jill

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based microelectrodes have been investigated as alternatives to carbon-fiber microelectrodes for the detection of neurotransmitters because they are sensitive, exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, and are more resistant to surface fouling. Wet spinning CNTs into fibers using a coagulating polymer produces a thin, uniform fiber that can be fabricated into an electrode. CNT fibers formed in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) have been used as microelectrodes to detect dopamine, serotonin, and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we characterize microelectrodes with CNT fibers made in polyethylenimine (PEI), which have much higher conductivity than PVA-CNT fibers. PEI-CNT fibers have lower overpotentials and higher sensitivities than PVA-CNT fiber microelectrodes, with a limit of detection of 5 nM for dopamine. The currents for dopamine were adsorption controlled at PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes, independent of scan repetition frequency, and stable for over 10 h. PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes were resistant to surface fouling by serotonin and the metabolite interferant 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No change in sensitivity was observed for detection of serotonin after 30 flow injection experiments or after 2 h in 5-HIAA for PEI-CNT electrodes. The antifouling properties were maintained in brain slices when serotonin was exogenously applied multiple times or after bathing the slice in 5-HIAA. Thus, PEI-CNT fiber electrodes could be useful for the in vivo monitoring of neurochemicals. PMID:25117550

  11. Selective serotonin reuptake blockade increases extracellular dopamine in noradrenaline-rich isocortical but not prefrontal areas: dependence on serotonin-1A receptors and independence from noradrenergic innervation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, V; Cacciapaglia, F; Frau, R; Di Chiara, G

    2005-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of two serotonin (5-HT) uptake inhibitors, citalopram and paroxetine, and of a non-selective noradrenaline (NA) and 5-HT uptake blocker, imipramine, on extracellular NA and dopamine (DA) in the prefrontal cortex (PfCX), parietal cortex (ParCX) and occipital cortex (OccCX). Citalopram, the most selective 5-HT uptake blocker, increased dialysate DA in the OccCX and ParCX but not in the PfCX and this effect was prevented in the OccCX by WAY-100635, an antagonist of serotonin-1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors, but not by dorsal noradrenergic bundle (DNAB) lesions that reduced to unmeasurable levels basal dialysate NA but did not affect dialysate DA. Paroxetine, a less selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor than citalopram, at the dose of 5 mg/kg, increased DA in the OccCX but not in the PfCX; however, at doses of 10 mg/kg, which increase PfCX NA, paroxetine increased DA also in this area. Imipramine increased dialysate DA and NA both in the PfCX and in the OccCX and this effect was abolished by DNAB lesions and was reduced but not abolished by WAY-100635. Administration of doses of reboxetine and citalopram that do not increase DA release in the OccCX if given separately, markedly increased DA when combined. These results indicate that endogenous 5-HT, raised by selective blockade of the 5-HT carrier, can increase extracellular DA in the OccCX and in the ParCX by stimulating 5-HT(1A) receptors independently from the presence of NA terminals, although blockade of 5-HT and NA carrier can strongly interact to raise extracellular DA in this area. These observations are consistent with the existence of DA neurons separate from the NA ones contributing to extracellular DA even in NA-rich/DA poor isocortical areas. PMID:15816860

  12. A carbon nanofiber based biosensor for simultaneous detection of dopamine and serotonin in the presence of ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Emily; Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Tanaka, Zuki; Zhang, David; Marsh, Michael P.; Andrews, Russell J.; Lee, Kendall H.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica E.

    2013-01-01

    A biosensor based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is found to be effective for the simultaneous detection of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the presence of excess ascorbic acid (AA). The CNF electrode outperforms the conventional glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for both selectivity and sensitivity. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), three distinct peaks are seen for the CNF electrode at 0.13 V, 0.45 V, and 0.70 V for the ternary mixture of AA, DA, and 5-HT. In contrast, the analytes are indistinguishable in a mixture using a GCE. For the CNF electrode, the detection limits are 50 nM for DA and 250 nM for 5-HT. PMID:23228495

  13. A carbon nanofiber based biosensor for simultaneous detection of dopamine and serotonin in the presence of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Rand, Emily; Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Tanaka, Zuki; Zhang, David A; Marsh, Michael P; Andrews, Russell J; Lee, Kendall H; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M; Koehne, Jessica E

    2013-04-15

    A biosensor based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is found to be effective for the simultaneous detection of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the presence of excess ascorbic acid (AA). The CNF electrode outperforms the conventional glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for both selectivity and sensitivity. Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), three distinct peaks are seen for the CNF electrode at 0.13 V, 0.45 V, and 0.70 V for the ternary mixture of AA, DA, and 5-HT. In contrast, the analytes are indistinguishable in a mixture using a GCE. For the CNF electrode, the detection limits are 50 nM for DA and 250 nM for 5-HT. PMID:23228495

  14. The role of endogenous serotonin in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Angoa Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Shah, Mrudang M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2010-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the striatum where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are maximal. Endogenous DA has been implicated as a critical participant in METH-induced neurotoxicity, most likely as a substrate for non-enzymatic oxidation by METH-generated reactive oxygen species. The striatum is also extensively innervated by serotonin (5HT) nerve endings and this neurochemical system is modified by METH in much the same manner as seen in DA nerve endings (i.e., increased release of 5HT, loss of function in tryptophan hydroxylase and the serotonin transporter, long-term depletion of 5HT stores). 5HT can also be modified by reactive oxygen species to form highly reactive species that damage neurons but its role in METH neurotoxicity has not been assessed. Increases in 5HT levels with 5-hydroxytryptophan do not change METH-induced neurotoxicity to the DA nerve endings as revealed by reductions in DA, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels. Partial reductions in 5HT with p-chlorophenylalanine are without effect on METH toxicity, despite the fact that p-chlorophenylalanine largely prevents METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice lacking the gene for brain tryptophan hydroxylase 2 are devoid of brain 5HT and respond to METH in the same manner as wild-type controls, despite showing enhanced drug-induced hyperthermia. Taken together, the present results indicate that endogenous 5HT does not appear to play a role in METH-induced damage to DA nerve endings of the striatum. PMID:20722968

  15. Disturbed neurotransmitter transporter expression in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin H; Reese, Edmund A; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Rapoport, Stanley I; Rao, Jagadeesh S

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by memory loss and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. An imbalance of different neurotransmitters--glutamate, acetylcholine, dopamine, and serotonin--has been proposed as the neurobiological basis of behavioral symptoms in AD. The molecular changes associated with neurotransmission imbalance in AD are not clear. We hypothesized that altered reuptake of neurotransmitters by vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), or the dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT) are involved in the neurotransmission imbalance in AD. We tested this hypothesis by examining protein and mRNA levels of these transporters in postmortem prefrontal cortex from 10 AD patients and 10 matched non-AD controls. Compared with controls, protein and mRNA levels of VGLUTs, EAAT1-3, VAChT, and SERT were reduced significantly in AD. Expression of DAT and catechol O-methyltransferase was unchanged. Reduced VGLUTs and EAATs may contribute to an alteration in glutamatergic recycling, and reduced SERT could exacerbate depressive symptoms in AD. The reduced VAChT expression could contribute to the recognized cholinergic deficit in AD. Altered neurotransmitter transporters could contribute to the pathophysiology of AD and are potential targets for therapy. PMID:21743130

  16. Pharmacological and Behavioral Characterization of D-473, an Orally Active Triple Reuptake Inhibitor Targeting Dopamine, Serotonin and Norepinephrine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Aloke K.; Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Xu, Liping; Mabrouk, Omar; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively) indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule. PMID:25427177

  17. Behaviorally active doses of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A increase brain serotonin and dopamine levels and turnover.

    PubMed

    Darmani, N A; Janoyan, J J; Kumar, N; Crim, J L

    2003-07-01

    Large doses (10-40 mg/kg) of the selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist, SR 141716A, produce the head-twitch response (HTR) and scratching in rodents and vomiting in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva). Agents that increase brain serotonin (5-HT) levels induce the HTR in rodents, whereas enhancements in either brain 5-HT or dopamine concentrations can lead to production of emesis in vomiting species. The present study was undertaken to demonstrate whether large doses of SR 141716A can (1) induce the HTR and scratching in the least shrew and (2) cause concurrent biochemical changes in brain 5-HT and dopamine concentrations. SR 141716A (0, 1, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p.) administration induced the HTR, scratching and vomiting. The HTR effect was bell shaped with a maximum frequency occurring at the 20 mg/kg SR 141716A dose, whereas the scratching and vomiting behaviors displayed dose-dependent effects. The selective 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist, SR 46349B (0, 0.1, 0.25, 1, 3 and 6 mg/kg i.p.), differentially attenuated all SR 141716A (20 mg/kg)-induced behaviors because the HTR was relatively more potently and completely blocked. In the shrew forebrain, SR 141716A (20 and 40 mg/kg ip) caused dose- and time-dependent increases in the levels of 5-HT and dopamine and the concentrations of their major metabolites [5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA)] and the turnover of both monoamines. Although the effects of SR 141716A on brainstem concentrations of both monoamines and their metabolites were not always consistent, the CB(1) antagonist did increase the turnover of both 5-HT and dopamine. The present findings suggest that the mechanism and the neurochemical substrate for SR 141716A-induced HTR and scratching behaviors is enhancement of 5-HT release, whereas increased release of 5-HT and dopamine probably contributes to the production of emesis. PMID:12957219

  18. Detection and Monitoring of Neurotransmitters - a Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia; Lee, Kendall; Durrer, William; Bennet, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman mapping spectroscopy for simultaneously and locally detecting important compounds in neuroscience such as dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine. The Raman results show shifting of the characteristic vibrations of the compounds, observations consistent with previous spectroscopic studies. Although some vibrations are common in these neurotransmitters, Raman mapping was achieved by detecting non-overlapping characteristic spectral signatures of the compounds, as follows: for dopamine the vibration attributed to C-O stretching, for serotonin the indole ring stretching vibration, and for adenosine the adenine ring vibrations. Without damage, dyeing, or preferential sample preparation, confocal Raman mapping provided positive detection of each neurotransmitter, allowing association of the high-resolution spectra with specific micro-scale image regions. Such information is particularly important for complex, heterogeneous samples, where modification of the chemical or physical composition can influence the neurotransmission processes. We also report an estimated dopamine diffusion coefficient two orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated by the flow-injection method.

  19. Radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study of neurotransmitter systems is one of the major thrusts in emission tomography today. The current generation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) radiotracers examines neurotransmitter properties from a number of different perspectives including their pre and post synaptic sites and the activity of the enzymes which regulate their concentration. Although the dopamine system has been the most extensively investigated, other neurotransmitter systems including the acetylcholine muscarine, serotonin, benzodiazepine, opiate, NMDA and others are also under intensive development. Enzymes involved in the synthesis and regulation of neurotransmitter concentration, for example monoamine oxidase and amino acid decarboxylase has also been probed in vivo. Medical applications range from the study of normal function and the characterization of neurotransmitter activity in neurological and psychiatric diseases and in heart disease and cancer to the study of the binding of therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. This chapter will provide an overview of the current generation of radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems including radiotracer design, synthesis localization mechanisms and applications in emission tomography. 60 refs., 1 tab.

  20. Multiple functions of neuronal plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Luca; Raiteri, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Removal from receptors of neurotransmitters just released into synapses is one of the major steps in neurotransmission. Transporters situated on the plasma membrane of nerve endings and glial cells perform the process of neurotransmitter (re)uptake. Because the density of transporters in the membranes can fluctuate, transporters can determine the transmitter concentrations at receptors, thus modulating indirectly the excitability of neighboring neurons. Evidence is accumulating that neurotransmitter transporters can exhibit multiple functions. Being bidirectional, neurotransmitter transporters can mediate transmitter release by working in reverse, most often under pathological conditions that cause ionic gradient dysregulations. Some transporters reverse to release transmitters, like dopamine or serotonin, when activated by 'indirectly acting' substrates, like the amphetamines. Some transporters exhibit as one major function the ability to capture transmitters into nerve terminals that perform insufficient synthesis. Transporter activation can generate conductances that regulate directly neuronal excitability. Synaptic and non-synaptic transporters play different roles. Cytosolic Na(+) elevations accompanying transport can interact with plasmalemmal or/and mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers thus generating calcium signals. Finally, neurotransmitter transporters can behave as receptors mediating releasing stimuli able to cause transmitter efflux through multiple mechanisms. Neurotransmitter transporters are therefore likely to play hitherto unknown roles in multiple therapeutic treatments. PMID:26300320

  1. SLC6 neurotransmitter transporters: structure, function, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Anders S; Andersen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine N; Sørensen, Lena; Eriksen, Jacob; Loland, Claus J; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gether, Ulrik

    2011-09-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), dopamine, and norepinephrine, and the amino acid neurotransmitters GABA and glycine. The SLC6 NTTs are widely expressed in the mammalian brain and play an essential role in regulating neurotransmitter signaling and homeostasis by mediating uptake of released neurotransmitters from the extracellular space into neurons and glial cells. The transporters are targets for a wide range of therapeutic drugs used in treatment of psychiatric diseases, including major depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and epilepsy. Furthermore, psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines have the SLC6 NTTs as primary targets. Beginning with the determination of a high-resolution structure of a prokaryotic homolog of the mammalian SLC6 transporters in 2005, the understanding of the molecular structure, function, and pharmacology of these proteins has advanced rapidly. Furthermore, intensive efforts have been directed toward understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in regulation of the activity of this important class of transporters, leading to new methodological developments and important insights. This review provides an update of these advances and their implications for the current understanding of the SLC6 NTTs. PMID:21752877

  2. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  3. WINCS-BASED WIRELESS ELECTROCHEMICAL MONITORING OF SEROTONIN (5-HT) USING FAST-SCAN CYCLIC VOLTAMMETRY: PROOF OF PRINCIPLE

    PubMed Central

    Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Chang, Su-Youne; Tye, Susannah J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Garris, Paul A.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-01-01

    Object We previously reported the development of a Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for measuring dopamine and suggested that this technology may be useful for evaluating deep brain stimulation (DBS)-related neuromodulatory effects on neurotransmitter systems. WINCS supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially resolved neurotransmitter measurements. The FSCV parameters used to establish WINCS dopamine measurements are not suitable for serotonin, a neurotransmitter implicated in depression, because they lead to CFM fouling and a loss of sensitivity. Here, we incorporate into WINCS a previously described N-shaped waveform applied at a high scan rate to establish wireless serotonin monitoring. Methods FSCV optimized for the detection of serotonin consisted of an N-shaped waveform scanned linearly from a resting potential of, in V, +0.2 to +1.0, then to ?0.1 and back to +0.2 at a rate of 1000 V/s. Proof of principle tests included flow injection analysis and electrically evoked serotonin release in the dorsal raphe nucleus of rat brain slices. Results Flow cell injection analysis demonstrated that the N waveform applied at a scan rate of 1000 V/s significantly reduced serotonin fouling of the CFM, relative to that observed with FSCV parameters for dopamine. In brain slices, WINCS reliably detected sub-second serotonin release in the dorsal raphe nucleus evoked by local high-frequency stimulation. Conclusion WINCS supported high-fidelity wireless serotonin monitoring by FSCV at a CFM. In the future such measurements of serotonin in large animal models and in humans may help to establish the mechanism of DBS for psychiatric disease. PMID:20415521

  4. The methylation, neurotransmitter, and antioxidant connections between folate and depression.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alan L

    2008-09-01

    Depression is common - one-fourth of the U.S. population will have a depressive episode sometime in life. Folate deficiency is also relatively common in depressed people, with approximately one-third of depressed individuals having an outright deficiency. Folate is a water-soluble B-vitamin necessary for the proper biosynthesis of the monoamine neurotransmitters serotonin, epinephrine, and dopamine. The active metabolite of folate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF, L-methylfolate), participates in re-methylation of the amino acid metabolite homocysteine, creating methionine. S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), the downstream metabolite of methionine, is involved in numerous biochemical methyl donation reactions, including reactions forming monoamine neurotransmitters. Without the participation of 5-MTHF in this process, SAMe and neurotransmitter levels decrease in the cerebrospinal fluid, contributing to the disease process of depression. SAMe supplementation was shown to improve depressive symptoms. 5-MTHF also appears to stabilize, enhance production of, or possibly act as a substitute for, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor in monoamine neurotransmitter biosynthesis. There are few intervention studies of folic acid or 5-MTHF as a stand-alone treatment for depression related to folate deficiency; however, the studies that have been conducted are promising. Depressed individuals with low serum folate also tend to not respond well to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant drugs. Correcting the insufficiency by dosing folate along with the SSRI results in a significantly better antidepressant response. PMID:18950248

  5. Associations between Dopamine and Serotonin Genes and Job Satisfaction: Preliminary Evidence from the Add Health Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Zhaoli; Li, Wendong; Arvey, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous behavioral genetic studies have found that job satisfaction is partially heritable. We went a step further to examine particular genetic markers that may be associated with job satisfaction. Using an oversample from the National Adolescent Longitudinal Study (Add Health Study), we found 2 genetic markers, dopamine receptor gene DRD4 VNTR…

  6. The Role of Dopamine in Schizophrenia from a Neurobiological and Evolutionary Perspective: Old Fashioned, but Still in Vogue

    PubMed Central

    Brisch, Ralf; Saniotis, Arthur; Wolf, Rainer; Bielau, Hendrik; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Braun, Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Kumaratilake, Jaliya; Henneberg, Maciej; Gos, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. The revised dopamine hypothesis states that dopamine abnormalities in the mesolimbic and prefrontal brain regions exist in schizophrenia. However, recent research has indicated that glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, and serotonin alterations are also involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. This review provides an in-depth analysis of dopamine in animal models of schizophrenia and also focuses on dopamine and cognition. Furthermore, this review provides not only an overview of dopamine receptors and the antipsychotic effects of treatments targeting them but also an outline of dopamine and its interaction with other neurochemical models of schizophrenia. The roles of dopamine in the evolution of the human brain and human mental abilities, which are affected in schizophrenia patients, are also discussed. PMID:24904434

  7. The role of dopamine in schizophrenia from a neurobiological and evolutionary perspective: old fashioned, but still in vogue.

    PubMed

    Brisch, Ralf; Saniotis, Arthur; Wolf, Rainer; Bielau, Hendrik; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Braun, Katharina; Braun, Anna Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Kumaratilake, Jaliya; Kumaritlake, Jaliya; Henneberg, Maciej; Gos, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. The revised dopamine hypothesis states that dopamine abnormalities in the mesolimbic and prefrontal brain regions exist in schizophrenia. However, recent research has indicated that glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, and serotonin alterations are also involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. This review provides an in-depth analysis of dopamine in animal models of schizophrenia and also focuses on dopamine and cognition. Furthermore, this review provides not only an overview of dopamine receptors and the antipsychotic effects of treatments targeting them but also an outline of dopamine and its interaction with other neurochemical models of schizophrenia. The roles of dopamine in the evolution of the human brain and human mental abilities, which are affected in schizophrenia patients, are also discussed. PMID:24904434

  8. Identification and developmental expression of the enzymes responsible for dopamine, histamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2013-01-01

    Neurochemicals are likely to play key roles in physiological/behavioral control in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton for much of the North Atlantic Ocean. Previously, a de novo assembled transcriptome consisting of 206,041 unique sequences was used to characterize the peptidergic signaling systems of Calanus. Here, this assembly was mined for transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amine biosynthesis. Using known Drosophila melanogaster proteins as templates, transcripts encoding putative Calanus homologs of tryptophan-phenylalanine hydroxylase (dopamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine biosynthesis), DOPA decarboxylase (dopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), histidine decarboxylase (histamine biosynthesis), tyrosine decarboxylase (octopamine biosynthesis), tyramine ?-hydroxylase (octopamine biosynthesis) and tryptophan hydroxylase (serotonin biosynthesis) were identified. Reverse BLAST and domain analyses show that the proteins deduced from these transcripts possess sequence homology to and the structural hallmarks of their respective enzyme families. Developmental profiling revealed a remarkably consistent pattern of expression for all transcripts, with the highest levels of expression typically seen in the early nauplius and early copepodite. These expression patterns suggest roles for amines during development, particularly in the metamorphic transitions from embryo to nauplius and from nauplius to copepodite. Taken collectively, the data presented here lay a strong foundation for future gene-based studies of aminergic signaling in this and other copepod species, in particular assessment of the roles they may play in developmental control. PMID:24148657

  9. Identification and developmental expression of the enzymes responsible for dopamine, histamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Lenz, Petra H

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemicals are likely to play key roles in physiological/behavioral control in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton for much of the North Atlantic Ocean. Previously, a de novo assembled transcriptome consisting of 206,041 unique sequences was used to characterize the peptidergic signaling systems of Calanus. Here, this assembly was mined for transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amine biosynthesis. Using known Drosophila melanogaster proteins as templates, transcripts encoding putative Calanus homologs of tryptophan-phenylalanine hydroxylase (dopamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine biosynthesis), DOPA decarboxylase (dopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), histidine decarboxylase (histamine biosynthesis), tyrosine decarboxylase (octopamine biosynthesis), tyramine ?-hydroxylase (octopamine biosynthesis) and tryptophan hydroxylase (serotonin biosynthesis) were identified. Reverse BLAST and domain analyses show that the proteins deduced from these transcripts possess sequence homology to and the structural hallmarks of their respective enzyme families. Developmental profiling revealed a remarkably consistent pattern of expression for all transcripts, with the highest levels of expression typically seen in the early nauplius and early copepodite. These expression patterns suggest roles for amines during development, particularly in the metamorphic transitions from embryo to nauplius and from nauplius to copepodite. Taken collectively, the data presented here lay a strong foundation for future gene-based studies of aminergic signaling in this and other copepod species, in particular assessment of the roles they may play in developmental control. PMID:24148657

  10. MPA-capped CdTe quantum dots exposure causes neurotoxic effects in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans by affecting the transporters and receptors of glutamate, serotonin and dopamine at the genetic level, or by increasing ROS, or both.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tianshu; He, Keyu; Zhan, Qinglin; Ang, Shengjun; Ying, Jiali; Zhang, Shihan; Zhang, Ting; Xue, Yuying; Tang, Meng

    2015-12-28

    As quantum dots (QDs) are widely used in biomedical applications, the number of studies focusing on their biological properties is increasing. While several studies have attempted to evaluate the toxicity of QDs towards neural cells, the in vivo toxic effects on the nervous system and the molecular mechanisms are unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurotoxic effects and the underlying mechanisms of water-soluble cadmium telluride (CdTe) QDs capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Our results showed that exposure to MPA-capped CdTe QDs induced behavioral defects, including alterations to body bending, head thrashing, pharyngeal pumping and defecation intervals, as well as impaired learning and memory behavior plasticity, based on chemotaxis or thermotaxis, in a dose-, time- and size-dependent manner. Further investigations suggested that MPA-capped CdTe QDs exposure inhibited the transporters and receptors of glutamate, serotonin and dopamine in C. elegans at the genetic level within 24 h, while opposite results were observed after 72 h. Additionally, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was observed in the CdTe QD-treated worms, which confirmed the common nanotoxicity mechanism of oxidative stress damage, and might overcome the increased gene expression of neurotransmitter transporters and receptors in C. elegans induced by long-term QD exposure, resulting in more severe behavioral impairments. PMID:26583374

  11. Striatal serotonin 2C receptors decrease nigrostriatal dopamine release by increasing GABA-A receptor tone in the substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Burke, Mary V; Nocjar, Christine; Sonneborn, Alex J; McCreary, Andrew C; Pehek, Elizabeth A

    2014-11-01

    Drugs acting at the serotonin-2C (5-HT2C) receptor subtype have shown promise as therapeutics in multiple syndromes including obesity, depression, and Parkinson's disease. While it is established that 5-HT2C receptor stimulation inhibits DA release, the neural circuits and the localization of the relevant 5-HT2C receptors remain unknown. This study used dual-probe in vivo microdialysis to investigate the relative contributions of 5-HT2C receptors localized in the rat substantia nigra (SN) and caudate-putamen (CP) in the control of nigrostriatal DA release. Systemic administration (3.0 mg/kg) of the 5-HT2C receptor selective agonist Ro 60-0175 [(?S)-6-Chloro-5-fluoro-?-methyl-1H-indole-1-ethanamine fumarate] decreased, whereas intrastriatal infusions of the selective 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242084 [6-Chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide; 1.0 ?M] increased, basal DA in the CP. Depending on the site within the SN pars reticulata (SNpr), infusions of SB 242084 had more modest but significant effects. Moreover, infusions of the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol (10 ?M) into the SNpr completely reversed the increases in striatal DA release produced by intrastriatal infusions of SB 242084. These findings suggest a role for 5-HT2C receptors regulating striatal DA release that is highly localized. 5-HT2C receptors localized in the striatum may represent a primary site of action that is mediated by the actions on GABAergic activity in the SN. Dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) project to the caudate-putamen (CP; striatum). This circuitry is implicated in numerous pathologies including Parkinson's disease. Using in vivo microdialysis, we demonstrated that blockade of serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptors in the CP increased nigrostriatal DA release. Infusions of a GABA-A agonist into the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) blocked this increase. This work indicates that striatal serotonin 2C receptors regulate GABAergic tone in the SNpr, which in turn regulates nigrostriatal DA release. PMID:25073477

  12. Identification of dopamine- and serotonin-related genes modulated by bisphenol A in the prefrontal cortex of male rats.

    PubMed

    Castro, Beatriz; Sánchez, Pilar; Miranda, María T; Torres, Jesús M; Ortega, Esperanza

    2015-11-01

    There is concern that exposure of embryos and/or infants to bisphenol A (BPA) may lead to neurological and behavioral disorders with unknown prefrontal cortex (PFC) involvement. Critical PFC functions are modulated by dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) systems, whose alterations have been associated with psychopathologies that may appear in youth and/or adulthood. This study aims to determine in the PFC of male rats exposed to a low dose of BPA (10?gkg(-1)d(-1)) from gestational day 12 (GD12) to postnatal day 21 (PND21): (i) DA- and 5-HT-related genes modulated by BPA at the juvenile stage (PND21); (ii) reversible and irreversible transcriptional effects; (iii) long-term consequences (effects in adult rats, PND90). In juvenile rats, BPA altered significantly the transcription of 12 out of the 84 genes analyzed using PCR-array techniques. Interestingly, transcript levels of the neurotrophic factor Gdnf were decrease by BPA in both juvenile and adult rats. At adulthood, disruptions in genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes for DA and 5-HT synthesis emerged. Overall, the results indicate that early-life exposure to BPA has consequences on DA and 5-HT systems in both juvenile- and adult-life stages. Additionally, we reveal molecular targets that could provide the foundation for future BPA neurotoxicity studies. PMID:26141625

  13. Site-specific activation of dopamine and serotonin transmission by aniracetam in the mesocorticolimbic pathway of rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Shirane, M; Koshikawa, N

    2001-04-01

    The effects of aniracetam on extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites were examined in five brain regions in freely moving stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) using in vivo microdialysis. Basal DA release in SHRSP was uniformly lower in all regions tested than that in age-matched control Wistar Kyoto rats. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid levels were altered in the basolateral amygdala, dorsal hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of SHRSP. While basal 5-HT release decreased in the striatum and increased in the basolateral amygdala, there was no associated change in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Systemic administration of aniracetam to SHRSP enhanced both DA and 5-HT release with partly associated change in their metabolite levels in the prefrontal cortex, basolateral amygdala and dorsal hippocampus, but not in the striatum and nucleus accumbens shell, in a dose-dependent manner (30 and/or 100 mg/kg p.o.). Microinjection (1 and 10 ng) of aniracetam or its metabolites (N-anisoyl-GABA and 2-pyrrolidinone) into the nucleus accumbens shell produced no turning behavior. These findings indicate that SHRSP have a dopaminergic hypofunction throughout the brain and that aniracetam elicits a site-specific activation in mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways in SHRSP, possibly via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the ventral tegmental area and raphe nuclei. The physiological roles in the aniracetam-sensitive brain regions may closely link with their clinical efficacy towards emotional disturbances appearing after cerebral infarction. PMID:11282361

  14. In vivo assessment of dopamine and serotonin receptors measured by C-11 n-methylspiperone (NMSP) in patients with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Tune, L.E.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Suneja, S.; Bjorvinsson, E.; Pearlson, G.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Links, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    The authors carried out PET imaging with C-11 NMSP in 13 pts. diagnosed as chronic schizophrenic by (DSM 3) criteria. They had no detectable serum neuroleptics by radioassay at the time of the scan. No pt. had received a neuroleptic for at least 1 week before study, with an avg. abstinence of 7 mo. One had never been on neuroleptics. During the time of scanning, 8/13 had delusions and hallucinations. There was no statistically significant difference from 44 age and sex matched control subjects for the 43 min. Caudate/cerebellar ratio, or the Frontal/Cerebellar ratio, both measures of relative dopamine D2, and serotonin S2 binding. These preliminary studies suggest that these drug free pts. show no large differences in the receptor levels compared to normal data. Differences from in vitro data could be due to: differences in duration of illness (the avg. 10.3) yrs.; difference in age (our pts. vg. 32.7 are much younger than those dying with schizophrenia); drug induced effects at death or persistent neuroleptic effect in our pts.; or difference in method.

  15. [Dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin content in various parts of the hypothalamus in alloxan diabetes].

    PubMed

    Baranov, V G; Propp, M V; Sokoloverova, I M; Savchenko, O N; Onegova, R F

    1980-01-01

    In male rats with various forms of alloxan diabetes ("prediabetes", latent and manifest diabetes) there was revealed an increase in noradrenaline level in the anterior and the medial-basal hypothalamus. A rise of dophamine content was noted in the hypothalamus of these animals. Serotonin level fell in all the parts of the hypothalamus of males with "prediabetes". The level of immunoreactive insulin on fasting stomach was diminished in manifest alloxan diabetes, particularly in its severe forms. The data obtained suggest the importance of the feedback mechanism between the metabolic disturbances as a result of insulin insufficiency and the changes in the monoamines level in the hypothalamus. The role of certain parts of the hypothalamus in the regulation of insulin secretion is stressed. PMID:7403031

  16. Orquestic regulation of neurotransmitters on reward-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area is strongly associated with the reward system. Dopamine is released in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex as a result of rewarding experiences such as food, sex, and neutral stimuli that become associated with them. Electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area or its output pathways can itself serve as a potent reward. Different drugs that increase dopamine levels are intrinsically rewarding. Although the dopaminergic system represent the cornerstone of the reward system, other neurotransmitters such as endogenous opioids, glutamate, ?-Aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, adenosine, endocannabinoids, orexins, galanin and histamine all affect this mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Consequently, genetic variations of neurotransmission are thought influence reward processing that in turn may affect distinctive social behavior and susceptibility to addiction. Here, we discuss current evidence on the orquestic regulation of different neurotranmitters on reward-seeking behavior and its potential effect on drug addiction. PMID:25061480

  17. Analysis of neurotransmitter tissue content of Drosophila melanogaster in different life stages.

    PubMed

    Denno, Madelaine E; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2015-01-21

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for studying neurological diseases with similar neurotransmission to mammals. While both larva and adult Drosophila have central nervous systems, not much is known about how neurotransmitter tissue content changes through development. In this study, we quantified tyramine, serotonin, octopamine, and dopamine in larval, pupal, and adult fly brains using capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Tyramine and octopamine content varied between life stages, with almost no octopamine being present in the pupa, while tyramine levels in the pupa were very high. Adult females had significantly higher dopamine content than males, but no other neurotransmitters were dependent on sex in the adult. Understanding the tissue content of different life stages will be beneficial for future work comparing the effects of diseases on tissue content throughout development. PMID:25437353

  18. Analysis of Neurotransmitter Tissue Content of Drosophila melanogaster in Different Life Stages

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for studying neurological diseases with similar neurotransmission to mammals. While both larva and adult Drosophila have central nervous systems, not much is known about how neurotransmitter tissue content changes through development. In this study, we quantified tyramine, serotonin, octopamine, and dopamine in larval, pupal, and adult fly brains using capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Tyramine and octopamine content varied between life stages, with almost no octopamine being present in the pupa, while tyramine levels in the pupa were very high. Adult females had significantly higher dopamine content than males, but no other neurotransmitters were dependent on sex in the adult. Understanding the tissue content of different life stages will be beneficial for future work comparing the effects of diseases on tissue content throughout development. PMID:25437353

  19. Discovery of a new class of potential multifunctional atypical antipsychotic agents targeting dopamine D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors: design, synthesis, and effects on behavior.

    PubMed

    Butini, Stefania; Gemma, Sandra; Campiani, Giuseppe; Franceschini, Silvia; Trotta, Francesco; Borriello, Marianna; Ceres, Nicoletta; Ros, Sindu; Coccone, Salvatore Sanna; Bernetti, Matteo; De Angelis, Meri; Brindisi, Margherita; Nacci, Vito; Fiorini, Isabella; Novellino, Ettore; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Mennini, Tiziana; Sandager-Nielsen, Karin; Andreasen, Jesper Tobias; Scheel-Kruger, Jorgen; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Fattorusso, Caterina

    2009-01-01

    Dopamine D(3) antagonism combined with serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor occupancy may represent a novel paradigm for developing innovative antipsychotics. The unique pharmacological features of 5i are a high affinity for dopamine D(3), serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors, together with a low affinity for dopamine D(2) receptors (to minimize extrapyramidal side effects), serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptors (to reduce the risk of obesity under chronic treatment), and for hERG channels (to reduce incidence of torsade des pointes). Pharmacological and biochemical data, including specific c-fos expression in mesocorticolimbic areas, confirmed an atypical antipsychotic profile of 5i in vivo, characterized by the absence of catalepsy at antipsychotic dose. PMID:19072656

  20. Central serotonin(2B) receptor blockade inhibits cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion independently of changes of subcortical dopamine outflow.

    PubMed

    Devroye, Céline; Cathala, Adeline; Di Marco, Barbara; Caraci, Filippo; Drago, Filippo; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Spampinato, Umberto

    2015-10-01

    The central serotonin2B receptor (5-HT2BR) is currently considered as an interesting pharmacological target for improved treatment of drug addiction. In the present study, we assessed the effect of two selective 5-HT2BR antagonists, RS 127445 and LY 266097, on cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and dopamine (DA) outflow in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the dorsal striatum of freely moving rats. The peripheral administration of RS 127445 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) or LY 266097 (0.63 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced basal DA outflow in the NAc shell, but had no effect on cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced DA outflow in this brain region. Also, RS 127445 failed to modify both basal and cocaine-induced DA outflow in the NAc core and the dorsal striatum. Conversely, both 5-HT2BR antagonists reduced cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion. Furthermore, RS 127445 as well as the DA-R antagonist haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced significantly the late-onset hyperlocomotion induced by the DA-R agonist quinpirole (0.5 mg/kg, s.c.). Altogether, these results demonstrate that 5-HT2BR blockade inhibits cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion independently of changes of subcortical DA outflow. This interaction takes place downstream to DA neurons and could involve an action at the level of dorsostriatal and/or NAc DA transmission, in keeping with the importance of these brain regions in the behavioural responses of cocaine. Overall, this study affords additional knowledge into the regulatory control exerted by the 5-HT2BR on ascending DA pathways, and provides additional support to the proposed role of 5-HT2BRs as a new pharmacological target in drug addiction. PMID:26116760

  1. Running Reduces Uncontrollable Stress-Evoked Serotonin and Potentiates Stress-Evoked Dopamine Concentrations in the Rat Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Amat, Jose; McConnell, Sara O.; Ghasem, Parsa R.; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Maier, Steven F.; Fleshner, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from both the human and animal literature indicates that exercise reduces the negative consequences of stress. The neurobiological etiology for this stress protection, however, is not completely understood. Our lab reported that voluntary wheel running protects rats from expressing depression-like instrumental learning deficits on the shuttle box escape task after exposure to unpredictable and inescapable tail shocks (uncontrollable stress). Impaired escape behavior is a result of stress-sensitized serotonin (5-HT) neuron activity in the dorsal raphe (DRN) and subsequent excessive release of 5-HT into the dorsal striatum following exposure to a comparatively mild stressor. However, the possible mechanisms by which exercise prevents stress-induced escape deficits are not well characterized. The purpose of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that exercise blunts the stress-evoked release of 5-HT in the dorsal striatum. Changes to dopamine (DA) levels were also examined, since striatal DA signaling is critical for instrumental learning and can be influenced by changes to 5-HT activity. Adult male F344 rats, housed with or without running wheels for 6 weeks, were either exposed to tail shock or remained undisturbed in laboratory cages. Twenty-four hours later, microdialysis was performed in the medial (DMS) and lateral (DLS) dorsal striatum to collect extracellular 5-HT and DA before, during, and following 2 mild foot shocks. We report wheel running prevents foot shock-induced elevation of extracellular 5-HT and potentiates DA concentrations in both the DMS and DLS approximately 24 h following exposure to uncontrollable stress. These data may provide a possible mechanism by which exercise prevents depression-like instrumental learning deficits following exposure to acute stress. PMID:26555633

  2. Regional and laminar distribution of the dopamine and serotonin innervation in the macaque cerebral cortex: a radioautographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, B.; Trottier, S.; Verney, C.; Gaspar, P.; Alvarez, C.

    1988-07-01

    The regional density and laminar distribution of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) afferents were investigated in the cerebral cortex of cynomolgus monkeys using a radioautographic technique that is based on the high affinity uptake capacity of these aminergic neurons. Large vibratome sections, 50 micron thick, were incubated with (3H) DA (0.2 microM) and desipramine (5 microM) or with unlabeled norepinephrine (5 microM) and (3H) 5-HT (0.6 microM), which allowed for the specific labeling of the DA and 5-HT innervations, respectively. After fixation, these sections were dried, defatted, and radioautographed by dipping. Semiquantitative data on the DA innervation also were provided by counting (3H) DA-labeled axonal varicosities in radioautographs from 4-micron-thick sections of the slices obtained after epon embedding. The DA innervation was widespread and differed in density and laminar distribution in the agranular and granular cortices. DA afferents were densest in the anterior cingulate (area 24) and the motor areas (areas 4, 6, and supplementary motor area (SMA)). In the latter they displayed a trilaminar pattern of distribution, predominating in layers I, IIIa, and V-VI, with characteristic cluster-like formations in layer IIIa, especially in the medial part of motor areas. In the granular prefrontal (areas 46, 9, 10, 11, 12), parietal (areas 1, 2, 3, 5, 7), temporal (areas 21, 22), and posterior cingulate (area 23) cortices, DA afferents were less dense and showed a bilaminar pattern of distribution, predominating in the depth of layer I and in layers V-VI; density in layers II, III, and IV was only 20% of that in layer I. The lowest density was in the visual cortex, particularly in area 17, where the DA afferents were almost restricted to layer I.

  3. The Role of Serotonin (5-HT) in Behavioral Control: Findings from Animal Research and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, CL; Biskup, CS; Herpertz, S; Gaber, TJ; Kuhn, CM; Hood, SH

    2015-01-01

    The neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine both have a critical role in the underlying neurobiology of different behaviors. With focus on the interplay between dopamine and serotonin, it has been proposed that dopamine biases behavior towards habitual responding, and with serotonin offsetting this phenomenon and directing the balance toward more flexible, goal-directed responding. The present focus paper stands in close relationship to the publication by Worbe et al. (2015), which deals with the effects of acute tryptophan depletion, a neurodietary physiological method to decrease central nervous serotonin synthesis in humans for a short period of time, on the balance between hypothetical goal-directed and habitual systems. In that research, acute tryptophan depletion challenge administration and a following short-term reduction in central nervous serotonin synthesis were associated with a shift of behavioral performance towards habitual responding, providing further evidence that central nervous serotonin function modulates the balance between goal-directed and stimulus-response habitual systems of behavioral control. In the present focus paper, we discuss the findings by Worbe and colleagues in light of animal experiments as well as clinical implications and discuss potential future avenues for related research. PMID:25991656

  4. REGULAR ARTICLE Immunohistochemical mapping of histamine, dopamine,

    E-print Network

    Hartline, Daniel K.

    REGULAR ARTICLE Immunohistochemical mapping of histamine, dopamine, and serotonin in the central amines histamine, dopamine, and serotonin. We have found low numbers of such cells and cell groups (approximately 37 histamine pairs, 22 dopamine pairs, and 12 serotonin pairs) compared with those in previously

  5. Memory, Mood, Dopamine, and Serotonin in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-Lesioned Mouse Model of Basal Ganglia Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vu?kovi?, Marta G.; Wood, Ruth I.; Holschneider, Daniel P.; Abernathy, Avery; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Smith, Alexsandra; Petzinger, Giselle M.; Jakowec, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned mouse serves as a model of basal ganglia injury and Parkinson’s disease. The present study investigated the effects of MPTP-induced lesioning on associative memory, conditioned fear, and affective behavior. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered saline or MPTP and separate groups were evaluated at either 7 or 30 days post-lesioning. In the social transmission of food preference test, mice showed a significant decrease in preference for familiar food 30 days post-MPTP compared to controls. Mice at both 7 and 30 days post-MPTP-lesioning had increased fear extinction compared to controls. HPLC analysis of tissues homogenates showed dopamine and serotonin were depleted in the striatum, frontal cortex, and amygdala. No changes in anxiety or depression were detected by the tail suspension, sucrose preference, light-dark preference, or hole-board tests. In conclusion, acute MPTP-lesioning regimen in mice causes impairments in associative memory and conditioned fear, no mood changes, and depletion of dopamine and serotonin throughout the brain. PMID:18718537

  6. Effect of bupropion on hippocampal neurotransmitters and on peripheral hormonal concentrations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, M F; Clinckers, R; Meeusen, R; Sarre, S; Ebinger, G; Michotte, Y

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to administer an acute dose of the dual dopamine norepinephrine reuptake blocker bupropion in freely moving rats and to monitor the extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations in the hippocampus via in vivo microdialysis and the peripheral hormonal concentrations via catheterization. A microdialysis probe was inserted in the hippocampus, and samples for serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine were collected every 20 min before and after the injection of 17 mg/kg of bupropion, for a total sampling time of 180 min. A catheter was placed in the vena femoralis of the second group of rats, and blood samples were collected before and after bupropion injection for quantification of growth hormone, prolactin, corticosterone, adrenocorticotropin hormone, and beta-endorphins. All neurotransmitter levels (dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin) significantly increased after bupropion injection. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in prolactin concentrations, whereas the other hormones showed no statistically significant variation. It can, therefore, be concluded that, although bupropion has dual reuptake proprieties, the observed effects both at the central and at the peripheral level seem to be ruled by the dopaminergic system. PMID:12692144

  7. Serotonin dysfunction disorders: a behavioral neurochemistry perspective.

    PubMed

    Petty, F; Davis, L L; Kabel, D; Kramer, G L

    1996-01-01

    The spectrum of efficacy of the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant drugs continues to expand. In fact, no psychiatric syndrome seems to worsen with these agents, and few studies fail to demonstrate clinical improvement in some patients, regardless of any nosologic nicety, such as precise DSM diagnosis. This suggests that the biological rubric of psychopathology is dimensional rather than categorical. New research using in vivo microdialysis shows differences in neurochemistry among SSRIs, wherein fluoxetine blocks reuptake of dopamine and norepinephrine, as well as serotonin, in medial prefrontal cortex, and fluvoxamine has a relatively more selective neurochemical profile. In the animal model of learned helplessness, which is a biobehavioral model for stress-induced anxiety causing depression, the SSRIs including fluvoxamine prevent helplessness. From these and other data, a neurotransmitter balance theory of biopsychopathology is formulated. In this hypothetical construct, dopamine, norepinephrine, and GABA modulate thought, anxiety, and mood, respectively. Serotonin is a stabilizing agent, which assists in returning the mind to its homeostatic setpoint. PMID:8698675

  8. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Guido K. W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  9. Neurotransmitters and Novelty: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Meeter, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Our brains are highly responsive to novelty. However, how novelty is processed in the brain, and what neurotransmitter systems play a role therein, remains elusive. Here, we systematically review studies on human participants that have looked at the neuromodulatory basis of novelty detection and processing. While theoretical models and studies on nonhuman animals have pointed to a role of the dopaminergic, cholinergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic systems, the human literature has focused almost exclusively on the first two. Dopamine was found to affect electrophysiological responses to novelty early in time after stimulus presentation, but evidence on its effects on later processing was found to be contradictory: While neuropharmacological studies mostly yielded null effects, gene studies did point to an important role for dopamine. Acetylcholine seems to dampen novelty signals in the medial temporal lobe, but boost them in frontal cortex. Findings on 5-HT (serotonin) were found to be mostly contradictory. Two large gaps were identified in the literature. First, few studies have looked at neuromodulatory influences on behavioral effects of novelty. Second, no study has looked at the involvement of the noradrenergic system in novelty processing. PMID:26601905

  10. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  11. Determination of Serotonin and Dopamine Metabolites in Human Brain Microdialysis and Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples by UPLC-MS/MS: Discovery of Intact Glucuronide and Sulfate Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Suominen, Tina; Uutela, Päivi; Ketola, Raimo A.; Bergquist, Jonas; Hillered, Lars; Finel, Moshe; Zhang, Hongbo; Laakso, Aki; Kostiainen, Risto

    2013-01-01

    An UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the determination of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), their phase I metabolites 5-HIAA, DOPAC and HVA, and their sulfate and glucuronide conjugates in human brain microdialysis samples obtained from two patients with acute brain injuries, ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples obtained from four patients with obstructive hydrocephalus, and a lumbar CSF sample pooled mainly from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia in preparation for orthopedic surgery. The method was validated by determining the limits of detection and quantification, linearity, repeatability and specificity. The direct method enabled the analysis of the intact phase II metabolites of 5-HT and DA, without hydrolysis of the conjugates. The method also enabled the analysis of the regioisomers of the conjugates, and several intact glucuronide and sulfate conjugates were identified and quantified for the first time in the human brain microdialysis and CSF samples. We were able to show the presence of 5-HIAA sulfate, and that dopamine-3-O-sulfate predominates over dopamine-4-O-sulfate in the human brain. The quantitative results suggest that sulfonation is a more important phase II metabolism pathway than glucuronidation in the human brain. PMID:23826355

  12. Ethylenedioxy homologs of N-methyl-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-aminopropane (MDMA) and its corresponding cathinone analog methylenedioxymethcathinone: Interactions with transporters for serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Del Bello, Fabio; Sakloth, Farhana; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H; Glennon, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    N-Methyl-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl)-2-aminopropane (MDMA; 'Ecstasy'; 1) and its ?-keto analog methylone (MDMC; 2) are popular drugs of abuse. Little is known about their ring-expanded ethylenedioxy homologs. Here, we prepared N-methyl-(3,4-ethylenedioxyphenyl)-2-aminopropane (EDMA; 3), both of its optical isomers, and ?-keto EDMA (i.e., EDMC; 4) to examine their effects at transporters for serotonin (SERT), dopamine (DAT), and norepinephrine (NET). In general, ring-expansion of the methylenedioxy group led to a several-fold reduction in potency at all three transporters. With respect to EDMA (3), S(+)3 was 6-fold, 50-fold, and 8-fold more potent than its R(-) enantiomer at SERT, DAT, and NET, respectively. Overall, in the absence of a ?-carbonyl group, the ethylenedioxy (i.e., 1,4-dioxane) substituent seems better accommodated at SERT than at DAT and NET. PMID:26233799

  13. Simultaneous measurement of serotonin, dopamine and their metabolites in mouse brain extracts by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry following derivatization with ethyl chloroformate.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Young; Myung, Seung-Woon; Kim, In-Soo; Choi, Dong-Kug; Kwon, Soon-Jung; Yoon, Sung-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    In order to measure the levels of serotonin (5-hydroxyltryptamine, 5-HT), dopamine (DA), 3,4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) and homovanillic acid (HVA) simultaneously, an effective derivatization method followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to electrochemical ionization mass spectrometry was used. The derivatization reaction of biological samples with ethyl chloroformate occurred rapidly at room temperature in aqueous conditions, and the resulting derivatives were isocratically separated with good selectivity using a C18 reversed-phase column within 30 min. The study results showed that the new derivatization procedure offers an excellent means of simultaneous determination of 5-HT, DA and their metabolites in mouse brain homogenates, which are important in a number of physiological and behavioral functions. PMID:23196426

  14. Neurotransmitters in the human and nonhuman primate basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Haber, S N

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new molecules, particularly peptides, have been identified as putative neurotransmitters. The basal ganglia, is especially rich in a number of classical transmitter molecules, amino acids and neuropeptides considered to function in neurotransmission. These include: the well-described terminal fields in the striatum which originate from the brain stem and contain the monoamines, dopamine and serotonin; amino acid containing axons projecting from the cortex and thalamus; striatal cholinergic and peptide-positive interneurons; and amino acid and peptide containing projection neurons to the globus pallidus and substantia nigra. Two amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, are considered to provide excitatory input to the striatum while gamma aminobutyric acid is thought to mediate inhibitory output. Neuropeptides which are richly concentrated in the basal ganglia include, enkephalin, dynorphin, substance P, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y and cholincystokinease. Changes in many of these peptide levels have recently been associated with a number of basal ganglia disorders. PMID:2876974

  15. LeuT-Desipramine Structure Reveals How Antidepressants Block Neurotransmitter Reuptake

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,Z.; Zhen, J.; Karpowich, N.; Goetz, R.; Law, C.; Reith, M.; Wang, D.

    2007-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants exert their pharmacological effect -- inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine -- by directly blocking neurotransmitter transporters (SERT, NET, and DAT, respectively) in the presynaptic membrane. The drug-binding site and the mechanism of this inhibition are poorly understood. We determined the crystal structure at 2.9 angstroms of the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a homolog of SERT, NET, and DAT, in complex with leucine and the antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine binds at the inner end of the extracellular cavity of the transporter and is held in place by a hairpin loop and by a salt bridge. This binding site is separated from the leucine-binding site by the extracellular gate of the transporter. By directly locking the gate, desipramine prevents conformational changes and blocks substrate transport. Mutagenesis experiments on human SERT and DAT indicate that both the desipramine-binding site and its inhibition mechanism are probably conserved in the human neurotransmitter transporters.

  16. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in major depression in a multi-neurotransmitter system: a focus on antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, R

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and the corresponding subreceptors involved in major depression. Neuronal circuits in the brainstem, hippocampus and hypothalamus are developed, since they can be used to derive a multimodal pharmacotherapy. In this sense, serotonin hypoactivity could occur through a strong presynaptic inhibition of glutaminergic neurons via the subtype 5 of metabotropic glutaminergic receptors, and noradrenaline hypoactivity could be due to an enhanced presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic neurons via GABAB receptors. In the hippocampus, dopamine hypoactivity leads to a decreased positive effect. In clinical trials, the antidepressant effect of drugs interfering with the mentioned subreceptors, for example the triple reuptake inhibitor amitifadine, is being investigated. Moreover, the alterations of neuropeptides, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone, neuropeptide Y and galanin are pointed out. The additional antidepressant effect of analogs, agonists and antagonists of the mentioned neuropeptides should be examined. PMID:24083608

  17. Loss of Ahi1 impairs neurotransmitter release and causes depressive behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Liyan; Qian, Xuanchen; Zhai, Lijing; Sun, Miao; Miao, Zhigang; Li, Jizhen; Xu, Xingshun

    2014-01-01

    Major depression is becoming one of the most prevalent forms of psychiatric disorders. However, the mechanisms of major depression are still not well-understood. Most antidepressants are only effective in some patients and produce some serious side effects. Animal models of depression are therefore essential to unravel the mechanisms of depression and to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Our previous studies showed that Abelson helper integration site-1 (Ahi1) deficiency causes depression-like behaviors in mice. In this study, we characterized the biochemical and behavioral changes in Ahi1 knockout (KO) mice. In Ahi1 KO mice, neurotransmitters including serotonin and dopamine were significantly decreased in different brain regions. However, glutamate and GABA levels were not affected by Ahi1 deficiency. The antidepressant imipramine attenuated depressive behaviors and partially restored brain serotonin level in Ahi1 KO mice. Our findings suggest that Ahi1 KO mice can be used for studying the mechanisms of depression and screening therapeutic targets. PMID:24691070

  18. Three-dimensional models of neurotransmitter transporters and their interactions with cocaine and S-citalopram.

    PubMed

    Ravna, Aina Westrheim

    2006-01-01

    Drugs that act on the human serotonin transporter (hSERT), human dopamine transporter (hDAT) and human noradrenaline transporter (hNET) are important in antidepressant treatment and well known in drug abuse. The investigation of their molecular mechanisms of action is very useful for designing new ligands with a therapeutic potential. The detailed three-dimensional molecular structure of any monoamine transporter is not known, but the three-dimensional electron density projection map of Escherichia coli Na+/H+ antiporter (NhaA) has provided structural basis for constructing models of such transporters using molecular modelling techniques. Three-dimensional models of these drug targets give insight into their structure, mechanisms and drug interactions. In these molecular modelling studies, an Escherichia coli NhaA model was first constructed based on its three-dimensional electron density projection map and experimental studies on NhaA and the Escherichia coli lactose permease symporter (Lac permease). Then three-dimensional models of the neurotransmitter transporters hDAT, hSERT and hNET were constructed based on the NhaA model and studies of ligand binding to mutated dopamine transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT). The structural properties of these neurotransmitter transporter models have been examined, and their interactions with cocaine and S-citalopram have been investigated. PMID:16684682

  19. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for /sup 3/H-glycine, /sup 3/H-dopamine, and /sup 3/H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these /sup 3/H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of /sup 3/H-glutamate and /sup 3/H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally.

