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Sample records for neutral activation analysis

  1. Antibodies that neutralize human beta interferon biologic activity recognize a linear epitope: analysis by synthetic peptide mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Redlich, P N; Hoeprich, P D; Colby, C B; Grossberg, S E

    1991-01-01

    The location of biologically relevant epitopes on recombinant human beta interferon in which Ser-17 replaces Cys-17 (rh[Ser17]IFN-beta) was evaluated by testing the immunoreactivity of antibodies against 159 sequential, overlapping octamer peptides. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize rh[Ser17]IFN-beta biologic activity, designated A1, A5, and A7, bound to peptides spanning only residues 39-48, whereas nonneutralizing mAb bound less specifically at multiple sites near the amino terminus. The immunoreactivity of peptides spanning residues 40-47 that contained a series of single amino acid substitutions suggested that residues 41-43 (Pro-Glu-Glu) and 46 (Gln) are important for the binding of neutralizing mAbs. The reactivity of mAbs to larger synthetic peptides containing rh[Ser17]IFN-beta sequences from residue 32 through residue 56 was evaluated. All mAbs except A7 reacted with synthetic peptides representing rh[Ser17]IFN-beta residues 32-47, 40-56, and 32-56, but only mAbs A1 and A5 bound to the core peptide composed of residues 40-47. Peptide 32-56 effectively blocked the binding of mAbs A1 and A5 to rh[Ser17]IFN-beta and markedly inhibited their neutralizing activity. Biologic activity of the peptides was undetectable. Rabbit antisera raised against peptides 32-47 and 40-56 recognized rh[Ser17]IFN-beta but did not neutralize its antiviral activity. Thus, structure-function analysis by peptide mapping has permitted the identification of a linear epitope recognized by neutralizing antibody on a biologically active cytokine. We conclude that the region spanning residues 32-56 is of major importance in the expression of the biologic activity of human IFN-beta. Images PMID:1708891

  2. Real-time cell analysis--a new method for dynamic, quantitative measurement of infectious viruses and antiserum neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zheng; Kuang, Xiaozhou; Wang, Jiayu; Zhang, Xi

    2013-11-01

    A newly developed electronic cell sensor array--the xCELLigence real-time cell analysis (RTCA) system is tested currently for dynamic monitoring of cell attachment, proliferation, damage, and death. In this study, human enterovirus (HEV71) infection of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) was used as an in vitro model to validate the application of this novel system as a straightforward and efficient assay for quantitative measurement of infectious viruses based on virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE). Several experimental tests were performed including the determination of optimal seeding density of the RD cells in 96-well E-plates, RTCA real-time monitoring of the virus induced CPE and virus titer calculation, and viral neutralization test to determine HEV71 antibody titer. Traditional 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) assay was also conducted for methodology comparison and validation, which indicated a consistent result between the two assays. These findings indicate that the xCELLigence RTCA system can be a valuable addition to current viral assays for quantitative measurement of infectious viruses and quantitation of neutralization antibody titer in real-time, warranting for future research and exploration of applications to many other animal and human viruses. PMID:23835032

  3. Analysis of Non-Enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Neutral-Loss Triggered MS3 Versus Multi-Stage Activation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-10-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been shown to outperform collision-induced dissociation (CID) in sequencing glycated peptides by tandem mass spectrometry, ETD instrumentation is not yet available in all laboratories. In this study, we evaluated different advanced CID techniques (i.e., neutral-loss triggered MS3 and multi-stage activation) during LC-MSn analyses of Amadori-modified peptides enriched from human serum glycated in vitro. During neutral-loss triggered MS3 experiments, MS3 scans triggered by neutral-losses of 3 H2O or 3 H2O + HCHO produced similar results in terms of glycated peptide identifications. However, neutral losses of 3 H2O resulted in significantly more glycated peptide identifications during multi-stage activation experiments. Overall, the multi-stage activation approach produced more glycated peptide identifications, while the neutral-loss triggered MS3 approach resulted in much higher specificity. Both techniques offer a viable alternative to ETD for identifying glycated peptides when that method is unavailable.

  4. Poliovirus neutralization epitopes: analysis and localization with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Emini, E A; Jameson, B A; Lewis, A J; Larsen, G R; Wimmer, E

    1982-01-01

    Two hybridomas (H3 and D3) secreting monoclonal neutralizing antibody to intact poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) were established. Each antibody bound to a site qualitatively different from that to which the other antibody bound. The H3 site was located on intact virions and, to a lesser extent, on 80S naturally occurring empty capsids and 14S precursor subunits. The D3 site was found only on virions and empty capsids. Neither site was expressed on 80S heat-treated virions. The antibodies did not react with free denatured or undenatured viral structural proteins. Viral variants which were no longer capable of being neutralized by either one or the other antibody were obtained. Such variants arose during normal cell culture passage of wild-type virus and were present in the progeny viral population on the order of 10(-4) variant per wild-type virus PFU. Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a heterobifunctional covalent cross-linking reagent, was used to irreversibly bind the F(ab) fragments of the two antibodies to their respective binding sites. In this way, VP1 was identified as the structural protein containing both sites. PMID:6183443

  5. Niche versus neutrality: a dynamical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhny, Michael; Seri, Efrat; Chocron, Rachel; Flather, Curtis H; Kadmon, Ronen; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the forces shaping ecological communities is of crucial importance for basic science and conservation. After 50 years in which ecological theory has focused on either stable communities driven by niche-based forces or nonstable "neutral" communities driven by demographic stochasticity, contemporary theories suggest that ecological communities are driven by the simultaneous effects of both types of mechanisms. Here we examine this paradigm using the longest available records for the dynamics of tropical trees and breeding birds. Applying a macroecological approach and fluctuation analysis techniques borrowed from statistical physics, we show that both stabilizing mechanisms and demographic stochasticity fail to play a dominant role in shaping assemblages over time. Rather, community dynamics in these two very different systems is predominantly driven by environmental stochasticity. Clearly, the current melding of niche and neutral theories cannot account for such dynamics. Our results highlight the need for a new theory of community dynamics integrating environmental stochasticity with weak stabilizing forces and suggest that such theory may better describe the dynamics of ecological communities than current neutral theories, deterministic niche-based theories, or recent hybrids. PMID:25226179

  6. Neutral Particle Analysis on ITER and requirements for DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Mironov, M. I.; Khudoleev, A. V.; Petrov, M. P.; Nesenevich, V. G.; Petrov, S. Ya.; Kislyakov, A. I.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Melnik, A. D.; Konovalov, S. V.; Kozlovsky, S. S.; Lyublin, B. V.

    2008-03-12

    The use of the neutral particle analysis (NPA) to study the ion component of plasma on ITER has been reviewed. Both thermal (10-200 keV) and supra-thermal (0.2-4 MeV) energy ranges of neutral fluxes are studied in respect to feasibility of the fusion fuel isotopic composition measurements. Influence of heating neutral beams and diagnostic neutral beam on the measurements is also shown. Possible application of the NPA to measure the energy distribution function of fusion alpha particles is discussed. Low- and high-energy NPA monitors have been proposed for DEMO machine to control the DT fuel isotope ratio.

  7. Thermochemical Analysis of Neutralization Reactions: An Introductory Discovery Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kenneth V.; Gullmette, Louise W.

    2007-01-01

    The article describes a new discovery experiment that uses thermodynamical analysis to study neutralization reactions based on neutralization of citric acid. The experiment would be able to reinforce students' understanding of stoichiometry and allow for the discovery of basic concepts of thermochemistry.

  8. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  9. Statistical Analysis of the Heavy Neutral Atoms Measured by IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeewoo; Kucharek, Harald; Möbius, Eberhard; Galli, André; Livadiotis, George; Fuselier, Steve A.; McComas, David J.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere by using heavy neutral maps generated with the IBEX-Lo instrument over three years from 2009 to 2011. The interstellar neutral (ISN) O&Ne gas flow was found in the first-year heavy neutral map at 601 keV and its flow direction and temperature were studied. However, due to the low counting statistics, researchers have not treated the full sky maps in detail. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the statistical significance of each pixel in the heavy neutral maps to get a better understanding of the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere. Here, we examine three statistical analysis methods: the signal-to-noise filter, the confidence limit method, and the cluster analysis method. These methods allow us to exclude background from areas where the heavy neutral signal is statistically significant. These methods also allow the consistent detection of heavy neutral atom structures. The main emission feature expands toward lower longitude and higher latitude from the observational peak of the ISN O&Ne gas flow. We call this emission the extended tail. It may be an imprint of the secondary oxygen atoms generated by charge exchange between ISN hydrogen atoms and oxygen ions in the outer heliosheath.

  10. Launch Deployment Assembly Extravehicular Activity Neutral Buoyancy Development Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T.

    1996-01-01

    This test evaluated the Launch Deployment Assembly (LDA) design for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) work sites (setup, igress, egress), reach and visual access, and translation required for cargo item removal. As part of the LDA design, this document describes the method and results of the LDA EVA Neutral Buoyancy Development Test to ensure that the LDA hardware support the deployment of the cargo items from the pallet. This document includes the test objectives, flight and mockup hardware description, descriptions of procedures and data collection used in the testing, and the results of the development test at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS).

  11. Geomagnetic activity effects on the equatorial neutral thermosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, M.D.; Abreu, V.J.; Orsini, N. ); Fesen, C.G. ); Roble, R.G. )

    1992-04-01

    The effects of geomagnetic activity on the equatorial neutral thermosphere are investigated with mass spectrometer measurements from the Atmosphere Explorer E (AE-E) satellite and simulations generated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere/ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM). A study of the local time dependence of the equatorial geomagnetic storm response concentrates on a disturbed period from March 20 (day 79) to March 31 (day 90), 1979. This interval was the subject of an intense data-gathering and analysis campaign for the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop 6, and global TIGCM predictions are available for the specific conditions of the storm as a function of universal time. The AE-E measurements demonstrate that significant geomagnetic storm-induced perturbations of upper thermospheric N{sub 2} and O densities extend into the equatorial zone but are mainly restricted to the midnight/early morning sector. The qualitative features of the observations are reproduced by the TIGCM, although in general, the model simulations overestimate the storm temperature and density enhancements, primarily in the nighttime thermosphere. This suggests that either the nighttime cooling rates in the TIGCM are too small or that the specified auroral forcing of the model are too persistent.

  12. Lunar Neutral Exposphere Properties from Pickup Ion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.; Killen, R.; Sittler, E. C. Jr.; Halekas, J.; Yokota, S.; Saito, Y.

    2009-01-01

    , yielding the necessary ion velocity spectra needed to further analysis of parent neutral exosphere properties.

  13. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  14. Neutral density filters with Risley prisms: analysis and design.

    PubMed

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Nicolov, Mirela

    2009-05-10

    We achieve the analysis and design of optical attenuators with double-prism neutral density filters. A comparative study is performed on three possible device configurations; only two are presented in the literature but without their design calculus. The characteristic parameters of this optical attenuator with Risley translating prisms for each of the three setups are defined and their analytical expressions are derived: adjustment scale (attenuation range) and interval, minimum transmission coefficient and sensitivity. The setups are compared to select the optimal device, and, from this study, the best solution for double-prism neutral density filters, both from a mechanical and an optical point of view, is determined with two identical, symmetrically movable, no mechanical contact prisms. The design calculus of this optimal device is developed in essential steps. The parameters of the prisms, particularly their angles, are studied to improve the design, and we demonstrate the maximum attenuation range that this type of attenuator can provide. PMID:19424388

  15. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed. PMID:25613522

  16. Magnitudes of muscle activation of spine stabilizers, gluteals, and hamstrings during supine bridge to neutral position.

    PubMed

    Youdas, James W; Hartman, James P; Murphy, Brooke A; Rundle, Ashley M; Ugorowski, Jenna M; Hollman, John H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of selective core muscle activation during supine bridging to neutral exercises (three on a stable and three on an unstable surface). Surface EMG analysis was performed on the lumbar multifidus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, and hamstrings from 13 male and 13 female subjects. Lumbar multifidus recruitment was not influenced by exercise or condition and ranged between 29.2 and 35.9% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Peak gluteus medius activation (42.0% MVIC) occurred in unstable single-leg bridge. Maximum recruitment of gluteus maximus (32.6% MVIC) appeared during stable single-leg bridge. Peak hamstring activation (59.6% MVIC) occurred during stable double-leg hamstring curl. Regardless of condition, hamstrings demonstrated high (51.9-59.6% MVIC) muscle recruitment during double-leg hamstring curls compared with the single-leg bridge or double-leg bridge. Various supine bridging to neutral exercises activated the hamstrings at levels conducive to strengthening, whereas recruitment of lumbar multifidus, gluteus medius, and gluteus maximus promoted endurance training. Clinically, we were unable to conclude the unstable support surface was preferable to the stable surface for boosting muscle recruitment of spine stabilizers, gluteals, and hamstring muscles during supine bridge to neutral position. PMID:25671354

  17. Mechanical Activation-Assisted Reductive Leaching of Cadmium from Zinc Neutral Leaching Residue Using Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Mi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, zinc neutral leaching residue was mechanically activated by ball-milling. The subsequent leaching behavior and kinetics of cadmium extraction in a mixed SO2-H2SO4 system were studied. Changes in the crystalline phase, lattice distortion, particle size and morphology, which were induced by mechanical activation, were also investigated. The activated samples showed different physicochemical characteristics, and cadmium extraction was found to be easier than for the un-activated samples. Under the same conditions, mechanical activation contributed to higher cadmium leaching. The cadmium extraction kinetics at 75-95°C was found to fit the shrinking core model. The raw neutral leaching residue, and the samples activated for 60 min and 120 min had a calculated activation energy of 65.02 kJ/mol, 59.45 kJ/mol and 53.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The leaching residue was characterized by ICP, XRD and SEM analysis. According to XRD analysis, the main phases in the residue were lead sulfate (PbSO4), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS).

  18. Adsorption of arsenic from water using activated neutralized red mud.

    PubMed

    Genç-Fuhrman, Hülya; Tjell, Jens Christian; McConchie, David

    2004-04-15

    In this paper activated seawater-neutralized red mud, herein referred to as activated Bauxsol (AB), is used as a novel adsorbent for removing inorganic arsenic (As) from water. The adsorption of As onto AB is studied as a function of contact time, particle size, pH, initial As concentration, AB dosage, and temperature. Kinetic data indicate that the process pseudoequilibrates in 3 and 6 h for As(V) (arsenate) and As(III) (arsenite), respectively, and follows a pseudo-first-order rate expression. Within the range tested, the optimal pH for As(V) adsorption is 4.5, and close to 100% removal can be achieved irrespective of the initial As(V) concentration. Desorption of As(V) is greatest at pH 11.6 where a maximum of 40% can be achieved. In contrast, the optimum pH for As(III) removal is 8.5, and the removal efficiency changes with the initial As(III) concentration. The adsorption data fit the Langmuir isotherm and its linearized form well, with thermodynamic data indicating the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. The FITEQL (V.4) and PHREEQC (V.2) computer programs are used to predict As(V) adsorption at various pH values (based on diffuse double layer models). The modeling results fit the experimental results very well and indicate that surface complexation modeling is useful in describing the complex AB surface during the adsorption process. This study shows that As(III) needs to be oxidized to As(V) for a favorable removal using AB and that AB can be a very efficient unconventional adsorbent for removing As(V) from water. PMID:15116850

  19. [Activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteinases in rat organs under cobalt and mercury chloride injection].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Samokhin, A A; Samokhina, L M

    2003-01-01

    The activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteinases in rats under cobalt and mercury chloride injection was investigated. The calpains activity increase in the lungs, heart, liver and kidneys was revealed after 2 h cobalt chloride action. The mercury chloride gives a reliable increase of calcium-dependent neutral proteinases only in the kidneys. PMID:14574747

  20. Au@Ag Heterogeneous Nanorods as Nanozyme Interfaces with Peroxidase-Like Activity and Their Application for One-Pot Analysis of Glucose at Nearly Neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Li, Cuncheng; Zhang, Tao; Lang, Qiaolin; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-01

    As substitutes for natural peroxidases, most nanomaterial-based enzyme mimetics (nanozymes) have unique properties such as high stability, low-cost, large surface area, and high catalytic activity. However, they usually work in acidic conditions and thus impede their real applications. In this work, by modulating the nanostructure, composition, and surface property of the bimetallic materials, the positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium)-stabilized Au@Ag heterogeneous nanorods (NRs) were developed as synergistic peroxidase-like interfaces, which exhibited high activity over a wide pH range (pH 4.0-6.5) using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) as the chromogenic substrate. At pH 6.5, the peroxidase-like activity for the Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs was stable and optimal within 20-40 °C. Moreover, the Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs showed excellent temperature stability and long-term storage stability. Given these characters, the detection of H2O2 at pH 6.5 was proposed on the basis of the Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs catalyzing the colorimetric reaction of H2O2 and ABTS, where the oxidized ABTS showed a typical absorption peak at 414 nm. The absorbance at 414 nm was linear with H2O2 concentration from 0.01 to 10 mM. Further, considering that Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs and glucose oxidase (GOx) have similar optimal pH for catalytic activities, a novel one-pot method for the detection of glucose was developed by the coupled catalytic reaction using GOx, Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs, and ABTS at nearly neutral pH (pH 6.5) and 37 °C. This proposed method had simple and rapid processes, wide linear range (0.05-20 mM), and reliability for the successful analysis of real samples. On the basis of these attractive and unique characteristics, Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs can become promising substitutes for peroxidase in analytical chemistry and environmental science. PMID:26076372

  1. Comprehensive Cross-Clade Neutralization Analysis of a Panel of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Binley, James M.; Wrin, Terri; Korber, Bette; Zwick, Michael B.; Wang, Meng; Chappey, Colombe; Stiegler, Gabriela; Kunert, Renate; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Katinger, Hermann; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are potentially important tools in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine design. A few rare MAbs have been intensively studied, but we still have a limited appreciation of their neutralization breadth. Using a pseudovirus assay, we evaluated MAbs from clade B-infected donors and a clade B HIV+ plasma against 93 viruses from diverse backgrounds. Anti-gp120 MAbs exhibited greater activity against clade B than non-B viruses, whereas anti-gp41 MAbs exhibited broad interclade activity. Unexpectedly, MAb 4E10 (directed against the C terminus of the gp41 ectodomain) neutralized all 90 viruses with moderate potency. MAb 2F5 (directed against an epitope adjacent to that of 4E10) neutralized 67% of isolates, but none from clade C. Anti-gp120 MAb b12 (directed against an epitope overlapping the CD4 binding site) neutralized 50% of viruses, including some from almost every clade. 2G12 (directed against a high-mannose epitope on gp120) neutralized 41% of the viruses, but none from clades C or E. MAbs to the gp120 V3 loop, including 447-52D, neutralized a subset of clade B viruses (up to 45%) but infrequently neutralized other clades (≤7%). MAbs b6 (directed against the CD4 binding site) and X5 (directed against a CD4-induced epitope of gp120) neutralized only sensitive primary clade B viruses. The HIV+ plasma neutralized 70% of the viruses, including some from all major clades. Further analysis revealed five neutralizing immunotypes that were somewhat associated with clades. As well as the significance for vaccine design, our data have implications for passive-immunization studies in countries where clade C viruses are common, given that only MAbs b12 and 4E10 were effective against viruses from this clade. PMID:15542675

  2. Functional analysis of neutralizing antibodies against Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin.

    PubMed

    McClain, Mark S; Cover, Timothy L

    2007-04-01

    The Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin causes a severe, often fatal illness (enterotoxemia) characterized by cardiac, pulmonary, kidney, and brain edema. In this study, we examined the activities of two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against the C. perfringens epsilon-toxin. Both antibodies inhibited epsilon-toxin cytotoxicity towards cultured MDCK cells and inhibited the ability of the toxin to form pores in the plasma membranes of cells, as shown by staining cells with the membrane-impermeant dye 7-aminoactinomycin D. Using an antibody competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a peptide array, and analysis of mutant toxins, we mapped the epitope recognized by one of the neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to amino acids 134 to 145. The antibody competition ELISA and analysis of mutant toxins suggest that the second neutralizing monoclonal antibody also recognizes an epitope in close proximity to this region. The region comprised of amino acids 134 to 145 overlaps an amphipathic loop corresponding to the putative membrane insertion domain of the toxin. Identifying the epitopes recognized by these neutralizing antibodies constitutes an important first step in the development of therapeutic agents that could be used to counter the effects of the epsilon-toxin. PMID:17261609

  3. Engineered Bispecific Antibodies with Exquisite HIV-1-Neutralizing Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaoxing; Yu, Jian; Lanzi, Anastasia; Yao, Xin; Andrews, Chasity D; Tsai, Lily; Gajjar, Mili R; Sun, Ming; Seaman, Michael S; Padte, Neal N; Ho, David D

    2016-06-16

    While the search for an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, emergence of a new generation of virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has re-ignited the field of passive immunization for HIV-1 prevention. However, the plasticity of HIV-1 demands additional improvements to these mAbs to better ensure their clinical utility. Here, we report engineered bispecific antibodies that are the most potent and broad HIV-neutralizing antibodies to date. One bispecific antibody, 10E8V2.0/iMab, neutralized 118 HIV-1 pseudotyped viruses tested with a mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.002 μg/mL. 10E8V2.0/iMab also potently neutralized 99% of viruses in a second panel of 200 HIV-1 isolates belonging to clade C, the dominant subtype accounting for ∼50% of new infections worldwide. Importantly, 10E8V2.0/iMab reduced virus load substantially in HIV-1-infected humanized mice and also provided complete protection when administered prior to virus challenge. These bispecific antibodies hold promise as novel prophylactic and/or therapeutic agents in the fight against HIV-1. PMID:27315479

  4. The antioxidant activities effect of neutral and acidic polysaccharides from Epimedium acuminatum Franch. on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhou; Feng, Shiling; Shen, Shian; Wang, Handong; Yuan, Ming; Liu, Jing; Huang, Yan; Ding, Chunbang

    2016-06-25

    A neutral polysaccharide (EAP-1N) and an acidic polysaccharide (EAP-2A) were purified from Epimedium acuminatum by DEAE-52 cellulose anion-exchange chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. Their structures were characterized by chemical composition analysis, high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Further, their antioxidant activities were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that EAP-2A had higher uronic acid content and larger average molecular weight than EAP-1N. Compared with EAP-1N, EAP-2A exhibited significantly scavenging activities against free radical in vitro, as well as strongly stimulating effect on antioxidant enzyme activities (including superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalases (CAT), and glutathione peroxidases (GSH-PX)) and preferably inhibitory effect on lipid peroxidation and protein carboxyl in the mode of Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:27083801

  5. Structural analysis of nested neutralizing and non-neutralizing B cell epitopes on ricin toxin's enzymatic subunit.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Michael J; Vance, David J; Cassidy, Michael S; Rong, Yinghui; Shoemaker, Charles B; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    In this report, we describe the X-ray crystal structures of two single domain camelid antibodies (VH H), F5 and F8, each in complex with ricin toxin's enzymatic subunit (RTA). F5 has potent toxin-neutralizing activity, while F8 has weak neutralizing activity. F5 buried a total of 1760 Å(2) in complex with RTA and made contact with three prominent secondary structural elements: α-helix B (Residues 98-106), β-strand h (Residues 113-117), and the C-terminus of α-helix D (Residues 154-156). F8 buried 1103 Å(2) in complex with RTA that was centered primarily on β-strand h. As such, the structural epitope of F8 is essentially nested within that of F5. All three of the F5 complementarity determining regions CDRs were involved in RTA contact, whereas F8 interactions were almost entirely mediated by CDR3, which essentially formed a seventh β-strand within RTA's centrally located β-sheet. A comparison of the two structures reported here to several previously reported (RTA-VH H) structures identifies putative contact sites on RTA, particularly α-helix B, associated with potent toxin-neutralizing activity. This information has implications for rational design of RTA-based subunit vaccines for biodefense. Proteins 2016; 84:1162-1172. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27159829

  6. Neutralization of Apis mellifera bee venom activities by suramin.

    PubMed

    El-Kik, Camila Z; Fernandes, Fabrício F A; Tomaz, Marcelo Amorim; Gaban, Glauco A; Fonseca, Tatiane F; Calil-Elias, Sabrina; Oliveira, Suellen D S; Silva, Claudia L M; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco; Melo, Paulo A

    2013-06-01

    In this work we evaluated the ability of suramin, a polysulfonated naphthylurea derivative, to antagonize the cytotoxic and enzymatic effects of the crude venom of Apis mellifera. Suramin was efficient to decrease the lethality in a dose-dependent way. The hemoconcentration caused by lethal dose injection of bee venom was abolished by suramin (30 μg/g). The edematogenic activity of the venom (0.3 μg/g) was antagonized by suramin (10 μg/g) in all treatment protocols. The changes in the vascular permeability caused by A. mellifera (1 μg/g) venom were inhibited by suramin (30 μg/g) in the pre- and posttreatment as well as when the venom was preincubated with suramin. In addition, suramin also inhibited cultured endothelial cell lesion, as well as in vitro myotoxicity, evaluated in mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle, which was inhibited by suramin (10 and 25 μM), decreasing the rate of CK release, showing that suramin protected the sarcolemma against damage induced by components of bee venom (2.5 μg/mL). Moreover, suramin inhibited the in vivo myotoxicity induced by i.m. injection of A. mellifera venom in mice (0.5 μg/g). The analysis of the area under the plasma CK vs. time curve showed that preincubation, pre- and posttreatment with suramin (30 μg/g) inhibited bee venom myotoxic activity in mice by about 89%, 45% and 40%, respectively. Suramin markedly inhibited the PLA2 activity in a concentration-dependent way (1-30 μM). Being suramin a polyanion molecule, the effects observed may be due to the interaction of its charges with the polycation components present in A. mellifera bee venom. PMID:23474269

  7. Diabetic state-induced activation of calcium-activated neutral proteinase in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Fujihara, M; Hoshino, N; Kimura, I; Kimura, M

    1989-12-01

    The effect of a diabetic state in the diabetic KK-CAy mouse on calcium activated neutral proteinase (CANP) of hind-limb skeletal muscles was investigated. In the diabetic state, there was an increased sensitivity to activation of CANP by calcium (Ca). In addition, there was an enhancement of maximal activity of the enzyme. The effect was induced by secondary modification of the diabetic state, but not genetical factors. Several lines of evidence suggest that the CANP is responsible for 92 K dalton protein in diabetic skeletal muscles. Among the evidence are the following: a) The 92 K band in the diabetic muscles was lower than in the prediabetic mouse and restored by the addition of 2 mM EDTA and 2 mM EGTA. b) The band was reduced by increasing the Ca content and neutral pH in the non-diabetic normal muscles. c) E-64-C, a CANP inhibitor, restored the 92 K component reduced by the diabetic state. Since the band in denervated muscles was not changed by the Ca chelating agents, the reduction of the band in the diabetic muscles is related with musculotrophic factors, not diabetic neuropathy. These results suggest that diabetic amyotrophy may be regarded as a phenomenon linked to an increase in intracellular Ca ions and an increase in CANP activity. PMID:2561275

  8. Enveloped Virus-Like Particle Expression of Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein B Antigen Induces Antibodies with Potent and Broad Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kirchmeier, Marc; Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Soare, Catalina; Bozic, Jasminka; Ontsouka, Barthelemy; Ahmed, Tanvir; Diress, Abebaw; Pereira, Lenore; Schödel, Florian; Plotkin, Stanley; Dalba, Charlotte; Klatzmann, David

    2014-01-01

    A prophylactic vaccine to prevent the congenital transmission of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in newborns and to reduce life-threatening disease in immunosuppressed recipients of HCMV-infected solid organ transplants is highly desirable. Neutralizing antibodies against HCMV confer significant protection against infection, and glycoprotein B (gB) is a major target of such neutralizing antibodies. However, one shortcoming of past HCMV vaccines may have been their failure to induce high-titer persistent neutralizing antibody responses that prevent the infection of epithelial cells. We used enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs), in which particles were produced in cells after the expression of murine leukemia virus (MLV) viral matrix protein Gag, to express either full-length CMV gB (gB eVLPs) or the full extracellular domain of CMV gB fused with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein (gB-G eVLPs). gB-G-expressing eVLPs induced potent neutralizing antibodies in mice with a much greater propensity toward epithelial cell-neutralizing activity than that induced with soluble recombinant gB protein. An analysis of gB antibody binding titers and T-helper cell responses demonstrated that high neutralizing antibody titers were not simply due to enhanced immunogenicity of the gB-G eVLPs. The cells transiently transfected with gB-G but not gB plasmid formed syncytia, consistent with a prefusion gB conformation like those of infected cells and viral particles. Two of the five gB-G eVLP-induced monoclonal antibodies we examined in detail had neutralizing activities, one of which possessed particularly potent epithelial cell-neutralizing activity. These data differentiate gB-G eVLPs from gB antigens used in the past and support their use in a CMV vaccine candidate with improved neutralizing activity against epithelial cell infection. PMID:24334684

  9. Enveloped virus-like particle expression of human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B antigen induces antibodies with potent and broad neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Kirchmeier, Marc; Fluckiger, Anne-Catherine; Soare, Catalina; Bozic, Jasminka; Ontsouka, Barthelemy; Ahmed, Tanvir; Diress, Abebaw; Pereira, Lenore; Schödel, Florian; Plotkin, Stanley; Dalba, Charlotte; Klatzmann, David; Anderson, David E

    2014-02-01

    A prophylactic vaccine to prevent the congenital transmission of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in newborns and to reduce life-threatening disease in immunosuppressed recipients of HCMV-infected solid organ transplants is highly desirable. Neutralizing antibodies against HCMV confer significant protection against infection, and glycoprotein B (gB) is a major target of such neutralizing antibodies. However, one shortcoming of past HCMV vaccines may have been their failure to induce high-titer persistent neutralizing antibody responses that prevent the infection of epithelial cells. We used enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs), in which particles were produced in cells after the expression of murine leukemia virus (MLV) viral matrix protein Gag, to express either full-length CMV gB (gB eVLPs) or the full extracellular domain of CMV gB fused with the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein (gB-G eVLPs). gB-G-expressing eVLPs induced potent neutralizing antibodies in mice with a much greater propensity toward epithelial cell-neutralizing activity than that induced with soluble recombinant gB protein. An analysis of gB antibody binding titers and T-helper cell responses demonstrated that high neutralizing antibody titers were not simply due to enhanced immunogenicity of the gB-G eVLPs. The cells transiently transfected with gB-G but not gB plasmid formed syncytia, consistent with a prefusion gB conformation like those of infected cells and viral particles. Two of the five gB-G eVLP-induced monoclonal antibodies we examined in detail had neutralizing activities, one of which possessed particularly potent epithelial cell-neutralizing activity. These data differentiate gB-G eVLPs from gB antigens used in the past and support their use in a CMV vaccine candidate with improved neutralizing activity against epithelial cell infection. PMID:24334684

  10. Integral Transport Analysis of Ions Flowing Through Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Gilbert; Santarius, John; Alderson, Eric

    2011-10-01

    A computational model for the flow of energetic ions through a background neutral gas is being developed. Its essence is to consider reactions as creating a new source of ions or neutrals if the energy or charge state of the resulting particle is changed. For a given source boundary condition, the creation and annihilation of the various species is formulated as a 1-D Volterra integral equation that can quickly be solved numerically by finite differences. The current work focuses on radially converging, multiple-pass, 1-D ion flow through neutral gas and a nearly transparent, concentric anode and cathode pair in spherical geometry. This has been implemented as a computer code for atomic (3He, 3He+) and molecular (D, D2, D-, D+, D2+, D3+) ion and neutral species, and applied to modeling inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices. The inclusion of negative ions is a recent development. The code yields detailed energy spectra of the various ions and energetic neutral species. Comparisons with experimental data for a University of Wisconsin IEC device will be presented. Research supported by US Dept of Energy, grant DE-FG02-04ER54745, and by the Grainger Foundation.

  11. Report for neutral buoyancy simulations of transfer orbit stage contingency extravehicular activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, J. D.

    1992-06-01

    The transfer orbit stage (TOS) will propel the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) from the Space Shuttle to an Earth geosynchronous transfer orbit. Two neutral buoyancy test series were conducted at MSFC to validate the extravehicular activities (EVA) contingency operations for the ACTS/TOS/mission. The results of the neutral buoyancy tests are delineated and a brief history of the TOS EVA program is given.

  12. Report for neutral buoyancy simulations of transfer orbit stage contingency extravehicular activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The transfer orbit stage (TOS) will propel the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) from the Space Shuttle to an Earth geosynchronous transfer orbit. Two neutral buoyancy test series were conducted at MSFC to validate the extravehicular activities (EVA) contingency operations for the ACTS/TOS/mission. The results of the neutral buoyancy tests are delineated and a brief history of the TOS EVA program is given.

