Science.gov

Sample records for neutral atmospheric boundary

  1. Turbulent flux events in a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Narasimha, Roddam; Kumar, S Rudra; Prabhu, A; Kailas, S V

    2007-03-15

    We propose here a novel method of analysing turbulent momentum flux signals. The data for the analysis come from a nearly neutral atmospheric boundary layer and are taken at a height of 4m above ground corresponding to 1.1 x 10(5) wall units, within the log layer for the mean velocity. The method of analysis involves examining the instantaneous flux profiles that exceed a given threshold, for which an optimum value is found to be 1 s.d. of the flux signal. It is found feasible to identify normalized flux variation signatures separately for positive and negative 'flux events'-the sign being determined by that of the flux itself. Using these signatures, the flux signal is transformed to one of events characterized by the time of occurrence, duration and intensity. It is also found that both the average duration and the average time-interval between successive events are of order 1s, about four orders of magnitude higher than a wall unit in time. This episodic description of the turbulence flux in the time domain enables us to identify separately productive, counter-productive and idle periods (accounting, respectively, for 36, 15 and 49% of the time), taking as criterion the generation of the momentum flux. A 'burstiness' index of 0.72 is found for the data. Comparison with laboratory data indicates higher (/lower) ejection (/sweep) quadrant occupancy but lower (/higher) contributions to flux from the ejection (/sweep) quadrant at the high Reynolds numbers of the atmospheric boundary layer. Possible connections with the concept of active and passive motion in a turbulent boundary layer are briefly discussed. PMID:17244581

  2. Wind farm performance in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers with varying inversion strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In this study we consider large wind farms in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer. In large wind farms the energy extracted by the turbines is dominated by downward vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from the airflow above the farm. However, atmospheric boundary layers are almost always capped by an inversion layer which slows down the entrainment rate and counteracts boundary layer growth. In a suite of large eddy simulations the effect of the strength of the capping inversion on the boundary layer and on the performance of a large wind farm is investigated. For simulations with and without wind turbines the results indicate that the boundary layer growth is effectively limited by the capping inversion and that the entrainment rate depends strongly on the inversion strength. The power output of wind farms is shown to decrease for increasing inversions.

  3. Modeling large wind farms in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers under varying initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers (ABL) are frequently capped by an inversion layer limiting the entrainment rate and boundary layer growth. Commonly used analytical models state that the entrainment rate is inversely proportional to the inversion strength. The height of the inversion turns out to be a second important parameter. Conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers (CNBL) are ABLs with zero surface heat flux developing against a stratified free atmosphere. In this regime the inversion-filling process is merely driven by the downward heat flux at the inversion base. As a result, CNBLs are strongly dependent on the heating history of the boundary layer and strong inversions will fail to erode during the course of the day. In case of large wind farms, the power output of the farm inside a CNBL will depend on the height and strength of the inversion above the boundary layer. On the other hand, increased turbulence levels induced by wind farms may partially undermine the rigid lid effect of the capping inversion, enhance vertical entrainment of air into the farm, and increase boundary layer growth. A suite of large eddy simulations (LES) is performed to investigate the effect of the capping inversion on the conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer and on the wind farm performance under varying initial conditions. For these simulations our in-house pseudo-spectral LES code SP-Wind is used. The wind turbines are modelled using a non-rotating actuator disk method. In the absence of wind farms, we find that a decrease in inversion strength corresponds to a decrease in the geostrophic angle and an increase in entrainment rate and geostrophic drag. Placing the initial inversion base at higher altitudes further reduces the effect of the capping inversion on the boundary layer. The inversion can be fully neglected once it is situated above the equilibrium height that a truly neutral boundary layer would attain under the same external conditions such as

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes in Prescribed Neutral and Non-Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlak Chivaee, Hamid; Sørensen, Jens N.

    2014-12-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of an infinitely long wind farm in a fully developed flow is carried out based on solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The wind turbines are modeled as equivalent rotating actuator disks by applying aerodynamic loads on the flow field using tabulated aerodynamic lift and drag coefficients to save computational time. As a substitute to standard wall modeling LES, a ''prescribed mean shear" profile (hereafter called PMS) approach has been implemented and analysed for generating the desired turbulent shear flow. It is applied on Neutral, Stable and Convective atmospheric boundary layers in presence of the -actuator disc represented- wind turbines and qualitatively meaningful results of mean and fluctuating velocity field is obtained. The effect of four different sub-grid scale (SGS) models on the flow structure is investigated and it is seen that subgrid scale modeling (in particular, the Mix-O and Smagorinsky models) improves the accuracy of the simulations. An optimal grid resolution is also proposed for this kind of simulation.