  20. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a negligible change to the signal. Chapter 3 is devoted to the development and characterization of new CNT-Yarn Microelectrodes (CNTYME) which display a beneficial enhancement in sensitivity and reduction in both electron transfer kinetics and overpotential. Chapter 4 introduces the high-speed dopamine detection capabilities of CNTYMEs, almost two orders of magnitude faster than at CFMEs without any compromise in electrochemical sensitivity, and discusses how adsorption and desorption relate to this phenomenon.

  1. Effect of metyrapone on the fluoxetine-induced change in extracellular dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in the rat frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rogó?, Zofia; Go?embiowska, Krystyna

    2010-01-01

    Major depression is frequently associated with the hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitors have been shown to exert antidepressant action. Metyrapone (an inhibitor of the enzyme 11-?-hydroxylase) has been found to be effective as an adjunctive therapy in combination with other antidepressants (ADs) in both treatment-resistant depression and animal models. To understand the mechanism of the clinical efficacy of a combination of an AD and metyrapone in treatment-resistant depression, the present study was aimed at determining the influence of fluoxetine (FLU; a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and metyrapone, given separately or jointly, on the extracellular level of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in rat frontal cortex of freely moving rats using microdialysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. FLU (10 mg/kg) given alone increased the extracellular level of DA and 5-HT in the rat frontal cortex. Metyrapone (100 mg/kg) alone did not change the level of monoamines. A combination of FLU and metyrapone produced the same change in the efflux of both DA and 5-HT as did FLU alone. However, the latter combination (FLU and metyrapone) produced significantly bigger increases in the levels of extracellular DA metabolites (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid) and a 5-HT metabolite (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) than did FLU alone. The above findings suggest that--among other mechanisms--increases in the levels of extracellular DA and 5-HT metabolites may play a role in the enhancement of FLU efficacy by metyrapone, and may be of crucial importance to the pharmacotherapy of drug-resistant depression. PMID:21273658

  2. Anxiety and affective disorder comorbidity related to serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems: obsessive–compulsive disorder as an example of overlapping clinical and genetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis L.; Moya, Pablo R.; Fox, Meredith A.; Rubenstein, Liza M.; Wendland, Jens R.; Timpano, Kiara R.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have also been shown to have comorbid lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD; rates greater than 70%), bipolar disorder (rates greater than 10%) and other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In addition, overlap exists in some common genetic variants (e.g. the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene), and rare variants in genes/chromosomal abnormalities (e.g. the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome) found across the affective/anxiety disorder spectrums. OCD has been proposed as a possible independent entity for DSM-5, but by others thought best retained as an anxiety disorder subtype (its current designation in DSM-IV), and yet by others considered best in the affective disorder spectrum. This review focuses on OCD, a well-studied but still puzzling heterogeneous disorder, regarding alterations in serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in addition to other systems involved, and how related genes may be involved in the comorbidity of anxiety and affective disorders. OCD resembles disorders such as depression, in which gene × gene interactions, gene × environment interactions and stress elements coalesce to yield OC symptoms and, in some individuals, full-blown OCD with multiple comorbid disorders. PMID:23440468

  3. Anxiety and affective disorder comorbidity related to serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems: obsessive-compulsive disorder as an example of overlapping clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Dennis L; Moya, Pablo R; Fox, Meredith A; Rubenstein, Liza M; Wendland, Jens R; Timpano, Kiara R

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have also been shown to have comorbid lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD; rates greater than 70%), bipolar disorder (rates greater than 10%) and other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In addition, overlap exists in some common genetic variants (e.g. the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene), and rare variants in genes/chromosomal abnormalities (e.g. the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome) found across the affective/anxiety disorder spectrums. OCD has been proposed as a possible independent entity for DSM-5, but by others thought best retained as an anxiety disorder subtype (its current designation in DSM-IV), and yet by others considered best in the affective disorder spectrum. This review focuses on OCD, a well-studied but still puzzling heterogeneous disorder, regarding alterations in serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in addition to other systems involved, and how related genes may be involved in the comorbidity of anxiety and affective disorders. OCD resembles disorders such as depression, in which gene × gene interactions, gene × environment interactions and stress elements coalesce to yield OC symptoms and, in some individuals, full-blown OCD with multiple comorbid disorders. PMID:23440468

  4. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  5. Dopamine transporters govern diurnal variation in extracellular dopamine tone

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J.; España, Rodrigo A.; Locke, Jason L.; Konstantopoulos, Joanne K.; Rose, Jamie H.; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of neurotransmitter systems shows variations in state-dependent cell firing rates that are mechanistically linked to variations in extracellular levels, or tone, of their respective neurotransmitter. Diurnal variation in dopamine tone has also been demonstrated within the striatum, but this neurotransmitter is unique, in that variation in dopamine tone is likely not related to dopamine cell firing; this is largely because of the observation that midbrain dopamine neurons do not display diurnal fluctuations in firing rates. Therefore, we conducted a systematic investigation of possible mechanisms for the variation in extracellular dopamine tone. Using microdialysis and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in rats, as well as wild-type and dopamine transporter (DAT) knock-out mice, we demonstrate that dopamine uptake through the DAT and the magnitude of subsecond dopamine release is inversely related to the magnitude of extracellular dopamine tone. We investigated dopamine metabolism, uptake, release, D2 autoreceptor sensitivity, and tyrosine hydroxylase expression and activity as mechanisms for this variation. Using this approach, we have pinpointed the DAT as a critical governor of diurnal variation in extracellular dopamine tone and, as a consequence, influencing the magnitude of electrically stimulated dopamine release. Understanding diurnal variation in dopamine tone is critical for understanding and treating the multitude of psychiatric disorders that originate from perturbations of the dopamine system. PMID:24979798

  6. Neurotransmitter, opiodergic system, steroid-hormone interaction and involvement in the replacement therapy of sexual disorders.

    PubMed

    Frajese, G; Lazzari, R; Magnani, A; Moretti, C; Sforza, V; Nerozzi, D

    1990-11-20

    Dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) are the neurotransmitters most directly involved in sexual activity. DA plays a stimulatory role while 5-HT has an inhibitory effect. The two monoaminergic systems modulate the secretion of many hormones (GnRH, LH, testosterone, prolactin and endorphins) involved in sexual functional capacity. Furthermore, hormones influence synthesis and storage of brain neurotransmitters. Impotence can often be associated to clinical depression and altered neurotransmitter function. Moreover, stress represents an unbalance between various neurotransmitter systems and can induce impotence especially when disorders of the endorphinic system are present. Replacement therapy is based upon the understanding of these basic concepts. Impotence due to an underlying depressive illness must be treated with dopaminergic antidepressant drugs; while in stressful conditions a good response to the naloxone test is the preliminary criterion to subsequent naltrexone treatment. When a hormonal deficiency has been proved, the hormone replacement therapy is of course highly effective (gonadotropins in hypogonadotropic syndromes, testosterone in aging, etc.). Finally, idiopathic impotence could be treated by DA agonist and/or 5-HT antagonist drugs either alone or better yet in association with psychotherapy. PMID:1979499

  7. Changes in the levels, expression, and possible roles of serotonin and dopamine during embryonic development in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Tinikul, Ruchanok; Sobhon, Prasert

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the changes in the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA), and their possible roles during embryonic development of the freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The 5-HT and DA concentrations were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). The levels of 5-HT and DA gradually increased from early developing embryos to late developing embryos. The 5-HT concentrations gradually increased from the pale yellow egg to orange egg stages, and reaching a maximum at the black egg stage. DA concentrations were much lower in the early embryos than those of 5-HT (P<0.05), and gradually increased to reach the highest level at the black egg stage. Immunohistochemically, 5-HT was firstly detected in the early embryonic stages, whereas DA developed later than 5-HT. Functionally, 5-HT-treated female prawns at doses of 2.5×10(-5), 2.5×10(-6) and 2.5×10(-7)mol/prawn, produced embryos with significantly shortened lengths of early embryonic stages, whereas DA-treated prawns at all three doses, exerted its effects by significantly lengthening the period of mid-embryonic stage onwards. These results suggest significant involvement of 5-HT and DA in embryonic developmental processes of this species. PMID:26393313

  8. Effects of monoamine releasers with varying selectivity for releasing dopamine/norepinephrine versus serotonin on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S. Stevens

    2011-01-01

    Monoamine releasers constitute one class of candidate medications for treatment of cocaine abuse, and concurrent cocaine-versus-food choice procedures are potentially valuable as experimental tools to evaluate the efficacy and safety of candidate medications. This study assessed choice between cocaine and food by rhesus monkeys during treatment with five monoamine releasers that varied in selectivity to promote release of dopamine and norepinephrine (DA/NE) vs. serotonin (5HT) [m-fluoroamphetamine, (+)-phenmetrazine, (+)-methamphetamine, napthylisopropylamine and (±)-fenfluramine]. Rhesus monkeys (n=8) responded under a concurrent-choice schedule of food delivery (1-g pellets, fixed-ratio 100 schedule) and cocaine injections (0 – 0.1 mg/kg/inj, fixed-ratio 10 schedule). Cocaine choice dose-effect curves were determined daily during continuous seven-day treatment with saline or each test compound dose. During saline treatment, cocaine maintained a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice, and the highest cocaine doses (0.032 – 0.1 mg/kg/inj) maintained almost exclusive cocaine choice. Efficacy of monoamine releasers to decrease cocaine choice corresponded to their pharmacological selectivity to release DA/NE vs. 5HT. None of the releasers reduced cocaine choice or promoted reallocation of responding to food choice to the same extent as substituting saline for cocaine. These results extend the range of conditions across which DA/NE-selective releasers have been shown to reduce cocaine self-administration. PMID:22015808

  9. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal regulation, neurotransmitters and affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, D S; Risch, S C; Huey, L Y; Judd, L L; Rausch, J L

    1983-01-01

    Considerable evidence has accumulated indicating that alterations in neurotransmitters may play a role in the etiology of affective disorders on the one hand, and in the regulation of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (LHPA) on the other. Acetylcholine, norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA, the opioid polypeptides and dopamine have all been implicated in both phenomena. Although some contradictory evidence exists, norepinephrine, opioids, and GABA appear inhibitory, and serotonin and acetylcholine appear excitatory of the LHPA axis. In a correlative study, non-suppression of cortisol by dexamethasone correlated positively and significantly with methylphenidate-induced euphoric and antidepressant responses, and methadone induced growth hormone responses, possibly suggesting catecholamine and opioid receptor hypersensitivity. Although the overall effects of the cholinomimetic, physostigmine, did not correlate with dexamethasone non-suppression, strong positive correlations were found in a subgroup, consisting of affective disorder patients, between non-suppression of cortisol by dexamethasone and the physostigmine response, suggesting cholinergic hypersensitivity in the non-suppressing subjects. PMID:6140674

  10. Does chronic nicotine alter neurotransmitter receptors involved in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.A.; Lapin, E.P.; Lajtha, A.; Maker, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    Cigarette smokers are fewer in number among Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients than among groups of persons who do not have PD. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. One which must be tested is the possibility that some pharmacologic agent present in cigarette smoke may interact with some central nervous system component involved in PD. To this end, they have investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on receptors for some of the neurotransmitters that are affected in PD. Rats were injected for six weeks with saline or nicotine 0.8 mg/kg S.C., then killed and brains removed and dissected. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-ketanserin to serotonin receptors in frontal cortex and of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone to dopamine receptors in caudate was not affected. However, the binding of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone in nucleus accumbens was altered: the K/sub d/ increased from 0.16 +/- 0.02 nM to 0.61 +/- 0.07 nM, and the B/sub max/ increased from 507 +/- 47 fmol/mg protein to 910 +/- 43 fmol/mg (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). These values are based on three ligand concentrations. Additional studies are in progress to substantiate the data. It is concluded that chronic nicotine administration may alter dopamine receptors in nucleus accumbens.

  11. Polymorphisms in genes implicated in dopamine, serotonin and noradrenalin metabolism suggest association with cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolite concentrations in psychosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) are the major monoamine metabolites in the central nervous system (CNS). Their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations, reflecting the monoamine turnover rates in CNS, are partially under genetic influence and have been associated with schizophrenia. We have hypothesized that CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations represent intermediate steps between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes implicated in monoaminergic pathways and psychosis. Methods We have searched for association between 119 SNPs in genes implicated in monoaminergic pathways [tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), TPH2, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), DOPA decarboxylase (DDC), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and MAOB] and monoamine metabolite concentrations in CSF in 74 patients with psychotic disorder. Results There were 42 nominally significant associations between SNPs and CSF monoamine metabolite concentrations, which exceeded the expected number (20) of nominal associations given the total number of tests performed. The strongest association (p =?0.0004) was found between MAOB rs5905512, a SNP previously reported to be associated with schizophrenia in men, and MHPG concentrations in men with psychotic disorder. Further analyses in 111 healthy individuals revealed that 41 of the 42 nominal associations were restricted to patients with psychosis and were absent in healthy controls. Conclusions The present study suggests that altered monoamine turnover rates in CNS reflect intermediate steps in the associations between SNPs and psychosis. PMID:25073638

  12. The elevation of immunoreactive beta-endorphin in old male rats is related to alterations in dopamine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Forman, L J; Cavalieri, T; Estilow, S; Tatarian, G T

    1990-01-01

    The concentration of immunoreactive beta-endorphin (IR-BE) in the anterior pituitary (AP) and the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary (NIL) was elevated in old as compared to young male rats. Treatment of old male rats with the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, did not affect the concentration of IR-BE in the AP and produced a significant reduction in the concentration of IR-BE in the NIL. By contrast, administration of the serotonergic neurotoxin, p-CPA, significantly diminished the concentration of IR-BE in the AP of old male rats, while the concentration of IR-BE in the NIL remained unchanged. Hypothalamic IR-BE was decreased in old male rats and was not influenced by administration of L-DOPA or p-CPA. Chromatographic analysis indicated that in the AP of old animals the amount of beta-endorphin relative to beta-lipotropin was increased and was diminished slightly by the treatments. Alterations in IR-BE in the NIL and hypothalamus were represented solely by beta-endorphin. These data suggest that in old male rats, a decrease in dopaminergic activity contributes to the increase in IR-BE levels in the NIL, and an increase in serotonergic function, at least in part, is responsible for the elevation in the level of IR-BE in the AP. PMID:2362654

  13. Positron Emission Tomographic Studies of Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Transporters in Abstinent (±) 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (“Ecstasy”) Users: Relationship to Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Una D.; Szabo, Zsolt; Vranesic, Melin; Palermo, Michael; Mathews, William B.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Dannals, Robert F.; Ricaurte, George A.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale (±)3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “Ecstasy”) is a recreational drug and brain serotonin (5-HT) neurotoxin. Under certain conditions, MDMA damages brain dopamine (DA) neurons, at least in rodents. Human MDMA users have been found to have reduced brain 5-HT transporter (SERT) density and cognitive deficits, although it is not known whether these are related. We sought to determine whether MDMA users who take closely spaced sequential doses develop DA transporter (DAT) deficits, in addition to SERT deficits, and whether there is a relationship between transporter binding and cognitive performance. Methods Sixteen abstinent MDMA users with a history of sequential MDMA use (two or more doses over a 3-12 hour period) and sixteen age and gender- matched controls participated. Subjects underwent positron emission tomography with the DAT and SERT radioligands, [11C]WIN 35,428 and [11C]DASB, respectively. Subjects also underwent formal neuropsychiatric testing. Results MDMA users had reduced SERT binding in multiple brain regions but no reductions in striatal DAT binding. Memory performance in the aggregate subject population was correlated with SERT binding in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex and parietal cortex, brain regions implicated in memory function. Prior exposure to MDMA significantly diminished the strength of this relationship. Conclusions Sequential MDMA use is associated with lasting decreases in brain SERT, but not DAT. Memory performance is associated with SERT binding in brain regions involved in memory function. Prior MDMA exposure appears to disrupt this relationship. These data are the first to directly relate memory performance to brain SERT density. PMID:18661256

  14. Serotonin2C receptor stimulation inhibits cocaine-induced Fos expression and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in the rat striatum independently of dopamine outflow.

    PubMed

    Devroye, Céline; Cathala, Adeline; Maitre, Marlène; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Abrous, Djoher Nora; Revest, Jean-Michel; Spampinato, Umberto

    2015-02-01

    The serotonin(2C) receptor (5-HT(2C)R) is known to control dopamine (DA) neuron function by modulating DA neuronal firing and DA exocytosis at terminals. Recent studies assessing the influence of 5-HT(2C)Rs on cocaine-induced neurochemical and behavioral responses have shown that 5-HT2CRs can also modulate mesoaccumbens DA pathway activity at post-synaptic level, by controlling DA transmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), independently of DA release itself. A similar mechanism has been proposed to occur at the level of the nigrostriatal DA system. Here, using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats and molecular approaches, we assessed this hypothesis by studying the influence of the 5-HT(2C)R agonist Ro 60-0175 on cocaine-induced responses in the striatum. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 1 mg/kg Ro 60-0175 had no effect on the increase in striatal DA outflow induced by cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). Conversely, Ro 60-0175 inhibited cocaine-induced Fos immunoreactivity and phosphorylation of the DA and c-AMP regulated phosphoprotein of Mr 32 kDa (DARPP-32) at threonine 75 residue in the striatum. Finally, the suppressant effect of Ro 60-0175 on cocaine-induced DARPP-32 phosphorylation was reversed by the selective 5-HT(2C)R antagonist SB 242084 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). In keeping with the key role of DARPP-32 in DA neurotransmission, our results demonstrate that 5-HT(2C)Rs are capable of modulating nigrostriatal DA pathway activity at post-synaptic level, by specifically controlling DA signaling in the striatum. PMID:25446572

  15. Abuse-Related Neurochemical Effects of Para-Substituted Methcathinone Analogs in Rats: Microdialysis Studies of Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine and Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Julie A; Sakloth, Farhana; Kolanos, Renata; Glennon, Richard A; Lazenka, Matthew F; Negus, S Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Methcathinone (MCAT) is a monoamine releaser and parent compound to a new class of designer drugs that includes the synthetic cathinones mephedrone and flephedrone. Using MCAT and a series of para-substituted (or 4-substituted) MCAT analogs, it has been previously shown that expression of abuse-related behavioral effects in rats correlates both with the volume of the para substituent and in vitro neurochemical selectivity to promote monoamine release via the dopamine (DA) versus serotonin (5-HT) transporters in rat brain synaptosomes. The present study used in vivo microdialysis to determine the relationship between these previous measures and the in vivo neurochemical selectivity of these compounds to alter nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA and 5-HT levels. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bilateral guide cannulae targeting the NAc. MCAT and five para-substituted analogs (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Br, 4-CH3, and 4-OCH3) produced dose- and time-dependent increases in NAc DA and/or 5-HT levels. Selectivity was determined as the dose required to increase peak 5-HT levels by 250% divided by the dose required to increase peak DA levels by 250%. This measure of in vivo neurochemical selectivity varied across compounds and correlated with 1) in vivo expression of abuse-related behavioral effects (r = 0.89, P = 0.02); 2) in vitro selectivity to promote monoamine release via DA and 5-HT transporters (r = 0.95, P < 0.01); and 3) molecular volume of the para substituent (r = -0.85, P = 0.03). These results support a relationship between these molecular, neurochemical, and behavioral measures and support a role for molecular structure as a determinant of abuse-related neurochemical and behavioral effects of MCAT analogs. PMID:26645638

  16. Locomotor stimulation produced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is correlated with dialysate levels of serotonin and dopamine in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Michael H.; Clark, Robert D.; Rothman, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    (±)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetmine (MDMA, or Ecstasy) is an illicit drug that evokes transporter-mediated release of monoamines, including serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA). Here we monitored the effects of MDMA on neurochemistry and motor activity in rats, as a means to evaluate relationships between 5-HT, DA, and behavior. Male rats undergoing in vivo microdialysis were housed in chambers equipped with photobeams for measurement of ambulation (i.e., forward locomotion) and stereotypy (i.e., head weaving and forepaw treading). Microdialysis probes were placed into the n. accumbens, striatum or prefrontal cortex in separate groups of rats. Dialysate samples were assayed for 5-HT and DA by microbore HPLC-ECD. Rats received two i.v. injections of MDMA, 1 mg/kg followed by 3 mg/kg 60 min later; neurochemical and locomotor parameters were measured concurrently. MDMA produced dose-related elevations in extracellular 5-HT and DA in all regions, with the magnitude of 5-HT release always exceeding that of DA release. MDMA-induced ambulation was positively correlated with dialysate DA levels in all regions (P<0.05-0.0001) and with dialysate 5-HT in striatum and cortex (P<0.001-0.0001). Stereotypy was strongly correlated with dialysate 5-HT in all areas (P<0.001-0.0001) and with dialysate DA in accumbens and striatum (P<0.001-0.0001). These data support previous work and suggest the complex spectrum of behaviors produced by MDMA involves 5-HT and DA in a region- and modality-specific manner. PMID:18403002

  17. [Neurotransmitter disorders in children--special reference to Segawa disease].

    PubMed

    Segawa, Masaya

    2011-09-01

    Aminergic neurotransmitter disorders occurring in childhood include metabolic disorders of pteridine and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Pteridine metabolic disorders cause a deficiency of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) and TH disorder causes a deficiency of noradrenaline (NA) and DA in the terminals of each aminergic neuron. The activities of TH or DA in the terminals are marked in early childhood, and then they show an exponential age-dependent decrement and achieve stationary or minimal levels in the twenties. As observed in Segawa disease, TH or DA activities in these disorders follow this age-related decrease with levels around 20% of normal, and patients develop symptoms age-dependently, with onset in childhood, progression by the late teens, and a stationary period after the twenties, but this does not cause morphological changes. These phenomena may occur with other neurotransmitters. So replacement therapies are effective irrespective of the clinical course. However, early-onset cases in infancy or early childhood showing a marked decrement of 5-HT or NA activities show postural hypotonia and failed locomotion. These cause failure in atonia restriction in the REM stage and induce dysfunction of the pedunculopontine nucleus, and, consequently induce dysfunction or failure in the development of DA neurons in the sutbstantia nigra and ventrotegmental area. These relate to failure in the development of higher cortical functions. Thus, assessing of ages at onset and activities of antigravity muscles and locomotion in infancy is cardinal for the treatment the neurotransmitter disorders occurring in infancy and early childhood. PARK2 with deficiency of DA in the substantia nigra leads to dystonia in the teens and Parkinson disease after 20 years, although these respond to 1-Dopa favorably but induce D2 receptor upregulation and intractable dyskinesia. A decrease of DA in the perikaryon leads to symptoms after 10 years and causes dysfunction of the target structures. PMID:21941841

  18. Effect of long-term actual spaceflight on the expression of key genes encoding serotonin and dopamine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Nina; Shenkman, Boris; Naumenko, Vladimir; Kulikov, Alexander; Kondaurova, Elena; Tsybko, Anton; Kulikova, Elisabeth; Krasnov, I. B.; Bazhenova, Ekaterina; Sinyakova, Nadezhda

    The effect of long-term spaceflight on the central nervous system represents important but yet undeveloped problem. The aim of our work was to study the effect of 30-days spaceflight of mice on Russian biosatellite BION-M1 on the expression in the brain regions of key genes of a) serotonin (5-HT) system (main enzymes in 5-HT metabolism - tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH-2), monoamine oxydase A (MAO A), 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors); b) pivotal enzymes in DA metabolism (tyrosine hydroxylase, COMT, MAO A, MAO B) and D1, D2 receptors. Decreased expression of genes encoding the 5-HT catabolism (MAO A) and 5-HT2A receptor in some brain regions was shown. There were no differences between “spaceflight” and control mice in the expression of TPH-2 and 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 receptor genes. Significant changes were found in genetic control of DA system. Long-term spaceflight decreased the expression of genes encoding the enzyme in DA synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase in s.nigra), DA metabolism (MAO B in the midbrain and COMT in the striatum), and D1 receptor in hypothalamus. These data suggested that 1) microgravity affected genetic control of 5-HT and especially the nigrostriatal DA system implicated in the central regulation of muscular tonus and movement, 2) the decrease in the expression of genes encoding key enzyme in DA synthesis, DA degradation and D1 receptor contributes to the movement impairment and dyskinesia produced by the spaceflight. The study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant ? 14-04-00173.

  19. Fast liquid chromatography separation and multiple-reaction monitoring mass spectrometric detection of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Loubna A; Neely, Matthew; Bridge, Bob; Mechref, Yehia

    2009-07-01

    We describe here the fast LC-MS/MS separation of a mixture of neurotransmitters consisting of dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxybenzylamine (DHBA), salsolinol, serotonin, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The new UltiMate 3000 Rapid Separation system (RSLC) was successfully coupled to the 4000 QTRAP mass spectrometer operating in multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The separation was attained using a 100 mm length, 2.2 microm particle size Acclaim column at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The column back pressure was 350 bar, while the total run time including column re-equilibration was 5.2 min. The peak resolution was minimally affected by the fast separation. The RSLC-MRM separation was found to have a precision range based on peak area for 50 replicate runs of 2-5% CV for all analytes, and the reproducibility of the retention time for all analytes was found to range from 0-2% CV. The described method represents an almost seven times shorter analysis time of neurotransmitters using LC/MRM which is very useful in screening large quantities of biological samples for various neurotransmitters. PMID:19569096

  20. Biochemical and Neurotransmitters Changes Associated with Tramadol in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ezzeldin, Essam; Souror, Wafaa A. H.; El-Nahhas, Toqa; Soudi, Abdel Nasser M. M.; Shahat, Abdelaaty A.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide. Chronic neuropathic pain occurs in approximately 25% of diabetic patients. Tramadol, an atypical analgesic with a unique dual mechanism of action, is used in the management of painful diabetic neuropathy. It acts on monoamine transporters to inhibit the reuptake of norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of diabetes on the brain neurotransmitter alterations induced by tramadol in rats, and to study the hepatic and renal toxicities of the drug. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into two sets: the normal set and the diabetic set. Diabetes was induced in rats. Tramadol was administered orally once daily for 28 days. The levels of DA, NE, and 5-HT in cerebral cortex, thalamus/hypothalamus, midbrain, and brainstem were evaluated in rats. In addition, the renal toxicity and histopathological effects of the drug were assessed. The induction of diabetes altered neurotransmitter levels. Oral administration of tramadol significantly decreased the neurotransmitter levels. Diabetes significantly altered the effects of tramadol in all brain regions. Tramadol affected function and histology of the liver and kidney. The clinical effects of tramadol in diabetic patients should be stressed. PMID:24971322

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene polymorphisms, neurotransmitter levels, and depressive symptoms in an elderly population.

    PubMed

    Czira, Maria E; Wersching, Heike; Baune, Bernhard T; Berger, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    A large number of studies have examined associations between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene polymorphisms and depressive symptoms. However, results still remain controversial. Recent studies suggested a significant age and gender effect on the heritability of depression. The potential neurobiological pathways that could possibly mediate this relationship have not been examined so far. Since BDNF is involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter production, a mediating role of neurotransmitters seems plausible. The present study aims to examine the association between three common BDNF single-nucleotid polymorphisms (SNPs; rs7103411, rs7124442, and rs6265) and depressive symptoms in a community-based elderly population taking into account the serum levels of four neurotransmitters, serotonin, dopamine, adrenalin, and noradrenalin, as potential mediating factors. We also examined whether age and gender had a modifying effect on this association. We collected and analyzed the genetic and laboratory data as well as Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scores of 350 community-dwelling elderly individuals (aged 65+ years). We found that the BDNF rs6265 polymorphism was related to the severity of depressive symptoms, and that this association was independent of neurotransmitter levels. Stratified analyses showed that this association was restricted to older individuals (?74 years) and men. The associations of SNPs rs7103411 or rs7124442 SNP with depressive symptoms were not statistically significant. This study importantly adds to the existing literature by affirming previous assumptions on an age and gender difference in the relation between BDNF genotype and depression. We moreover first-time report a missing mediating role of neurotransmitters in this association. PMID:21898033

  2. Neurotransmitters - Duration: 20 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Our nerve cells (neurons) communicate with each other using little chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. These neurotransmitters are transferred from one neuron to the next within a space c...

  3. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Graphical Kinetic Data Analysis of the Dopamine Neurotransmitter System: An Exercise for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course.

    PubMed

    Mirrione, Martine M; Ruth, Nora; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Fowler, Joanna; Kernan, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET), are widely used in clinical settings and in basic neuroscience research. Education in these methods and their applications may be incorporated into curricula to keep pace with this expanding field. Here, we have developed pedagogical materials on the fundamental principles of PET that incorporate a hands-on laboratory activity to view and analyze human brain scans. In this activity, students will use authentic PET brain scans generated from original research at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Volkow et al., 2009) to explore the neurobiological effects of a drug on the dopamine system. We provide lecture and assignment materials (including a 50-minute PowerPoint presentation introducing PET concepts), written background information for students and instructors, and explicit instructions for a 4-hour, computer-based laboratory to interested educators. Also, we discuss our experience implementing this exercise as part of an advanced undergraduate laboratory course at Stony Brook University in 2010 and 2011. Observing the living human brain is intriguing, and this laboratory is designed to illustrate how PET neuroimaging techniques are used to directly probe biological processes occurring in the living brain. Laboratory course modules on imaging techniques such as PET can pique the interest of students potentially interested in neuroscience careers, by exposing them to current research methods. This activity provides practical experience analyzing PET data using a graphical analysis method known as the Logan plot, and applies core neuropharmacology concepts. We hope that this manuscript inspires college instructors to incorporate education in PET neuroimaging into their courses. PMID:24693258

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Graphical Kinetic Data Analysis of the Dopamine Neurotransmitter System: An Exercise for an Undergraduate Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Mirrione, Martine M.; Ruth, Nora; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Fowler, Joanna; Kernan, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques, including positron emission tomography (PET), are widely used in clinical settings and in basic neuroscience research. Education in these methods and their applications may be incorporated into curricula to keep pace with this expanding field. Here, we have developed pedagogical materials on the fundamental principles of PET that incorporate a hands-on laboratory activity to view and analyze human brain scans. In this activity, students will use authentic PET brain scans generated from original research at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Volkow et al., 2009) to explore the neurobiological effects of a drug on the dopamine system. We provide lecture and assignment materials (including a 50-minute PowerPoint presentation introducing PET concepts), written background information for students and instructors, and explicit instructions for a 4-hour, computer-based laboratory to interested educators. Also, we discuss our experience implementing this exercise as part of an advanced undergraduate laboratory course at Stony Brook University in 2010 and 2011. Observing the living human brain is intriguing, and this laboratory is designed to illustrate how PET neuroimaging techniques are used to directly probe biological processes occurring in the living brain. Laboratory course modules on imaging techniques such as PET can pique the interest of students potentially interested in neuroscience careers, by exposing them to current research methods. This activity provides practical experience analyzing PET data using a graphical analysis method known as the Logan plot, and applies core neuropharmacology concepts. We hope that this manuscript inspires college instructors to incorporate education in PET neuroimaging into their courses. PMID:24693258

  5. Abuse-Related Effects of Dual Dopamine/Serotonin Releasers with Varying Potency to Release Norepinephrine in Male Rats and Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Blough, Bruce E.; Rothman, Richard B.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H; Negus, S. Stevens

    2014-01-01

    d-Amphetamine selectively promotes release of both dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) vs. serotonin (5HT), and chronic d-amphetamine treatment decreases cocaine-taking behavior in rats, nonhuman primates, and humans. However, abuse liability limits the clinical utility of amphetamine maintenance for treating cocaine abuse. One strategy to improve safety and efficacy of monoamine releasers as candidate anti-cocaine medications has been to develop dual DA/5HT releasers like 1-napthyl-2-aminopropane (PAL-287), but the pharmacology of this class of compounds has not been extensively examined. In particular, PAL-287 has similar potencies to release DA, 5HT and NE, and the role of manipulating NE release potency on abuse-related or anti-cocaine effects of dual DA/5HT releasers is not known. To address this issue, the present study compared effects of four novel DA/5HT releasers that varied >800-fold in their selectivities to release DA/5HT vs NE: [1-(5-chloro-1H-indol-3-yl)propan-2-amine (PAL-542), 1-(5-fluoro-1H-indol-3-yl)propan-2-amine (PAL-544), 1-(1H-indol-5-yl)propan-2-amine (PAL-571), and (R)-1-(1H-indol-1-yl)propain-2-amine (PAL-569). Abuse-related effects of all four compounds were evaluated in assays of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats and cocaine discrimination in rats and monkeys, and none of the compounds reliably facilitated ICSS or substituted for cocaine. Anti-cocaine effects of the compound with highest selectivity to release DA/5HT vs. NE (PAL-542) were tested in an assay of cocaine vs. food choice in rhesus monkeys, and PAL-542 failed to reduce cocaine choice. These results suggesst that potency to release NE has minimal influence on abuse liability of dual DA/5HT releasers, and reducing relative potency to release NE vs. DA/5HT does not improve anti-cocaine efficacy. PMID:24796848

  6. [C-11]{beta}CNT: A new monoamine uptake ligand for studying serotonin and dopamine transporter sites in the living brain with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.K.; Zheng, Q.H.; Zhou, F.C.

    1996-05-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) function in the human brain. Altered levels of 5HT and DA are recognized in drug abuse, neurotoxicities, psychiatric disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease. Several phenyltropane analogs of cocaine bind tightly to both DA and 5HT uptake proteins. We have made a new agent from this class called {beta}CNT, 2{beta}-carboxymethyl-3{beta}-(2-naphthyl)-tropane, the isosteric O-for-CH{sub 2} analog of a compound reported to have among the highest measured affinities for DA and 5HT transporters and studied its in vivo brain distributions in animals for the first time. Optically pure {beta}CNT was made from cocaine, and labeled at the O-methyl position by esterification of {beta}CNT-acid with [C-11]CH{sub 3}OTfl under conditions similar to Wilson`s. HPLC-purified (99+%) final products (15-50% eob yield from CO{sub 2}, 40 min synth) had specific activities 0.1-1.2 Ci/{mu}mol at the time of injection. Preliminary [C-11]{beta}{beta}CNT rodent distribution showed very high brain uptake (3% ID at 60 min) and localization (striat: fr cort: hypo: cer: blood, 11: 5: 4: 1: 06). {beta}CNT-PET studies in juvenile pigs (5-20 mCi, 20-35 kg) found rapid brain uptake, and prominent retention (85 min) in midbrain, anterior brainstem and striatum, followed by cortex and olfactory bulb. Paroxetine pretreatment (5HT uptake blocker, 2mg/kg), diminished retention in most brain areas; nomifensine (DA/NE uptake blocker, 6 mg/kg) reduced striatum selectively. Direct comparisons of [C-11]{beta}CNT with other PET transporter radioligands {beta}CFT, {beta}CIT, and {beta}CTT (RTI-32) in the same pig found {beta}CNT had highest overall brain uptake among the agents. These initial results suggest {beta}CNT has favorable properties for imaging both 5HT and DA transporters in vivo, and further evaluation of its potential as a human PET agent is warranted.

  7. A network model of basal ganglia for understanding the roles of dopamine and serotonin in reward-punishment-risk based decision making

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramani, Pragathi P.; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Ravindran, Balaraman; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    There is significant evidence that in addition to reward-punishment based decision making, the Basal Ganglia (BG) contributes to risk-based decision making (Balasubramani et al., 2014). Despite this evidence, little is known about the computational principles and neural correlates of risk computation in this subcortical system. We have previously proposed a reinforcement learning (RL)-based model of the BG that simulates the interactions between dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) in a diverse set of experimental studies including reward, punishment and risk based decision making (Balasubramani et al., 2014). Starting with the classical idea that the activity of mesencephalic DA represents reward prediction error, the model posits that serotoninergic activity in the striatum controls risk-prediction error. Our prior model of the BG was an abstract model that did not incorporate anatomical and cellular-level data. In this work, we expand the earlier model into a detailed network model of the BG and demonstrate the joint contributions of DA-5HT in risk and reward-punishment sensitivity. At the core of the proposed network model is the following insight regarding cellular correlates of value and risk computation. Just as DA D1 receptor (D1R) expressing medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum were thought to be the neural substrates for value computation, we propose that DA D1R and D2R co-expressing MSNs are capable of computing risk. Though the existence of MSNs that co-express D1R and D2R are reported by various experimental studies, prior existing computational models did not include them. Ours is the first model that accounts for the computational possibilities of these co-expressing D1R-D2R MSNs, and describes how DA and 5HT mediate activity in these classes of neurons (D1R-, D2R-, D1R-D2R- MSNs). Starting from the assumption that 5HT modulates all MSNs, our study predicts significant modulatory effects of 5HT on D2R and co-expressing D1R-D2R MSNs which in turn explains the multifarious functions of 5HT in the BG. The experiments simulated in the present study relates 5HT to risk sensitivity and reward-punishment learning. Furthermore, our model is shown to capture reward-punishment and risk based decision making impairment in Parkinson's Disease (PD). The model predicts that optimizing 5HT levels along with DA medications might be essential for improving the patients' reward-punishment learning deficits. PMID:26136679

  8. Pharmacological profile of the "triple" monoamine neurotransmitter uptake inhibitor, DOV 102,677.

    PubMed

    Popik, Piotr; Krawczyk, Martyna; Golembiowska, Krystyna; Nowak, Gabriel; Janowsky, Aaron; Skolnick, Phil; Lippa, Arnold; Basile, Anthony S

    2006-01-01

    1. The molecular and behavioral pharmacology of DOV 102,677 is characterized. 2. This characterization was performed using radioligand binding and neurotransmitter uptake assays targeting the monoamine neurotransmitter receptors. In addition, the effects of DOV 102,677 on extracellular neurotransmitter levels were investigated using in vivo microdialysis. Finally, the effects of DOV 102,677 in the forced swim test, locomotor function, and response to prepulse inhibition was investigated.3. DOV 102,677 is a novel, "triple" uptake inhibitor that suppresses [(3)H]dopamine (DA), [(3)H]norepinephrine (NE) and [(3)H]serotonin (5-HT) uptake by recombinant human transporters with IC(50) values of 129, 103 and 133 nM, respectively. Radioligand binding to the dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine (NET), and serotonin (SERT) transporters is inhibited with k (i) values of 222, 1030, and 740 nM, respectively. DOV 102,677 (20 mg/kg IP) increased extracellular levels of DA and 5-HT in the prefrontal cortex to 320 and 280% above baseline 100 min after administration. DA levels were stably increased for the duration (240 min) of the study, but serotonin levels declined to baseline by 200 min after administration. NE levels increased linearly to a maximum of 348% at 240 min post-dosing. Consistent with these increases in NE levels, the density of beta-adrenoceptors was selectively decreased in the cortex of rats treated with DOV 102,677 (20 mg/kg per day, PO, 35 days). 4. DOV 102,677 dose-dependently reduced the amount of time spent immobile by rats in the forced swim test, a model predictive of antidepressant activity, with a minimum effective dose (MED) of 20 mg/kg and a maximal efficacy comparable to imipramine. This decrease in immobility time did not appear to result from increased motor activity. Further, DOV 102,677 was as effective as methylphenidate in reducing the amplitude of the startle response in juvenile mice, without notably altering motor activity. 5. In summary, DOV 102,677 is an orally active, "balanced" inhibitor of DAT, NET and SERT with therapeutic versatility in treating neuropsychiatric disorders beyond depression. PMID:16636898

  9. Receptors and Other Signaling Proteins Required for Serotonin Control of Locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    E-print Network

    Gustafson, Megan A.

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of signaling by the neurotransmitter serotonin is required to assess the hypothesis that defects in serotonin signaling underlie depression in humans. Caenorhabditis elegans ...

  10. Oestradiol Increases Phosphorylation of a Dopamine-and Cyclic AMP-Regulated Phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) in Female Rat Brain

    E-print Network

    Oestradiol Increases Phosphorylation of a Dopamine- and Cyclic AMP-Regulated Phosphoprotein (DARPP. Key words: oestrogen, steroids, dopamine, hypothalamus, brain. Abstract Recent studies suggest that oestrogen and progestin receptors may be activated by the neurotransmitter dopamine, as well

  11. Transcranial electrostimulation effects on rat opioid and neurotransmitter levels.

    PubMed

    Warner, R L; Johnston, C; Hamilton, R; Skolnick, M H; Wilson, O B

    1994-01-01

    A specific form of Transcranial Electrostimulation Treatment (TCET) has been shown to induce analgesia, alleviate symptoms of opiate withdrawal and alter nociceptive responses in neurons in the midbrain and hypothalamus of rats. TCET consists of a 10Hz, charge balanced, 10 mu A current passed for 30 minutes between electrodes placed in the ears. Both serotonin (5HT) and endogenous opioids have been strongly implicated in TCET responses. This study directly measured brain levels of several neurotransmitters and their metabolites in anesthetized rats stimulated with either 10 mu A TCET or 0 mu A (Sham). Neurotransmitters measured in selected homogenized brain areas by high performance liquid chromatography were 5HT and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5HIAA); norepinephrine (NE) and its metabolite, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenethyleneglycol (MHPG); and dopamine (DA). Levels of NE and DA were significantly higher in the hypothalamic region of TCET rats than of control rats. The midbrains of TCET rats contained significantly elevated levels of DA, MHPG, 5HT and 5HIAA. In the hindbrain no significant differences were observed. Thus, TCET appears to cause an increase in the synthesis or release of 5HT, DA and NE in the midbrain and DA and 5HT in the hypothalamus. In a separate experiment, beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity was measured in blood plasma taken from rats at intervals before, during and after a 30 minute TCET treatment, but no demonstrable TCET effect was observed. The lack of change in serum endorphin levels suggests that TCET-induced opioid activity may be confined to the central nervous system, a reasonable theory because the current passes only through the head. PMID:7906003

  12. Mutations in human monoamine-related neurotransmitter pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Haavik, Jan; Blau, Nenad; Thöny, Beat

    2008-07-01

    Biosynthesis and metabolism of serotonin and catecholamines involve at least eight individual enzymes that are mainly expressed in tissues derived from the neuroectoderm, e.g., the central nervous system (CNS), pineal gland, adrenal medulla, enterochromaffin tissue, sympathetic nerves, and ganglia. Some of the enzymes appear to have additional biological functions and are also expressed in the heart and various other internal organs. The biosynthetic enzymes are tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), tryptophan hydroxylases type 1 and 2 (TPH1, TPH2), aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH), and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), and the specific catabolic enzymes are monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT). For the TH, DDC, DBH, and MAOA genes, many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with unknown function, and small but increasing numbers of cases with autosomal recessive mutations have been recognized. For the remaining genes (TPH1, TPH2, PNMT, and COMT) several different genetic markers have been suggested to be associated with regulation of mood, pain perception, and aggression, as well as psychiatric disturbances such as schizophrenia, depression, suicidality, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The genetic markers may either have a functional role of their own, or be closely linked to other unknown functional variants. In the future, molecular testing may become important for the diagnosis of such conditions. Here we present an overview on mutations and polymorphisms in the group of genes encoding monoamine neurotransmitter metabolizing enzymes. At the same time we propose a unified nomenclature for the nucleic acid aberrations in these genes. New variations or details on mutations will be updated in the Pediatric Neurotransmitter Disorder Data Base (PNDDB) database (www.bioPKU.org). PMID:18444257

  13. Central PGE2 exhibits anxiolytic-like activity via EP1 and EP4 receptors in a manner dependent on serotonin 5-HT1A, dopamine D1 and GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chihiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki; Narumiya, Shuh; Ohinata, Kousaku

    2011-07-21

    We found that centrally administered prostaglandin (PG) E(2) exhibited anxiolytic-like activity in the elevated plus-maze and open field test in mice. Agonists selective for EP(1) and EP(4) receptors, among four receptor subtypes for PGE(2), mimicked the anxiolytic-like activity of PGE(2). The anxiolytic-like activity of PGE(2) was blocked by an EP(1) or EP(4) antagonist, as well as in EP(4) but not EP(1) knockout mice. Central activation of either EP(1) or EP(4) receptors resulted in anxiolytic-like activity. The PGE(2)-induced anxiolytic-like activity was inhibited by antagonists for serotonin 5-HT(1A), dopamine D(1) and GABA(A) receptors. Taken together, PGE(2) exhibits anxiolytic-like activity via EP(1) and EP(4) receptors, with downstream involvement of 5-HT(1A), D(1) and GABA(A) receptor systems. PMID:21693121

  14. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction. PMID:26097446

  15. Role of serotonin in fish reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviors, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH) secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may also play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction. PMID:26097446

  16. Acute exposure to zinc oxide nanoparticles does not affect the cognitive capacity and neurotransmitters levels in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Amara, Salem; Ben-Slama, Imen; Mrad, Imen; Rihane, Naima; Jeljeli, Mustapha; El-Mir, Lassaad; Ben-Rhouma, Khemais; Rachidi, Walid; Sève, Michel; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Sakly, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    With the industrialization and increasing public exposure, nano-sized materials have received much more concerns. However, the impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) on the human body, especially on the central nervous system is extremely limited. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of ZnO-NPs on the behavioral performances and the brain contents of some monoamines neurotransmitters. Male Wistar rats were treated with a single intravenous injection of a suspension of ZnO-NPs (25?mg/kg body weight). Subsequently, 14 days after nanoparticles injection, the rats were sacrificed. During that period, Morris water maze and open-field tests were performed, respectively, for the spatial working memory and the analysis of locomotor activity of the rats. The data showed that plasma and brain zinc concentrations increased after administration of ZnO-NPs. However, brain content of neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and serotonin remained unchanged in ZnO-NPs-treated rats compared with control group. The results showed also that the working memory, locomotor activity and exploratory behavior were not impaired in ZnO-NPs exposed groups. These data revealed that acute intravenous injection of ZnO-NPs does not affect neurotransmitter contents, locomotor activity and spatial working memory in adult rats. Thus, the effect of nanoparticles on the behavioral performances is still a new topic that requires more attention. PMID:24524369

  17. The conditioning of intervention effects on early adolescent alcohol use by maternal involvement and dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) and serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, H Harrington; Schlomer, Gabriel L; Vandenbergh, David J; Feinberg, Mark; Greenberg, Mark; Spoth, Richard; Redmond, Cleve; Shriver, Mark D; Zaidi, Arslan A; Hair, Kerry L

    2015-02-01

    Data drawn from the in-home subsample of the PROSPER intervention dissemination trial were used to investigate the moderation of intervention effects on underage alcohol use by maternal involvement and candidate genes. The primary gene examined was dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4). Variation in this gene and maternal involvement were hypothesized to moderate the influence of intervention status on alcohol use. The PROSPER data used were drawn from 28 communities randomly assigned to intervention or comparison conditions. Participating youth were assessed in five in-home interviews from sixth to ninth grades. A main effect of sixth-grade pretest maternal involvement on ninth-grade alcohol use was found. Neither intervention status nor DRD4 variation was unconditionally linked to ninth-grade drinking. However, moderation analyses revealed a significant three-way interaction among DRD4 status, maternal involvement, and intervention condition. Follow-up analyses revealed that prevention reduced drinking risk, but only for youth with at least one DRD4 seven-repeat allele who reported average or greater pretest levels of maternal involvement. To determine if this conditional pattern was limited to the DRD4 gene, we repeated analyses using the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region site near the serotonin transporter gene. The results for this supplemental analysis revealed a significant three-way interaction similar but not identical to that found for DRD4. PMID:25640830

  18. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in generalized epilepsy: a focus on antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Werner, F-M; Coveñas, R

    2011-01-01

    We describe the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in generalized epilepsy. A neuronal network in this disease is developed. Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) hypoactivity induces dopamine hyperactivity because dopaminergic neurons are affected by the inhibitory influence of the GABAergic system through GABA(A) receptors. Glutamate hyperactivity is exerted via presynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which strongly inhibit serotoninergic neurons, and via postsynaptic ionotropic glutaminergic receptors, which can induce epileptic seizures. A collection of specific subreceptors of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in epileptogenesis is reported. The question arises whether agonists/antagonists of neuropeptides (neuropeptide Y, galanin…) could have additional antiepileptic properties. The effect of conventional and newer antiepileptic drugs interfering with these subreceptors is discussed on the basis of the neuronal network suggested. From these data, it is concluded that new antiepileptic drugs interfering with other specific subreceptors (GABA(B) antagonists, metabotropic glutaminergic receptors subtype 5 (mGlu5R) antagonists, mGlu2/3R agonists, 5-serotonin (5-HT(7)) agonists) could further stabilize the neuronal network in generalized epilepsy. PMID:22050744

  19. Serotonin Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Serotonin Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... as: 5-Hydroxy Tryptamine; 5-HT Formal name: Serotonin Related tests: 5-HIAA ; Chromogranin A At a ...

  20. Effects of perinatal exposure to bisphenol A on brain neurotransmitters in female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Honma, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Muneyuki; Suda, Megumi; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Sekiguchi, Soichiro

    2006-07-01

    Pregnant Sprague-Dawley (CD IGS) rats were orally administered doses of bisphenol A (BPA) at 4, 40, and 400 mg/kg, from gestation days 6 to postnatal day 20. Neurotransmitters such as dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) were extracted from the brains of dams and female offspring, and measured using liquid chromatography. BPA at 400 mg/kg was toxic and dosed rats died. At 3 wk after birth, brain levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, a DA metabolite), homovanillic acid (HVA, a DA metabolite), 5HT, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA, a 5HT metabolite) in female offspring were increased and the HVA/DA ratio was high in some brain areas of BPA-treated groups as compared with controls. At the age of 6 wk, levels of choline (Ch) in BPA-treated groups at 4 and 40 mg/kg were higher than control in all of eight brain areas. No changes were observed in acetylcholine (ACh) contents. In 9-wk-old offspring, changes in monoamines and metabolites were scattered and not great. At 3 wk after delivery, levels of 5HIAA in some brain areas of dams treated with BPA were higher than in control dams. Dose dependent increases in HVA and the HVA/DA ratio of the occipital cortex, and in the HVA/DA ratio of the frontal cortex were observed. The turnover of DA and 5HT was accelerated in 3-wk-old offspring and dams. BPA possesses very weak estrogenic activity. Changes in cerebral neurotransmitters observed in offspring and dams in this study may have been related to the estrogenic activity of BPA. However, further investigation is needed to examine the contribution of hormonal activity to such neurotransmitter changes. PMID:16922197

  1. 5-HT receptor regulation of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Fink, Klaus B; Göthert, Manfred

    2007-12-01

    Serotoninergic neurons in the central nervous system impinge on many other neurons and modulate their neurotransmitter release. This review focuses on 1) the function of presynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) heteroreceptors on axon terminals of central cholinergic, dopaminergic, noradrenergic, or GABAergic neurons and 2) the role of GABAergic interneurons expressing 5-HT heteroreceptors in the regulation of acetylcholine, dopamine, or noradrenaline release. In vitro studies on slices or synaptosomes and in vivo microdialysis experiments have shown that 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C), 5-HT(3), and/or 5-HT(4) heteroreceptors mediate this modulation. 5-HT(1B) receptors on neocortical cholinergic, striatal dopaminergic, or hippocampal GABAergic axon terminals are examples for release-inhibiting 5-HT heteroreceptors; 5-HT(3) receptors on hippocampal GABAergic or 5-HT(4) receptors on hippocampal cholinergic axon terminals are examples for release-facilitating 5-HT heteroreceptors. GABA released from GABAergic interneurons upon activation of facilitatory 5-HT receptors, e.g., 5-HT(2A) or 5-HT(3) receptors, mediates inhibition of the release of other neurotransmitters such as prefrontal neocortical dopamine or neocortical acetylcholine release, respectively. Conversely, attenuated GABA release in response to activation of inhibitory 5-HT heteroreceptors, e.g., 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(1B) receptors on GABAergic interneurons is involved in paradoxical facilitation of hippocampal acetylcholine and striatal dopamine release, respectively. Such 5-HT heteroreceptors are considered potential targets for appropriate 5-HT receptor ligands which, by enhancing the release of a relevant neurotransmitter, can compensate for its hypothesized deficiency in distinct brain areas. Examples for such deficiencies are the impaired release of hippocampal or neocortical acetylcholine, striatal dopamine, and hippocampal or neocortical noradrenaline in disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and major depression, respectively. PMID:18160701

  2. An aplysia dopamine1-like receptor: molecular and functional characterization

    E-print Network

    Byrne, John H.