  13. Values in the Net Neutrality Debate: Applying Content Analysis to Testimonies from Public Hearings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, An-Shou

    2012-01-01

    The Net neutrality debate is an important telecommunications policy issue that closely tied to technological innovation, economic development, and information access. Existing studies on Net neutrality have focused primarily on technological requirements, economic analysis, and regulatory justifications. Since values, technology, and policy are…

  14. An analysis of bipropellant neutralization for spacecraft refueling operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffman, David

    1987-01-01

    Refueling of satellites on orbit with storable propellants will involve venting part or all of the pressurant gas from the propellant tanks. This gas will be saturated with propellant vapor, and it may also have significant amounts of entrained fine droplets of propellant. The two most commonly used bipropellants, monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4), are highly reactive and toxic. Various possible ways of neutralizing the vented propellants are examined. The amount of propellant vented in a typical refueling operation is shown to be in the range of 0.2 to 5% of the tank capacity. Four potential neutralization schemes are examined: chemical decomposition, chemical reaction, condensation and adsorption. Chemical decomposition to essentially inert materials is thermodynamically feasible for both MMH and N2O4. It would be the simplest and easiest neutralization method to implement. Chemical decomposition would require more complex control. Condensation would require a refrigeration system and a very efficent phase separator. Adsorption is likely to be much heavier. A preliminary assessment of the four neutralization shemes is presented, along with suggested research and development plans.

  15. Analysis of system coupling - search for common scaling domains within solar, geomagnetic, ionospheric and neutral atmosphere data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosna, Zbysek

    Ionosphere is variable over wide range of periods from minutes to tens of years and more. Primarily the system is influenced by solar and geomagnetic activity, however processes taking place in the neutral atmosphere contribute also to the resulting ionospheric behavior. The paper presents scaling analysis of the solar, geomagnetic and neutral atmosphere parameters together with ionospheric parameters. First the dominant periodicities are detected in each time series and attributed to the particular process, then removed/filtered out from the data. Residual time series are further analyzed in order to find common scaling domains that may indicate strong system couplings.

  16. Neural Activation Underlying Cognitive Control in the Context of Neutral and Affectively Charged Pictures in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Connie; White, Lauren K.; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Fox, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    The neural correlates of cognitive control for typically developing 9-year-old children were examined using dense-array ERPs and estimates of cortical activation (LORETA) during a go/no-go task with two conditions: a neutral picture condition and an affectively charged picture condition. Activation was estimated for the entire cortex after which…

  17. Preclinical evaluation of three polyspecific antivenoms against the venom of Echis ocellatus: Neutralization of toxic activities and antivenomics.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Juan J; Arias, Ana Silvia; Rodríguez, Yania; Quesada-Bernat, Sarai; Sánchez, Laura V; Chippaux, Jean Philippe; Pla, Davinia; Gutiérrez, José María

    2016-09-01

    Snakebite envenoming has a heavy burden in the public health in sub-Saharan Africa. The viperid species Echis ocellatus (carpet viper or saw-scaled viper) is the medically most important snake in the savannahs of western sub-Saharan Africa. Several antivenoms are being distributed and used in this region for the treatment of envenomings by E. ocellatus, but the preclinical efficacy of some of these antivenoms has not been assessed. The present study evaluated the preclinical efficacy against E. ocellatus venom of three polyspecific antivenoms: (a) Snake Venom Antiserum (Pan Africa), manufactured by Premium Serums and Vaccines (India); (b) Snake Venom Antiserum (Africa), manufactured by VINS Bioproducts (India); and (c) Antivipmyn(®) Africa, manufactured by Instituto Bioclon (Mexico). Antivenomics analysis revealed the ability of the three antivenoms to immunocapture the majority of components of the venoms of E. ocellatus from Cameroon, Nigeria and Mali, although their maximal immunocapturing capability varied. Bioclon and Premium Serums antivenoms were effective in the neutralization of lethal, hemorrhagic and in vitro coagulant activities of the venom of E. ocellatus from Cameroon, albeit with different potencies. VINS antivenom neutralized hemorrhagic activity of this venom, but failed to neutralize lethality at the highest antivenom dose tested, and had a low neutralizing efficacy against in vitro coagulant effect. PMID:27377229

  18. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  19. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  20. Bifurcation Analysis for Neural Networks in Neutral Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Sun, Xiao-Ke

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a system of neural networks in neutral form with time delay is investigated. Further, by introducing delay τ as a bifurcation parameter, it is found that Hopf bifurcation occurs when τ is across some critical values. The direction of the Hopf bifurcations and the stability are determined by using normal form method and center manifold theory. Next, the global existence of periodic solution is established by using a global Hopf bifurcation result. Finally, an example is given to support the theoretical predictions.

  1. Emittance Analysis of the DIII-D Neutral Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, N. A.; Crowley, B.

    2014-10-01

    In a high powered neutral beam system ions are extracted from a low temperature plasma, through apertures in the arc chamber, by application of a potential to an external electrode. It has been determined that to increase the beam energy of the DIII-D neutral beam system beyond 95 keV the accelerator must be reconfigured to avoid excessive electrical breakdown in the grid gaps. Deciding exactly what modifications are to be made requires modeling and experimental effort. A basic problem is to find a geometry with which the extracted beam is intense, low divergence, free of aberrations, and does not strike the focusing electrodes. We present the results of modeling proposed reconfigurations to the accelerator geometry and source conditions. The quality of the beam produced from the various accelerator configurations is quantified through metrics such as the beam emittance and the average divergence per beamlet. By comparing the beam quality and power delivered for each proposed reconfiguration an optimal design is selected and recommended. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US DOE under DE-FG02-94ER54235, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  2. Neutral-Line Magnetic Shear and Enhanced Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Gary, G. A.; Shimizu, T.

    1997-01-01

    By examining the magnetic structure at sites in the bright coronal interiors of active regions that are not flaring but exhibit persistent strong coronal heating, we establish some new characteristics of the magnetic origins of this heating. We have examined the magnetic structure of these sites in five active regions, each of which was well observed by both the Yohkoh SXT and the Marshall Space Flight Center Vector Magnetograph and showed strong shear in its magnetic field along part of at least one neutral line (polarity inversion). Thus, we can assess whether this form of nonpotential field structure in active regions is a characteristic of the enhanced coronal heating and vice versa. From 27 orbits' worth of Yohkoh SXT images of the five active regions, we have obtained a sample of 94 persistently bright coronal features (bright in all images from a given orbit), 40 long (greater than or approximately equals 20,000 km) neutral-line segments having strong magnetic shear throughout (shear angle greater than 45 deg), and 39 long neutral-line segments having weak magnetic shear throughout (shear angle less than 45 deg). From this sample, we find that: (1) all of our persistently bright coronal features are rooted in magnetic fields that are stronger than 150 G; (2) nearly all (95%) of these enhanced coronal features are rooted near neutral lines (closer than 10,000 km); (3) a great majority (80%) of the bright features are rooted near strong-shear portions of neutral lines; (4) a great majority (85%) of long strong-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; (5) a large minority (40%) of long weak-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; and (6) the brightness of a persistently bright Coronal feature often changes greatly over a few hours. From these results, we conclude that most persistent enhanced heating of coronal loops in active regions: (1) requires the

  3. Pseudotype-Based Neutralization Assays for Influenza: A Systematic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carnell, George William; Ferrara, Francesca; Grehan, Keith; Thompson, Craig Peter; Temperton, Nigel James

    2015-01-01

    The use of vaccination against the influenza virus remains the most effective method of mitigating the significant morbidity and mortality caused by this virus. Antibodies elicited by currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominantly hemagglutination-inhibition (HI)-competent antibodies that target the globular head of hemagglutinin (HA) thus inhibiting influenza virus entry into target cells. These antibodies predominantly confer homosubtypic/strain specific protection and only rarely confer heterosubtypic protection. However, recent academia or pharma-led R&D toward the production of a “universal vaccine” has centered on the elicitation of antibodies directed against the stalk of the influenza HA that has been shown to confer broad protection across a range of different subtypes (H1–H16). The accurate and sensitive measurement of antibody responses elicited by these “next-generation” influenza vaccines is, however, hampered by the lack of sensitivity of the traditional influenza serological assays HI, single radial hemolysis, and microneutralization. Assays utilizing pseudotypes, chimeric viruses bearing influenza glycoproteins, have been shown to be highly efficient for the measurement of homosubtypic and heterosubtypic broadly neutralizing antibodies, making them ideal serological tools for the study of cross-protective responses against multiple influenza subtypes with pandemic potential. In this review, we will analyze and compare literature involving the production of influenza pseudotypes with particular emphasis on their use in serum antibody neutralization assays. This will enable us to establish the parameters required for optimization and propose a consensus protocol to be employed for the further deployment of these assays in influenza vaccine immunogenicity studies. PMID:25972865

  4. A Plaque Assay for Malignant Catarrhal Fever Virus and Virus Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hazlett, D. T. G.

    1980-01-01

    A cell-free strain of malignant catarrhal fever virus which produced a readily recognizable cytopathic effect was obtained by serial passage of the virus in a rabbit kidney cell line. Plaque assay of the virus was more rapid and gave higher titres 11 days postinoculation than tube titration, but the latter advantage decreased with a longer incubation period. Plaques were clear with sharp edges and measured 0.5 to 2 mm in diameter after 15 days. A plaque neutralization test was developed and successfully employed for the titration of malignant catarrhal fever virus neutralizing activity in the sera and nasal secretions of blue wildebeest. PMID:7427840

  5. Low activation energy, high-quality oxidation of Si and Ge using neutral beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Akira; Endo, Kazuhiko; Masahara, Meishoku; Huang, Chi-Hsien; Samukawa, Seiji

    2011-05-01

    In this letter, we investigated the mechanism that forms thin silicon and germanium oxide films with a high-quality interface using a low-temperature neutral beam oxidation (NBO) process. Because NBO has high reactivity due to bombardment by energetic oxygen-neutral beams even at low substrate temperatures, we found that an extremely low activation energy for the atomic layer oxidation reaction could be achieved during the process itself. As a result, there was little suboxide at the interface between the oxide films and the semiconductor, and device characteristics with a high performance were observed.

  6. Chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated by sodium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Maxim Kearsley, Elsabe P. Shekhovtsova, Julia

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents results of a study on chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated using sodium carbonate. As strength development of alkali-activated slag cements containing neutral GBFS and sodium carbonate as activator at room temperature is known to be slow, three accelerators were investigated: sodium hydroxide, ordinary Portland cement and a combination of silica fume and slaked lime. In all cements, the main hydration product is C–(A)–S–H, but its structure varies between tobermorite and riversideite depending on the accelerator used. Calcite and gaylussite are present in all systems and they were formed due to either cation exchange reaction between the slag and the activator, or carbonation. With accelerators, compressive strength up to 15 MPa can be achieved within 24 h in comparison to 2.5 MPa after 48 h for a mix without an accelerator.

  7. Peptide-Modulated Activity Enhancement of Acidic Protease Cathepsin E at Neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Masayuki; Biyani, Madhu; Ghimire Gautam, Sunita; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are regulated by their activation and inhibition. Enzyme activators can often be effective tools for scientific and medical purposes, although they are more difficult to obtain than inhibitors. Here, using the paired peptide method, we report on protease-cathepsin-E-activating peptides that are obtained at neutral pH. These selected peptides also underwent molecular evolution, after which their cathepsin E activation capability improved. Thus, the activators we obtained could enhance cathepsin-E-induced cancer cell apoptosis, which indicated their potential as cancer drug precursors. PMID:23365585

  8. Prefusion F–specific antibodies determine the magnitude of RSV neutralizing activity in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Ngwuta, Joan O.; Chen, Man; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Joyce, M. Gordon; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Kumar, Azad; Yassine, Hadi M.; Moin, Syed M.; Killikelly, April M.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Rundlet, Emily J.; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Nason, Martha C.; Capella, Cristina; Peeples, Mark E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Graham, Barney S.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is estimated to claim more lives among infants <1 year old than any other single pathogen, except malaria, and poses a substantial global health burden. Viral entry is mediated by a type I fusion glycoprotein (F) that transitions from a metastable prefusion (pre-F) to a stable postfusion (post-F) trimer. A highly neutralization-sensitive epitope, antigenic site Ø, is found only on pre-F. We determined what fraction of neutralizing (NT) activity in human sera is dependent on antibodies specific for antigenic site Ø or other antigenic sites on F in healthy subjects from ages 7 to 93 years. Adsorption of individual sera with stabilized pre-F protein removed >90% of NT activity and depleted binding antibodies to both F conformations. In contrast, adsorption with post-F removed ~30% of NT activity, and binding antibodies to pre-F were retained. These findings were consistent across all age groups. Protein competition neutralization assays with pre-F mutants in which sites Ø or II were altered to knock out binding of antibodies to the corresponding sites showed that these sites accounted for ~35 and <10% of NT activity, respectively. Binding competition assays with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) indicated that the amount of site Ø–specific antibodies correlated with NT activity, whereas the magnitude of binding competed by site II mAbs did not correlate with neutralization. Our results indicate that RSV NT activity in human sera is primarily derived from pre-F–specific antibodies, and therefore, inducing or boosting NT activity by vaccination will be facilitated by using pre-F antigens that preserve site Ø. PMID:26468324

  9. Structures and anti-HSV-2 activities of neutral polysaccharides from an edible plant, Basella rubra L.

    PubMed

    Dong, Cai-Xia; Hayashi, Kyoko; Mizukoshi, Yusuke; Lee, Jung-Bum; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2012-01-01

    Four neutral polysaccharides (BRN-1, BRN-2, BRN-3 and BRN-4) were isolated from the hot water extract of the aerial part of Basella rubra L. They were found to consist of a large amount of D-galactose (81.0-92.4%) and small amounts of L-arabinose (5.4-7.8%), D-glucose (2.2-11.0%) and mannose (~2.9%). Linkage analysis revealed that all these neutral polysaccharides might be arabinogalactan type I polysaccharides in different molecular weight and chain length. Among them, only BRN-3 showed antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) with 50% inhibitory concentration of 55 μg/mL without showing the cytotoxicity up to 2300 μg/mL. Furthermore, the main antiviral target of BRN-3 was shown to be the inhibition of virus adsorption to host cells. This is the first report on the neutral polysaccharide with anti-HSV-2 activity obtained from B. rubra L. PMID:22085753

  10. Active to sterile neutrino mixing limits from neutral-current interactions in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Cavanaugh, S; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Coleman, S J; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grant, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Ilic, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Lefeuvre, G; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Nowak, J A; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Petyt, D A; Phan-Budd, S; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Ratchford, J; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Shanahan, P; Sousa, A; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Walding, J J; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2011-07-01

    Results are reported from a search for active to sterile neutrino oscillations in the MINOS long-baseline experiment, based on the observation of neutral-current neutrino interactions, from an exposure to the NuMI neutrino beam of 7.07×10(20) protons on target. A total of 802 neutral-current event candidates is observed in the Far Detector, compared to an expected number of 754 ± 28(stat) ± 37(syst) for oscillations among three active flavors. The fraction f(s) of disappearing ν(μ) that may transition to ν(s) is found to be less than 22% at the 90% C.L. PMID:21797535

  11. Active to Sterile Neutrino Mixing Limits from Neutral-Current Interactions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Childress, S.; Harris, D.; Hatcher, R.; Hylen, J.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Koizumi, G.; Kreymer, A.; Lucas, P.; Moore, C. D.; Morfin, J.; Plunkett, R. K.; Rebel, B.; Sharma, R.; Shanahan, P.; Torretta, D.

    2011-07-01

    Results are reported from a search for active to sterile neutrino oscillations in the MINOS long-baseline experiment, based on the observation of neutral-current neutrino interactions, from an exposure to the NuMI neutrino beam of 7.07x10{sup 20} protons on target. A total of 802 neutral-current event candidates is observed in the Far Detector, compared to an expected number of 754{+-}28(stat){+-}37(syst) for oscillations among three active flavors. The fraction f{sub s} of disappearing {nu}{sub {mu}} that may transition to {nu}{sub s} is found to be less than 22% at the 90% C.L.

  12. Active to sterile neutrino mixing limits from neutral-current interactions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G.J.; Boehnlein, D.J.; Bogert, D.; Cavanaugh, S.; /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Tufts U.

    2011-04-01

    Results are reported from a search for active to sterile neutrino oscillations in the MINOS long-baseline experiment, based on the observation of neutral-current neutrino interactions, from an exposure to the NuMI neutrino beam of 7.07 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. A total of 802 neutral-current event candidates is observed in the Far Detector, compared to an expected number of 754 {+-} 28(stat.) {+-} 37(syst.) for oscillations among three active flavors. The fraction f{sub s} of disappearing {nu}{sub {mu}} that may transition to {nu}{sub s} is found to be less than 22% at the 90% C.L.

  13. Novel Ca2+-activated neutral protease from an aquatic fungus, Allomyces arbuscula.

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, M; Wallace, C J

    1988-01-01

    A Ca2+-activated neutral protease was purified to homogeneity from an aquatic Phycomycete fungus, Allomyces arbuscula. It requires millimolar concentrations of Ca2+ for activation (1.8 to 2 mM for 50% activation). Sr2+ can replace Ca2+ but at higher concentrations (4 mM for 50% activation). The enzyme is a dimer of 40-kilodalton subunits and contains six cysteine residues, three of which are revealed only after the addition of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+; the other three are free. Enzyme activity is strongly inhibited by SH-group inhibitors and some trypsin inhibitors (leupeptin and alpha-N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone). The enzyme lacks general trypsinlike specificity, since substrates containing tryptic cleavage sites are not cleaved nor is enzyme activity inhibited by other trypsin inhibitors. The enzyme has many functional similarities to the extensively characterized mammalian and avian Ca2+-activated neutral proteases but differs in its substrate specificity, inhibition by alpha-N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, and subunit structure. It is, nevertheless, presumed that this enzyme has a similar high order of specificity and is involved in the regulation of a specific growth function. Images PMID:2830232

  14. Highly active cobalt phosphate and borate based oxygen evolving catalysts operating in neutral and natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, AJ; Surendranath, Y; Reece, SY; Nocera, DG

    2011-02-01

    A high surface area electrode is functionalized with cobalt-based oxygen evolving catalysts (Co-OEC = electrodeposited from pH 7 phosphate, Pi, pH 8.5 methylphosphonate, MePi, and pH 9.2 borate electrolyte, Bi). Co-OEC prepared from MePi and operated in Pi and Bi achieves a current density of 100 mA cm(-2) for water oxidation at 442 and 363 mV overpotential, respectively. The catalyst retains activity in near-neutral pH buffered electrolyte in natural waters such as those from the Charles River (Cambridge, MA) and seawater (Woods Hole, MA). The efficacy and ease of operation of anodes functionalized with Co-OEC at appreciable current density together with its ability to operate in near neutral pH buffered natural water sources bodes well for the translation of this catalyst to a viable renewable energy storage technology.

  15. Containment Sump Neutralization Using Trisodium Phosphate: Parametric Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaki, Tarek G.

    2002-07-01

    For post-LOCA conditions, the pH of the aqueous solution collected in the containment sump after completion of injection of containment spray and ECC water, and all additives for reactivity control, fission product removal, and other purposes, should be maintained at a level sufficiently high to provide assurance that significant long-term iodine re-evolution does not occur. Long-term iodine retention may be assumed only when the equilibrium sump solution pH is above 7. This pH value should be achieved by the onset of the spray recirculation mode. A trisodium phosphate (TSP)-based, passive system can be used to achieve this pH value. This is a proven technology that is already in use in nuclear power plants. This system consists of several wire mesh baskets, filled with TSP and strategically located in the sump in order to insure timely dissolution of TSP and rapid pH rise under LOCA conditions. Accurate determination of the total quantity of TSP required to raise the pH of borated water in the sump to within the acceptable range is the key element to a proper design of this system. However, this type of analysis is quite involved and highly iterative, which requires the use of a computer program. This paper describes the basis for a computer program that determines the required quantity of TSP as a function of the quantity of borated water in the sump, the boron concentration, the sump temperature, and the specified pH value. The equilibrium quantities of boric acid species are calculated iteratively based on its molal equilibrium quotients. The equilibrium quantities of phosphoric acid species are calculated iteratively based on its dissociation constants. The charge balance error (CBE) is the sum of ionic charges for all species and ions in the solution, including sodium. All species are in equilibrium when the CBE reduces to zero. The paper also presents the results of a parametric analysis that is performed using this computer program. Ranges of borated water

  16. Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles in afterglow in neon at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejović, Milić M.; Nešić, Nikola T.; Pejović, Momčilo M.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles formed during breakdown and successive discharge in neon-filled tube at 6.6 millibars pressure had been analyzed. This analysis was performed on the basis of mean value of electrical breakdown time delay t¯d dependence on afterglow period τ (memory curve). It was shown that positive ions are present in the 1μs < τ < 30 ms interval, which is manifested through t ¯d slow increase with the increase of τ. A rapid t¯d increase in the 30 ms < τ < 3 s interval is a consequence of significant decrease of positive ions concentration and dominant role in breakdown initiation have ground state nitrogen atoms, which further release secondary electrons from the cathode by catalytic recombination process. These atoms are formed during discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in neon. For τ > 3 s, breakdown is initiated by cosmic rays and natural radioactivity. The increase of discharge current leads to decrease of t¯d due to the increase of positive ions concentration in inter electrode gap. The increase of applied voltage also decreases t¯d for τ > 30 ms due to the increase of the probability for initial electron to initiate breakdown. The presence of UV radiation leads to the decrease of t¯d due to the increased electron yield caused by photoelectrons. The influence of photoelectrons on breakdown initiation can be noticed for τ > 0.1 ms, while they dominantly determine t¯d for τ > 30 ms.

  17. Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles in afterglow in neon at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pejović, Milić M. Nešić, Nikola T.; Pejović, Momčilo M.

    2014-04-15

    Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles formed during breakdown and successive discharge in neon-filled tube at 6.6 millibars pressure had been analyzed. This analysis was performed on the basis of mean value of electrical breakdown time delay t{sup ¯}{sub d} dependence on afterglow period τ (memory curve). It was shown that positive ions are present in the 1μs < τ < 30 ms interval, which is manifested through t{sup ¯}{sub d} slow increase with the increase of τ. A rapid t{sup ¯}{sub d} increase in the 30 ms < τ < 3 s interval is a consequence of significant decrease of positive ions concentration and dominant role in breakdown initiation have ground state nitrogen atoms, which further release secondary electrons from the cathode by catalytic recombination process. These atoms are formed during discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in neon. For τ > 3 s, breakdown is initiated by cosmic rays and natural radioactivity. The increase of discharge current leads to decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increase of positive ions concentration in inter electrode gap. The increase of applied voltage also decreases t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms due to the increase of the probability for initial electron to initiate breakdown. The presence of UV radiation leads to the decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increased electron yield caused by photoelectrons. The influence of photoelectrons on breakdown initiation can be noticed for τ > 0.1 ms, while they dominantly determine t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms.

  18. Activity and stability trends of perovskite oxides for oxygen evolution catalysis at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Binghong; Risch, Marcel; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Ling, Chen; Jia, Hongfei; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Perovskite oxides (ABO3) have been studied extensively to promote the kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline electrolytes. However, developing highly active catalysts for OER at near-neutral pH is desirable for many photoelectrochemical/electrochemical devices. In this paper, we systematically studied the activity and stability of well-known perovskite oxides for OER at pH 7. Previous activity descriptors established for perovskite oxides at pH 13, such as having an eg occupancy close to unity or having an O p-band center close to Fermi level, were shown to scale with OER activity at pH 7. Stability was a greater challenge at pH 7 than at pH 13, where two different modes of instability were identified from combined transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory analyses. Perovskites with O p-band close to Fermi level showed leaching of A-site atoms and surface amorphization under all overpotentials examined at pH 7, while those with O p-band far from Fermi level were stable under low OER current/potential but became unstable at high current/potential accompanied by leaching of B-site atoms. Therefore, efforts are needed to enhance the activity and stability of perovskites against A-site or B-site loss if used at neutral pH. PMID:26271910

  19. Depletion of interfering antibodies in chronic hepatitis C patients and vaccinated chimpanzees reveals broad cross-genotype neutralizing activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Zhong, Lilin; Struble, Evi Budo; Watanabe, Hisayoshi; Kachko, Alla; Mihalik, Kathleen; Virata-Theimer, Maria Luisa; Alter, Harvey J.; Feinstone, Stephen; Major, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Using human immune globulins made from antihepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive plasma, we recently identified two antibody epitopes in the E2 protein at residues 412–426 (epitope I) and 434–446 (epitope II). Whereas epitope I is highly conserved among genotypes, epitope II varies. We discovered that epitope I was implicated in HCV neutralization whereas the binding of non-neutralizing antibody to epitope II disrupted virus neutralization mediated by antibody binding at epitope I. These findings suggested that, if this interfering mechanism operates in vivo during HCV infection, a neutralizing antibody against epitope I can be restrained by an interfering antibody, which may account for the persistence of HCV even in the presence of an abundance of neutralizing antibodies. We tested this hypothesis by affinity depletion and peptide-blocking of epitope-II-specific antibodies in plasma of a chronically HCV-infected patient and recombinant E1E2 vaccinated chimpanzees. We demonstrate that, by removing the restraints imposed by the interfering antibodies to epitope-II, neutralizing activity can be revealed in plasma that previously failed to neutralize viral stock in cell culture. Further, cross-genotype neutralization could be generated from monospecific plasma. Our studies contribute to understanding the mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization and interference and provide a practical approach to the development of more potent and broadly reactive hepatitis C immune globulins. PMID:19380744

  20. Neutralization Activity of Patient Sera Collected during the 2008-2009 Chikungunya Outbreak in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sasayama, Mikiko; Takeda, Naokazu; Sa-ngasang, Areerat; Anuegoonpipat, Atchareeya; Anantapreecha, Surapee

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection typically causes fever, rash, myalgia, and arthralgia and sometimes results in recurrent joint pain or, in severe cases, neurological disorders or death. How CHIKV infection leads to prolonged or severe symptoms is still not well understood. In this study, we examined the neutralization (NT) titer of 98 serum samples collected from patients during the 2008-2009 chikungunya outbreak in Thailand. While all serum samples showed neutralizing activity, virus was detected in 58% of the serum samples. When we analyzed a possible association between virus and antibody titers and the presence of typical symptoms of CHIKV infection, fever and joint pain, there was no significant association except that the number of patients with fever was over three times more than the number of those without fever when CHIKV was detectable in serum. This study indicates that although neutralizing antibody is critical to eliminate CHIKV, it appears not to be the main factor associated with clinical symptoms in some cases, so that other aspects of immune responses, such as those involving proinflammatory mediators and adaptive immune cells, should be considered altogether. PMID:25378567

  1. Interstellar neutral flow characteristics, composition, and interaction with the heliosphere - neutral gas and pickup ion analysis from ongoing observations and perspectives for IMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Drews, C.; Frisch, P. C.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Gloeckler, G.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Leonard, T.; McComas, D. J.; Park, J.; Schwadron, N.; Swaczyna, P.; Sokol, J. M.; Wood, B. E.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Sun's motion relative to the surrounding interstellar medium leads to an interstellar neutral (ISN) wind through the heliosphere that is moderately depleted by ionization. This situation allows remote sensing of the ISN through resonant scattering of solar UV and in-situ sampling, first via pickup ions (PUI) and most recently with direct neutral atom imaging. PUI observations have revealed the gravitational focusing cone of interstellar He and Ne as well as the composition of high ionization potential elements. After the first direct ISN He observations with Ulysses GAS, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes with high collecting power the ISN flow trajectories very close to their perihelion in Earth's orbit for H, He, O, and Ne from December through March. Meanwhile, IBEX has recorded seven years of ISN observations, with changing solar activity and varying viewing strategies. These recurring and remarkably repeatable observations allow us to consolidate the derived physical parameters and some key compositional aspects of the interstellar medium. IBEX observations provide a very precise relation between ISN flow longitude and speed via the hyperbolic trajectory equation, but with larger uncertainties separately for longitude and speed. Recent concerted studies have led to a velocity vector that is consistent between IBEX and Ulysses, with a substantially higher temperature than found previously. The fact that the IBEX He and O ISN observations contain a substantial secondary neutral contribution adds complexity to the quantitative analysis of the physical interstellar medium parameters. However, their discovery also provides invaluable insight into the interstellar plasma interaction in the outer heliosheath, which is shaped strongly by the interstellar magnetic field. The longitude range of the IBEX observations limits the precision of the ISN velocity vector. The IBEX collection power and its sensitivity to the Earth's magnetosphere limit

  2. A Human Monoclonal Antibody with Neutralizing Activity against Highly Divergent Influenza Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Solforosi, Laura; Moreno, Guisella J.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Mishin, Vasiliy; Di Pietro, Andrea; Vicenzi, Elisa; Siccardi, Antonio G.; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The interest in broad-range anti-influenza A monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has recently been strengthened by the identification of anti-hemagglutinin (HA) mAbs endowed with heterosubtypic neutralizing activity to be used in the design of “universal” prophylactic or therapeutic tools. However, the majority of the single mAbs described to date do not bind and neutralize viral isolates belonging to highly divergent subtypes clustering into the two different HA-based influenza phylogenetic groups: the group 1 including, among others, subtypes H1, H2, H5 and H9 and the group 2 including, among others, H3 subtype. Here, we describe a human mAb, named PN-SIA28, capable of binding and neutralizing all tested isolates belonging to phylogenetic group 1, including H1N1, H2N2, H5N1 and H9N2 subtypes and several isolates belonging to group 2, including H3N2 isolates from the first period of the 1968 pandemic. Therefore, PN-SIA28 is capable of neutralizing isolates belonging to subtypes responsible of all the reported pandemics, as well as other subtypes with pandemic potential. The region recognized by PN-SIA28 has been identified on the stem region of HA and includes residues highly conserved among the different influenza subtypes. A deep characterization of PN-SIA28 features may represent a useful help in the improvement of available anti-influenza therapeutic strategies and can provide new tools for the development of universal vaccinal strategies. PMID:22162996

  3. Toward Effective HIV Vaccination INDUCTION OF BINARY EPITOPE REACTIVE ANTIBODIES WITH BROAD HIV NEUTRALIZING ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; Nitti, Giovanni; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Jin, Lei; Symersky, Jindrich; Boivin, Stephane; Sienczyk, Marcin; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl V.; Paul, Sudhir

    2009-11-23

    We describe murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised by immunization with an electrophilic gp120 analog (E-gp120) expressing the rare ability to neutralize genetically heterologous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains. Unlike gp120, E-gp120 formed covalent oligomers. The reactivity of gp120 and E-gp120 with mAbs to reference neutralizing epitopes was markedly different, indicating their divergent structures. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides and electrophilic peptide analogs indicated binary recognition of two distinct gp120 regions by anti-E-gp120 mAbs, the 421-433 and 288-306 peptide regions. Univalent Fab and single chain Fv fragments expressed the ability to recognize both peptides. X-ray crystallography of an anti-E-gp120 Fab fragment revealed two neighboring cavities, the typical antigen-binding cavity formed by the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and another cavity dominated by antibody heavy chain variable (VH) domain framework (FR) residues. Substitution of the FR cavity VH Lys-19 residue by an Ala residue resulted in attenuated binding of the 421-433 region peptide probe. The CDRs and VH FR replacement/silent mutation ratios exceeded the ratio for a random mutation process, suggesting adaptive development of both putative binding sites. All mAbs studied were derived from VH1 family genes, suggesting biased recruitment of the V gene germ line repertoire by E-gp120. The conserved 421-433 region of gp120 is essential for HIV binding to host CD4 receptors. This region is recognized weakly by the FR of antibodies produced without exposure to HIV, but it usually fails to induce adaptive synthesis of neutralizing antibodies. We present models accounting for improved CD4-binding site recognition and broad HIV neutralizing activity of the mAbs, long sought goals in HIV vaccine development.

  4. Modeling activities on the negative-ion-based Neutral Beam Injectors of the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Pilan, N.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-26

    At the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) large-scaled negative ion sources have been widely used for the Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) mounted on the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is the world-largest superconducting helical system. These injectors have achieved outstanding performances in terms of beam energy, negative-ion current and optics, and represent a reference for the development of heating and current drive NBIs for ITER.In the framework of the support activities for the ITER NBIs, the PRIMA test facility, which includes a RF-drive ion source with 100 keV accelerator (SPIDER) and a complete 1 MeV Neutral Beam system (MITICA) is under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova.An experimental validation of the codes has been undertaken in order to prove the accuracy of the simulations and the soundness of the SPIDER and MITICA design. To this purpose, the whole set of codes have been applied to the LHD NBIs in a joint activity between Consorzio RFX and NIFS, with the goal of comparing and benchmarking the codes with the experimental data. A description of these modeling activities and a discussion of the main results obtained are reported in this paper.