  5. Conditionally Averaged Large-Scale Motions in the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Insights for Aeolian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Chinthaka; Anderson, William

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian erosion of flat, arid landscapes is induced (and sustained) by the aerodynamic surface stress imposed by flow in the atmospheric surface layer. Conceptual models typically indicate that sediment mass flux, Q (via saltation or drift), scales with imposed aerodynamic stress raised to some exponent, n, where n > 1 . This scaling demonstrates the importance of turbulent fluctuations in driving aeolian processes. In order to illustrate the importance of surface-stress intermittency in aeolian processes, and to elucidate the role of turbulence, conditional averaging predicated on aerodynamic surface stress has been used within large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over an arid, flat landscape. The conditional-sampling thresholds are defined based on probability distribution functions of surface stress. The simulations have been performed for a computational domain with ≈ 25 H streamwise extent, where H is the prescribed depth of the neutrally-stratified boundary layer. Thus, the full hierarchy of spatial scales are captured, from surface-layer turbulence to large- and very-large-scale outer-layer coherent motions. Spectrograms are used to support this argument, and also to illustrate how turbulent energy is distributed across wavelengths with elevation. Conditional averaging provides an ensemble-mean visualization of flow structures responsible for erosion `events'. Results indicate that surface-stress peaks are associated with the passage of inclined, high-momentum regions flanked by adjacent low-momentum regions. Fluid in the interfacial shear layers between these adjacent quasi-uniform momentum regions exhibits high streamwise and vertical vorticity.

  6. On the characterization of coherent structures within a neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, Giuseppe; Le Bastide, Benen; Gaebler, Julia; Kinzel, Matias; Rival, David

    2012-11-01

    Up to this point, a clear characterization of wind turbulence and extreme gust events through experimentation has frustrated countless researchers. The statistical analysis of fluctuating components has been exhausted while the conditional analysis of extreme events, though insightful, often results in constricted conclusions that cannot be bridged from study to study. Thus the current study shifts towards an understanding of the fundamental turbulent flow structures within a neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layer. Two approaches to characterize coherent wind structures are presented. The first approach identifies hairpin-vortex heads by correlating three-dimensional, fluctuating data from two high-speed anemometers situated at 40m and 50m heights on a wind mast. The model assumes that a hairpin-vortex head can be approximated as a transverse vortex with a Vatistas viscous core of assumed radius when the hairpin-vortex head impinges onto the two anemometers. The second approach employs large-scale particle tracking velocimetry to follow seeded bubbles next to the wind mast. The results obtained with both approaches are then compared, and the advantages and shortcomings of each method are discussed.

  7. Large eddy simulation of a large wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Under conventionally neutral conditions, the boundary layer is frequently capped by an inversion layer, which counteracts vertical entrainment of kinetic energy. Very large wind farms are known to depend on vertical entrainment to transport energy from above the farm towards the turbines. In this study, large eddy simulations of an infinite wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer are performed. By carefully selecting the initial potential-temperature profile, the influence of the height and the strength of a capping inversion on the power output of a wind farm is investigated. Results indicate that both the height and the strength have a significant effect on the boundary layer flow, and that the height of the neutral boundary layer is effectively controlled by the capping inversion. In addition, it is shown that the vertical entrainment rate decreases for increasing inversion strength or height. In our infinite wind-farm simulations, varying the inversion characteristics leads to differences in power extraction on the order of 13% ± 0.2% (for increasing the strength from 2.5 to 10 K), and 31% ± 0.4% (for increasing the height from 500 to 1500 m). A detailed analysis of the mean kinetic-energy equation is included, showing that the variation in power extraction originates from the work done by the driving pressure gradient related to the boundary layer height and the geostrophic angle, while entrainment of kinetic energy from the free atmosphere does not play a significant role. Also, the effect of inversion strength on power extraction is energetically not related to different amounts of energy entrained, but explained by a difference in boundary layer growth, leading to higher boundary layers for lower inversion strengths. We further present a simple analytical model that allows to obtain wind-farm power output and driving power for the fully developed regime as function of Rossby number and boundary layer height.