    An aplysia dopamine1-like receptor: molecular and functional characterization Demian Barbas´bec, Canada Abstract In Aplysia, the neurotransmitter dopamine is involved in the regulation of various. In this paper, we report the characterization of the first Aplysia D1-like dopamine receptor (Apdop1) mainly

  3. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Pharmacological analysis of dopamine modulation in the

    E-print Network

    Cooper, Robin L.

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH Pharmacological analysis of dopamine modulation in the Drosophila melanogaster, KY, 40506-0225 Keywords Dopamine, Drosophila melanogaster, heart, larva, pharmacology. Correspondence), 2013, e00020, doi: 10.1002/phy2.20 Abstract Dopamine (DA) and other neurotransmitters affect

  4. Neurotransmitters and neuronal apoptotic cell death of chronically aluminum intoxicated Nile catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in response to ascorbic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Samah R; Hussein, Mohamed M A

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have been carried out to assess the neurotoxic effect of aluminum (Al) on the aquatic creatures. This study aims to evaluate the neurotoxic effects of long term Al exposure on the Nile catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and the potential ameliorative influence of ascorbic acid (ASA) over a 180 days exposure period. Forty eight Nile catfish were divided into four groups: control group, placed in clean water, ASA exposed group (5mg/l), AlCl3 received group (28.96?g/l; 1/20 LC50), and group received AlCl3 concomitantly with ASA. Brain tissue was examined by using flow cytometry to monitor the apoptotic cell population, HPLC analysis for the quantitative estimation of brain monoamine neurotransmitters [serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE)]. The amino acid neurotransmitters [serum taurine, glycine, aspartate and glutamine and brain gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)] levels were assessed, plus changes in brain tissue structure using light microscopy. The concentration of Al in both brain tissue and serum was determined by using atomic absorption spectrophotometery. The Al content in serum and brain tissue were both elevated and Al exposure induced an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, a marked reduction of the monoamine and amino acids neurotransmitters levels and changes in tissue morphology. ASA supplementation partially abolished the effects of AL on the reduced neurotransmitter, the degree of apoptosis and restored the morphological changes to the brain. Overall, our results indicate that, ASA is a promising neuroprotective agent against for Al-induced neurotoxicity in the Nile catfish. PMID:26459186

  5. Colocalization of serotonin and GABA in retinal neurons of Ichthyophis kohtaoensis (amphibia; Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Dünker, N

    1998-01-01

    Ichthyophis kohtaoensis, a member of the limbless Gymnophiona, has a specialized subterranean burrowing mode of life and a predominantly olfactory-guided orientation. The only visually guided behavior seems to be negative phototaxis. As these animals possess extremely small eyes (only 540 microm in diameter in adults), functional investigations of single retinal cells by electrophysiological methods have so far failed. Therefore, the content and distribution of retinal transmitters have been investigated as indications of a functioning sense organ in an animal that is supposed to be blind. Previous immunohistochemical investigation of the retinal transmitter system revealed immunoreactivity for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine synthetic pathway. The present studies have been performed in order to determine a possible colocalization of serotonin and GABA in retinal neurons of the caecilian retina. Therefore retinal cryostat sections of various developmental stages have been investigated by the indirect fluorescence method. In single-label preparations, serotonin is localized to cells in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. GABA immunocytochemistry labels a variety of cell types in the inner nuclear layer as well as cell bodies in the ganglion cell layer. In double-label preparations, some of the serotonergic cells are found to express GABA immunoreactivity and some GABAergic neurons also label for serotonin immunocytochemistry. Thus, despite the fact that caecilians mainly rely on olfaction and are believed to have a reduced visual system, their retina exhibits a surprisingly "normal" distribution of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, also typical of other anamniotes with a well-developed visual system, including the partial colocalization of serotonin and GABA at all developmental stages of I. kohtaoensis. These results indicate that a functional system that is under no strong selective pressure obviously has a long evolutionary persistence irrespective of its need for use. PMID:9462859

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Metal Microelectrodes for the Detection of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B; Nguyen, Michael D; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Zestos, Alexander G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Venton, B Jill

    2016-01-01

    Microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are useful for the detection of neurotransmitters because the CNTs enhance sensitivity and have electrocatalytic effects. CNTs can be grown on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) but the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon fibers makes evaluating the effect of CNT enhancement difficult. Metal wires are highly conductive and many metals have no intrinsic electrochemical activity for dopamine, so we investigated CNTs grown on metal wires as microelectrodes for neurotransmitter detection. In this work, we successfully grew CNTs on niobium substrates for the first time. Instead of planar metal surfaces, metal wires with a diameter of only 25 ?m were used as CNT substrates; these have potential in tissue applications due to their minimal tissue damage and high spatial resolution. Scanning electron microscopy shows that aligned CNTs are grown on metal wires after chemical vapor deposition. By use of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, CNT-coated niobium (CNT-Nb) microelectrodes exhibit higher sensitivity and lower ?Ep value compared to CNTs grown on carbon fibers or other metal wires. The limit of detection for dopamine at CNT-Nb microelectrodes is 11 ± 1 nM, which is approximately 2-fold lower than that of bare CFMEs. Adsorption processes were modeled with a Langmuir isotherm, and detection of other neurochemicals was also characterized, including ascorbic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin, adenosine, and histamine. CNT-Nb microelectrodes were used to monitor stimulated dopamine release in anesthetized rats with high sensitivity. This study demonstrates that CNT-grown metal microelectrodes, especially CNTs grown on Nb microelectrodes, are useful for monitoring neurotransmitters. PMID:26639609

  7. Photophysics of dopamine-modified quantum dots and effects on biological

    E-print Network

    Minarik, William

    ARTICLES Photophysics of dopamine-modified quantum dots and effects on biological systems SAMUEL J between a small molecule (the neurotransmitter dopamine) and CdSe/ZnS QDs. QD­dopamine conjugates label of its occurrence5,6 . In this work, we find that electron transfer between a small molecule (dopamine

  8. The role of neurotransmitters and opioids in polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lobo, R A

    1988-12-01

    In this article, the characteristic gonadotropin dysfunction of PCOD is discussed. The potential role of modulators such as the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine as well as the role of endogenous opiates are considered. A review of the effect of these neuromodulators is followed by speculation as to whether disordered secretion of these substances may be operative in the pathophysiology of PCOD. PMID:2904366

  9. Predator Exposure/Psychosocial Stress Animal Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Modulates Neurotransmitters in the Rat Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C. Brad; Ebenezer, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Leslie D.; Francis, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can develop in response to a traumatic event involving a threat to life. To date, no diagnostic biomarkers have been identified for PTSD. Recent research points toward physiological abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, sympathoadrenal medullary and immune system that may be implicated in the disorder. The modulation of neurotransmitters is another possible mechanism, but their role in the progression of PTSD is poorly understood. Low serotonin (5-HT) may be a factor, but it may not be the only neurotransmitter affected as modulation affects levels of other neurotransmitters. In this study, we hypothesized the predator exposure/psychosocial stress rodent model of PTSD may alter levels of 5-HT and other neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experiment. We induced PTSD via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress model, whereby rats were placed in a cage with a cat for 1 hour on days 1 and 11 of the 31-day experiment. Rats also received psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. On day 32, the rats were sacrificed and the brains dissected to remove the hippocampus and PFC. Norepinephrine (NE), 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanillic acid (HVA), dopamine (DA), and 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 5-HT levels in the hippocampus and PFC were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the hippocampus, 5-HT and HVA were lower, while NE and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. In the PFC, only 5-HT was lower, while NE, DA, and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. The rate limiting enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase were also examined and confirmed our findings. These results demonstrate that the predator exposure/psychosocial stress model of PTSD produces neurotransmitter changes similar to those seen in human patients and may cause a heightened noradrenergic response. PMID:24551226

  10. Influence of cytotoxic doses of 4-hydroxynonenal on selected neurotransmitter receptors in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, M A; Singh, G; Kashyap, M P; Khanna, V K; Yadav, S; Chandra, D; Pant, A B

    2008-10-01

    Effect of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), a long-chain alpha, beta unsaturated aldehyde product, generated by the oxidation of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the sensitivity of selected neurotransmitter receptors was studied in PC-12 cells. Cytotoxicity profiling was carried out at varying concentrations of HNE (0.1-50microM) for 30min to 24h. Trypan blue dye exclusion, MTT, LDH release and neutral red uptake (NRU) assays were carried out to assess the cytotoxicity of HNE. Cytotoxic response was found to be significant at 2h of exposure. Cytotoxicity of HNE at 50microM was exerted even at 90min. HNE 10-50microM was found to be cytotoxic, whereas, 2-5microM causes physiological stress only and 1-0.1microM non-cytotoxic. Effect on dopamine, cholinergic, serotonin and benzodiazepine receptors was studied at varying concentrations of HNE (1, 10, 25 and 50microM for 1-8h). A significant decrease in binding of 3H-QNB, 3H-Fluinitrazepam and 3H-Ketanserin, known to label cholinergic (muscarinic), benzodiazepine and serotonin (5HT(2A)) receptors respectively was observed at 1h exposure of PC-12 cells to HNE at 25 and 50microM concentrations. The decrease in the binding of (3)H-Spiperone, known to label dopamine (DA-D2) receptors was evident at 4h of exposure of PC-12 cells to HNE. The decrease in the binding with DA-D2 receptors continued till 8h. Effect on the binding of (3)H-Fluinitrazepam and 3H-Ketanserin appeared to be maximum at 25 and 50microM concentrations of HNE for 4h and 8h. The PC-12 cells appear to be vulnerable to cytotoxic concentrations of HNE. Experimental HNE exposure provides an intriguing model of toxicant-cell interactions involving neurotransmitter receptors in HNE neurotoxicity. PMID:18672050

  11. Primary culture of striatal neurons: a model of choice for pharmacological and biochemical studies of neurotransmitter receptors.

    PubMed

    Bockaert, J; Gabrion, J; Sladeczek, F; Pin, J P; Recasens, M; Sebben, M; Kemp, D; Dumuis, A; Weiss, S

    1986-01-01

    Striatal neurons were cultured from fetal mouse brain and maintained in serum-free medium for 14-21 days in vitro (DIV). A double coating of culture dishes with polyornithine and fetal calf serum was needed in order to obtain synaptic differentiation. Synaptic vesicles were present in axon terminals as well as in varicosities along extended axons. The presence of differentiated synapses was confirmed by the immunostaining of the preparation with synapsin I antibody. After 13 days in vitro synapsin I was present in axonal varicosities and particularly concentrated at contact points between axonal terminals and postsynaptic sites on adjacent axons or perikarya. On a surface of 429 mm2 on which 2211 cells were observed under phase contrast microscopy only 7% were stained with an antibody against GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein). One or two days after the formation of differentiated synapses (11 DIV), a Ca2+-dependent liberation of GABA was observed. These cultures are an excellent model for studying the coupling of some neurotransmitter receptors with an adenylate cyclase. In particular using this preparation we were able to demonstrate that dopamine (D2) and serotonin-(5-HT1) receptors are negatively coupled with an adenylate cyclase. These cultures are also an excellent model to study the coupling of some neurotransmitter receptors with inositol phosphate producing enzymes. We demonstrated for the first time that the quisqualate subtype of glutamate receptors is able to increase inositol phosphate production in striatal neurons. PMID:2883308

  12. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  13. Serotonin and brain development.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Monsheel S K; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    The role of the serotonergic system in the neuroplastic events that create, repair, and degenerate the brain has been explored. Synaptic plasticity occurs throughout life and is critical during brain development. Evidence from biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical studies demonstrates the huge importance of an intact serotonergic system for normal central nervous system (CNS)function. Serotonin acts as a growth factor during embryogenesis, and serotonin receptor activity forms a crucial part of the cascade of events leading to changes in brain structure. The serotonergic system interacts with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), S100beta, and other chemical messengers, in addition to ts cross talk with the GABAergic, glutamatergic, and dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems. Disruption of these processes may contribute to CNS disorders that have been associated with impaired development. Furthermore, many psychiatric drugs alter serotonergic activity and have been shown to create changes in brain structure with long-term treatment. However, the mechanisms for their therapeutic efficacy are still unclear. Treatments for psychiatric illness are usually chronic and alleviate psychiatric symptoms, rather than cure these diseases. Therefore, greater exploration of the serotonin system during brain development and growth could lead to real progress in the discovery of treatments for mental disorders. PMID:15006487

  14. Towards neuroimmunotherapy for cancer: the neurotransmitters glutamate, dopamine and GnRH-II augment substantially the ability of T cells of few head and neck cancer patients to perform spontaneous migration, chemotactic migration and migration towards the autologous tumor, and also elevate markedly the expression of CD3zeta and CD3epsilon TCR-associated chains.

    PubMed

    Saussez, Sven; Laumbacher, Barbara; Chantrain, Gilbert; Rodriguez, Alexandra; Gu, Songhai; Wank, Rudolf; Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    In previous studies we found that several Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides among them: Glutamate, Dopamine, Gonadotropin-releasing-hormone (GnRH) I and II, Somatostatin, CGRP and Neuropeptide Y, can each by itself, at low physiological concentration (~10 nM) bind its receptors in human T cells and trigger several key T cell functions. These findings showed that the nervous system, via Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides, can 'talk' directly to the immune system, and stimulate what we coined 'Nerve-Driven Immunity': immune responses dictated by the nervous system. In various human cancers, the immune system of the patients, and their T cells in particular, are not functioning well enough against the cancer due to several reasons, among them the suppressive effects on the immune system induced by: (1) the cancer itself, (2) the chemotherapy and radiotherapy, (3) the ongoing/chronic stress, anxiety, depression and pain felt by the cancer patients. In Head and Neck Cancer (HNC), 5-year survival rate remains below 50%, primarily because of local recurrences or second primary tumors. Two-thirds of HNC patients are diagnosed at advanced clinical stage and have significantly poorer prognosis. Most HNC patients have multiple severe immunological defects especially in their T cells. A major defect in T cells of patients with HNC or other types of cancer is low CD3zeta expression that correlates with poor prognosis, decreased proliferation, apoptotic profile, abnormal cytokine secretion and poor abilities of destructing cancer cells. T cells of cancer patients are often also unable to migrate properly towards the tumor. In this study we asked if Glutamate, Dopamine or GnRH-II can augment the spontaneous migration, chemotactic migration and towards autologous HNC migration, and also increase CD3zeta and CD3epsilon expression, of peripheral T cells purified from the blood of five HNC patients. These HNC patients had either primary tumor or recurrence, and have been already treated by surgery and/or radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy without satisfactory outcomes. We found that Glutamate, Dopamine and GnRH-II, each by itself, at 10 nM, and during 30 min incubation only with the peripheral T cells of the HNC patients increased substantially their: (1) spontaneous migration (up to 4.4 fold increase), (2) chemotactic migration towards the key chemokine SDF-1 (up to 2.3 fold increase), (3) migration towards the autologous HNC tumor removed surgically ~48 h earlier in a pre-planned operation (up to 3.5 fold increase). Each of the Neurotransmitters even 'allowed' the T cells of one HNC patient to overcome completely the suppressive anti-migration effect of his autologous tumor, (4) cell surface CD3zeta expression (up to 4.3 fold increase), (5) cell surface CD3epsilon expression (up to 1.9 fold increase). If the absolutely essential larger scale subsequent studies would validate our present findings, Glutamate, Dopamine and GnRH-II could be used for a completely novel indication: adoptive T cell immunotherapy for some patients with HNC and maybe also other types of cancer. We coin here a novel term-'Neuroimmunotherapy' for this new form of T cell immunotherapy, based on the direct activation of the patient's own T cells by Neurotransmitters. Such 'Neuroimmunotherapy' could be reduced to practice by rather simple, painless and repeated/periodical removal of peripheral T cells from the cancer patients, activating them ex vivo for 30 min by either Glutamate, Dopamine or GnRH-II, and infusing them back to the patients by intravenous and/or intratumoral injection. The 'rejuvenated' Neurotransmitter-treated T cells are expected to have significantly improved abilities to reach and eradicate the cancer, and also combat infectious organisms that cancer patients often suffer from. Since the T cells are autologous, since the Neurotransmitters are physiological molecules, and since the ex vivo 'parking period' is very short, such Neuroimmunotherapy is expected to be very safe. PMID:25030361

  15. Altered Neurocircuitry in the Dopamine Transporter Knockout Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Bearer, Elaine L.; Boulat, Benoit; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine modulate the dynamics of these monoamine neurotransmitters. Thus, activity of these transporters has significant consequences for monoamine activity throughout the brain and for a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Gene knockout (KO) mice that reduce or eliminate expression of each of these monoamine transporters have provided a wealth of new information about the function of these proteins at molecular, physiological and behavioral levels. In the present work we use the unique properties of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to probe the effects of altered dopaminergic dynamics on meso-scale neuronal circuitry and overall brain morphology, since changes at these levels of organization might help to account for some of the extensive pharmacological and behavioral differences observed in dopamine transporter (DAT) KO mice. Despite the smaller size of these animals, voxel-wise statistical comparison of high resolution structural MR images indicated little morphological change as a consequence of DAT KO. Likewise, proton magnetic resonance spectra recorded in the striatum indicated no significant changes in detectable metabolite concentrations between DAT KO and wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, alterations in the circuitry from the prefrontal cortex to the mesocortical limbic system, an important brain component intimately tied to function of mesolimbic/mesocortical dopamine reward pathways, were revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Analysis of co-registered MEMRI images taken over the 26 hours after introduction of Mn2+ into the prefrontal cortex indicated that DAT KO mice have a truncated Mn2+ distribution within this circuitry with little accumulation beyond the thalamus or contralateral to the injection site. By contrast, WT littermates exhibit Mn2+ transport into more posterior midbrain nuclei and contralateral mesolimbic structures at 26 hr post-injection. Thus, DAT KO mice appear, at this level of anatomic resolution, to have preserved cortico-striatal-thalamic connectivity but diminished robustness of reward-modulating circuitry distal to the thalamus. This is in contradistinction to the state of this circuitry in serotonin transporter KO mice where we observed more robust connectivity in more posterior brain regions using methods identical to those employed here. PMID:20634895

  16. Changes in the expression of neurotransmitter receptors in Parkin and DJ-1 knockout mice - A quantitative multireceptor study.

    PubMed

    Cremer, J N; Amunts, K; Schleicher, A; Palomero-Gallagher, N; Piel, M; Rösch, F; Zilles, K

    2015-12-17

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a well-characterized neurological disorder with regard to its neuropathological and symptomatic appearance. At the genetic level, mutations of particular genes, e.g. Parkin and DJ-1, were found in human hereditary PD with early onset. Neurotransmitter receptors constitute decisive elements in neural signal transduction. Furthermore, since they are often altered in neurological and psychiatric diseases, receptors have been successful targets for pharmacological agents. However, the consequences of PD-associated gene mutations on the expression of transmitter receptors are largely unknown. Therefore, we studied the expression of 16 different receptor binding sites of the neurotransmitters glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and adenosine by means of quantitative receptor autoradiography in Parkin and DJ-1 knockout mice. These knockout mice exhibit electrophysiological and behavioral deficits, but do not show the typical dopaminergic cell loss. We demonstrated differential changes of binding site densities in eleven brain regions. Most prominently, we found an up-regulation of GABAB and kainate receptor densities in numerous cortical areas of Parkin and DJ-1 knockout mice, as well as increased NMDA but decreased AMPA receptor densities in different brain regions of the Parkin knockout mice. The alterations of three different glutamate receptor types may indicate the potential relevance of the glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis of PD. Furthermore, the cholinergic M1, M2 and nicotinic receptors as well as the adrenergic ?2 and the adenosine A2A receptors showed differentially increased densities in Parkin and DJ-1 knockout mice. Taken together, knockout of the PD-associated genes Parkin or DJ-1 results in differential changes of neurotransmitter receptor densities, highlighting a possible role of altered non-dopaminergic, and in particular of glutamatergic neurotransmission in PD pathogenesis. PMID:26546471

  17. Evidence for a neurotransmitter function of acetylcholine in rabbit superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, T; Illing, R B; Starke, K

    1987-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase staining and studies on the uptake of [3H]choline into the subsequent efflux of tritium from collicular slices were carried out in order to provide evidence for a neurotransmitter function of acetylcholine in rabbit superior colliculus. Acetylcholinesterase staining was dense and homogeneous in superficial layers whereas the staining was arranged in patches with slightly higher density caudally than rostrally in the intermediate layers. The accumulation of tritium in slices incubated with [3H]choline depended on time, temperature and concentration, and was inhibited by hemicholinium-3. Accumulation was slightly higher in caudal than in rostral slices. Electrical stimulation enhanced tritium outflow from slices preincubated with [3H]choline. Tetrodotoxin and a low calcium medium inhibited the evoked overflow whereas hemicholinium-3 caused an enhancement. Oxotremorine decreased the evoked overflow; atropine prevented this effect. The opioids [D-Ala2, MePhe4, Glycol5]enkephalin, [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and ethylketocyclazocine caused an inhibition. The effects of the latter two agonists were antagonized by naloxone. The GABAB-receptor-agonist (-)-baclofen decreased the evoked overflow at lower concentrations than GABA, whereas the GABAA-receptor-agonist muscimol was ineffective. Serotonin produced an inhibition which was prevented by metitepin, alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor as well as dopamine-receptor ligands caused no change. It is concluded that in the rabbit superior colliculus the pattern of acetylcholinesterase staining is comparable, but not identical to the distribution in other species. The accumulation of [3H]choline, as well as the tetrodotoxin-sensitive and calcium-dependent overflow of tritium upon electrical stimulation (reflecting presumably release of [3H]acetylcholine) indicate that acetylcholine has a neurotransmitter function in this tissue. The release of [3H]acetylcholine was modulated by various transmitter substances and related compounds. The pattern of modulation of release differed from the pattern in other cholinergically innervated tissues. PMID:2893996

  18. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  19. Sex hormones affect neurotransmitters and shape the adult female brain during hormonal transition periods

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Claudia; Villringer, Arno; Sacher, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Sex hormones have been implicated in neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, dendritic branching, myelination and other important mechanisms of neural plasticity. Here we review the evidence from animal experiments and human studies reporting interactions between sex hormones and the dominant neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, GABA and glutamate. We provide an overview of accumulating data during physiological and pathological conditions and discuss currently conceptualized theories on how sex hormones potentially trigger neuroplasticity changes through these four neurochemical systems. Many brain regions have been demonstrated to express high densities for estrogen- and progesterone receptors, such as the amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the hippocampus. As the hippocampus is of particular relevance in the context of mediating structural plasticity in the adult brain, we put particular emphasis on what evidence could be gathered thus far that links differences in behavior, neurochemical patterns and hippocampal structure to a changing hormonal environment. Finally, we discuss how physiologically occurring hormonal transition periods in humans can be used to model how changes in sex hormones influence functional connectivity, neurotransmission and brain structure in vivo. PMID:25750611

  20. Body Mass Index in Multiple Sclerosis: Associations with CSF Neurotransmitter Metabolite Levels.

    PubMed

    Markianos, Manolis; Evangelopoulos, Maria-Eleftheria; Koutsis, Georgios; Davaki, Panagiota; Sfagos, Constantinos

    2013-01-01

    Body weight and height of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome suggesting MS (CIS) in the age range 18 to 60 years (154 males and 315 females) were compared with those of subjects (146 males and 212 females) free of any major neurological disease. In drug-free patients, CSF levels of the metabolites of noradrenaline (MHPG), serotonin (5-HIAA), and dopamine (HVA), neurotransmitters involved in eating behavior, were estimated in searching for associations with body mass index (BMI). Statistical evaluations were done separately for males and females. Lower BMI was found in female MS patients compared to female controls, more pronounced in RRMS. BMI was not associated with duration of illness, smoking, present or previous drug treatment, or disability score. Body height showed a shift towards greater values in MS patients compared to controls. Patients in the lower BMI quartile (limits defined from control subjects) had lower 5-HIAA and HVA compared to patients in the upper quartile. The results provide evidence for weight reduction during disease process in MS, possibly related to deficits in serotoninergic and dopaminergic activities that develop during disease course, resulting in impairments in food reward capacity and in motivation to eat. PMID:24205443

  1. Involvement of neurotransmitter and neuropeptides in behavioural action of some neurohormones.

    PubMed

    Telegdy, G; Kádár, T; Balázs, M

    1990-01-01

    Investigations were made of the action of ACTH and LH-RH on a number of behavioural paradigms and the possible involvement of neurotransmitters or opiates by pretreatment of receptor blockers in rats and mice. ACTH delayed the extinction of active avoidance behaviour. Atropine and haloperidol blocked this action, whereas phenoxybenzamine and propranolol were ineffective. LH-RH or a highly potent analogue of LH-RH (D-Trp6-LH-RH) decreased the rate of disappearance of dopamine in the hypothalamus following alpha-methyl- paratyrosine inhibition of catecholamine synthesis, and blocked the accumulation of serotonin following MAO inhibition. LH-RH or the analogue attenuated the consolidation of passive avoidance learning. Apomorphine-induced cage-climbing was also inhibited by the LH-RH analogue, but this action was not influenced by naloxone. Open-field activity (ambulation, rearing and grooming) was decreased by the analogue peptide. Naloxone blocked the action on ambulation and rearing, but was ineffective on grooming. The LH-RH analogue caused a dose-dependent increase in cataleptogenic activity. This action could not be blocked with naloxone. The LH-RH analogue suppressed picrotoxin-induced seizures. Naloxone restored the situation to the control level. The data suggested that the effects of some neurohormones are mediated by transmitters or endogenous opiates, and that both peptide-transmitter and peptide-peptide interactions have to be considered in the action of neurohormones. PMID:1983290

  2. Monoaminergic neurotransmitter alterations in postmortem brain regions of depressed and aggressive patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Yannick; Van Dam, Debby; Aerts, Tony; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P

    2014-12-01

    Depression and aggression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are 2 of the most severe and prominent neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS). Altered monoaminergic neurotransmitter system functioning has been implicated in both NPS, although their neurochemical etiology remains to be elucidated. Left frozen hemispheres of 40 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients were regionally dissected. Dichotomization based on depression and aggression scores resulted in depressed/nondepressed (AD + D/AD - D) and aggressive/nonaggressive (AD + Agr/AD - Agr) groups. Concentrations of dopamine, serotonin (5-HT), (nor)epinephrine ((N)E), and respective metabolites were determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Significantly lower 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and higher homovanillic acid levels were observed in Brodmann area (BA) 9 and 10 of AD + D compared with AD - D. In AD + Agr, 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in BA9, 5-HIAA to 5-HT ratios in BA11, and MHPG, NE, and 5-HIAA levels in the hippocampus were significantly decreased compared with AD - Agr. These findings indicate that brain region-specific altered monoamines and metabolites may contribute to the occurrence of depression and aggression in AD. PMID:24997673

  3. Integrated Carbon Nanostructures for Detection of Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Sainio, Sami; Palomäki, Tommi; Tujunen, Noora; Protopopova, Vera; Koehne, Jessica; Kordas, Krisztian; Koskinen, Jari; Meyyappan, M; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-10-01

    Carbon-based materials, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are inherently interesting for neurotransmitter detection due to their good biocompatibility, low cost and relatively simple synthesis. In this paper, we report on new carbon-hybrid materials, where either CNTs or CNFs are directly grown on top of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C). We show that these hybrid materials have electrochemical properties that not only combine the best characteristics of the individual "building blocks" but their synergy makes the electrode performance superior compared to conventional carbon based electrodes. By combining ta-C with CNTs, we were able to realize electrode materials that show wide and stable water window, almost reversible electron transfer properties and high sensitivity and selectivity for detecting dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid. Furthermore, the sensitivity of ta-C + CNF hybrids towards dopamine as well as glutamate has been found excellent paving the road for actual in vivo measurements. The wide and stable water window of these sensors enables detection of other neurotransmitters besides DA as well as capability of withstanding higher potentials without suffering from oxygen and hydrogen evolution. PMID:26093378

  4. Development of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Covey, Daniel P.; Blaha, Charles D.; Agnesi, Filippo; Mohseni, Pedram; Whitlock, Sidney; Johnson, David M.; Horne, April; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.; Garris, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Object Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that modulation of specific central neuronal systems contributes to the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of targeted regions may therefore advance functional neurosurgery by, among other goals, providing a strategy for investigation of mechanisms, identification of new candidate neurotransmitters, and chemically guided placement of the stimulating electrode. The authors report the development of a device called the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring during functional neurosurgery. This device supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially and chemically resolved neurotransmitter measurements in the brain. Methods The FSCV study consisted of a triangle wave scanned between ?0.4 and 1 V at a rate of 300 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages were compared with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single carbon fiber (r = 2.5 ?m) into a glass capillary and pulling the capillary to a microscopic tip by using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (that is, the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by ~ 100 ?m. The neurotransmitter dopamine was selected as the analyte for most trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow injection and noise analysis, and in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring dopamine release in the striatum following high-frequency electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. Direct comparisons were made to a conventional hardwired system. Results The WINCS, designed in compliance with FDA-recognized consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, consisted of 4 modules: 1) front-end analog circuit for FSCV (that is, current-to-voltage transducer); 2) Bluetooth transceiver; 3) microprocessor; and 4) direct-current battery. A Windows-XP laptop computer running custom software and equipped with a Universal Serial Bus–connected Bluetooth transceiver served as the base station. Computer software directed wireless data acquisition at 100 kilosamples/second and remote control of FSCV operation and adjustable waveform parameters. The WINCS provided reliable, high-fidelity measurements of dopamine and other neurochemicals such as serotonin, norepinephrine, and ascorbic acid by using FSCV at CFM and by flow injection analysis. In rats, the WINCS detected subsecond striatal dopamine release at the implanted sensor during high-frequency stimulation of ascending dopaminergic fibers. Overall, in vitro and in vivo testing demonstrated comparable signals to a conventional hardwired electrochemical system for FSCV. Importantly, the WINCS reduced susceptibility to electromagnetic noise typically found in an operating room setting. Conclusions Taken together, these results demonstrate that the WINCS is well suited for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring. It is anticipated that neurotransmitter measurements at an implanted chemical sensor will prove useful for advancing functional neurosurgery. PMID:19425890

  5. Cellular mechanisms governing neuronal plasticity during serotonin-induced neuromodulation and regeneration 

    E-print Network

    Achee, Nicole Louise

    1995-01-01

    and neural networks underlying an animals behavior. In this thesis, electrophysiological modifications of identified buccal neuron 5.(B5) induced by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and axonal crush were examined using intracellular...

  6. Neurotransmitter targeting in the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Blier, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Residual symptoms are a common hindrance to daily life for patients with major depressive disorder. Even after antidepressant treatment has led patients to meet remission criteria, almost all patients have at least 1 symptom that remains unresolved. These symptoms can increase the risk for relapse, a chronic course, and suicide attempts. Residual symptoms are lingering symptoms that do not resolve with treatment of the depressive episode, and they should be distinguished from symptoms of comorbid psychiatric or medical conditions and medication side effects. By understanding how various antidepressants affect the 3 monoamine systems of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine, clinicians can select treatments based on the most effective mechanism of action. Dual-action agents show promise for alleviating depressive symptoms that do not resolve with single-action agents. Medications that increase norepinephrine or dopamine neurotransmission may improve several common residual symptoms left after treatment with serotonin-specific agents. Treatment strategies like adjunctive therapies and dosing options are given for common residual symptoms, including sleep difficulties, sexual dysfunction, and pain. For patients to truly regain their quality of life, clinicians must target residual symptoms. PMID:24191974

  7. Reinforcement learning models the dopamine system and their behavioral implications

    E-print Network

    mechanisms also explain animal behavior conditioning ex­ periments; extend theories' reach to incorporate neuroscientific experiments making theoretical algorithmic ideas from computer science. The work centers around proposals about functional interactions between dopamine and serotonin systems, about behavioral data animal

  8. MODERATE PRENATAL ALCOHOL EXPOSURE AND SEROTONIN GENOTYPE INTERACT TO ALTER CNS SEROTONIN FUNCTION IN RHESUS MONKEYS OFFSPRING

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mary L.; Moore, Colleen F.; Barr, Christina S.; Larson, Julie A.; Kraemer, Gary W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Moderate prenatal alcohol exposure can contribute to neurodevelopmental impairments and disrupt several neurotransmitter systems. We examined the timing of moderate level alcohol exposure, serotonin transporter gene polymorphic region variation (rh5-HTTLPR), and levels of primary serotonin and dopamine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in rhesus monkeys. Methods Thirty-two 30-month old rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) from four groups of females were assessed: (1) early alcohol-exposed group (n = 9), in which mothers voluntarily consumed 0.6 g/kg/day alcohol solution on gestational days 0 – 50; (2) middle-to-late gestation alcohol-exposed group (n = 6), mothers consumed 0.6 g/kg/day alcohol solution on gestational days 50 – 135; (3) a continuous-exposure group (n = 8), mothers consumed 0.6 g/kg/day alcohol solution on gestational days 0 – 135; and (4) controls (n = 9), mothers consumed an isocaloric control solution on gestational days 0 – 50, 50 – 135, or 0 – 135. Serotonin transporter promoter region allelic variants (homozygous s/s or heterozygous s/l versus homozygous l/l) were determined. We examined CSF concentrations of the 5-HT and DA metabolites, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and homovanillic acid (HVA), respectively, at baseline and 50 hours after separation from cage-mates, when the monkeys were 30 months old. Results Early- and middle-to-late gestation-alcohol exposed monkeys carrying the short allele had lower concentrations of 5-HIAA in CSF relative to other groups. Concentrations of 5-HIAA in CSF were lower for s allele carriers and increased from baseline relative to pre-separation values, while 5-HIAA levels in l/l allele carriers were not affected by separation. Monkeys carrying the short allele had lower basal concentrations of HVA in CSF compared to monkeys homozygous for the long allele. Conclusion Carrying the s allele of the 5-HT transporter increased the probability of reduced 5-HIAA in early- and middle-to-late gestation alcohol-exposed monkeys and reduced HVA at baseline. These findings that prenatal alcohol exposure altered central 5-HT activity in genetically sensitive monkeys raise questions about whether abnormal serotonin biological pathways could underlie some of the psychiatric disorders reported in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). PMID:21294753

  9. Salvinorin A regulates dopamine transporter function via a kappa opioid receptor and ERK1/2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kivell, Bronwyn; Uzelac, Zeljko; Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Rajamanickam, Jeyaganesh; Ewald, Amy; Chefer, Vladimir; Jaligam, Vanaja; Bolan, Elizabeth; Simonson, Bridget; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Sitte, Harald H; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2014-11-01

    Salvinorin A (SalA), a selective ?-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist, produces dysphoria and pro-depressant like effects. These actions have been attributed to inhibition of striatal dopamine release. The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine transmission via uptake of released neurotransmitter. KORs are apposed to DAT in dopamine nerve terminals suggesting an additional target by which SalA modulates dopamine transmission. SalA produced a concentration-dependent, nor-binaltorphimine (BNI)- and pertussis toxin-sensitive increase of ASP(+) accumulation in EM4 cells coexpressing myc-KOR and YFP-DAT, using live cell imaging and the fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate, trans 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium) (ASP(+)). Other KOR agonists also increased DAT activity that was abolished by BNI pretreatment. While SalA increased DAT activity, SalA treatment decreased serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and had no effect on norepinephrine transporter (NET) activity. In striatum, SalA increased the Vmax for DAT mediated DA transport and DAT surface expression. SalA up-regulation of DAT function is mediated by KOR activation and the KOR-linked extracellular signal regulated kinase-½ (ERK1/2) pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation and BRET studies revealed that DAT and KOR exist in a complex. In live cells, DAT and KOR exhibited robust FRET signals under basal conditions. SalA exposure caused a rapid and significant increase of the FRET signal. This suggests that the formation of KOR and DAT complexes is promoted in response to KOR activation. Together, these data suggest that enhanced DA transport and decreased DA release resulting in decreased dopamine signalling may contribute to the dysphoric and pro-depressant like effects of SalA and other KOR agonists. PMID:25107591

  10. Salvinorin A Regulates Dopamine Transporter Function Via A Kappa Opioid Receptor and ERK1/2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kivell, Bronwyn; Uzelac, Zeljko; Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Rajamanickam, Jeyaganesh; Ewald, Amy; Chefer, Vladimir; Jaligam, Vanaja; Bolan, Elizabeth; Simonson, Bridget; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Prisinzano, Thomas; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.; Sitte, Harald H.; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2014-01-01

    Salvinorin A (SalA), a selective ?-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist, produces dysphoria and pro-depressant like effects. These actions have been attributed to inhibition of striatal dopamine release. The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine transmission via uptake of released neurotransmitter. KORs are apposed to DAT in dopamine nerve terminals suggesting an additional target by which SalA modulates dopamine transmission. SalA produced a concentration-dependent, nor-binaltorphimine (BNI)- and pertussis toxin-sensitive increase of ASP+ accumulation in EM4 cells coexpressing myc-KOR and YFP-DAT, using live cell imaging and the fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate, trans 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium) (ASP+). Other KOR agonists also increased DAT activity that was abolished by BNI pretreatment. While SalA increased DAT activity, SalA treatment decreased serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and had no effect on norepinephrine transporter (NET) activity. In striatum, SalA increased the Vmax for DAT mediated DA transport and DAT surface expression. SalA up-regulation of DAT function is mediated by KOR activation and the KOR-linked extracellular signal regulated kinase-½ (ERK1/2) pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation and BRET studies revealed that DAT and KOR exist in a complex. In live cells, DAT and KOR exhibited robust FRET signals under basal conditions. SalA exposure caused a rapid and significant increase of the FRET signal. This suggests that the formation of KOR and DAT complexes is promoted in response to KOR activation. Together, these data suggest that enhanced DA transport and decreased DA release resulting in decreased dopamine signaling may contribute to the dysphoric and pro-depressant like effects of SalA and other KOR agonists. PMID:25107591

  11. The antimalarial drug quinine interferes with serotonin biosynthesis and action

    PubMed Central

    Islahudin, Farida; Tindall, Sarah M.; Mellor, Ian R.; Swift, Karen; Christensen, Hans E. M.; Fone, Kevin C. F.; Pleass, Richard J.; Ting, Kang-Nee; Avery, Simon V.

    2014-01-01

    The major antimalarial drug quinine perturbs uptake of the essential amino acid tryptophan, and patients with low plasma tryptophan are predisposed to adverse quinine reactions; symptoms of which are similar to indications of tryptophan depletion. As tryptophan is a precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT), here we test the hypothesis that quinine disrupts serotonin function. Quinine inhibited serotonin-induced proliferation of yeast as well as human (SHSY5Y) cells. One possible cause of this effect is through inhibition of 5-HT receptor activation by quinine, as we observed here. Furthermore, cells exhibited marked decreases in serotonin production during incubation with quinine. By assaying activity and kinetics of the rate-limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2), we showed that quinine competitively inhibits TPH2 in the presence of the substrate tryptophan. The study shows that quinine disrupts both serotonin biosynthesis and function, giving important new insight to the action of quinine on mammalian cells. PMID:24402577

  12. Imaging dopamine receptors in the human brain by position tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstrom, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors may be involved in a number of neuropsychiatric disease states. The ligand 3-N-(/sup 11/C)methylspiperone, which preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, was used to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and in humans. This technique holds promise for noninvasive clinical studies of dopamine receptors in humans.

  13. Development of a simple and rapid solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry method for the analysis of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine in human urine.

    PubMed

    Naccarato, Attilio; Gionfriddo, Emanuela; Sindona, Giovanni; Tagarelli, Antonio

    2014-01-31

    The work aims at developing a simple and rapid method for the quantification of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) in human urine. The urinary levels of these biogenic amines can be correlated with several pathological conditions concerning heart disease, stress, neurological disorders and cancerous tumors. The proposed analytical approach is based on the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) combined with gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS) after a fast derivatization of both aliphatic amino and phenolic moieties by propyl chloroformate. The variables influencing the derivatization reaction were reliably optimized by the multivariate approach of "Experimental design". The optimal conditions were obtained by performing derivatization with 100?L of propyl chloroformate and 100?L of pyridine. The extraction ability of five commercially available SPME fibers was evaluated in univariate mode and the best results were obtained using the polyacrylate fiber. The variables affecting the efficiency of SPME analysis were again optimized by the multivariate approach of "Experimental design" and, in particular, a central composite design (CCD) was applied. The optimal values were extraction in 45min at room temperature, desorption temperature at 300°C, no addition of NaCl. Assay of derivatized analytes was performed by using a gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-QqQ-MS) system in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) acquisition. An evaluation of all analytical parameters demonstrates that the developed method provides satisfactory results. Indeed, very good linearities were achieved in the tested calibration range with correlation coefficient values of 0.9995, 0.9999 and 0.9997 for DA, 5-HT and NE, respectively. Accuracies and RSDs calculated for between-run and tested at concentrations of 30, 200, and 800?g L(-1) were in the range from 92.8% to 103.0%, and from 0.67 to 4.5%, respectively. Finally, the LOD values obtained can be considered very good (0.587, 0.381 and 1.23?g L(-1) for DA, 5-HT and NE, respectively). PMID:24439500

  14. Dopamine Bonuses 1 Dopamine Bonuses

    E-print Network

    Dayan, Peter

    Dopamine Bonuses 1 Dopamine Bonuses Sham Kakade Peter Dayan Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit@gatsby.ucl.ac.uk Running Head: Dopamine Bonuses Acknowledgements Funding is from the NSF and the Gatsby Charitable on Kakade & Dayan (2000). #12; Dopamine Bonuses 2 Abstract In the temporal di#erence model of primate

  15. Excitatory and Inhibitory Effects of Serotonin on Sensorimotor Reactivity Measured with Acoustic Startle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael; Astrachan, David I.; Kass, Elizabeth

    1980-07-01

    Serotonin infused into the lateral ventricle in rats produced a dose-dependent depression of the acoustic startle reflex. When infused onto the spinal cord, serotonin produced a dose-dependent increase in startle. Thus the same neurotransmitter can modulate the same behavior in opposite ways, depending on which part of the central nervous system is involved.

  16. Cochlear Damage Affects Neurotransmitter Chemistry in the Central Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Augustine C.; Godfrey, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus, the perception of a monotonous sound not actually present in the environment, affects nearly 20% of the population of the United States. Although there has been great progress in tinnitus research over the past 25?years, the neurochemical basis of tinnitus is still poorly understood. We review current research about the effects of various types of cochlear damage on the neurotransmitter chemistry in the central auditory system and document evidence that different changes in this chemistry can underlie similar behaviorally measured tinnitus symptoms. Most available data have been obtained from rodents following cochlear damage produced by cochlear ablation, intense sound, or ototoxic drugs. Effects on neurotransmitter systems have been measured as changes in neurotransmitter level, synthesis, release, uptake, and receptors. In this review, magnitudes of changes are presented for neurotransmitter-related amino acids, acetylcholine, and serotonin. A variety of effects have been found in these studies that may be related to animal model, survival time, type and/or magnitude of cochlear damage, or methodology. The overall impression from the evidence presented is that any imbalance of neurotransmitter-related chemistry could disrupt auditory processing in such a way as to produce tinnitus. PMID:25477858

  17. Serotonin enhances solitariness in phase transition of the migratory locust

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojiao; Ma, Zongyuan; Kang, Le

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral plasticity of locusts is a striking trait presented during the reversible phase transition between solitary and gregarious individuals. However, the results of serotonin as a neurotransmitter from the migratory locust Locusta migratoria in phase transition showed an alternative profile compared to the results from the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria. In this study, we investigated the roles of serotonin in the brain during the phase change of the migratory locust. During the isolation of gregarious nymphs, the concentration of serotonin in the brain increased significantly, whereas serotonin receptors (i.e., 5-HT1, 5-HT2, and 5-HT7) we identified here showed invariable expression patterns. Pharmacological intervention showed that serotonin injection in the brain of gregarious nymphs did not induced the behavioral change toward solitariness, but injection of this chemical in isolated gregarious nymphs accelerated the behavioral change from gregarious to solitary phase. During the crowding of solitary nymphs, the concentration of serotonin in the brain remained unchanged, whereas 5-HT2 increased after 1 h of crowding and maintained stable expression level thereafter. Activation of serotonin-5-HT2 signaling with a pharmaceutical agonist inhibited the gregariousness of solitary nymphs in crowding treatment. These results indicate that the fluctuations of serotonin content and 5-HT2 expression are results of locust phase change. Overall, this study demonstrates that serotonin enhances the solitariness of the gregarious locusts. Serotonin may regulate the withdrawal-like behavioral pattern displayed during locust phase change and this mechanism is conserved in different locust species. PMID:24109441

  18. Analysis of 17 neurotransmitters, metabolites and precursors in zebrafish through the life cycle using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Santos-Fandila, A; Vázquez, E; Barranco, A; Zafra-Gómez, A; Navalón, A; Rueda, R; Ramírez, M

    2015-09-15

    An ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of neurotransmitters, metabolites and precursors at different stages in zebrafish life was developed. Betaine, glutamine, glutamic acid, ?-aminobutyric acid, phosphocholine, glycerophosphocholine, cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine, choline, acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, tyrosine, epinephrine, tryptophan, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and agmatine were selected as analytes. The method consisted of a simple deproteinization of samples using methanol and formic acid, subsequent injection onto the chromatographic equipment and quantification with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer detector using an electrospray ionization interface in positive mode. Limits of detection ranged from 0.02 to 11ngmL(-1) and limits of quantification from 0.1 to 38ngmL(-1), depending on the analyte. The method was validated according to US Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) guideline for bioanalytical assays. Precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (%RSD), was lower than 15% in all cases, and the determination coefficient (R(2)) was equal or higher than 99.0% with a residual deviation for each calibration point lower than ±25%. Mean recoveries were between 85% and 115%. The method was applied to determine of these compounds in zebrafish from early stages of development to adulthood and showed the time-course of neurotransmitters and others neurocompounds through the life cycle. The possibility of measuring up to 17 compounds related with the main neurotransmitter systems in a simple analytical method will complement and reinforce the use of zebrafish in multiple applications in the field of neurosciences. The proposed method will facilitate future studies related with brain development. PMID:26281771

  19. The roles of peripheral serotonin in metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    El-Merahbi, Rabih; Löffler, Mona; Mayer, Alexander; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic homeostasis in the organism is assured both by the nervous system and by hormones. Among a plethora of hormones regulating metabolism, serotonin presents a number of unique features. Unlike classical hormones serotonin is produced in different anatomical locations. In brain it acts as a neurotransmitter and in the periphery it can act as a hormone, auto- and/or paracrine factor, or intracellular signaling molecule. Serotonin does not cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore the two major pools of this bioamine remain separated. Although 95% of serotonin is produced in the periphery, its functions have been ignored until recently. Here we review the impact of the peripheral serotonin on the regulation of function of the organs involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. PMID:26070423

  20. Effects of Postnatal Serotonin Agonism on Fear Response and Memory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) also acts as a neurogenic compound in the developing brain. Early administration of a 5-HT agonist could alter the development of the serotonergic circuitry, altering behaviors mediated by 5-HT signaling, such as memory, fear and aggression. White leghorn chicks...

  1. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states. PMID:26154191

  2. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  3. Serotonin Control of Thermotaxis Memory Behavior in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuling; Wang, Daoyong; Li, Chaojun; Wang, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf)) increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans. PMID:24223727

  4. Snapshot of antidepressants at work: the structure of neurotransmitter transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Cuboni, Serena; Hausch, Felix

    2014-05-12

    In the sweet spot: Cocrystal structures of engineered neurotransmitter transporters reveal the binding mode of commonly prescribed antidepressants, providing a basis for a rational drug design for this class of proteins. The picture shows the structure of the dopamine transporter of Drosophila melanogaster in complex with the antidepressant nortriptyline. PMID:24729171

  5. Voltammetric and mathematical evidence for dual transport mediation of serotonin clearance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kevin M; Zeqja, Anisa; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-08-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin underlies many of the brain's functions. Understanding serotonin neurochemistry is important for improving treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Antidepressants commonly target serotonin clearance via serotonin transporters and have variable clinical effects. Adjunctive therapies, targeting other systems including serotonin autoreceptors, also vary clinically and carry adverse consequences. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is particularly well suited for studying antidepressant effects on serotonin clearance and autoreceptors by providing real-time chemical information on serotonin kinetics in vivo. However, the complex nature of in vivo serotonin responses makes it difficult to interpret experimental data with established kinetic models. Here, we electrically stimulated the mouse medial forebrain bundle to provoke and detect terminal serotonin in the substantia nigra reticulata. In response to medial forebrain bundle stimulation we found three dynamically distinct serotonin signals. To interpret these signals we developed a computational model that supports two independent serotonin reuptake mechanisms (high affinity, low efficiency reuptake mechanism, and low affinity, high efficiency reuptake system) and bolsters an important inhibitory role for the serotonin autoreceptors. Our data and analysis, afforded by the powerful combination of voltammetric and theoretical methods, gives new understanding of the chemical heterogeneity of serotonin dynamics in the brain. This diverse serotonergic matrix likely contributes to clinical variability of antidepressants. PMID:24702305

  6. Voltammetric and Mathematical Evidence for Dual Transport Mediation of Serotonin Clearance In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kevin M.; Zeqja, Anisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin underlies many of the brain’s functions. Understanding serotonin neurochemistry is important for improving treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Antidepressants commonly target serotonin clearance via serotonin transporters (SERTs) and have variable clinical effects. Adjunctive therapies, targeting other systems including serotonin autoreceptors, also vary clinically and carry adverse consequences. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is particularly well suited for studying antidepressant effects on serotonin clearance and autoreceptors by providing real-time chemical information on serotonin kinetics in vivo. However, the complex nature of in vivo serotonin responses makes it difficult to interpret experimental data with established kinetic models. Here, we electrically stimulated the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to provoke and detect terminal serotonin in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr). In response to MFB stimulation we found three dynamically distinct serotonin signals. To interpret these signals we developed a computational model that supports two independent serotonin reuptake mechanisms (high affinity, low efficiency reuptake mechanism and low affinity, high efficiency reuptake system) and bolsters an important inhibitory role for the serotonin autoreceptors. Our data and analysis, afforded by the powerful combination of voltammetric and theoretical methods, gives new understanding of the chemical heterogeneity of serotonin dynamics in the brain. This diverse serotonergic matrix likely contributes to clinical variability of antidepressants. PMID:24702305

  7. Convergent Pathways for Steroid Hormone-and Neurotransmitter-Induced Rat Sexual Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, S. K.; Allen, J. M. C.; Clark, J. H.; Blaustein, J. D.; O'Malley, B. W.

    1994-08-01

    Estrogen and progesterone modulate gene expression in rodents by activation of intracellular receptors in the hypothalamus, which regulate neuronal networks that control female sexual behavior. However, the neurotransmitter dopamine has been shown to activate certain steroid receptors in a ligand-independent manner. A dopamine receptor stimulant and a D_1 receptor agonist, but not a D_2 receptor agonist, mimicked the effects of progesterone in facilitating sexual behavior in female rats. The facilitatory effect of the neurotransmitter was blocked by progesterone receptor antagonists, a D_1 receptor antagonist, or antisense oligonucleotides to the progesterone receptor. The results suggest that in rodents neurotransmitters may regulate in vivo gene expression and behavior by means of cross-talk with steroid receptors in the brain.