  5. Production in yeast of pseudotype virus-like particles harboring functionally active antibody fragments neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recombinant antibodies can be produced in different formats and different expression systems. Single chain variable fragments (scFvs) represent an attractive alternative to full-length antibodies and they can be easily produced in bacteria or yeast. However, the scFvs exhibit monovalent antigen-binding properties and short serum half-lives. The stability and avidity of the scFvs can be improved by their multimerization or fusion with IgG Fc domain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibilities to produce in yeast high-affinity scFv-Fc proteins neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin (VLY), the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis. Results The scFv protein derived from hybridoma cell line producing high-affinity neutralizing antibodies against VLY was fused with human IgG1 Fc domain. Four different variants of anti-VLY scFv-Fc fusion proteins were constructed and produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-tagged scFv-Fc and hexahistidine-tagged scFv-Fc proteins were found predominantly as insoluble aggregates and therefore were not suitable for further purification and activity testing. The addition of yeast α-factor signal sequence did not support secretion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc but increased the amount of its intracellular soluble form. However, the purified protein showed a weak VLY-neutralizing capability. In contrast, the fusion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc molecules with hamster polyomavirus-derived VP2 protein and its co-expression with VP1 protein resulted in an effective production of pseudotype virus-like particles (VLPs) that exhibited strong VLY-binding activity. Recombinant scFv-Fc molecules displayed on the surface of VLPs neutralized VLY-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and HeLa cells with high potency comparable to that of full-length antibody. Conclusions Recombinant scFv-Fc proteins were expressed in yeast with low efficiency. New approach to display the scFv-Fc molecules on the surface of

  6. Enhancement of neutralizing activity of influenza virus-specific antibodies by serum components.

    PubMed

    Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Feng, Jingqi; Eid, Mark; Zharikova, Darya; Gerhard, Walter

    2006-09-01

    The role of serum components in enhancing virus neutralizing (VN) activity of influenza virus A/PR/8/34 hemagglutinin (HA)-specific MAbs in vitro was investigated. The degree of enhancement depended on the MAb's fine specificity and heavy chain isotype and on type of serum. Greatest enhancement (>100-fold) was seen with sera from immunodeficient mice that lacked serum immunoglobulin. At least two serum components were involved: C1q and a heat-resistant factor. C1q was mandatory for enhancement, and other components of the complement system were not required. C1q appeared to operate by improving MAb-mediated inhibition of virus attachment to host cells and was most effective with MAbs that inhibited virus attachment poorly on their own. The heat-resistant factor enhanced VN activity only in the presence of C1q and appeared to operate by enhancing VN activity at a post-attachment stage. PMID:16777168

  7. A Single Amino Acid Deletion in the Matrix Protein of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Confers Resistance to a Polyclonal Swine Antibody with Broadly Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Luca N.; Monday, Nicholas; Calvert, Jay G.; Rowland, Raymond R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of virus neutralization (VN) activity in 176 pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) identified one pig with broadly neutralizing activity. A Tyr-10 deletion in the matrix protein provided escape from broad neutralization without affecting homologous neutralizing activity. The role of the Tyr-10 deletion was confirmed through an infectious clone with a Tyr-10 deletion. The results demonstrate differences in the properties and specificities of VN responses elicited during PRRSV infection. PMID:25855739

  8. Digital image analysis of four-frame holographic plasma and neutral gas interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, G. A.; Allen, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic interferograms characterizing the dynamics of plasma and neutral in the anode-cathode gap of magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITL) are well suited for digital image analysis. The presence of plasma or a neutral gas near the cathode surface produces bending of a pattern of background fringes on the interferogram; the fringes would be straight and uniformly spaced in the absence of such a perturbation. Because the fringes are periodic, a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) can be performed and the phase of the dominant spatial frequency component of the fringe pattern extracted. The fringe phase shift is proportional to the plasma electron or neutral gas density. Futhermore, the location of the plasma-cathode interface can be estimated from the interferogram so that electron density as a function of distance from the cathode surface can be computed. The technical problem is introduced. The image analysis algorithm examined and diagnostic interferogram analysis results presented. The ability to reliably extract and estimate quantitative parameters from interferograms via digital image analysis is emphasized.

  9. Brain Activity in Response to Trauma-specific, Negative, and Neutral Stimuli. A fMRI Study of Recent Road Traffic Accident Survivors.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Andre S; Blix, Ines; Leknes, Siri; Ekeberg, Øivind; Skogstad, Laila; Endestad, Tor; Østberg, Bjørn C; Heir, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of neuro-functional patterns in trauma-exposed individuals have been conducted considerable time after the traumatic event. Hence little is known about neuro-functional processing shortly after trauma-exposure. We investigated brain activity patterns in response to trauma reminders as well as neutral and negative stimuli in individuals who had recently (within 3 weeks) been involved in a road traffic accident (RTA). Twenty-three RTA survivors and 17 non-trauma-exposed healthy controls (HCs) underwent functional MRI while viewing Trauma-specific, Negative, and Neutral pictures. Data were analyzed from four a priori regions of interest, including bilateral amygdala, subcallosal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. In addition, we performed a whole brain analysis and functional connectivity analysis during stimulus presentation. For both groups, Negative stimuli elicited more activity in the amygdala bilaterally than did Neutral and Trauma-specific stimuli. The whole brain analysis revealed higher activation in sensory processing related areas (bilateral occipital and temporal cortices and thalamus) as well as frontal and superior parietal areas, for the RTA group compared to HC, for Trauma-specific stimuli contrasted with Neutral stimuli. We also observed higher functional connectivity for Trauma-specific stimuli, between bilateral amygdala and somatosensory areas, for the RTA group compared to controls, when contrasted with Neutral stimuli. We argue that these results might indicate an attentional sensory processing bias toward Trauma-specific stimuli for trauma exposed individuals, a result in line with findings from the post-traumatic stress disorder literature. PMID:27547195

  10. Brain Activity in Response to Trauma-specific, Negative, and Neutral Stimuli. A fMRI Study of Recent Road Traffic Accident Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Andre S.; Blix, Ines; Leknes, Siri; Ekeberg, Øivind; Skogstad, Laila; Endestad, Tor; Østberg, Bjørn C.; Heir, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of neuro-functional patterns in trauma-exposed individuals have been conducted considerable time after the traumatic event. Hence little is known about neuro-functional processing shortly after trauma-exposure. We investigated brain activity patterns in response to trauma reminders as well as neutral and negative stimuli in individuals who had recently (within 3 weeks) been involved in a road traffic accident (RTA). Twenty-three RTA survivors and 17 non-trauma-exposed healthy controls (HCs) underwent functional MRI while viewing Trauma-specific, Negative, and Neutral pictures. Data were analyzed from four a priori regions of interest, including bilateral amygdala, subcallosal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. In addition, we performed a whole brain analysis and functional connectivity analysis during stimulus presentation. For both groups, Negative stimuli elicited more activity in the amygdala bilaterally than did Neutral and Trauma-specific stimuli. The whole brain analysis revealed higher activation in sensory processing related areas (bilateral occipital and temporal cortices and thalamus) as well as frontal and superior parietal areas, for the RTA group compared to HC, for Trauma-specific stimuli contrasted with Neutral stimuli. We also observed higher functional connectivity for Trauma-specific stimuli, between bilateral amygdala and somatosensory areas, for the RTA group compared to controls, when contrasted with Neutral stimuli. We argue that these results might indicate an attentional sensory processing bias toward Trauma-specific stimuli for trauma exposed individuals, a result in line with findings from the post-traumatic stress disorder literature. PMID:27547195

  11. Urinary neutral endopeptidase 24.11 activity: modulation by chronic salt loading.

    PubMed

    Aviv, R; Gurbanov, K; Hoffman, A; Blumberg, S; Winaver, J

    1995-03-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (NEP) 24.11 is a zinc-metallopeptidase involved in the metabolism of several biologically active peptides including enkephalin, atrial natriuretic peptide, bradykinin, and endothelin. The enzyme is found in abundant amounts in the brush border of renal proximal epithelial cells. A soluble form of NEP was previously identified in human urine with characteristics similar to the renal enzyme. The present study further characterized the excreted form of NEP activity in urine of normal rats using a sensitive two-stage enzymatic assay. The response of urinary NEP to known inhibitors such as phosphoramidon and thiorphan, and its dependence on pH and salt concentration was studied. In addition, we evaluated the effects of acute and chronic changes in salt balance, induced by i.v. saline infusion and drinking of saline solution, on urinary NEP and on the activity of the enzyme in isolated proximal tubules. Our findings demonstrated that abundant NEP activity was detected in the urine of normal rats. Furthermore, chronic salt loading, but not acute salt infusion, was associated with increased activity of NEP in urine and in isolated proximal tubules, suggesting that the enzyme may be regulated by salt balance. Finally, the data suggest that urinary NEP may be used as an index of enzyme activity in the kidney. PMID:7752584

  12. Measurement of the Total Active 8B Solar Neutrino Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with Enhanced Neutral Current Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S. N.; Anthony, A. E.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Biller, S. D.; Boger, J.; Boulay, M. G.; Bowler, M. G.; Bowles, T. J.; Brice, S. J.; Bullard, T. V.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox, G. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Doe, P. J.; Dosanjh, R. S.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duba, C. A.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J. A.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Frame, K.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gagnon, N.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hahn, R. L.; Hall, J. C.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hamer, A. S.; Handler, W. B.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hemingway, R. J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M. A.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N. A.; Klein, J. R.; Kos, M. S.; Krumins, A. V.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A. D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K. K.; Miller, G. G.; Moffat, B. A.; Nally, C. W.; Nickel, B. G.; Noble, A. J.; Norman, E. B.; Oblath, N. S.; Okada, C. E.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Ouellet, C.; Peeters, S. J.; Poon, A. W.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G.; Rollin, E.; Rosendahl, S. S.; Rusu, V. L.; Schwendener, M. H.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sims, C. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W.; Starinsky, N.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tafirout, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tešić, G.; Thomson, M.; Thorman, M.; van Berg, R.; van de Water, R. G.; Virtue, C. J.; Wall, B. L.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C. E.; Tseung, H. Wan; Wark, D. L.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Yeh, M.; Zuber, K.

    2004-05-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has precisely determined the total active (νx) 8B solar neutrino flux without assumptions about the energy dependence of the νe survival probability. The measurements were made with dissolved NaCl in heavy water to enhance the sensitivity and signature for neutral-current interactions. The flux is found to be 5.21±0.27(stat)±0.38(syst)×106 cm-2 s-1, in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of these and other solar and reactor neutrino results yields Δm2=7.1+1.2-0.6×10-5 eV2 and θ=32.5+2.4-2.3 degrees. Maximal mixing is rejected at the equivalent of 5.4 standard deviations.

  13. EFFECT OF ION-NEUTRAL COLLISIONS IN SIMULATIONS OF EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.

    2013-02-10

    We present results of 2.5D numerical simulations of the emergence of sub-surface magnetic flux into the solar atmosphere, with emerging flux regions ranging from 10{sup 18} to 10{sup 21} Mx, representing both ephemeral and active regions. We include the presence of neutral hydrogen in the governing equations, improve upon previous models by including the ionization in the equation of state, and use a more realistic convection zone model. We find that ionization and recombination of plasma during the rise of a convection zone flux tube reduces the rise speed of the tube's axis. The presence of neutral hydrogen allows the effective flow of mass across field lines, by the addition of a Pedersen resistivity to the generalized Ohm's law, which dissipates current perpendicular to the magnetic field. This causes an increase of up to 10% in the amount of magnetic in-plane flux supplied to the corona and a reduction of up to 89% in the amount of sub-surface plasma brought up into the corona. However, it also reduces the amount of free magnetic energy supplied to the corona, and thus does not positively affect the likelihood of creating unstable coronal structures.

  14. Fatty acids and glucose increase neutral endopeptidase activity in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muangman, Pornprom; Spenny, Michelle L; Tamura, Richard N; Gibran, Nicole S

    2003-06-01

    Neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a membrane-bound metallopeptidase enzyme that degrades neuropeptides, bradykinin, atrial natriuretic factor, enkephalins, and endothelin may regulate response to injury. We have previously demonstrated increased NEP localization and enzyme activity in diabetic wounds and skin compared with normal controls. We hypothesized that hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus may induce excessive NEP activity and thereby diminish normal response to injury. Human microvascular endothelial cells were treated with five different fatty acids (40 microM) with varying degrees of saturation, including oleic acid, linoleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, and linolenic acid and/or glucose (40 mM) for 48 h. The effect of the antioxidative agents vitamin E and C on NEP enzyme activation was determined by treating the cultured cells with alpha-tocopherol succinate and/or L-ascorbic acid. Cell membrane preparations were assayed for NEP activity by incubation with glutaryl-Ala-Ala-Phe-4-methoxy-beta naphthylamide to generate a fluorescent degradation product methoxy 2 naphthylamine. High glucose or fatty acid concentration upregulated NEP activity. The highest NEP activity was observed with combined elevated glucose, linoleic acid, and oleic acid (P < 0.05). Antioxidant vitamin E and C treatment significantly reduced NEP enzyme activity after fatty acid exposure (P < 0.05). Thus, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus may increase endothelial cell NEP activity and thereby decrease early pro-inflammatory responses. The modulator effect of vitamin E and C on NEP membrane enzyme activity after exposure to fatty acid stimulation suggests that lipid oxidation may activate NEP. PMID:12785004

  15. Neutral sphingomyelinase activity dependent on Mg2+ and anionic phospholipids in the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, K; Mitamura, T; Fukasawa, M; Magistrado, P A; Horii, T; Nishijima, M

    2000-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism and metabolites are important in various cellular events in eukaryotes. However, little is known about their function in plasmodial parasites. Here we demonstrate that neutral sphingomyelinase (SMase) involved in the sphingomyelin (SM) catabolism is retained by the intraerythrocytic parasite Plasmodium falciparum. When assayed in a neutral pH buffer supplemented with Mg(2+) and phosphatidylserine, an activity for the release of the phosphocholine group from SM was detected in parasite-infected, but not in uninfected, erythrocyte ghosts. The SMase activity in the parasite-infected erythrocyte ghosts was enhanced markedly by anionic phospholipids including unsaturated but not saturated phosphatidylserine. Mn(2+) could not substitute for Mg(2+) to activate SMase in parasite-infected erythrocyte ghosts, whereas both Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) activated mammalian neutral SMase. The specific activity level of SMase was higher in isolated parasites than in infected erythrocyte ghosts; further fractionation of lysates of the isolated parasites showed that the activity was bound largely to the membrane fraction of the parasites. The plasmodial SMase seemed not to hydrolyse phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylinositol. The plasmodial SMase, but not SM synthase, was sensitive to scyphostatin, an inhibitor of mammalian neutral SMase, indicating that the plasmodial activities for SM hydrolysis and SM synthesis are mediated by different catalysts. Our finding that the malaria parasites possess SMase activity might explain why the parasites seem to have an SM synthase activity but no activity to synthesize ceramide de novo. PMID:10698693

  16. Anti-angiogenic poly-L-lysine dendrimer binds heparin and neutralizes its activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Jamal, Khuloud T; Al-Jamal, Wafa T; Kostarelos, Kostas; Turton, John A; Florence, Alexander T

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between heparin, a polyanion, and a polycationic dendrimer with a glycine core and lysine branches Gly-Lys63(NH2)64 has been investigated. Complexation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy, size and zeta potential measurements, methylene blue spectroscopy, and measuring the anti-coagulant activity of heparin in vitro and in vivo. Complete association between the heparin and the dendrimer occurred a 1:1 mass ratio (2:1 molar ratio or +/-charge ratio) with formation of quasi-spherical complexes in the size range of 99-147 nm with a negative zeta potential (-47 mV). Heparin-dendrimer (dendriplex) formation led to a concentration-dependent neutralization of the anticoagulant activity of heparin in human plasma in vitro, with complete loss of activity at a 1:1 mass ratio. The anticoagulant activity of the dendriplexes in Sprague-Dawley rats was also evaluated after subcutaneous administration with uncomplexed heparin as a comparator. The in vivo anticoagulant activity of heparin in plasma, evaluated using an antifactor Xa assay, was abolished after complexation. Measurement of [(3)H]-heparin showed that both free heparin and dendriplexes were present in plasma and in organs. Such data confirmed stably the formation of dendriplexes, which could be essential in developing novel dendrimer-based anti-angiogenic therapeutics suitable in combinatory therapeutics and theranostics. PMID:25755989

  17. Nucleonic analysis of a preliminary design for the ETF neutral-beam-injector duct shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Seed, T.J.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A nucleonic analysis of the Engineering Test Facility Neutral-Beam-Injector duct shielding has been made using a hybrid Monte Carlo/discrete-ordinates method. This method used Monte Carlo to determine internal and external boundary surface sources for a subsequent discrete-ordinates calculation of the neutron and gamma-ray transport through the shield. The analysis also included determination of the energy and angular distribution of neutrons and gamma rays entering the duct from the torus plasma chamber. Confidence in the hybrid method and the results obtained were provided through a comparison with three-dimensional Monte Carlo results.

  18. Monte-Carlo Analysis of the Flavour Changing Neutral Current B \\to Gamma at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.

    2001-09-01

    The main theme of this thesis is a Monte-Carlo analysis of the rare Flavour Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) decay b→sγ. The analysis develops techniques that could be applied to real data, to discriminate between signal and background events in order to make a measurement of the branching ratio of this rare decay using the BaBar detector. Also included in this thesis is a description of the BaBar detector and the work I have undertaken in the development of the electronic data acquisition system for the Electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC), a subsystem of the BaBar detector.

  19. Lethal, oedema, haemorrhagic activity of spotted butterfish (Scatophagus argus, Linn) sting extract and its neutralization by antiserum and pharmacological antagonists.

    PubMed

    Muhuri, D; Dasgupta, S C; Gomes, A

    2005-06-01

    An attempt has been made in this communication to develop antiserum in rabbit against Scatophagus. argus sting extract. Antiserum did not neutralized the sting extract induced proinflammatory and haemorrhagic activity but successfully neutralized lethality upto 2LD50. Cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW 755C pretreatment significantly reduced sting extract induced proinflammatory activity. The haemorrhagic activity of sting extract was significantly inhibited by temperature, UV-exposure, EDTA, cyproheptadine, indomethacin and BW 755C pretreatment. The results conclude that the local effects of S.argus venom is likely to be mediated through release of mediators and may be encountered by pharmacological antagonists better than the antiserum. PMID:15991572

  20. Lipolytic activity of ricin from Ricinus sanguineus and Ricinus communis on neutral lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, S; Helmy, M E; Piéroni, G

    2001-01-01

    The present study was carried out with a view of determining ricin lipolytic activity on neutral lipids in emulsion and in a membrane-like model. Using 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol tributyrate (BAL-TC(4)) as substrate, the lipolytic activity of ricin was found to be proportional to ricin and substrate concentrations, with an apparent K(m) (K(m,app)) of 2.4 mM, a k(cat) of 200 min(-1) and a specific activity of 1.0 unit/mg of protein. This work was extended to p-nitrophenyl (pNP) fatty acid esters containing two to twelve carbon atoms. Maximum lipolytic activity was registered on pNP decanoate (pNPC(10)), with a K(m,app) of 3.5 mM, a k(cat) of 173 min(-1) and a specific activity of 3.5 units/mg of protein. Ricin lipolytic activity is pH and galactose dependent, with a maximum at pH 7.0 in the presence of 0.2 M galactose. Using the monolayer technique with dicaprin as substrate, ricin showed a lipolytic activity proportional to the ricin concentration at 20 mN/m, which is dependent on the surface pressure of the lipid monolayer and is detectable up to 30 mN/m, a surface pressure that is of the same order of magnitude as that of natural cell membranes. The methods based on pNPC(10) and BAL-TC(4) hydrolysis are simple and reproducible; thus they can be used for routine studies of ricin lipolytic activity. Ricin from Ricinus communis and R. sanguineus were treated with diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, an irreversible serine esterase inhibitor, and their lipolytic activities on BAL-TC(4) and pNPC(10), and cytotoxic activity, were concurrently recorded. A reduction in lipolytic activity was accompanied by a decrease in cytotoxicity on Caco2 cells. These data support the idea that the lipolytic activity associated with ricin is relevant to a lipase whose activity is pH and galactose dependent, sensitive to diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, and that a lipolytic step may be involved in the process of cell poisoning by ricin. Both colorimetric tests used in this study are sensitive

  1. development of a neutral mass spectrometer dedicated to the analysis of planetary envelopes (NIMEIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.

    2012-12-01

    LATMOS worked for several years on a newly designed instrument suitable for measuring neutral environments as rarefied exosphere of Mars, Venus, Europa, asteroids or Titan for example. This instrument NIMEIS for Neutral and Ion Mass and Energy Imaging Spectrometer has as main features the ability to measure low densities of neutral but also conduct an analysis of mass and energy in an energy range covering the thermal and suprathermal between ~ 1 eV and 20 eV far unexplored. My thesis is divided into two independent parts. First, we optimize the ionization source, that is an innovative concept, and secondly we design the optics of the instrument based on an electrostatic optimization. The ionization source is based on the use of carbon nanotubes and to extract the electrons and ionize the neutral. Employing this technology we can significantly reduce the power, because previously we were using heated filaments. We develop this technology in close collaboration with a laboratory Ajou University (South Korea) that provides us with carbon nanotubes. I did a simulation study of the mode of extraction of electrons from initial tests, from an assembly developed by our laboratory in South Korea. The instrument has been optimized so that the impact on the detector gives us the one hand the energy of the particle and on the other hand the mass of the particle simultaneously and in continuous time. I developed the optics of the instrument using an electrostatic optical software. A comprehensive numerical model has been defined and a prototype is being manufactured.

  2. Neutral sphingomyelinase 2 is required for cytokine-induced skeletal muscle calpain activation.

    PubMed

    Supinski, Gerald S; Alimov, Alexander P; Wang, Lin; Song, Xiao-Hong; Callahan, Leigh A

    2015-09-15

    Calpain contributes to infection-induced diaphragm dysfunction but the upstream mechanism(s) responsible for calpain activation are poorly understood. It is known, however, that cytokines activate neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) and nSMase has downstream effects with the potential to increase calpain activity. We tested the hypothesis that infection-induced skeletal muscle calpain activation is a consequence of nSMase activation. We administered cytomix (20 ng/ml TNF-α, 50 U/ml IL-1β, 100 U/ml IFN-γ, 10 μg/ml LPS) to C2C12 muscle cells to simulate the effects of infection in vitro and studied mice undergoing cecal ligation puncture (CLP) as an in vivo model of infection. In cell studies, we assessed sphingomyelinase activity, subcellular calcium levels, and calpain activity and determined the effects of inhibiting sphingomyelinase using chemical (GW4869) and genetic (siRNA to nSMase2 and nSMase3) techniques. We assessed diaphragm force and calpain activity and utilized GW4869 to inhibit sphingomyelinase in mice. Cytomix increased cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium levels in C2C12 cells (P < 0.001); addition of GW4869 blocked these increases (P < 0.001). Cytomix also activated calpain, increasing calpain activity (P < 0.02), and the calpain-mediated cleavage of procaspase 12 (P < 0.001). Procaspase 12 cleavage was attenuated by either GW4869 (P < 0.001), BAPTA-AM (P < 0.001), or siRNA to nSMase2 (P < 0.001) but was unaffected by siRNA to nSMase3. GW4869 prevented CLP-induced diaphragm calpain activation and diaphragm weakness in mice. These data suggest that nSMase2 activation is required for the development of infection-induced diaphragm calpain activation and muscle weakness. As a consequence, therapies that inhibit nSMase2 in patients may prevent infection-induced skeletal muscle dysfunction. PMID:26138644

  3. Broadly Neutralizing Activity of Zika Virus-Immune Sera Identifies a Single Viral Serotype.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Kimberly A; DeMaso, Christina R; Pelc, Rebecca S; Speer, Scott D; Smith, Alexander R Y; Goo, Leslie; Platt, Derek J; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Mulligan, Mark J; Diamond, Michael S; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Pierson, Theodore C

    2016-08-01

    Recent epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV) have been associated with congenital malformation during pregnancy and Guillain-Barré syndrome. There are two ZIKV lineages (African and Asian) that share >95% amino acid identity. Little is known regarding the ability of neutralizing antibodies elicited against one lineage to protect against the other. We investigated the breadth of the neutralizing antibody response following ZIKV infection by measuring the sensitivity of six ZIKV strains to neutralization by ZIKV-confirmed convalescent human serum or plasma samples. Contemporary Asian and early African ZIKV strains were similarly sensitive to neutralization regardless of the cellular source of virus. Furthermore, mouse immune serum generated after infection with African or Asian ZIKV strains was capable of neutralizing homologous and heterologous ZIKV strains equivalently. Because our study only defines a single ZIKV serotype, vaccine candidates eliciting robust neutralizing antibody responses should inhibit infection of both ZIKV lineages, including strains circulating in the Americas. PMID:27481466

  4. Neutral sphingomyelinase-3 mediates TNF-stimulated oxidant activity in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Jennifer S.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; McLean, Julie B.; Deevska, Gergana M.; Bonnell, Mark R.; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N.; Reid, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Sphingolipid and oxidant signaling affect glucose uptake, atrophy, and force production of skeletal muscle similarly and both are stimulated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF), suggesting a connection between systems. Sphingolipid signaling is initiated by neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase), a family of agonist-activated effector enzymes. Northern blot analyses suggest that nSMase3 may be a striated muscle-specific nSMase. The present study tested the hypothesis that nSMase3 protein is expressed in skeletal muscle and functions to regulate TNF-stimulated oxidant production. Results We demonstrate constitutive nSMase activity in skeletal muscles of healthy mice and humans and in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. nSMase3 (Smpd4 gene) mRNA is highly expressed in muscle. An nSMase3 protein doublet (88 and 85 kD) is derived from alternative mRNA splicing of exon 11. The proteins partition differently. The full-length 88 kD isoform (nSMase3a) fractionates with membrane proteins that are resistant to detergent extraction; the 85 kD isoform lacking exon 11 (nSMase3b) is more readily extracted and fractionates with detergent soluble membrane proteins; neither variant is detected in the cytosol. By immunofluorescence microscopy, nSMase3 resides in both internal and sarcolemmal membranes. Finally, myotube nSMase activity and cytosolic oxidant activity are stimulated by TNF. Both if these responses are inhibited by nSMase3 knockdown. Innovation These findings identify nSMase3 as an intermediate that links TNF receptor activation, sphingolipid signaling, and skeletal muscle oxidant production. Conclusion Our data show that nSMase3 acts as a signaling nSMase in skeletal muscle that is essential for TNF-stimulated oxidant activity. PMID:25180167

  5. Broadly neutralizing DNA vaccine with specific mutation alters the antigenicity and sugar-binding activities of influenza hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Wei; Liao, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Yaoxing; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Ren, Chien-Tai; Wu, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Ting-Jen Rachel; Ho, David D.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2011-01-01

    The rapid genetic drift of influenza virus hemagglutinin is an obstacle to vaccine efficacy. Previously, we found that the consensus hemagglutinin DNA vaccine (pCHA5) can only elicit moderate neutralization activities toward the H5N1 clade 2.1 and clade 2.3 viruses. Two approaches were thus taken to improve the protection broadness of CHA5. The first one was to include certain surface amino acids that are characteristic of clade 2.3 viruses to improve the protection profiles. When we immunized mice with CHA5 harboring individual mutations, the antibodies elicited by CHA5 containing P157S elicited higher neutralizing activity against the clade 2.3 viruses. Likewise, the viruses pseudotyped with hemagglutinin containing 157S became more susceptible to neutralization. The second approach was to update the consensus sequence with more recent H5N1 strains, generating a second-generation DNA vaccine pCHA5II. We showed that pCHA5II was able to elicit higher cross-neutralization activities against all H5N1 viruses. Comparison of the neutralization profiles of CHA5 and CHA5II, and the animal challenge studies, revealed that CHA5II induced the broadest protection profile. We concluded that CHA5II combined with electroporation delivery is a promising strategy to induce antibodies with broad cross-reactivities against divergent H5N1 influenza viruses. PMID:21321237

  6. Global asymptotic stability analysis for neutral stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weiwei; Chen, Yiming

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the global asymptotic stability is investigated for a class of neutral stochastic neural networks with time-varying delays and norm-bounded uncertainties. Based on Lyapunov stability theory and stochastic analysis approaches, delay-dependent criteria are derived to ensure the global, robust, asymptotic stability of the addressed system in the mean square for all admissible parameter uncertainties. The criteria can be checked easily by the LMI Control Toolbox in Matlab. A numerical example is given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the results.