  8. Effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on Eating Disorders: neurotransmitter secretory response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, F; Dalle Grave, R; Calugi, S; Marchesini, G; Baroni, S; Marazziti, D

    2010-06-01

    The effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on central dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) secretion were studied in a group of 50 female inpatients, of which 14 suffered from anorexia nervosa restricted type (AN-R), 14 from anorexia nervosa bingeing-purging type (AN-BP), and 22 from bulimia nervosa (BN). The aim of the study was to see whether or not CBT modifies the secretion of central DA (blood homovanillic acid=HVA), NE (blood 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol=MHPG) and the 5-HT transporter (as evaluated by the platelet paroxetine binding=[(3)H]-Par-binding), if the physical and psychological effects of CBT correlate with changes of the neurotransmitter secretion; and if the biological effects of CBT are linked to specific psychopathological aspect of the disorders. The treatment lasted 20 weeks. Body-mass Index, bingeing and purging, specific AN-BN psychopathological (EDE 12-OD), depression (Beck Inventory), anxiety (STAY Form-Y-1), impulsiveness (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Biochemical Scale) and temperament (Temperament and Character Inventory, Cloninger Scale) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the treatment. CBT significantly improved the psychophysical aspects of the diseases. HVA and MHPG concentrations did not change. The [(3)H]-Par-binding parameters, the maximum binding capacity (B(max)) and dissociation constant (K(d)) values did not change in either AN-R or AN-BP patients, while the [(3)H]-Par B(max) (and not the K(d)) increased significantly in BN patients. Correlations emerged between basal and final [(3)H]-Par B(max) values and psychopathological scores, but not between CBT-induced differences between basal and final values. Our data suggest that only in BN CBT may act through changes in 5-HT system function. PMID:19962832

  9. Neurotransmitters of the suprachiasmatic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Reghunandanan, Vallath; Reghunandanan, Rajalaxmy

    2006-01-01

    There has been extensive research in the recent past looking into the molecular basis and mechanisms of the biological clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. Neurotransmitters are a very important component of SCN function. Thorough knowledge of neurotransmitters is not only essential for the understanding of the clock but also for the successful manipulation of the clock with experimental chemicals and therapeutical drugs. This article reviews the current knowledge about neurotransmitters in the SCN, including neurotransmitters that have been identified only recently. An attempt was made to describe the neurotransmitters and hormonal/diffusible signals of the SCN efference, which are necessary for the master clock to exert its overt function. The expression of robust circadian rhythms depends on the integrity of the biological clock and on the integration of thousands of individual cellular clocks found in the clock. Neurotransmitters are required at all levels, at the input, in the clock itself, and in its efferent output for the normal function of the clock. The relationship between neurotransmitter function and gene expression is also discussed because clock gene transcription forms the molecular basis of the clock and its working. PMID:16480518

  10. Protein cysteine S-nitrosylation inhibits vesicular uptake of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Zhou, Z; Leylek, T; Tan, H; Sun, Y; Parkinson, F E; Wang, J-F

    2015-12-17

    Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide can induce cysteine S-nitrosylation of total protein in synaptosomes, suggesting that nitric oxide may contribute to the regulation of synaptic protein function. Vesicular neurotransmitter transporters pack neurotransmitters into synaptic vesicles and play an important role in neurotransmission. In the central nervous system, vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is responsible for the uptake of monoamines, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) is responsible for the uptake of acetylcholine, while vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) are responsible for the uptake of glutamate. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of cysteine S-nitrosylation in the regulation of these vesicular neurotransmitter transporters. Using the biotin switch assay followed by avidin precipitation and immunoblotting we found that the nitric oxide donor nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) not only increased total cysteine S-nitrosylation, but also increased cysteine S-nitrosylation of VMAT2, VAChT, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the mouse brain. Further, GSNO also decreased the vesicular uptake of [(3)H]dopamine, [(3)H]acetylcholine and [(3)H]glutamate. Our studies suggest that the cysteine S-nitrosylation may play an important role in the regulation of vesicular neurotransmitter transport. PMID:26541750

  11. Harmane: an atypical neurotransmitter?

    PubMed

    Abu Ghazaleh, Haya; Lalies, Maggie D; Nutt, David J; Hudson, Alan L

    2015-03-17

    Harmane is an active component of clonidine displacing substance and a candidate endogenous ligand for imidazoline binding sites. The neurochemistry of tritiated harmane was investigated in the present study examining its uptake and release properties in the rat brain central nervous system (CNS) in vitro. At physiological temperature, [(3)H]harmane was shown to be taken up in rat brain cortex. Further investigations demonstrated that treatment with monoamine uptake blockers (citalopram, nomifensine and nisoxetine) did not alter [(3)H]harmane uptake implicating that the route of [(3)H]harmane transport was distinct from the monoamine uptake systems. Furthermore, imidazoline ligands (rilmenidine, efaroxan, 2-BFI and idazoxan) showed no prominent effect on [(3)H]harmane uptake suggesting the lack of involvement of imidazoline binding sites. Subsequent analyses showed that disruption of the Na(+) gradient using ouabain or choline chloride did not block [(3)H]harmane uptake suggesting a Na(+)-independent transport mechanism. Moreover, higher temperatures (50°C) failed to impede [(3)H]harmane uptake implying a non-physiological transporter. The failure of potassium to evoke the release of preloaded [(3)H]harmane from rat brain cortex indicates that the properties of this putative endogenous ligand for imidazoline binding sites do not resemble that of a conventional neurotransmitter. PMID:25625221

  12. Dopamine Transporter Blockade Increases LTP in the CA1 Region of the Rat Hippocampus via Activation of the D3 Dopamine Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swant, Jarod; Wagner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine has been demonstrated to be involved in the modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. As monoamine transporter blockade will increase the actions of endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters, the effect of a dopamine transporter (DAT) antagonist on LTP was assessed using field excitatory postsynaptic…

  13. Mimicking subsecond neurotransmitter dynamics with femtosecond laser stimulated nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takashi; Chin, Catherine; Myint, David Mo Aung; Tan, Eng Wui; Hale, Peter John; Krishna M., Bala Murali; Reynolds, John N. J.; Wickens, Jeff; Dani, Keshav M.

    2014-06-01

    Existing nanoscale chemical delivery systems target diseased cells over long, sustained periods of time, typically through one-time, destructive triggering. Future directions lie in the development of fast and robust techniques capable of reproducing the pulsatile chemical activity of living organisms, thereby allowing us to mimic biofunctionality. Here, we demonstrate that by applying programmed femtosecond laser pulses to robust, nanoscale liposome structures containing dopamine, we achieve sub-second, controlled release of dopamine - a key neurotransmitter of the central nervous system - thereby replicating its release profile in the brain. The fast delivery system provides a powerful new interface with neural circuits, and to the larger range of biological functions that operate on this short timescale.

  14. Neurotransmitters involved in the opioid regulation of prolactin secretion at the end of pregnancy in rats.

    PubMed

    Soaje, Marta; Bregonzio, Claudia; Carón, Rubén W; Deis, Ricardo P

    2004-01-01

    Using a pharmacological approach, we explored potential mechanisms for the regulation of prolactin secretion by opioid peptides at the end of pregnancy in rats. On day 19 of pregnancy, intracereboventricular administration of the mu-opioid receptor agonist (D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Gly-ol5)-enkephalin (DAMGO) or beta-endorphin (beta-END) induced a dose-related increase in serum prolactin levels 30 min later. Pretreatment with the opioid antagonist naloxone abolished the increase induced by DAMGO injection. At lower doses, DAMGO and beta-END did not modify the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio, but at higher doses, the mu-agonists evoked a significant increase of the dopaminergic activity as compared with saline control. The time course of the effects of beta-END (2.5 microg/rat) showed a higher increase in serum prolactin levels at 15 min than at 30 min after treatment. The 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio increased 15 min after beta-END administration and was even higher 30 min later. Neither the selective kappa-agonist U50,488H nor the selective delta-agonist (D-Pen2, D-Pen5)- enkephalin were able to modify the serum prolactin levels at the doses studied. To evaluate potential neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of prolactin secretion at the end of pregnancy, we combined the administration of serotoninergic or GABAergic antagonists with the opioid agonist DAMGO. The serotonin 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin increased the serum prolactin levels and potentiated the effect of DAMGO. The intracerebroventricular administration of SR-95531 did not modify the serum prolactin concentration under basal conditions, but partially prevented the increase induced by DAMGO injection. The intracerebroventricular administration of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist phaclofen had no effect on the serum prolactin levels either in naive or DAMGO-treated rats. The present results support the proposal that activation of mu-opioid receptors stimulates prolactin secretion at the end of pregnancy. Although the exact mechanisms by which the opioid system modulates prolactin secretion at the end of pregnancy are unclear, these results suggest an interaction of the opioidergic system with serotoninergic and GABAergic systems, without ruling out a direct or indirect action on dopaminergic neurons. In conclusion, the opioid system may regulate prolactin secretion at the end of pregnancy through either stimulatory (present results) or inhibitory actions previously described. PMID:15340248

  15. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-03-20

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  16. Excess nicotinamide increases plasma serotonin and histamine levels.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yan-Jie; Li, Da; Ma, Qiang; Gu, Xin-Yi; Guo, Ming; Lun, Yong-Zhi; Sun, Wu-Ping; Wang, Xin-Yuan; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Shi-Sheng

    2013-02-25

    Methylation, a methyl group-consuming reaction, plays a key role in the degradation (i.e., inactivation) of monoamine neurotransmitters, including catecholamines, serotonin and histamine. Without labile methyl groups, the methylation-mediated degradation cannot take place. Although high niacin (nicotinic acid and nicotinamide) intake, which is very common nowadays, is known to deplete the body's methyl-group pool, its effect on monoamine-neurotransmitter degradation is not well understood. The aim of this article was to investigate the effect of excess nicotinamide on the levels of plasma serotonin and histamine in healthy subjects. Urine and venous blood samples were collected from nine healthy male volunteers before and after oral loading with 100 mg nicotinamide. Plasma N(1)-methylnicotinamide, urinary N(1)-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (2-Py), and plasma betaine levels were measured by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Plasma concentrations of choline, serotonin and histamine were measured using commercial kits. The results showed that the plasma N(1)-methylnicotinamide level and the urinary excretion of 2-Py significantly increased after oral loading with 100 mg nicotinamide, which was accompanied with a decrease in the methyl-group donor betaine. Compared with those before nicotinamide load, five-hour postload plasma serotonin and histamine levels significantly increased. These results suggest that excess nicotinamide can disturb monoamine-neurotransmitter metabolism. These findings may be of significance in understanding the etiology of monoamine-related mental diseases, such as schizophrenia and autism (a neurodevelopmental disorder). PMID:23426511

  17. Role of serotonin in fish immunomodulation

    PubMed

    Khan; Deschaux

    1997-01-01

    In the recent past, the importance of the fish brain monoaminergic system in aggression, mating and feeding has been documented. There are several apparent similarities between the functioning of the fish and mammalian monoaminergic systems. In fish, the hypermetabolism of catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and indoleamine (serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been found to be associated with stressful conditions. In contrast to the situation in mammals, these monoamines can pass through the blood­brain barrier in teleost fishes, contributing to the high levels of biogenic amines in the periphery. Hence, high levels of serotonin in the peripheral circulation, during different stressful conditions, may influence the functioning of other physiological systems, notably the immune system. Serotonin is also stored in considerable amounts by mast cells and platelets, and can be synthetized by chromaffin cells. In mammals, it has been established that 5-HT modulates immune function at a variety of levels. However, little is known about the role of serotonin in the functioning of the immune system in fish. In this perspective article, we will discuss our results and the findings of other laboratories, although meagre on this subject, on the possible role of serotonin in the functioning of immunocompetent cells in fish. PMID:9319745

  18. Dopamine Signaling Regulates Fat Content through ?-Oxidation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Alexandre Guimarães de Almeida; Bridi, Jessika Cristina; de Souza, Bruno Rezende; de Castro Júnior, Célio; de Lima Torres, Karen Cecília; Malard, Leandro; Jorio, Ado; de Miranda, Débora Marques; Ashrafi, Kaveh; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of energy balance involves an intricate interplay between neural mechanisms that respond to internal and external cues of energy demand and food availability. Compelling data have implicated the neurotransmitter dopamine as an important part of body weight regulation. However, the precise mechanisms through which dopamine regulates energy homeostasis remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate mechanisms through which dopamine modulates energy storage. We showed that dopamine signaling regulates fat reservoirs in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that the fat reducing effects of dopamine were dependent on dopaminergic receptors and a set of fat oxidation enzymes. Our findings reveal an ancient role for dopaminergic regulation of fat and suggest that dopamine signaling elicits this outcome through cascades that ultimately mobilize peripheral fat depots. PMID:24465759

  19. A rapid and simple method for the simultaneous determination of four endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters in rat brain using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenbin; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Lyu, Chunming; Zhang, Shen; Yan, Chao; Cheng, Yu; Wei, Hai

    2015-10-01

    Endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters play an essential role in neural communication in mammalians. Many quantitative methods for endogenous monoamines have been developed during recent decades. Yet, matrix effect was usually a challenge in the quantification, in many cases asking for tedious sample preparation or sacrificing sensitivity. In this work, a simple, fast and sensitive method with no matrix effect was developed to simultaneously determine four endogenous monoamines including serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine in rat brain tissues, using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Various conditions, including columns, chromatographic conditions, ion source, MS/MS conditions, and brain tissue preparation methods, were optimized and validated. Pre-weighed 20mg brain sample could be effectively and reproducibly homogenized and protein-precipitated by 20 times value of 0.2% formic acid in cold organic solvents (methanol-acetonitrile, 10:90, v/v). This method exhibited excellent linearity for all analytes (regression coefficients>0.998 or 0.999). The precision, expressed as coefficients of variation, was less than 3.43% for intra-day analyses and ranged from 4.17% to 15.5% for inter-day analyses. Good performance was showed in limit of detection (between 0.3nM and 3.0nM for all analytes), recovery (90.8-120%), matrix effect (84.4-107%), accuracy (89.8-100%) and stability (88.3-104%). The validated method was well applied to simultaneously determine the endogenous serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine in four brain sections of 18 Wistar rats. The quantification of four endogenous monoamines in rat brain performed excellently in the sensitivity, high throughput, simple sample preparation and matrix effect. PMID:26363373

  20. Contributions to the field of neurotransmitters by Japanese scientists, and reflections on my own research

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    Part I describes important contributions made by some Japanese pioneers in the field of neurotransmitters: (their achievements in parentheses) J. Takamine (isolation and crystallization of adrenaline); K. Shimidzu (early hint for acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter); F. Kanematsu (donation of the Kanematsu Memorial Institute in Sydney); T. Hayashi (discovery of the excitatory action of glutamate and the inhibitory action of GABA); and I. Sano (discovery of a high concentration of dopamine in striatum, its reduction in a patient with Parkinson’s disease and the treatment with DOPA). In Part II, I present some of my reflections on my research on neurotransmitters. The work of my colleagues and myself has made some significant contributions to the establishment of neurotransmitter roles played by GABA and substance P, the first amino acid and the first peptide neurotransmitters, respectively. By the early 1960s, 3 substances, i.e., acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline, had been established as neurotransmitters. Now the number of neurotransmitters is believed to be as many as 50 or even more mainly due to the inclusion of several amino acids and a large number of peptide transmitters. PMID:24019584

  1. A Preliminary Study of Gene Polymorphisms Involved in the Neurotransmitters Metabolism of a Homogeneous Spanish Autistic Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calahorro, Fernando; Alejandre, Encarna; Anaya, Nuria; Guijarro, Teresa; Sanz, Yolanza; Romero, Auxiliadora; Tienda, Pilar; Burgos, Rafael; Gay, Eudoxia; Sanchez, Vicente; Ruiz-Rubio, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Twin studies have shown a strong genetic component for autism. Neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and catecholamines, have been suggested to play a role in the disease since they have an essential function in synaptogenesis and brain development. In this preliminary study, polymorphism of genes implicated in the serotonergic and dopaminergic…

  2. A Conserved Salt Bridge between Transmembrane Segments 1 and 10 Constitutes an Extracellular Gate in the Dopamine Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Anders V.; Andreassen, Thorvald F.; Loland, Claus J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters play an important role in termination of synaptic transmission by mediating reuptake of neurotransmitter, but the molecular processes behind translocation are still unclear. The crystal structures of the bacterial homologue, LeuT, provided valuable insight into the structural and dynamic requirements for substrate transport. These structures support the existence of gating domains controlling access to a central binding site. On the extracellular side, access is controlled by the “thin gate” formed by an interaction between Arg-30 and Asp-404. In the human dopamine transporter (DAT), the corresponding residues are Arg-85 and Asp-476. Here, we present results supporting the existence of a similar interaction in DAT. The DAT R85D mutant has a complete loss of function, but the additional insertion of an arginine in opposite position (R85D/D476R), causing a charge reversal, results in a rescue of binding sites for the cocaine analogue [3H]CFT. Also, the coordination of Zn2+ between introduced histidines (R85H/D476H) caused a ?2.5-fold increase in [3H]CFT binding (Bmax). Importantly, Zn2+ also inhibited [3H]dopamine transport in R85H/D476H, suggesting that a dynamic interaction is required for the transport process. Furthermore, cysteine-reactive chemistry shows that mutation of the gating residues causes a higher proportion of transporters to reside in the outward facing conformation. Finally, we show that charge reversal of the corresponding residues (R104E/E493R) in the serotonin transporter also rescues [3H](S)-citalopram binding, suggesting a conserved feature. Taken together, these data suggest that the extracellular thin gate is present in monoamine transporters and that a dynamic interaction is required for substrate transport. PMID:25339174

  3. Serotonin: a never-ending story.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Berend

    2015-04-15

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is an evolutionary ancient molecule that has remarkable modulatory effects in almost all central nervous system integrative functions, such as mood, anxiety, stress, aggression, feeding, cognition and sexual behavior. After giving a short outline of the serotonergic system (anatomy, receptors, transporter) the author's contributions over the last 40 years in the role of serotonin in depression, aggression, anxiety, stress and sexual behavior is outlined. Each area delineates the work performed on animal model development, drug discovery and development. Most of the research work described has started from an industrial perspective, aimed at developing animals models for psychiatric diseases and leading to putative new innovative psychotropic drugs, like in the cases of the SSRI fluvoxamine, the serenic eltoprazine and the anxiolytic flesinoxan. Later this research work mainly focused on developing translational animal models for psychiatric diseases and implicating them in the search for mechanisms involved in normal and diseased brains and finding new concepts for appropriate drugs. PMID:25446560

  4. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  5. Prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide enriched butanolic residue from Senecio brasiliensis affects behavior and striatal neurotransmitter levels of rats in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Sandini, Thaísa M; Udo, Mariana S B; Reis-Silva, Thiago M; Sanches, Daniel; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Flório, Jorge Camilo; Spinosa, Helenice de S

    2015-12-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are toxins that are exclusively biosynthesized by plants and are commonly present in foods and herbs. PAs are usually associated with poisoning events in livestock and human beings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of prenatal exposure to PA integerrimine N-oxide of rats in adulthood. Pregnant Wistar rats received integerrimine N-oxide from the butanolic residue of Senecio brasiliensis by gavage on gestational days 6-20 at doses of 3, 6 and 9mg/kg. During adulthood of the offspring, the following behavioral tests were performed: open-field, plus-maze, forced swimming, catalepsy and stereotypy. Histological analyses and monoamine levels were measured. Male offspring from dams that were exposed to 9mg/kg showed an increase in locomotion in the open-field test, an increased frequency of entries and time spent in open arms in elevated plus-maze test, as well as decreased swimming time. In the female offspring from dams that were exposed to 9mg/kg, there was an increased time of climbing in forced swimming and intensity of stereotyped behavior. The histological study indicates an increase in the number of multinucleated cells in the liver (6 and 9mg/kg). In neurotransmitter analysis, specifically in the striatum, we observed change in dopamine and serotonin levels in the middle dose. Thus, our results indicate that prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide changed behavior in adulthood and neurotransmitter levels in the striatum. Our results agree with previous studies, which showed that integerrimine N-oxide impaired physical and neurobehavioral development in childhood that can persist until adulthood. PMID:26416213

  6. Update on the pharmacology of selective inhibitors of MAO-A and MAO-B: focus on modulation of CNS monoamine neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Finberg, John P M

    2014-08-01

    Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO) were initially used in medicine following the discovery of their antidepressant action. Subsequently their ability to potentiate the effects of an indirectly-acting sympathomimetic amine such as tyramine was discovered, leading to their limitation in clinical use, except for cases of treatment-resistant depression. More recently, the understanding that: a) potentiation of indirectly-acting sympathomimetic amines is caused by inhibitors of MAO-A but not by inhibitors of MAO-B, and b) that reversible inhibitors of MAO-A cause minimal tyramine potentiation, has led to their re-introduction to clinical use for treatment of depression (reversible MAO-A inhibitors and new dose form MAO-B inhibitor) and treatment of Parkinson's disease (MAO-B inhibitors). The profound neuroprotective properties of propargyl-based inhibitors of MAO-B in preclinical experiments have drawn attention to the possibility of employing these drugs for their neuroprotective effect in neurodegenerative diseases, and have raised the question of the involvement of the MAO-mediated reaction as a source of reactive free radicals. Despite the long-standing history of MAO inhibitors in medicine, the way in which they affect neuronal release of monoamine neurotransmitters is still poorly understood. In recent years, the detailed chemical structure of MAO-B and MAO-A has become available, providing new possibilities for synthesis of mechanism-based inhibitors. This review describes the latest advances in understanding the way in which MAO inhibitors affect the release of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin (5-HT) in the CNS, with an accent on the importance of these effects for the clinical actions of the drugs. PMID:24607445

  7. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, tolmetin and sulindac, inhibit liver tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase activity and alter brain neurotransmitter levels.

    PubMed

    Dairam, A; Antunes, E M; Saravanan, K S; Daya, S

    2006-11-10

    Hepatic tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) is one of the rate-limiting enzymes in tryptophan catabolism and plays an important role in regulating the physiological flux of tryptophan into relevant metabolic pathways. In this study, we determined the effect of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, tolmetin and sulindac, on rat liver TDO activity and the subsequent changes in the hippocampal and striatal neurotransmitter levels. The amount of melatonin produced by the pineal gland was also measured using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Treatment of rats with tolmetin or sulindac (5 mg/kg/bd for 5 days) significantly inhibited liver TDO activity. The results show that whilst tolmetin and sulindac increase serotonin levels in the hippocampus, these agents also significantly reduce dopamine levels in the striatum. Tolmetin, but not sulindac, increased the amount of melatonin produced by the pineal gland. The results of this study suggest that whilst tolmetin and sulindac may be beneficial for patients suffering from depression, these agents also have the potential to induce adverse effects in patients suffering with neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:16952380

  8. PET evaluation of the dopamine system of the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S. |

    1996-07-01

    Dopamine plays a pivotal role in the regulation and control of movement, motivation and cognition. It also is closely linked to reward, reinforcement and addiction. Abnormalities in brain dopamine are associated with many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinson`s disease, schizophrenia and substance abuse. This close association between dopamine and neurological and psychiatric diseases and with substance abuse make it an important topic in research in the neurosciences and an important molecular target in drug development. PET enables the direct measurement of components of the dopamine system in the living human brain. It relies on radiotracers which label dopamine receptors, dopamine transporters, precursors of dopamine or compounds which have specificity for the enzymes which degrade dopamine. Additionally, by using tracers that provide information on regional brain metabolism or blood flow as well as neurochemically specific pharmacological interventions, PET can be used to assess the functional consequences of change in brain dopamine activity. PET dopamine measurements have been used to investigate the normal human brain and its involvement in psychiatric and neurological diseases. It has also been used in psychopharmacological research to investigate dopamine drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson`s disease and of schizophrenia as well as to investigate the effects of drugs of abuse on the dopamine system. Since various functional and neurochemical parameters can be studied in the same subject, PET enables investigation of the functional integrity of the dopamine system in the human brain and investigation of the interactions of dopamine with other neurotransmitters. This paper summarizes the different tracers and experimental strategies developed to evaluate the various elements of the dopamine system in the human brain with PET and their applications to clinical research. 254 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. [Increased tolerance of the dopamine- and serotoninergic systems during chronic administration of haloperidol and levomepromazine].

    PubMed

    Allikmets, L Kh; Zharkovski?, A M; Otter, M Ia; Khinrikus, T Kh

    1979-01-01

    In experiments on male albino rats single administration of haloperidol produced catalepsy, increase in dopamine turnover, enhancement of main dopamine metabolite homovanilinic acid in the forebrain. After single administration of the levomepromazine the cataleptogenic effect was accompanied by an enhanced 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid level, and no influence on the dopamine metabolism was observed. During chronic administration of haloperidol and levomepromazine their ability to induce catalepsy and to increase homovanilinic acid or 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentration diminished. Thus, it appears that chronic administration of haloperidol reduces the sensitivity of dopamine receptors, and chronic administration of levomepromazine--reduces the sensitivity of dopamine and serotonin receptors in the brain. PMID:573939

  10. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  11. Using dopamine research to generate rational cannabinoid drug policy

    E-print Network

    Cheer, Joseph F.

    Using dopamine research to generate rational cannabinoid drug policy G. C. Loewinger, E. B. Oleson and J. F. Cheer* The recent rise in the recreational use of synthetic cannabinoids (e.g. `K2' and `Spice drugs that indirectly stimulate these receptors by increasing levels of endogenous CB neurotransmitters

  12. BASAL GANGLIA PATHOLOGY IN SCHIZOPHRENIA: DOPAMINE CONNECTIONS and ANOMALIES

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Costas, Emma; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Roberts, Rosalinda C.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness that affects 1% of the world population. The disease usually manifests itself in early adulthood with hallucinations, delusions, cognitive and emotional disturbances and disorganized thought and behavior. Dopamine was the first neurotransmitter to be implicated in the disease, and though no longer the only suspect in schizophrenia pathophysiology, it obviously plays an important role. The basal ganglia are the site of most of the dopamine neurons in the brain and the target of antipsychotic drugs. In this review we will start with an overview of basal ganglia anatomy emphasizing dopamine circuitry. Then, we will review the major deficits in dopamine function in schizophrenia, emphasizing the role of excessive dopamine in the basal ganglia and the link to psychosis. PMID:20089137

  13. How Addictive Drugs Disrupt Presynaptic Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle that unites addictive drugs appears to be that each enhances synaptic dopamine by means that dissociate it from normal behavioral control, so that they act to reinforce their own acquisition. This occurs via the modulation of synaptic mechanisms involved in learning, including enhanced excitation or disinhibition of dopamine neuron activity, blockade of dopamine reuptake, and altering the state of the presynaptic terminal to enhance evoked over basal transmission. Amphetamines offer an exception to such modulation in that they combine multiple effects to produce non-exocytic stimulation-independent release of neurotransmitter via reverse transport independent from normal presynaptic function. Questions on the molecular actions of addictive drugs, prominently including the actions of alcohol and solvents, remain unresolved, but their ability to co-opt normal presynaptic functions helps to explain why treatment for addiction has been challenging. PMID:21338876

  14. Serotonin and Mental Disorders: A Concise Review on Molecular Neuroimaging Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Hsien; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin is one of the most important neurotransmitters influencing mental health and, thus, is a potential target for pharmaco-logical treatments. Functional neuroimaging techniques, such as positron-emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), could provide persuasive evidence for the association between mental disorders and serotonin. In this concise review, we focus on evidence of the links between serotonin and major depressive disorders, as well as other mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, addiction, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and autism. PMID:25598822

  15. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility.

    PubMed

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  16. Dynamic changes of five neurotransmitters and their related enzymes in various rat tissues following ?-asarone and levodopa co-administration

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, LIPING; DENG, MINZHEN; FANG, YONGQI; LI, LING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the dynamic changes of five neurotransmitters and their associated enzymes in the rat plasma and brain tissues following the co-administration of ?-asarone and levodopa (L-dopa). The rats were divided into five groups, including the control group and four treatment groups that were intragastrically co-administered ?-asarone and L-dopa and sacrificed at 1, 5, 18 and 48 h, respectively. Neurotransmitter levels in the brain tissues and plasma were detected using high performance liquid chromatograph and the related enzymes of dopamine (DA) were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that the striatal levels of L-dopa and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) peaked at 1 h and then returned to the normal levels, while the striatal levels of DA were stable within 48 h. In the cortex and hippocampus tissue, L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and homovanillic acid (HVA) levels peaked at 1 h and then returned to normal levels. In the plasma, L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and HVA levels peaked at 1 h. Compared with the control group, L-dopa, DA and HVA levels were higher between 18 and 48 h, whereas the DOPAC level was lower. By contrast, no statistically significant differences were observed in the serotonin (5-HT) levels among the plasma, hippocampus, cortex and striatum. Furthermore, the DA/L-dopa ratio in the brain tissues and plasma increased in the first 5 h, while (DOPAC + HVA)/DA ratios demonstrated a significant reduction. Striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) levels were higher compared with the control group; however, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase B levels were reduced. In the rat plasma, TH and COMT peaked at 1 h, while AADC peaked at 5 h. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that the co-administration of L-dopa and ?-asarone may be used to maintain a stable striatal DA level within 48 h. In addition, this treatment may promote DA generation by AADC and reduce the metabolism of DA by COMT. PMID:26622527

  17. Plasma HVA in Adults with Mental Retardation and Stereotyped Behavior: Biochemical Evidence for a Dopamine Deficiency Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Mark H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of the neurotransmitter dopamine through measurement of the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) in adult subjects with mental retardation and with high rates of body stereotypy (n=12), compulsive behaviors (n=9), or neither (n=12) found lowest HVA concentrations in the stereotypy group and highest in the compulsive group. (DB)

  18. Optogenetic control of striatal dopamine release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Caroline E; Grinevich, Valentina P; Vance, Zachary B; Sullivan, Ryan P; Bonin, Keith D; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2010-01-01

    Optogenetic control over neuronal firing has become an increasingly elegant method to dissect the microcircuitry of mammalian brains. To date, examination of these manipulations on neurotransmitter release has been minimal. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of optogenetic stimulation on dopamine neurotransmission in the dorsal striatum of urethane-anesthetized rats. By combining the tight spatial and temporal resolution of both optogenetics and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry we have determined the parameters necessary to control phasic dopamine release in the dorsal striatum of rats in vivo. The kinetics of optically induced dopamine release mirror established models of electrically evoked release, indicating that potential artifacts of electrical stimulation on ion channels and the dopamine transporter are negligible. Furthermore a lack of change in extracellular pH indicates that optical stimulation does not alter blood flow. Optical control over dopamine release is highly reproducible and flexible. We are able to repeatedly evoke concentrations of dopamine release as small as a single dopamine transient (50 nM). A U-shaped frequency response curve exists with maximal stimulation inducing dopamine effluxes exceeding 500 nM. Taken together, these results have obvious implications for understanding the neurobiological basis of dopaminergic-based disorders and provide the framework to effectively manipulate dopamine patterns. PMID:20534006

  19. Larvae of small white butterfly, Pieris rapae, express a novel serotonin receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biogenic amine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a neurotransmitter in vertebrates and invertebrates. It acts in regulation and modulation of many physiological and behavioral processes through G protein-coupled receptors. Insects express five 5-HT receptor subtypes that share high simila...

  20. Effects of Early Serotonin Programming on Fear Response, Memory and Aggression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) also acts as a neurogenic compound in the developing brain. Early administration of a 5-HT agonist could alter development of serotonergic circuitry, altering behaviors mediated by 5-HT signaling, including memory, fear and aggression. The present study was desi...

  1. Influence of serotonin on the immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J C; Cross, R J; Walker, R F; Markesbery, W R; Brooks, W H; Roszman, T L

    1985-01-01

    The present study investigates the influence of pharmacological agents known to regulate biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) on the primary antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in the CBA mouse. Systemic administration of 5-HT (4-100 mg/kg) or its precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, 50-400 mg/kg), 30-60 min before immunization resulted in dose-dependent suppression of both the IgM and IgG plaque-forming cell (PFC) response to SRBC. Conversely, para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 250 mg/kg), which inhibits the rate-limiting enzyme (tryptophan hydroxylase) in 5-HT biosynthesis, markedly enhanced IgM and IgG antibody production when injected 48 hr prior to antigen. Effects of these drugs on immune processes appeared independent of observed changes in plasma corticosterone levels. Further, immune function was preserved following selective depletion of brain serotonin through intracisternal injection of the neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) in mice pretreated with desmethylimipramine (DMI). Thus, immunomodulation by serotonin appears to be mediated via peripheral mechanism(s). PMID:3156091

  2. The Dopamine Augmenter L-DOPA Does Not Affect Positive Mood in Healthy Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Liggins, John; Pihl, Robert O.; Benkelfat, Chawki; Leyton, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission influences approach toward rewards and reward-related cues. The best cited interpretation of this effect proposes that dopamine mediates the pleasure that commonly accompanies reward. This hypothesis has received support in some animal models and a few studies in humans. However, direct assessments of the effect of transiently increasing dopamine neurotransmission have been largely limited to the use of psychostimulant drugs, which elevate brain levels of multiple neurotransmitters in addition to dopamine. In the present study we tested the effect of more selectively elevating dopamine neurotransmission, as produced by administration of the immediate dopamine precursor, L-DOPA (0, 100/25, 200/50 mg, Sinemet), in healthy human volunteers. Neither dose altered positive mood. The results suggest that dopamine neurotransmission does not directly influence positive mood in humans. PMID:22238577

  3. The dopamine theory of addiction: 40 years of highs and lows.

    PubMed

    Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Erritzoe, David; Stokes, Paul R A

    2015-05-01

    For several decades, addiction has come to be viewed as a disorder of the dopamine neurotransmitter system; however, this view has not led to new treatments. In this Opinion article, we review the origins of the dopamine theory of addiction and discuss the ability of addictive drugs to elicit the release of dopamine in the human striatum. There is robust evidence that stimulants increase striatal dopamine levels and some evidence that alcohol may have such an effect, but little evidence, if any, that cannabis and opiates increase dopamine levels. Moreover, there is good evidence that striatal dopamine receptor availability and dopamine release are diminished in individuals with stimulant or alcohol dependence but not in individuals with opiate, nicotine or cannabis dependence. These observations have implications for understanding reward and treatment responses in various addictions. PMID:25873042

  4. Chemical stimulants of leaf-trenching by cabbage loopers: natural products, neurotransmitters, insecticides, and drugs.

    PubMed

    Dussourd, David E

    2003-09-01

    Larvae of the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), often transect leaves with a narrow trench before eating the distal section. The trench reduces larval exposure to exudates, such as latex, during feeding. Plant species that do not emit exudate, such as Plantago lanceolata, are not trenched. However, if exudate is applied to a looper's mouth during feeding on P. lanceolata, the larva will often stop and cut a trench. Dissolved chemicals can be similarly applied and tested for effectiveness at triggering trenching. With this assay, I have documented that lactucin from lettuce latex (Lactuca sativa), myristicin from parsley oil (Petroselinum crispum), and lobeline from cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis) elicit trenching. These compounds are the first trenching stimulants reported. Several other constituents of lettuce and parsley, including some phenylpropanoids, monoterpenes, and furanocoumarins had little or no activity. Cucurbitacin E glycoside found in cucurbits, another plant family trenched by cabbage loopers, also was inactive. Lactucin, myristicin, and lobeline all affect the nervous system of mammals, with lobeline acting specifically as an antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. To determine if cabbage loopers respond selectively to compounds active at acetylcholine synapses, I tested several neurotransmitters, insecticides, and drugs with known neurological activity, many of which triggered trenching. Active compounds included dopamine, serotonin, the insecticide imidacloprid, and various drugs such as ipratropium, apomorphine, buspirone, and metoclopramide. These results document that noxious plant chemicals trigger trenching, that loopers respond to different trenching stimulants in different plants, that diverse neuroactive chemicals elicit the behavior, and that feeding deterrents are not all trenching stimulants. The trenching assay offers a novel approach for identifying defensive plant compounds with potential uses in agriculture or medicine. Cabbage loopers in the lab and field routinely trench and feed on plants in the Asteraceae and Apiaceae. However, first and third instar larvae enclosed on Lobelia cardinalis (Campanulaceae) failed to develop, even though the third instar larvae attempted to trench. Trenching ability does not guarantee effective feeding on plants with canal-borne exudates. Cabbage loopers must not only recognize and respond to trenching stimulants, they must also tolerate exudates during the trenching procedure to disable canalicular defenses. PMID:14584674

  5. Effects of delayed treatment with nebracetam on neurotransmitters in brain regions after microsphere embolism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Takeo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Hideki; Miyake, Keiko; Takagi, Kaori; Tadokoro, Mina; Takagi, Norio; Oshikawa, Sayuri

    1997-01-01

    The effects of delayed treatment with nebracetam, a novel nootropic drug, on neurotransmitters of brain regions were examined in rats with microsphere embolism-induced cerebral ischaemia. Cerebral ischaemia was induced by administration of 900 microspheres (48??m) into the internal carotid artery. The rats with stroke-like symptoms were treated p.o. with 30?mg?kg?1 nebracetam twice daily. The levels of acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and their metabolites in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus of animals with microsphere embolism were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.) on the 3rd and 7th days after the operation. Although the microsphere embolism induced significant changes in most of the neurotransmitters and some of their metabolites in the brain regions, the delayed treatment with nebracetam partially restored only the hippocampal 5-HT and the striatal dopamine metabolite contents on the 3rd day. The hippocampal in vivo 5-HT synthesis, but not the striatal dopamine synthesis, was attenuated in rats with microsphere embolism on the 3rd day, but was restored by treatment with nebracetam. In vivo striatal dopamine turnover rate of the rats with microsphere embolism was inhibited on the 3rd day irrespective of treatment with nebracetam. The present study provides evidence for a possible action of nebracetam on 5-HT metabolism in the ischaemic brain. PMID:9179389

  6. Serotonin and serotonin transport in the regulation of lactation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Aaron M; Hernandez, Laura L; Horseman, Nelson D

    2014-03-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), classically known as a neurotransmitter involved in regulating sleep, appetite, memory, sexual behavior, neuroendocrine function and mood is also synthesized in epithelial cells located in many organs throughout the body, including the mammary gland. The function of epithelial 5-HT is dependent on the expression of the 5-HT receptors in a particular system. The conventional components of a classic 5-HT system are found within the mammary gland; synthetic enzymes (tryptophan hydroxylase I, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase), several 5-HT receptors and the 5-HT reuptake transporter (SERT). In the mammary gland, two actions of 5-HT through two different 5-HT receptor subtypes have been described: negative feedback on milk synthesis and secretion, and stimulation of parathyroid hormone related-protein, a calcium-mobilizing hormone. As with neuronal systems, the regulation of 5-HT activity is multifactorial, but one seminal component is reuptake of 5-HT from the extracellular space following its release. Importantly, the wide availability of selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) allows the manipulation of 5-HT activity in a biological system. Here, we review the role of 5-HT in mammary gland function, review the biochemistry, genetics and physiology of SERT, and discuss how SERT is vital to the function of the mammary gland. PMID:24136337

  7. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  8. Biophysics of risk aversion based on neurotransmitter receptor theory

    E-print Network

    Takahashi, Taiki

    2011-01-01

    Decision under risk and uncertainty has been attracting attention in neuroeconomics and neuroendocrinology of decision-making. This paper demonstrated that the neurotransmitter receptor theory-based value (utility) function can account for human and animal risk-taking behavior. The theory predicts that (i) when dopaminergic neuronal response is efficiently coupled to the formation of ligand-receptor complex, subjects are risk-aversive (irrespective of their satisfaction level) and (ii) when the coupling is inefficient, subjects are risk-seeking at low satisfaction levels, consistent with risk-sensitive foraging theory in ecology. It is further suggested that some anomalies in decision under risk are due to inefficiency of the coupling between dopamine receptor activation and neuronal response. Future directions in the application of the model to studies in neuroeconomics of addiction and neuroendocrine modulation of risk-taking behavior are discussed.

  9. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  10. The serotonin aldehyde, 5-HIAL, oligomerizes alpha-synuclein.

    PubMed

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Cooney, Adele; Sullivan, Patricia; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2015-03-17

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) alpha-synuclein oligomers are thought to be pathogenic, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), an obligate aldehyde intermediate in neuronal dopamine metabolism, potently oligomerizes alpha-synuclein. PD involves alpha-synuclein deposition in brainstem raphe nuclei; however, whether 5-hydroxyindoleacetaldehyde (5-HIAL), the aldehyde of serotonin, oligomerizes alpha-synuclein has been unknown. In this study we tested whether 5-HIAL oligomerizes alpha-synuclein in vitro and in PC12 cells conditionally over-expressing alpha-synuclein. Alpha-synuclein oligomers were quantified by western blotting after incubation of alpha-synuclein with serotonin and monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) to generate 5-HIAL or dopamine to generate DOPAL. Oligomerization of alpha-synuclein in PC12 cells over-expressing the protein was compared between vehicle-treated cells and cells incubated with levodopa to generate DOPAL or 5-hydroxytryptophan to generate 5-HIAL. Monoamine aldehyde mediation of the oligomerization was assessed using the MAO inhibitor, pargyline. Dopamine and serotonin incubated with MAO-A both strongly oligomerized alpha-synuclein (more than 10 times control); pargyline blocked the oligomerization. In synuclein overexpressing PC12 cells, levodopa and 5-hydroxytryptophan elicited pargyline-sensitive alpha-synuclein oligomerization. 5-HIAL oligomerizes alpha-synuclein both in vitro and in synuclein-overexpressing PC12 cells, in a manner similar to DOPAL. The findings may help explain loss of serotonergic neurons in PD. PMID:25637699

  11. Fast Phasic Release Properties of Dopamine Studied with a Channel Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Geraldine J.; Shu, Hong-Jin; Yu, Andrew; Taylor, Amanda; Benz, Ann; Harmon, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Few other neurotransmitters are of as intense interest to neuropsychiatry and neurology as dopamine, yet existing techniques to monitor dopamine release leave an important spatiotemporal gap in our understanding. Electrochemistry and fluorescence imaging tools have been developed to fill the gap, but these methods have important limitations. We circumvent these limitations by introducing a dopamine-gated chloride channel into rat dorsal striatal medium spiny neurons, targets of strong dopamine innervation, thereby transforming dopamine from a slow transmitter into a fast transmitter and revealing new opportunities for studying moment-to-moment regulation of dopamine release. We demonstrate pharmacological and biophysical properties of the channel that make it suitable for fast, local dopamine measurements, and we demonstrate for the first time spontaneous and evoked responses to vesicular dopamine release in the dorsal striatum. Evoked dopamine currents were separated into a fast, monosynaptic component and a slower-rising and decaying disynaptic component mediated by nicotinic receptor activation. In summary, LGC-53 represents a dopamine biosensor with properties suitable for temporal separation of distinct dopamine signals in targets of dopamine innervation. PMID:25164674

  12. Pharmacological profile of 2-bromoterguride at human dopamine D2, porcine serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A, and ?2C-adrenergic receptors, and its antipsychotic-like effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Jantschak, F; Brosda, J; Franke, R T; Fink, H; Möller, D; Hübner, H; Gmeiner, P; Pertz, H H

    2013-10-01

    Dopaminergic, serotonergic, and adrenergic receptors are targets for therapeutic actions in schizophrenia. Dopamine D2 receptor partial agonists such as aripiprazole represent a treatment option for patients with this severe disorder. The ineffectiveness of terguride, another D2 receptor partial agonist, in treating schizophrenia was recently attributed to its considerably high intrinsic activity at D2 receptors. In this study, we used functional assays for recombinant D2 receptors and native 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT2A), ?2C-adrenergic, and histamine H1 receptors to compare the pharmacological properties of terguride and three of its halogenated derivatives (2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodoterguride) with those of aripiprazole. Subsequently, we studied the antidopaminergic effects of 2-bromoterguride using amphetamine-induced locomotion (AIL). Its influence on spontaneous behavior was tested in the open field. Extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability was evaluated by catalepsy test. In a guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP?S) binding assay, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, and 2-iodoterguride produced intrinsic activities at human D2short (hD2S) receptors that were half as high as the intrinsic activity for terguride; aripiprazole lacked agonist activity. 2-Bromoterguride and aripiprazole activated D2S receptor-mediated inhibition of cAMP accumulation to the same extent; intrinsic activity was half as high as that of terguride. All compounds tested behaved as antagonists at human D2long/G?o (hD2L/G?o) receptors. Compared with aripiprazole, terguride and its derivatives displayed higher affinity at porcine 5-HT2A receptors and ?2C-adrenoceptors and lower affinity at H1 receptors. 2-Bromoterguride inhibited AIL and did not induce catalepsy in rats. Because of its in vitro and in vivo properties, 2-bromoterguride may be a strong candidate for the treatment of schizophrenia with a lower risk to induce EPS. PMID:23863695

  13. Structure and functional expression of cloned rat serotonin 5HT-2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Pritchett, D B; Bach, A W; Wozny, M; Taleb, O; Dal Toso, R; Shih, J C; Seeburg, P H

    1988-01-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding a serotonin receptor with 51% sequence identity to the 5HT-1C subtype was isolated from a rat brain cDNA library by homology screening. Transient expression of the cloned cDNA in mammalian cells was used to establish the pharmacological profile of the encoded receptor polypeptide. Membranes from transfected cells showed high-affinity binding of the serotonin antagonists spiperone, ketanserin and mianserin, low affinity for haloperidol (a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist), 8-OH-DPAT as well as MDL-72222 and no detectable binding of [3H]serotonin. This profile is consonant with the 5HT-2 subtype of serotonin receptors. In agreement with this assignment, serotonin increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and activated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in transfected mammalian cells. The agonist also elicited a current flow, blocked by spiperone, in Xenopus oocytes injected with in vitro synthesized RNA containing the cloned nucleotide sequences. PMID:2854054

  14. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  15. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT) in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    PubMed

    Urra, Javier A; Villaroel-Espíndola, Franz; Covarrubias, Alejandra A; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  16. Serotonin of mast cell origin contributes to hippocampal function

    PubMed Central

    Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Dailey, Christopher A.; Jahn, Jaquelyn L.; Rodriquez, Elizabeth; Son, Nguyen Hong; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Silver, Rae

    2012-01-01

    In the CNS, serotonin, an important neurotransmitter and trophic factor, is synthesized by both mast cells and neurons. Mast cells, like other immune cells, are born in the bone marrow and migrate to many tissues. We show that they are resident in the mouse brain throughout development and adulthood. Measurements based on capillary electrophoresis with native fluorescence detection indicate that a significant contribution of serotonin to the hippocampal milieu is associated with mast cell activation. Compared to their littermates, mast cell deficient C57BL/6 KitW-sh/W-sh mice have profound deficits in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory and in hippocampal neurogenesis. These deficits are associated with a reduction in cell proliferation and in immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, but not in the subventricular zone – a neurogenic niche lacking mast cells. Chronic treatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, reverses the deficit in hippocampal neurogenesis in mast cell deficient mice. In summary, the present studies demonstrate that mast cells are a source of serotonin, that mast cell deficient C57BL/6 KitW-sh/W-sh mice have disrupted hippocampus-dependent behavior and neurogenesis, and that elevating serotonin in these mice, by treatment with fluoxetine, reverses these deficits. We conclude that mast cells contribute to behavioral and physiological functions of the hippocampus and note that they play a physiological role in neuroimmune interactions, even in the absence of inflammatory responses. PMID:22632453

  17. Serotonin Deficiency Exacerbates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Toxicity In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)).Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1? in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration. PMID:25631548

  18. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    PubMed

    S?oniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the ?1 and ?2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides/neurotransmitters are involved in cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, it is possible that they play a role in corneal wound healing. PMID:26214847

  19. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ

    PubMed Central

    S?oniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the ?1 and ?2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides/neurotransmitters are involved in cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis, it is possible that they play a role in corneal wound healing. PMID:26214847

  20. Central actions of a novel and selective dopamine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine traditionally have been divided into two subgroups: the D/sub 1/ class, which is linked to the stimulation of adenylate cyclase-activity, and the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor that mediates the physiological and behavioral actions of dopamine in the intact animal. However, the benzazepine SCH23390 is a dopamine antagonist which has potent behavioral actions while displaying apparent neurochemical selectivity for the D/sub 1/ class of dopamine receptors. The purpose of this dissertation was to (1) confirm and characterize this selectivity, and (2) test certain hypothesis related to possible modes of action of SCH233390. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase by SCH23390 occurred via an action at the dopamine receptor only. A radiolabeled analog of SCH23390 displayed the receptor binding properties of a specific high-affinity ligand, and regional receptor densities were highly correlated with dopamine levels. The subcellular distribution of (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding did not correspond completely with that of dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. The neurochemical potency of SCH23390 as a D/sub 1/ receptor antagonist was preserved following parental administration. A variety of dopamine agonists and antagonists displayed a high correlation between their abilities to compete for (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding in vitro and to act at an adenylate cyclase-linked receptor. Finally, the relative affinities of dopamine and SCH23390 for both D/sub 1/ receptors and (/sup 3/H)-SCH23390 binding sites were comparable. It is concluded that the behavioral effects of SCH23390 are mediated by actions at D/sub 1/ dopamine receptors only, and that the physiological importance of this class of receptors should be reevaluated.

  1. Molecular Mechanism of Dopamine Transport by Human Dopamine Transporter.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine transporters (DATs) control neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) homeostasis by reuptake of excess DA, assisted by sodium and chloride ions. The recent resolution of DAT structure (dDAT) from Drosophila permits us for the first time to directly view the sequence of events involved in DA reuptake in human DAT (hDAT) using homology modeling and full-atomic microseconds accelerated simulations. Major observations are spontaneous closure of extracellular gates prompted by DA binding; stabilization of a holo-occluded intermediate; disruption of N82-N353 hydrogen bond and exposure to intracellular (IC) water triggered by Na2 dislocation; redistribution of a network of salt bridges at the IC surface in the inward-facing state; concerted tilting of IC-exposed helices to enable the release of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions; and DA release after protonation of D79. The observed time-resolved interactions confirm the conserved dynamics of LeuT-fold family, while providing insights into the mechanistic role of specific residues in hDAT. PMID:26481814

  2. Levels in neurotransmitter precursor amino acids correlate with mental health in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, K; Oberguggenberger, A; Kohl, C; Geisler, S; Gamper, E; Meraner, V; Egeter, J; Hubalek, M; Beer, B; Fuchs, D; Sperner-Unterweger, B

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among females. Approximately 30% of cancer patients develop depression or depressive adaptation disorder within 5 years post diagnosis. Low grade inflammation and subsequent changes in neurotransmitter levels could be the pathophysiological link. In the current study we investigated the association of neurotransmitter precursor amino acids with a diagnosis of depression or state anxiety in 154 subjects suffering from breast cancer (BCA(+)), depression (DPR(+)), both or neither. Sociodemographic parameters, severity of depressive symptoms, and state anxiety (ANX) were recorded. Neopterin, kynurenine/tryptophan and phenylalanine/tyrosine were analysed by HPLC or ELISA. Significantly higher serum neopterin values were found in DPR(+) patients (p = 0.034) and in ANX(+) subjects (p = 0.008), as a marker of Th1-related inflammation. The phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio (index of the catecholamine pathway) was associated with the factors "breast cancer" and "depression" and their interaction (all p < 0.001); it was highest in the DPR(+)BCA(+) group. The kynurenine/tryptophan ratio (index of the serotonin pathway) was significantly associated with the factors "breast cancer" and "state anxiety" and their interaction (p < 0.001, p = 0.026, p = 0.02, respectively); it was highest in the ANX(+)BCA(+) group. In BCA(+) patients kynurenine/tryptophan ratios correlated with severity of state anxiety (r = 0.226, p = 0.048, uncorrected) and phenylalanine/tyrosine ratios with severity of depressive symptoms (r = 0.376, p < 0.05, corrected). In conclusion, levels of neurotransmitter precursor amino acids correlate with mental health, an effect which was much more pronounced in BCA(+) patients than in BCA(-) subjects. Aside from identifying underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, these results could be the basis for future treatment studies: in BCA(+) patients with depression the use of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors might be recommended while in those with predominant anxiety selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors might be the treatment of choice. PMID:26112459

  3. Effects of dietary amino acids, carbohydrates, and choline on neurotransmitter synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a meal to increase or decrease brain neurotransmitter synthesis has been studied. It is concluded that brain serotonin synthesis is directly controlled by the proportions of carbohydrate to protein in meals and snacks that increase or decrease brain tryptophan levels, thereby changing the substrate saturation of tryptophan hydroxylase and the rate of serotonin synthesis. The ability of serotoninergic neurons to have their output coupled to dietary macronutrients enables them to function as sensors of peripheral metabolism, and to subserve an important role in the control of appetite. The robust and selective responses of catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurons to supplemental tyrosine and choline suggest that these compounds may become useful as a new type of drug for treating deseases or conditions in which adequate quantities of the transmitter would otherwise be unavailable.

  4. Circadian-related heteromerization of adrenergic and dopamine D? receptors modulates melatonin synthesis and release in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    González, Sergio; Moreno-Delgado, David; Moreno, Estefanía; Pérez-Capote, Kamil; Franco, Rafael; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Ortiz, Jordi; Ferré, Sergi; Canela, Enric; McCormick, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The role of the pineal gland is to translate the rhythmic cycles of night and day encoded by the retina into hormonal signals that are transmitted to the rest of the neuronal system in the form of serotonin and melatonin synthesis and release. Here we describe that the production of both melatonin and serotonin by the pineal gland is regulated by a circadian-related heteromerization of adrenergic and dopamine D? receptors. Through ?(?B)-D? and ??-D? receptor heteromers dopamine inhibits adrenergic receptor signaling and blocks the synthesis of melatonin induced by adrenergic receptor ligands. This inhibition was not observed at hours of the day when D? was not expressed. These data provide a new perspective on dopamine function and constitute the first example of a circadian-controlled receptor heteromer. The unanticipated heteromerization between adrenergic and dopamine D? receptors provides a feedback mechanism for the neuronal hormone system in the form of dopamine to control circadian inputs. PMID:22723743

  5. Immunohistological localization of serotonin in the CNS and feeding system of the stable fly stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera: muscidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), plays critical roles as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator that control or modulate many behaviors in insects, such as feeding. Neurons immunoreactive (IR)to 5-HT were detected in the central nervous system (CNS) of the larval and adult stages of the stab...

  6. Acrylamide increases dopamine levels by affecting dopamine transport and metabolism related genes in the striatal dopaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Guo, Xiongxiong; Xiong, Fei; Cheng, Guihong; Lu, Qing; Yan, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Dopaminergic system dysfunction is proved to be a possible mechanism in acrylamide (ACR) -induced neurotoxicity. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has an increasingly important role in the dopaminergic system. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate effects of ACR on dopamine and its metabolite levels, dopamine transport and metabolic gene expression in dopaminergic neurons. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed orally with ACR at 0 (saline), 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg/day for 20 days. Splayed hind limbs, reduced tail flick time and abnormal gait which preceded other neurologic parameters were observed in the above rats. ACR significantly increased dopamine levels, decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) contents in an area dependent manner in rat striatum. Immunohistochemical staining of the striatum revealed that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells significantly increased, while monoamine oxidase (MAO) positive cells were drastically reduced, which was consistent with changes in their mRNA and protein expressions. In addition, dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression levels were both down-regulated in the striatum. These results suggest that dopamine levels increase significantly in response to ACR, presumably due to changes in the dopamine transport and metabolism related genes expression in the striatal dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25943760

  7. Chlorophenylpiperazine analogues as high affinity dopamine transporter ligands

    PubMed Central

    Viard, Eddy; Pouw, Buddy; Martin, Kelly; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Coop, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Selective ?2 ligands continue to be an active target for medications to attenuate the effects of psychostimulants. In the course of our studies to determine the optimal substituents in the ?2-selective phenyl piperazines analogues with reduced activity at other neurotransmitter systems, we discovered that 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4-phenethylpiperazine actually had preferentially increased affinity for dopamine transporters (DAT), yielding a highly selective DAT ligand. PMID:24211020

  8. Waterborne lead affects circadian variations of brain neurotransmitters in fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, R.E.; Russo, A.C.; Weber, D.N.

    1995-09-01

    Lead is a potent neurotoxin affecting brain levels of a number of vertebrate neurotransmitters. Reports on these effects are, however, not consistent either among or within species. For example, with lead-intoxicated rats there are reports of decreased acetylcholine (ACh) release and decreased ACh brain levels as well as reports of increased levels or no change in levels. Also, with rats there are reports of increased levels, decreased levels, or no change in brain catecholamines, with lead producing similar changes in both norephinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) in some cases and differences in response between the two in others. Although most early reports dealt with whole brain levels, reports on neurotransmitter levels in specific brain regions can be equally conflicting. Similar sorts of discrepancies exist among studies with fishes. Much of the variation among studies on lead effects on neurotransmitters is, no doubt, due to differences among the studies in variables such as: species, age, dosage and duration, route of administration. However, lead can apparently affect circadian locomotor rhythms of both rats and fishes. Therefore, another possible cause for the variation among studies is that there is an interaction among dosage, sampling time and endogenous rhythms. A lead-produced phase shift or disruption in endogenous neurotransmitter rhythms could in turn elicit a host of varying results and interpretations depending on the circadian time of sampling. We elected to examine this possibility in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a freshwater species widely used for toxicity studies. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Rationality and emotionality: serotonin transporter genotype influences reasoning bias

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Stephanie E.; Anderson, Lindsay M.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Vaidya, Chandan J.

    2013-01-01

    Reasoning often occurs under emotionally charged, opinion-laden circumstances. The belief-bias effect indexes the extent to which reasoning is based upon beliefs rather than logical structure. We examined whether emotional content increases this effect, particularly for adults genetically predisposed to be more emotionally reactive. SS/SLG carriers of the serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) were less accurate selectively for evaluating emotional relational reasoning problems with belief-logic conflict relative to LALA carriers. Trait anxiety was positively associated with emotional belief-bias, and the 5-HTTLPR genotype significantly accounted for the variance in this association. Thus, deductive reasoning, a higher cognitive ability, is sensitive to differences in emotionality rooted in serotonin neurotransmitter function. PMID:22275169

  10. Antidepressant binding site in a bacterial homologue of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satinder K; Yamashita, Atsuko; Gouaux, Eric

    2007-08-23

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 A above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational design of new inhibitors. PMID:17687333

  11. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational design of new inhibitors.

  12. Near-infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering (NIR-SERS) of neurotransmitters in colloidal silver solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Wang, Yang; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    1995-03-01

    NIR-SERS spectra are measured for the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine at concentrations as low as 5 × 10 -9 M in colloidal silver solutions with accumulation times as short as 25 ms. The detection range and acquisition time are on the order of physiologically relevant concentrations and the time scale of neuronal processes, respectively. The spectra are obtained using a CCD detection system, dye laser at 830 nm for excitation, fiber optic probe and high throughput spectrograph. Mixtures containing the two neurotransmitters are used to demonstrate the capability of extracting quantitative information from SERS spectra. Albumin added to the sample up to 0.5% concentration does not show any influence on the SERS spectra of the neurotransmitters in the silver colloidal solutions. The results demonstrate the potential of NIR-SERS in probing dopamine and norepinephrine with high sensitivity and specificity. They also suggest that NIR-SERS from colloidal silver solution can be a powerful tool for the study of neurotransmitters in brain extracts and dialysates.

  13. Dopamine Regulation of Human Speech and Bird Song: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonyan, Kristina; Horwitz, Barry; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the neural basis of human speech control, extensive research has been done using a variety of methodologies in a range of experimental models. Nevertheless, several critical questions about learned vocal motor control still remain open. One of them is the mechanism(s) by which neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, modulate speech and…

  14. Blink Rate in Boys with Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Evidence for Altered Dopamine Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, J. E.; Symons, F. J.; Johnson, A.-M.; Hatton, D. D.; Boccia, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in motor and cognitive functioning, can be non-invasively measured via observation of spontaneous blink rates. Blink rates have been studied in a number of clinical conditions including schizophrenia, autism, Parkinsons, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder with results implicating either…

  15. Developmental Changes in Dopamine Neurotransmission in Adolescence: Behavioral Implications and Issues in Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlstrom, Dustin; Collins, Paul; White, Tonya; Luciana, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence is characterized by increased risk-taking, novelty-seeking, and locomotor activity, all of which suggest a heightened appetitive drive. The neurotransmitter dopamine is typically associated with behavioral activation and heightened forms of appetitive behavior in mammalian species, and this pattern of activation has been described in…

  16. A Neurobiological Hypothesis of Treatment-Resistant Depression – Mechanisms for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Non-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Gopinath, Srinath; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Berry, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    First-line treatment of major depression includes administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), yet studies suggest that remission rates following two trials of an SSRI are <50%. The authors examine the putative biological substrates underlying “treatment resistant depression (TRD)” with the goal of elucidating novel rationales to treat TRD. We look at relevant articles from the preclinical and clinical literature combined with clinical exposure to TRD patients. A major focus was to outline pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the serotonin system becomes impervious to the desired enhancement of serotonin neurotransmission by SSRIs. A complementary focus was to dissect neurotransmitter systems, which serve to inhibit the dorsal raphe. We propose, based on a body of translational studies, TRD may not represent a simple serotonin deficit state but rather an excess of midbrain peri-raphe serotonin and subsequent deficit at key fronto-limbic projection sites, with ultimate compromise in serotonin-mediated neuroplasticity. Glutamate, serotonin, noradrenaline, and histamine are activated by stress and exert an inhibitory effect on serotonin outflow, in part by “flooding” 5-HT1A autoreceptors by serotonin itself. Certain factors putatively exacerbate this scenario – presence of the short arm of the serotonin transporter gene, early-life adversity and comorbid bipolar disorder – each of which has been associated with SSRI-treatment resistance. By utilizing an incremental approach, we provide a system for treating the TRD patient based on a strategy of rescuing serotonin neurotransmission from a state of SSRI-induced dorsal raphe stasis. This calls for “stacked” interventions, with an SSRI base, targeting, if necessary, the glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems, thereby successively eliminating the inhibitory effects each are capable of exerting on serotonin neurons. Future studies are recommended to test this biologically based approach for treatment of TRD. PMID:24904340

  17. Discovery of Novel Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Through Development of a Protein-Based Pharmacophore

    PubMed Central

    Manepalli, Sankar; Geffert, Laura M.; Surratt, Christopher K.

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT), a member of the neurotransmitter sodium symporter (NSS) family, is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin from the synaptic cleft to maintain neurotransmitter homeostasis. SERT is established as an important target in the treatment of anxiety and depression. Because a high-resolution crystal structure is not available, a computational model of SERT was built based upon the x-ray coordinates of the leucine transporter LeuT, a bacterial NSS homolog. The model was used to develop the first SERT structure-based pharmacophore. Virtual screening (VS) of a small molecule structural library using the generated SERT computational model yielded candidate ligands of diverse scaffolds. Pharmacological analysis of the VS hits identified two SERT-selective compounds, potential lead compounds for further SERT-related medication development. PMID:21834587

  18. Effect of manganese treatment on the levels of neurotransmitters, hormones, and neuropeptides: modulation by stress

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.S.; Jung, C.R.; Seth, P.K.; Mason, G.; Bondy, S.C.

    1984-08-01

    Six weeks of daily intraperitoneal injection with manganese chloride (15 mg/kg body wt) reduced the normal weight gain of male Fischer-344 rats. This treatment depressed plasma testosterone and corticosterone levels, but prolactin levels were unaffected. The only significant changes in the levels of a variety of neuropeptides assayed in several regions were increases in the levels of hypothalamic substance P and pituitary neurotensin. Striatal serotonin, dopamine, and their metabolites were unchanged in manganese-exposed rats relative to saline-injected controls. However, the stress of injection combined with the effect of manganese appeared to significantly increase concentrations of striatal monoamines relative to uninjected controls.

  19. Dopamine induces an optimism bias in rats-Pharmacological proof for the translational validity of the ambiguous-cue interpretation test.

    PubMed

    Kregiel, J; Golebiowska, J; Popik, P; Rygula, R

    2016-01-15

    Recent findings have revealed that pharmacological enhancement of dopaminergic (DA) function by the administration of a dopaminergic precursor (dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine; l-DOPA) increases an optimism bias in humans. This effect is due to l-DOPA's impairment of the ability to update beliefs in response to undesirable information about the future. To test whether an 'optimistic' bias is also mediated by dopamine in animals, first, two groups of rats received either a dopaminergic precursor, l-DOPA, or a D2 receptor antagonist, haloperidol, and were subsequently tested using the ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) paradigm. To test whether similar effects might be observed when manipulating another neurotransmitter implicated in learning about reward and punishment, we administered the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor escitalopram to a third group of animals and the selective and irreversible tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) to a fourth group. The results of our study demonstrated that prolonged (2 weeks), but not acute, l-DOPA administration induced optimistic bias in rats. Neither acute nor chronic treatment with the other tested compounds had significant effects on the cognitive judgment bias of rats. The convergence of these results with human studies suggests the translational validity of the ambiguous-cue interpretation paradigm in testing the effects of pharmacological manipulations on cognitive judgment bias (optimism/pessimism) in rats. PMID:26462571

  20. In Vivo Calibration of Microdialysis Using Infusion of Stable-Isotope Labeled Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In vivo calibration of microdialysis probes is required for interpreting measured concentrations. The most popular method of in vivo calibration is no-net-flux (NNF), which requires infusing several concentrations of neurotransmitters to determine in vivo recoveries (extraction fraction or Ed) and extracellular concentrations. A new method for in vivo calibration of microdialysis of neurotransmitters using glutamate (GLU) and dopamine (DA) as model analytes is reported. 13C6-DA and 13C5-GLU were perfused through microdialysis probes as internal calibrators. Using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, it was possible to distinguish the 13C-forms from the endogenous forms of each neurotransmitter. Ed was directly calculated by measuring the loss of the 13C-forms during infusion. The measured endogenous 12C forms of the neurotransmitters could be corrected for Ed to give calibrated extracellular concentrations in vivo. Retrodialysis of stable-isotope-labeled (SIL) neurotransmitters gave Ed and extracellular concentrations of 13C5-GLU and 13C6-DA that matched no-net-flux measurements; however, the values were obtained in a fraction of time because no added measurements were required to obtain the calibration. Ed was reduced during uptake inhibition for GLU and DA when measured by SIL retrodialysis. Because Ed is directly measured at each microdialysis fraction, it was possible to monitor changes in Ed under transient conditions created by systemic injection of uptake inhibitors. The results show that DA and GLU concentrations are underestimated by as much as 50% if not corrected for Ed during uptake inhibition. SIL retrodialysis provides equivalent information to NNF at much reduced time and animal use. PMID:23374073

  1. Chronic paroxetine treatment: effects on other non-serotonergic neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, Paola; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, Joaquin; Franco-Perez, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Due to its efficacy and acceptability, paroxetine is situated in the top ten of drugs prescribed for the treatment of major depression and essentially all anxiety disorders. Adults under paroxetine treatment report relief after 4-6 weeks of administration; furthermore, this drug can be prescribed for periods lasting longer than one year. Therefore, paroxetine treatment has a pattern of ingestion that is mainly chronic rather than acute. There is a considerable number of reviews in the literature concerning the effects of paroxetine on the serotonergic system; however, the alterations caused by chronic ingestion of this drug in other neurotransmitter systems have received little attention. For this reason, we consider very important to review the experimental studies concerning the effects of chronic paroxetine intake on neurotransmitter levels, neuronal firing rate and the expression of receptors and transporters in different neurotransmitter systems in the brain. According to the experimental data analyzed in this work, we can establish that long-term paroxetine intake has the ability to increase GABA, glutamate, dopamine and noradrenaline levels in the brain. Furthermore, high levels of AMPA, orexine-1,2 and histamine-1 receptors have been reported in different brain regions after treatment with paroxetine over several weeks. In addition, paroxetine has differential effects on neuropeptide systems, such as galanine, opioid receptors and substance P. Available data lead us to establish that chronic ingestion of paroxetine induces changes in several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, thus illuminating how each one may contribute to the antidepressant and anxiolytic response elicited by this drug. We consider that all reported changes in the neurotransmitter systems should be further considered to individualize clinical treatment and, in the case of patients taking a drug "cocktail", to gain better control over drug interactions and adverse effects. PMID:24138712

  2. Two cases of mild serotonin toxicity via 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Hiroto; Umeda, Sumiyo; Nibuya, Masashi; Terao, Takeshi; Nisijima, Koichi; Nomura, Soichiro

    2014-01-01

    We propose the possibility of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor involvement in mild serotonin toxicity. A 64-year-old woman who experienced hallucinations was treated with perospirone (8 mg/day). She also complained of depressed mood and was prescribed paroxetine (10 mg/day). She exhibited finger tremors, sweating, coarse shivering, hyperactive knee jerks, vomiting, diarrhea, tachycardia, and psychomotor agitation. After the discontinuation of paroxetine and perospirone, the symptoms disappeared. Another 81-year-old woman, who experienced delusions, was treated with perospirone (8 mg/day). Depressive symptoms appeared and paroxetine (10 mg/day) was added. She exhibited tachycardia, finger tremors, anxiety, agitation, and hyperactive knee jerks. The symptoms disappeared after the cessation of paroxetine and perospirone. Recently, the effectiveness of coadministrating 5-HT1A agonistic psychotropics with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been reported, and SSRIs with 5-HT1A agonistic activity have been newly approved in the treatment of depression. Perospirone is a serotonin–dopamine antagonist and agonistic on the 5-HT1A receptors. Animal studies have indicated that mild serotonin excess induces low body temperature through 5-HT1A, whereas severe serotonin excess induces high body temperature through 5-HT2A activation. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that mild serotonin excess induces side effects through 5-HT1A, and severe serotonin excess induces lethal side effects with hyperthermia through 5-HT2A. Serotonin toxicity via a low dose of paroxetine that is coadministered with perospirone, which acts agonistically on the 5-HT1A receptor and antagonistically on the 5-HT2A receptor, clearly indicated 5-HT1A receptor involvement in mild serotonin toxicity. Careful measures should be adopted to avoid serotonin toxicity following the combined use of SSRIs and 5-HT1A agonists. PMID:24627634

  3. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  4. Context-dependent fluctuation of serotonin in the auditory midbrain: the influence of sex, reproductive state and experience

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jessica L.; Hurley, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    In the face of changing behavioral situations, plasticity of sensory systems can be a valuable mechanism to facilitate appropriate behavioral responses. In the auditory system, the neurotransmitter serotonin is an important messenger for context-dependent regulation because it is sensitive to both external events and internal state, and it modulates neural activity. In male mice, serotonin increases in the auditory midbrain region, the inferior colliculus (IC), in response to changes in behavioral context such as restriction stress and social contact. Female mice have not been measured in similar contexts, although the serotonergic system is sexually dimorphic in many ways. In the present study, we investigated the effects of sex, experience and estrous state on the fluctuation of serotonin in the IC across contexts, as well as potential relationships between behavior and serotonin. Contrary to our expectation, there were no sex differences in increases of serotonin in response to a restriction stimulus. Both sexes had larger increases in second exposures, suggesting experience plays a role in serotonergic release in the IC. In females, serotonin increased during both restriction and interactions with males; however, the increase was more rapid during restriction. There was no effect of female estrous phase on the serotonergic change for either context, but serotonin was related to behavioral activity in females interacting with males. These results show that changes in behavioral context induce increases in serotonin in the IC by a mechanism that appears to be uninfluenced by sex or estrous state, but may depend on experience and behavioral activity. PMID:24198252

  5. Modeling Dopamine and Serotonin Systems in a Visual Recognition Network

    E-print Network

    computation and neuronal learning. This work proposes a neuromorphic motivational system, which includes two the possibility of a de- velopmental agent, he called a "child machine" [26]. The child machine is an artificial- sification network using supervised learning. In order to enable a recognition network to learn autonomously

  6. VEGF-induced antidepressant effects involve modulation of norepinephrine and serotonin systems.

    PubMed

    Udo, Hiroshi; Hamasu, Kousuke; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Sugiyama, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-15

    Throughout life, we are exposed to a variety of stresses, which may be inevitable and noxious sometimes. During evolution, animals must have acquired some physiological means to counteract stress. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic and neurogenic factor, which has been shown to elicit antidepressant-like effects in response to different external stimuli, potentially functioning as an anti-stress molecule. However, it remains largely unknown how VEGF modulates mood-related behaviors. To investigate molecular correlates, we analyzed monoaminergic systems of VEGF transgenic mice that display antidepressant-like behavior. Immunostaining showed that overall morphologies of monoaminergic nuclei and their processes were normal. However, we found imbalances in brain monoamine contents, in which the levels of norepinephrine and serotonin, but not dopamine, were decreased exclusively in the regions where VEGF was expressed. The turnover of norepinephrine showed a marked increase and serotonin turnover showed a modest reduction, whereas dopamine turnover was not affected. The protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of catecholamine and serotonin synthesis, remained constant. The mRNA levels of monoamine receptors were generally similar but adrenergic receptors of ADR?1A and ADR?1 were down-regulated. Behavioral tests showed that serotonin- or norepinephrine-selective antidepressant drugs failed to additively enhance antidepressant-like behaviors, whereas monoamine depleting drugs attenuated VEGF-mediated antidepressant-like effect. These data suggest that VEGF-induced antidepressant-like effects involve modulation of norepinephrine and serotonin systems. PMID:25218306

  7. Altered serous levels of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites in patients with refractory and non-refractory depression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guiqing; Zhang, Yanxia; Yang, Jianxia; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yueqi; Liang, Xia

    2012-01-01

    The study examined plasma metabolite changes of monoamine neurotransmitters in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and non-TRD before and after therapy. All 30 TRD and 30 non-TRD patients met the diagnostic criteria for a depressive episode in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Before treatment, and at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment, the plasma metabolite products of monoamine neurotransmitters in TRD group, including 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol and homovanillic acid, were significantly lower than those in the non-TRD group. After two types of anti-depressive therapy with 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, combined with psychotherapy, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly reduced in both groups of patients, and the serous levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol were significantly increased. In contrast, the homovanillic acid level exhibited no significant change. The levels of plasma metabolite products of peripheral monoamine neurotransmitters in depressive patients may predict the degree of depression and the therapeutic effects of treatment. PMID:25722703

  8. Altered serous levels of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites in patients with refractory and non-refractory depression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guiqing; Zhang, Yanxia; Yang, Jianxia; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yueqi; Liang, Xia

    2012-05-15

    The study examined plasma metabolite changes of monoamine neurotransmitters in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and non-TRD before and after therapy. All 30 TRD and 30 non-TRD patients met the diagnostic criteria for a depressive episode in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Before treatment, and at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment, the plasma metabolite products of monoamine neurotransmitters in TRD group, including 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol and homovanillic acid, were significantly lower than those in the non-TRD group. After two types of anti-depressive therapy with 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, combined with psychotherapy, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly reduced in both groups of patients, and the serous levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol were significantly increased. In contrast, the homovanillic acid level exhibited no significant change. The levels of plasma metabolite products of peripheral monoamine neurotransmitters in depressive patients may predict the degree of depression and the therapeutic effects of treatment. PMID:25722703

  9. Synthesis on accumulation of putative neurotransmitters by cultured neural crest cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, G.D.; Sietz, P.D.; Rafford, C.E.

    1982-07-01

    The events mediating the differentiation of embryonic neural crest cells into several types of neurons are incompletely understood. In order to probe one aspect of this differentiation, we have examined the capacity of cultured quail trunk neural crest cells to synthesize, from radioactive precursors, and store several putative neurotransmitter compounds. These neural crest cultures develop the capacity to synthesize and accumulate acetylcholine and the catecholamines norepinephrine and dopamine. In contrast, detectable but relatively little synthesis and accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine gamma-aminobutyric acid, or octopamine from the appropriate radiolabeled precursors were observed. The capacity for synthesis and accumulation of radiolabeled acetylcholine and catecholamines is very low or absent at 2 days in vitro. Between 3 and 7 days in vitro, there is a marked rise in both catecholamine and acetylcholine accumulation in the cultures. These findings suggest that, under the particular conditions used in these experiments, the development of neurotransmitter biosynthesis in trunk neural crest cells ijs restricted and resembles, at least partially, the pattern observed in vivo. The development of this capacity to synthesize and store radiolabeled acetylcholine and catecholamines from the appropriate radioactive precursors coincides closely with the development of the activities of the synthetic enzymes choline acetyltransferase and dopamine beta-hydroxylase reported by others.

  10. Occupancy of central neurotransmitter receptors by risperidone, clozapine and haloperidol, measured ex vivo by quantitative autoradiography.

    PubMed

    Schotte, A; Janssen, P F; Megens, A A; Leysen, J E

    1993-12-24

    Risperidone (Risperdal) is a novel antipsychotic drug, with beneficial effects on both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, and with a low incidence of extrapyramidal side effects (EPS). These particular properties have been attributed to the predominant and very potent serotonin 5-HT2 receptor antagonism of the drug combined with less potent dopamine D2 antagonism. In order to provide data on the degree to which various central neurotransmitter receptors are occupied in vivo, we performed ex vivo receptor occupancy studies with risperidone in comparison with clozapine and haloperidol in rats and guinea pigs. Various types of receptors, to which the compounds were known to bind to in vitro, were investigated precisely using receptor autoradiography in sections of the same rat brain except for histamine H1 receptors that were measured in the guinea-pig cerebellum. Risperidone (2 h after s.c. treatment) occupied 5-HT2 receptors at very low doses (ED50 = 0.067 mg/kg). Nearly full occupancy (> 80%) was achieved before H1, D2, alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptors became occupied (ED50 = 0.45, 0.66, 0.75 and 3.7 mg/kg, respectively). Clozapine displayed occupancy of H1 and alpha 1 receptors at low doses (ED50 = 0.15 and 0.58 mg/kg, respectively) and of 5-HT2, 5-HT1C, D2, alpha 2, cholinergic muscarinic and 5-HT1A receptors at higher doses (ED50 = 1.3, 1.8, 9.0, 9.5, 11 and 15 mg/kg, respectively). Haloperidol occupied D2 and alpha 1 receptors at low doses (ED50 = 0.13 and 0.42 mg/kg, respectively) and 5-HT2 receptors at a higher dose (ED50 = 2.6 mg/kg). Occupancy of receptor types occurred with similar ED50-values in various brain areas, e.g. D2 receptors in striatum and mesolimbic areas. The ED50-values for the ex vivo measured occupancy of 5-HT2 and D2 receptors were in good agreement with ED50-values for functional effects putatively mediated by these central receptors. The dose-dependent occupancy of D2 receptors proceeded more gradually with risperidone (slope in the caudate-putamen: 0.85) than with clozapine (slope: 1.44) or haloperidol (slope: 1.51). It has previously been suggested that partial D2 receptor occupancy may suffice to control the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, whereas higher D2 receptor occupancy would induce extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). The dose ratio for high (75%) vs. low (25%) D2 receptor occupancy in the caudate-putamen, was 37.3 for risperidone, 8.4 for clozapine, and 7.9 for haloperidol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7510574

  11. Selective detection of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid via fluorescence quenching of InP/ZnS quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Ankireddy, Seshadri Reddy; Kim, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter of the catecholamine family and has many important roles, especially in human brain. Several diseases of the nervous system, such as Parkinson’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, restless legs syndrome, are believed to be related to deficiency of dopamine. Several studies have been performed to detect dopamine by using electrochemical analysis. In this study, quantum dots (QDs) were used as sensing media for the detection of dopamine. The surface of the QDs was modified with l-cysteine by coupling reaction to increase the selectivity of dopamine. The fluorescence of cysteine-capped indium phosphide/zinc sulfide QDs was quenched by dopamine with various concentrations in the presence of ascorbic acid. This method shows good selectivity for dopamine detection, and the detection limit was 5 nM. PMID:26347250

  12. Exaggerated aggression and decreased anxiety in mice deficient in brain serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Mosienko, V; Bert, B; Beis, D; Matthes, S; Fink, H; Bader, M; Alenina, N

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Dysregulation of serotonin transmission in the CNS is reported to be related to different psychiatric disorders in humans including depression, impulsive aggression and anxiety disorders. The most frequently prescribed antidepressants and anxiolytics target the serotonergic system. However, these drugs are not effective in 20–30% of cases. The causes of this failure as well as the molecular mechanisms involved in the origin of psychological disorders are poorly understood. Biosynthesis of serotonin in the CNS is initiated by tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2). In this study, we used Tph2-deficient (Tph2?/?) mice to evaluate the impact of serotonin depletion in the brain on mouse behavior. Tph2?/? mice exhibited increased depression-like behavior in the forced swim test but not in the tail suspension test. In addition, they showed decreased anxiety-like behavior in three different paradigms: elevated plus maze, marble burying and novelty-suppressed feeding tests. These phenotypes were accompanied by strong aggressiveness observed in the resident–intruder paradigm. Despite carrying only one copy of the gene, heterozygous Tph2+/? mice showed only 10% reduction in brain serotonin, which was not sufficient to modulate behavior in the tested paradigms. Our findings provide unequivocal evidence on the pivotal role of central serotonin in anxiety and aggression. PMID:22832966

  13. Drug Abuse and the Simplest Neurotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter vesicles are known to concentrate hydrogen ions (or protons), the simplest ion, and to release them during neurotransmission. Furthermore, receptors highly sensitive to protons, acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), were previously localized on the opposite side of the synaptic cleft on dendritic spines. Now, recent experiments provide some of the strongest support to date that protons function as a neurotransmitter in mice, crossing synapses onto medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), activating ASICs, and ultimately suppressing drug abuse-related behaviors. PMID:25054738

  14. Firing properties of dopamine neurons in freely moving dopamine-deficient mice: Effects of dopamine

    E-print Network

    Firing properties of dopamine neurons in freely moving dopamine-deficient mice: Effects of dopamine 15, 2004 To examine the regulation of midbrain dopamine neurons, record- ings were obtained from single neurons of freely moving, genet- ically engineered dopamine-deficient (DD) mice. DD mice were

  15. Neuroanatomical dichotomy of sexual behaviors in rodents: a special emphasis on brain serotonin.

    PubMed

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M

    2015-09-01

    Much of the social behavior in which rodents engage is related to reproduction, such as maintaining a breeding territory, seeking mates, mating, and caring for their young. Rodents belong to the internally fertilizing species that require sexual behavior for reproduction. The dyadic, heterosexual patterns of most mammalian species are sexually dimorphic, but they also share mutual components in both sexes: sexual attraction is reciprocal, sexual initiative is assumed, appetitive behavior is engaged in, and mating involves consummatory and postconsummatory phases in females as well as in males. Serotonin, a phylogenetically ancient molecule, is the most widely distributed neurotransmitter in the brain and its signaling pathways are essential for numerous functions including sexual behavior. Since the late 1960s, brain serotonergic neurotransmission has been considered to exert an inhibitory influence on the neural mechanisms mediating sexual behavior. This contention was based mainly on the observations that a decrease in central serotonergic activity facilitated the elicitation of sexual behavior, whereas an increase in central serotonergic activity attenuated it. However, the discovery of over 14 types of serotonin receptors has added numerous layers of complexity to the study of serotonin and sexual behavior. Evidence shows that, upon activation, certain receptor subtypes facilitate, whereas some others suppress, sexual behavior, as well as sexual arousal and motivation. Furthermore, the role of these receptors has been shown to be different in the male and female sexes. The use of serotonergic pharmacological interventions, mouse strains with genetic polymorphisms causing alterations in the levels of brain serotonin, and animal models with genetic manipulations of various serotonin effectors has helped delineate the fundamental role of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of sexual behavior. This review aims to examine the basics of the components of female and male sexual behavior and the participation of the serotonin system in the modulation of these behaviors, with emphasis on rodents. PMID:26110223

  16. Detection and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Dialysates

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Denoroy, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive analytical methods are needed for the separation and quantification of neurotransmitters obtained in microdialysate studies. This unit describes methods that permit quantification of nanomolar concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (high-pressure liquid chromatography electrochemical detection), acetylcholine (HPLC-coupled to an enzyme reactor), and amino acids (HPLC-fluorescence detection; capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection). PMID:19575473

  17. Serotonin receptor modulators in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fayyaz, Mohammad; Lackner, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the pathophysiology and clinical role of serotonin receptor modulators used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Serotonin is an important monoamine neurotransmitter that plays a key role in the initiation of peristaltic and secretory refl exes, and in modulation of visceral sensations. Several serotonin receptor subtypes have been characterized, of which 5HT3, 5HT4, and 5HT1b are the most important for GI function. 5HT4 agonists (eg, tegaserod) potentiate peristalsis initiated by 5HT1 receptor stimulation. 5HT4 agonists are therefore useful in constipation predominant form of IBS and in chronic constipation. 5HT3 antagonists (Alosetron and Cilansetron) prevent the activation of 5HT3 receptors on extrinsic afferent neurons and can decrease the visceral pain associated with IBS. These agents also retard small intestinal and colonic transit, and are therefore useful in diarrhea-predominant IBS. Tegaserod has been demonstrated in several randomized, placebo controlled trials to relieve global IBS symptoms as well as individual symptoms of abdominal discomfort, number of bowel movements and stool consistency. Several randomized, controlled trials have shown that alosetron relieves pain, improves bowel function, and provides global symptom improvement in women with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. However, ischemic colitis and severe complications of constipation have been major concerns leading to voluntary withdrawal of Alosetron from the market followed by remarketing with a comprehensive risk management program. PMID:18728719

  18. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1?-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1? is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1?-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1?-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1?-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1?-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1?-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1?-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1?-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1?-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1?-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study. PMID:26417153

  19. Single Cell Measurement of Dopamine Release with Simultaneous Voltage-clamp and Amperometry

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Kaustuv; Swant, Jarod; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2012-01-01

    After its release into the synaptic cleft, dopamine exerts its biological properties via its pre- and post-synaptic targets1. The dopamine signal is terminated by diffusion2-3, extracellular enzymes4, and membrane transporters5. The dopamine transporter, located in the peri-synaptic cleft of dopamine neurons clears the released amines through an inward dopamine flux (uptake). The dopamine transporter can also work in reverse direction to release amines from inside to outside in a process called outward transport or efflux of dopamine5. More than 20 years ago Sulzer et al. reported the dopamine transporter can operate in two modes of activity: forward (uptake) and reverse (efflux)5. The neurotransmitter released via efflux through the transporter can move a large amount of dopamine to the extracellular space, and has been shown to play a major regulatory role in extracellular dopamine homeostasis6. Here we describe how simultaneous patch clamp and amperometry recording can be used to measure released dopamine via the efflux mechanism with millisecond time resolution when the membrane potential is controlled. For this, whole-cell current and oxidative (amperometric) signals are measured simultaneously using an Axopatch 200B amplifier (Molecular Devices, with a low-pass Bessel filter set at 1,000 Hz for whole-cell current recording). For amperometry recording a carbon fiber electrode is connected to a second amplifier (Axopatch 200B) and is placed adjacent to the plasma membrane and held at +700 mV. The whole-cell and oxidative (amperometric) currents can be recorded and the current-voltage relationship can be generated using a voltage step protocol. Unlike the usual amperometric calibration, which requires conversion to concentration, the current is reported directly without considering the effective volume7. Thus, the resulting data represent a lower limit to dopamine efflux because some transmitter is lost to the bulk solution. PMID:23207721

  20. Detection of neurotransmitters by a light scattering technique based on seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2008-03-01

    A simple light scattering detection method for neurotransmitters has been developed, based on the growth of gold nanoparticles. Neurotransmitters (dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline) can effectively function as active reducing agents for generating gold nanoparticles, which result in enhanced light scattering signals. The strong light scattering of gold nanoparticles then allows the quantitative detection of the neurotransmitters simply by using a common spectrofluorometer. In particular, Au-nanoparticle seeds were added to facilitate the growth of nanoparticles, which was found to enhance the sensing performance greatly. Using this light scattering technique based on the seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles, detection limits of 4.4 × 10-7 M, 3.5 × 10-7 M, 4.1 × 10-7 M, and 7.7 × 10-7 M were achieved for dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline, respectively. The present strategy can be extended to detect other biologically important molecules in a very fast, simple and sensitive way, and may have potential applications in a wide range of fields.

  1. Effects of theanine, r-glutamylethylamide, on neurotransmitter release and its relationship with glutamic acid neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Terashima, Takehiko; Okubo, Tsutomu; Juneja, Lekh Raj; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2005-08-01

    t Theanine, r-glutamylethylamide, is one of the major amino acid components in green tea and many researchers have compared theanine's effects with glutamic acid because the chemical structure is similar. In the previous study, we demonstrated that theanine can pass brain-blood barrier and may play as an agonist or an antagonist of some receptors. In this study, we investigated the effects of theanine on neurotransmitter release in the rat brain striatum by in vivo brain microdialysis and examined whether theanine affected glutamate transporters by comparing it with a glutamate transporter blocker, L-trans-Pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (L-trans-2,4-PDC). Because we investigated whether the effects of theanine is similar to L-trans-2,4-PDC on the brain neurotransmission, we measured dopamine release and some amino acids release which are known as excitatory or inhibitory neurotransmitters from neurons by theanine or L-trans-2,4-PDC perfusion into the rat brain striatum. L-trans-2,4-PDC or theanine perfusion into the brain striatum caused dopamine release from dopaminergic neurons. In addition, L-trans-2,4-PDC perfusion increased glutamic acid, aspartic acid and, whereas theanine perfusion prevented aspartic acid release and increased glycine release. These results suggested that the mechanism of dopamine release caused by theanine is different from glutamate transporter blockers or glutamic acid. Further, L-trans-2,4-PDC cause excitatory neurotransmission, whereas theanine may inhibit excitatory neurotransmission and cause inhibitory neurotransmission via glycine receptors. PMID:16493792

  2. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  3. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W.; Haydon, P.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  4. Reward-based hypertension control by a synthetic brain-dopamine interface.

    PubMed

    Rössger, Katrin; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of synthetic trigger-controlled devices that can reprogram mammalian cells to interface with complex metabolic activities. In the brain, the neurotransmitter dopamine coordinates communication with target neurons via a set of dopamine receptors that control behavior associated with reward-driven learning. This dopamine transmission has recently been suggested to increase central sympathetic outflow, resulting in plasma dopamine levels that correlate with corresponding brain activities. By functionally rewiring the human dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) via the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to synthetic promoters containing cAMP response element-binding protein 1(CREB1)-specific cAMP-responsive operator modules, we have designed a synthetic dopamine-sensitive transcription controller that reversibly fine-tunes specific target gene expression at physiologically relevant brain-derived plasma dopamine levels. Following implantation of circuit-transgenic human cell lines insulated by semipermeable immunoprotective microcontainers into mice, the designer device interfaced with dopamine-specific brain activities and produced a systemic expression response when the animal's reward system was stimulated by food, sexual arousal, or addictive drugs. Reward-triggered brain activities were able to remotely program peripheral therapeutic implants to produce sufficient amounts of the atrial natriuretic peptide, which reduced the blood pressure of hypertensive mice to the normal physiologic range. Seamless control of therapeutic transgenes by subconscious behavior may provide opportunities for treatment strategies of the future. PMID:24127594

  5. Reward-based hypertension control by a synthetic brain–dopamine interface

    PubMed Central

    Rössger, Katrin; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of synthetic trigger-controlled devices that can reprogram mammalian cells to interface with complex metabolic activities. In the brain, the neurotransmitter dopamine coordinates communication with target neurons via a set of dopamine receptors that control behavior associated with reward-driven learning. This dopamine transmission has recently been suggested to increase central sympathetic outflow, resulting in plasma dopamine levels that correlate with corresponding brain activities. By functionally rewiring the human dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) via the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to synthetic promoters containing cAMP response element-binding protein 1(CREB1)-specific cAMP-responsive operator modules, we have designed a synthetic dopamine-sensitive transcription controller that reversibly fine-tunes specific target gene expression at physiologically relevant brain-derived plasma dopamine levels. Following implantation of circuit-transgenic human cell lines insulated by semipermeable immunoprotective microcontainers into mice, the designer device interfaced with dopamine-specific brain activities and produced a systemic expression response when the animal’s reward system was stimulated by food, sexual arousal, or addictive drugs. Reward-triggered brain activities were able to remotely program peripheral therapeutic implants to produce sufficient amounts of the atrial natriuretic peptide, which reduced the blood pressure of hypertensive mice to the normal physiologic range. Seamless control of therapeutic transgenes by subconscious behavior may provide opportunities for treatment strategies of the future. PMID:24127594

  6. Serotonin System Implication in l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia: From Animal Models to Clinical Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Manolo; Tronci, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In the recent years, the serotonin system has emerged as a key player in the induction of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) in animal models of Parkinson’s disease. In fact, serotonin neurons possess the enzymatic machinery able to convert exogenous l-DOPA to dopamine (DA), and mediate its vesicular storage and release. However, serotonin neurons lack a feedback control mechanism able to regulate synaptic DA levels. While in a situation of partial DA depletion spared DA terminals can buffer DA released from serotonin neurons, the progression of DA neuron degeneration impairs this protective mechanism, causing swings in synaptic DA levels and pulsatile stimulation of post-synaptic DA receptors. In line with this view, removal of serotonin neurons by selective toxin, or pharmacological silencing of their activity, produced complete suppression of LID in animal models of Parkinson’s disease. In this article, we will revise the experimental evidence pointing to the important role of serotonin neurons in dyskinesia, and we will discuss the clinical implications. PMID:24904522

  7. Novel repeat polymorphisms of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter genes among dogs and wolves.

    PubMed

    Hejjas, Krisztina; Vas, Judit; Kubinyi, Eniko; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Miklosi, Adam; Ronai, Zsolt

    2007-12-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of the neurotransmission systems are intensively studied in the human because of a possible influence on personality traits and the risk of psychiatric disorders. The investigation of genetic variations of the dog genome has recently been a promising approach, as a considerable similarity can be observed between dogs and humans, in both genetic and social aspects, suggesting that the dog could become an appropriate animal model of human behavioral genetic studies. The aim of our study was the identification and analysis of variable number of tandem repeats polymorphisms (VNTRs) in the genes of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system of dogs. The in silico search was followed by the development of PCR-based techniques for the analysis of the putative VNTRs. Highly variable repetitive sequence regions were found in the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT), and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) genes. Allele frequency and genotype distribution of these novel polymorphisms together with the exon 3 and exon 1 VNTR of the dopamine D4 receptor gene were determined in a large sample involving four dog breeds (German Shepherd, Belgian Tervueren, Groenandael, and Malinois) and European Grey Wolves. A significant difference of allele and genotype frequencies was demonstrated among the analyzed breeds; therefore, an association analysis was also carried out between the activity-impulsivity phenotype and the described VNTRs. Preliminary findings are presented that polymorphisms of the DRD4, DBH, and DAT genes can be associated with attention deficit among Belgian Tervuerens. PMID:18049838

  8. Effects of their nutrient precursors on the synthesis and release of serotonin, the catecholamines, and acetylcholine - Implications for behavioral disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Authentic foods affect brain serotonin synthesis by modifying brain tryptophan levels, carbohydrates increasing and proteins decreasing these levels. The carbohydrate-induced rise in brain serotonin tends to diminish the likelihood that one carbohydrate-rich, protein-poor meal or snack will be followed by another. This mechanism is apparently disturbed in carbohydrate-craving obesity, which may explain why this syndrome responds well to d-fenfluramine, a serotoninergic drug. Pure nutrients like tyrosine or choline can also affect the rates at which their neurotransmitter products, the catecholamines and acetylcholine, are synthesized in and released from nerve terminals, suggesting that these compounds may find uses as drugs.

  9. The (B)link Between Creativity and Dopamine: Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates Predict and Dissociate Divergent and Convergent Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chermahini, Soghra Akbari; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Human creativity has been claimed to rely on the neurotransmitter dopamine, but evidence is still sparse. We studied whether individual performance (N=117) in divergent thinking (alternative uses task) and convergent thinking (remote association task) can be predicted by the individual spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a clinical marker of…

  10. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Although the gut contains most of the body’s 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), many of its most important functions have recently been discovered. This review summarizes and directs attention to this new burst of knowledge. Recent findings Enteroendocrine cells have classically been regarded as pressure sensors, which secrete 5-HT to initiate peristaltic reflexes; nevertheless, recent data obtained from studies of mice that selectively lack 5-HT either in enterochromaffin cells (deletion of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 knockout; TPH1KO) or neurons (TPH2KO) imply that neuronal 5-HT is more important for constitutive gastrointestinal transit than that of enteroendocrine cells. The enteric nervous system of TPH2KO mice, however, also lacks a full complement of neurons; therefore, it is not clear whether slow transit in TPH2KO animals is due to their neuronal deficiency or absence of serotonergic neurotransmission. Neuronal 5-HT promotes the growth/maintenance of the mucosa as well as neurogenesis. Enteroendocrine cell derived 5-HT is an essential component of the gastrointestinal inflammatory response; thus, deletion of the serotonin transporter increases, whereas TPH1KO decreases the severity of intestinal inflammation. Enteroendocrine cell derived 5-HT, moreover, is also a hormone, which inhibits osteoblast proliferation and promotes hepatic regeneration. Summary New studies show that enteric 5-HT is a polyfunctional signalling molecule, acting both in developing and mature animals as a neurotransmitter paracrine factor, endocrine hormone and growth factor. PMID:23222853

  11. Tyrosine administration enhances dopamine synthesis and release in light-activated rat retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, C. J.; Watkins, C. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of dark-adapted albino rats to light (350 lux) significantly elevated retinal levels of the dopamine metabolite dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid during the next hour; their return to a dark environment caused dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid levels to fall. Retinal dopamine levels were increased slightly by light exposure, suggesting that the increase in dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid reflected accelerated dopamine synthesis. Administration of tyrosine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) further elevated retinal dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid among light-exposed animals, but failed to affect dopamine release among animals in the dark. These observations show that a physiological stimulus - light exposure - can cause catecholaminergic neurons to become tyrosine-dependent; they also suggest that food consumption may affect neurotransmitter release within the retina.

  12. Neurotransmitter Systems in a Mild Blast Traumatic Brain Injury Model: Catecholamines and Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Kawa, Lizan; Arborelius, Ulf P; Yoshitake, Takashi; Kehr, Jan; Hökfelt, Tomas; Risling, Mårten; Agoston, Denes

    2015-08-15

    Exposure to improvised explosive devices can result in a unique form of traumatic brain injury--blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). At the mild end of the spectrum (mild bTBI [mbTBI]), there are cognitive and mood disturbances. Similar symptoms have been observed in post-traumatic stress disorder caused by exposure to extreme psychological stress without physical injury. A role of the monoaminergic system in mood regulation and stress is well established but its involvement in mbTBI is not well understood. To address this gap, we used a rodent model of mbTBI and detected a decrease in immobility behavior in the forced swim test at 1?d post-exposure, coupled with an increase in climbing behavior, but not after 14?d or later, possibly indicating a transient increase in anxiety-like behavior. Using in situ hybridization, we found elevated messenger ribonucleic acid levels of both tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 in the locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively, as early as 2?h post-exposure. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis 1?d post-exposure primarily showed elevated noradrenaline levels in several forebrain regions. Taken together, we report that exposure to mild blast results in transient changes in both anxiety-like behavior and brain region-specific molecular changes, implicating the monoaminergic system in the pathobiology of mbTBI. PMID:25525686

  13. Microwave-induced post-exposure hyperthermia: Involvement of endogenous opioids and serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Chou, C.K.; Guy, A.W.; Horita, A.

    1984-08-01

    Acute exposure to pulsed microwaves (2450 MHz, 1 mW/ cm/sup 2/, SAR 0.6 W/kg, 2-..mu..s pulses, 500 pulses/s) induces a transient post-exposure hyperthermia in the rat. The hyperthermia was attenuated by treatment with either the narcotic antagonist naltrexone or one of the serotonin antagonists cinanserin, cyproheptadine, or metergoline. It was not affected, however, by treatment with the peripheral serotonin antagonist xylamidine nor the dopamine antagonist haloperidol. It thus appears that both endogenous opioids and central serotonin are involved. It is proposed that pulsed microwaves activate endogenous opioid systems, and that they in turn activate a serotonergic mechanism that induces the rise in body temperature.

  14. Parallel Recording of Neurotransmitters Release from Chromaffin Cells Using a 10 × 10 CMOS IC Potentiostat Array with On-Chip Working Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Brian Namghi; Herbst, Adam D.; Kim, Sung June; Minch, Bradley A.; Lindau, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is modulated by many drugs and molecular manipulations. We present an active CMOS-based electrochemical biosensor array with high throughput capability (100 electrodes) for on-chip amperometric measurement of neurotransmitter release. The high-throughput of the biosensor array will accelerate the data collection needed to determine statistical significance of changes produced under varying conditions, from several weeks to a few hours. The biosensor is designed and fabricated using a combination of CMOS integrated circuit (IC) technology and a photolithography process to incorporate platinum working electrodes on-chip. We demonstrate the operation of an electrode array with integrated high-gain potentiostats and output time-division multiplexing with minimum dead time for readout. The on-chip working electrodes are patterned by conformal deposition of Pt and lift-off photolithography. The conformal deposition method protects the underlying electronic circuits from contact with the electrolyte that covers the electrode array during measurement. The biosensor was validated by simultaneous measurement of amperometric currents from 100 electrodes in response to dopamine injection, which revealed the time course of dopamine diffusion along the surface of the biosensor array. The biosensor simultaneously recorded neurotransmitter release successfully from multiple individual living chromaffin cells. The biosensor was capable of resolving small and fast amperometric spikes reporting release from individual vesicle secretions. We anticipate that this device will accelerate the characterization of the modulation of neurotransmitter secretion from neuronal and endocrine cells by pharmacological and molecular manipulations of the cells. PMID:23084756

  15. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding biologically distinct neurochemical systems that interact to produce a variety of behaviors and disorders. Neurotransmitters are neither static nor isolated in their distribution. In fact, it is through interactions with other neurochemically distinct systems that the central nervous system (CNS) performs its vital role in sustaining life. Exclusive quantitative capabilities intrinsic to PET make this technology a suitable experimental tool to measure not only the regional distribution of specific receptors and their subtypes, but also the dynamic properties of neuroreceptors and their inherent influence on related neurotransmitter pathways. The ability to investigate dynamic properties in a non-invasive and reproducible manner provides a powerful tool that can extend our current knowledge of these interactions. Coupled with innovative paradigms including pharmacologic manipulations, physiologic models and reconstruction theories, knowledge derived from PET studies can greatly advance our understanding of normal and abnormal brain function.

  16. A heterocyclic compound CE-103 inhibits dopamine reuptake and modulates dopamine transporter and dopamine D1-D3 containing receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sase, Ajinkya; Aher, Yogesh D; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Ganesan, Minu Karthika; Sase, Sunetra; Holy, Marion; Höger, Harald; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Ecker, Gerhard F; Langer, Thierry; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann; Lubec, Gert

    2016-03-01

    A series of compounds have been reported to enhance memory via the DA system and herein a heterocyclic compound was tested for working memory (WM) enhancement. 2-((benzhydrylsulfinyl)methyl)thiazole (CE-103) was synthesized in a six-step synthesis. Binding of CE-103 to the dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters and dopamine reuptake inhibition was tested as well as blood brain permeation and a screen for GPCR targets. 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups: CE-103 treated 1-10 mg/kg body weight, trained (TDI) and yoked (YDI) and vehicle treated, trained (TVI) and yoked (YVI) rats. Daily single intraperitoneal injections for a period of 10 days were administered and rats were tested in a radial arm maze (RAM). Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT) and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits were determined. CE-103 was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 14.73 ?M). From day eight the compound was decreasing WM errors in the RAM significantly at both doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. In the trained CE-103-treated group levels of the complex containing the phosphorylated dopamine transporter (pDAT) as well as D1R were decreased while levels of complexes containing D2R and D3R were significantly increased. CE-103 was shown to enhance spatial WM and DA reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3 receptors is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26407764

  17. A Role for Adenosine A1 Receptors in GABA and NMDA-Receptor Mediated Modulation of Dopamine Release: Studies Using Fast Cyclic Voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    O?Connor, John J.; O?Neill, Carmel

    2008-01-01

    In the striatum many neurotransmitters including GABA, glutamate, acetylcholine, dopamine, nitric oxide and adenosine interact to regulate synaptic transmission. Dopamine release in the striatum is regulated by a number of pre- and post-synaptic receptors including adenosine. We have recently shown using isolated rat striatal slices, and the technique of fast cyclic voltammetry, that adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of dopamine release is modulated by dopamine D1 receptors. In the present study we have investigated the influence of NMDA and GABA receptor activation on the modulation of electrically stimulated dopamine release by adenosine. Application of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), concentration-dependently inhibited dopamine release to a maxiumum of 50%. Perfusion of the glutamate receptor agonist, NMDA, in low magnesium, caused a rapid and concentration-dependent inhibition of dopamine release. Prior perfusion with the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, DPCPX, significantly reduced the effect of 5 ?M and 10 ?M NMDA on dopamine release. The GABAA receptor agonist, isoguvacine, had a significant concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on dopamine release which was reversed by prior application of the GABAA receptor antagonist, picrotoxin, but not DPCPX. Finally inhibition of dopamine release by CPA (1?M) was significantly enhanced by prior perfusion with picrotoxin. These data demonstrate an important role for GABA, NMDA and adenosine in the modulation of dopamine release.