  7. Optimization, characterization, sulfation and antitumor activity of neutral polysaccharides from the fruit of Borojoa sorbilis cuter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangfang; Liao, Kangsheng; Wu, Yunshan; Pan, Qi; Wu, Lilan; Jiao, Hong; Guo, Dean; Li, Ben; Liu, Bo

    2016-10-20

    Extraction optimization, purification, characterization, sulfation and antitumor activity of polysaccharides from the fruit body of Borojoa sorbilis cuter were investigated in present study. The optimal Ultrahigh Pressure extraction condition was determined as: extraction once with the solid-liquid ratio of 1:10 in 30°C and 1500Mpa for crude polysaccharide (BP) and experimental yield was 8.28%. Four water-soluble polysaccharides named as BP1-1, BP1-2, BP1-3 and BP1-4, with molecular weight of 35.8, 32.4, 30.1 and 27.7kDa, were purified by DEAE Sepharose and Superdex 200 chromatography. On the basis of chemical and spectroscopic analyses, BP1-1-BP1-4 were found to be neutral β-d-galactan containing a (1→4)-linked backbone. S-BP1s with the DSS of 1.18, was sulfated by chloro-sulfonic acid-pyridine method. Furthermore, S-BP1s exhibited significant in vitro antitumor activity against liver cancer HepG2 and lung cancer A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicated that S-BP1s could be potentially developed as functional antitumor drug. PMID:27474578

  8. Performance of thermally activated dolomite for the treatment of Ni and Zn in contaminated neutral drainage.

    PubMed

    Calugaru, Iuliana Laura; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Genty, Thomas; Bussière, Bruno; Potvin, Robin

    2016-06-01

    Intensive research is ongoing for developing low-cost and highly efficient materials in metal removal from contaminated effluents. The present study evaluated dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2], both raw and modified by thermal activation (charring), for Ni and Zn treatment in contaminated neutral drainage (CND). Batch adsorption testing (equilibrium and kinetics) were conducted at pH 6, to evaluate the performance of initial vs. modified dolomite, and to assess potential mechanisms of metal removal. Charring of dolomite led to a rigid and porous material, mainly consisting of CaCO3 and MgO, which showed a sorption capacity increased sevenfold for Zn and doubled for Ni, relative to the raw material. In addition, Freundlich model best described the sorption of the both metals by dolomite, whereas the Langmuir model best described their sorption on charred dolomite. Plausible mechanisms of metal removal include cation exchange, surface precipitation and sorption processes, with carbonate ions and magnesium oxides acting as active centers. Based on these results, charred dolomite seems a promising option for the efficient treatment of Ni and Zn in CND. PMID:26897574

  9. HIV-1 Dual Infected LTNP-EC Patients Developed an Unexpected Antibody Cross-Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pernas, Maria; Sanchez-Merino, Victor; Casado, Concepcion; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Olivares, Isabel; Yuste, Eloisa; Lopez-Galindez, Cecilio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the neutralization breadth in dually infected (DI) HIV-1 long-term non-progressor elite controller patients (LTNP-EC) using a representative minipanel of 6 viruses from 5 different subtypes. Our results showed an improved neutralization breadth in DI LTNP-EC patients when compared with matched LTNP single-infected patients. The role of viral diversity in neutralization was estimated with the Shannon Entropy and the p-distance in viral quasispecies. We found a positive correlation between neutralization breadth and diversity within the viral quasispecies. This correlation could explain why a group of LTNP-EC patients developed a broad neutralizing response despite having undetectable levels of viremia. PMID:26258485

  10. HIV-1 Dual Infected LTNP-EC Patients Developed an Unexpected Antibody Cross-Neutralizing Activity.

    PubMed

    Pernas, Maria; Sanchez-Merino, Victor; Casado, Concepcion; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Olivares, Isabel; Yuste, Eloisa; Lopez-Galindez, Cecilio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the neutralization breadth in dually infected (DI) HIV-1 long-term non-progressor elite controller patients (LTNP-EC) using a representative minipanel of 6 viruses from 5 different subtypes. Our results showed an improved neutralization breadth in DI LTNP-EC patients when compared with matched LTNP single-infected patients. The role of viral diversity in neutralization was estimated with the Shannon Entropy and the p-distance in viral quasispecies. We found a positive correlation between neutralization breadth and diversity within the viral quasispecies. This correlation could explain why a group of LTNP-EC patients developed a broad neutralizing response despite having undetectable levels of viremia. PMID:26258485

  11. Hydrolytic and autolytic behavior of two forms of calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP).

    PubMed

    Inomata, M; Hayashi, M; Nakamura, M; Imahori, K; Kawashima, S

    1985-08-01

    Some endogenous substrates were incubated with two forms of calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP) with high (muCANP) and low (mCANP) sensitivities to calcium ions. In addition to analyses of the processes of their degradation, changes in the molecular properties of these CANPs were also examined. Among the tested substrate proteins, the myosin heavy chain of rabbit skeletal muscle myofibrils and spectrin or band 3 protein of human erythrocyte membranes were degraded relatively rapidly. So far as these proteins were concerned, a higher degradation velocity was observed for muCANP than for mCANP. Vimentin from ascites tumor cells was degraded most rapidly and no difference was observed in degradation velocity between muCANP and mCANP. In all cases, muCANP and mCANP produced different proteolytic peptide fragments, suggesting the different substrate-specificities of these CANPs. The degradation of substrates always accompanied the autodigestion of CANPs, and the small subunits of both CANPs were degraded in the early stage of the autodigestion. The large subunit of muCANP (79K) was converted to a 76K polypeptide via a 77K polypeptide as an intermediate. The autodigested muCANP with 76K polypeptide retained sufficient protease activity and, moreover, its calcium-sensitivity was higher than that of intact muCANP. The possibility is thus proposed that restricted autodigestion is a necessary activation step for the appearance of activity of muCANP. No such transition was observed for mCANP. PMID:2999095

  12. Sialorphin, a natural inhibitor of rat membrane-bound neutral endopeptidase that displays analgesic activity

    PubMed Central

    Rougeot, Catherine; Messaoudi, Michaël; Hermitte, Véronique; Rigault, Anne Gaëlle; Blisnick, Thierry; Dugave, Christophe; Desor, Didier; Rougeon, François

    2003-01-01

    Sialorphin is an exocrine and endocrine signaling mediator, which has been identified by a genomic approach. It is synthesized predominantly in the submandibular gland and prostate of adult rats in response to androgen steroids and is released locally and systemically in response to stress. We now demonstrate that the cell surface molecule to which sialorphin binds in vivo in the rat kidney is the membrane-anchored neutral endopeptidase (neprilysin; NEP, EC 3.4.24.11). NEP plays an important role in nervous and peripheral tissues, as it turns off several peptide-signaling events at the cell surface. We show that sialorphin prevents spinal and renal NEP from breaking down its two physiologically relevant substrates, substance P and Met-enkephalin in vitro. Sialorphin inhibited the breakdown of substance P with an IC50 of 0.4–1 μM and behaved as a competitive inhibitor. In vivo, i.v. sialorphin elicited potent antinociceptive responses in two behavioral rat models of injury-induced acute and tonic pain, the pin-pain test and formalin test. The analgesia induced by 100–200 μg/kg doses of sialorphin required the activation of μ- and δ-opioid receptors, consistent with the involvement of endogenous opioid receptors in enkephalinergic transmission. We conclude that sialorphin protects endogenous enkephalins released after nociceptive stimuli by inhibiting NEP in vivo. Sialorphin is a natural systemically active regulator of NEP activity. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that it is a physiological modulator of pain perception after injury and might be the progenitor of a new class of therapeutic molecules. PMID:12835417

  13. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2015-05-15

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  14. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2015-05-01

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  15. Reduction Impairs the Antibacterial Activity but Benefits the LPS Neutralization Ability of Human Enteric Defensin 5.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhang, Naixin; Wang, Song; Xu, Yang; Chen, Shilei; Chen, Fang; Yang, Ke; He, Ting; Wang, Aiping; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized human defensin 5 (HD5OX), a Paneth cell-secreted antibacterial peptide with three characteristic disulfide bonds, protects the host from invasion by morbigenous microbes in the small intestine. HD5OX can be reduced by thioredoxin (Trx) in vitro, while the biochemical properties of the reduced linear peptide, HD5RED, remain unclear. Here, we first confirm that HD5RED does exist in vivo. Furthermore, we reveal that the recruitment of HD5RED to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and to the anionic lipid A is lower than that of HD5OX, and HD5RED is less efficient in penetrating bacterial outer and inner membranes and inducing membrane depolarization, which confers an attenuated antibacterial activity to HD5RED. However, due to its higher structural flexibility, the binding of HD5RED to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is markedly stronger than that of HD5OX. Consequently, HD5RED is more effective in suppressing the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in LPS-stimulated macrophages by blocking the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein, thus suggesting that HD5RED might act as a scavenger to neutralize LPS in the gut. This study provides insights into the antibacterial and immunoregulatory effects of HD5RED and expands the known repertoire of the enteric defensins. PMID:26960718

  16. Reduction Impairs the Antibacterial Activity but Benefits the LPS Neutralization Ability of Human Enteric Defensin 5

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Shen, Mingqiang; Zhang, Naixin; Wang, Song; Xu, Yang; Chen, Shilei; Chen, Fang; Yang, Ke; He, Ting; Wang, Aiping; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Zhao, Jinghong; Wang, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized human defensin 5 (HD5OX), a Paneth cell-secreted antibacterial peptide with three characteristic disulfide bonds, protects the host from invasion by morbigenous microbes in the small intestine. HD5OX can be reduced by thioredoxin (Trx) in vitro, while the biochemical properties of the reduced linear peptide, HD5RED, remain unclear. Here, we first confirm that HD5RED does exist in vivo. Furthermore, we reveal that the recruitment of HD5RED to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and to the anionic lipid A is lower than that of HD5OX, and HD5RED is less efficient in penetrating bacterial outer and inner membranes and inducing membrane depolarization, which confers an attenuated antibacterial activity to HD5RED. However, due to its higher structural flexibility, the binding of HD5RED to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is markedly stronger than that of HD5OX. Consequently, HD5RED is more effective in suppressing the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in LPS-stimulated macrophages by blocking the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein, thus suggesting that HD5RED might act as a scavenger to neutralize LPS in the gut. This study provides insights into the antibacterial and immunoregulatory effects of HD5RED and expands the known repertoire of the enteric defensins. PMID:26960718

  17. Synthesis, structural characterisation and antibacterial activity of Ag+-doped fluorapatite nanomaterials prepared by neutralization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanić, Vojislav; Radosavljević-Mihajlović, Ana S.; Živković-Radovanović, Vukosava; Nastasijević, Branislav; Marinović-Cincović, Milena; Marković, Jelena P.; Budimir, Milica D.

    2015-05-01

    Silver doped fluorapatite nanopowders were synthesised by neutralization method, which consists of dissolving Ag2O in solution of HF and H3PO4 and addition to suspension of Ca(OH)2. The powder XRD, SEM and FTIR studies indicated the formation of a fluorapatite nanomaterials with average length of the particles is about 80 nm and a width of about 15 nm. The FTIR studies show that carbonate content in samples is very small and carbonte ions substitute both phosphate and hydroxyl groups in the crystal structure of samples, forming AB-type fluorapatite. Antibacterial studies have demonstrated that all Ag+-doped fluorapatite samples exhibit bactericidal effect against pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Kllebsiela pneumoniae. Antibacterial activity increased with the increase of Ag+ in the samples. The atomic force microscopy studies revealed extensive damage to the bacterial cell envelops in the presence of Ag+-doped fluorapatite particles which may lead to their death. The synthesized Ag+-doped fluorapatite nanomaterials are promising as antibacterial biomaterials in orthopedics and dentistry.

  18. Opportunities to exploit non-neutralizing HIV-specific antibody activity

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret E.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies act as a nexus between innate and adaptive immunity: they provide a means to engage a spectrum of innate immune effector cells in order to clear viral particles and infected cells, and prime antigen presentation. This functional landscape is remarkably complex, and depends on antibody isotype, subclass, and glycosylation; the expression levels and patterns of a suite of Fc receptors with both complementary and opposing activities; and a host of innate immune cells capable of differential responses to opsonized particles and present at different sites. In vivo, even neutralizing antibodies rely on their ability to act as molecular beacons and recruit innate immune effector cells in order to provide protection, and results from both human and macaque studies have implicated these effector functions in vaccine-mediated protection. Thus, while enhancing effector function is a tractable handle for potentiating antibody-mediated protection from HIV infection, success will depend critically on leveraging understanding of the means by which antibodies with specific functional profiles could be elicited, which effector functions could provide optimal protection, and perhaps most critically, how to efficiently recruit the innate effector cells present at sites of infection. PMID:24191934

  19. Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and functioning: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity.Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures of intraspecific variation (phenotypically adaptive vs. neutral) and have considered different measures of ecological structure in different ecological and spatial contexts. The aim of this study is to strengthen conceptual understanding by providing an empirical synthesis quantifying the relationship between genetic diversity and ecological structure.Here, I present a meta-analysis of the relationship between genetic diversity within plant populations and the structure and functioning of associated ecological communities (including 423 effect sizes from 70 studies). I used Bayesian meta-analyses to examine (i) the strength and direction of this relationship, (ii) the extent to which phenotypically adaptive and neutral (molecular) measures of diversity differ in their association with ecological structure and (iii) variation in outcomes among different measures of ecological structure and in different ecological contexts.Effect sizes measuring the relationship between adaptive diversity (genotypic richness) and both community- and ecosystem-level ecological responses were small, but significantly positive. These associations were supported by genetic effects on species richness and productivity, respectively.There was no overall association between neutral genetic diversity and measures of ecological structure, but a positive correlation was observed under a limited set of demographic conditions. These

  20. Insertion of an electron beam ionizer in a quadrupole spectrometer for secondary neutral mass analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameziane, O.; Blanco, J. M.; Serrano, J. J.; Guzmán, B.; Aguilar, M.

    2003-06-01

    An insertable electron beam ionizer into a quadrupole-based secondary ion mass spectrometer instrument has been designed and installed to analyze sputtered neutrals. The optimum design conditions of the ionizer have been obtained by modeling various configurations of the system using a simulation program developed by us. The program has allowed us to compute the potentials and ion trajectories inside the system to test the performance of the ion optics design. We have investigated the advantages of using a large ionization volume with low electron current to minimize the space charge effect in the ionizer, as this is the major problem in this type of instrument. In addition, we have used the simulations to obtain all electrodes voltages which provide an efficient suppression of residual gas and secondary ions. A good useful yield was obtained, even with low electron densities, thanks to the high geometrical acceptance of the ionizer and its large active volume. This configuration implies less thermal radiation in the ionizer and, in addition, a longer life time of the filament. Although the signal of residual gas not suppressed (i.e. in residual gas mode) is two orders of magnitude higher than the signal of sputtered neutrals, we have achieved a good background suppression.

  1. Non-Cationic Proteins Are Associated with HIV Neutralizing Activity in Genital Secretions of Female Sex Workers

    PubMed Central

    Birse, Kenzie D. M.; Cole, Amy L.; Hirbod, Taha; McKinnon, Lyle; Ball, Terry B.; Westmacott, Garrett R.; Kimani, Joshua; Plummer, Frank; Cole, Alexander M.; Burgener, Adam; Broliden, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cationic proteins found in cervicovaginal secretions (CVS) are known to contribute to the early antiviral immune response against HIV-infection in vitro. We here aimed to define additional antiviral factors that are over-expressed in CVS from female sex workers at high risk of infection. Methods CVS were collected from Kenyan HIV-seronegative (n = 34) and HIV-seropositive (n = 12) female sex workers, and were compared with those from HIV-seronegative low-risk women (n = 12). The highly exposed seronegative (HESN) sex workers were further divided into those with less (n = 22) or more (n = 12) than three years of documented sex work. Cationic protein-depleted CVS were assessed for HIV-neutralizing activity by a PBMC-based HIV-neutralizing assay, and then characterized by proteomics. Results HIV neutralizing activity was detected in all unprocessed CVS, however only CVS from the female sex worker groups maintained its HIV neutralizing activity after cationic protein-depletion. Differentially abundant proteins were identified in the cationic protein-depleted secretions including 26, 42, and 11 in the HESN>3yr, HESN<3yr, and HIV-positive groups, respectively. Gene ontology placed these proteins into functional categories including proteolysis, oxidation-reduction, and epidermal development. The proteins identified in this study include proteins previously associated with the HESN phenotype in other cohorts as well as novel proteins not yet associated with anti-HIV activities. Conclusion While cationic proteins appear to contribute to the majority of the intrinsic HIV neutralizing activity in the CVS of low-risk women, a broader range of non-cationic proteins were associated with HIV neutralizing activity in HESN and HIV-positive female sex workers. These results indicate that novel protein factors found in CVS of women with high-risk sexual practices may have inherent antiviral activity, or are involved in other aspects of anti-HIV host defense, and warrant

  2. A resonance photoionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry instrument for submicron microarea analysis of ULSI devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shichi, H.; Osabe, S.; Sugaya, M.; Ino, T.; Kakibayashi, H.; Kanehori, K.; Mitsui, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The lateral profile of boron in an actual microdevice was obtained by 3D analysis—using the newly developed resonance photoionization sputtered neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) instrument—with a detection limit of 10 18 atoms/cm 3. The primary ion beam optical system of the instrument uses a Ga liquid metal ion source. The Ga beam diameter was about 30 nm and the ion beam current was about 60 pA. The analysis time to get the profile was about 40 min. Boron was excited by using one ultraviolet photon (249.7 nm) and by one visible photon (563 nm), and then it was ionized by an infrared photon (1064 nm): the so-called three-color resonance ionization. Lateral diffusion profile of boron in the device after chemical vapor deposition (CVD) including heating the wafer was also obtained. These results mean that this SNMS instrument will enable us to easily determine semiconductor processing conditions.

  3. Structural characterization of a novel neutral polysaccharide from Lentinus giganteus and its antitumor activity through inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuting; Zhao, Yingting; Zeng, Hongliang; Zhang, Yaling; Zheng, Baodong

    2016-12-10

    A novel neutral polysaccharide (LGPS-1), with a molecular weight of 1.547×10(5)Da, was isolated from Lentinus giganteus by precipitation and purification. The monosaccharides included d-mannose (Man), d-glucose (Glc) and d-galactose (Gal) with a molar ratio of 3.0:4.1:7.1. The backbone of LGPS-1 was composed of 1,6-Galp and 1,3,6-Manp whereas the branches were composed of 1,6-Glcp and 1-Glcp. The anticancer efficacy of LGPS-1 was assessed using HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The results showed that LGPS-1 inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells and also induced the activation of caspase-3, and cleavage of PARP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that LGSP-1 significantly induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δym), increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, promoted the release of cytochrome c into cytoplasm as well as inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt in HepG2 cells. These findings suggest that LGPS-1 induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells through intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. PMID:27577914

  4. NON-NEUTRALIZED ELECTRIC CURRENT PATTERNS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: ORIGIN OF THE SHEAR-GENERATING LORENTZ FORCE

    SciTech Connect

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Mikic, Zoran

    2012-12-10

    Using solar vector magnetograms of the highest available spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, we perform a detailed study of electric current patterns in two solar active regions (ARs): a flaring/eruptive and a flare-quiet one. We aim to determine whether ARs inject non-neutralized (net) electric currents in the solar atmosphere, responding to a debate initiated nearly two decades ago that remains inconclusive. We find that well-formed, intense magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) within ARs are the only photospheric magnetic structures that support significant net current. More intense PILs seem to imply stronger non-neutralized current patterns per polarity. This finding revises previous works that claim frequent injections of intense non-neutralized currents by most ARs appearing in the solar disk but also works that altogether rule out injection of non-neutralized currents. In agreement with previous studies, we also find that magnetically isolated ARs remain globally current-balanced. In addition, we confirm and quantify the preference of a given magnetic polarity to follow a given sense of electric currents, indicating a dominant sense of twist in ARs. This coherence effect is more pronounced in more compact ARs with stronger PILs and must be of sub-photospheric origin. Our results yield a natural explanation of the Lorentz force, invariably generating velocity and magnetic shear along strong PILs, thus setting a physical context for the observed pre-eruption evolution in solar ARs.

  5. Electric fields measured by ISEE-1 within and near the neutral sheet during quiet and active times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C. A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of the physical processes occurring in the magnetotail and plasmasheet during different interplanetary magnetic field orientations and differing levels of ground magnetic activity is crucial for the development of a theory of energy transfer from the solar wind to the particles which produce auroral arcs. In the present investigation, the first observations of electric fields during neutral sheet crossings are presented, taking into account the statistical correlations of the interplanetary magnetic field direction and ground activity with the character of the electric field. The electric field data used in the study were obtained from a double probe experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite. The observations suggest that turbulent electric and magnetic fields are intimately related to plasma acceleration in the neutral sheet and to the processes which create auroral particles.

  6. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  7. Efficient small sample analysis via laser post-ionized neutrals desorbed from surfaces: LPI-SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I.; Calaway, W.; Pellin, M.; Moore, J.; Burnett, D.

    2003-04-01

    A number of popular analytical techniques rely on ion sputtering or laser desorption to probe solid samples. The popularity of this class of techniques is derived from the fact that they produce information on elemental and molecular compositions at trace levels. These techniques are particularly amenable to small sample analysis, since both ion and photon beams can be focused to sub-micron dimensions. Because ion sputtering and laser desorption consume material, there exists a trade off between sample size and achievable detection limit. This trade off is quantified by an instruments useful yield, which is defined as the number of atoms detected per atoms consumed. Laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (LPI-SNMS) has useful yields significantly higher than competing techniques and is thus well suited for trace analysis of small samples. With LPI-SNMS, either a pulse of energetic ions or photons remove material from a solid surface into the gas phase. The desorbed material, predominantly ground state neutral atoms, is photo-ionized by one or more lasers and then extracted into a mass spectrometer for detection. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed a new reflectron time-of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer especially designed to optimize useful yield in LPI-SNMS measurements. Using ion optics simulations, an improved extraction design has been developed that allows photo ions from a large (4 × 4 × 3 mm^3) volume above a sample surface to be transmitted through a TOF mass spectrometer with > 98% efficiency. Efficient extraction from such a large ionization volume means that more than 40% of all desorbed species are available for detection, producing an overall useful yield of > 30%. Such a high sensitivity allows analysis of small samples at trace levels never before achievable, opening many new applications. For example, the new LPI-SNMS instrument will allow (1) part-per-trillion detections of solar wind elements implanted in the top

  8. Role of IgG(T) and IgGa isotypes obtained from arachnidic antivenom to neutralize toxic activities of Loxosceles gaucho, Phoneutria nigriventer and Tityus serrulatus venoms.

    PubMed

    Toro, Ana Flávia; Malta, Marília Brinati; Soares, Sabrina Lucio; Da Rocha, Guilherme Casoni; da Silva Lira, Marcela; De Oliveira, Thais Abbate; Takehara, Harumi Ando; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica; Santoro, Marcelo Larami; Guidolin, Rosalvo; Gondo Higashi, Hisako; Fernandes, Irene; Barbaro, Katia Cristina

    2006-11-01

    The ability of IgG(T) and IgGa subclasses--isolated by liquid chromatography from equine arachnidic antivenom (AAV)-to neutralize toxic activities of Loxosceles gaucho, Phoneutria nigriventer and Tityus serrulatus venoms as well as to remove venom toxins from circulation was investigated. These subclasses showed similar antibody titers against L. gaucho, P. nigriventer and T. serrulatus venoms, and by immunoblotting few differences were observed in the recognition pattern of venom antigens. IgG(T) and IgGa neutralized 100% lethality induced by L. gaucho and 50% of P. nigriventer venom, but IgGa failed to neutralize T. serrulatus venom, in contrast to IgG(T). Both subclasses neutralized local reactions and dermonecrosis induced by L. gaucho venom in rabbits. In mice, IgG(T) and IgGa partially neutralized the edematogenic activity induced by P. nigriventer and T. serrulatus venoms, but only IgG(T) neutralized (ca. 81%) the nociceptive activity induced by T. serrulatus venom. Both subclasses failed to neutralize nociceptive activity induced by P. nigriventer venom. IgG(T) reduced the serum venom levels of animals injected with L. gaucho, P. nigriventer or T. serrulatus venoms, while IgGa solely reduced L. gaucho and P. nigriventer venoms levels. Our results demostrate that IgG(T) and IgGa subclasses neutralize toxic activities induced by P. nigriventer, T. serrulatus and L. gaucho venoms with different efficacies, as well as depurate these venoms from circulation. PMID:16979205

  9. Towards energy neutrality by optimising the activated sludge process of the WWTP Bochum-Ölbachtal.

    PubMed

    Marner, S T; Schröter, D; Jardin, N

    2016-01-01

    As a result of Ruhrverband's regularly performed energy audits the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) Bochum-Ölbachtal shows substantial deficits concerning energy efficiency. Due to the energy consumption of internal recirculation, mixers and return activated sludge (RAS) pumping the existing pre-denitrification process configuration offers a specific energy consumption for biological treatment of 23 kWh (PE · a)(-1). In order to optimise the energy situation and to improve the treatment efficiency, the process layout was changed completely to a three-stage step-feed process. By optimising the hydraulic conditions, it was possible to reconstruct the plant with a free flow throughout the whole biological treatment system without any additional pumping. The total investment costs for this process scheme were 3.9 million €. These costs could be partly offset against the wastewater charge paid (2.9 million €). Compared to the overall energy consumption before the process modification, today the energy consumption for biological treatment amounts to 12.4 kWh (PE · a)(-1). The highest saving potential has been achieved by optimising mixing and reducing the energy demand for internal recirculation and RAS pumping. In the case of the WWTP Bochum-Ölbachtal, the modification of the treatment process not only results in an improved energy situation but also increased the treatment efficiency in such a way that the nitrogen concentration in the effluent could be constantly kept below 5 mg L(-1) N(tot), which provides the basis for being exempted from the wastewater discharge for nitrogen. As a result of all these measures, the rate of self-sufficiency by using biogas from the digester in combined heat and power units has been increased substantially from 60% before process modifications to 97%. With the upcoming optimisation measures, a further increase of self-sufficiency is expected to finally achieve energy neutrality based on yearly averages. The example of the

  10. Localized activation of the distant tail neutral line just prior to substorm onsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masakazu; Pinnock, Michael; Rodger, Alan S.; Sato, Natsuo; Yamagishi, Hisao; Sessai Yukimatu, A.; Greenwald, Raymond A.; Villain, Jean-Paul; Hairston, Marc R.

    1998-08-01

    We have found flow burst features in the nightside ionosphere that are thought to be the ionospheric signature of distant tail reconnection. These are observed to form just prior to substorm onsets. Simultaneous observations by the Goose Bay-Stokkseyri dual HF radars and DMSP satellites provide the data. Our conclusions are based on equatorward flow bursts on the nightside during two isolated substorms that followed a long period of magnetospheric inactivity associated with a northward interplanetary magnetic field. Both flow bursts start ~60 min after the growth phase onset and last ~10-20 min until the expansion phase onset, migrating equatorward with time. Simultaneous DMSP observations of precipitating particles show that the flow burst occurs at the polar cap boundary, suggesting that the equatorward migration corresponds to the expansion of the polar cap during the growth phase. For one event, the reconnection electric field at 400 km altitude was 14 mV/m and its longitudinal scale was 290 km, which is equivalent to a reconnection voltage of 4.1 kV. For the other event, these values were 11 mV/m (reconnection electric field), 380 km (longitudinal scale), and 4.0 kV (reconnection voltage). In addition to the reconnection signatures, we discuss implications for substorm dynamics during the final stage of the substorm growth phase. The morphology indicates that the distant tail neutral line is activated ~1 hour after the growth phase onset and at the same time the nightside separatrix starts to move equatorward much faster than during the preceding early and middle growth phases. The 1-hour time lag would correspond to the timescale on which slow rarefaction waves from both northern and southern tail lobes converge in the equatorial magnetotail. The fast-moving separatrix on the nightside implies a rapid change of magnetotail configuration resulting from nonlinear enhancement and/or earthward movement of the cross-tail current for the last 10-20 min prior to the

  11. Between detection and neutralization.

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  12. Effect of Epilobium angustifolium L. extracts and polyphenols on cell proliferation and neutral endopeptidase activity in selected cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kiss, A; Kowalski, J; Melzig, M F

    2006-01-01

    The ability of Epilobium extracts and polyphenols to induce neutral endopeptidase (NEP) activity and to inhibit the proliferation in cell lines with high NEP expression (SK-N-SH) and with low NEP expression (PC-3) was investigated. Epilobium extracts enhanced in a dose-depend manner NEP activity in both cell lines with additional inhibition of cell proliferation. The sensitivity of cells depended on basal enzyme activity. SK-N-SK cells were much more sensitive than PC-3 cells. Oenothein B enhanced NEP activity at a concentration of 5-40 microM while quercetin-3-glucuronide and quercetin-3-O-(6"-gal-loyl) galactoside showed slight or no activity at a concentration of 100 microM. The comparison of activities of the extracts with oenothein B, a dimeric macrocyclic ellagitannin, suggests that the latter is mostly responsible for the observed effects. Taking into account the role of NEP in the homeostasis of signalling peptides, Epilobium angustifolium extracts may be a potential herbal remedy in diseases connected with the disturbed metabolism of signaling peptides caused by an unbalanced neutral endopeptidase activity. PMID:16454210

  13. Analysis of Solar Wind Samples Returned by Genesis Using Laser Post Ionization Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I. V.; Calaway, W. F.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    A new secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) instrument implementing laser post ionization (LPI) of ion sputtered and laser desorbed neutral species has been developed and constructed for the specific purpose of quantitative analysis of metallic elements at ultra trace levels in solar wind collector samples returned to Earth by the Genesis Discovery mission. The first LPI SNMS measurements are focusing on determining Al, Ca, Cr, and Mg in these samples. These measurements provide the first concentration and isotopic abundances determinations for several key metallic elements and also elucidate possible fractionation effects between the photosphere and the solar wind compositions. It is now documented that Genesis samples suffered surface contamination both during flight and during the breach of the Sample Return Capsule when it crashed. Since accurate quantitative analysis is compromised by sample contamination, several features have been built into the new LPI SNMS instrument to mitigate this difficulty. A normally-incident, low-energy (<500 eV) ion beam combined with a keV energy ion beam and a desorbing laser beam (both microfocused) enables dual beam analyses. The low-energy ion beam can be used to remove surface contaminant by sputtering with minimum ion beam mixing. This low-energy beam also will be used to perform ion beam milling, while either the microfocused ion or laser beam probes the solar wind elemental compositions as a function of sample depth. Because of the high depth resolution of dual beam analyses, such depth profiles clearly distinguish between surface contaminants and solar wind implanted atoms. In addition, in-situ optical and electron beam imaging for observing and avoiding particulates and scratches on solar wind sample surfaces is incorporated in the new LPI SNMS instrument to further reduce quantification problems. The current status of instrument tests and analyses will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of

  14. The design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, J. A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R. P.

    1981-10-01

    To test neutral beam sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam on times, actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles are required. The dumps should be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/sq cm anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on two different panel designs. The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  15. Neutralizer optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Mohajeri, Kayhan

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a test program to optimize a neutralizer design for 30 cm xenon ion thrusters are discussed. The impact of neutralizer geometry, neutralizer axial location, and local magnetic fields on neutralizer performance is discussed. The effect of neutralizer performance on overall thruster performance is quantified, for thruster operation in the 0.5-3.2 kW power range. Additionally, these data are compared to data published for other north-south stationkeeping (NSSK) and primary propulsion xenon ion thruster neutralizers.

  16. Protective antiviral antibodies that lack neutralizing activity: precedents and evolution of concepts.

    PubMed

    Schmaljohn, Alan L

    2013-07-01

    Antibody-mediated resistance to viral disease is often attributed solely to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) despite a body of evidence -- more than 30 years in the making -- to show that other populations of antibodies (protective non-neutralizing antibodies, PnNAbs) can also contribute and are sometimes pivotal in host resistance to viruses. Recently, interest in varieties of PnNAbs has been restored and elevated by an HIV vaccine trial in which virus-specific nNAbs have been highlighted as a positive correlate of immunity. Here, I briefly review some of the historical precedents with many viruses other than HIV, along with the emergence of data over the course of some four decades, pointing emphatically to the importance of subsets of antiviral antibodies that operate by mechanisms other than classical virus neutralization. Foremost among suspected mechanisms of protection by PnNAbs is antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicty (ADCC), but additional mechanisms have sometimes been incriminated or not experimentally excluded. Examples are given for the diversity of proteins and cognate epitopes bound by PnNAbs. Some such epitopes are restricted to virus-infected cell surfaces or found on secreted proteins; others may be associated with virions but unavailable to antibodies during much of the viral cycle; these are epitopes variously described as cryptic, transitional, dynamic, or reversibly masked. PMID:24191933

  17. Mass Spectrometric Collisional Activation and Product Ion Mobility of Human Serum Neutral Lipid Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Hankin, Joseph A.; Barkley, Robert M.; Zemski-Berry, Karin; Deng, Yiming; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for lipid analysis called CTS (collisional activation and traveling wave mass spectrometry) involving tandem mass spectrometry of all precursor ions with ion mobility determinations of all product ions was applied to a sample of human serum. The resulting four dimensional data set (precursor ion, product ion, ion mobility values, and intensity) was found to be useful for characterization of lipids as classes as well as identification of specific species. Utilization of ion mobility measurements of the product ions is a novel approach for lipid analysis. The trends and patterns of product mobility values when visually displayed yield information on lipid classes and specific species independent of mass determination. The collection of a comprehensive set of data that incorporates all precursor-product relationships combined with ion mobility measurements of all products enables data analysis where different molecular properties can be juxtaposed and analyzed to assist with class and species identification. Overall, CTS is powerful, specific, and comprehensive method for lipid analysis. PMID:27213895

  18. Chondrocytes, synoviocytes and dermal fibroblasts all express PH-20, a hyaluronidase active at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    El Hajjaji, Hafida; Cole, Ada Asbury; Manicourt, Daniel-Henri

    2005-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), an important component of connective tissues, is highly metabolically active, but the mechanisms involved in its catabolism are still largely unknown. We hypothesized that a protein similar to sperm PH-20, the only mammalian hyaluronidase known to be active at neutral pH, could be expressed in connective tissue cells. An mRNA transcript similar to that of PH-20 was found in chondrocytes, synoviocytes, and dermal fibroblasts, and its levels were enhanced upon stimulation with IL-1. In cell layers extracted with Triton X-100 – but not with octylglucoside – and in culture media, a polyclonal antipeptide anti-PH-20 antibody identified protein bands with a molecular weight similar to that of sperm PH-20 (60 to 65 kDa) and exhibiting a hyaluronidase activity at neutral pH. Further, upon stimulation with IL-1, the amounts of the neutral-active hyaluronidase increased in both cell layers and culture media. These findings contribute potential important new insights into the biology of connective tissues. It is likely that PH-20 facilitates cell-receptor-mediated uptake of HA, while overexpression or uncontrolled expression of the enzyme can cause great havoc to connective tissues: not only does HA fragmentation compromise the structural integrity of tissues, but also the HA fragments generated are highly angiogenic and are potent inducers of proinflammatory cytokines. On the other hand, the enzyme activity may account for the progressive depletion of HA seen in osteoarthritis cartilage, a depletion that is believed to play an important role in the apparent irreversibility of this disease process. PMID:15987477

  19. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics. PMID:27083372

  20. Immunologic analysis of anaphylaxis to protamine component in neutral protamine Hagedorn human insulin.

    PubMed

    Dykewicz, M S; Kim, H W; Orfan, N; Yoo, T J; Lieberman, P

    1994-01-01

    We report the clinical and immunologic analysis of two patients with diabetes who had anaphylaxis to neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) human insulin in the absence of allergy to regular insulin. A 36-year-old woman without a recent history of local insulin reactions or interruption of insulin therapy experienced anaphylaxis within 15 minutes of her usual morning dose of subcutaneously administered NPH human insulin. A 62-year-old man with a history of generalized reactions to NPH human insulin and of anaphylaxis to intravenously administered protamine had generalized urticaria after injection of NPH human insulin. Both patients subsequently tolerated Lente human insulin. Skin test results in both patients were negative to regular and Lente insulin preparations but positive to NPH insulin and to protamine at concentrations tested. In vitro assays demonstrated that both patients had markedly elevated serum levels of IgE and IgG to protamine, but not to regular human insulin, and that their IgE antibodies to protamine recognized protamine antigenic determinants in NPH human insulin. We conclude that the anaphylactic reactions to NPH insulin in our patients were mediated by IgE to protamine, which should be a pathogenetic consideration in the evaluation of immediate-type reactions to protamine-containing insulins. PMID:8308177

  1. Application of subtracted gDNA microarray-assisted Bulked Segregant Analysis for rapid discovery of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa).