  18. Serotonin receptor and transporter ligands - current status.

    PubMed

    Oh, S J; Ha, H J; Chi, D Y; Lee, H K

    2001-07-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) receptor system has 14 different subtypes classified by pharmacology and function. Many ligands are widely used for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes in some severe human diseases. Most of the ligands that are specific for each 5-HT receptor have distinctive chemical structures with regard to pharmacophore elements including 4-arylpiperazine, benzimidazole, benzamide, chroman, aminopyridazine, tetralin, and polycycles. However, their affinity and selectivity for 5-HT, dopamine and alpha1 receptors depend on their substituents and linker spacers. 5-HT transporter inhibitors have also been developed as potential antidepressants. In contrast to classical tricyclic compounds, newly developed secondary amine derivatives such as paroxetine and tetralin show high binding affinity and selectivity. Radioisotope-labeled ligands have also been developed, including [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY 100635 for 5-HT1A receptor, [(11C) or (18)F]ketanserine derivatives for 5-HT(2) receptor, [(125)I]DAIZAC for 5-HT(3) receptor, and [123I]IDAM for 5-HT transporter, and these are accumulated in brain regions that are rich in the respective receptors. This review summarizes the recent development of 5-HT receptor- and transporter-specific ligands and their pharmacological properties on the basis of their chemical structures. PMID:11472239

  19. Dopamine overdose hypothesis: evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Vaillancourt, David E; Schonfeld, Daniel; Kwak, Youngbin; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Seidler, Rachael

    2013-12-01

    About a half a century has passed since dopamine was identified as a neurotransmitter, and it has been several decades since it was established that people with Parkinson's disease receive motor symptom relief from oral levodopa. Despite the evidence that levodopa can reduce motor symptoms, there has been a developing body of literature that dopaminergic therapy can improve cognitive functions in some patients but make them worse in others. Over the past two decades, several laboratories have shown that dopaminergic medications can impair the action of intact neural structures and impair the behaviors associated with these structures. In this review, we consider the evidence that has accumulated in the areas of reversal learning, motor sequence learning, and other cognitive tasks. The purported inverted-U shaped relationship between dopamine levels and performance is complex and includes many contributory factors. The regional striatal topography of nigrostriatal denervation is a critical factor, as supported by multimodal neuroimaging studies. A patient's individual genotype will determine the relative baseline position on this inverted-U curve. Dopaminergic pharmacotherapy and individual gene polymorphisms can affect the mesolimbic and prefrontal cortical dopaminergic functions in a comparable, inverted-U dose-response relationship. Depending on these factors, a patient can respond positively or negatively to levodopa when performing reversal learning and motor sequence learning tasks. These tasks may continue to be relevant as our society moves to increased technological demands of a digital world that requires newly learned motor sequences and adaptive behaviors to manage daily life activities. PMID:24123087

  20. [Calmodulin inhibitors suppress a calcium signal from serotonin receptors in smooth muscle cells and remove the vasoconstrictive response upon intravenous introduction of serotonin].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikova, L M; Zharkikh, I L; Avdonin, P V

    2013-01-01

    Comparative study of the effect of calmodulin inhibitors (trifluoperazine, W-12, and W-13) and the TRPVI channel blocker (capsazepine) on receptor-dependent calcium exchange in smooth muscle cells of the rat aorta and on the contractility of the isolated aorta was conducted. It was determined that trifluoperazine almost completely removes an increase in the concentration of calcium ions in the cytoplasm of smooth muscle cells (isolated from the rat aorta) and smooth muscle cells of the A7r5 line in response to serotonin and does not influence the cell response to vasopressin and angiotensin II. W-12 and W-13 also do not reduce calcium ion concentration increase (induced by vasopressin and angiotensin II) but reduces by two times its rise in response to serotonin. It was found that the efficiency of calcium exchange suppression by calmodulin inhibitors correlates with the intensity at which they inhibit the contractile response of the aorta on the effect of serotonin. It was detected that the inhibiting effect of calmodulin blockers on calcium exchange in smooth muscle cells and the contractility of the rat isolated aorta during the activation of serotonin vasoconstrictive receptors are realized by a TRPV1-independent mechanism. It was demonstrated in experiments in vivo that trifluoperazine does not influence hypotensive reaction in rats (normally observed in response to intravenous serotonin introduction), but removes the hypertensive effect of this neurotransmitter in rats after chronic introduction of dexamethasone. The results obtained confirm the hypothesis (that we previously stated) about the direct involvement of calmodulin in signal transmission from vasoconstrictive serotonin receptors. PMID:24459849

  1. Genetic determinants of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor related sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, James M; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a troubling obstacle for individuals being treated for depression and can be caused by both depressive symptoms as well as antidepressant drugs. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent a class of antidepressants commonly associated with sexual dysfunction, even after symptomatic improvement. Candidate gene studies have identified associations between sexual dysfunction and altered SSRI pharmacokinetics or to the neurotransmitter systems affected by depression and SSRI treatment. The multifactorial nature of this phenotype and study heterogeneity are currently limitations to the translation of these findings to clinical use. Larger, prospective studies of genetic-guided antidepressant selection may help to clarify the clinical utility of pharmacogenetics in minimizing sexual side effects. PMID:25493571

  2. The Dopamine Imbalance Hypothesis of Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis and Other Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dobryakova, Ekaterina; Genova, Helen M.; DeLuca, John; Wylie, Glenn R.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most pervasive symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), and has engendered hundreds of investigations on the topic. While there is a growing literature using various methods to study fatigue, a unified theory of fatigue in MS is yet to emerge. In the current review, we synthesize findings from neuroimaging, pharmacological, neuropsychological, and immunological studies of fatigue in MS, which point to a specific hypothesis of fatigue in MS: the dopamine imbalance hypothesis. The communication between the striatum and prefrontal cortex is reliant on dopamine, a modulatory neurotransmitter. Neuroimaging findings suggest that fatigue results from the disruption of communication between these regions. Supporting the dopamine imbalance hypothesis, structural and functional neuroimaging studies show abnormalities in the frontal and striatal regions that are heavily innervated by dopamine neurons. Further, dopaminergic psychostimulant medication has been shown to alleviate fatigue in individuals with traumatic brain injury, chronic fatigue syndrome, and in cancer patients, also indicating that dopamine might play an important role in fatigue perception. This paper reviews the structural and functional neuroimaging evidence as well as pharmacological studies that suggest that dopamine plays a critical role in the phenomenon of fatigue. We conclude with how specific aspects of the dopamine imbalance hypothesis can be tested in future research. PMID:25814977

  3. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Kelly M; Bernstein, Alison I; Stout, Kristen A; Dunn, Amy R; Lazo, Carlos R; Alter, Shawn P; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M; Goldstein, David S; Guillot, Thomas S; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W

    2014-07-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780

  4. Determination of dopamine in pharmaceutical formulation using enhanced luminescence from europium complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; ALOthman, Zeid Abdullah; Naushad, Mu.

    Biologically important compound dopamine plays an important role in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Insufficient dopamine level due to the loss of dopamine producing cells may lead to disease called Schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Hence, a simple and fast detection of dopamine is necessary to study in the fields of neurophysiology and clinical medicine. An enhanced fluorimetric determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid is achieved using photoluminescence of europium complex, Eu(III)-dipicolinic acid. In order to obtain better responses, several operational parameters have been investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the method showed good stability and reproducibility. The application of this method for the determination of dopamine neurotransmitters was satisfactory. Linear response was found down to 3.0 × 10-7 M with limit of detection 1.0 × 10-8 M. The relative standard deviation was found to be 3.33% from 20 independent measurements for 1.0 × 10-5 M of dopamine.

  5. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kelly M.; Bernstein, Alison I.; Stout, Kristen A.; Dunn, Amy R.; Lazo, Carlos R.; Alter, Shawn P.; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M.; Goldstein, David S.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780

  6. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Terrell; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Serotonin is a monoamine that regulates numerous physiological responses including those in the central nervous system. The cardinal signal transduction mechanisms via serotonin and its receptors are well established, but fundamental questions regarding complex interactions between the serotonin system and heritable epigenetic modifications that exert control on gene function remain a topic of intense research and debate. This review focuses on recent advances and contributions to our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms of serotonin receptor-dependent signaling, with focus on psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. PMID:25734378

  7. Serotonin signaling in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Gustafson, Megan Alyse

    2007-01-01

    Wild-type animals that have been acutely food deprived slow their locomotory rate upon encountering bacteria more than do well-fed animals. This behavior, called the enhanced slowing response, is partly serotonin (5-HT) ...

  8. Modulation of stress consequences by hippocampal monoaminergic, glutamatergic and nitrergic neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Joca, Sâmia Regiane Lourenço; Ferreira, Frederico Rogério; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2007-08-01

    Several findings relate the hippocampal formation to the behavioural consequences of stress. It contains a high concentration of corticoid receptors and undergoes plastic modifications, including decreased neurogenesis and cellular remodelling, following stress exposure. Various major neurotransmitter systems in the hippocampus are involved in these effects. Serotonin (5-HT) seems to exert a protective role in the hippocampus and attenuates the behavioural consequences of stress by activating 5-HT1A receptors in this structure. These effects may mediate the therapeutic actions of several antidepressants. The role of noradrenaline is less clear and possibly depends on the specific hippocampal region (dorsal vs. ventral). The deleterious modifications induced in the hippocampus by stress might involve a decrease in neurotrophic factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) following glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. In addition to glutamate, nitric oxide (NO) could also be related to these effects. Systemic and intra-hippocampal administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors attenuates stress-induced behavioural consequences. The challenge for the future will be to integrate results related to these different neurotransmitter systems in a unifying theory about the role of the hippocampus in mood regulation, depressive disorder and antidepressant effects. PMID:17613938

  9. Aberrant mesolimbic dopamine-opiate interaction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Lauri; Tuulari, Jetro; Karlsson, Henry; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Salminen, Paulina; Parkkola, Riitta; Hietala, Jarmo; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-11-15

    Dopamine and opioid neurotransmitter systems share many functions such as regulation of reward and pleasure. ?-Opioid receptors (MOR) modulate the mesolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area and striatum, key areas implicated in reward. We hypothesized that dopamine and opioid receptor availabilities correlate in vivo and that this correlation is altered in obesity, a disease with altered reward processing. Twenty lean females (mean BMI 22) and 25 non-binge eating morbidly obese females (mean BMI 41) underwent two positron emission tomography scans with [(11)C]carfentanil and [(11)C]raclopride to measure the MOR and dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) availability, respectively. In lean subjects, the MOR and DRD2 availabilities were positively associated in the ventral striatum (r=0.62, p=0.003) and dorsal caudate nucleus (r=0.62, p=0.004). Moreover, DRD2 availability in the ventral striatum was associated with MOR availability in other regions of the reward circuitry, particularly in the ventral tegmental area. In morbidly obese subjects, this receptor interaction was significantly weaker in ventral striatum but unaltered in the caudate nucleus. Finally, the association between DRD2 availability in the ventral striatum and MOR availability in the ventral tegmental area was abolished in the morbidly obese. The study demonstrates a link between DRD2 and MOR availabilities in living human brain. This interaction is selectively disrupted in mesolimbic dopamine system in morbid obesity. We propose that interaction between the dopamine and opioid systems is a prerequisite for normal reward processing and that disrupted cross-talk may underlie altered reward processing in obesity. PMID:26260431

  10. Neurotransmitter CART as a New Therapeutic Candidate for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Peizhong; Meshul, Charles K.; Thuillier, Philippe; Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. To date, there is no effective treatment that halts its progression. Increasing evidence indicates that mitochondria play an important role in the development of PD. Hence mitochondria-targeted approaches or agents may have therapeutic promise for treatment of the disease. Neuropeptide CART (cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript), a hypothalamus and midbrain enriched neurotransmitter with an antioxidant property, can be found in mitochondria, which is the main source of reactive oxygen species. Systemic administration of CART has been found to ameliorate dopaminergic neuronal loss and improve motor functions in a mouse model of PD. In this article, we summarize recent progress in studies investigating the relationship between CART, dopamine, and the pathophysiology of PD, with a focus on mitochondria-related topics. PMID:23543038

  11. The Iowa Gambling Task and the three fallacies of dopamine in gambling disorder

    PubMed Central

    Linnet, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Gambling disorder sufferers prefer immediately larger rewards despite long term losses on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), and these impairments are associated with dopamine dysfunctions. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter linked with temporal and structural dysfunctions in substance use disorder, which has supported the idea of impaired decision-making and dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder. However, evidence from substance use disorders cannot be directly transferred to gambling disorder. This article focuses on three hypotheses of dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder, which appear to be “fallacies,” i.e., have not been supported in a series of positron emission tomography (PET) studies. The first “fallacy” suggests that gambling disorder sufferers have lower dopamine receptor availability, as seen in substance use disorders. However, no evidence supported this hypothesis. The second “fallacy” suggests that maladaptive decision-making in gambling disorder is associated with higher dopamine release during gambling. No evidence supported the hypothesis, and the literature on substance use disorders offers limited support for this hypothesis. The third “fallacy” suggests that maladaptive decision-making in gambling disorder is associated with higher dopamine release during winning. The evidence did not support this hypothesis either. Instead, dopaminergic coding of reward prediction and uncertainty might better account for dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder. Studies of reward prediction and reward uncertainty show a sustained dopamine response toward stimuli with maximum uncertainty, which may explain the continued dopamine release and gambling despite losses in gambling disorder. The findings from the studies presented here are consistent with the notion of dopaminergic dysfunctions of reward prediction and reward uncertainty signals in gambling disorder. PMID:24115941

  12. Regional concentrations of GABA, serotonin and noradrenaline in brain at onset of seizures induced by lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane).

    PubMed

    Suñol, C; Tusell, J M; Gelpí, E; Rodríguez-Farré, E

    1988-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the modifications induced by the pesticide lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) in the regional concentration of neurotransmitters in brain, taking the tonic-clonic seizure as the main sign of its neurotoxic action. The animals were given lindane (150 mg/kg p.o. in olive oil) and killed at the onset of the first seizure (mean latency time: 18.3 +/- 5.5 min, n = 16). The inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the biogenic amines noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT), as well as its corresponding acidic metabolite, were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorimetric or electrochemical detection in different areas of the brain: hippocampus, mesencephalon, colliculi, frontal cortex, parietal cortex, striatum and thalamus. The concentration of GABA in whole tissue was only significantly decreased in the colliculi. The concentration of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were decreased in the colliculi, striatum and frontal cortex, suggesting a decreased synthesis and release of 5-HT, but increased in the parietal cortex. The concentration of NA was significantly decreased in the parietal cortex. Thus, the results indicate that lindane induces some modifications of the concentration of neurotransmitters in cortical structures, basal nuclei, midbrain and colliculi. These changes may be consequent upon the proposed interaction of lindane with the GABAergic system, although a direct action of lindane on other neurotransmitter systems cannot be excluded. PMID:2458533

  13. Pharmacology of neurotransmitter release: measuring exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Khvotchev, Mikhail; Kavalali, Ege T

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmission in the nervous system is initiated at presynaptic terminals by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane and subsequent exocytic release of chemical transmitters. Currently, there are multiple methods to detect neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals, each with their own particular advantages and disadvantages. For instance, most commonly employed methods monitor actions of released chemical substances on postsynaptic receptors or artificial substrates such as carbon fibers. These methods are closest to the physiological setting because they have a rapid time resolution and they measure the action of the endogenous neurotransmitters rather than the signals emitted by exogenous probes. However, postsynaptic receptors only indirectly report neurotransmitter release in a form modified by the properties of receptors themselves, which are often nonlinear detectors of released substances. Alternatively, released chemical substances can be detected biochemically, albeit on a time scale slower than electrophysiological methods. In addition, in certain preparations, where presynaptic terminals are accessible to whole cell recording electrodes, fusion of vesicles with the plasma membrane can be monitored using capacitance measurements. In the last decade, in addition to electrophysiological and biochemical methods, several fluorescence imaging modalities have been introduced which report synaptic vesicle fusion, endocytosis, and recycling. These methods either take advantage of styryl dyes that can be loaded into recycling vesicles or exogenous expression of synaptic vesicle proteins tagged with a pH-sensitive GFP variant at regions facing the vesicle lumen. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of these methods with particular emphasis on their relative strengths and weaknesses and discuss the types of information one can obtain from them. PMID:18064410

  14. Influence of age on neurotransmitter function.

    PubMed

    Simpkins, J W; Millard, W J

    1987-12-01

    Regulation by neurotransmitters of anterior pituitary hormone secretion is complex and a thorough understanding of their normal role in hormone secretion is a prerequisite to understanding their involvement in age-related changes in endocrine function. To date, uncertainties far out-number demonstrated causative relationships between alterations in neurotransmitter release and resulting age-associated changes in hormone secretion. The best demonstrated relationships are the following. First, a decline in function of the TIDA system is responsible, in part, for the age-related elevation in prolactin secretion and may be involved in the decline in LH secretion. Second, the age-related decrease in hypothalamic norepinephrine turnover plays a role in the decline in LH and GH secretion and may be involved in alterations in TSH secretion during aging. Third, the decline in circadian activity of suprachiasmatic nucleus serotoninergic neurons may account for the blunting of circadian rhythms in the secretions of several anterior pituitary hormones in old animals. Fourth, evidence exists for an age-related decline in function of LHRH neurons, which may contribute to the observation of blunted LH secretion in old animals. Finally, somatostatin release may be increased in old animals, which likely contributes to the age-related decline in GH secretion. Other hypothalamic-releasing hormones have only recently been isolated and characterized; thus, little research on their age-related alterations has been done. Research on these neuropeptides will contribute further to our understanding of the role of neurotransmitters in age-related alterations in hormone secretion. PMID:2892672

  15. Trans-synaptic (GABA-dopamine) modulation of cocaine induced dopamine release: A potential therapeutic strategy for cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, S.L.; Straughter-Moore, R.; Chen, R.

    1995-05-01

    We recently developed a new experimental strategy for measuring interactions between functionally-linked neurotransmitter systems in the primate and human brain with PET. As part of this research, we demonstrated that increases in endogenous GABA concentrations significantly reduced striatal dopamine concentrations in the primate brain. We report here the application of the neurotransmitter interaction paradigm with PET and with microdialysis to the investigation of a novel therapeutic strategy for treating cocaine abuse based on the ability of GABA to inhibit cocaine induced increases in striatal dopamine. Using gamma-vinyl GABA (GVG, a suicide inhibitor of GABA transaminase), we performed a series of PET studies where animals received a baseline PET scan with labeled raclopride injection, animals received cocaine (2.0 mg/kg). Normally, a cocaine challenge significantly reduces the striatal binding of {sup 11}C-raclopride. However, in animals pretreated with GVG, {sup 11}C-raclopride binding was less affected by a cocaine challenge compared to control studies. Furthermore, microdialysis studies in freely moving rats demonstrate that GVG (300 mg/kg) significantly inhibited cocaine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine release. GVG also attenuated cocaine-induced increases in locomotor activity. However, at a dose of 100 mg/kg, GVG had no effect. Similar findings were obtained with alcohol. Alcohol pretreatment dose dependantly (1-4 g/kg) inhibited cocaine-induced increases in extracellular dopamine concentrations in freely moving rats. Taken together, these studies suggest that therapeutic strategies targeted at increasing central GABA concentrations may be beneficial for the treatment of cocaine abuse.

  16. Pathological gambling induced by dopamine antagonists: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grötsch, Philipp; Lange, Claudia; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Lang, Undine

    2015-03-01

    Pathological gambling is defined as inappropriate, persistent, and maladaptive gambling behaviour. It is a non-pharmacological addiction classified as an impulse control disorder. However, pathological gambling has been associated with dopamine agonist use. Here we report of a 28-year-old man with a first major depressive episode and a post-traumatic stress disorder who has been treated with a combination of the serotonine/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine and the tricyclic antidepressant maprotiline. The administration of antipsychotic flupentixole (up to 7 mg) turned this slight online poker gambler into an excessive gambler. Only after the discontinuation of the antidopaminergic agents and the switch to bupropion did this gambling behaviour stop which suggests a causal relationship between dopamine antagonists and pathological gambling. PMID:24356928

  17. X-ray structures of Drosophila dopamine transporter in complex with nisoxetine and reboxetine

    PubMed Central

    Gouaux, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most antidepressants elicit their therapeutic benefits through selective blockade of Na+?Cl? - coupled neurotransmitters transporters. Here we report x-ray structures of the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter in complexes with the polycyclic antidepressants nisoxetine or reboxetine. The inhibitors stabilize the transporter in an outward-open conformation by occupying the substrate binding site. These structures explain how interactions between the binding pocket and substituents on the aromatic rings of antidepressants modulate drug – transporter selectivity. PMID:25961798

  18. X-ray structures of Drosophila dopamine transporter in complex with nisoxetine and reboxetine.

    PubMed

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Wang, Kevin H; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Most antidepressants elicit their therapeutic benefits through selective blockade of Na(+)/Cl(-)-coupled neurotransmitter transporters. Here we report X-ray structures of the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter in complexes with the polycyclic antidepressants nisoxetine or reboxetine. The inhibitors stabilize the transporter in an outward-open conformation by occupying the substrate-binding site. These structures explain how interactions between the binding pocket and substituents on the aromatic rings of antidepressants modulate drug-transporter selectivity. PMID:25961798

  19. Comparison of the performance of different DFT methods in the calculations of the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Gao, Hongwei

    2012-04-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter which plays an important role in treating acute or clinical stress. The comparative performance of different density functional theory (DFT) methods at various basis sets in predicting the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin was reported. The calculation results of different methods including mPW1PW91, HCTH, SVWN, PBEPBE, B3PW91 and B3LYP with various basis sets including LANL2DZ, SDD, LANL2MB, 6-31G, 6-311++G and 6-311+G* were compared with the experimental data. It is remarkable that the SVWN/6-311++G and SVWN/6-311+G* levels afford the best quality to predict the structure of serotonin. The results also indicate that PBEPBE/LANL2DZ level show better performance in the vibration spectra prediction of serotonin than other DFT methods.

  20. A Mechanism for Intracellular Release of Na+ by Neurotransmitter: Sodium Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Malinauskaite, Lina; Reinhard, Linda; Lyons, Joseph A.; Yano, Hideaki; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) terminate synaptic signal transmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters, with key conformational states reported for a bacterial homolog LeuT and an inhibitor-bound Drosophila dopamine transporter. However, a coherent mechanism of Na+-driven transport has not been described. Here, we present two crystal structures of MhsT, a NSS member from Bacillus halodurans, in occluded inward-facing states with bound Na+ ions and L-Trp that provide insight into the cytoplasmic release of Na+. The switch from outward- to inward-oriented states is centered on the partial unwinding of transmembrane helix 5, which is facilitated by a conserved GlyX9Pro motif that opens an intracellular pathway for water to access the Na2 site. Based on our structural and functional findings we propose a mechanism according to which solvation through the TM5 pathway facilitates Na+ release from Na2 and the transition to an inward-open state. PMID:25282149

  1. Neurotransmitter signaling in the pathophysiology of microglia

    PubMed Central

    Domercq, María; Vázquez-Villoldo, Nuria; Matute, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system. In the resting state, microglia are highly dynamic and control the environment by rapidly extending and retracting motile processes. Microglia are closely associated with astrocytes and neurons, particularly at the synapses, and more recent data indicate that neurotransmission plays a role in regulating the morphology and function of surveying/resting microglia, as they are endowed with receptors for most known neurotransmitters. In particular, microglia express receptors for ATP and glutamate, which regulate microglial motility. After local damage, the release of ATP induces microgliosis and activated microglial cells migrate to the site of injury, proliferate, and phagocytose cells, and cellular compartments. However, excessive activation of microglia could contribute to the progression of chronic neurodegenerative diseases, though the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Microglia have the capacity to release a large number of substances that can be detrimental to the surrounding neurons, including glutamate, ATP, and reactive oxygen species. However, how altered neurotransmission following acute insults or chronic neurodegenerative conditions modulates microglial functions is still poorly understood. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the role of neurotransmitter receptors in microglial physiology and pathology. PMID:23626522

  2. Pharmacophore design and database searching for selective monoamine neurotransmitter transporter ligands.

    PubMed

    Macdougall, Iain J A; Griffith, Renate

    2008-04-01

    Neuronal monoamine transporters (MATs) are involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of mental health conditions such as depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, substance abuse and neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Various structural classes of compounds have been synthesized and tested in vitro for activity against transporters of three monoamine signaling molecules: noradrenaline (NET); serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT). We have developed and validated a number of pharmacophore models describing the interaction of two classes of compounds with each of these three MATs. These pharmacophores explain the selectivity of binding to the MATs for various compound classes and have been used to search in silico databases for novel, potentially selective ligands. These ligands, after confirmation of their activities, will provide tools for investigating the function of MATs as well as the potential for new therapeutic agents in mental health applications. The database searches also retrieved close analogues of known MAT ligands, further validating the approach. PMID:18023378

  3. Neurotransmitter mechanisms of the action of the antihistamine dimebon on the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shadurskaya, S.K.; Khomenko, A.I.; Pereverzev, V.A.; Balakeevskii, A.I.

    1986-11-01

    To discover the possible mechanism of the stimulating effect of dimebon on the CNS, the action of the drug was studied on catecholamine concentrations and turnover and activity of forms of monoamine oxidase (MAO), differing in the substrate metabolized, in brain structures involved in the regulation of the emotional state and in the regulation of motor activity in rats. /sup 3/H-serotonin creatinine-sulfate, /sup 3/H-dopamine hydrochloride, and /sup 14/C- benzylamine hydrochloride were used as substrates. The results show that dimebon can inhibit MAO activity in the basal ganglia and other brain structures both in vitro and in vivo, and can cause changes in DA and NA metabolism and in functional activity of catecholaminergic neuronal structures of the brain.

  4. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    De Souza, E.B.; Kuyatt, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake into neurons. Serotonin uptake sites have been identified, localized, and quantified in rat brain by autoradiography with 3H-paroxetine; 3H-paroxetine binding in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain was of high affinity (KD = 10 pM) and the inhibition affinity constant (Ki) values of various drugs in competing 3H-paroxetine binding significantly correlated with their reported potencies in inhibiting synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Serotonin uptake sites labeled by 3H-paroxetine were highly concentrated in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, central gray, superficial layer of the superior colliculus, lateral septal nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and the islands of Calleja. High concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in brainstem areas containing dopamine (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) and norepinephrine (locus coeruleus) cell bodies. Moderate concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were present in laminae I and IV of the frontal parietal cortex, primary olfactory cortex, olfactory tubercle, regions of the basal ganglia, septum, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and some brainstem areas including the interpeduncular, trigeminal, and parabrachial nuclei. Lower densities of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in other regions of the neocortex and very low to nonsignificant levels of binding were present in white matter tracts and in the cerebellum. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine caused large decreases in 3H-paroxetine binding. The autoradiographic distribution of 3H-paroxetine binding sites in rat brain corresponds extremely well to the distribution of serotonin terminals and cell bodies as well as with the pharmacological sites of action of serotonin.

  5. Acoustic trauma triggers upregulation of serotonin receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam R.; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Navarro, Marco; Hurley, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss induces plasticity in excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems in auditory brain regions. Excitatory-inhibitory balance is also influenced by a range of neuromodulatory regulatory systems, but less is known about the effects of auditory damage on these networks. In this work, we studied the effects of acoustic trauma on neuromodulatory plasticity in the auditory midbrain of CBA/J mice. Quantitative PCR was used to measure the expression of serotonergic and GABAergic receptor genes in the inferior colliculus (IC) of mice that were unmanipulated, sham controls with no hearing loss, and experimental individuals with hearing loss induced by exposure to a 116 dB, 10 kHz pure tone for 3 hours. Acoustic trauma induced substantial hearing loss that was accompanied by selective upregulation of two serotonin receptor genes in the IC. The Htr1B receptor gene was upregulated tenfold following trauma relative to shams, while the Htr1A gene was upregulated threefold. In contrast, no plasticity in serotonin receptor gene expression was found in the hippocampus, a region also innervated by serotonergic projections. Analyses in the IC demonstrated that acoustic trauma also changed the coexpression of genes in relation to each other, leading to an overexpression of Htr1B compared to other genes.. These data suggest that acoustic trauma induces serotonergic plasticity in the auditory system, and that this plasticity may involve comodulation of functionally-linked receptor genes. PMID:24997228

  6. Serotonin receptor 3A controls interneuron migration into the neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Sahana; Niquille, Mathieu; Hurni, Nicolas; Limoni, Greta; Frazer, Sarah; Chameau, Pascal; van Hooft, Johannes A.; Vitalis, Tania; Dayer, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal excitability has been shown to control the migration and cortical integration of reelin-expressing cortical interneurons (INs) arising from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), supporting the possibility that neurotransmitters could regulate this process. Here we show that the ionotropic serotonin receptor 3A (5-HT3AR) is specifically expressed in CGE-derived migrating interneurons and upregulated while they invade the developing cortex. Functional investigations using calcium imaging, electrophysiological recordings and migration assays indicate that CGE-derived INs increase their response to 5-HT3AR activation during the late phase of cortical plate invasion. Using genetic loss-of-function approaches and in vivo grafts, we further demonstrate that the 5-HT3AR is cell autonomously required for the migration and proper positioning of reelin-expressing CGE-derived INs in the neocortex. Our findings reveal a requirement for a serotonin receptor in controlling the migration and laminar positioning of a specific subtype of cortical IN. PMID:25409778

  7. The Modulatory Role of Dopamine in Anxiety-like Behavior.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Khakpai, Fatemeh

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety is an unpleasant physiological state in which an overreaction to a situation occurs. It has been suggested that different brain regions are involved in the modulation and expression of anxiety, including the amygdala, hippocampus, and frontal cortex. Dysfunction of neurotransmitters and their receptors can lead to many mood disorders like anxiety. There are evidences that dopamine plays an important role in anxiety modulation in different parts of the brain. Some evidence has shown that the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic system are involved in anxiety. Both dopamine D1 and D2 receptor mechanisms are important in mediating anxiety. The activity of dopaminergic system is modulated by several neurotransmitters, including glutamatergic neurons from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), GABAergic fibers from the nucleus accumbens (NAc) as well as the ventral pallidum and cholinergic fibers from the pedunculopontine nucleus and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. Thus, changes in the glutamatergic, and GABAergic, as well as mediated transmission in the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic system may influence anxiety-like behavior. PMID:26317601

  8. Restoration of Dopamine Release Deficits during Object Recognition Memory Acquisition Attenuates Cognitive Impairment in a Triple Transgenic Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman-Ramos, Kioko; Moreno-Castilla, Perla; Castro-Cruz, Monica; McGaugh, James L.; Martinez-Coria, Hilda; LaFerla, Frank M.; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2012-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the acquisition and consolidation of recognition memory involves dopaminergic activity. Although dopamine deregulation has been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, the dysfunction of this neurotransmitter has not been investigated in animal models of AD. The aim of this study was to assess, by in vivo…

  9. [Alcohol dependence mediated by monoamine neurotransmitters in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huafeng; Lai, Jianghua

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dependence, a chronic relapsing brain disease with the characteristics of drinking alcohol out of control, has become a serious social problem. Monoamine neurotransmitters, mainly including dopamine and 5-hydroxytryp¬tamine, play important roles in the occurrence, development and neural dysfunction of alcohol dependence syndrome. In this review, the roles of key factors of the monoamine system (dopamine receptor genes, 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor genes, transporter genes, tyrosine hydroxylase gene, tryptophanhydroxylase gene and monoamine oxidase gene) in alcohol dependence were discussed, and strategies for further studies of molecular mechanisms were proposed based on gene knockout mice models generated in our laboratory. Then, combining with studies on tyrosine hydroxylase activator CaMKII in our lab, therapeutic targets were discussed. Besides, epigenetic strategies for prevention and treatment of alcohol dependence syndrome were proposed. Furthermore, manipulating methylation levels in gene regulatory regions and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs might also have clinical implications. Finally, based on new findings on genetic polymorphism, it is of great potential to carry out individual prevention and treatment for patients suffering from alcohol dependence. PMID:24846914

  10. Tributyltin exposure influences predatory behavior, neurotransmitter content and receptor expression in Sebastiscus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ang; Wang, Xinli; Zuo, Zhenghong; Cai, Jiali; Wang, Chonggang

    2013-03-15

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a ubiquitous marine contaminant due to its extensive use as a biocide, fungicide and antifouling agent. However, the neurotoxic effect of TBT has not been extensively studied, especially in marine fish. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of TBT (10, 100 and 1000 ng/L) on the predatory behavior of Sebastiscus marmoratus and to look into the mechanism involved. The results showed that TBT exposure depressed predatory activity after 50 days exposure. Dopamine levels in the fish brains increased in a dose-dependent manner, while 5-hydroxytryptamine and norepinephrine levels decreased significantly in the TBT exposure group compared to the control. The mRNA levels of dopamine receptors, which have functions such as cognition, motor activity, motivation and reward, mood, attention and learning, were significantly down-regulated by TBT exposure. Although the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters, including glutamate, did not show marked alteration, the expression of the glutamatergic signaling pathway such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor, calmodulin, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases-II and cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element binding protein, was significantly reduced by TBT exposure, which indicated that central nerve activities were in a state of depression, thus affecting the predatory activities of the fish. PMID:23314275

  11. Brain Histamine Is Crucial for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors‘ Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Munari, Leonardo; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Cassano, Tommaso; Benetti, Fernando; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Backgound: The neurobiological changes underlying depression resistant to treatments remain poorly understood, and failure to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may result from abnormalities of neurotransmitter systems that excite serotonergic neurons, such as histamine. Methods: Using behavioral (tail suspension test) and neurochemical (in vivo microdialysis, Western-blot analysis) approaches, here we report that antidepressant responses to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram or paroxetine) are abolished in mice unable to synthesize histamine due to either targeted disruption of histidine decarboxylase gene (HDC-/-) or injection of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide inhibitor of this enzyme. Results: In the tail suspension test, all classes of antidepressants tested reduced the immobility time of controls. Systemic reboxetine or imipramine reduced the immobility time of histamine-deprived mice as well, whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors did not even though their serotonergic system is functional. In in vivo microdialysis experiments, citalopram significantly increased histamine extraneuronal levels in the cortex of freely moving mice, and methysergide, a serotonin 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, abolished this effect, thus suggesting the involvement of endogenous serotonin. CREB phosphorylation, which is implicated in the molecular mechanisms of antidepressant treatment, was abolished in histamine-deficient mice treated with citalopram. The CREB pathway is not impaired in HDC-/- mice, as administration of 8-bromoadenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate increased CREB phosphorylation, and in the tail suspension test it significantly reduced the time spent immobile by mice of both genotypes. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors selectively require the integrity of the brain histamine system to exert their preclinical responses. PMID:25899065

  12. Interactions Between Bacteria and the Gut Mucosa: Do Enteric Neurotransmitters Acting on the Mucosal Epithelium Influence Intestinal Colonization or Infection?

    PubMed

    Green, Benedict T; Brown, David R

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is a critical barrier between the internal and external milieux of the mammalian host. Epithelial interactions between these two host environments have been shown to be modulated by several different, cross-communicating cell types residing in the gut mucosa. These include enteric neurons, whose activity is influenced by bacterial pathogens, and their secreted products. Neurotransmitters appear to influence epithelial associations with bacteria in the intestinal lumen. For example, internalization of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 into the Peyer's patch mucosa of the small intestine is altered after the inhibition of neural activity with saxitoxin, a neuronal sodium channel blocker. Catecholamine neurotransmitters, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, also alter bacterial internalization in Peyer's patches. In the large intestine, norepinephrine increases the mucosal adherence of E. coli. These neurotransmitter actions are mediated by well-defined catecholamine receptors situated on the basolateral membranes of epithelial cells rather than through direct interactions with luminal bacteria. Investigations of the involvement of neuroepithelial communication in the regulation of interactions between the intestinal mucosa and luminal bacteria will provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying bacterial colonization and pathogenesis at mucosal surfaces. PMID:26589216

  13. Structural Modification of the Designer Stimulant ?-Pyrrolidinovalerophenone (?-PVP) Influences Potency at Dopamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Kolanos, R; Sakloth, F; Jain, A D; Partilla, J S; Baumann, M H; Glennon, R A

    2015-10-21

    ?-Pyrrolidinovalerophenone (?-PVP, 7) is an illegal synthetic stimulant that is being sold on the clandestine market as "flakka" and "gravel". The potent pharmacological effects of ?-PVP are presumably mediated by inhibition of dopamine uptake at the dopamine transporter (DAT). However, little is known about how structural modification of ?-PVP influences activity at DAT. Eleven analogs of ?-PVP were synthesized and examined for their ability to inhibit uptake of [(3)H]dopamine and [(3)H]serotonin in rat brain synaptosomes. None of the analogs significantly inhibited [(3)H]serotonin uptake when tested at 10 ?M at the serotonin transporter (SERT). All of the analogs behaved as DAT reuptake inhibitors, but potencies varied over a >1500-fold range. Potency was primarily associated with the nature of the ?-substituent, with the more bulky substituents imparting the highest potency. Expansion of the pyrrolidine ring to a piperidine reduced potency up to 10-fold, whereas conformational constraint in the form of an aminotetralone resulted in the least potent compound. Our study provides the first systematic and comparative structure-activity investigation on the ability of ?-PVP analogs to act as inhibitors of DAT. PMID:26217965

  14. Vesicular and Plasma Membrane Transporters for Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Blakely, Randy D.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The regulated exocytosis that mediates chemical signaling at synapses requires mechanisms to coordinate the immediate response to stimulation with the recycling needed to sustain release. Two general classes of transporter contribute to release, one located on synaptic vesicles that loads them with transmitter, and a second at the plasma membrane that both terminates signaling and serves to recycle transmitter for subsequent rounds of release. Originally identified as the target of psychoactive drugs, these transport systems have important roles in transmitter release, but we are only beginning to understand their contribution to synaptic transmission, plasticity, behavior, and disease. Recent work has started to provide a structural basis for their activity, to characterize their trafficking and potential for regulation. The results indicate that far from the passive target of psychoactive drugs, neurotransmitter transporters undergo regulation that contributes to synaptic plasticity. PMID:22199021

  15. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  16. Juvenile hormone-dopamine systems for the promotion of flight activity in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Ken; Nagao, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    The reproductive roles of dopamine and dopamine regulation systems are known in social hymenopterans, but the knowledge on the regulation systems in solitary species is still needed. To test the possibility that juvenile hormone (JH) and brain dopamine interact to trigger territorial flight behavior in males of a solitary bee species, the effects on biogenic amines of JH analog treatments and behavioral assays with dopamine injections in males of the large carpenter bee Xylocopa appendiculata were quantified. Brain dopamine levels were significantly higher in methoprene-treated males than in control males 4 days after treatment, but were not significantly different after 7 days. Brain octopamine and serotonin levels did not differ between methoprene-treated and control males at 4 and 7 days after treatment. Injection of dopamine caused significantly higher locomotor activities and a shorter duration for flight initiation in experimental versus control males. These results suggest that brain dopamine can be regulated by JH and enhances flight activities in males. The JH-dopamine system in males of this solitary bee species is similar to that of males of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera.

  17. The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate: A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the interplay between the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the striatum has become the highlight of several theories of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Using in vivo brain imaging in humans, alterations in dopamine and glutamate concentrations have been observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear a priori how alterations in striatal dopamine should modulate glutamate concentrations in the basal ganglia. In this selective mini-review, we examine the consequence of reducing striatal dopamine functioning on glutamate concentrations in the striatum and cortex; regions of interest heavily examined in the human brain imaging studies. We examine the predictions of the classical model of the basal ganglia, and contrast it with findings in humans and animals. The review concludes that chronic dopamine depletion (>4months) produces decreases in striatal glutamate levels which are consistent with the classical model of the basal ganglia. However, acute alterations in striatal dopamine functioning, specifically at the D2 receptors, may produce opposite affects. This has important implications for models of the basal ganglia and theorizing about neurochemical alterations in neuropsychiatric diseases. Moreover, these findings may help guide a priori hypotheses for (1)H-MRS studies measuring glutamate changes given alterations in dopaminergic functioning in humans. PMID:26334687

  18. Carbon nanospikes grown on metal wires as microelectrode sensors for dopamine.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B; Hensley, Dale; Venton, B Jill

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous as electrodes for neurotransmitter detection, but the difficulty of nanomaterials deposition on electrode substrates limits the reproducibility and future applications. In this study, we used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to directly grow a thin layer of carbon nanospikes (CNS) on cylindrical metal substrates. No catalyst is required and the CNS surface coverage is uniform over the cylindrical metal substrate. The CNS growth was characterized on several metallic substrates including tantalum, niobium, palladium, and nickel wires. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), bare metal wires could not detect 1 ?M dopamine while carbon nanospike coated wires could. The highest sensitivity and optimized S/N ratio was recorded from carbon nanospike-tantalum (CNS-Ta) microwires grown for 7.5 minutes, which had a LOD of 8 ± 2 nM for dopamine with FSCV. CNS-Ta microelectrodes were more reversible and had a smaller ?Ep for dopamine than carbon-fiber microelectrodes, suggesting faster electron transfer kinetics. The kinetics of dopamine redox were adsorption controlled at CNS-Ta microelectrodes and repeated electrochemical measurements displayed stability for up to ten hours in vitro and over a ten day period as well. The oxidation potential was significantly different for ascorbic acid and uric acid compared to dopamine. Growing carbon nanospikes on metal wires is a promising method to produce uniformly-coated, carbon nanostructured cylindrical microelectrodes for sensitive dopamine detection. PMID:26389138

  19. Breathing is affected by dopamine D2-like receptors in the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Toshihisa; Kanamaru, Mitsuko; Iizuka, Makito; Sato, Kanako; Tsukada, Setsuro; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Homma, Ikuo; Izumizaki, Masahiko

    2015-04-01

    The precise mechanisms underlying how emotions change breathing patterns remain unclear, but dopamine is a candidate neurotransmitter in the process of emotion-associated breathing. We investigated whether basal dopamine release occurs in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), where sensory-related inputs are received and lead to fear or anxiety responses, and whether D1- and D2-like receptor antagonists affect breathing patterns and dopamine release in the BLA. Adult male mice (C57BL/6N) were perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, a D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH 23390), or a D2-like receptor antagonist ((S)-(-)-sulpiride) through a microdialysis probe in the BLA. Respiratory variables were measured using a double-chamber plethysmograph. Dopamine release was measured by an HPLC. Perfusion of (S)-(-)-sulpiride in the BLA, not SCH 23390, specifically decreased respiratory rate without changes in local release of dopamine. These results suggest that basal dopamine release in the BLA, at least partially, increases respiratory rates only through post-synaptic D2-like receptors, not autoreceptors, which might be associated with emotional responses. PMID:25281921

  20. The effects of dopamine on antioxidant enzymes activities and reactive oxygen species levels in soybean roots

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruno Ribeiro; Siqueira-Soares, Rita de Cássia; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Marchiosi, Rogério; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    In the current work, we investigated the effects of dopamine, an neurotransmitter found in several plant species on antioxidant enzyme activities and ROS in soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) roots. The effects of dopamine on SOD, CAT and POD activities, as well as H2O2, O2•?, melanin contents and lipid peroxidation were evaluated. Three-day-old seedlings were cultivated in half-strength Hoagland nutrient solution (pH 6.0), without or with 0.1 to 1.0 mM dopamine, in a growth chamber (25°C, 12 h photoperiod, irradiance of 280 ?mol m?2 s?1) for 24 h. Significant increases in melanin content were observed. The levels of ROS and lipid peroxidation decreased at all concentrations of dopamine tested. The SOD activity increased significantly under the action of dopamine, while CT activity was inhibited and POD activity was unaffected. The results suggest a close relationship between a possible antioxidant activity of dopamine and melanin and activation of SOD, reducing the levels of ROS and damage on membranes of soybean roots. PMID:25482756

  1. Serotonergic modulation of dopamine neurotransmission: a mechanism for enhancing therapeutics in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2006-08-01

    Although the principal mechanism by which all antipsychotic drugs act is the blockade of dopamine D-2 receptors, typical antipsychotics given in doses within the clinically effective range induce extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). Serotonin Hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT can modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, while the activity of atypical antipsychotic agent towards serotonin receptors is involved in the ability of these agents to produce fewer EPS. In order to extend therapeutics in schizophrenia, it is important to examine the serotonergic modulation of neuroleptic activity. This review analyzes differences in neurochemical, behavioral and pharmacological profiles of typical and atypical antipsychotics and the role of serotonin receptors in the attenuation of EPS-induced by the typical neuroleptics. In addition to blocking dopamine receptors, the atypical antipsychotics also have affinities for serotonin receptors. Serotonergic modulation of motor activity appears primarily of inhibitory type. Stimulation of somatodendritic 5-HT-1A receptors decreases the availability of 5-HT at inhibitory 5-HT-2C receptors located on dopaminergic neurons to attenuate acute parkinsonian-like effects of typical antipsychotics. An increase in the effectiveness of pre and postsynaptic 5-HT-1A receptors following long-term administration of haloperidol raises the possibility that 5-HT agonists may also prove useful for the alleviation of late appearing tardive dyskinesias. Clinicians can now apply the knowledge of serotonergic modulation of neuroleptic action to the treatment of schizophrenic patients by using selected serotonergic anxiolytics and antidepressants as adjuvants in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:16899192

  2. Amphetamine Paradoxically Augments Exocytotic Dopamine Release and Phasic Dopamine Signals

    PubMed Central

    Daberkow, DP; Brown, HD; Bunner, KD; Kraniotis, SA; Doellman, MA; Ragozzino, ME; Garris, PA; Roitman, MF

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting non-exocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties - which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to two hours. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, non-electrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sucrose reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sucrose-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify up-regulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  3. Serotonin’s role in piglet mortality and thriftiness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving piglet survivability rates is of high priority for swine production as well as for piglet well-being. Dysfunction in the serotonin system has been associated with growth deficiencies, infant mortalities or failure to thrive in human infants. The aim of this research was to determine if a r...

  4. Hypoximimetic activity of N-acyl-dopamines. N-arachidonoyl-dopamine stabilizes HIF-1? protein through a SIAH2-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Soler-Torronteras, Rafael; Lara-Chica, Maribel; García, Victor; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    The N-acyl conjugates of amino acids and neurotransmitters (NAANs) are a class of endogenous lipid messengers that are expressed in the mammalian central and peripheral nervous system. Hypoxia inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?) is a transcription factor that plays a key role in the cellular adaptation to hypoxia and ischemia, and hypoxic preconditioning through HIF-1? has been shown to be neuroprotective in ischemic models. This study showed that N-acyl-dopamines induce HIF-1? stabilization on human primary astrocytes and neurons as well as in transformed cell lines. N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA)-induced HIF-1? stabilization depends on the dopamine moiety of the molecule and is independent of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid type I (TRPV1) activation. NADA increases the activity of the E3 ubiquitin ligase seven in absentia homolog-2 (SIAH2), inhibits prolyl-hydroxylase-3 (PHD3) and stabilizes HIF-1?. NADA enhances angiogenesis in endothelial vascular cells and promotes the expression of genes such as erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX-1), hexokinase 2 (HK2) and Bcl-2/E1B-nineteen kiloDalton interacting protein (BNIP3) in primary astrocytes. These findings indicate a link between N-acyl-dopamines and hypoxic preconditioning and suggest that modulation of the N-acyl-dopamine metabolism might prove useful for prevention against hypoxic diseases. PMID:25090972

  5. Ligand-Gated Chloride Channels Are Receptors for Biogenic Amines in C. elegans

    E-print Network

    Ringstad, Niels

    Biogenic amines such as serotonin and dopamine are intercellular signaling molecules that function widely as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. We have identified in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans three ligand-gated ...

  6. Role of 5-ht2c receptor density on behaviour in mice 

    E-print Network

    Stevenson, Paula Louise

    2011-07-05

    The neurotransmitters serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) play roles in eating disorders, mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety, and in the regulation of locomotion. The 5-HT2C receptor is one of fourteen 5-HT receptor subtypes...

  7. Dopamine antagonism inhibits anorectic behavior in an animal model for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Linda A W; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; Adan, Roger A H

    2009-03-01

    Excessive physical activity is commonly described as symptom of Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model for AN. The ABA model mimics severe body weight loss and increased physical activity. Suppression of hyperactivity by olanzapine in anorectic patients as well as in ABA rats suggested a role of dopamine and/or serotonin in this trait. Here, we investigated the effect of a non-selective dopamine antagonist in the ABA model. A dose-response curve of chronic treatment with the non-selective dopaminergic antagonist cis-flupenthixol was determined in the ABA model. Treatment reduced activity levels in both ad libitum fed and food-restricted rats. Treated ABA rats reduced body weight loss and increased food intake. These data support a role for dopamine in anorexia associated hyperactivity. Interestingly, in contrast to leptin treatment, food-anticipatory activity still persists in treated ABA rats. PMID:18977121

  8. Serotonin release varies with brain tryptophan levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines directly the effects on serotonin release of varying brain tryptophan levels within the physiologic range. It also addresses possible interactions between tryptophan availability and the frequency of membrane depolarization in controlling serotonin release. We demonstrate that reducing tryptophan levels in rat hypothalamic slices (by superfusing them with medium supplemented with 100 microM leucine) decreases tissue serotonin levels as well as both the spontaneous and the electrically-evoked serotonin release. Conversely, elevating tissue tryptophan levels (by superfusing slices with medium supplemented with 2 microM tryptophan) increases both the tissue serotonin levels and the serotonin release. Serotonin release was found to be affected independently by the tryptophan availability and the frequency of electrical field-stimulation (1-5 Hz), since increasing both variables produced nearly additive increases in release. These observations demonstrate for the first time that both precursor-dependent elevations and reductions in brain serotonin levels produce proportionate changes in serotonin release, and that the magnitude of the tryptophan effect is unrelated to neuronal firing frequency. The data support the hypothesis that serotonin release is proportionate to intracellular serotonin levels.

  9. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  10. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  11. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  12. Improved techniques for examining rapid dopamine signaling with iontophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Natalie R.; Wightman, Robert Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that is utilized in brain circuits associated with reward processing and motor activity. Advances in microelectrode techniques and cyclic voltammetry have enabled its extracellular concentration fluctuations to be examined on a subsecond time scale in the brain of anesthetized and freely moving animals. The microelectrodes can be attached to micropipettes that allow local drug delivery at the site of measurement. Drugs that inhibit dopamine uptake or its autoreceptors can be evaluated while only affecting the brain region directly adjacent to the electrode. The drugs are ejected by iontophoresis in which an electrical current forces the movement of molecules by a combination of electrical migration and electroosmosis. Using electroactive tracer molecules, the amount ejected can be measured with cyclic voltammetry. In this review we will give an introduction to the basic principles of iontophoresis, including a historical account on the development of iontophoresis. It will also include an overview of the use of iontophoresis to study neurotransmission of dopamine in the rat brain. It will close by summarizing the advantages of iontophoresis and how the development of quantitative iontophoresis will facilitate future studies. PMID:23276986

  13. Serotonin and inhibitory response control: focusing on the role of 5-HT(1A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Pattij, Tommy; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M

    2015-04-15

    Disturbances in behavioral inhibition are key features in several neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Parkinson's disease and substance use disorders. Therefore, elucidating the neural correlates of inhibitory control processes is crucial for developing novel treatment strategies to ameliorate the symptomatology of these disorders and to improve the quality of life. The development of preclinical translational paradigms to study inhibitory control processes has greatly enhanced our neurobiological understanding of these cognitive processes. Over the last decades, emphasis has been mainly on monoamines including dopamine and serotonin and their contribution to behavioral inhibition. This short review will focus on the involvement of the serotonergic system, and in particular serotonin1A receptors, in inhibitory control processes. PMID:25094037

  14. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  15. An updated view on the role of dopamine in myopia.

    PubMed

    Feldkaemper, Marita; Schaeffel, Frank

    2013-09-01

    A large body of data is available to support the hypothesis that dopamine (DA) is one of the retinal neurotransmitters involved in the signaling cascade that controls eye growth by vision. Initially, reduced retinal DA levels were observed in eyes deprived of sharp vision by either diffusers ("deprivation myopia", DM) or negative lenses ("lens induced myopia", LIM). Simulating high retinal DA levels by intravitreal application of a DA agonist can suppress the development of both DM and LIM. Also more recent studies using knock-out mouse models of DA receptors support the idea of an association between decreased DA levels and DM. There seem to be differences in the magnitude of the effects of DA on DM and LIM, with larger changes in DM but the degrees of image degradation by both treatments need to be matched to support this conclusion. Although a number of studies have shown that the inhibitory effects of dopamine agonists on DM and LIM are mediated through stimulation of the D2-receptor, there is also recent evidence that the balance of D2- and D1-receptor activation is important. Inhibition of D2-receptors can also slow the development of spontaneous myopia in albino guinea pigs. Retinal DA content displays a distinct endogenous diurnal, and partially circadian rhythm. In addition, retinal DA is regulated by a number of visual stimuli like retinal illuminance, spatial frequency content of the image, temporal contrast and, in chicks, by the light input from the pineal organ. A close interaction was found between muscarinergic and dopaminergic systems, and between nitric oxide and dopaminergic pathways, and there is evidence for crosstalk between the different pathways, perhaps multiple binding of the ligands to different receptors. It was shown that DA agonists interact with the immediate early signaling molecule ZENK which triggers the first steps in eye growth regulation. However, since long treatment periods were often needed to induce significant changes in retinal dopamine synthesis and release, the role of dopamine in the early steps is unclear. The wide spatial distribution of dopaminergic amacrine cells in the retina and the observation that changes in dopamine levels can be locally induced by local retinal deprivation is in line with the assumption that dopaminergic mechanisms control both central and peripheral eye growth. The protective effect of outdoor activity on myopia development in children seems to be partly mediated by the stimulatory effect of light on retinal dopamine production and release. However, the dose-response function linking light exposure to dopamine and to the suppression of myopia is not known and requires further studies. PMID:23434455

  16. Dopamine and glucose, obesity, and reward deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Gold, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity as a result of overeating as well as a number of well described eating disorders has been accurately considered to be a world-wide epidemic. Recently a number of theories backed by a plethora of scientifically sound neurochemical and genetic studies provide strong evidence that food addiction is similar to psychoactive drug addiction. Our laboratory has published on the concept known as Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) which is a genetic and epigenetic phenomena leading to impairment of the brain reward circuitry resulting in a hypo-dopaminergic function. RDS involves the interactions of powerful neurotransmitters and results in abnormal craving behavior. A number of important facts which could help translate to potential therapeutic targets espoused in this focused review include: (1) consumption of alcohol in large quantities or carbohydrates binging stimulates the brain’s production of and utilization of dopamine; (2) in the meso-limbic system the enkephalinergic neurons are in close proximity, to glucose receptors; (3) highly concentrated glucose activates the calcium channel to stimulate dopamine release from P12 cells; (4) a significant correlation between blood glucose and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid the dopamine metabolite; (5) 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), the glucose analog, in pharmacological doses is associated with enhanced dopamine turnover and causes acute glucoprivation. Evidence from animal studies and fMRI in humans support the hypothesis that multiple, but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug dependence and for the most part, implicate the involvement of DA-modulated reward circuits in pathologic eating behaviors. Based on a consensus of neuroscience research treatment of both glucose and drug like cocaine, opiates should incorporate dopamine agonist therapy in contrast to current theories and practices that utilizes dopamine antagonistic therapy. Considering that up until now clinical utilization of powerful dopamine D2 agonists have failed due to chronic down regulation of D2 receptors newer targets based on novel less powerful D2 agonists that up-regulate D2 receptors seems prudent. We encourage new strategies targeted at improving DA function in the treatment and prevention of obesity a subtype of reward deficiency. PMID:25278909

  17. Neurotransmitter replacement therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, E; Mendis, T; Rusk, I N; Grimes, J D

    1994-01-01

    The relative success of symptomatic attenuation of motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease with dopaminomimetics has spurred interest in neurotransmitter replacement therapy for treating Alzheimer's disease. While cholinergic dysfunction has been linked to various clinical parameters in Alzheimer's disease, cholinergic replacement, including precursor therapy, administration of direct-acting agonists and inhibition of enzymatic degradation has had only very modest success. The inhibition of enzymatic degradation has perhaps shown the most interesting results to date. However, conclusions with respect to efficacy continue to be controversial. Discussion continues about whether or not single transmitter replacement for Alzheimer's disease is a viable treatment approach. Deficiencies in central noradrenergic, serotonergic, GABAergic and perhaps dopaminergic neural transmission may also play a critical role in some of the clinical manifestations of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, certain neuropeptides, in particular somatostatin, may be important in this context. Several series of clinical trials are currently attempting to address these issues. Given the complexities of the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, symptomatic relief may require multiple transmitter replacement and necessitate more definitive intercessions at the molecular biological level. PMID:7908537

  18. Microfabrication of biosensors for neurotransmitter analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weihong; Cordek, Julia; Liu, Xiaojing; Gross, Brooks; Liesenfeld, Bernd

    1999-06-01

    We have developed ultrasensitive biosensors for the analysis of neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA and lactate. These sensors have micrometer to submicrometer sizes. They are based on biomolecule immobilization on optical fiber probe surfaces. The miniaturized fiber probes are fabricated by either pulling or etching conventional optical fibers. For example, surface immobilized glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is being used for glutamate analysis. GDH has been directly immobilized onto an optical fiber probe surface through a new optical fiber sensor fabrication technique using covalent binding mechanisms. None of the direct or indirect physical confinement methods, such as mechanical confinement, gel trapping or membrane immobilization, has been used for the sensor preparation. An optical fiber surface is initially activated by silanization, which adds amine groups (-NH2) to the surface. We then affix functional groups -CHO to the optical fiber surface by employing a bifunctional cross-linking agent, glutaraldehyde. The amino acids of GDH enzyme molecules (or other biomolecules) readily attach to these free -CHO groups on the fiber surface. The sensor is able to detect its substrate, glutamate, by monitoring the fluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), a product of the reaction between nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and glutamate. Similar procedures and principle have been used for the development of lactate and GABA sensors. Our biomolecule based biosensors have been applied to the study of single living cell neurophysiological responses.

  19. [The multiplicity of neurotransmitters: the functional significance].

    PubMed

    Sakharov, D A

    1990-01-01

    The generally accepted synaptic concept is an idealization based on two major assumptions essential for a system of neurone to be orderly organized: firstly, specificity of anatomical connections between neurones is assumed, and, secondly, it is postulated that the signal is transmitted via isolated compartment of extracellular space, the synaptic cleft. In the framework of this conceptual model, systems can be built using a single sort of signal molecules, and knowledge on diversity of neurotransmitters remains unconceptualized. To provide that the signal is properly delivered to a due address, neurones can however equally utilize the chemical mode of addressing. According to an alternative conceptual model proposed by the author, orderliness of a neuronal system is based on plurality of signal molecules. To describe the idealized elementary unit of heterochemical integration, the term "Heteron" is introduced. Heteron is defined as the network of individually specific neurones differing in their respective transmitters. It is postulated that (i) the transmitter situation is changed evenly throughout the heteron and (ii) responses of sensitive targets to a specific transmitter situation are composed into a well co-ordinated whole. The functional repertory of a heteron containing n neurones (i.e. n transmitters) will thus include at least n integrated states. The conceptual synapse corresponds to a theoretical limit of the heteron (when n = 1). It is suggested that primitive, simpler nervous systems roughly correspond to a single heteron while evolved brains and cords include multiple units of heterochemical integration. PMID:1982597

  20. Developmental origins of neurotransmitter and transcriptome alterations in adult female zebrafish exposed to atrazine during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wirbisky, Sara E; Weber, Gregory J; Sepúlveda, Maria S; Xiao, Changhe; Cannon, Jason R; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2015-07-01

    Atrazine is an herbicide applied to agricultural crops and is indicated to be an endocrine disruptor. Atrazine is frequently found to contaminate potable water supplies above the maximum contaminant level of 3?g/L as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The developmental origin of adult disease hypothesis suggests that toxicant exposure during development can increase the risk of certain diseases during adulthood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying disease progression are still unknown. In this study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to 0, 0.3, 3, or 30?g/L atrazine throughout embryogenesis. Larvae were then allowed to mature under normal laboratory conditions with no further chemical treatment until 7 days post fertilization (dpf) or adulthood and neurotransmitter analysis completed. No significant alterations in neurotransmitter levels was observed at 7dpf or in adult males, but a significant decrease in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and serotonin turnover was seen in adult female brain tissue. Transcriptomic analysis was completed on adult female brain tissue to identify molecular pathways underlying the observed neurological alterations. Altered expression of 1928, 89, and 435 genes in the females exposed to 0.3, 3, or 30?g/L atrazine during embryogenesis were identified, respectively. There was a high level of overlap between the biological processes and molecular pathways in which the altered genes were associated. Moreover, a subset of genes was down regulated throughout the serotonergic pathway. These results provide support of the developmental origins of neurological alterations observed in adult female zebrafish exposed to atrazine during embryogenesis. PMID:25929836

  1. MicroRNAs in Schizophrenia: Implications for Synaptic Plasticity and Dopamine-Glutamate Interaction at the Postsynaptic Density. New Avenues for Antipsychotic Treatment Under a Theranostic Perspective.

    PubMed

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Iasevoli, Felice; Tomasetti, Carmine; Buonaguro, Elisabetta F

    2015-12-01

    Despite dopamine-glutamate aberrant interaction that has long been considered a relevant landmark of psychosis pathophysiology, several aspects of these two neurotransmitters reciprocal interaction remain to be defined. The emerging role of postsynaptic density (PSD) proteins at glutamate synapse as a molecular "lego" making a functional hub where different signals converge may add a new piece of information to understand how dopamine-glutamate interaction may work with regard to schizophrenia pathophysiology and treatment. More recently, compelling evidence suggests a relevant role for microRNA (miRNA) as a new class of dopamine and glutamate modulators with regulatory functions in the reciprocal interaction of these two neurotransmitters. Here, we aimed at addressing the following issues: (i) Do miRNAs have a role in schizophrenia pathophysiology in the context of dopamine-glutamate aberrant interaction? (ii) If miRNAs are relevant for dopamine-glutamate interaction, at what level this modulation takes place? (iii) Finally, will this knowledge open the door to innovative diagnostic and therapeutic tools? The biogenesis of miRNAs and their role in synaptic plasticity with relevance to schizophrenia will be considered in the context of dopamine-glutamate interaction, with special focus on miRNA interaction with PSD elements. From this framework, implications both for biomarkers identification and potential innovative interventions will be considered. PMID:25394379

  2. Platelet serotonin and magnesium concentrations in suicidal and non-suicidal depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Ruljancic, Nedjeljka; Mihanovic, Mate; Cepelak, Ivana; Bakliza, Ana; Curkovic, Katarina Dodig

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology and treatment of depression involves monoamine neurotransmitters and the magnesium (Mg)-modulated monoaminergic pathway. Serum and platelet Mg concentrations and platelet serotonin concentrations were measured in 79 depressed patients who had attempted suicide, and 101 patients without suicidal behaviour, according to the ICD-10 diagnoses F 33.2 and F32.2, with or without intentional self-harm (X60-X84). The control group consisted of 77 voluntary blood donors. The platelet serotonin concentration was determined using the competitive enzyme immunoassay test: Mg concentrations in platelets and serum were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The ANOVA test showed significantly lower serum Mg in the group of depressive patients who had attempted suicide (N = 257, F = 8.32, p<0.001), compared to depressive patients who had not, and the control group. Serum albumin was lower in the group of depressive patients who had attempted suicide and showed a significant, positive correlation with serum Mg concentrations. Platelet Mg concentrations were found to be higher in depressive patients who had not attempted suicide (N = 257, F = 3.90, p = 0.012) compared to the control group, with no difference compared to depressive patients who had attempted suicide. The Kruskal Wallis test (N = 257, H = 48.54, p<0.0001) showed the lowest concentration of platelet serotonin in the groups of depressed patients with and without suicidal behaviour, compared to the healthy control group. A positive correlation was found between platelet Mg and serotonin concentrations only in the healthy control group. In conclusion, differences were observed in serum and platelet Mg concentrations, which represent progress in the study of Mg status and its relation to serotonin. PMID:23614979

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PubMed Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome On this page: Description Genetic ... names Glossary definitions Reviewed October 2015 What is dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome? Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome is ...

  4. Amperozide, a putative anti-psychotic drug: Uptake inhibition and release of dopamine in vitro in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, E. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of amperozide (a diphenylbutylpiperazinecarboxamide derivative) on the uptake and release of {sup 3}H-dopamine in vitro were investigated. Amperozide inhibited the amphetamine-stimulated release of dopamine from perfused rat striatal tissue in a dose-dependent manner. With 1 and 10 {mu}m amperozide there was significant inhibition of the amphetamine-stimulated release of dopamine, to 44 and 36 % of control. In contrast, 10 {mu}M amperozide significantly strengthened the electrically stimulated release of dopamine from perfused striatal slices. Amperozide 1-10 {mu}M had no significant effect on the potassium-stimulated release of dopamine, 10 {mu}M amperozide also slightly increased the basal release of {sup 3}H-dopamine from perfused striatal tissue. These effects on various types of release are similar to those reported for uptake inhibitors. The uptake of dopamine in striatal tissue was inhibited by amperozide with IC{sub 50} values of 18 {mu}M for uptake in chopped tissue and 1.0 {mu}M for uptake in synaptosomes. Amperozide also inhibited the uptake of serotonin in synaptosomes from frontal cortex, IC{sub 50} = 0.32 {mu}M and the uptake of noradrenaline in cortical synaptosomes, IC{sub 50} = 0.78 {mu}M.

  5. Electrochemical nanoprobes for the chemical detection of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, acting as chemical messengers, play an important role in neurotransmission, which governs many functional aspects of nervous system activity. Electrochemical probes have proven a very useful technique to study neurotransmission, especially to quantify and qualify neurotransmitters. With the emerging interests in probing neurotransmission at the level of single cells, single vesicles, as well as single synapses, probes that enable detection of neurotransmitters at the nanometer scale become vitally important. Electrochemical nanoprobes have been successfully employed in nanometer spatial resolution imaging of single nanopores of Si membrane and single Au nanoparticles, providing both topographical and chemical information, thus holding great promise for nanometer spatial study of neurotransmission. Here we present the current state of electrochemical nanoprobes for chemical detection of neurotransmitters, focusing on two types of nanoelectrodes, i.e. carbon nanoelectrode and nano-ITIES pipet electrode. PMID:26327927

  6. Updating dopamine reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has advanced our knowledge of phasic dopamine reward prediction error signals. The error signal is bidirectional, reflects well the higher order prediction error described by temporal difference learning models, is compatible with model-free and model-based reinforcement learning, reports the subjective rather than physical reward value during temporal discounting and reflects subjective stimulus perception rather than physical stimulus aspects. Dopamine activations are primarily driven by reward, and to some extent risk, whereas punishment and salience have only limited activating effects when appropriate controls are respected. The signal is homogeneous in terms of time course but heterogeneous in many other aspects. It is essential for synaptic plasticity and a range of behavioural learning situations. PMID:23267662

  7. Dopamine and Effort-Based Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Kurniawan, Irma Triasih; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Dolan, Ray J.

    2011-01-01

    Motivational theories of choice focus on the influence of goal values and strength of reinforcement to explain behavior. By contrast relatively little is known concerning how the cost of an action, such as effort expended, contributes to a decision to act. Effort-based decision making addresses how we make an action choice based on an integration of action and goal values. Here we review behavioral and neurobiological data regarding the representation of effort as action cost, and how this impacts on decision making. Although organisms expend effort to obtain a desired reward there is a striking sensitivity to the amount of effort required, such that the net preference for an action decreases as effort cost increases. We discuss the contribution of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) toward overcoming response costs and in enhancing an animal's motivation toward effortful actions. We also consider the contribution of brain structures, including the basal ganglia and anterior cingulate cortex, in the internal generation of action involving a translation of reward expectation into effortful action. PMID:21734862

  8. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders. PMID:25078294

  9. Dopamine receptors – IUPHAR Review 13

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as ?-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  10. Dopamine receptors - IUPHAR Review 13.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as ?-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  11. Bacillus licheniformis Isolated from Traditional Korean Food Resources Enhances the Longevity of Caenorhabditis elegans through Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Ri; Oh, Sangnam; Son, Seok Jun; Park, Dong-June; Oh, Sejong; Kim, Sae Hun; Jeong, Do-Youn; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Youngbok; Song, Minho; Kim, Younghoon

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated potentially probiotic Bacillus licheniformis strains isolated from traditional Korean food sources for ability to enhance longevity using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a simple in vivo animal model. We first investigated whether B. licheniformis strains were capable of modulating the lifespan of C. elegans. Among the tested strains, preconditioning with four B. licheniformis strains significantly enhanced the longevity of C. elegans. Unexpectedly, plate counting and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results indicated that B. licheniformis strains were not more highly attached to the C. elegans intestine compared with Escherichia coli OP50 or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG controls. In addition, qRT-PCR and an aging assay with mutant worms showed that the conditioning of B. licheniformis strain 141 directly influenced genes associated with serotonin signaling in nematodes, including tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase), bas-1 (serotonin- and dopamine-synthetic aromatic amino acid decarboxylase), mod-1 (serotonin-gated chloride channel), ser-1, and ser-7 (serotonin receptors) during C. elegans aging. Our findings suggest that B. licheniformis strain 141, which is isolated from traditional Korean foods, is a probiotic generally recognized as safe (GRAS) strain that enhances the lifespan of C. elegans via host serotonin signaling. PMID:26541069

  12. Generation of a Tph2 Conditional Knockout Mouse Line for Time- and Tissue-Specific Depletion of Brain Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Migliarini, Sara; Pacini, Giulia; Pasqualetti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin has been gaining increasing attention during the last two decades due to the dual function of this monoamine as key regulator during critical developmental events and as neurotransmitter. Importantly, unbalanced serotonergic levels during critical temporal phases might contribute to the onset of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism. Despite increasing evidences from both animal models and human genetic studies have underpinned the importance of serotonin homeostasis maintenance during central nervous system development and adulthood, the precise role of this molecule in time-specific activities is only beginning to be elucidated. Serotonin synthesis is a 2-step process, the first step of which is mediated by the rate-limiting activity of Tph enzymes, belonging to the family of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and existing in two isoforms, Tph1 and Tph2, responsible for the production of peripheral and brain serotonin, respectively. In the present study, we generated and validated a conditional knockout mouse line, Tph2flox/flox, in which brain serotonin can be effectively ablated with time specificity. We demonstrated that the Cre-mediated excision of the third exon of Tph2 gene results in the production of a Tph2null allele in which we observed the near-complete loss of brain serotonin, as well as the growth defects and perinatal lethality observed in serotonin conventional knockouts. We also revealed that in mice harbouring the Tph2null allele, but not in wild-types, two distinct Tph2 mRNA isoforms are present, namely Tph2?3 and Tph2?3?4, with the latter showing an in-frame deletion of amino acids 84–178 and coding a protein that could potentially retain non-negligible enzymatic activity. As we could not detect Tph1 expression in the raphe, we made the hypothesis that the Tph2?3?4 isoform can be at the origin of the residual, sub-threshold amount of serotonin detected in the brain of Tph2null/null mice. Finally, we set up a tamoxifen administration protocol that allows an efficient, time-specific inactivation of brain serotonin synthesis. On the whole, we generated a suitable genetic tool to investigate how serotonin depletion impacts on time-specific events during central nervous system development and adulthood life. PMID:26291320

  13. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the pathway by which psychosocial stimuli increase renin secretion.

  14. Protection against 1,2-di-methylhydrazine-induced systemic oxidative stress and altered brain neurotransmitter status by probiotic Escherichia coli CFR 16 secreting pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sumeet; Singh, Ashish; Chaudhari, Nirja; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya P; Kumar, G Naresh

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutant 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) is attributed to systemic oxidative stress and is known to cause neurotropic effect by altering brain neurotransmitter status. Probiotics are opted as natural therapeutic against oxidative stress and also have the ability to modulate gut-brain axis. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is water-soluble, heat-stable antioxidant molecule. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant efficacy of PQQ-producing probiotic E. coli CFR 16 on DMH-induced systemic oxidative damage and altered neurotransmitter status in rat brain. Adult virgin Charles Forster rats (200-250 g) were given DMH dose (25 mg/kg body weight, s.c.) for 8 weeks. Blood lipid peroxidation levels exhibited a marked increase while antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase were found to be reduced in DMH-treated rats. Likewise, brain serotonin and norepinephrine levels displayed a significant decrease, whereas epinephrine levels demonstrated a marked increase in brain of these rats. PQQ-producing E. coli CFR 16 supplementation reduced systemic oxidative stress and also restored brain neurotransmitter status. However, E. coli CFR 16 did not show any effect on these parameters. In contrast, E. coli CFR 16:: vgb-gfp and E. coli CFR 16:: vgb-gfp vector exhibited some degree of protection again oxidative stress but they were not able to modulate neurotransmitter levels. In conclusion, continuous and sustained release of PQQ by probiotic E. coli in rat intestine ameliorates systemic oxidative stress and restored brain neurotransmitter levels. PMID:25586077

  15. Interaction of psychoactive tryptamines with biogenic amine transporters and serotonin receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Blough, Bruce E.; Landavazo, Antonio; Decker, Ann M.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.; Rothman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Synthetic hallucinogenic tryptamines, especially those originally described by Alexander Shulgin, continue to be abused in the United States. The range of subjective experiences produced by different tryptamines suggests that multiple neurochemical mechanisms are involved in their actions, in addition to the established role of agonist activity at serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptors. Objectives This study evaluated the interaction of a series of synthetic tryptamines with biogenic amine neurotransmitter transporters and with serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes implicated in psychedelic effects. Methods Neurotransmitter transporter activity was determined in rat brain synaptosomes. Receptor activity was determined using calcium mobilization and DiscoveRx PathHunter® assays in HEK293, G?16-CHO, and CHOk1 cells transfected with human receptors. Results Twenty-one tryptamines were analyzed in transporter uptake and release assays, and 5-HT2A, serotonin 1A (5-HT1A), and 5-HT2A ?-arrestin functional assays. Eight of the compounds were found to have 5-HT-releasing activity. Thirteen compounds were found to be 5-HT uptake inhibitors or were inactive. All tryptamines were 5-HT2A agonists with a range of potencies and efficacies, but only a few compounds were 5-HT1A agonists. Most tryptamines recruited ?-arrestin through 5-HT2A activation. Conclusions All psychoactive tryptamines are 5-HT2A agonists, but 5-HT transporter (SERT) activity may contribute significantly to the pharmacology of certain compounds. The in vitro transporter data confirm structure-activity trends for releasers and uptake inhibitors whereby releasers tend to be structurally smaller compounds. Interestingly, two tertiary amines were found to be selective substrates at SERT, which dispels the notion that 5-HT-releasing activity is limited only to primary or secondary amines. PMID:24800892

  16. Leptin, adiponectin and serotonin levels in lean and obese dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Serotonin (5-hydroytryptamine or 5HT) is associated with numerous behavioral and psychological factors and is a biochemical marker of mood. 5HT is involved in the hypothalamic regulation of energy consumption. 5HT controls appetite in the central nerve system (CNS) and stimulates intestinal mobility. There are few studies looking at the role of 5HT and the relationship between peripheral circulating serotonin and obesity. The aim of this study was to find any differences in leptin, adiponectin, and 5HT between lean and obese dogs and to identify correlations among these factors. Results Leptin, triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol levels were higher in the obese group (all p < 0.01). Adiponectin and 5HT levels were higher in the lean group compared to the obese group (p < 0.01). Leptin (r = 0.628, p < 0.01), TG (r = 0.491, p < 0.01) and cholesterol (r = 0.419, p < 0.01) were positively correlated with body condition score (BCS), and adiponectin (r = -0.446, p < 0.01) and 5HT (r = -0.490, p < 0.01) were negatively correlated with BCS. Leptin was negatively correlated with adiponectin (r = -0.294, p < 0.01) and 5HT (r = -0.343, p < 0.01). 5HT was negatively correlated with leptin (r = -0.343, p < 0.01), TG (r = -0.268, p < 0.05) and cholesterol (r = -0.357, p < 0.05). Conclusions 5HT is an important appetite control neurotransmitter, but there are limited studies for 5HT levels related to obesity in dogs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate peripheral 5HT levels in obese dogs. From this research, we can assume that 5HT may be correlated with canine obesity. Further studies will be needed to further elucidate the role of low serum 5HT levels in canine obesity. PMID:24886049

  17. Dopamine and norepinephrine depletion in ring doves fed DDE, dieldrin, and Aroclor 1254

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hill, E.F.; Contrera, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The levels of dopamine and norepinephrine were measured in one-half of the brain of ring doves fed a control diet or a diet containing 2, 20, or 200 ppm DDE; 1, 4, or 16 ppm dieldrin; or 1, 10, or 100 ppm Aroclor 1254. Levels of DDE, dieldrin, or Aroclor 1254 were determined in the other half of each brain. The intermediate and high levels of each chemical caused depletions in both neurotransmitters, and brain residues of each chemical were negatively correlated with levels of neurotransmitters. The highest concentrations of DDE, dieldrin, and Aroclor 1254 depressed averages of dopamine to 42.4, 41.4, and 45.2% of the control level and norepinephrine to 61.6, 62.0, and 56.9% of controls, respectively. Depletions of dopamine and norepinephrine could result in abnormal behavior of contaminated birds in the wild, and the detection of such depletions could become an important tool in assessing contaminant-induced behavioral aberrations in birds.

  18. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  19. Role of the Neurotransmitter Reuptake-Blocking Activity of Antidepressants in Reversing Chloroquine Resistance In Vitro in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Dale; Walden, Jason C.; Robins, Ashley H.; Smith, Peter J.

    2000-01-01

    Since the discovery of the chloroquine (CQ) resistance reversal properties of several different, structurally unrelated classes of compounds, including antidepressants, the way is again open to employ the aminoquinoline drugs to combat malaria effectively. In this study, CQ sensitivity was restored to varying extents in vitro in the CQ-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strain RSA11 by using the antidepressants amitriptyline, citalopram, oxaprotiline, and nomifensine. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of CQ were reduced from 360 to as low as 11 nM when antidepressants were present. These particular antidepressants are highly specific for blocking the ATP-binding cassette transport protein-mediated reuptake of different neurotransmitters at the synaptic level. This study was aimed at determining the extent to which the neurotransmitter reuptake-blocking properties of these antidepressants play a role in the reversal process. None of the compounds or CQ-antidepressant combinations tested had innate antimalarial activity. No chemosensitizer or combination showed an increased CQ accumulation or significant shift in the IC50 in the CQ-sensitive clone D10. Of the compounds tested, citalopram, a highly specific serotonin reuptake blocker, produced the largest shift observed in the IC50 for the resistant isolate RSA11. No particular class of antidepressant was found to be better than any other at restoring CQ sensitivity. We conclude that the resistance-reversing properties of these compounds do not correlate with their activities as reuptake blockers. PMID:10991845

  20. Involvement of S-nitrosylation of actin in inhibition of neurotransmitter release by nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingshan; Katano, Tayo; Okuda-Ashitaka, Emiko; Oishi, Yo; Urade, Yoshihiro; Ito, Seiji

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of the diffusible messenger nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of pain transmission is still a debate of matter, pro-nociceptive and/or anti-nociceptive. S-Nitrosylation, the reversible post-translational modification of selective cysteine residues in proteins, has emerged as an important mechanism by which NO acts as a signaling molecule. The occurrence of S-nitrosylation in the spinal cord and its targets that may modulate pain transmission remain unclarified. The "biotin-switch" method and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were employed for identifying S-nitrosylated proteins. Results Here we show that actin was a major protein S-nitrosylated in the spinal cord by the NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP). Interestingly, actin was S-nitrosylated, more in the S2 fraction than in the P2 fraction of the spinal homogenate. Treatment of PC12 cells with SNAP caused rapid S-nitrosylation of actin and inhibited dopamine release from the cells. Just like cytochalasin B, which depolymerizes actin, SNAP decreased the amount of filamentous actin cytoskeleton just beneath the membrane. The inhibition of dopamine release was not attenuated by inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that actin is a major S-nitrosylated protein in the spinal cord and suggests that NO directly regulates neurotransmitter release by S-nitrosylation in addition to the well-known phosphorylation by cGMP-dependent protein kinase. PMID:19785772

  1. Neurotransmitter roles in synaptic modulation, plasticity and learning in the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Lovinger, David M

    2010-06-01

    The dorsal striatum is a large forebrain region involved in action initiation, timing, control, learning and memory. Learning and remembering skilled movement sequences requires the dorsal striatum, and striatal subregions participate in both goal-directed (action-outcome) and habitual (stimulus-response) learning. Modulation of synaptic transmission plays a large part in controlling input to as well as the output from striatal medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs). Synapses in this brain region are subject to short-term modulation, including allosteric alterations in ion channel function and prominent presynaptic inhibition. Two forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have also been observed in striatum, long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). LTP at glutamatergic synapses onto MSNs involves activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors and D1 dopamine or A2A adenosine receptors. Expression of LTP appears to involve postsynaptic mechanisms. LTD at glutamatergic synapses involves retrograde endocannabinoid signaling stimulated by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and D2 dopamine receptors. While postsynaptic mechanisms participate in LTD induction, maintained expression involves presynaptic mechanisms. A similar form of LTD has also been observed at GABAergic synapses onto MSNs. Studies have just begun to examine the roles of synaptic plasticity in striatal-based learning. Findings to date indicate that molecules implicated in induction of plasticity participate in these forms of learning. Neurotransmitter receptors involved in LTP induction are necessary for proper skill and goal-directed instrumental learning. Interestingly, receptors involved in LTP and LTD at glutamatergic synapses onto MSNs of the "indirect pathway" appear to have important roles in habit learning. More work is needed to reveal if and when synaptic plasticity occurs during learning and if so what molecules and cellular processes, both short- and long-term, contribute to this plasticity. PMID:20096294

  2. Autism spectrum disorder associated with low serotonin in CSF and mutations in the SLC29A4 plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may have low brain serotonin concentrations as reflected by the serotonin end-metabolite 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5HIAA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Methods We sequenced the candidate genes SLC6A4 (SERT), SLC29A4 (PMAT), and GCHFR (GFRP), followed by whole exome analysis. Results The known heterozygous p.Gly56Ala mutation in the SLC6A4 gene was equally found in the ASD and control populations. Using a genetic candidate gene approach, we identified, in 8 patients of a cohort of 248 with ASD, a high prevalence (3.2%) of three novel heterozygous non-synonymous mutations within the SLC29A4 plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) gene, c.86A?>?G (p.Asp29Gly) in two patients, c.412G?>?A (p.Ala138Thr) in five patients, and c.978 T?>?G (p.Asp326Glu) in one patient. Genome analysis of unaffected parents confirmed that these PMAT mutations were not de novo but inherited mutations. Upon analyzing over 15,000 normal control chromosomes, only SLC29A4 c.86A?>?G was found in 23 alleles (0.14%), while neither c.412G?>?A (<0.007%) nor c.978 T?>?G (<0.007%) were observed in all chromosomes analyzed, emphasizing the rareness of the three alterations. Expression of mutations PMAT-p.Ala138Thr and p.Asp326Glu in cellulae revealed significant reduced transport uptake activity towards a variety of substrates including serotonin, dopamine, and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), while mutation p.Asp29Gly had reduced transport activity only towards MPP+. At least two ASD subjects with either the PMAT-Ala138Thr or the PMAT-Asp326Glu mutation with altered serotonin transport activity had, besides low 5HIAA in CSF, elevated serotonin levels in blood and platelets. Moreover, whole exome sequencing revealed additional alterations in these two ASD patients in mainly serotonin-homeostasis genes compared to their non-affected family members. Conclusions Our findings link mutations in SLC29A4 to the ASD population although not invariably to low brain serotonin. PMAT dysfunction is speculated to raise serotonin prenatally, exerting a negative feedback inhibition through serotonin receptors on development of serotonin networks and local serotonin synthesis. Exome sequencing of serotonin homeostasis genes in two families illustrated more insight in aberrant serotonin signaling in ASD. PMID:25802735

  3. Who's flying the plane: Serotonin levels, aggression and free will

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Allan; Douard, John

    2010-01-01

    The present paper addresses the philosophical problem raised by current causal neurochemical models of impulsive violence and aggression: to what extent can we hold violent criminal offenders responsible for their conduct if that conduct is the result of deterministic biochemical processes in the brain. This question is currently receiving a great deal of attention among neuroscientists, legal scholars and philosophers. We examine our current knowledge of neuroscience to assess the possible roles of deterministic factors which induce impulsive aggression, and the extent to which this behavior can be controlled by neural conditioning mechanisms. Neural conditioning mechanisms, we suggest, may underlie what we consider the basis of responsible (though not necessarily moral) behavior: the capacity to give and take reasons. The models we first examine are based in part upon the role played by the neurotransmitter, serotonin, in the regulation of violence and aggression. Collectively, these results would appear to argue in favor of the view that low brain serotonin levels induce impulsive aggression which overrides mechanisms related to rational decision making processes. We next present an account of responsibility as based on the capacity to exercise a certain kind of reason-responsive control over one's conduct. The problem with such accounts of responsibility, however, is that they fail to specify a neurobiological realization of such mechanisms of control. We present a neurobiological, and weakly determinist, framework for understanding how persons can exercise guidance control over their conduct. This framework is based upon classical conditioning of neurons in the prefrontal cortex that allow for a decision making mechanism that provides for prefrontal cortical control of the sites in the brain which express aggressive behavior that include the hypothalamus and midbrain periaqueductal gray. The authors support the view that, in many circumstances, neural conditioning mechanisms provide the basis for the control of human aggression in spite of the presence of brain serotonin levels that might otherwise favor the expression of impulsive aggressive behavior. Indeed if those neural conditioning mechanisms underlie the human capacity to exercise control, they may be the neural realization of reason-responsiveness generally. PMID:21112635

  4. Mice Genetically Depleted of Brain Serotonin Display Social Impairments, Communication Deficits and Repetitive Behaviors: Possible Relevance to Autism

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Denise I.; Sykes, Catherine E.; Francescutti, Dina M.; Rosenberg, David R.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired reciprocal social interaction, communication deficits and repetitive behaviors. A very large number of genes have been linked to autism, many of which encode proteins involved in the development and function of synaptic circuitry. However, the manner in which these mutated genes might participate, either individually or together, to cause autism is not understood. One factor known to exert extremely broad influence on brain development and network formation, and which has been linked to autism, is the neurotransmitter serotonin. Unfortunately, very little is known about how alterations in serotonin neuronal function might contribute to autism. To test the hypothesis that serotonin dysfunction can contribute to the core symptoms of autism, we analyzed mice lacking brain serotonin (via a null mutation in the gene for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2)) for behaviors that are relevant to this disorder. Mice lacking brain serotonin (TPH2?/?) showed substantial deficits in numerous validated tests of social interaction and communication. These mice also display highly repetitive and compulsive behaviors. Newborn TPH2?/? mutant mice show delays in the expression of key developmental milestones and their diminished preference for maternal scents over the scent of an unrelated female is a forerunner of more severe socialization deficits that emerge in weanlings and persist into adulthood. Taken together, these results indicate that a hypo-serotonin condition can lead to behavioral traits that are highly characteristic of autism. Our findings should stimulate new studies that focus on determining how brain hyposerotonemia during critical neurodevelopmental periods can alter the maturation of synaptic circuits known to be mis-wired in autism and how prevention of such deficits might prevent this disorder. PMID:23139830

  5. Temporal differentiation of pH-dependent capacitive current from dopamine.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Kenji; Weitemier, Adam

    2014-09-01

    Voltammetric recording of dopamine (DA) with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) on carbon fiber microelectrodes have been widely used, because of its high sensitivity to dopamine. However, since an electric double layer on a carbon fiber surface in a physiological ionic solution behaves as a capacitor, fast voltage manipulation in FSCV induces large capacitive current. The faradic current from oxidation/reduction of target chemicals must be extracted from this large background current. It is known that ionic shifts, including H(+), influence this capacitance, and pH shift can cause confounding influences on the FSCV recordings within a wide range of voltage. Besides FSCV with a triangular waveform, we have been using rectangular pulse voltammetry (RPV) for dopamine detection in the brain. In this method, the onset of a single pulse causes a large capacitive current, but unlike FSCV, the capacitive current is restricted to a narrow temporal window of just after pulse onset (<5 ms). In contrast, the peak of faradic current from dopamine oxidation occurs after a delay of more than a few milliseconds. Taking advantage of the temporal difference, we show that RPV could distinguish dopamine from pH shifts clearly and easily. In addition, the early onset current was useful to evaluate pH shifts. The narrow voltage window of our RPV pulse allowed a clear differentiation of dopamine and serotonin (5-HT), as we have shown previously. Additional recording with RPV, alongside FSCV, would improve identification of chemicals such as dopamine, pH, and 5-HT. PMID:25105214

  6. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  7. Effects of neurotransmitters on the chemokinesis and chemotaxis of MDA-MB-468 human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drell, T L; Joseph, J; Lang, K; Niggemann, B; Zaenker, K S; Entschladen, F

    2003-07-01

    Most patients suffering from breast carcinoma do not die due to the primary tumor but from the development of metastases. Active migration of cancer cells is a prerequisite for development of these metastases. We used time-lapse videomicroscopy and computer-assisted cell tracking of MDA-MB-468 human breast carcinoma cells, which were incorporated into a three-dimensional collagen matrix, in order to analyze the migratory activity of these cells in response to different neurotransmitters. Our results show that met-enkephalin, substance P, bombesin, dopamine, and norepinephrine have a stimulatory effect on the migration of the breast cancer cells; moreover, these cells show positive chemotaxis towards norepinephrine as was analyzed by the directionality and persistence on a single-cell basis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) however has an inhibitory effect. Endorphin and leu-enkephalin, as well as histamin and acetylcholine, had no influence on the migratory activity of the cells. In summary, we provide evidence for a strong regulatory involvement of neurotransmitters in the regulation of breast cancer cell migration, which might provide the basis for the use of the pharmacological agonists and antagonists for the chemopreventive inhibition of metastasis development. PMID:12889599

  8. Single Molecule Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Regulation Using Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jerry; Tomlinson, Ian; Warnement, Michael; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana; Piston, David; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, we implement a novel, single molecule approach to define the localization and mobility of the brain's major target of widely prescribed antidepressant medications, the serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT labeled with single quantum dot (Qdot) revealed unsuspected features of transporter mobility with cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (often referred to as ``lipid rafts'') and cytoskeleton network linked to transporter activation. We document two pools of surface SERT proteins defined by their lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion in the plasma membrane and a second that displays significantly restricted mobility and localizes to cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Diffusion model prediction and instantaneous velocity analysis indicated that stimuli that act through p38 MAPK-dependent signaling pathways to activate SERT trigger rapid SERT movements within membrane microdomains. Cytoskeleton disruption showed that SERT lateral mobility behaves a membrane raft-constrained, cytoskeleton-associated manner. Our results identify an unsuspected aspect of neurotransmitter transporter regulation that we propose reflects the dissociation of inhibitory, SERT-associated cytoskeletal anchors.

  9. Electrochemical performance of porous diamond-like carbon electrodes for sensing hormones, neurotransmitters, and endocrine disruptors.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tiago A; Zanin, Hudson; May, Paul W; Corat, Evaldo J; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-12-10

    Porous diamond-like carbon (DLC) electrodes have been prepared, and their electrochemical performance was explored. For electrode preparation, a thin DLC film was deposited onto a densely packed forest of highly porous, vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the carbon nanotubes to clump together to form a microstructured surface with an enlarged surface area. DLC:VACNT electrodes show fast charge transfer, which is promising for several electrochemical applications, including electroanalysis. DLC:VACNT electrodes were applied to the determination of targeted molecules such as dopamine (DA) and epinephrine (EP), which are neurotransmitters/hormones, and acetaminophen (AC), an endocrine disruptor. Using simple and low-cost techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry, analytical curves in the concentration range from 10 to 100 ?mol L(-1) were obtained and excellent analytical parameters achieved, including high analytical sensitivity, good response stability, and low limits of detection of 2.9, 4.5, and 2.3 ?mol L(-1) for DA, EP, and AC, respectively. PMID:25402230

  10. Preparation of Graphene-Modified Acupuncture Needle and Its Application in Detecting Neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lina; Du, Danxin; Yang, Fan; Liang, Zhong; Ning, Yong; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-06-01

    We report a unique nanosensing platform by combining modern nanotechnology with traditional acupuncture needle to prepare graphene-modified acupuncture needle (G-AN), and using it for sensitive detection of neurotransmitters via electrochemistry. An electrochemical deposition method was employed to deposit Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the tip surface of the traditional acupuncture needle, while the other part of the needle was coated with insulation paste. Subsequently, the G-AN was obtained by cyclic voltammetry reduction of a graphene oxide solution on the surface of the AuNPs. To investigate the sensing property of the G-AN, pH dependence was measured by recording the open circuit potential in the various pH buffer solutions ranging from 2.0 to 10.0. What’s more, the G-AN was further used for detection of dopamine (DA) with a limit of detection of 0.24??M. This novel G-AN exhibited a good sensitivity and selectivity, and could realize direct detection of DA in human serum.

  11. Preparation of Graphene-Modified Acupuncture Needle and Its Application in Detecting Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lina; Du, Danxin; Yang, Fan; Liang, Zhong; Ning, Yong; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-01-01

    We report a unique nanosensing platform by combining modern nanotechnology with traditional acupuncture needle to prepare graphene-modified acupuncture needle (G-AN), and using it for sensitive detection of neurotransmitters via electrochemistry. An electrochemical deposition method was employed to deposit Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the tip surface of the traditional acupuncture needle, while the other part of the needle was coated with insulation paste. Subsequently, the G-AN was obtained by cyclic voltammetry reduction of a graphene oxide solution on the surface of the AuNPs. To investigate the sensing property of the G-AN, pH dependence was measured by recording the open circuit potential in the various pH buffer solutions ranging from 2.0 to 10.0. What’s more, the G-AN was further used for detection of dopamine (DA) with a limit of detection of 0.24??M. This novel G-AN exhibited a good sensitivity and selectivity, and could realize direct detection of DA in human serum. PMID:26112773

  12. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  13. The relationship between problem behavior and neurotransmitter deficiency in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoqin; Wang, Hongxing; Zheng, Lei; Chen, Dingyan; Wang, Zengzhen

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the association of problem behavior with neurotransmitter deficiency in adolescents, which would provide new insights into behavioral problems. A total of 1259 students of the seventh grade from 4 middle schools in Wuhan city located in the central China were recruited. With the approval of school and parents, they were invited to complete the Youth Self-Report (YSR) questionnaire and Symptom Scale of Neurotransmitter Deficiency (SSND) questionnaire. Pearson's bivariate correlation analysis showed that the correlation coefficients between each subscale of YSR and SSND ranged from 0.24 to 0.61 with all P<0.01. Canonical correlation analysis indicated that anxiety/depression was interrelated with insufficiency of GABA and 5-HT; aggressive behavior was associated with inadequate GABA; famine of DA influenced the attention problems. It was concluded that neurotransmitter deficiency may cause a series of behavioral and mental problems. PMID:21181360

  14. Complexity of dopamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) coincides with a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. A key player in the loss of dopaminergic neurons is oxidative stress. Dopamine (DA) metabolism itself is strongly linked to oxidative stress as its degradation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DA oxidation can lead to endogenous neurotoxins whereas some DA derivatives show antioxidative effects. Therefore, DA metabolism is of special importance for neuronal redox-homeostasis and viability. In this review we highlight different aspects of dopamine metabolism in the context of PD and neurodegeneration. Since most reviews focus only on single aspects of the DA system, we will give a broader overview by looking at DA biosynthesis, sequestration, degradation and oxidation chemistry at the metabolic level, as well as at the transcriptional, translational and posttranslational regulation of all enzymes involved. This is followed by a short overview of cellular models currently used in PD research. Finally, we will address the topic from a medical point of view which directly aims to encounter PD. PMID:23683503

  15. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets.

    PubMed

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Dop1. To resolve the discrepancy between studies in different insect species, we produced Dop1 knockout crickets using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that they are defective in aversive learning with sodium chloride punishment but not appetitive learning with water or sucrose reward. The results suggest that dopamine and octopamine neurons mediate aversive and appetitive reinforcement, respectively, in crickets. We suggest unexpected diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement between crickets and fruit-flies, although the neurotransmitter mediating aversive reinforcement is conserved. This study demonstrates usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for producing knockout animals for the study of learning and memory. PMID:26521965

  16. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets

    PubMed Central

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Dop1. To resolve the discrepancy between studies in different insect species, we produced Dop1 knockout crickets using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that they are defective in aversive learning with sodium chloride punishment but not appetitive learning with water or sucrose reward. The results suggest that dopamine and octopamine neurons mediate aversive and appetitive reinforcement, respectively, in crickets. We suggest unexpected diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement between crickets and fruit-flies, although the neurotransmitter mediating aversive reinforcement is conserved. This study demonstrates usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for producing knockout animals for the study of learning and memory. PMID:26521965

  17. THE PURINERGIC NEUROTRANSMITTER REVISITED: A SINGLE SUBSTANCE OR MULTIPLE PLAYERS?

    PubMed Central

    Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.; Durnin, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    The past half century has witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of extracellular purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic neurotransmission, in particular, has emerged as a key contributor in the efficient control mechanisms in the nervous system. The identity of the purine neurotransmitter, however, remains controversial. Identifying it is difficult because purines are present in all cell types, have a large variety of cell sources, and are released via numerous pathways. Moreover, studies on purinergic neurotransmission have relied heavily on indirect measurements of integrated postjunctional responses that do not provide direct information for neurotransmitter identity. This paper discusses experimental support for adenosine 5?-triphosphate (ATP) as a neurotransmitter and recent evidence for possible contribution of other purines, in addition to or instead of ATP, in chemical neurotransmission in the peripheral, enteric and central nervous systems. Sites of release and action of purines in model systems such as vas deferens, blood vessels, urinary bladder and chromaffin cells are discussed. This is preceded by a brief discussion of studies demonstrating storage of purines in synaptic vesicles. We examine recent evidence for cell type targets (e.g., smooth muscle cells, interstitial cells, neurons and glia) for purine neurotransmitters in different systems. This is followed by brief discussion of mechanisms of terminating the action of purine neurotransmitters, including extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis and possible salvage and reuptake in the cell. The significance of direct neurotransmitter release measurements is highlighted. Possibilities for involvement of multiple purines (e.g., ATP, ADP, NAD+, ADP-ribose, adenosine, and diadenosine polyphosphates) in neurotransmission are considered throughout. PMID:24887688

  18. Pharmacological profile of the abeorphine 201-678, a potent orally active and long lasting dopamine agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jaton, A.L.; Giger, R.K.A.; Vigouret, J.M.; Enz, A.; Frick, W.; Closse, A.; Markstein, R.

    1986-01-13

    The central dopaminergic effects of an abeorphine derivative 201-678 were compared to those of apomorphine and bromocriptine in different model systems. After oral administration, this compound induced contralateral turning in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced nigral lesions and exhibited strong anti-akinetic properties in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced hypothalamic lesions. It decreased dopamine metabolism in striatum and cortex, but did not modify noradrenaline and serotonin metabolism in the rat brain. 201-678 counteracted the in vivo increase of tyrosine hydroxylase activity induced by ..gamma..-butyrolactone. In vitro it stimulated DA-sensitive adenylate cyclase and inhibited acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices. This compound had high affinity for /sup 3/H-dopamine and /sup 3/H-clonidine binding sites. These results indicate that 201-678 is a potent, orally active dopamine agonist with a long duration of action. Furthermore it appears more selective than other dopaminergic drugs. 29 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  19. 5-HT1B autoreceptor regulation of serotonin transporter activity in synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Catherine E.; McDevitt, Ross A.; Liu, Yusha; Furay, Amy R.; Neumaier, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin-1B (5-HT1B) autoreceptors are located in serotonin (5-HT) terminals along with serotonin transporters (SERT), and play a critical role in autoregulation of serotonergic neurotransmission, and are implicated in disorders of serotonergic function, particularly emotional regulation. SERT modulates serotonergic neurotransmission by high-affinity reuptake of 5-HT. Alterations in SERT activity are associated with increased risk for depression and anxiety. Several neurotransmitter receptors are known to regulate SERT Km and Vmax, and previous work suggests that 5-HT1B autoreceptors may regulate 5-HT reuptake, in addition to modulating 5-HT release and synthesis. We used rotating disk electrode voltammetry to investigate 5-HT1B autoreceptor regulation of SERT-mediated 5-HT uptake into synaptosomes. The selective 5-HT1B antagonist SB224289 decreased SERT activity in synaptosomes prepared from wild-type but not 5-HT1B knockout mice, whereas SERT uptake was enhanced after pre-treatment with the selective 5-HT1B agonist CP94253. Furthermore, SERT activity varies as a function of 5-HT1B receptor expression—specifically, genetic deletion of 5-HT1B decreased SERT function, while viral-mediated overexpression of 5-HT1B autoreceptors in rat raphe neurons increased SERT activity in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Considered collectively, these results provide evidence that 5-HT1B autoreceptors regulate SERT activity. Since SERT clearance rate varies as a function of 5-HT1B autoreceptor expression levels and is modulated by both activation and inhibition of 5-HT1B autoreceptors, this dynamic interaction may be an important mechanism of serotonin autoregulation with therapeutic implications. PMID:22961814

  20. Tautomeric and ionisation forms of dopamine and tyramine in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruickshank, Laura; Kennedy, Alan R.; Shankland, Norman

    2013-11-01

    Crystallisation of the phenylethylamine neurotransmitter dopamine from basic aqueous solution yielded the 3-phenoxide Zwitterionic tautomer, despite this being a minority form in the solution state. In the crystal structure, dopamine has a dimeric [OCCOH]2 hydrogen bonded catechol motif that expands through Nsbnd H⋯O interactions to give a 2-dimensional sheet of classical hydrogen bonds. These sheets are further interconnected by Nsbnd H⋯? interactions. The structurally related base tyramine crystallises under similar conditions as a hemihydrate with all four possible species of tyramine present (cationic, anionic, Zwitterionic and neutral) in the crystal structure. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies at 121 and 293 K showed dynamic hydrogen atom disorder for the phenol/phenoxide group, suggesting that the tyramine speciation observed arises from a solid-state process.

  1. DNA aptamer-based fiber optic biosensor for selective and label-free detection of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Asadollahi, A.; Bayat, A. H.; Haghparast, A.

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine (DA) analysis is complicated by the interference from other electrochemically active endogenous compounds present in the brain, including DA precursors and metabolites and other neurotransmitters (NT). Here we report a simple, sensitive and selective optical fiber biosensor for the detection of DA in the presence of other NT. It is composed of a 57-mer dopamine-binding aptamer (DBA) as recognition element and nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber (NATOF) as probe. Upon the addition of DA, the conformation of DBA would change from a random coil structure to a rigid tertiary structure like a pocket. The conformational change of DBA lead to the refractive index (RI) change around the tapered fiber surface. Specific recognition of DA by the aptamer allowed a selective optical detection of DA within the physiologically relevant 500 nM to 10 ?M range. Some common interferents such as epinephrine (EP) and ascorbic acid (AA) showed no or just a little interference in the determination of DA.