    PubMed

    Gor, Mian Chee; Mantri, Nitin; Pang, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    A Fragaria Discovery Panel (FDP; strawberry-specific SDA) containing 287 features was constructed by subtracting the pooled gDNA of nine non-angiosperm species from the pooled gDNA of five strawberry genotypes. This FDP was used for Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA) to enable identification of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality. Analysis of hybridisation patterns of a short day (SD) DNA bulk and three day-neutral (DN) DNA bulks varying in flowering strength allowed identification of a novel feature, FaP2E11, closely linked to CYTOKININ OXIDASE 1 (CKX1) gene possibly involved in promoting flowering under non-inductive condition. The signal intensities of FaP2E11 feature obtained from the strong DN bulk (DN1) is three fold higher than the short day bulk (SD), indicating that the putative marker may linked to a CKX1 variant allele with lower enzyme activity. We propose a model for flowering regulation based on the hypothesis that flowering strength may be regulated by the copy number of FaP2E11-linked CKX1 alleles. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the SDA-based BSA approach for the identification of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality in strawberry. This innovative strategy is an efficient and cost-effective approach for molecular marker discovery. PMID:27586242

  2. Application of subtracted gDNA microarray-assisted Bulked Segregant Analysis for rapid discovery of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa)

    PubMed Central

    Gor, Mian Chee; Mantri, Nitin; Pang, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    A Fragaria Discovery Panel (FDP; strawberry-specific SDA) containing 287 features was constructed by subtracting the pooled gDNA of nine non-angiosperm species from the pooled gDNA of five strawberry genotypes. This FDP was used for Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA) to enable identification of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality. Analysis of hybridisation patterns of a short day (SD) DNA bulk and three day-neutral (DN) DNA bulks varying in flowering strength allowed identification of a novel feature, FaP2E11, closely linked to CYTOKININ OXIDASE 1 (CKX1) gene possibly involved in promoting flowering under non-inductive condition. The signal intensities of FaP2E11 feature obtained from the strong DN bulk (DN1) is three fold higher than the short day bulk (SD), indicating that the putative marker may linked to a CKX1 variant allele with lower enzyme activity. We propose a model for flowering regulation based on the hypothesis that flowering strength may be regulated by the copy number of FaP2E11-linked CKX1 alleles. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the SDA-based BSA approach for the identification of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality in strawberry. This innovative strategy is an efficient and cost-effective approach for molecular marker discovery. PMID:27586242

  3. Ion temperature by charge exchange neutral analysis from vertical sightlines on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, C.L.; Medley, S.S.; Hammett, G.W.; Kaita, R.; Scott, S.D.

    1987-12-01

    The Fokker-Planck code FPPRF is used to calculate the expected deuterium charge exchange flux along vertical sighlines from TFTR neutral-beam-injected discharges. The feasibility of obtaining central ion temperature measurements by fitting the spectra obtained from these sightlines at two energy regions--above the highest neutral beam injection energy (> 100 keV) and from 20-80 keV--is investigated. It is demonstrated that the central ion temperature can be obtained from the central vertical slightline for fitting the high energy data. The deuterium neutral particle flux energy distribution below the neutral beam injection energy is insentive to the code input ion temperature, however. 6 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Stray neutral current problems and analysis associated with multiple ATS generator installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Samuel Douglas

    In generator installations where there is more than one 3-pole automatic-transfer-switch (ATS) on a 4-wire system, stray neutral currents and unwanted magnetic fields may arise. These stray currents and fields can cause a multitude of problems. Magnetic fields created by stray neutral currents can cause objectionable current on the conduit system. Objectionable current of this type can cause voltage rises on the grounding system. Geometries of stray neutral current paths can cause magnetic fields through areas of buildings that may cause problems with sensitive electronic equipment. Ground fault protection devices may detect incorrect ground fault condition. The presence of stray ground currents in multi-ATS installations is dependent on equipment selection and bonding connection points, whereas the magnitude of these currents depend on the system geometry, raceway size/types, and other factors. This paper looks at several stray neutral configurations tested in the Vanderbilt Power Laboratory.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of higher amino acid Schiff bases, as monosodium salts and neutral forms. Investigation of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding in all Schiff bases, antibacterial and antifungal activities of neutral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan

    2014-09-01

    Schiff bases derived from 5-nitro-salicylaldehyde and 4-aminobutyric acid, 5-aminopentanoic acid and 6-aminohexanoic acid were synthesized both as monosodium salts (1a-3a) and neutral forms (1b-3b). The monosodium-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The neutral-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, 2D NMR (HMQC), mass, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The intramolecular hydrogen bonding and related tautomeric equilibria in all the Schiff bases were studied by UV-vis and 1H NMR spectra in solution. Additionally, the neutral-Schiff bases were screened against Staphylococcus aureus-EB18, S. aureus-ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli-ATCC 11230, Candida albicans-M3 and C. albicans-ATCC 16231.

  6. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L.; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J.; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J.; Kamali, Anatoli; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Parks, Christopher L.

    2015-08-15

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Screened 146 serum samples for measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb). • MV nAb is prevalent in the sera. • CDV neutralizing activity is generally low or absent and when detected it is present in sera with high MV nAb titers. • A neutralization-resistant CDV mutant was isolated using human serum selection. • A mutation was identified in the receptor-binding region of CDV hemagglutinin protein that confers the neutralization resistance.

  7. Design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility will test Neutral Beam Sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam-on times. For this application actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles will be required. The dumps will be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/ anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on a prototype panel. The prototype tests were performed on two different panel designs, one manufactured by Mc Donnell Douglas (MDAC) the other by United Technologies (UT). The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  8. Isolation of a human-like antibody fragment (scFv) that neutralizes ricin biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Pelat, Thibaut; Hust, Michael; Hale, Martha; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Dübel, Stefan; Thullier, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background Ricin is a lethal toxin that inhibits protein synthesis. It is easily extracted from a ubiquitously grown plant, Ricinus communis, and thus readily available for use as a bioweapon (BW). Anti-ricin antibodies provide the only known therapeutic against ricin intoxication. Results In this study, after immunizing a non-human primate (Macaca fascicularis) with the ricin chain A (RTA), a phage-displayed immune library was built (2 × 108 clones), that included the λ light chain fragment. The library was screened against ricin, and specific binders were sequenced and further analyzed. The best clone, 43RCA, was isolated using a new, stringent neutralization test. 43RCA had a high, picomolar affinity (41 pM) and neutralized ricin efficiently (IC50 = 23 ± 3 ng/ml, corresponding to a [scFv]/[ricin] molar ratio of 4). The neutralization capacity of 43RCA compared favourably with that of polyclonal anti-deglycosylated A chain (anti-dgRCA) IgGs, obtained from hyperimmune mouse serum, which were more efficient than any monoclonal at our disposal. The 43RCA sequence is very similar to that for human IgG germline genes, with 162 of 180 identical amino acids for the VH and VL (90% sequence identity). Conclusion Results of the characterization studies, and the high degree of identity with human germline genes, altogether make this anti-ricin scFv, or an IgG derived from it, a likely candidate for use in humans to minimize effects caused by ricin intoxication. PMID:19563687

  9. TRIM21 Immune Signaling Is More Sensitive to Antibody Affinity Than Its Neutralization Activity.

    PubMed

    Foss, Stian; Watkinson, Ruth E; Grevys, Algirdas; McAdam, Martin B; Bern, Malin; Høydahl, Lene Stokken; Dalhus, Bjørn; Michaelsen, Terje E; Sandlie, Inger; James, Leo C; Andersen, Jan Terje

    2016-04-15

    Ab-coated viruses can be detected in the cytosol by the FcR tripartite motif-containing 21 (TRIM21), which rapidly recruits the proteasomal machinery and triggers induction of immune signaling. As such, TRIM21 plays a key role in intracellular protection by targeting invading viruses for destruction and alerting the immune system. A hallmark of immunity is elicitation of a balanced response that is proportionate to the threat, to avoid unnecessary inflammation. In this article, we show how Ab affinity modulates TRIM21 immune function. We constructed a humanized monoclonal IgG1 against human adenovirus type 5 (AdV5) and a panel of Fc-engineered variants with a wide range of affinities for TRIM21. We found that IgG1-coated viral particles were neutralized via TRIM21, even when affinity was reduced by as much as 100-fold. In contrast, induction of NF-κB signaling was more sensitive to reduced affinity between TRIM21 and the Ab variants. Thus, TRIM21 mediates neutralization under suboptimal conditions, whereas induction of immune signaling is balanced according to the functional affinity for the incoming immune stimuli. Our findings have implications for engineering of antiviral IgG therapeutics with tailored effector functions. PMID:26962230

  10. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liqing; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Kaiyun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Hu, Liqun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Li, Erzhong; Lin, Shiyao; Shi, Tonghui; Duan, Yanmin; Zhu, Yubao

    2015-12-15

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey–predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well.

  11. Optimizing 50kV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam performance for active spectroscopy in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Boguski, J.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Munaretto, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Olivia, S.

    2015-11-01

    The 50 kV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam on MST provides local measurements of impurity ion emission through charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) and of core-localized magnetic field through the motional Stark effect (MSE). The beam, which was designed to provide 5A of neutral current at 50 kV to meet these needs, is currently on a test stand to accommodate diagnosis, in order to increase the reliability of beam formation, sustain a steady current of 5 amps for 20ms, and optimize the primary energy fraction. The reliability of arc formation was increased from 40% to 80% success rate with increase of cathode gas pressure from 150kPa to 200kPa, and the stability of the arc current is improved with a decrease of the insulation magnetic field. A calorimeter with 5 thermocouples is installed to measure the horizontal and vertical beam profiles as well as beam divergence. Beam energy components are quantified through Doppler-shift spectroscopy. Preliminary simulation results of the beam using the ALCBEAM code as well as a description of how changes to the beam performance can affect CHERS and MSE measurements are presented. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE.

  12. Induction of neutral endopeptidase activity in PC-3 cells by an aqueous extract of Epilobium angustifolium L. and oenothein B.

    PubMed

    Kiss, A; Kowalski, J; Melzig, M F

    2006-03-01

    An aqueous extract of Epilobium angustifolium and its main compound oenothein B (OeB), a dimeric macrocyclic ellagitannin, are specifically able to induce the neutral endopeptidase (NEP) in prostate cancer cells. The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is not influenced. Additionally, a weak but statistically significant inhibition of cell proliferation is observed. Simultaneous treatment of the cells with arabinosylcytosine and the extract as well as the OeB, leads to an additional enhancement of NEP activity. Taking into account the role of this peptidase in prostate cancer progression, our results might offer a pharmacological explanation for the use of Epilobium in folk medicine. PMID:16492533

  13. SNP Array Analysis Reveals Novel Genomic Abnormalities Including Copy Neutral Loss of Heterozygosity in Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Dehais, Caroline; Courdy, Célia; Carpentier, Catherine; de Bernard, Simon; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Honnorat, Jérôme; Chinot, Olivier; Ramirez, Carole; Beauchesne, Patrick; Benouaich-Amiel, Alexandra; Godard, Joël; Eimer, Sandrine; Parker, Fabrice; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Colin, Philippe; Loussouarn, Delphine; Faillot, Thierry; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Bauchet, Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Fontaine, Denys; Vauleon, Elodie; Menei, Philippe; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Desenclos, Christine; Verelle, Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Noel, Georges; Labrousse, François; Carpentier, Antoine; Dhermain, Frédéric; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD) are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19)(q10;p10), IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations). To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA),” has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA). Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples) were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively. At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH) inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD. Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD. PMID:23071531

  14. Analysis of the mineral acid-base components of acid-neutralizing capacity in Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, R. K.; Gherini, S. A.

    1993-04-01

    Mineral acids and bases influence pH largely through their effects on acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). This influence becomes particularly significant as ANC approaches zero. Analysis of data collected by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC) from 1469 lakes throughout the Adirondack region indicates that variations in ANC in these lakes correlate well with base cation concentrations (CB), but not with the sum of mineral acid anion concentrations (CA). This is because (CA) is relatively constant across the Adirondacks, whereas CB varies widely. Processes that supply base cations to solution are ion-specific. Sodium and silica concentrations are well correlated, indicating a common source, mineral weathering. Calcium and magnesium also covary but do not correlate well with silica. This indicates that ion exchange is a significant source of these cations in the absence of carbonate minerals. Iron and manganese concentrations are elevated in the lower waters of some lakes due to reducing conditions. This leads to an ephemeral increase in CB and ANC. When the lakes mix and oxic conditions are restored, these ions largely precipitate from solution. Sulfate is the dominant mineral acid anion in ALSC lakes. Sulfate concentrations are lowest in seepage lakes, commonly about 40 μeq/L less than in drainage lakes. This is due in part to the longer hydraulic detention time in seepage lakes, which allows slow sulfate reduction reactions more time to decrease lake sulfate concentration. Nitrate typically influences ANC during events such as snowmelt. Chloride concentrations are generally low, except in lakes impacted by road salt.

  15. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  16. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew T.; Gray, Matthew D.; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Freund, Natalia T.; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B.; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Strong, Roland K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  17. Interactive analysis program activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. P.; Frisch, H. P.; Jones, G. K.; Walker, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an analysis software system capable of performing interdisciplinary preliminary design analyses of large space structure configurations is discussed. Disciplines such as thermal, structures, and controls are to be integrated into a highly user oriented analysis capability. The key feature of the integrated analysis capability, a rapid and efficient system that will minimize solution turnaround time, is discussed.

  18. Analysis of anisotropic suprathermal ion distributions using multidirectional measurements of escaping neutral atom fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, P. R.; Ozaki, T.; Veshchev, E. A.; Sudo, S.

    2008-10-15

    A feasible approach in obtaining experimental data on the angular dependence of the ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is to perform angle-resolved measurements of kinetic energy spectra of escaping neutral atoms. A general calculation scheme has been developed and realized as a FORTRAN code that has a predictive force to simulate the experimentally measurable anisotropic distributions and random samples of escaping neutral atom kinetic energies for any given angle-dependent ion distribution law, electron density, and temperature profiles, plasma composition, magnetic surface structure, and experiment geometry on any toroidal plasma device with magnetic confinement. As a particular application of the method to a specific experiment, measured signals for all 20 channels of the angle-resolved multisightline neutral particle analyzer on Large Helical Device have been numerically simulated for certain predefined model fast ion distribution functions.

  19. Analysis of anisotropic suprathermal ion distributions using multidirectional measurements of escaping neutral atom fluxes.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, P R; Ozaki, T; Veshchev, E A; Sudo, S

    2008-10-01

    A feasible approach in obtaining experimental data on the angular dependence of the ion distribution function in a fusion plasma is to perform angle-resolved measurements of kinetic energy spectra of escaping neutral atoms. A general calculation scheme has been developed and realized as a FORTRAN code that has a predictive force to simulate the experimentally measurable anisotropic distributions and random samples of escaping neutral atom kinetic energies for any given angle-dependent ion distribution law, electron density, and temperature profiles, plasma composition, magnetic surface structure, and experiment geometry on any toroidal plasma device with magnetic confinement. As a particular application of the method to a specific experiment, measured signals for all 20 channels of the angle-resolved multisightline neutral particle analyzer on Large Helical Device have been numerically simulated for certain predefined model fast ion distribution functions. PMID:19044624

  20. High-resolution spectral analysis of light from neutral beams and ion source plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D H; Kim, J

    1980-05-01

    The spectral distributions of Balmer alpha emission from 7- and 22-cm-diam neutral hydrogen beams have been measured with a Fabry-Perot interferometer to obtain information on the beam energy, divergence, and species composition. Results of these measurements are compared with other data on the beam properties to evaluate high-resolution spectroscopy as a beam diagnostic technique. Measurements on ion source plasmas and on beam-produced background plasmas yield average neutral atom energies of approximately 0.3 and 2.5 eV, respectively.

  1. Divergent Trends of Anti-JCPyV Serum Reactivity and Neutralizing Activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Patients during Treatment with Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Diotti, Roberta Antonia; Capra, Ruggero; Moiola, Lucia; Caputo, Valeria; De Rossi, Nicola; Sangalli, Francesca; Martinelli, Vittorio; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Mancini, Nicasio

    2016-01-01

    The association between natalizumab and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is established, but a reliable clinical risk stratification flow-chart is lacking. New risk factors are needed, such as the possible role of the anti-JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) neutralizing antibody. In this pilot study, we analyzed this parameter during natalizumab treatment. Sequential sera of 38 multiple sclerosis patients during their first year of natalizumab treatment were collected, and grouped according to the number of infusions. For 11 patients, samples were also available after 24 infusions (T24), when progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) risk is higher. The reactivity against VP1, the main JCPyV surface protein, and the anti-JCPyV neutralizing activity were evaluated. During the first year, a lack of correlation between anti-JCPyV antibody response and its neutralizing activity was observed: a significant decrease in anti-JCPyV antibody response was observed (p = 0.0039), not paralleled by a similar trend in the total anti-JCPyV neutralizing activity (p = 0.2239). This lack of correlation was even more evident at T24 when, notwithstanding a significant increase in the anti-JCPyV response (p = 0.0097), a further decrease of the neutralizing activity was observed (p = 0.0062). This is the first study evidencing, prospectively, the lack of correlation between the anti-JCPyV antibody response and its neutralizing activity during natalizumab treatment. PMID:27164128

  2. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the delivery of anti-VEGF mAbs in the mouse K-ras(LA1) model. We found that pulmonary delivery of these mAbs significantly reduced the number of tumor lesions and inhibited malignant progression. The antitumor effect involves the VEGFR2-dependent inhibition of blood vessel growth, which impairs tumor proliferation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of aerosolized anti-VEGF showed its low rate of passage into the bloodstream, suggesting that this delivery route is associated with reduced systemic side effects. Our findings highlight the value of the aerosol route for administration of anti-angiogenic mAbs in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations. PMID:25484066

  3. Analysis on Global Stability of Stochastic Neural Networks of Neutral Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ju H.; Kwon, O. M.

    In this paper, the problem of global asymptotic stability of stochastic neural networks of neutral type is considered. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, a new delay-dependent stability criterion for the network is derived in terms of LMI (linear matrix inequality). A numerical example is given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Broadening of neutralization activity to directly block a dominant antibody-driven SARS-coronavirus evolution pathway.

    PubMed

    Sui, Jianhua; Aird, Daniel R; Tamin, Azaibi; Murakami, Akikazu; Yan, Meiying; Yammanuru, Anuradha; Jing, Huaiqi; Kan, Biao; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Quan; Yuan, Qing-An; Adams, Gregory P; Bellini, William J; Xu, Jianguo; Anderson, Larry J; Marasco, Wayne A

    2008-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses have provided strong evidence that amino acid changes in spike (S) protein of animal and human SARS coronaviruses (SARS-CoVs) during and between two zoonotic transfers (2002/03 and 2003/04) are the result of positive selection. While several studies support that some amino acid changes between animal and human viruses are the result of inter-species adaptation, the role of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in driving SARS-CoV evolution, particularly during intra-species transmission, is unknown. A detailed examination of SARS-CoV infected animal and human convalescent sera could provide evidence of nAb pressure which, if found, may lead to strategies to effectively block virus evolution pathways by broadening the activity of nAbs. Here we show, by focusing on a dominant neutralization epitope, that contemporaneous- and cross-strain nAb responses against SARS-CoV spike protein exist during natural infection. In vitro immune pressure on this epitope using 2002/03 strain-specific nAb 80R recapitulated a dominant escape mutation that was present in all 2003/04 animal and human viruses. Strategies to block this nAb escape/naturally occurring evolution pathway by generating broad nAbs (BnAbs) with activity against 80R escape mutants and both 2002/03 and 2003/04 strains were explored. Structure-based amino acid changes in an activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) "hot spot" in a light chain CDR (complementarity determining region) alone, introduced through shuffling of naturally occurring non-immune human VL chain repertoire or by targeted mutagenesis, were successful in generating these BnAbs. These results demonstrate that nAb-mediated immune pressure is likely a driving force for positive selection during intra-species transmission of SARS-CoV. Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of a single VL CDR can markedly broaden the activity of a strain-specific nAb. The strategies investigated in this study, in particular the use of structural information in

  5. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    PubMed

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process. PMID:26652215

  6. Orientation Control in Thin Films of a High-χ Block Copolymer with a Surface Active Embedded Neutral Layer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jieqian; Clark, Michael B; Wu, Chunyi; Li, Mingqi; Trefonas, Peter; Hustad, Phillip D

    2016-01-13

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCPs) is an attractive advanced patterning technology being considered for future integrated circuit manufacturing. By controlling interfacial interactions, self-assembled microdomains in thin films of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate), PS-b-PMMA, can be oriented perpendicular to surfaces to form line/space or hole patterns. However, its relatively weak Flory interaction parameter, χ, limits its capability to pattern sub-10 nm features. Many BCPs with higher interaction parameters are capable of forming smaller features, but these "high-χ" BCPs typically have an imbalance in surface energy between the respective blocks that make it difficult to achieve the required perpendicular orientation. To address this challenge, we devised a polymeric surface active additive mixed into the BCP solution, referred to as an embedded neutral layer (ENL), which segregates to the top of the BCP film during casting and annealing and balances the surface tensions at the top of the thin film. The additive comprises a second BCP with a "neutral block" designed to provide matched surface tensions with the respective polymers of the main BCP and a "surface anchoring block" with very low surface energy that drives the material to the air interface during spin-casting and annealing. The surface anchoring block allows the film to be annealed above the glass transition temperature of the two materials without intermixing of the two components. DSA was also demonstrated with this embedded neutral top layer formulation on a chemical patterned template using a single step coat and simple thermal annealing. This ENL technology holds promise to enable the use of high-χ BCPs in advanced patterning applications. PMID:26682931

  7. AAV-Delivered Antibody Mediates Significant Protective Effects against SIVmac239 Challenge in the Absence of Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian P.; Martinez-Navio, José M.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term delivery of potent broadly-neutralizing antibodies is a promising approach for the prevention of HIV-1 infection. We used AAV vector intramuscularly to deliver anti-SIV monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in IgG1 form to rhesus monkeys. Persisting levels of delivered mAb as high as 270 μg/ml were achieved. However, host antibody responses to the delivered antibody were observed in 9 of the 12 monkeys and these appeared to limit the concentration of delivered antibody that could be achieved. This is reflected in the wide range of delivered mAb concentrations that were achieved: 1–270 μg/ml. Following repeated, marginal dose, intravenous challenge with the difficult-to-neutralize SIVmac239, the six monkeys in the AAV-5L7 IgG1 mAb group showed clear protective effects despite the absence of detectable neutralizing activity against the challenge virus. The protective effects included: lowering of viral load at peak height; lowering of viral load at set point; delay in the time to peak viral load from the time of the infectious virus exposure. All of these effects were statistically significant. In addition, the monkey with the highest level of delivered 5L7 mAb completely resisted six successive SIVmac239 i.v. challenges, including a final challenge with a dose of 10 i.v. infectious units. Our results demonstrate the continued promise of this approach for the prevention of HIV-1 infection in people. However, the problem of anti-antibody responses will need to be understood and overcome for the promise of this approach to be effectively realized. PMID:26248318

  8. Simulation and Analysis of Wind Turbine Loads for Neutrally Stable Inflow Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, C.; Manuel, L.; Basu, S.

    2009-12-01

    Efficient temporal resolution and spatial grids are important in simulation of the inflow turbulence for wind turbine loads analyses. There have not been many published studies that address optimal space-time resolution of generated inflow velocity fields in order to estimate accurate load statistics. This study investigates turbine extreme and fatigue load statistics for a utility-scale 5MW wind turbine with a hub-height of 90 m and a rotor diameter of 126 m. Load statistics, spectra, and time-frequency analysis representations are compared for various alternative space and time resolutions employed in inflow turbulence field simulation. Conclusions are drawn regarding adequate resolution in space of the inflow turbulence simulated on the rotor plane prior to extracting turbine load statistics. Similarly, conclusions are drawn with regard to what constitutes adequate temporal filtering to preserve turbine load statistics. This first study employs conventional Fourier-based spectral methods for stochastic simulation of velocity fields for a neutral atmospheric boundary layer. In the second part of this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is employed with similar spatial and temporal resolution as in the earlier Fourier-based simulations to again establish turbine load statistics. A comparison of extreme and fatigue load statistics is presented for the two approaches used for inflow field generation. The use of LES-generated flows (enhanced in deficient high-frequency energy by the use of fractal interpolation) to establish turbine load statistics in this manner is computationally very expensive but the study is justified in order to evaluate the ability of LES to be used as an alternative to more common approaches. LES with fractal interpolation is shown to lead to accurate load statistics when compared with stochastic simulation. A more compelling reason for using LES in turbine load studies is the following: for stable boundary layers, it is not possible to

  9. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme: role of catalytic cysteine residues in regulation of enzymatic activity through changes in oligomeric state.

    PubMed

    Dotson, P Patrick; Karakashian, Alexander A; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N

    2015-02-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase-2) is the major sphingomyelinase activated in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and during oxidative stress. It is a membrane-bound 655 amino acid protein containing 22 cysteine residues. In this study, we expressed recombinant mouse nSMase-2 protein in Escherichia coli, and investigated whether nSMase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme. Our results demonstrate that nSMase-2 exists as both monomers and multimers that are associated with high and low enzymatic activity respectively. Mutational analysis of nSMase-2 identified within its C-terminal catalytic domain several oxidant-sensitive cysteine residues that were shown to be involved in enzyme oligomerization. Changing Cys(617) to Ser for example is a gain-of-function mutation associated with a decreased propensity for oligomerization. Alternatively, nSMase-2 expression in a bacterial strain that lacks endogenous thioredoxin, Rosetta-gami2, results in increased oligomer formation and lower enzyme activity. Phenotypic rescue was accomplished by treating nSMase-2 lysates with recombinant human thioredoxin. This indicates that nSMase-2 may be a novel substrate for thioredoxin. FRET analysis confirmed the presence of nSMase-2 multimers in mammalian HEK cells and their localization to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results identify nSMase-2 as a redox-sensitive enzyme, whose basal activity is influenced by thioredoxin-mediated changes in its oligomeric state. PMID:25287744

  10. Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme: role of catalytic cysteine residues in regulation of enzymatic activity through changes in oligomeric state

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, P. Patrick; Karakashian, Alexander A.; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N.

    2015-01-01

    Neutral sphingomyelinase-2 (nSMase-2) is the major sphingomyelinase activated in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and during oxidative stress. It is a membrane-bound 655 amino acid protein containing 22 cysteine residues. In this study, we expressed recombinant mouse nSMase-2 protein in Escherichia coli, and investigated whether nSMase-2 is a redox sensitive enzyme. Our results demonstrate that nSMase-2 exists as both monomers and multimers that are associated with high and low enzymatic activity respectively. Mutational analysis of nSMase-2 identified within its C-terminal catalytic domain several oxidant-sensitive cysteine residues that were shown to be involved in enzyme oligomerization. Changing Cys617 to Ser for example is a gain-of-function mutation associated with a decreased propensity for oligomerization. Alternatively, nSMase-2 expression in a bacterial strain that lacks endogenous thioredoxin, Rosetta-gami2, results in increased oligomer formation and lower enzyme activity. Phenotypic rescue was accomplished by treating nSMase-2 lysates with recombinant human thioredoxin. This indicates that nSMase-2 may be a novel substrate for thioredoxin. FRET analysis confirmed the presence of nSMase-2 multimers in mammalian HEK cells and their localization to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, our results identify nSMase-2 as a redox-sensitive enzyme, whose basal activity is influenced by thioredoxin-mediated changes in its oligomeric state. PMID:25287744

  11. Chlamydial Plasmid-Encoded Virulence Factor Pgp3 Neutralizes the Antichlamydial Activity of Human Cathelicidin LL-37

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuping; Dong, Xiaohua; Yang, Zhangsheng; Li, Zhongyu; Liu, Quanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection in the lower genital tract can ascend to and cause pathologies in the upper genital tract, potentially leading to severe complications, such as tubal infertility. However, chlamydial organisms depleted of plasmid or deficient in the plasmid-encoded Pgp3 are attenuated in ascending infection and no longer are able to induce the upper genital tract pathologies, indicating a significant role of Pgp3 in chlamydial pathogenesis. We now report that C. trachomatis Pgp3 can neutralize the antichlamydial activity of human cathelicidin LL-37, a host antimicrobial peptide secreted by both genital tract epithelial cells and infiltrating neutrophils. Pgp3 bound to and formed stable complexes with LL-37. We further showed that the middle region of Pgp3 (Pgp3m) was responsible for both the binding to and neutralization of LL-37, suggesting that Pgp3m can be targeted for attenuating chlamydial pathogenicity or developed for blocking LL-37-involved non-genital-tract pathologies, such as rosacea and psoriasis. Thus, the current study has provided significant information for both understanding the mechanisms of chlamydial pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic agents. PMID:26416907

  12. Cryo-EM structures elucidate neutralizing mechanisms of anti-chikungunya human monoclonal antibodies with therapeutic activity

    PubMed Central

    Long, Feng; Fong, Rachel H.; Austin, Stephen K.; Chen, Zhenguo; Klose, Thomas; Fokine, Andrei; Liu, Yue; Porta, Jason; Sapparapu, Gopal; Akahata, Wataru; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Diamond, Michael S.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with antibody fragments (Fab) of two highly protective human mAbs, 4J21 and 5M16, that block virus fusion with host membranes. Both mAbs bind primarily to sites within the A and B domains, as well as to the B domain’s β-ribbon connector of the viral glycoprotein E2. The footprints of these antibodies on the viral surface were consistent with results from loss-of-binding studies using an alanine scanning mutagenesis-based epitope mapping approach. The Fab fragments stabilized the position of the B domain relative to the virus, particularly for the complex with 5M16. This finding is consistent with a mechanism of neutralization in which anti-CHIKV mAbs that bridge the A and B domains impede movement of the B domain away from the underlying fusion loop on the E1 glycoprotein and therefore block the requisite pH-dependent fusion of viral and host membranes. PMID:26504196

  13. Cryo-EM structures elucidate neutralizing mechanisms of anti-chikungunya human monoclonal antibodies with therapeutic activity.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Fong, Rachel H; Austin, Stephen K; Chen, Zhenguo; Klose, Thomas; Fokine, Andrei; Liu, Yue; Porta, Jason; Sapparapu, Gopal; Akahata, Wataru; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Diamond, Michael S; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-11-10

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with antibody fragments (Fab) of two highly protective human mAbs, 4J21 and 5M16, that block virus fusion with host membranes. Both mAbs bind primarily to sites within the A and B domains, as well as to the B domain's β-ribbon connector of the viral glycoprotein E2. The footprints of these antibodies on the viral surface were consistent with results from loss-of-binding studies using an alanine scanning mutagenesis-based epitope mapping approach. The Fab fragments stabilized the position of the B domain relative to the virus, particularly for the complex with 5M16. This finding is consistent with a mechanism of neutralization in which anti-CHIKV mAbs that bridge the A and B domains impede movement of the B domain away from the underlying fusion loop on the E1 glycoprotein and therefore block the requisite pH-dependent fusion of viral and host membranes. PMID:26504196

  14. Mechanism for neutralizing activity by the anti-CMV gH/gL monoclonal antibody MSL-109

    PubMed Central

    Fouts, Ashley E.; Comps-Agrar, Laëtitia; Stengel, Katharina F.; Ellerman, Diego; Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Warming, Søren; Eaton, Dan L.; Feierbach, Becket

    2014-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a widespread opportunistic pathogen that causes birth defects when transmitted transplacentally and severe systemic illness in immunocompromised individuals. MSL-109, a human monoclonal IgG isolated from a CMV seropositive individual, binds to the essential CMV entry glycoprotein H (gH) and prevents infection of cells. Here, we suggest a mechanism for neutralization activity by MSL-109. We define a genetic basis for resistance to MSL-109 and have generated a structural model of gH that reveals the epitope of this neutralizing antibody. Using surface-based, time-resolved FRET, we demonstrate that gH/gL interacts with glycoprotein B (gB). Additionally, we detect homodimers of soluble gH/gL heterodimers and confirm this novel oligomeric assembly on full-length gH/gL expressed on the cell surface. We show that MSL-109 perturbs the dimerization of gH/gL:gH/gL, suggesting that dimerization of gH/gL may be required for infectivity. gH/gL homodimerization may be conserved between alpha- and betaherpesviruses, because both CMV and HSV gH/gL demonstrate self-association in the FRET system. This study provides evidence for a novel mechanism of action for MSL-109 and reveals a previously undescribed aspect of viral entry that may be susceptible to therapeutic intervention. PMID:24843144

  15. JAK1 Activates STAT3 Activity in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer cells and IL-6 Neutralizing Antibodies can Suppress JAK1-STAT3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lanxi; Rawal, Bhupendra; Nemeth, Jeffrey A.; Haura, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family of transcription factors are potential targets for the treatment and prevention of cancers including non-small-cell lung cancer. STAT proteins can be phosphorylated and activated by diverse upstream kinases including cytokine receptors and tyrosine kinases. We examined STAT protein activation in lung cancer cell lines including those with activating mutations in the EGFR and examined upstream kinases responsible for STAT3 phosphorylation and activation using small molecules, antibodies, and RNA interference. We found more pronounced STAT3 activation in cells with activating EGFR mutations yet inhibition of EGFR activity had no effect on STAT3 activation. Inhibition of JAK1 with small molecules or RNA interference resulted in loss of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibition of cell growth. An interleukin-6 neutralizing antibody, siltuximab (CNTO 328) could inhibit STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation in a cell-dependent manner. Siltuximab could completely inhibit STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation in H1650 cells and this resulted in inhibition of lung cancer cell growth in vivo. Combined EGFR inhibition with erlotinib and siltuximab resulted in dual inhibition of both tyrosine and serine STAT3 phosphorylation, more pronounced inhibition of STAT3 transcriptional activity, and translated into combined effects on lung cancer growth in a mouse model. Our results suggest that JAK1 is responsible for STAT3 activation in lung cancer cells, and that indirect attacks on JAK1-STAT3 using an IL-6 neutralizing antibody with or without EGFR inhibition can inhibit lung cancer growth in lung cancer subsets. PMID:21216930

  16. Analysis of defined combinations of monoclonal antibodies in anthrax toxin neutralization assays and their synergistic action.

    PubMed

    Ngundi, Miriam M; Meade, Bruce D; Little, Stephen F; Quinn, Conrad P; Corbett, Cindi R; Brady, Rebecca A; Burns, Drusilla L

    2012-05-01

    Antibodies against the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin play an important role in protection against disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we examined defined combinations of PA-specific monoclonal antibodies for their ability to neutralize anthrax toxin in cell culture assays. We observed additive, synergistic, and antagonistic effects of the antibodies depending on the specific antibody combination examined and the specific assay used. Synergistic toxin-neutralizing antibody interactions were examined in more detail. We found that one mechanism that can lead to antibody synergy is the bridging of PA monomers by one antibody, with resultant bivalent binding of the second antibody. These results may aid in optimal design of new vaccines and antibody therapies against anthrax. PMID:22441391

  17. Activity of neutral endopeptidase and aminopeptidase N in mouse thymic stromal cells which bind double-positive thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Small, M; Kaiser, M; Tse, W; Heimfeld, S; Blumberg, S

    1996-04-01

    The activity of two peptidases was determined in immortalized lines of thymic stromal cells. A line of total stromal cells (T-TG-St) was grown from transgenic mouse expressing temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen under the control of the regulatory elements of the mouse major histocompatibility complex class I gene. From these cells we isolated a subset (DP-TG-St) that binds thymocytes which are mainly CD4+8+. We also assayed a clone of fetal thymic epithelial cells (BA/10) that binds CD4+8+ thymocytes. Both lines of double -positive cell-binding stroma exhibited strong activity of two peptidases, neutral endopeptidase (NEP; EC 3.4.24.11) and aminopeptidase N (APN; EC 3.4.11.2). In contrast, the activity of both enzymes was very low in the total thymic stromal line. Use of the specific inhibitors confirmed that these two enzymes were responsible for the activity observed but also suggested the presence of additional unidentified aminopeptidase(s) in the same stromal cells. The high activity of the two peptidases on stromal cells that bind thymocytes at the double-positive stage raises the possibility that they might contribute to the microenvironment of the developing thymocytes. PMID:8625997

  18. Separation of cellular nonpolar neutral lipids by normal-phase chromatography and analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Patrick M.; Barkley, Robert M.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Neutral lipids are an important class of hydrophobic compounds found in all cells that play critical roles from energy storage to signal transduction. Several distinct structural families make up this class, and within each family there are numbers of individual molecular species. A solvent extraction protocol has been developed to efficiently isolate neutral lipids without complete extraction of more polar phospholipids. Normal-phase HPLC was used for the separation of cholesteryl esters (CEs), monoalkylether diacylglycerols, triacylglycerols, and diacylglycerols in a single HPLC run from this extract. Furthermore, minor lipids such as ubiquinone-9 could be detected in RAW 264.7 cells. Molecular species that make up each neutral lipid class can be analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively by on-line LC-MS and LC-MS/MS strategies. The quantitation of >20 CE molecular species revealed that challenging RAW 264.7 cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 agonist caused a >20-fold increase in the content of CEs within cells, particularly those CE molecular species that contained saturated (14:0, 16:0, and 18:1) fatty acyl groups. Longer chain CE molecular species did not change in response to the activation of these cells. PMID:18223242

  19. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DUST AND SOIL SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.14)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for extracting and preparing a dust or soil sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  20. Endotoxin-neutralizing activity and mechanism of action of a cationic α-helical antimicrobial octadecapeptide derived from α-amylase of rice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Akihito; Matsushima, Kenta; Tajima, Koji; Kato, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Eiichi; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that AmyI-1-18, an octadecapeptide derived from α-amylase (AmyI-1) of rice, is a novel cationic α-helical peptide that exhibited antimicrobial activity against human pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Propionibacterium acnes, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In this study, to further investigate the potential functions of AmyI-1-18, we examined its inhibitory ability against the endotoxic activities of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs, smooth and Rc types) and lipid A from Escherichia coli. AmyI-1-18 inhibited the production of endotoxin-induced nitric oxide (NO), an inflammatory mediator, in mouse macrophages (RAW264) in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of a chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay illustrated that the ability [50% effective concentration (EC50): 0.17 μM] of AmyI-1-18 to neutralize lipid A was similar to its ability (EC50: 0.26 μM) to neutralize LPS, suggesting that AmyI-1-18 specifically binds to the lipid A moiety of LPS. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the interaction between AmyI-1-18 and LPS or lipid A also suggested that AmyI-1-18 directly binds to the lipid A moiety of LPS because the dissociation constant (KD) of AmyI-1-18 with lipid A is 5.6×10(-10) M, which is similar to that (4.3×10(-10) M) of AmyI-1-18 with LPS. In addition, AmyI-1-18 could block the binding of LPS-binding protein to LPS, although its ability was less than that of polymyxin B. These results suggest that AmyI-1-18 expressing antimicrobial and endotoxin-neutralizing activities is useful as a safe and potent host defense peptide against pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria in many fields of healthcare. PMID:26643956

  1. Neutralization, by a monospecific Bothrops lanceolatus antivenom, of toxic activities induced by homologous and heterologous Bothírops snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Bogarín, G; Romero, M; Rojas, G; Lutsch, C; Casadamont, M; Lang, J; Otero, R; Gutiérrez, J M

    1999-03-01

    A monospecific Bothrops lanceolatus antivenom, currently used in Martinique, was tested for its efficacy in the neutralization of several toxic and enzymatic activities of the venoms of B. lanceolatus, B. atrox and B. asper. When tested by the i.p. route in mice, B. lanceolatus venom had an LD50 of 12.8 microg/g. In addition, it induced local tissue damage (hemorrhage, edema and myotoxicity) and showed indirect hemolytic activity, but was devoid of coagulant effect on human plasma in vitro and of defibrinating activity in mice. Antivenom was fully effective in the neutralization of lethal, hemorrhagic, edema-forming, myotoxic and indirect hemolytic effects of B. lanceolatus venom in assays involving preincubation of venom and antivenom. When tested against the venoms of B. asper and B. atrox, the antivenom completely neutralized the lethal, hemorrhagic, myotoxic and indirect hemolytic effects, and was partially effective in neutralizing edema-forming activity. In contrast, the antivenom was ineffective in the neutralization of in vitro coagulant and in vivo defibrinating effects induced by these two venoms. PMID:10080358

  2. Effect of activation and preactivation on the mechanical behavior and neutral position of stainless steel and beta-titanium T-loops

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Rui; Braga, Ana Cristina; Ferreira, Afonso Pinhão; Pollmann, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To quantify, for each activation, the effect of preactivations of differing distribution and intensity on the neutral position of T-loops (7-mm height), specifically the horizontal force, moment to force (M/F) ratio, and load to deflection ratio. Methods A total 100 loops measuring 0.017 × 0.025 inches in cross-section were divided into two groups (n = 50 each) according to composition, either stainless steel or beta-titanium. The two groups were further divided into five subgroups, 10 loops each, corresponding to the five preactivations tested: preactivations with occlusal distribution (0°, 20°, and 40°), gingival distribution (20°), and occlusal-gingival distribution (40°). The loops were subjected to a total activation of 6-mm with 0.5-mm iterations. Statistical analysis was performed using comprised ANOVA and Bonferoni multiple comparison tests, with a significance level of 5%. Results The location and intensity of preactivation influenced the force intensity. For the M/F ratio, the highest value achieved without preactivation was lower than the height of the loop. Without preactivation, the M/F ratio increased with activation, while the opposite effect was observed with preactivation. The increase in the M/F ratio was greater when the preactivation distribution was partially or fully gingival. Conclusions Depending on the preactivation distribution, displacement of uprights is higher or lower than the activation, which is a factor to consider in clinical practice. PMID:26258066

  3. Identification of minute damage in composite bridge structures equipped with fiber optic sensors using the location of neutral axis and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi; Glisic, Branko

    2016-04-01

    By definition, the neutral axis of a loaded composite beam structure is the curve along which the section experiences zero bending strain. When no axial loading is present, the location of the neutral axis passes through the centroid of stiffness of the beam cross-section. In the presence of damage, the centroid of stiffness, as well as the neutral axis, shift from the healthy position. The concept of neutral axis can be widely applied to all beam-like structures. According to literature, a change in location of the neutral axis can be associated with damage in the corresponding cross-section. In this paper, the movement of neutral axis near locations of minute damage in a composite bridge structure was studied using finite element analysis and experimental results. The finite element model was developed based on a physical scale model of a composite simply-supported structure with controlled minute damage in the reinforced concrete deck. The structure was equipped with long-gauge fiber optic strain and temperature sensors at a healthy reference location as well as two locations of damage. A total of 12 strain sensors were installed during construction and used to monitor the structure during various loading events. This paper aims to explain previous experimental results which showed that the observed positions of neutral axis near damage locations were higher than the predicted healthy locations in some loading events. Analysis has shown that finite element analysis has potential to simulate and explain the physical behavior of the test structure.

  4. Activation analysis using Cornell TRIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Tim Z.

    1994-07-01

    A major use of the Cornell TRIGA is for activation analysis. Over the years many varieties of samples have been analyzed from a number of fields of interest ranging from geology, archaeology and textiles. More recently the analysis has been extended to high technology materials for applications in optical and semiconductor devices. Trace analysis in high purity materials like Si wafers has been the focus in many instances, while in others analysis of major/minor components were the goals. These analysis has been done using the delayed mode. Results from recent measurements in semiconductors and other materials will be presented. In addition the near future capability of using prompt gamma activation analysis using the Cornell cold neutron beam will be discussed. (author)

  5. Review of global ocean intermediate water masses: 1. part A, the neutral density surface (the `mcdougall surface') as a study frame for water-mass analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yuzhu

    2006-07-01

    This review article commences with a comprehensive historical review of the evolution and application of various density surfaces in atmospheric and oceanic studies. The background provides a basis for the birth of the neutral density idea. Attention is paid to the development of the neutral density surface concept from the nonlinearity of the equation of state of seawater. The definition and properties of neutral density surface are described in detail as developed from the equations of state of seawater and the buoyancy frequency when the squared buoyancy frequency N 2 is zero, a neutral state of stability. In order to apply the neutral density surface to intermediate water-mass analysis, this review also describes in detail its practical oceanographic application. The mapping technique is focused for the first time on applying regularly gridded data in this review. It is reviewed how a backbone and ribs framework was designed to flesh out from a reference cast and first mapped the global neutral surfaces in the world's oceans. Several mapped neutral density surfaces are presented as examples for each world ocean. The water-mass property is analyzed in each ocean at mid-depth. The characteristics of neutral density surfaces are compared with those of potential density surfaces.

  6. Standardizing Activation Analysis: New Software for Photon Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Green, J.; Segebade, C.

    2011-06-01

    Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) of environmental, archaeological and industrial samples requires extensive data analysis that is susceptible to error. For the purpose of saving time, manpower and minimizing error, a computer program was designed, built and implemented using SQL, Access 2007 and asp.net technology to automate this process. Based on the peak information of the spectrum and assisted by its PAA library, the program automatically identifies elements in the samples and calculates their concentrations and respective uncertainties. The software also could be operated in browser/server mode, which gives the possibility to use it anywhere the internet is accessible. By switching the nuclide library and the related formula behind, the new software can be easily expanded to neutron activation analysis (NAA), charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Implementation of this would standardize the analysis of nuclear activation data. Results from this software were compared to standard PAA analysis with excellent agreement. With minimum input from the user, the software has proven to be fast, user-friendly and reliable.

  7. The simultaneous release by bone explants in culture and the parallel activation of procollagenase and of a latent neutral proteinase that degrades cartilage proteoglycans and denatured collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Vaes, G; Eeckhout, Y; Lenaers-Claeys, G; François-Gillet, C; Druetz, J E

    1978-01-01

    1. A latent neutral proteinase was found in culture media of mouse bone explants. Its accumulation during the cultures is closely parallel to that of procollagenase; both require the presence of heparin in the media. 2. Latent neutral proteinase was activated by several treatments of the media known to activate procollagenase, such as limited proteolysis by trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasmin or kallikrein, dialysis against 3 M-NaSCN at 4 degrees C and prolonged preincubation at 25 degrees C. Its activation often followed that of the procollagenase present in the same media. 3. Activation of neutral proteinase (as does that of procollagenase) by trypsin or plasmin involved two successive steps: the activation of a latent endogenous activator present in the media followed by the activation of neutral proteinase itself by that activator. 4. The proteinase degrades cartilage proteoglycans, denatured collagen (Azocoll) and casein at neutral pH; it is inhibited by EDTA, cysteine or serum. Collagenase is not inhibited by casein or Azocoll and is less resistant to heat or to trypsin than is the proteinase. Partial separation of the two enzymes was achieved by gel filtration of the media but not by fractional (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, by ion exchange or by affinity chromatography on Sepharose-collagen. These fractionations did not activate latent enzymes. 5. Trypsin activation decreases the molecular weight of both latent enzymes (60 000-70 000) by 20 000-30 000, as determined by gel filtration of media after removal of heparin. 6. The latency of both enzymes could be due either to a zymogen or to an enzyme-inhibitor complex. A thermostable inhibitor of both enzymes was found in some media. However, combinations of either enzyme with that inhibitor were not reactivated by trypsin, indicating that this inhibitor is unlikely to be the cause of the latency. PMID:208518

  8. Measurement and analysis of electron-neutral collision frequency in the calibrated cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-03-01

    As collisions between electrons and neutral particles constitute one of the most representative physical phenomena in weakly ionized plasma, the electron-neutral (e-n) collision frequency is a very important plasma parameter as regards understanding the physics of this material. In this paper, we measured the e-n collision frequency in the plasma using a calibrated cutoff-probe. A highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma/cutoff-probe system, which is expected based on previous cutoff-probe circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], is obtained using the calibrated cutoff-probe method, and the e-n collision frequency is calculated based on the cutoff-probe circuit model together with the high-frequency conductance model. The measured e-n collision frequency (by the calibrated cutoff-probe method) is compared and analyzed with that obtained using a Langmuir probe, with the latter being calculated from the measured electron-energy distribution functions, in wide range of gas pressure.

  9. Mass analysis of neutral particles and ions released during electrical breakdowns on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Charged-particle fluxes from breakdown events were studied. Methods to measure mass spectra and total emitted flux of neutral particles were developed. The design and construction of the specialized mass spectrometer was completed. Electrical breakdowns were initiated by a movable blunt contact touching the insulating surface. The contact discharge apparatus was used for final development of two different high-speed recording systems and for measurements of the composition of the materials given off by the discharge. It was shown that intense instantaneous fluxes of neutral particles were released from the sites of electrical breakdown events. A laser micropulse mass analyzer showed that visible discoloration at breakdown sites were correllated with the presence of iron on the polymer side of the film, presumably caused by punch-through to the Inconel backing. Kapton samples irradiated by an oxygen ion beam were tested. The irradiated samples were free of surface hydrocarbon contamination but otherwise behaved in the same way as the Kapton samples tested earlier. Only the two samples exposed to oxygen ion bombardment were relatively clean. This indicates an additional variable that should be considered when testing spacecraft materials in the laboratory.

  10. Large-scale genomic analysis suggests a neutral punctuated dynamics of transposable elements in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Iranzo, Jaime; Gómez, Manuel J; López de Saro, Francisco J; Manrubia, Susanna

    2014-06-01

    Insertion sequences (IS) are the simplest and most abundant form of transposable DNA found in bacterial genomes. When present in multiple copies, it is thought that they can promote genomic plasticity and genetic exchange, thus being a major force of evolutionary change. The main processes that determine IS content in genomes are, though, a matter of debate. In this work, we take advantage of the large amount of genomic data currently available and study the abundance distributions of 33 IS families in 1811 bacterial chromosomes. This allows us to test simple models of IS dynamics and estimate their key parameters by means of a maximum likelihood approach. We evaluate the roles played by duplication, lateral gene transfer, deletion and purifying selection. We find that the observed IS abundances are compatible with a neutral scenario where IS proliferation is controlled by deletions instead of purifying selection. Even if there may be some cases driven by selection, neutral behavior dominates over large evolutionary scales. According to this view, IS and hosts tend to coexist in a dynamic equilibrium state for most of the time. Our approach also allows for a detection of recent IS expansions, and supports the hypothesis that rapid expansions constitute transient events-punctuations-during which the state of coexistence of IS and host becomes perturbated. PMID:24967627

  11. Design and evaluation of a hybrid passive and active gravity neutral orthosis (GNO).

    PubMed

    Koo, Benjamin; Montes, Jacqueline; Gamarnik, Viktor; Yeager, Keith; Marra, Jonathan; Dunaway, Sally; Montgomery, Megan; De Vivo, Darryl C; Strauss, Nancy; Konofagou, Elisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD), including Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), result in progressive muscular weakness that often leaves patients functionally dependent on caregivers for many activities of daily living (ADL) such as eating, bathing, grooming (touching the face and head), reaching (grabbing for objects), and dressing. In severe cases, patients are unable to perform even the simplest of activities from exploring their 3D space to touching their own face. The ability to move and initiate age appropriate tasks, such as playing and exploration, are considered to be of vital importance to both their physical and cognitive development. Therefore, to improve quality of life and reduce dependence on caregivers in children and young adults with NMD, we designed, built and evaluated an assistive, active orthosis to support arm function. The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of a mechanical arm orthosis to both encourage and assist functional arm movement while providing the user a sense of independence and control over one's own body. PMID:19963513

  12. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions. PMID:26945637

  13. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  14. Expression Patterns, Activities and Carbohydrate-Metabolizing Regulation of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase, Sucrose Synthase and Neutral Invertase in Pineapple Fruit during Development and Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Wei; Du, Li-Qing; Xie, Jiang-Hui; Yao, Yan-Li; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Differences in carbohydrate contents and metabolizing-enzyme activities were monitored in apical, medial, basal and core sections of pineapple (Ananas comosus cv. Comte de paris) during fruit development and ripening. Fructose and glucose of various sections in nearly equal amounts were the predominant sugars in the fruitlets, and had obvious differences until the fruit matured. The large rise of sucrose/hexose was accompanied by dramatic changes in sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SuSy) activities. By contrast, neutral invertase (NI) activity may provide a mechanism to increase fruit sink strength by increasing hexose concentrations. Furthermore, two cDNAs of Ac-sps (accession no. GQ996582) and Ac-ni (accession no. GQ996581) were first isolated from pineapple fruits utilizing conserved amino-acid sequences. Homology alignment reveals that the amino acid sequences contain some conserved function domains. Transcription expression analysis of Ac-sps, Ac-susy and Ac-ni also indicated distinct patterns related to sugar accumulation and composition of pineapple fruits. It suggests that differential expressions of multiple gene families are necessary for sugar metabolism in various parts and developmental stages of pineapple fruit. A cycle of sucrose breakdown in the cytosol of sink tissues could be mediated through both Ac-SuSy and Ac-NI, and Ac-NI could be involved in regulating crucial steps by generating sugar signals to the cells in a temporally and spatially restricted fashion. PMID:22949808

  15. Arsenic trioxide and resveratrol show synergistic anti-leukemia activity and neutralized cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuhua; Chen, Meng; Meng, Jia; Yu, Lei; Tu, Yingfeng; Wan, Lin; Fang, Kun; Zhu, Wenliang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is an aggravating side effect of many clinical antineoplastic agents such as arsenic trioxide (As2O3), which is the first-line treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Clinically, drug combination strategies are widely applied for complex disease management. Here, an optimized, cardiac-friendly therapeutic strategy for APL was investigated using a combination of As2O3 and genistein or resveratrol. Potential combinations were explored with respect to their effects on mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase activity, autophagy, and apoptosis in both NB4 cells and neonatal rat left ventricular myocytes. All experiments consistently suggested that 5 µM resveratrol remarkably alleviates As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. To achieve an equivalent effect, a 10-fold dosage of genistein was required, thus highlighting the dose advantage of resveratrol, as poor bioavailability is a common concern for its clinical application. Co-administration of resveratrol substantially amplified the anticancer effect of As2O3 in NB4 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol exacerbated oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis, thereby reflecting its full range of synergism with As2O3. Addition of 5 µM resveratrol to the single drug formula of As2O3 also further increased the expression of LC3, a marker of cellular autophagy activity, indicating an involvement of autophagy-mediated tumor cell death in the synergistic action. Our results suggest a possible application of an As2O3 and resveratrol combination to treat APL in order to achieve superior therapeutics effects and prevent cardiotoxicity. PMID:25144547

  16. High Photothermal Activity within Neutral Nickel Dithiolene Complexes Derived from Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Mebrouk, Kenny; Camerel, Franck; Jeannin, Olivier; Heinrich, Benoit; Donnio, Bertrand; Fourmigué, Marc

    2016-02-01

    A new series of nickel N,N'-dialkylimidazolidine-2,4,5-trithione complexes ([Ni(R2timdt)2]) carrying linear or branched carbon chains (R = n-C4H9, n-C8H17, n-C12H25, n-C16H33, 2-ethylhexyl, 2-butyloctyl, phytanyl) have been obtained through an original synthetic pathway starting from easily available imidazolium-based ionic liquids. The chemical structures of these nickel complexes were confirmed by NMR and high-resolution mass spectroscopies as well as by X-ray analysis performed on single crystals. The complexes strongly absorb in the near-IR (NIR) region around 1000 nm, with high extinction coefficients reaching 80 000 M(-1) cm(-1). They are able to efficiently convert NIR light into heat under laser irradiation with very high photothermal conversion efficiencies (around 30%). PMID:26788960

  17. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids. PMID:20192410

  18. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Inoue, T.

    2010-02-15

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  19. Mass analysis of neutral particles and ions released during electrical breakdowns on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1983-01-01

    A specialized spectrometer was designed and developed to measure the mass and velocity distributions of neutral particles (molecules and molecular clusters) released from metal-backed Teflon and Kapton films. Promising results were obtained with an insulation breakdown initiation system based on a moveable contact touching the insulated surfaces. A variable energy, high voltage pulse is applied to the contact. The resulting surface damage sites can be made similar in size and shape to those produced by a high voltage electron beam system operating at similar discharge energies. The point discharge apparatus was used for final development of several high speed recording systems and for measurements of the composition of the materials given off by the discharge. Results with this apparatus show evolution of large amounts of fluorocarbon fragments from discharge through Teflon FEP, while discharges through Kapton produce mainly very light hydrocarbon fragments at masses below about 80 a.m.u.

  20. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces[S

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids. PMID:24482490

  1. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E

    2014-04-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids. PMID:24482490

  2. Variation of acharan sulfate and monosaccharide composition and analysis of neutral N-glycans in African giant snail (Achatina fulica)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youmie; Zhang, Zhenqing; Laremore, Tatiana N.; Li, Boyangzi; Sim, Joon-Soo; Im, A-Rang; Ahn, Mi Young

    2009-01-01

    Acharan sulfate content from African giant snail (Achatina fulica) was compared in eggs and snails of different ages. Acharan sulfate was not found in egg. Acharan sulfate disaccharide →4)-α-d-GlcNpAc (1→4)-α-l-IdoAp2S(1→, analyzed by SAX (strong-anion exchange)–HPLC was observed soon after hatching and increases as the snails grow. Monosaccharide compositional analysis showed that mole % of glucosamine, a major monosaccharide of acharan sulfate, increased with age while mole % of galactose decreased with age. These results suggest that galactans represent a major energy source during development, while acharan sulfate appearing immediately after hatching, is essential for the snail growth. The structures of neutral N-glycans released from eggs by peptide N-glycosidase F (PNGase F), were next elucidated using ESI-MS/MS, MALDI-MS/MS, enzyme digestion, and monosaccharide composition analysis. Three types of neutral N-glycan structures were observed, truncated (Hex2–4-Hex-NAc2), high mannose (Hex5–9-HexNAc2), and complex (Hex3-HexNAc2–10) types. None showed core fucosylation. PMID:18670878

  3. The neuromuscular activity of Micrurus pyrrhocryptus venom and its neutralization by commercial and specific coral snake antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Thiago Magalhães; de Roodt, Adolfo Rafael; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa

    2011-01-01

    The neuromuscular activity ofMicrurus pyrrochryptus venom was studied in chick biventer cervicis (BC) and mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparations. The venom (0.5-50μg/ml) caused irreversible, time- and concentration-dependent blockade, with BC being more sensitive than PND (50% blockade with 10μg/ml in 22±;3min and 62±4min, respectively; mean±SEM, n=6; p<0.05). In BC preparations, venom (0.5μg/ml) progressively abolished ACh-induced contractures, whereas contractures to exogenous KCl and muscle twitches in curarized preparations were unaffected. The venom neither altered creatine kinase release (venom: 25.8±1.75IU/l vs control: 24.3±2.2IU/l, n=6, after 120min), nor it caused significant muscle damage (50μg of venom/ml vs control: 3.5±0.8% vs 1.1±0.7% for PND; 4.3±1.5% vs 1.2±0.5% for BC, n=5). The venom had low PLA(2) activity. Neurotoxicity was effectively neutralized by commercial Micrurus antivenom and specific antivenom. These findings indicate that M. pyrrhocryptus venom acts postsynaptically on nicotinic receptors, with no significant myotoxicity. PMID:21858249

  4. Simulation of Cl− Secretion in Epithelial Tissues: New Methodology Estimating Activity of Electro-Neutral Cl− Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sasamoto, Kouhei; Niisato, Naomi; Taruno, Akiyuki; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Transcellular Cl− secretion is, in general, mediated by two steps; (1) the entry step of Cl− into the cytosolic space from the basolateral space across the basolateral membrane by Cl− transporters, such as Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1, an isoform of NKCC), and (2) the releasing step of Cl− from the cytosolic space into the luminal (air) space across the apical membrane via Cl− channels, such as cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. Transcellular Cl− secretion has been characterized by using various experimental techniques. For example, measurements of short-circuit currents in the Ussing chamber and patch clamp techniques provide us information on transepithelial ion movements via transcellular pathway, transepithelial conductance, activity (open probability) of single channel, and whole cell currents. Although many investigators have tried to clarify roles of Cl− channels and transporters located at the apical and basolateral membranes in transcellular Cl− secretion, it is still unclear how Cl− channels/transporters contribute to transcellular Cl− secretion and are regulated by various stimuli such as Ca2+ and cAMP. In the present study, we simulate transcellular Cl− secretion using mathematical models combined with electrophysiological measurements, providing information on contribution of Cl− channels/transporters to transcellular Cl− secretion, activity of electro-neutral ion transporters and how Cl− channels/transporters are regulated. PMID:26779025

  5. Ethylene C-H Bond Activation by Neutral Mn2O5 Clusters under Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2016-05-01

    A photo excitation fast flow reactor coupled with a single-photon ionization (118 nm, 10.5 eV) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) instrument is used to investigate reactions of neutral MnmOn clusters with C2H4 under visible (532 nm) light irradiation. Association products Mn2O5(C2H4) and Mn3O6,7(C2H4) are observed without irradiation. Under light irradiation, the Mn2O5(C2H4) TOFMS feature decreases, and a new species, Mn2O5H2, is observed. This light-activated reaction suggests that the visible radiation can induce the chemistry, Mn2O5 + C2H4 + hv(532 nm) → Mn2O5*(C2H4) → Mn2O5H2 + C2H2. High barriers (0.67 and 0.59 eV) are obtained on the ground-state potential energy surface (PES); the reaction is barrierless and thermodynamically favorable on the first excited-state PES, as performed by time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The calculational and experimental results suggest that Mn2O5-like structures on manganese oxide surfaces are the appropriate active catalytic sites for visible light photocatalysis of ethylene dehydrogenation. PMID:27099985

  6. Neutralization of the haemorrhagic activities of viperine snake venoms and venom metalloproteinases using synthetic peptide inhibitors and chelators.

    PubMed

    Howes, J-M; Theakston, R D G; Laing, G D

    2007-04-01

    Envenoming by the West African saw-scaled viper, Echis ocellatus resembles that of most vipers, in that it results in local blistering, necrosis and sometimes life-threatening systemic haemorrhage. While effective against systemic envenoming, current antivenoms have little or no effect against local tissue damage. The major mediators of local venom pathology are the zinc-dependant snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The high degree of structural and functional homology between SVMPs and their mammalian relatives the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) suggests that substrate/inhibitor interactions between these subfamilies are likely to be analogous. In this study, four recently developed MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) (Marimastat, AG-3340, CGS-270 23A and Bay-12 9566) are evaluated in addition to three metal ion chelators (EDTA, TPEN and BAPTA) for their ability to inhibit the haemorrhagic activities of the medically important E. ocellatus venom and one of its haemorrhagic SVMPs, EoVMP2. As expected, the metal ion chelators significantly inhibited the haemorrhagic activities of both whole E. ocellatus venom and EoVMP2, while the synthetic MMPIs show more variation in their efficacies. These variations suggest that individual MMPIs show specificity towards SVMPs and that their application to the neutralization of local haemorrhage may require a synthetic MMPI mixture, ensuring that a close structural component for each SVMP is represented. PMID:17196631

  7. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Lin Jianguo; Sun Yuliang; Bennouna, Soumaya; Lo, Michael; Wu Qingyang; Bu Zhigao; Pulendran, Bali; Compans, Richard W. . E-mail: compans@microbio.emory.edu; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection.

  8. Neutralizing activities of human immunoglobulin derived from donors in Japan against mosquito-borne flaviviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Yunoki, Mikihiro; Kurosu, Takeshi; Koketsu, Ritsuko Kubota; Takahashi, Kazuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), West Nile virus (WNV), and dengue virus (DenV) are causal agents of Japanese encephalitis, West Nile fever, and dengue fever, respectively. JEV is considered to be indigenized and widespread in Japan, whereas WNV and DenV are not indigenized in Japan. Globulin products seem to reflect the status of the donor population according to antivirus neutralization activity. However, the anti-JEV, -WNV, and -DenV neutralization activities of globulin products derived from donors in Japan have not been clarified. Furthermore, potential candidates for the development of an effective immunotherapeutic drug for encephalitis caused by JEV, WNV, or DenV have also not been identified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the overall status of the donor population in Japan based on globulin products by evaluating anti-JEV, -WNV, and -DenV neutralizing activities of intravenous immunoglobulin. Overall, intravenous immunoglobulin products showed stable neutralizing activity against JEV but showed no or only weak activity against WNV or DenV. These results suggest that the epidemiological level against WNV and DenV in the donor population of Japan is still low, suggesting that these viruses are not yet indigenized. In addition, JEV vaccinations and/or infections in the donor population do not induce a cross-reactive antibody against WNV. PMID:27462140

  9. Neutralizing activities of human immunoglobulin derived from donors in Japan against mosquito-borne flaviviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Mikihiro; Kurosu, Takeshi; Koketsu, Ritsuko Kubota; Takahashi, Kazuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), West Nile virus (WNV), and dengue virus (DenV) are causal agents of Japanese encephalitis, West Nile fever, and dengue fever, respectively. JEV is considered to be indigenized and widespread in Japan, whereas WNV and DenV are not indigenized in Japan. Globulin products seem to reflect the status of the donor population according to antivirus neutralization activity. However, the anti-JEV, -WNV, and -DenV neutralization activities of globulin products derived from donors in Japan have not been clarified. Furthermore, potential candidates for the development of an effective immunotherapeutic drug for encephalitis caused by JEV, WNV, or DenV have also not been identified. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the overall status of the donor population in Japan based on globulin products by evaluating anti-JEV, -WNV, and -DenV neutralizing activities of intravenous immunoglobulin. Overall, intravenous immunoglobulin products showed stable neutralizing activity against JEV but showed no or only weak activity against WNV or DenV. These results suggest that the epidemiological level against WNV and DenV in the donor population of Japan is still low, suggesting that these viruses are not yet indigenized. In addition, JEV vaccinations and/or infections in the donor population do not induce a cross-reactive antibody against WNV. PMID:27462140

  10. Decanting of Neutralized H-Canyon Unirradiated Nuclear Material High Activity Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect

    BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAELG.