  2. Imaging the passionate stage of romantic love by dopamine dynamics.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kayo; Mizuno, Kei; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Wada, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Tajima, Kanako; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Watanabe, Kyosuke; Zeki, Semir; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Using [(11)C]raclopride, a dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist, we undertook a positron emission tomography (PET) study to investigate the involvement of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system when subjects viewed the pictures of partners to whom they were romantically attached. Ten subjects viewed pictures of their romantic partners and, as a control, of friends of the same sex for whom they had neutral feelings during the PET study. We administered [(11)C]raclopride to subjects using a timing for injecting the antagonist which had been determined in previous studies to be optimal for detecting increases in the amount of dopamine released by stimulation. The results demonstrated statistically significant activation of the dopaminergic system in two regions, the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and medial prefrontal cortex, the former of which has been strongly implicated in a variety of rewarding experiences, including that of beauty and love. A positive correlation was obtained in mOFC between excitement levels and dopaminergic activation only in the love but not in the control condition. PMID:25914637

  3. Imaging the passionate stage of romantic love by dopamine dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kayo; Mizuno, Kei; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Wada, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Tajima, Kanako; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Watanabe, Kyosuke; Zeki, Semir; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Using [11C]raclopride, a dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist, we undertook a positron emission tomography (PET) study to investigate the involvement of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system when subjects viewed the pictures of partners to whom they were romantically attached. Ten subjects viewed pictures of their romantic partners and, as a control, of friends of the same sex for whom they had neutral feelings during the PET study. We administered [11C]raclopride to subjects using a timing for injecting the antagonist which had been determined in previous studies to be optimal for detecting increases in the amount of dopamine released by stimulation. The results demonstrated statistically significant activation of the dopaminergic system in two regions, the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and medial prefrontal cortex, the former of which has been strongly implicated in a variety of rewarding experiences, including that of beauty and love. A positive correlation was obtained in mOFC between excitement levels and dopaminergic activation only in the love but not in the control condition. PMID:25914637

  4. Disturbances to neurotransmitter levels and their metabolic enzyme activity in a freshwater planarian exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jui-Pin; Li, Mei-Hui; Chen, Jhih-Sheng; Chung, Szu-Yao; Lee, Hui-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Using specific neurobehaviors as endpoints, previous studies suggested that planarian neurotransmission systems could be targets of Cd neurotoxicity. However, direct evidence for disturbed neurotransmission systems by Cd in treated planarians is still lacking. In planarians, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play critical roles in neuromuscular function, but little is known about their metabolic degradation. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to determine the appearances of DA, 5-HT, and their metabolic products in the freshwater planarian Dugesia japonica, characterize the activity of enzymes involved in their metabolism, and investigate the effects of Cd on planarian 5-HTergic and DAergic neurotransmission systems. Only DA, 5-HT, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were found in planarian tissues. Further enzymatic study revealed the activity of planarian monoamine oxidase (MAO) but not catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT). These findings suggest that planarian MAO catalyzes the metabolism of 5-HT into 5-HIAA. However, DA metabolites from the MAO-involved metabolic pathway were not found, which might be due to a lack of COMT activity. Finally, in Cd-treated planarians, tissue levels of 5-HT and DA were decreased and MAO activity altered, suggesting that planarian neurotransmission systems are disturbed following Cd treatment. PMID:25644215

  5. Effects of acute handling stress on cerebral monoaminergic neurotransmitters in juvenile Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis.

    PubMed

    Weber, R A; Pérez Maceira, J J; Aldegunde, M J; Peleteiro, J B; García Martín, L O; Aldegunde, M

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile Senegalese sole Solea senegalensis were subjected for short periods to two different types of handling-related stress: air exposure stress and net handling stress. The S. senegalensis were sacrificed 2 and 24?h after the stress events and the levels of serotonin (5-HT), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and their respective major metabolites, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), were measured in three brain regions (telencephalon, hypothalamus and optic tectum) and compared with those in control, non-stressed S. senegalensis. Neither type of stress caused any significant alteration of serotoninergic activity (5-HIAA:5-HT ratio) or NA levels. Dopaminergic activity (DOPAC:DA ratio) was lower in stressed fish in all of the brain regions studied. For both air exposure stress and net handling stress, DA levels were significantly higher (P?

  6. Role of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitters in behavioral alterations observed in rodent model of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Saurabh; Sandhir, Rajat

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in behavioral alterations observed in rat model of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) following bile duct ligation (BDL). Male Wistar rats subjected to BDL developed biliary fibrosis after four weeks which was supported by altered liver function tests, increased ammonia levels and histological staining (Sirius red). Animals were assessed for their behavioral performance in terms of cognitive, anxiety and motor functions. The levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE) were estimated in different regions of brain viz. cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum using HPLC along with activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO). Cognitive assessment of BDL rats revealed a progressive decline in learning, memory formation, retrieval, exploration of novel environment and spontaneous locomotor activity along with decrease in 5-HT and NE levels. This was accompanied by an increase in MAO activity. Motor functions of BDL rats were also altered which were evident from decrease in the time spent on the rotating rod and higher foot faults assessed using narrow beam walk task. A global decrease was observed in the DA content along with an increase in MAO activity. Histopathological studies using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and cresyl violet exhibited marked neuronal degeneration, wherein neurons appeared more pyknotic, condensed and damaged. The results reveal that dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways are disturbed in chronic liver failure post-BDL which may be responsible for behavioral impairments observed in HE. PMID:25639545

  7. Exposure to diesel exhaust during fetal period affects behavior and neurotransmitters in male offspring mice.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Satoshi; Moriya, Nozomu; Iwata, Mari; Umezawa, Masakazu; Oshio, Shigeru; Takeda, Ken

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has been associated with the onset of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are major components of ambient PM. We first reported DEP in the central nervous system of offspring utilizing maternal inhalation to diesel exhaust (DE). In addition, we found that the effects of maternal exposure to DE reduced spontaneous motor activity. However, it is still unknown whether maternal exposure to DE affects higher order behavioral function. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of fetal exposure to DE on motor coordination, impulsive behavior and monoaminergic systems in various brain regions. The results of the rotating rod test showed that DE-exposed mice displayed decreased time on the rota rod compared to control mice. However, no changes were detected between the two groups in the hanging test. Furthermore, the cliff avoidance test revealed that DE-exposed mice spent more time in the corner and fell off an inverted glass beaker compared to control mice. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that noradrenaline turnover in the cerebellum was decreased by prenatal exposure to DE, and was significantly increased in the hypothalamus. Dopamine and serotonin levels in various brain regions were also changed by prenatal exposure to DE. Our study found that prenatal exposure to DE alters motor coordination, impulsive behavior and related monoamine levels. Therefore, the present study underscores the role of behavioral changes related to monoamine in response to maternal inhalation of DE. PMID:23358136

  8. Carbon nanotube multi-electrode array chips for noninvasive real-time measurement of dopamine, action potentials, and postsynaptic potentials.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuro; Fukuda, Mao; Shirakawa, Keiichi; Jiko, Hideyasu; Gotoh, Masao

    2013-11-15

    Multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) can be used for noninvasive, real-time, and long-term recording of electrophysiological activity and changes in the extracellular chemical microenvironment. Neural network organization, neuronal excitability, synaptic and phenotypic plasticity, and drug responses may be monitored by MEAs, but it is still difficult to measure presynaptic activity, such as neurotransmitter release, from the presynaptic bouton. In this study, we describe the development of planar carbon nanotube (CNT)-MEA chips that can measure both the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine as well as electrophysiological responses such as field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) and action potentials (APs). These CNT-MEA chips were fabricated by electroplating the indium-tin oxide (ITO) microelectrode surfaces. The CNT-plated ITO electrode exhibited electrochemical response, having much higher current density compared with the bare ITO electrode. Chronoamperometric measurements using these CNT-MEA chips detected dopamine at nanomolar concentrations. By placing mouse striatal brain slices on the CNT-MEA chip, we successfully measured synaptic dopamine release from spontaneous firings with a high S/N ratio of 62. Furthermore, APs and fPSPs were measured from cultured hippocampal neurons and slices with high temporal resolution and a 100-fold greater S/N ratio. Our CNT-MEA chips made it possible to measure neurotransmitter dopamine (presynaptic activities), postsynaptic potentials, and action potentials, which have a central role in information processing in the neuronal network. CNT-MEA chips could prove useful for in vitro studies of stem cell differentiation, drug screening and toxicity, synaptic plasticity, and pathogenic processes involved in epilepsy, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23774164

  9. Clinically Combating Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) with Dopamine Agonist Therapy as a Paradigm Shift: Dopamine for Dinner?

    PubMed

    Blum, Kenneth; Febo, Marcelo; Thanos, Panayotis K; Baron, David; Fratantonio, James; Gold, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Everyday, there are several millions of people that are increasingly unable to combat their frustrating and even fatal romance with getting high and/or experiencing "normal" feelings of well-being. In the USA, the FDA has approved pharmaceuticals for drug and alcohol abuse: tobacco and nicotine replacement therapy. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) remarkably continue to provide an increasing understanding of the intricate functions of brain reward circuitry through sophisticated neuroimaging and molecular genetic applied technology. Similar work is intensely investigated on a worldwide basis with enhanced clarity and increased interaction between not only individual scientists but across many disciplines. However, while it is universally agreed that dopamine is a major neurotransmitter in terms of reward dependence, there remains controversy regarding how to modulate its role clinically to treat and prevent relapse for both substance and non-substance-related addictive behaviors. While the existing FDA-approved medications promote blocking dopamine, we argue that a more prudent paradigm shift should be biphasic-short-term blockade and long-term upregulation, enhancing functional connectivity of brain reward circuits. PMID:25750061

  10. Opiate modulation of striatal dopamine and hippocampal norepinephrine release following morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Grasing, K; Bills, D; Ghosh, S; Schlussman, S D; Patel, A H; Woodward, J J

    1997-03-01

    When opiates are abruptly withdrawn after chronic treatment, increases in hippocampal noradrenergic function are observed which are accompanied by decreases in striatal dopamine release. The latter effects have to shown to persist for several weeks following the onset of opiate withdrawal. We examined the long-term effects of opiate withdrawal on 4-aminopyridine and potassium stimulated release of striatal dopamine and hippocampal norepinephrine. Tissue samples were obtained either from rats that had been exposed to opiate withdrawal following a seven day morphine infusion or sham treated control subjects. At 48 hours after the onset of withdrawal (cessation of morphine infusions), slices were loaded with [3H] neurotransmitter, washed extensively, and exposed to different drug treatments. 4-aminopyridine induced concentration related increases in striatal dopamine release, which was 36% calcium independent. Similar values for fractional release of striatal dopamine were obtained in morphine withdrawn and control subjects, for both potassium and 4-aminopyridine induced release. In addition, thresholds for 4-aminopyridine or potassium induced release of striatal dopamine did not differ between control and morphine withdrawn subjects. Treatment with 1.0 microM morphine sulfate potentiated potassium evoked release of norepinephrine to an equal extent in both morphine withdrawn and sham treated hippocampal tissue. Exposure to a threshold concentration of potassium (8.0 mM), stimulated increased release of hippocampal norepinephrine in a significantly greater fraction of tissue samples obtained from morphine withdrawn animals. Although these results do not support changes in striatal dopamine release following opiate withdrawal, opiate mechanisms appear to be important determinants of in vitro hippocampal norepinephrine release. PMID:9051656

  11. The Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia: Version III—The Final Common Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Oliver D.; Kapur, Shitij

    2009-01-01

    The dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia has been one of the most enduring ideas in psychiatry. Initially, the emphasis was on a role of hyperdopaminergia in the etiology of schizophrenia (version I), but it was subsequently reconceptualized to specify subcortical hyperdopaminergia with prefrontal hypodopaminergia (version II). However, these hypotheses focused too narrowly on dopamine itself, conflated psychosis and schizophrenia, and predated advances in the genetics, molecular biology, and imaging research in schizophrenia. Since version II, there have been over 6700 articles about dopamine and schizophrenia. We selectively review these data to provide an overview of the 5 critical streams of new evidence: neurochemical imaging studies, genetic evidence, findings on environmental risk factors, research into the extended phenotype, and animal studies. We synthesize this evidence into a new dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia—version III: the final common pathway. This hypothesis seeks to be comprehensive in providing a framework that links risk factors, including pregnancy and obstetric complications, stress and trauma, drug use, and genes, to increased presynaptic striatal dopaminergic function. It explains how a complex array of pathological, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other findings, such as frontotemporal structural and functional abnormalities and cognitive impairments, may converge neurochemically to cause psychosis through aberrant salience and lead to a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The hypothesis has one major implication for treatment approaches. Current treatments are acting downstream of the critical neurotransmitter abnormality. Future drug development and research into etiopathogenesis should focus on identifying and manipulating the upstream factors that converge on the dopaminergic funnel point. PMID:19325164

  12. Mesolimbic dopamine signals the value of work.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Arif A; Pettibone, Jeffrey R; Mabrouk, Omar S; Hetrick, Vaughn L; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Kennedy, Robert T; Aragona, Brandon J; Berke, Joshua D

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (phasic) dopamine fluctuations support learning, whereas much slower (tonic) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We found that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covaried with reward rate and motivational vigor. Second-by-second dopamine release encoded an estimate of temporally discounted future reward (a value function). Changing dopamine immediately altered willingness to work and reinforced preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, which is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  13. Mice Lacking Serotonin 2C Receptors Have increased Affective Responses to Aversive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bonasera, Stephen J.; Schenk, A. Katrin; Luxenberg, Evan J.; Wang, Xidao; Basbaum, Allan; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2015-01-01

    Although central serotonergic systems are known to influence responses to noxious stimuli, mechanisms underlying serotonergic modulation of pain responses are unclear. We proposed that serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2CRs), which are expressed within brain regions implicated in sensory and affective responses to pain, contribute to the serotonergic modulation of pain responses. In mice constitutively lacking 5-HT2CRs (2CKO mice) we found normal baseline sensory responses to noxious thermal, mechanical and chemical stimuli. In contrast, 2CKO mice exhibited a selective enhancement of affect-related ultrasonic afterdischarge vocalizations in response to footshock. Enhanced affect-related responses to noxious stimuli were also exhibited by 2CKO mice in a fear-sensitized startle assay. The extent to which a brief series of unconditioned footshocks produced enhancement of acoustic startle responses was markedly increased in 2CKO mice. As mesolimbic dopamine pathways influence affective responses to noxious stimuli, and these pathways are disinhibited in 2CKO mice, we examined the sensitivity of footshock-induced enhancement of startle to dopamine receptor blockade. Systemic administration of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist raclopride selectively reduced footshock-induced enhancement of startle without influencing baseline acoustic startle responses. We propose that 5-HT2CRs regulate affective behavioral responses to unconditioned aversive stimuli through mechanisms involving the disinhibition of ascending dopaminergic pathways. PMID:26630489

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals transmembrane targets on transplantable midbrain dopamine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Marie E.; Björklund, Anders; Parish, Clare L.; Thompson, Lachlan H.

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge for the continued development of cell therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the establishment of procedures that better standardize cell preparations for use in transplantation. Although cell sorting has been an anticipated strategy, its application has been limited by lack of knowledge regarding transmembrane proteins that can be used to target and isolate progenitors for midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons. We used a “FACS-array” approach to identify 18 genes for transmembrane proteins with high expression in mDA progenitors and describe the utility of four of these targets (Alcam, Chl1, Gfra1, and Igsf8) for isolating mDA progenitors from rat primary ventral mesencephalon through flow cytometry. Alcam and Chl1 facilitated a significant enrichment of mDA neurons following transplantation, while targeting of Gfra1 allowed for robust separation of dopamine and serotonin neurons. Importantly, we also show that mDA progenitors isolated on the basis of transmembrane proteins are capable of extensive, functional innervation of the host striatum and correction of motor impairment in a unilateral model of PD. These results are highly relevant for current efforts to establish safe and effective stem cell-based procedures for PD, where clinical translation will almost certainly require safety and standardization measures in order to deliver well-characterized cell preparations. PMID:25775569

  15. Transcriptome analysis reveals transmembrane targets on transplantable midbrain dopamine progenitors.

    PubMed

    Bye, Chris R; Jönsson, Marie E; Björklund, Anders; Parish, Clare L; Thompson, Lachlan H

    2015-04-14

    An important challenge for the continued development of cell therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) is the establishment of procedures that better standardize cell preparations for use in transplantation. Although cell sorting has been an anticipated strategy, its application has been limited by lack of knowledge regarding transmembrane proteins that can be used to target and isolate progenitors for midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons. We used a "FACS-array" approach to identify 18 genes for transmembrane proteins with high expression in mDA progenitors and describe the utility of four of these targets (Alcam, Chl1, Gfra1, and Igsf8) for isolating mDA progenitors from rat primary ventral mesencephalon through flow cytometry. Alcam and Chl1 facilitated a significant enrichment of mDA neurons following transplantation, while targeting of Gfra1 allowed for robust separation of dopamine and serotonin neurons. Importantly, we also show that mDA progenitors isolated on the basis of transmembrane proteins are capable of extensive, functional innervation of the host striatum and correction of motor impairment in a unilateral model of PD. These results are highly relevant for current efforts to establish safe and effective stem cell-based procedures for PD, where clinical translation will almost certainly require safety and standardization measures in order to deliver well-characterized cell preparations. PMID:25775569

  16. The Evolution of Dopamine Systems in Chordates

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kei; Vernier, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS) is found throughout chordates, and its emergence predates the divergence of chordates. Many of the molecular components of DA systems, such as biosynthetic enzymes, transporters, and receptors, are shared with those of other monoamine systems, suggesting the common origin of these systems. In the mammalian CNS, the DA neurotransmitter systems are diversified and serve for visual and olfactory perception, sensory–motor programming, motivation, memory, emotion, and endocrine regulations. Some of the functions are conserved among different vertebrate groups, while others are not, and this is reflected in the anatomical aspects of DA systems in the forebrain and midbrain. Recent findings concerning a second tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH2) revealed new populations of DA-synthesizing cells, as evidenced in the periventricular hypothalamic zones of teleost fish. It is likely that the ancestor of vertebrates possessed TH2 DA-synthesizing cells, and the TH2 gene has been lost secondarily in placental mammals. All the vertebrates possess DA cells in the olfactory bulb, retina, and in the diencephalon. Midbrain DA cells are abundant in amniotes while absent in some groups, e.g., teleosts. Studies of protochordate DA cells suggest that the diencephalic DA cells were present before the divergence of the chordate lineage. In contrast, the midbrain cell populations have probably emerged in the vertebrate lineage following the development of the midbrain–hindbrain boundary. The functional flexibility of the DA systems, and the evolvability provided by duplication of the corresponding genes permitted a large diversification of these systems. These features were instrumental in the adaptation of brain functions to the very variable way of life of vertebrates. PMID:21483723

  17. The vital role of constitutive GPCR activity in the mesolimbic dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Meye, F J; Ramakers, G M J; Adan, R A H

    2014-01-01

    The midbrain dopamine system has an important role in processing rewards and the stimuli associated with them, and is implicated in various psychiatric disorders. This system is tightly regulated by various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). It is becoming increasingly clear that these receptors are not only activated by (endogenous) agonists but that they also exhibit agonist-independent intrinsic constitutive activity. In this review we highlight the evidence for the physiological role of such constitutive GPCR activity (in particular for cannabinoid 1, serotonin 2C and mu-opioid receptors) in the ventral tegmental area and in its output regions like the nucleus accumbens. We also address the behavioral relevance of constitutive GPCR signaling and discuss the repercussions of its abolition in dopamine-related psychiatric diseases. PMID:24518399

  18. Dopamine, Affordance and Active Inference

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Shiner, Tamara; FitzGerald, Thomas; Galea, Joseph M.; Adams, Rick; Brown, Harriet; Dolan, Raymond J.; Moran, Rosalyn; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Bestmann, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions) about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order) in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal) model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors) to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level. PMID:22241972

  19. Neurotransmitter levels in cerebrospinal fluid in relation to severity of symptoms and response to medical therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ondarza, R; Velasco, F; Velasco, M; Aceves, J; Flores, G

    1994-01-01

    Determinations of biopterin (BP), homovanilic acid (HVA), glutamic acid (GTA), and glutamine (GT) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained through a lumbar tap were performed in 20 parkinsonian patients in different stages of evolution and without medication. In patients with motor symptoms not related to Parkinson's disease (dystonia, dyskinesia and essential tremor) (n = 4). In 7 other neurological patients subjected to spinal tap for diagnostic procedures neurotransmitters were also determined and taken as control groups. In 14 of the patients with Parkinson's disease, the symptoms were evaluated using conventional scales (UPDS, NYPDS, NWPDS, Schwab and England, and Hoehn and Yahr scale). The amplitude and the frequency of tremor were quantitatively evaluated through a single plane accelerometer Grass SP-1, akinesia was measured through reaction time to auditory stimuli, and rigidity through the speed of lineal movement. Evaluations were performed with the patient not on any medication for 1 week and repeated 1 h after the intake of 250 mg of 200/50 L-dopa/carbidopa preparation (Sinemet) and on a different day after the intake of biperiden (Akineton) 6 mg/day. Differences in neurotransmitter or metabolites levels between Parkinson's disease and control groups were determined through an independent Student's t test. Correlation between severity of symptoms in the scales and for each individual symptom measured through the quantitative tests and the levels of neurotransmitters in CSF were evaluated through the Pearson correlation analysis test. Modifications in the motor performance after administration of Sinemet and Akineton, and the levels of neurotransmitters were indirectly determined. RESULTS. (1) There were significant differences between the levels of BP and GT in patients with Parkinson's disease and control groups, (2) lower GTA levels correlated with more severe rigidity and akinesia, and with the best response to the administration of L-dopa and may be an important marker for prognosis, and (3) lower levels of GT correlated with least akinesia, but not with tremor, which may indicate that the akinesia depends on other biochemical abnormalities besides dopamine depletion. PMID:7631094

  20. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    E-print Network

    Celada, Pau

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is ...

  1. The role of serotonin in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Oostland, M; van Hooft, J A

    2013-09-17

    In adult animals, the cerebellum is richly innervated by serotonin: serotonergic fibres are the third main afferent fibres into the cerebellum. However, the physiology of the serotonergic system and its functional significance are not fully known during development in the cerebellum. In this review we will focus on the serotonergic regulation of the cerebellum during postnatal development. We hypothesize a powerful role for serotonin in the physiology of the developing cerebellum. A presumably tonic activation of serotonin receptors by binding of serotonin becomes specific by temporally and spatially restricted expression of different serotonin receptors, each with their own (sometimes antagonizing) functions. During the first postnatal week, activation of 5-HT? receptors expressed by both granule cells and Purkinje cells stimulates dendritic growth and synapse formation. Later, activation of 5-HT? receptors expressed by granule cells limits dendritic growth of Purkinje cells via mediating the secretion of reelin, influences physiological maturation of Purkinje cells, modulates synaptic plasticity at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses and thereby affects competition with the climbing fibres on Purkinje cell dendrites resulting in proper climbing fibre elimination. Last, activation of 5-HT? receptors expressed by granule cells and Purkinje cells both during late postnatal development and in the mature cerebellum promotes the stability of synaptic activity. Thus, we propose that serotonin controls cerebellar development in three phases: (1) stimulation of dendritic growth and formation of synapses, (2) hard-wiring of neuronal connections with limits to dendritic growth but ensuring synaptic plasticity, and (3) stabilization of synapses. Taken together, serotonin receptors expressed by different cells in the cerebellum have a specialized role during postnatal development, but with some similar main effects. Distinct spatial and temporal expression of these receptors gives serotonin a powerful and specific role in cerebellar development. PMID:23721821

  2. Putamen–midbrain functional connectivity is related to striatal dopamine transporter availability in patients with Lewy body diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, A.; Gomperts, S.N.; Johnson, K.A.; Growdon, J.H.; Van Dijk, K.R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has shown that functional connectivity between the midbrain and putamen is altered in patients with impairments in the dopamine system. This study examines whether individual differences in midbrain–striatal connectivity are proportional to the integrity of the dopamine system in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss (Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies). We assessed functional connectivity of the putamen during resting state fMRI and dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in the striatum using 11C-Altropane PET in twenty patients. In line with the hypothesis that functional connectivity between the midbrain and the putamen reflects the integrity of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system, putamen–midbrain functional connectivity was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability even after stringent control for effects of head motion. DAT availability did not relate to functional connectivity between the caudate and thalamus/prefrontal areas. As such, resting state functional connectivity in the midbrain–striatal pathway may provide a useful indicator of underlying pathology in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss. PMID:26137443

  3. Putamen-midbrain functional connectivity is related to striatal dopamine transporter availability in patients with Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, A; Gomperts, S N; Johnson, K A; Growdon, J H; Van Dijk, K R A

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has shown that functional connectivity between the midbrain and putamen is altered in patients with impairments in the dopamine system. This study examines whether individual differences in midbrain-striatal connectivity are proportional to the integrity of the dopamine system in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss (Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies). We assessed functional connectivity of the putamen during resting state fMRI and dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in the striatum using 11C-Altropane PET in twenty patients. In line with the hypothesis that functional connectivity between the midbrain and the putamen reflects the integrity of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system, putamen-midbrain functional connectivity was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability even after stringent control for effects of head motion. DAT availability did not relate to functional connectivity between the caudate and thalamus/prefrontal areas. As such, resting state functional connectivity in the midbrain-striatal pathway may provide a useful indicator of underlying pathology in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss. PMID:26137443

  4. Dopamine D1 receptor activation regulates the expression of the estrogen synthesis gene aromatase B in radial glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lei; McDonald, Heather; Da Fonte, Dillon F.; Gutierrez-Villagomez, Juan M.; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2015-01-01

    Radial glial cells (RGCs) are abundant stem-like non-neuronal progenitors that are important for adult neurogenesis and brain repair, yet little is known about their regulation by neurotransmitters. Here we provide evidence for neuronal-glial interactions via a novel role for dopamine to stimulate RGC function. Goldfish were chosen as the model organism due to the abundance of RGCs and regenerative abilities of the adult central nervous system. A close anatomical relationship was observed between tyrosine hydroxylase-positive catecholaminergic cell bodies and axons and dopamine-D1 receptor expressing RGCs along the ventricular surface of telencephalon, a site of active neurogenesis. A primary cell culture model was established and immunofluorescence analysis indicates that in vitro RGCs from female goldfish retain their major characteristics in vivo, including expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and brain lipid binding protein. The estrogen synthesis enzyme aromatase B is exclusively found in RGCs, but this is lost as cells differentiate to neurons and other glial types in adult teleost brain. Pharmacological experiments using the cultured RGCs established that specific activation of dopamine D1 receptors up-regulates aromatase B mRNA through a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent molecular mechanism. These data indicate that dopamine enhances the steroidogenic function of this neuronal progenitor cell. PMID:26388722

  5. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1–D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Yasemin; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D.; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R.; Cicvaric, Ana; Höger, Harald; Berger, Michael; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Sitte, Harald H.; Leban, Johann; Monje, Francisco J.; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM) enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) by modafinil was tested. Sixty male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1–5–10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days) and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM), a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC) and complexes containing the D1–3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1–D3-CC) were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 11.11 ?M; SERT 1547 ?M; NET 182 ?M). From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight) modafinil was decreasing WM errors (WMEs) in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1–D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1–3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26347626

  6. Occupancy of Dopamine D2/3 Receptors in Rat Brain by Endogenous Dopamine

    E-print Network

    Pike, Victor W.

    Occupancy of Dopamine D2/3 Receptors in Rat Brain by Endogenous Dopamine Measured With the Agonist dopamine depletion; reserpine; a-methyl-para-tyrosine; PET; D2/3 receptor; [11 C]MNPA ABSTRACT Estimates of dopamine D2/3 receptor occupancy by endogenous dopa- mine using positron emission tomography (PET

  7. Parkin Increases Dopamine Uptake by Enhancing the Cell Surface Expression of Dopamine Transporter*

    E-print Network

    Feng, Jian

    Parkin Increases Dopamine Uptake by Enhancing the Cell Surface Expression of Dopamine Transporter dopamine uptake in the human dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH- SY5Y. This effect was accompanied by increased Vmax of dopamine uptake and unchanged Km. Consistent with this, increased binding sites

  8. The dopamine puzzle Recently, Brischoux et al. (1) proposed that dopamine neu-

    E-print Network

    LETTER The dopamine puzzle Recently, Brischoux et al. (1) proposed that dopamine neu- rons). Along with other recent studies (e.g., ref. 3), a complementary role of dopamine neurons in aversive learning is emerging. Aversive dopamine signaling points to a new role of dopa- mine in drug abuse. Most

  9. Associations between purine metabolites and monoamine neurotransmitters in first-episode psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jeffrey K.; Dougherty, George G.; Reddy, Ravinder D.; Matson, Wayne R.; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a biochemically complex disorder characterized by widespread defects in multiple metabolic pathways whose dynamic interactions, until recently, have been difficult to examine. Rather, evidence for these alterations has been collected piecemeal, limiting the potential to inform our understanding of the interactions amongst relevant biochemical pathways. We herein review perturbations in purine and neurotransmitter metabolism observed in early SZ using a metabolomic approach. Purine catabolism is an underappreciated, but important component of the homeostatic response of mitochondria to oxidant stress. We have observed a homeostatic imbalance of purine catabolism in first-episode neuroleptic-naïve patients with SZ (FENNS). Precursor and product relationships within purine pathways are tightly correlated. Although some of these correlations persist across disease or medication status, others appear to be lost among FENNS suggesting that steady formation of the antioxidant uric acid (UA) via purine catabolism is altered early in the course of illness. As is the case for within-pathway correlations, there are also significant cross-pathway correlations between respective purine and tryptophan (TRP) pathway metabolites. By contrast, purine metabolites show significant cross-pathway correlation only with tyrosine, and not with its metabolites. Furthermore, several purine metabolites (UA, guanosine, or xanthine) are each significantly correlated with 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in healthy controls, but not in FENNS at baseline or 4-week after antipsychotic treatment. Taken together, the above findings suggest that purine catabolism strongly associates with the TRP pathways leading to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and kynurenine metabolites. The lack of a significant correlation between purine metabolites and 5-HIAA, suggests alterations in key 5-HT pathways that may both be modified by and contribute to oxidative stress via purine catabolism in FENNS. PMID:23781173

  10. Conductor compounds of phenylpentane in Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii mycelium enhance the release of dopamine from rat brain striatum slices.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Satoshi; Sawasaki, Emi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2004-04-01

    Monoterpene compound is a major component of essential oils in various aromatic species. Previous reports about the monoterpene compound linalool and its effect on the brain neurotransmitters glutamic acid, GABA and acetylcholine, but not catecholamines, have been reported. In this study, we investigated the effect of linalool or conductor compounds of phenylpentane, including 1-phenyl-3-pentanol and 1-phenyl-3-pentanone, on dopamine release using rat striatal slices. The edible mushroom Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii belongs to the Climacodontaceae family, and its cultivate medium or mycelium contains derivatives of the fragrant conductor compound, phenylpentane. Compared to basal levels, 2.5 microg linalool increased dopamine from striatal slices 3-fold. A 4-fold increase in dopamine release resulted from 2.5 microg 1-phenyl-3-pentanol administration, while a half dose of this compound induced a 2.5-fold increase. A greater than 2-fold increase resulted with 2.5 microg 1-phenyl-3-pentanone. These data indicate that striatum has sensitivity for these fragrant compounds and different releasing effects result with differ structures. These actions may affect other neurotransmitters and influence brain function. PMID:15279496

  11. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signaling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behavior. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings. PMID:26581305

  12. Single Molecule Imaging of Conformational Dynamics in Sodium-Coupled Transporters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) proteins remove neurotransmitters released into the synapse through a transport process driven by the physiological sodium ion (Na[superscript +]) gradient. NSSs for dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin are targeted by the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines, as well as by antidepressants. The…

  13. Wnt signalling tunes neurotransmitter release by directly targeting Synaptotagmin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Marzo, Aude; Boyle, Kieran; Stamatakou, Eleanna; Lopes, Douglas M.; Anane, Derek; McLeod, Faye; Rosso, Silvana B.; Gibb, Alasdair; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The functional assembly of the synaptic release machinery is well understood; however, how signalling factors modulate this process remains unknown. Recent studies suggest that Wnts play a role in presynaptic function. To examine the mechanisms involved, we investigated the interaction of release machinery proteins with Dishevelled-1 (Dvl1), a scaffold protein that determines the cellular locale of Wnt action. Here we show that Dvl1 directly interacts with Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt-1) and indirectly with the SNARE proteins SNAP25 and Syntaxin (Stx-1). Importantly, the interaction of Dvl1 with Syt-1, which is regulated by Wnts, modulates neurotransmitter release. Moreover, presynaptic terminals from Wnt signalling-deficient mice exhibit reduced release probability and are unable to sustain high-frequency release. Consistently, the readily releasable pool size and formation of SNARE complexes are reduced. Our studies demonstrate that Wnt signalling tunes neurotransmitter release and identify Syt-1 as a target for modulation by secreted signalling proteins. PMID:26400647

  14. ECL-cell histamine mobilization in conscious rats: effects of locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    Norlén, P; Bernsand, M; Konagaya, T; Håkanson, R

    2001-01-01

    The ECL cells control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to circulating gastrin. In addition, the ECL cells are thought to operate under nervous control and to be influenced by local inflammatory processes. The purpose of the present study was to monitor histamine mobilization from ECL cells in conscious rats in response to locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. Three days later, the agents to be tested were administered via the microdialysis probe and their effects on basal (48?h fast) and stimulated (intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, 3?nmol?kg?1?h?1) mobilization of ECL-cell histamine was monitored by continuous measurement of histamine in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). Locally administered gastrin-17 and sulfated cholecystokinin-8 mobilized histamine as did pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27, vasoactive intestinal peptide, peptide YY, met-enkephalin, endothelin and noradrenaline, adrenaline and isoprenaline. While gastrin, sulfated-cholecystokinin-8, met-enkephalin and isoprenaline induced a sustained elevation of the submucosal histamine concentration, endothelin, peptide YY, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, noradrenaline and adrenaline induced a transient elevation. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, somatostatin and the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-stimulated histamine mobilization. The gut hormones neurotensin and secretin and the neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide, neuropeptide Y and substance P failed to affect ECL-cell histamine mobilization, while motilin and neuromedin U-25 had weak stimulatory effects. Also acetylcholine, carbachol, serotonin and the amino acid neurotransmitters aspartate, ?-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and glycine were inactive or weakly active as was bradykinin. In summary, a range of circulating hormones, local hormones, catecholamines, neuropeptides and inflammatory mediators participate in controlling the activity of rat stomach ECL cells in situ. PMID:11739254

  15. Linking nucleus accumbens dopamine and blood oxygenation

    E-print Network

    Knutson, Brian

    REVIEW Linking nucleus accumbens dopamine and blood oxygenation Brian Knutson & Sasha E. B. Gibbs-Verlag 2007 Abstract Rationale Animal research suggests that anticipation of reward can elicit dopamine in the NAcc. However, the physiolog- ical relationship between dopamine release and BOLD signal increases

  16. 2002 Special issue Dopamine: generalization and bonuses

    E-print Network

    Kakade, Sham M.

    2002 Special issue Dopamine: generalization and bonuses Sham Kakade*, Peter Dayan Gatsby October 2001; accepted 2 April 2002 Abstract In the temporal difference model of primate dopamine neurons of experimental data. However, in certain circumstances, the activity of the dopamine cells seems anomalous under

  17. A buffering model for calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed Central

    Nachshen, D A; Drapeau, P

    1982-01-01

    A simple model is proposed, whereby a single buffering system for intracellular calcium accounts for the steep external Ca dependence of neurotransmitter release during depolarization of the presynaptic nerve terminal. Ca entry and buffering in the nerve terminal are assumed to be saturable; release is assumed to be proportional to intracellular Ca. The novel feature of this model is that it explains the apparent cooperative relationship between transmitter release and extracellular calcium, without invoking cooperative Ca binding. PMID:6124284

  18. Immunomodulation Mechanism of Antidepressants: Interactions between Serotonin/Norepinephrine Balance and Th1/Th2 Balance

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Matteo; Rocchi, Giulio; Escelsior, Andrea; Fornaro, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and hormones regulate major immune functions, including the selection of T helper (Th)1 or Th2 cytokine responses, related to cell-mediated and humoral immunity, respectively. A role of imbalance and dynamic switching of Th1/Th2 system has been proposed, with relative displacement of the immune reserve in relation to complex interaction between Th1/Th2 and neuro-hormonal balance fluctuations, in the pathogenesis of various chronic human diseases, probably also including psychiatric disorders. Components of the stress system such as norepinephrine (NE) and glucocorticoids appear to mediate a Th2 shift, while serotonin (5-HT) and melatonin might mediate a Th1 shift. Some antidepressants would occur affecting these systems, acting on neurotransmitter balance (especially the 5-HT/NE balance) and expression levels of receptor subtypes, which in turn affect cytokine production and relative Th1/Th2 balance. It could be therefore hypothesized that the antidepressant-related increase in NE tone enhances the Th2 response, while the decrease in NE tone or the increase in 5-HT tone enhances the Th1 response. However, the neurotransmitter and Th1/Th2 balance modulation could be relative, aiming to restore physiological levels a previous imbalance in receptor sensitivity and cytokine production. The considerations on neuro-immunomodulation could represent an additional aid in the study of pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders and in the choice of specific antidepressants in specific clusters of symptoms, especially in comorbidity with internal pathologies. Furthermore limited data, reviewed here, have shown the effectiveness of some antidepressants as pure immunomodulators. However, these considerations are tentative and require experimental confirmation or refutation by future studies. PMID:23204981

  19. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzis?aw; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  20. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzis?aw; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  1. Electrochemical Techniques for Subsecond Neurotransmitter Detection in Live Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in neurotransmission have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Unfortunately, few techniques support the measurement of real-time changes in neurotransmitter levels over multiple days, as is essential for ethologic and pharmacodynamic testing. Microdialysis is commonly used for these research paradigms, but its poor temporal and spatial resolution make this technique inadequate for measuring the rapid dynamics (milliseconds to seconds) of fast signaling neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and acetylcholine. Enzymatic microelectrode arrays (biosensors) coupled with electrochemical recording techniques have demonstrated fast temporal resolution (less than 1 s), excellent spatial resolution (micron-scale), low detection limits (?200 nM), and minimal damage (50 to 100 µm) to surrounding brain tissue. Here we discuss the benefits, methods, and animal welfare considerations of using platinum microelectrodes on a ceramic substrate for enzyme-based electrochemical recording techniques for real-time in vivo neurotransmitter recordings in both anesthetized and awake, freely moving rodents. PMID:25296011

  2. Electrochemical techniques for subsecond neurotransmitter detection in live rodents.

    PubMed

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in neurotransmission have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Unfortunately, few techniques support the measurement of real-time changes in neurotransmitter levels over multiple days, as is essential for ethologic and pharmacodynamic testing. Microdialysis is commonly used for these research paradigms, but its poor temporal and spatial resolution make this technique inadequate for measuring the rapid dynamics (milliseconds to seconds) of fast signaling neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and acetylcholine. Enzymatic microelectrode arrays (biosensors) coupled with electrochemical recording techniques have demonstrated fast temporal resolution (less than 1 s), excellent spatial resolution (micron-scale), low detection limits (?200 nM), and minimal damage (50 to 100 ?m) to surrounding brain tissue. Here we discuss the benefits, methods, and animal welfare considerations of using platinum microelectrodes on a ceramic substrate for enzyme-based electrochemical recording techniques for real-time in vivo neurotransmitter recordings in both anesthetized and awake, freely moving rodents. PMID:25296011

  3. Switching brain serotonin with oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Mottolese, Raphaelle; Redouté, Jérôme; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Sirigu, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) and oxytocin (OXT) are two neuromodulators involved in human affect and sociality and in disorders like depression and autism. We asked whether these chemical messengers interact in the regulation of emotion-based behavior by administering OXT or placebo to 24 healthy subjects and mapping cerebral 5-HT system by using 2?-methoxyphenyl-(N-2?-pyridinyl)-p-[18F]fluoro-benzamidoethylpiperazine ([18F]MPPF), an antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors. OXT increased [18F]MPPF nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), the core area of 5-HT synthesis, and in the amygdala/hippocampal complex, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex. Importantly, the amygdala appears central in the regulation of 5-HT by OXT: [18F]MPPF BPND changes in the DRN correlated with changes in right amygdala, which were in turn correlated with changes in hippocampus, insula, subgenual, and orbitofrontal cortex, a circuit implicated in the control of stress, mood, and social behaviors. OXT administration is known to inhibit amygdala activity and results in a decrease of anxiety, whereas high amygdala activity and 5-HT dysregulation have been associated with increased anxiety. The present study reveals a previously unidentified form of interaction between these two systems in the human brain, i.e., the role of OXT in the inhibitory regulation of 5-HT signaling, which could lead to novel therapeutic strategies for mental disorders. PMID:24912179

  4. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Velasco-Velázquez, Marco Antonio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabian, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a) membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b) downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c) enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases. PMID:25961058

  5. Nonexocytotic serotonin release tonically suppresses serotonergic neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Mlinar, Boris; Montalbano, Alberto; Baccini, Gilda; Tatini, Francesca; Berlinguer Palmini, Rolando; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-03-01

    The firing activity of serotonergic neurons in raphe nuclei is regulated by negative feedback exerted by extracellular serotonin (5-HT)o acting through somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. The steady-state [5-HT]o, sensed by 5-HT1A autoreceptors, is determined by the balance between the rates of 5-HT release and reuptake. Although it is well established that reuptake of 5-HTo is mediated by 5-HT transporters (SERT), the release mechanism has remained unclear. It is also unclear how selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants increase the [5-HT]o in raphe nuclei and suppress serotonergic neuron activity, thereby potentially diminishing their own therapeutic effect. Using an electrophysiological approach in a slice preparation, we show that, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), continuous nonexocytotic 5-HT release is responsible for suppression of phenylephrine-facilitated serotonergic neuron firing under basal conditions as well as for autoinhibition induced by SSRI application. By using 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels of patched serotonergic neurons as 5-HTo sensors, we show substantial nonexocytotic 5-HT release under conditions of abolished firing activity, Ca(2+) influx, vesicular monoamine transporter 2-mediated vesicular accumulation of 5-HT, and SERT-mediated 5-HT transport. Our results reveal a cytosolic origin of 5-HTo in the DRN and suggest that 5-HTo may be supplied by simple diffusion across the plasma membrane, primarily from the dense network of neurites of serotonergic neurons surrounding the cell bodies. These findings indicate that the serotonergic system does not function as a sum of independently acting neurons but as a highly interdependent neuronal network, characterized by a shared neurotransmitter pool and the regulation of firing activity by an interneuronal, yet activity-independent, nonexocytotic mechanism. PMID:25712017

  6. Serotonin and central nervous system fatigue: nutritional considerations.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Alderson, N L; Welsh, R S

    2000-08-01

    Fatigue from voluntary muscular effort is a complex phenomenon involving the central nervous system (CNS) and muscle. An understanding of the mechanisms within muscle that cause fatigue has led to the development of nutritional strategies to enhance performance. Until recently, little was known about CNS mechanisms of fatigue, even though the inability or unwillingness to generate and maintain central activation of muscle is the most likely explanation of fatigue for most people during normal daily activities. A possible role of nutrition in central fatigue is receiving more attention with the development of theories that provide a clue to its biological mechanisms. The focus is on the neurotransmitter serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] because of its role in depression, sensory perception, sleepiness, and mood. Nutritional strategies have been designed to alter the metabolism of brain 5-HT by affecting the availability of its amino acid precursor. Increases in brain 5-HT concentration and overall activity have been associated with increased physical and perhaps mental fatigue during endurance exercise. Carbohydrate (CHO) or branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) feedings may attenuate increases in 5-HT and improve performance. However, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of CHO on the brain and those on the muscles themselves, and most studies involving BCAA show no performance benefits. It appears that important relations exist between brain 5-HT and central fatigue. Good theoretical rationale and data exist to support a beneficial role of CHO and BCAA on brain 5-HT and central fatigue, but the strength of evidence is presently weak. PMID:10919962

  7. Nonexocytotic serotonin release tonically suppresses serotonergic neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Baccini, Gilda; Tatini, Francesca; Palmini, Rolando Berlinguer; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The firing activity of serotonergic neurons in raphe nuclei is regulated by negative feedback exerted by extracellular serotonin (5-HT)o acting through somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. The steady-state [5-HT]o, sensed by 5-HT1A autoreceptors, is determined by the balance between the rates of 5-HT release and reuptake. Although it is well established that reuptake of 5-HTo is mediated by 5-HT transporters (SERT), the release mechanism has remained unclear. It is also unclear how selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants increase the [5-HT]o in raphe nuclei and suppress serotonergic neuron activity, thereby potentially diminishing their own therapeutic effect. Using an electrophysiological approach in a slice preparation, we show that, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), continuous nonexocytotic 5-HT release is responsible for suppression of phenylephrine-facilitated serotonergic neuron firing under basal conditions as well as for autoinhibition induced by SSRI application. By using 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated G protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels of patched serotonergic neurons as 5-HTo sensors, we show substantial nonexocytotic 5-HT release under conditions of abolished firing activity, Ca2+ influx, vesicular monoamine transporter 2–mediated vesicular accumulation of 5-HT, and SERT-mediated 5-HT transport. Our results reveal a cytosolic origin of 5-HTo in the DRN and suggest that 5-HTo may be supplied by simple diffusion across the plasma membrane, primarily from the dense network of neurites of serotonergic neurons surrounding the cell bodies. These findings indicate that the serotonergic system does not function as a sum of independently acting neurons but as a highly interdependent neuronal network, characterized by a shared neurotransmitter pool and the regulation of firing activity by an interneuronal, yet activity-independent, nonexocytotic mechanism. PMID:25712017

  8. No association between schizophrenia and polymorphisms within the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.; Williams, J.; Asherson, P.; McGuffin, P.; Owen, M.

    1995-02-27

    It has been suggested that the cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase, debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, is involved in the catabolism and processing of neurotransmitters subsequent to their reuptake into target cells. It is also thought to be related to the dopamine transporter that acts to take released dopamine back up into presynaptic terminals. The present study used the association approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in the genes for debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) and the dopamine transporter (DAT) confer susceptibility to schizophrenia. There were no differences in allele or genotype frequencies between patients and controls in the mutations causing the poor metaboliser phenotype in CYP2D6. In addition there was no association found between schizophrenia and a 48 bp repeat within the 3{prime} untranslated region of DAT. 18 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Prenatal Cocaine Disrupts Serotonin Signaling-Dependent Behaviors: Implications for Sex Differences, Early Stress and Prenatal SSRI Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Sarah K; Lauder, Jean M; Johns, Josephine M

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine (PC) exposure negatively impacts the developing nervous system, including numerous changes in serotonergic signaling. Cocaine, a competitive antagonist of the serotonin transporter, similar to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), also blocks dopamine and norepinephrine transporters, leaving the direct mechanism through which cocaine disrupts the developing serotonin system unclear. In order to understand the role of the serotonin transporter in cocaine’s effect on the serotonergic system, we compare reports concerning PC and prenatal antidepressant exposure and conclude that PC exposure affects many facets of serotonergic signaling (serotonin levels, receptors, transporters) and that these effects differ significantly from what is observed following prenatal SSRI exposure. Alterations in serotonergic signaling are dependent on timing of exposure, test regimens, and sex. Following PC exposure, behavioral disturbances are observed in attention, emotional behavior and stress response, aggression, social behavior, communication, and like changes in serotonergic signaling, these effects depend on sex, age and developmental exposure. Vulnerability to the effects of PC exposure can be mediated by several factors, including allelic variance in serotonergic signaling genes, being male (although fewer studies have investigated female offspring), and experiencing the adverse early environments that are commonly coincident with maternal drug use. Early environmental stress results in disruptions in serotonergic signaling analogous to those observed with PC exposure and these may interact to produce greater behavioral effects observed in children of drug-abusing mothers. We conclude that based on past evidence, future studies should put a greater emphasis on including females and monitoring environmental factors when studying the impact of PC exposure. PMID:22379462

  10. DRD4 dopamine receptor genotype and CSF monoamine metabolites in Finnish alcoholics and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.D.; Dean, M.; Goldman, D.

    1995-06-19

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is thus far unique among neurotransmitter receptors in having a highly polymorphic gene structure that has been reported to produce altered receptor functioning. These allelic variations are caused by a 48-bp segment in exon III of the coding region which may be repeated from 2-10 times. Varying the numbers of repeated segments changes the length, structure, and, possibly, the functional efficiency of the receptor, which makes this gene an intriguing candidate for variations in dopamine-related behaviors, such as alcoholism and drug abuse. Thus far, these DRD4 alleles have been investigated for association with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson`s disease, and chronic alcoholism, and all have been largely negative for a direct association. We evaluated the DRD4 genotype in 226 Finish adult males, 113 of whom were alcoholics, many of the early onset type with features of impulsivity and antisocial traits. Genotype frequencies were compared to 113 Finnish controls who were free of alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and major mental illness. In 70 alcoholics and 20 controls, we measured CSF homovanillic acid (HVA), the major metabolite of dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No association was found between a particular DRD4 dopamine receptor allele and alcoholism. CSF concentrations of the monoamine metabolites showed no significant difference among the DRD4 genotypes. This study of the DRD4 dopamine receptor in alcoholics is the first to be conducted in a clinically and ethnically homogeneous population and to relate the DRD4 genotype to CSF monoamine concentrations. The results indicate that there is no association of the DRD4 receptor with alcoholism. 52 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Response inhibition and serotonin in autism: a functional MRI study using acute tryptophan depletion

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Christine; Hallahan, Brian; Deeley, Quinton; Craig, Michael; Murphy, Clodagh; Johnston, Patrick; Spain, Debbie; Gillan, Nicola; Gudbrandsen, Maria; Brammer, Michael; Giampietro, Vincent; Lamar, Melissa; Page, Lisa; Toal, Fiona; Schmitz, Nicole; Cleare, Anthony; Robertson, Dene; Rubia, Katya; Murphy, Declan G. M.

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the restricted, stereotyped and repetitive behaviours typically found in autism are underpinned by deficits of inhibitory control. The biological basis of this is unknown but may include differences in the modulatory role of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, which are implicated in the condition. However, this has never been tested directly. We therefore assessed the modifying role of serotonin on inhibitory brain function during a Go/No-Go task in 14 adults with autism and normal intelligence and 14 control subjects that did not differ in gender, age and intelligence. We undertook a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of acute tryptophan depletion using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Following sham, adults with autism relative to controls had reduced activation in key inhibitory regions of inferior frontal cortex and thalamus, but increased activation of caudate and cerebellum. However, brain activation was modulated in opposite ways by depletion in each group. Within autistic individuals depletion upregulated fronto-thalamic activations and downregulated striato-cerebellar activations toward control sham levels, completely ‘normalizing’ the fronto-cerebellar dysfunctions. The opposite pattern occurred in controls. Moreover, the severity of autism was related to the degree of differential modulation by depletion within frontal, striatal and thalamic regions. Our findings demonstrate that individuals with autism have abnormal inhibitory networks, and that serotonin has a differential, opposite, effect on them in adults with and without autism. Together these factors may partially explain the severity of autistic behaviours and/or provide a novel (tractable) treatment target. PMID:25070512

  12. Convulsive ergotism: epidemics of the serotonin syndrome?

    PubMed

    Eadie, Mervyn J

    2003-07-01

    Between 1085 and 1927, epidemics of "convulsive ergotism" were widespread east of the Rhine in Europe due to consumption of grain contaminated with ergot, which is produced by the fungus Claviceps purpurea. West of the Rhine, consumption of ergot-contaminated food caused epidemics of gangrenous ergotism. The clinical features of convulsive ergotism--muscle twitching and spasms, changes in mental state, hallucinations, sweating, and fever lasting for several weeks--suggest serotonergic overstimulation of the CNS (ie, the serotonin syndrome). The ergot alkaloids are serotonin agonists. Dihydroergotamine binds to serotonin receptors in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which is the site of neuropathological changes in convulsive ergotism. Dihydroergotamine given to human beings can cause the serotonin syndrome. Ergots produced by different strains of Claviceps purpurea, and those growing in different soils, may have different ergot alkaloid compositions. An alkaloid, present in high concentrations in ergots from east of the Rhine, may have caused convulsive ergotism at a circulating concentration insufficient to produce peripheral ischaemia. The serotonin syndrome may, therefore, have been a public-health problem long before it was recognised as a complication of modern psychopharmacology. PMID:12849122

  13. Electrical interfacing of neurotransmitter receptor and field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitz, I.; Fromherz, P.

    2009-10-01

    The interfacing of a ligand-gated ion channel to a transistor is studied. It relies on the transduction of ion current to a voltage in a cell-transistor junction. For the first time, a genetically modified cell is used without external driving voltage as applied by a patch-pipette. Using a core-coat conductor model, we show that an autonomous dynamics gives rise to a signal if a driving voltage is provided by potassium channels, and if current compensation is avoided by an inhomogeneous activation of channels. In a proof-of-principle experiment, we transfect HEK293 cells with the serotonin receptor 5-HT3A and the potassium channel Kv1.3. The interfacing is characterized under voltage-clamp with a negative transistor signal for activated 5-HT3A and a positive signal for activated Kv1.3. Without patch-pipette, a biphasic transient is induced by serotonin. The positive wave is assigned to 5-HT3A receptors in the free membrane that drive a potassium outward current through the adherent membrane. The negative wave is attributed to 5-HT3A receptors in the adherent membrane that are activated with a delay due to serotonin diffusion. The implementation of a receptor-cell-transistor device is a fundamental step in the development of biosensors that combine high specificity and universal microelectronic readout.