    2004-08-05

    An option to dispose of the High Activity Waste (HAW) stream from the processing of unirradiated materials directly to Saltstone is being evaluated to conserve High Level Waste (HLW) tank farm space and to reduce the future production of HLW glass logs. To meet the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), decanting the supernate from precipitated solids was proposed to reduce mercury and radionuclide levels in the waste. Only the caustic supernate will then be sent to Saltstone. Verification that the Saltstone WAC will be met has involved a series of laboratory studies using surrogate and actual HAW solutions from H-Canyon. The initial experiment involved addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to a surrogate HAW test solution and subsequent decanting of the supernate away from the precipitated solids. The chemical composition of the surrogate solution was based on a composition defined from analyses of actual HAW solutions generated during dissolution of unirradiated nuclear materials in H-Canyon [1]. Results from testing the surrogate HAW solution were reported in Reference [2]. Information obtained from the surrogate test solution study was used to define additional experiments on actual HAW solutions obtained from H-Canyon. These experiments were conducted with samples from three different batches of HAW solutions. The first and third HAW samples (HAW No.1 and HAW No.3 solutions) contained the centrifuge filter cake material from a gelatin strike that is periodically added to the waste stream. The second HAW sample (HAW No.2 solution) did not contain filter cake material. Monosodium titanate (MST) was added to the HAW No.2 and HAW No.3 solutions after addition of NaOH was complete and before the settling step. The addition of MST was to improve the decontamination of alpha and beta emitters (primarily plutonium and strontium) from the supernate. The addition of excess NaOH and the addition of MST were expected to result in sufficient alpha and beta

  11. Laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry for ultra-trace analysis of samples from space return missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, Igor V.; Calaway, Wallis F.; Emil Tripa, C.; Moore, Jerry F.; Wucher, Andreas; Pellin, Michael J.

    2005-12-01

    A new generation of secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) instruments has been developed that is especially designed for laser post-ionization (LPI). These instruments combine high useful yield and high background discrimination. Results presented here demonstrate that these instruments can detect one in every four atoms removed from a samples surface - a greater than one order of magnitude improvement over current large frame secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments. Because of their high sensitivity, these new LPI-SNMS instruments are especially amenable to analysis of samples of limited size and rare one-of-a-kind samples. Such an application is analysis of samples returned to Earth from space by the Genesis and Stardust Discovery missions of NASA.

  12. Oxalates as Activating Groups for Alcohols in Visible Light Photoredox Catalysis: Formation of Quaternary Centers by Redox-Neutral Fragment Coupling

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, David W. C.; Overman, Larry E.

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl oxalates are new bench-stable alcohol-activating groups for radical generation under visible light photoredox conditions. Using these precursors, the first net redox-neutral coupling of tertiary and secondary alcohols with electron-deficient alkenes is achieved. PMID:26322524

  13. AGE-RELATED CHANGES IN NEUTRAL SPHINGOMYELIN-SPECIFIC PHOSPHOLIPASE C ACTIVITY IN STRIATUM, HIPPOCAMPUS, AND FRONTAL CORTEX: IMPLICATION FOR SENSITIVITY TO STRESS AND INFLAMMATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies show the enrichment of mammalian brain with neutral sphingomyelin specific phospholipase C (ceramide-phosphocholine phosphodiesterase, EC 3.1.4.12; N-Sase). The objective of this study was to evaluate the subcellular N-Sase activity in striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex. Resu...

  14. Structure, Aggregation, and Activity of a Covalent Insulin Dimer Formed During Storage of Neutral Formulation of Human Insulin.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Christian Fogt; Norrman, Mathias; Wahlund, Per-Olof; Benie, Andrew J; Petersen, Bent O; Jessen, Christian M; Pedersen, Thomas Å; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Naver, Helle; Hubálek, František; Poulsen, Christian; Otzen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A specific covalently linked dimeric species of insulin high molecular weight products (HMWPs), formed during prolonged incubation of a neutral pharmaceutical formulation of human insulin, were characterized in terms of tertiary structure, self-association, biological activity, and fibrillation properties. The dimer was formed by a covalent link between A21Asn and B29Lys. It was analyzed using static and dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering to evaluate its self-association behavior. The tertiary structure was obtained using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The biological activity of HMWP was determined using 2 in vitro assays, and its influence on fibrillation was investigated using Thioflavin T assays. The dimer's tertiary structure was nearly identical to that of the noncovalent insulin dimer, and it was able to form hexamers in the presence of zinc. The dimer exhibited reduced propensity for self-association in the absence of zinc but significantly postponed the onset of fibrillation in insulin formulations. Consistent with its dimeric state, the tested species of HMWP showed little to no biological activity in the used assays. This study is the first detailed characterization of a specific type of human insulin HMWP formed during storage of a marketed pharmaceutical formulation. These results indicate that this specific type of HMWP is unlikely to antagonize the physical stability of the formulation, as HMWP retained a tertiary structure similar to the noncovalent dimer and participated in hexamer assembly in the presence of zinc. In addition, increasing amounts of HMWP reduce the rate of insulin fibrillation. PMID:26921119

  15. Neutralization Analysis of a Chicken Single-Chain Variable Fragment Derived from an Immune Antibody Library Against Infectious Bronchitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Li, Benqiang; Ye, Jiaxin; Wang, Man; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Jianguo

    2015-09-01

    Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), which is prevalent in many countries causing severe economic loss to the poultry industry, causes infectious bronchitis (IB) in birds. Recombinant single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) have been proven to effectively inhibit many viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, and they could be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic reagent to control IB. In this study, six anti-IBV chicken scFvs, ZL.10, ZL.64, ZL.78, ZL.80, ZL.138, and ZL.256, were obtained by screening random clones from an immune antibody library. An analysis of nucleotide sequences revealed that they represented distinctive genetic sequences and greatly varied in complementarity-determining region three of the heavy chain. Neutralization tests showed that ZL.10, which bound the S1 protein in western blots, inhibited the formation of syncytia in Vero cells 48 h post IBV infection and decreased the transcriptional level of nucleoprotein mRNA to 17.2%, while the other five scFvs, including ZL.78 and ZL.256, that bound the N protein did not. In conclusion, the results suggested that specific and neutralizing chicken scFvs against IBV, which can be safe and economical antibody reagents, can be produced in vitro through prokaryotic expression. PMID:26090700

  16. Neutral "Cp-Free" Silyl-Lanthanide(II) Complexes: Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zitz, Rainer; Hlina, Johann; Gatterer, Karl; Marschner, Christoph; Szilvási, Tibor; Baumgartner, Judith

    2015-07-20

    Complexes featuring lanthanide silicon bonds represent a research area still in its infancy. Herein, we report a series of Cp-free lanthanide (+II) complexes bearing σ-bonded silyl ligands. By reactions of LnI2 (Ln = Yb, Eu, Sm) either with a 1,4-oligosilanyl dianion [K-Si(SiMe3)2SiMe2SiMe2Si(SiMe3)2-K)] (1) or with 2 (Me3Si)3SiK (3) the corresponding neutral metallacyclopentasilanes ({Me2Si(Me3Si)2Si}2)Ln·(THF)4 (Ln = Yb (2a), Eu (2b), Sm (2c)), or the disilylated complexes ({Me3Si}3Si)2Ln·(THF)3 (Ln = Yb (4a), Eu (4b), Sm (4c)), were selectively obtained. Complexes 2b, 2c, 4b, and 4c represent the first examples of structurally characterized Cp-free Eu and Sm complexes with silyl ligands. In both series, a linear correlation was observed between the Ln-Si bond lengths and the covalent radii of the corresponding lanthanide metals. Density functional theory calculations were also carried out for complexes 2a-c and 4a-c to elucidate the bonding situation between the Ln(+II) centers and Si. PMID:26132550

  17. Neutral “Cp-Free” Silyl-Lanthanide(II) Complexes: Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Complexes featuring lanthanide silicon bonds represent a research area still in its infancy. Herein, we report a series of Cp-free lanthanide (+II) complexes bearing σ-bonded silyl ligands. By reactions of LnI2 (Ln = Yb, Eu, Sm) either with a 1,4-oligosilanyl dianion [K-Si(SiMe3)2SiMe2SiMe2Si(SiMe3)2-K)] (1) or with 2 (Me3Si)3SiK (3) the corresponding neutral metallacyclopentasilanes ({Me2Si(Me3Si)2Si}2)Ln·(THF)4 (Ln = Yb (2a), Eu (2b), Sm (2c)), or the disilylated complexes ({Me3Si}3Si)2Ln·(THF)3 (Ln = Yb (4a), Eu (4b), Sm (4c)), were selectively obtained. Complexes 2b, 2c, 4b, and 4c represent the first examples of structurally characterized Cp-free Eu and Sm complexes with silyl ligands. In both series, a linear correlation was observed between the Ln–Si bond lengths and the covalent radii of the corresponding lanthanide metals. Density functional theory calculations were also carried out for complexes 2a–c and 4a–c to elucidate the bonding situation between the Ln(+II) centers and Si. PMID:26132550

  18. Factor Associated with Neutral Sphingomyelinase Activity Mediates Navigational Capacity of Leukocytes Responding to Wounds and Infection: Live Imaging Studies in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Boecke, Alexandra; Sieger, Dirk; Neacsu, Cristian Dan; Kashkar, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Factor associated with neutral sphingomyelinase activity (FAN) is an adaptor protein that specifically binds to the p55 receptor for TNF (TNF-RI). Our previous investigations demonstrated that FAN plays a role in TNF-induced actin reorganization by connecting the plasma membrane with actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that FAN may impact on cellular motility in response to TNF and in the context of immune inflammatory conditions. In this study, we used the translucent zebrafish larvae for in vivo analysis of leukocyte migration after morpholino knockdown of FAN. FAN-deficient zebrafish leukocytes were impaired in their migration toward tail fin wounds, leading to a reduced number of cells reaching the wound. Furthermore, FAN-deficient leukocytes show an impaired response to bacterial infections, suggesting that FAN is generally required for the directed chemotactic response of immune cells independent of the nature of the stimulus. Cell-tracking analysis up to 3 h after injury revealed that the reduced number of leukocytes is not due to a reduction in random motility or speed of movement. Leukocytes from FAN-deficient embryos protrude pseudopodia in all directions instead of having one clear leading edge. Our results suggest that FAN-deficient leukocytes exhibit an impaired navigational capacity, leading to a disrupted chemotactic response. PMID:22802420

  19. Structural characterization of neutral oligosaccharides with blood-group A and H activity isolated from bovine submaxillary mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, A V; D'Arcy, S M; Donoghue, C M

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated the structures of 11 neutral oligosaccharides released from bovine submaxillary mucin by alkaline borohydride treatment and isolated by h.p.l.c. One hexa-, one penta-, three tetra-, four tri- and two di-saccharides containing core types 1, 2, 3 or 4 were obtained. We report their structures, determined by a combination of one- and two-dimensional 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy at 270 MHz and methylation analysis involving g.l.c.-m.s., along with their approximate molar ratios. Only three of these oligosaccharides have previously been reported in this source. Of the new oligosaccharides, one contains the blood-group-A antigenic determinant, two contain the blood-group-H type 2 determinant, while another contains the blood-group-H type 3 determinant. The oligosaccharide GlcNAc beta (1----6)[GlcNAc beta (1----3)]GalNAcol, although previously found as a core structure, has been isolated here as a novel trisaccharide. PMID:1718265

  20. Structure-function relationships in novel peptide dodecamerswith broad-spectrum bactericidal and endotoxin-neutralizing activities.

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, K H; Haseman, J; Young, H C; Mayo, J W

    2000-01-01

    A series of designed peptide 33-mers (betapep peptides) areknown to be bactericidal [Mayo, Haseman, Ilyina and Gray (1998)Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1425, 81-92]. Here dodecapeptides (SC-1-SC-8), which 'walk through' the sequence ofbetapep-25, were investigated for their ability to kill Gram-negativeand -positive bacteria and to neutralize endotoxin. SC-4 (KLFKRHLKWKI I-NH(2); the -NH(2) at the right of each sequenceindicates amidation of the C-terminal carboxylate group) is the mosteffective, more so than betapep-25, at killing Gram-negative bacteriawith nanomolar LD(50) values. Against Gram-positive bacteria,SC-4 also shows good activity with submicromolar LD(50)values. Leakage studies indicate rapid bacterial membrane permeability,with t(1/2) valuesof 10-15 min. SC-4 in the micromolar range also effectivelyneutralizes endotoxin and is not haemolytic below 10(-4)M. For all SC peptides, CD and NMR data indicate the presence of both 3(10)- and alpha-helix. For SC-4, nuclear-Overhauser-effect-based computational modelling yields an amphipathic helix with K1, K4,R5, and K8 arrayed on the same face (K is lysine, R is arginine).Activity differences among SC peptides and single-site variants of SC-4allow some structure-function relationships to be deduced.Relative to other known bactericidal peptides in the linear peptide,helix-forming category, SC-4 is the most potent broad-spectrumantibacterial identified to date. The present study contributes to thedevelopment of agents involved in combating the ever-recurring problemof drug-resistant micro-organisms. PMID:10903132

  1. Monoclonal Antibody Combinations that Present Synergistic Neutralizing Activity: A Platform for Next-Generation Anti-Toxin Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Eran; Torgeman, Amram; Ozeri, Eyal; Zichel, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are among the fastest-growing therapeutics and are being developed for a broad range of indications, including the neutralization of toxins, bacteria and viruses. Nevertheless, MAbs potency is still relatively low when compared to conventional polyclonal Ab preparations. Moreover, the efficacy of an individual neutralizing MAb may significantly be hampered by the potential absence or modification of its target epitope in a mutant or subtype of the infectious agent. These limitations of individual neutralizing MAbs can be overcome by using oligoclonal combinations of several MAbs with different specificities to the target antigen. Studies conducted in our lab and by others show that such combined MAb preparation may present substantial synergy in its potency over the calculated additive potency of its individual MAb components. Moreover, oligoclonal preparation is expected to be better suited to compensating for reduced efficacy due to epitope variation. In this review, the synergistic neutralization properties of combined oligoclonal Ab preparations are described. The effect of Ab affinity, autologous Fc fraction, and targeting a critical number of epitopes, as well as the unexpected contribution of non-neutralizing clones to the synergistic neutralizing effect are presented and discussed. PMID:26035486

  2. Passivity analysis for neural networks of neutral type with Markovian jumping parameters and time delay in the leakage term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, P.; Nagamani, G.; Rakkiyappan, R.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, the problem of passivity analysis is investigated for neutral type neural networks with Markovian jumping parameters and time delay in the leakage term. The delay is assumed to be time-varying and belong to a given interval, which means that the lower and upper bounds of interval time-varying delays are available. By constructing proper Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, new delay-dependent passivity conditions are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Moreover, it is well known that the passivity behavior of neural networks is very sensitive to the time delay in the leakage term. Finally, three numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness and less conservatism of the proposed method.

  3. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-27

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  4. Antibodies with specificity to native gp120 and neutralization activity against primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates elicited by immunization with oligomeric gp160.

    PubMed Central

    VanCott, T C; Mascola, J R; Kaminski, R W; Kalyanaraman, V; Hallberg, P L; Burnett, P R; Ulrich, J T; Rechtman, D J; Birx, D L

    1997-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope vaccine candidates elicit high antibody binding titers with neutralizing activity against T-cell line-adapted but not primary HIV-1 isolates. Serum antibodies from these human vaccine recipients were also found to be preferentially directed to linear epitopes within gp120 that are poorly exposed on native gp120. Systemic immunization of rabbits with an affinity-purified oligomeric gp160 protein formulated with either Alhydrogel or monophosphoryl lipid A-containing adjuvants resulted in the induction of high-titered serum antibodies that preferentially bound epitopes exposed on native forms of gp120 and gp160, recognized a restricted number of linear epitopes, efficiently bound heterologous strains of monomeric gp120 and cell surface-expressed oligomeric gp120/gp41, and neutralized several strains of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1. Additionally, those immune sera with the highest oligomeric gp160 antibody binding titers had neutralizing activity against some primary HIV-1 isolates, using phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell targets. Induction of an antibody response preferentially reactive with natively folded gp120/gp160 was dependent on the tertiary structure of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen as well as its adjuvant formulation, route of administration, and number of immunizations administered. These studies demonstrate the capacity of a soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein vaccine to elicit an antibody response capable of neutralizing primary HIV-1 isolates. PMID:9151820

  5. Crystal Structure of PG16 and Chimeric Dissection with Somatically Related PG9: Structure-Function Analysis of Two Quaternary-Specific Antibodies That Effectively Neutralize HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; McLellan, Jason S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Changela, Anita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Phogat, Sanjay; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-03

    HIV-1 resists neutralization by most antibodies. Two somatically related human antibodies, PG9 and PG16, however, each neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Here we present the structure of the antigen-binding fragment of PG16 in monoclinic and orthorhombic lattices at 2.4 and 4.0 {angstrom}, respectively, and use a combination of structural analysis, paratope dissection, and neutralization assessment to determine the functional relevance of three unusual PG9/PG16 features: N-linked glycosylation, extensive affinity maturation, and a heavy chain-third complementarity-determining region (CDR H3) that is one of the longest observed in human antibodies. Glycosylation extended off the side of the light chain variable domain and was not required for neutralization. The CDR H3 formed an axe-shaped subdomain, which comprised 42% of the CDR surface, with the axe head looming {approx}20 {angstrom} above the other combining loops. Comprehensive sets of chimeric swaps between PG9 and PG16 of light chain, heavy chain, and CDR H3 were employed to decipher structure-function relationships. Chimeric swaps generally complemented functionally, with differences in PG9/PG16 neutralization related primarily to residue differences in CDR H3. Meanwhile, chimeric reversions to genomic V genes showed isolate-dependent effects, with affinity maturation playing a significant role in augmenting neutralization breadth (P = 0.036) and potency (P < 0.0001). The structural and functional details of extraordinary CDR H3 and extensive affinity maturation provide insights into the neutralization mechanism of and the elicitation pathway for broadly neutralizing antibodies like PG9 and PG16.

  6. Correcting the Record on the Analysis of IBEX and STEREO Data Regarding Variations in the Neutral Interstellar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Bzowski, M.; Drews, C.; Leonard, T.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Möbius, E.; Schwadron, N.; Sokół, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The journey of the Sun through space carries the solar system through a dynamic interstellar environment that is presently characterized by a Mach ~1 motion between the heliosphere and the surrounding warm partially ionized interstellar cloud. The interaction between the heliosphere and interstellar medium is an evolving process due to variable solar wind properties and the turbulent nature of the interstellar cloud that surrounds the heliosphere. Frisch et al. presented a meta-analysis of the historical data on the interstellar wind flowing through the heliosphere and concluded that temporal changes in the ecliptic longitude of the flow direction with time were statistically indicated by the data available in the refereed literature at the time of that writing. Lallement & Bertaux disagree with this result, and suggested, for instance, that a key instrumental response function of IBEX-Lo was incorrect and that the STEREO pickup ion data are unsuitable for diagnosing the flow of interstellar neutrals through the heliosphere. In this paper we first show that temporal variations in the interstellar wind through the heliosphere are consistent with our knowledge of the very local interstellar medium. The statistical analysis of the helium wind data is revisited, and a recent correction of a typographical error in the literature is incorporated into the new fits. With this correction, and including no newer IBEX results, these combined data still indicate that a change in the longitude of the interstellar neutral wind of λ = 5.°6 ± 2.°4 over the past forty years remains statistically likely, but an constant flow longitude is now statistically possible. Other scenarios for the selection of subsets of these data used in the fitting process produce similar conclusions. We show that the speculations made by Lallement & Bertin about the IBEX instrumental response function are incorrect, and that their other objections to the data used in the meta-analysis are either

  7. Gender Neutralities, Dichotomies and Hidden Inequalities: Analysis of Vocational Teachers' Reflections on Gender in the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappalainen, Sirpa; Lahelma, Elina; Pehkonen, Leila; Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses how Finnish vocational teachers make sense of the meanings of gender in their work. The context of the study consists of the two most gender segregated environments of vocational education: the female-dominated Sector of Health and Social Services and the male-dominated Sector of Technology and Transport. Our analysis draws…

  8. Search for active neutrino disappearance using neutral-current interactions in the MINOS long-baseline experiment.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Andreopoulos, C; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Baller, B; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehm, J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Cavanaugh, S; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Coleman, S J; Culling, A J; de Jong, J K; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Dytman, S A; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Harris, E Falk; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Godley, A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hsu, L; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, J J; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Ma, J; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Metelko, C J; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlović, Z; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Petyt, D A; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahaman, A; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ryabov, V A; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tavera, M A; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Yang, T; Zhang, K; Zwaska, R

    2008-11-28

    We report the first detailed comparisons of the rates and spectra of neutral-current neutrino interactions at two widely separated locations. A depletion in the rate at the far site would indicate mixing between nu(mu) and a sterile particle. No anomalous depletion in the reconstructed energy spectrum is observed. Assuming oscillations occur at a single mass-squared splitting, a fit to the neutral- and charged-current energy spectra limits the fraction of nu(mu) oscillating to a sterile neutrino to be below 0.68 at 90% confidence level. A less stringent limit due to a possible contribution to the measured neutral-current event rate at the far site from nu(e) appearance at the current experimental limit is also presented. PMID:19113477

  9. Search for Active Neutrino Disappearance Using Neutral-Current Interactions in the MINOS Long-Baseline Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Baller, B.; Bernstein, R. H.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Grossman, N.; Harris, D.; Hatcher, R.; Hsu, L.; Hylen, J.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Koizumi, G.; Kreymer, A.; Lucas, P.; Marchionni, A.

    2008-11-28

    We report the first detailed comparisons of the rates and spectra of neutral-current neutrino interactions at two widely separated locations. A depletion in the rate at the far site would indicate mixing between {nu}{sub {mu}} and a sterile particle. No anomalous depletion in the reconstructed energy spectrum is observed. Assuming oscillations occur at a single mass-squared splitting, a fit to the neutral- and charged-current energy spectra limits the fraction of {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillating to a sterile neutrino to be below 0.68 at 90% confidence level. A less stringent limit due to a possible contribution to the measured neutral-current event rate at the far site from {nu}{sub e} appearance at the current experimental limit is also presented.

  10. Gas chromatography analysis of cellular fatty acids and neutral monosaccharides in the identification of lactobacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, A F; Korkeala, H; Mononen, I

    1987-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids and monosaccharides in a group of 14 lactobacilli were analyzed by gas chromatography and the identity of the components was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the same bacterial sample, both monosaccharides and fatty acids were liberated by methanolysis, and in certain experiments, fatty acids alone were released by basic hydrolysis. The results indicate that basic hydrolysis gave more comprehensive information about the fatty acids, but the analysis of monosaccharides was found to be much more useful in distinguishing between different species of lactobacilli. The method described allowed differentiation of 11 of 14 Lactobacillus species, and even single colonies isolated from agar plates could be used for analysis without subculturing. PMID:3435147

  11. Efficacy of IgG and F(ab')2 antivenoms to neutralize snake venom-induced local tissue damage as assessed by the proteomic analysis of wound exudate.

    PubMed

    Rucavado, Alexandra; Escalante, Teresa; Shannon, John D; Ayala-Castro, Carla N; Villalta, Mauren; Gutiérrez, José María; Fox, Jay W

    2012-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of wound exudates represents a valuable tool to investigate tissue pathology and to assess the therapeutic success of various interventions. In this study, the ability of horse-derived IgG and F(ab')(2) antivenoms to neutralize local pathological effects induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops asper in mouse muscle was investigated by the proteomic analysis of exudates collected in the vicinity of affected tissue. In experiments involving the incubation of venom and antivenom prior to injection in mice, hemorrhagic activity was completely abolished and local muscle-damaging activity was significantly reduced by the antivenoms. In these conditions, the relative amounts of several intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins were reduced by the action of antivenoms, whereas the relative amounts of various plasma proteins were not modified. Because not all intracellular proteins were reduced, it is likely that there is a residual cytotoxicity not neutralized by antivenoms. In experiments designed to more closely reproduce the actual circumstances of envenoming, that is, when antivenom is administered after envenomation, the number of proteins whose amounts in exudates were reduced by antivenoms decreased, underscoring the difficulty in neutralizing local pathology due to the very rapid onset of venom-induced pathology. In these experiments, IgG antivenom was more efficient than F(ab')(2) antivenom when administered after envenomation, probably as a consequence of differences in their pharmacokinetic profiles. PMID:22004524

  12. The Activity of Neutral α-Glucosidase and Selected Biochemical Parameters in the Annual Cycle of Breeding Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kotońska-Feiga, Julia; Dobicki, Wojciech; Pokorny, Przemysław; Nowacki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate seasonal changes in the hydrolytic and transferase activity of neutral α-glucosidase, the level of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and total protein in the annual breeding cycle of the carp. The study was conducted on fish from a fish farm in Lower Silesia (Poland). Blood serum was collected from the heart in: June, September and December of two consecutive years. The results of the study show that the hydrolytic and transferase activity of neutral α-glucosidase, as well as the results of basic biochemical parameters are highest in summer, when the fish seek and intake food intensively. The lowest values were observed in spring, when carp have the lowest metabolism after the wintering period. PMID:26559406

  13. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Rosén, T; Einarsson, J; Nordmark, A; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2015-12-01

    We numerically analyze the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem, we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number Re(a). As Re(a)→0 and as the box size of the system tends to infinity, we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in Re(a) for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are substantial finite-size corrections to the analytical results obtained for the unbounded system. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice Boltzmann simulations to analyze the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio λ(c)≈0.137 below which tumbling is stable (as well as log rolling). The simulation results show a bifurcation line in the λ-Re(a) plane that reaches λ≈0.1275 at the smallest shear Reynolds number (Re(a)=1) at which we could simulate with the lattice Boltzmann code, in qualitative agreement with the analytical results. PMID:26764819

  14. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, T.; Einarsson, J.; Nordmark, A.; Aidun, C. K.; Lundell, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-12-01

    We numerically analyze the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem, we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number Rea. As Rea→0 and as the box size of the system tends to infinity, we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in Rea for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are substantial finite-size corrections to the analytical results obtained for the unbounded system. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice Boltzmann simulations to analyze the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio λc≈0.137 below which tumbling is stable (as well as log rolling). The simulation results show a bifurcation line in the λ -Rea plane that reaches λ ≈0.1275 at the smallest shear Reynolds number (Rea=1 ) at which we could simulate with the lattice Boltzmann code, in qualitative agreement with the analytical results.

  15. ACDOS1: a computer code to calculate dose rates from neutron activation of neutral beamlines and other fusion-reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Keney, G.S.

    1981-08-01

    A computer code has been written to calculate neutron induced activation of neutral-beam injector components and the corresponding dose rates as a function of geometry, component composition, and time after shutdown. The code, ACDOS1, was written in FORTRAN IV to calculate both activity and dose rates for up to 30 target nuclides and 50 neutron groups. Sufficient versatility has also been incorporated into the code to make it applicable to a variety of general activation problems due to neutrons of energy less than 20 MeV.

  16. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of volcanic samples: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Finnegan, D.L.; Crowe, B.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of volcanic emissions have been collected between and during eruptions of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes during the last three years. Airborne particles have been collected on Teflon filters and acidic gases on base-impregnated cellulose filters. Chemically neutral gas-phase species are collected on charcoal-coated cellulose filters. The primary analytical technique used is nondestructive neutron activation analysis, which has been used to determine the quantities of up to 35 elements on the different filters. The use of neutron activation analysis makes it possible to analyze for a wide range of elements in the different matrices used for the collection and to learn about the distribution between particles and gas phases for each of the elements.

  17. Quetiapine Inhibits Microglial Activation by Neutralizing Abnormal STIM1-Mediated Intercellular Calcium Homeostasis and Promotes Myelin Repair in a Cuprizone-Induced Mouse Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanzhi; Liu, Shubao; Tian, Yanping; Wu, Xiyan; He, Yangtao; Li, Chengren; Namaka, Michael; Kong, Jiming; Li, Hongli; Xiao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation has been considered as a crucial process in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and psychiatric disorders. Several antipsychotic drugs (APDs) have been shown to display inhibitory effects on microglial activation in vitro, possibly through the suppression of elevated intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration. However, the exact underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects of quetiapine (Que), an atypical APD, on microglial activation. We utilized a chronic cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination mouse model to determine the direct effect of Que on microglial activation. Our results showed that treatment with Que significantly reduced recruitment and activation of microglia/macrophage in the lesion of corpus callosum and promoted remyelination after CPZ withdrawal. Our in vitro studies also confirmed the direct effect of Que on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of microglial N9 cells, whereby Que significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Moreover, we demonstrated that pretreatment with Que, neutralized the up-regulation of STIM1 induced by LPS and declined both LPS and thapsigargin (Tg)-induced store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Finally, we found that pretreatment with Que significantly reduced the translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit from cytoplasm to nuclei in LPS-activated primary microglial cells. Overall, our data suggested that Que may inhibit microglial activation by neutralization of the LPS-induced abnormal STIM1-mediated intercellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:26732345

  18. LHC searches for heavy neutral Higgs bosons with a top jet substructure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ning; Li, Jinmian; Liu, Yandong

    2016-05-01

    We study the LHC searches for the heavy C P -odd Higgs boson A and C P -even Higgs boson H in the context of a general two-Higgs-doublet model. Specifically, we consider the decay mode of A /H →t t ¯ through the t t ¯ associated production channels. In the so-called "alignment limit" of the two-Higgs-doublet model, this decay mode can be the most dominant one. By employing the HEPTopTagger and the multivariate analysis method, we present the search sensitivities for both C P -odd Higgs boson A and C P -even Higgs boson H via this channel with multiple top quarks at the high-luminosity LHC runs.

  19. Surface analysis of rubbers and plastics using secondary neutral mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.

    1999-08-23

    Rubber and plastics are complex mixtures of long-chain polymers, smaller organic additives used as plasticizers, mildicides, fungicides, colorants, etc., and inorganic additives such as carbon and silica. Surface analysis of such materials is at once difficult and important. The difficulty lies in the need to identify specific carbon molecules on a very similar organic surface. The importance arises from the dramatic effect that the distribution and concentration of additives have on the physical properties of polymeric materials. Recently we have had some success in applying laser desorption post-ionization mass spectrometry in measuring the surface concentration and distribution of both additives and the polymer molecules themselves. The key has been to use the photoionization properties of the analyte of interest to augment mass spectrometric information.

  20. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DERMAL WIPE SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.16)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method for extracting and preparing a dermal (hand) wipe sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this SOP. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  1. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING AIR SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.12)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method is for extracting an indoor and outdoor air sample consisting of a quartz fiber filter and an XAD-2 cartridge for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass...

  2. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING SURFACE WIPE FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.17)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for extracting and preparing a hard floor surface wipe or food preparation surface wipe sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spect...

  3. Use of a Synthetic Biosensor for Neutralizing Activity-Biased Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies against Atroxlysin-I, an Hemorrhagic Metalloproteinase from Bothrops atrox Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Francisco Santos; Nguyen, Dung Le; Castro, Karen Larissa; Cobo, Sandra; Machado de Avila, Ricardo Andrez; Ferreira, Nivia de Assis; Sanchez, Eladio Flores; Nguyen, Christophe; Granier, Claude; Galéa, Pascale; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Molina, Franck

    2014-01-01

    Background The snake Bothrops atrox is responsible for the majority of envenomings in the northern region of South America. Severe local effects, including hemorrhage, which are mainly caused by snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs), are not fully neutralized by conventional serum therapy. Little is known about the immunochemistry of the P-I SVMPs since few monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against these molecules have been obtained. In addition, producing toxin-neutralizing mAbs remains very challenging. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we report on the set-up of a functional screening based on a synthetic peptide used as a biosensor to select neutralizing mAbs against SVMPs and the successful production of neutralizing mAbs against Atroxlysin-I (Atr-I), a P-I SVMP from B. atrox. Hybridomas producing supernatants with inhibitory effect against the proteolytic activity of Atr-I towards the FRET peptide Abz-LVEALYQ-EDDnp were selected. Six IgG1 Mabs were obtained (named mAbatr1 to mAbatr6) and also two IgM. mAbatrs1, 2, 3 and 6 were purified. All showed a high specific reactivity, recognizing only Atr-I and B. atrox venom in ELISA and a high affinity, showing equilibrium constants in the nM range for Atr-I. These mAbatrs were not able to bind to Atr-I overlapping peptides, suggesting that they recognize conformational epitopes. Conclusions/Significance For the first time a functional screening based on a synthetic biosensor was successfully used for the selection of neutralizing mAbs against SVMPs. PMID:24762927

  4. Inference of Splicing Regulatory Activities by Sequence Neighborhood Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Michael B; Shomron, Noam; Yeo, Gene W; Schneider, Aniket; Xiao, Xinshu; Burge, Christopher B

    2006-01-01

    Sequence-specific recognition of nucleic-acid motifs is critical to many cellular processes. We have developed a new and general method called Neighborhood Inference (NI) that predicts sequences with activity in regulating a biochemical process based on the local density of known sites in sequence space. Applied to the problem of RNA splicing regulation, NI was used to predict hundreds of new exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) and silencer (ESS) hexanucleotides from known human ESEs and ESSs. These predictions were supported by cross-validation analysis, by analysis of published splicing regulatory activity data, by sequence-conservation analysis, and by measurement of the splicing regulatory activity of 24 novel predicted ESEs, ESSs, and neutral sequences using an in vivo splicing reporter assay. These results demonstrate the ability of NI to accurately predict splicing regulatory activity and show that the scope of exonic splicing regulatory elements is substantially larger than previously anticipated. Analysis of orthologous exons in four mammals showed that the NI score of ESEs, a measure of function, is much more highly conserved above background than ESE primary sequence. This observation indicates a high degree of selection for ESE activity in mammalian exons, with surprisingly frequent interchangeability between ESE sequences. PMID:17121466

  5. Structural Analysis of Human and Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies 2909 and 2.5B: Implications for the Configuration of the Quaternary Neutralizing Epitope of HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    B Spurrier; J Sampson; M Totrov; H Li; T ONeal; C Williams; J Robinson; M Gorny; S Zolla-Pazner; X Kong

    2011-12-31

    The quaternary neutralizing epitope (QNE) of HIV-1 gp120 is preferentially expressed on the trimeric envelope spikes of intact HIV virions, and QNE-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potently neutralize HIV-1. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Fabs of human mAb 2909 and macaque mAb 2.5B. Both mAbs have long beta hairpin CDR H3 regions >20 {angstrom} in length that are each situated at the center of their respective antigen-binding sites. Computational analysis showed that the paratopes include the whole CDR H3, while additional CDR residues form shallow binding pockets. Structural modeling suggests a way to understand the configuration of QNEs and the antigen-antibody interaction for QNE mAbs. Our data will be useful in designing immunogens that may elicit potent neutralizing QNE Abs.

  6. Phenotypic and functional analysis of the modification of murine bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) induced by neutral Ginseng polysaccharides (NGP)

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingjuan; Meng, Yiming; Liang, Zaifu; Du, Lin; Zhang, Zhenjie; Hu, Xu; Shan, Fengping

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we reveal that a neutral polysaccharide isolated from a Chinese medicinal herb, named Ginseng (Panaxgiseng C.A. Meyer), promotes maturation of BMDCs via inducing changes both inside and outside BMDCs, as well as changes of functions. These affects of NGP on BMDCs were evaluated with use of conventional scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) for morphology of BMDCs, flow cytometry (FCM) for key surface markers of BMDCs, cytochemistry assay, FITC-dextran, bio-assay for their phagocytosis and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cytokine production by BMDCs. Our results proved that NGP induced maturation of BMDCs as reflected by the downregulation of acid phosphatase (ACP) activity inside the BMDCs, which occurs when phagocytosis of BMDCs decreased, while antigen presentation increased upon maturation. These data also revealed higher expression of MHC II, CD80, CD86, CD83, CD40 and secretion of higher level of IL-12 and low level of TNF-α. Our approach suggests that NGP could therefore stimulate the maturation of murine BMDCs through a series of regulation to the BMDCs. PMID:23291949

  7. New Organocatalyst Scaffolds with High Activity in Promoting Hydrazone and Oxime Formation at Neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of two new classes of catalysts for hydrazone and oxime formation in water at neutral pH, namely 2-aminophenols and 2-(aminomethyl)benzimidazoles, is reported. Kinetics studies in aqueous solutions at pH 7.4 revealed rate enhancements up to 7-fold greater than with classic aniline catalysis. 2-(Aminomethyl)benzimidazoles were found to be effective catalysts with otherwise challenging aryl ketone substrates. PMID:25545888

  8. Search for active neutrino disappearance using neutral-current interactions in the MINOS long-baseline experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, Kregg E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C. Baller, B.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W.L.; Becker, B.R.; /Minnesota U. /Rutherford

    2008-07-01

    We have measured the rates and spectra of neutral-current neutrino interactions in the MINOS detectors, which are separated by 734 km. A depletion in the rate at the far site would indicate mixing between {nu}{sub {mu}} and a sterile particle. The depletion of the total neutral-current event rate at the far site is limited to be below 17% at 90% confidence level without {nu}{sub e} appearance. Assuming oscillations occur at a single mass-squared splitting, a fit to the neutral- and charged-current energy spectra shows the fraction of {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillating to a sterile neutrino is 0.28{sub -0.28}{sup +0.25}(stat.+syst.). Including {nu}{sub e} appearance at the current experimental upper bound limits the depletion to be below 21% at 90% confidence level and the fit fraction of {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillating to a sterile neutrino is 0.43{sub -0.27}{sup +0.23}(stat.+syst.).

  9. Analysis of Cross-Reactive Neutralizing Antibodies in Human HFMD Serum with an EV71 Pseudovirus-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jun; Xu, Lin; Sun, Shiyang; Jiang, Liping; Li, Xiaojun; Shao, Jie; Ma, Hongxia; Huang, Xueyong; Guo, Shijie; Chen, Haiying; Cheng, Tong; Yang, Lisheng; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Liang, Zhenglun; Jiang, Chunlai

    2014-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease, associated with enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections, has recently become an important public health issue throughout the world. Serum neutralizing antibodies are major indicators of EV71 infection and protective immunity. However, the potential for cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies for different EV71 genotypes and subgenotypes is unclear. Here we measured the cross-reactive neutralizing antibody titers against EV71 of different genotypes or subgenotypes in sera collected from EV71-infected children and vaccine-inoculated children in a phase III clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01636245) using a new pseudovirus-based neutralization assay. Antibodies induced by EV71-C4a were cross-reactive for different EV71 genotypes, demonstrating that C4a is a good candidate strain for an EV71 vaccine. Our study also demonstrated that this new assay is practical for analyses of clinical samples from epidemiological and vaccine studies. PMID:24964084

  10. Purification and some physico-chemical and enzymic properties of a calcium ion-activated neutral proteinase from rabbit skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Azanza, Jean-Louis; Raymond, Jacques; Robin, Jean-Michel; Cottin, Patrick; Ducastaing, André

    1979-01-01

    Ca2+-activated neutral proteinase was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle by a method involving DEAE-Sephacel chromatography, affinity chromatography on organomercurial–Sepharose and gel filtration on Sephacryl S-200 and Sephadex G-150. The SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate)/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoresis data show that the purified enzyme contains only one polypeptide chain of mol.wt. 73000. The purification procedure used allowed us to eliminate a contaminant containing two components of mol.wt. about 30000 each. Whole casein or α1-casein were hydrolysed with a maximum rate at 30°C, pH7.5, and with 5mm-CaCl2, but myofibrils were found to be a very susceptible substrate for this proteinase. This activity is associated with the destruction of the Z-discs, which is caused by the solubilization of the Z-line proteins. The activity of the proteinase in vitro is not limited to the removal of Z-line. SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis on larger plates showed the ability of the proteinase to degrade myofibrils more extensively than previously supposed. This proteolysis resulted in the production of a 30000-dalton component as well as in various other higher- and lower-molecular-weight peptide fragments. Troponin T, troponin I, α-tropomyosin, some high-molecular-weight proteins (M protein, heavy chain of myosin) and three unidentified proteins are degraded. Thus the number of proteinase-sensitive regions in the myofibrils is greater than as previously reported by Dayton, Goll, Zeece, Robson & Reville [(1976) Biochemistry 15, 2150–2158]. The Ca2+-activated neutral proteinase is not a chymotrypsin- or trypsin-like enzyme, but it reacted with all the classic thiol-proteinase inhibitors for cathepsin B, papain, bromelain and ficin. Thus the proteinase was proved to have an essential thiol group. Antipain and leupeptin are also inhibitors of the Ca2+-activated neutral proteinase. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:534501

  11. Analysis of neutralizing antigenic sites on the surface of type A12 foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Baxt, B; Vakharia, V; Moore, D M; Franke, A J; Morgan, D O

    1989-01-01

    A series of seven neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (nMAbs) directed against type A12 foot-and-mouth disease virus was used to generate neutralization-resistant variants. Both plaque reduction neutralization and microneutralization assays showed that the variants were no longer neutralized by the nMAbs used to generate them, although some of the variants still reacted with the nMAbs at high antibody concentrations. Results of cross-neutralization studies by both plaque reduction neutralization and microneutralization assays suggested the presence of at least one immunodominant antigenic site on the surface of type A12 foot-and-mouth disease virus, along with evidence of a second antigenic site on the viral surface. Two of the variants had reduced virulence in tissue culture as evidenced by their inability to inhibit cellular protein synthesis and a marked reduction in virus-induced cellular morphological alterations. Nucleotide sequencing of the variant genomes placed three epitopes of the major antigenic site on VP1 and the fourth epitope on VP3 and VP1. The one epitope of the minor site appears to reside only on VP1. Images PMID:2467993

  12. Structural Characterization of Humanized Nanobodies with Neutralizing Activity against the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin: Implications for a Potential Epitope of Toxin-Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Imtong, Chompounoot; Sookrung, Nitat; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2016-04-01

    Previously, the 126-kDa CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) fragment cloned from Bordetella pertussis--the causative agent of whooping cough--and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli was revealed as a key determinant for CyaA-mediated hemolysis against target erythrocytes. Here, phagemid-transfected E. coli clones producing nanobodies capable of binding to CyaA-Hly were selected from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage-display library. Subsequently verified for binding activities by indirect ELISA and Western blotting, four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies were obtained and designated according to the presence/absence of VHH-hallmark amino acids as VHH2, VH5, VH18 and VHH37. In vitro neutralization assay revealed that all four ~17-kDa His-tagged VH/VHH nanobodies, in particular VHH37, which were over-expressed as inclusions and successfully unfolded-refolded, were able to effectively inhibit CyaA-Hly-mediated hemolysis. Phage-mimotope searching revealed that only peptides with sequence homologous to Linker 1 connecting Blocks I and II within the CyaA-RTX subdomain were able to bind to these four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies. Structural analysis of VHH37 via homology modeling and intermolecular docking confirmed that this humanized nanobody directly interacts with CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 through multiple hydrogen and ionic bonds. Altogether, our present data demonstrate that CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 could serve as a potential epitope of CyaA-protective antigen that may be useful for development of peptide-based pertussis vaccines. Additionally, such toxin-specific nanobodies have a potential for test-driven development of a ready-to-use therapeutic in passive immunization for mitigation of disease severity. PMID:27043627

  13. Structural Characterization of Humanized Nanobodies with Neutralizing Activity against the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin: Implications for a Potential Epitope of Toxin-Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Imtong, Chompounoot; Sookrung, Nitat; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2016-01-01

    Previously, the 126-kDa CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) fragment cloned from Bordetella pertussis—the causative agent of whooping cough—and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli was revealed as a key determinant for CyaA-mediated hemolysis against target erythrocytes. Here, phagemid-transfected E. coli clones producing nanobodies capable of binding to CyaA-Hly were selected from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage-display library. Subsequently verified for binding activities by indirect ELISA and Western blotting, four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies were obtained and designated according to the presence/absence of VHH-hallmark amino acids as VHH2, VH5, VH18 and VHH37. In vitro neutralization assay revealed that all four ~17-kDa His-tagged VH/VHH nanobodies, in particular VHH37, which were over-expressed as inclusions and successfully unfolded-refolded, were able to effectively inhibit CyaA-Hly-mediated hemolysis. Phage-mimotope searching revealed that only peptides with sequence homologous to Linker 1 connecting Blocks I and II within the CyaA-RTX subdomain were able to bind to these four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies. Structural analysis of VHH37 via homology modeling and intermolecular docking confirmed that this humanized nanobody directly interacts with CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 through multiple hydrogen and ionic bonds. Altogether, our present data demonstrate that CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 could serve as a potential epitope of CyaA-protective antigen that may be useful for development of peptide-based pertussis vaccines. Additionally, such toxin-specific nanobodies have a potential for test-driven development of a ready-to-use therapeutic in passive immunization for mitigation of disease severity. PMID:27043627

  14. Iron-Carbonyl-Catalyzed Redox-Neutral [4+2] Annulation of N-H Imines and Internal Alkynes by C-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Teng; Zhao, Chongyang; He, Ruoyu; Chen, Hui; Wang, Congyang

    2016-04-18

    Stoichiometric C-H bond activation of arenes mediated by iron carbonyls was reported by Pauson as early as in 1965, yet the catalytic C-H transformations have not been developed. Herein, an iron-catalyzed annulation of N-H imines and internal alkynes to furnish cis-3,4-dihydroisoquinolines is described, and represents the first iron-carbonyl-catalyzed C-H activation reaction of arenes. Remarkablely, this is also the first redox-neutral [4+2] annulation of imines and alkynes proceeding by C-H activation. The reaction also features only cis stereoselectivity and excellent atom economy as neither base, nor external ligand, nor additive is required. Experimental and theoretical studies reveal an oxidative addition mechanism for C-H bond activation to afford a dinuclear ferracycle and a synergetic diiron-promoted H-transfer to the alkyne as the turnover-determining step. PMID:27002210

  15. Modeling thermospheric neutral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Liying

    Satellite drag prediction requires determination of thermospheric neutral density. The NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and the global-mean Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM) were used to quantify thermospheric neutral density and its variations, focusing on annual/semiannual variation, the effect of using measured solar irradiance on model calculations of solar-cycle variation, and global change in the thermosphere. Satellite drag data and the MSIS00 empirical model were utilized to compare to the TIEGCM simulations. The TIEGCM simulations indicated that eddy diffusion and its annual/semiannual variation is a mechanism for annual/semiannual density variation in the thermosphere. It was found that eddy diffusion near the turbopause can effectively influence thermospheric neutral density. Eddy diffusion, together with annual insolation variation and large-scale circulation, generated global annual/semiannual density variation observed by satellite drag. Using measured solar irradiance as solar input for the TIEGCM improved the solar-cycle dependency of the density calculation shown in F10.7 -based thermospheric empirical models. It has been found that the empirical models overestimate density at low solar activity. The TIEGCM simulations did not show such solar-cycle dependency. Using historic measurements of CO2 and F 10.7, simulations of the global-mean TIMEGCM showed that thermospheric neutral density at 400 km had an average long-term decrease of 1.7% per decade from 1970 to 2000. A forecast of density decrease for solar cycle 24 suggested that thermospheric density will decrease at 400 km from present to the end of solar cycle 24 at a rate of 2.7% per decade. Reduction in thermospheric density causes less atmospheric drag on earth-orbiting space objects. The implication of this long-term decrease of thermospheric neutral density is that it will increase the

  16. 9G4 Autoreactivity Is Increased in HIV-Infected Patients and Correlates with HIV Broadly Neutralizing Serum Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kobie, James J.; Alcena, Danielle C.; Zheng, Bo; Bryk, Peter; Mattiacio, Jonelle L.; Brewer, Matthew; LaBranche, Celia; Young, Faith M.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Montefiori, David C.; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Feng, Changyong; Jin, Xia; Keefer, Michael C.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The induction of a broadly neutralizing antibody (BNAb) response against HIV-1 would be a desirable feature of a protective vaccine. Vaccine strategies thus far have failed to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses; however a minority of HIV-infected patients do develop circulating BNAbs, from which several potent broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been isolated. The findings that several BNmAbs exhibit autoreactivity and that autoreactive serum antibodies are observed in some HIV patients have advanced the possibility that enforcement of self-tolerance may contribute to the rarity of BNAbs. To examine the possible breakdown of tolerance in HIV patients, we utilized the 9G4 anti-idiotype antibody system, enabling resolution of both autoreactive VH4-34 gene-expressing B cells and serum antibodies. Compared with healthy controls, HIV patients had significantly elevated 9G4+ serum IgG antibody concentrations and frequencies of 9G4+ B cells, a finding characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, both of which positively correlated with HIV viral load. Compared to the global 9G4−IgD− memory B cell population, the 9G4+IgD− memory fraction in HIV patients was dominated by isotype switched IgG+ B cells, but had a more prominent bias toward “IgM only" memory. HIV envelope reactivity was observed both in the 9G4+ serum antibody and 9G4+ B cell population. 9G4+ IgG serum antibody levels positively correlated (r = 0.403, p = 0.0019) with the serum HIV BNAbs. Interestingly, other serum autoantibodies commonly found in SLE (anti-dsDNA, ANA, anti-CL) did not correlate with serum HIV BNAbs. 9G4-associated autoreactivity is preferentially expanded in chronic HIV infection as compared to other SLE autoreactivities. Therefore, the 9G4 system provides an effective tool to examine autoreactivity in HIV patients. Our results suggest that the development of HIV BNAbs is not merely a consequence of a general breakdown in

  17. Potent and broad neutralizing activity of a single chain antibody fragment against cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Andrew Rosa; Ptak, Roger G; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Antony S; Alam, S. Munir; Wieczorek, Lindsay; Bouma, Peter; Fouts, Timothy; Jiang, Shibo; Polonis, Victoria R; Haynes, Barton F; Quinnan, Gerald V; Montefiori, David C; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2010-01-01

    Several human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) exhibit relatively potent and broad neutralizing activity against HIV-1, but there has not been much success in using them as potential therapeutics. We have previously hypothesized and demonstrated that small engineered antibodies can target highly conserved epitopes that are not accessible by full-size antibodies. However, their potency has not been comparatively evaluated with known HIV-1-neutralizing hmAbs against large panels of primary isolates. We report here the inhibitory activity of an engineered single chain antibody fragment (scFv), m9, against several panels of primary HIV-1 isolates from group M (clades A–G) using cell-free and cell-associated virus in cell line-based assays. M9 was much more potent than scFv 17b, and more potent than or comparable to the best-characterized broadly neutralizing hmAbs IgG1 b12, 2G12, 2F5 and 4e10. It also inhibited cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1 with higher potency than enfuvirtide (t-20, Fuzeon). M9 competed with a sulfated CCR5 N-terminal peptide for binding to gp120-CD4 complex, suggesting an overlapping epitope with the coreceptor binding site. M9 did not react with phosphatidylserine (pS) and cardiolipin (CL), nor did it react with a panel of autoantigens in an antinuclear autoantibody (ANA) assay. We further found that escape mutants resistant to m9 did not emerge in an immune selection assay. these results suggest that m9 is a novel anti-HIV-1 candidate with potential therapeutic or prophylactic properties, and its epitope is a new target for drug or vaccine development. PMID:20305395

  18. An immunogen containing four tandem 10E8 epitope repeats with exposed key residues induces antibodies that neutralize HIV-1 and activates an ADCC reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiwu; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Qian; Ye, Ling; Dai, Yanyan; Su, Shan; Yu, Fei; Ying, Tianlei; Yang, Chinglai; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    After three decades of intensive research efforts, an effective vaccine against HIV-1 remains to be developed. Several broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1, such as 10E8, recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 protein. Thus, the MPER is considered to be a very important target for vaccine design. However, the MPER segment has very weak immunogenicity and tends to insert its epitope residues into the cell membrane, thereby avoiding antibody binding. To address this complication in vaccine development, we herein designed a peptide, designated 10E8-4P, containing four copies of the 10E8 epitope as an immunogen. As predicted by structural simulation, 10E8-4P exhibits a well-arranged tandem helical conformation, with the key residues in the 10E8 epitope oriented at different angles, thus suggesting that some of these key residues may be exposed outside of the lipid membrane. Compared with a peptide containing a single 10E8 epitope (10E8-1P), 10E8-4P not only exhibited better antigenicity but also elicited neutralizing antibody response against HIV-1 pseudoviruses, whereas 10E8-1P could not induce detectable neutralizing antibody response. Importantly, antibodies elicited by 10E8-4P also possessed a strong ability to activate an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) reporter gene, thus suggesting that they may have ADCC activity. Therefore, this strategy shows promise for further optimization and application in future HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:27329850

  19. An immunogen containing four tandem 10E8 epitope repeats with exposed key residues induces antibodies that neutralize HIV-1 and activates an ADCC reporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiwu; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Qian; Ye, Ling; Dai, Yanyan; Su, Shan; Yu, Fei; Ying, Tianlei; Yang, Chinglai; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    After three decades of intensive research efforts, an effective vaccine against HIV-1 remains to be developed. Several broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1, such as 10E8, recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 protein. Thus, the MPER is considered to be a very important target for vaccine design. However, the MPER segment has very weak immunogenicity and tends to insert its epitope residues into the cell membrane, thereby avoiding antibody binding. To address this complication in vaccine development, we herein designed a peptide, designated 10E8-4P, containing four copies of the 10E8 epitope as an immunogen. As predicted by structural simulation, 10E8-4P exhibits a well-arranged tandem helical conformation, with the key residues in the 10E8 epitope oriented at different angles, thus suggesting that some of these key residues may be exposed outside of the lipid membrane. Compared with a peptide containing a single 10E8 epitope (10E8-1P), 10E8-4P not only exhibited better antigenicity but also elicited neutralizing antibody response against HIV-1 pseudoviruses, whereas 10E8-1P could not induce detectable neutralizing antibody response. Importantly, antibodies elicited by 10E8-4P also possessed a strong ability to activate an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) reporter gene, thus suggesting that they may have ADCC activity. Therefore, this strategy shows promise for further optimization and application in future HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:27329850

  20. Quantifying Ruminal Digestion of Organic Matter and Neutral Detergent Fiber Using Omasal Sampling in Cattle--A Meta-Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A data set from 32 studies (122 diets) was used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the omasal sampling technique by investigating the relationships between ruminal and total digestion of neutral detergent fiber (NDF), between intake and apparent and true ruminal digestion of organic matter (O...

  1. Analysis of Physical Science Textbooks for Conceptual Frameworks on Acids, Bases and Neutralization: Implications for Students' Conceptual Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erduran, Sibel

    Eight physical science textbooks were analyzed for coverage on acids, bases, and neutralization. At the level of the text, clarity and coherence of statements were investigated. The conceptual framework for this topic was represented in a concept map which was used as a coding tool for tracing concepts and links present in textbooks. Cognitive…

  2. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  3. Structure-Function Analysis of the Epitope for 4E10, a Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibody†

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Florence M.; Zwick, Michael B.; Cardoso, Rosa M. F.; Nelson, Josh D.; Wilson, Ian A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Dawson, Philip E.

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibody 4E10 binds to a linear, highly conserved epitope within the membrane-proximal external region of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. We have delineated the peptide epitope of the broadly neutralizing 4E10 antibody to gp41 residues 671 to 683, using peptides with different lengths encompassing the previously suggested core epitope (NWFDIT). Peptide binding to the 4E10 antibody was assessed by competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the Kd values of selected peptides were determined using surface plasmon resonance. An Ala scan of the epitope indicated that several residues, W672, F673, and T676, are essential (>1,000-fold decrease in binding upon replacement with alanine) for 4E10 recognition. In addition, five other residues, N671, D674, I675, W680, and L679, make significant contributions to 4E10 binding. In general, the Ala scan results agree well with the recently reported crystal structure of 4E10 in complex with a 13-mer peptide and with our circular dichroism analyses. Neutralization competition assays confirmed that the peptide NWFDITNWLWYIKKKK-NH2 could effectively inhibit 4E10 neutralization. Finally, to limit the conformational flexibility of the peptides, helix-promoting 2-aminoisobutyric acid residues and helix-inducing tethers were incorporated. Several peptides have significantly improved affinity (>1,000-fold) over the starting peptide and, when used as immunogens, may be more likely to elicit 4E10-like neutralizing antibodies. Hence, this study represents the first stage toward iterative development of a vaccine based on the 4E10 epitope. PMID:16439525

  4. Immune Response to Recombinant Capsid Proteins of Adenovirus in Humans: Antifiber and Anti-Penton Base Antibodies Have a Synergistic Effect on Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gahéry-Ségard, Hanne; Farace, Françoise; Godfrin, Dominique; Gaston, Jesintha; Lengagne, Renée; Tursz, Thomas; Boulanger, Pierre; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    1998-01-01

    Replication-deficient adenovirus used in humans for gene therapy induces a strong immune response to the vector, resulting in transient recombinant protein expression and the blocking of gene transfer upon a second administration. Therefore, in this study we examined in detail the capsid-specific humoral immune response in sera of patients with lung cancer who had been given one dose of a replication-defective adenovirus. We analyzed the immune response to the three major components of the viral capsid, hexon (Hx), penton base (Pb), and fiber (Fi). A longitudinal study of the humoral response assayed on adenovirus particle-coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates showed that patients had preexisting immunity to adenovirus prior to the administration of adenovirus–β-gal. The level of the response increased in three patients after adenovirus administration and remained at a maximum after three months. One patient had a strong immune response to adenovirus prior to treatment, and this response was unaffected by adenovirus administration. Sera collected from the patients were assayed for recognition of each individual viral capsid protein to determine more precisely the molecular basis of the humoral immune response. Clear differences existed in the humoral response to the three major components of the viral capsid in serum from humans. Sequential appearance of these antibodies was observed: anti-Fi antibodies appeared first, followed by anti-Pb antibodies and then by anti-Hx antibodies. Moreover, anti-Fi antibodies preferentially recognized the native trimeric form of Fi protein, suggesting that they recognized conformational epitopes. Our results showed that sera with no neutralizing activity contained only anti-Fi antibodies. In contrast, neutralizing activity was only obtained with sera containing anti-Fi and anti-Pb antibodies. More importantly, we showed that anti-native Fi and anti-Pb antibodies had a synergistic effect on neutralization. The

  5. Dengue virus neutralization and antibody-dependent enhancement activities of human monoclonal antibodies derived from dengue patients at acute phase of secondary infection.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tadahiro; Setthapramote, Chayanee; Kurosu, Takeshi; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Asai, Azusa; Omokoko, Magot D; Pipattanaboon, Chonlatip; Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip; Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Subchareon, Arunee; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Hirai, Itaru; Leaungwutiwong, Pornsawan; Misaki, Ryo; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Ono, Ken-Ichiro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Public health concern about dengue diseases, caused by mosquito-borne infections with four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1-DENV-4), is escalating in tropical and subtropical countries. Most of the severe dengue cases occur in patients experiencing a secondary infection with a serotype that is different from the first infection. This is believed to be due to antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), by which one DENV serotype uses pre-existing anti-DENV antibodies elicited in the primary infection to facilitate entry of a different DENV serotype into the Fc receptor-positive macrophages. Recently, we prepared a number of hybridomas producing human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) by using peripheral blood lymphocytes from Thai patients at acute phase of secondary infection with DENV-2. Here, we characterized 17 HuMAbs prepared from two patients with dengue fever (DF) and one patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) that were selected as antibodies recognizing viral envelope protein and showing higher neutralization activity to all serotypes. In vivo evaluation using suckling mice revealed near perfect activity to prevent mouse lethality following intracerebral DENV-2 inoculation. In a THP-1 cell assay, these HuMAbs showed ADE activities against DENV-2 at similar levels between HuMAbs derived from DF and DHF patients. However, the F(ab')2 fragment of the HuMAb showed a similar virus neutralization activity as original, with no ADE activity. Thus, these HuMAbs could be one of the therapeutic candidates against DENV infection. PMID:23545366

  6. Techniques of Neutralization and Persistent Sexual Abuse by Clergy: A Content Analysis of Priest Personnel Files From the Archdiocese of Milwaukee.

    PubMed

    Spraitz, Jason D; Bowen, Kendra N

    2016-09-01

    The sexual abuse problem in the Catholic Church has received considerable attention by the media in recent years and growing attention from empirical researchers. Despite this growth, there is a lack of theoretical research that uses neutralization techniques to examine clergy offending. Using Sykes and Matza's theory, this study examines the techniques of neutralization used by accused priests in the Archdiocese of Milwaukee. Priests' personnel files, which were made publicly available by the Archbishop of Milwaukee in July 2013, were analyzed retrospectively through a qualitative content analysis of all direct statements and correspondences from the accused. The findings indicate that many priests denied responsibility or injury in an effort to justify their sexually abusive behaviors, but that no discernible patterns of technique use emerged. The need for continued research using recently released personnel files from other dioceses is also discussed. PMID:25854588

  7. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  8. Bactericidal Dendritic Polycation Cloaked with Stealth Material via Lipase-Sensitive Intersegment Acquires Neutral Surface Charge without Losing Membrane-Disruptive Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lulu; He, Chen; Hui, Liwei; Xie, Yuntao; Li, Jia-Min; He, Wei-Dong; Yang, Lihua

    2015-12-23

    Net cationicity of membrane-disruptive antimicrobials is necessary for their activity but may elicit immune attack when administered intravenously. By cloaking a dendritic polycation (G2) with poly(caprolactone-b-ethylene glycol) (PCL-b-PEG), we obtain a nanoparticle antimicrobial, G2-g-(PCL-b-PEG), which exhibits neutral surface charge but kills >99.9% of inoculated bacterial cells at ≤8 μg/mL. The observed activity may be attributed PCL's responsive degradation by bacterial lipase and the consequent exposure of the membrane-disruptive, bactericidal G2 core. Moreover, G2-g-(PCL-b-PEG) exhibits good colloidal stability in the presence of serum and insignificant hemolytic toxicity even at ≥2048 μg/mL. suggesting good blood compatibility required for intravenous administration. PMID:26632646

  9. An analysis of post-vocalic /s-ʃ/ neutralization in Augsburg German: evidence for a gradient sound change

    PubMed Central

    Bukmaier, Véronique; Harrington, Jonathan; Kleber, Felicitas

    2014-01-01

    The study is concerned with a sound change in progress by which a post-vocalic, pre-consonantal /s-ʃ/ contrast in the standard variety of German (SG) in words such as west/wäscht (/vɛst/~/vɛʃt/, west/washes) is influencing the Augsburg German (AG) variety in which they have been hitherto neutralized as /veʃt/. Two of the main issues to be considered are whether the change is necessarily categorical; and the extent to which the change affects both speech production and perception equally. For the production experiment, younger and older AG and SG speakers merged syllables of hypothetical town names to create a blend at the potential neutralization site. These results showed a trend for a progressively greater /s-ʃ/ differentiation in the order older AG, younger AG, and SG speakers. For the perception experiment, forced-choice responses were obtained from the same subjects who had participated in the production experiment to a 16-step /s-ʃ/ continuum that was embedded into two contexts: /mIst-mIʃt/ in which /s-ʃ/ are neutralized in AG and /və'mIsə/-/və'mIʃə/ in which they are not. The results from both experiments are indicative of a sound change in progress such that the neutralization is being undone under the influence of SG, but in such a way that there is a gradual shift between categories. The closer approximation of the groups on perception suggests that the sound change may be more advanced on this modality than in production. Overall, the findings are consistent with the idea that phonological contrasts are experience-based, i.e., a continuous function of the extent to which a subject is exposed to, and makes use of, the distinction and are thus compatible with exemplar models of speech. PMID:25132828

  10. Analysis of solids with a secondary-neutral microprobe based on electron-gas post-ionization.

    PubMed

    Bieck, W; Gnaser, H; Oechsner, H

    1995-10-01

    The detection sensitivity and the lateral resolution in electron-gas SNMS have been improved in a newly developed secondary-neutral microprobe. This instrument combines the high post-ionization efficiency provided by the electron component of an rf-plasma (post-ionization probability alpha(0) of some 10(-2)) with a high-transmission magnetic mass spectrometer. Using the plasma as an effective primary ion source, secondary-neutral intensities of up to 10(9) cps can be realized for 1 keV Ar(+) ion bombardment and a primary current density of 1 mA/cm(2). To obtain laterally resolved secondary-neutral micrographs, a 20 keV-Ga(+)-ion beam produced in a liquid-metal ion source (LMIS) is utilized for sputter excitation. At Ga(+)-ion-beam currents of about 6 nA a spot size on the target of 1 microm is possible. The detection sensitivity in this operation mode is on the order of