  8. RAMS sensitivity to mesh resolution in large eddy simulation of the neutral and convective atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercolani, Giulia; Gorlé, Catherine; Corbari, Chiara; Mancini, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a computational fluid dynamic technique that has been extensively used to reproduce turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL). Most LES applications to ABL modelling deal with idealized regimes, particularly suited for the verification of simulation results and consisting in homogeneous surface properties, prescribed fluxes at the surface and periodic lateral boundary conditions. In recent years interest has grown around the possibility of using LES as a tool to study ABL turbulence in more realistic situations, i.e. avoiding periodic lateral boundary conditions and coupling LES with a land surface model that dynamically computes heat and moisture fluxes at the surface. One appealing alternative to periodic lateral boundary conditions seems to be grid nesting, that should make LES a suitable tool to reproduce real meteorological flows over complex terrain at the microscale. In this framework Numerical Weather Prediction Limited Area Models (NWP-LAMs) appear to be particularly suitable to perform LES of the ABL in realistic conditions because of both i) their capability of nesting, ii) the presence of one or more land surface model coupled with the equations of motion. The use of NWP-LAMs at the microscale is increasing, but the fact that NWP-LAMs are built to work at the mesoscale has to be taken into account. Consequently the evaluation of their performances at the microscale in idealized regimes should be the first step for their use in more complex simulations. The Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS) is one of the most popular and used NWP-LAMs, and its performances in LES of a ABL in both real and idealized conditions have been evaluated in several studies. This work aims at assessing the impact of mesh resolution on the performances of RAMS-LES in the two opposite idealized regimes of neutral and convective atmospheric boundary layer, for which the turbulent statistics and flow structures are well known. For

  9. Study of Near-Surface Models in Large-Eddy Simulations of a Neutrally Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senocak, I.; Ackerman, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Stevens, D. E.; Mansour, N. N.

    2004-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is a widely used technique in armospheric modeling research. In LES, large, unsteady, three dimensional structures are resolved and small structures that are not resolved on the computational grid are modeled. A filtering operation is applied to distinguish between resolved and unresolved scales. We present two near-surface models that have found use in atmospheric modeling. We also suggest a simpler eddy viscosity model that adopts Prandtl's mixing length model (Prandtl 1925) in the vicinity of the surface and blends with the dynamic Smagotinsky model (Germano et al, 1991) away from the surface. We evaluate the performance of these surface models by simulating a neutraly stratified atmospheric boundary layer.

  10. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  11. The atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book is aimed at researchers in the atmospheric and associated sciences who require a moderately advanced text on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in which the many links between turbulence, air-surface transfer, boundary-layer structure and dynamics, and numerical modeling are discussed and elaborated upon. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction, with Chapters 2 and 3 dealing with the development of mean and turbulence equations, and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modelling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, and Chapters 4 and 5 deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL is treated in Chapter 6, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter 7 then extends the discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is seen as particularly relevant since the extensive stratocumulus regions over the sub-tropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic are now identified as key players in the climate system. Finally, Chapters 8 and 9 bring much of the book's material together in a discussion of appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes for the general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate simulation.

  12. Improved Large-Eddy Simulation Using a Stochastic Backscatter Model: Application to the Neutral Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Urban Street Canyon Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, J. J.; Cai, X.; Kinnersley, R.

    2015-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) provides a powerful tool for developing our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics, which in turn can be used to improve the parameterisations of simpler operational models. However, LES modelling is not without its own limitations - most notably, the need to parameterise the effects of all subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence. Here, we employ a stochastic backscatter SGS model, which explicitly handles the effects of both forward and reverse energy transfer to/from the subgrid scales, to simulate the neutrally stratified ABL as well as flow within an idealised urban street canyon. In both cases, a clear improvement in LES output statistics is observed when compared with the performance of a SGS model that handles forward energy transfer only. In the neutral ABL case, the near-surface velocity profile is brought significantly closer towards its expected logarithmic form. In the street canyon case, the strength of the primary vortex that forms within the canyon is more accurately reproduced when compared to wind tunnel measurements. Our results indicate that grid-scale backscatter plays an important role in both these modelled situations.

  13. DIFFUSION IN THE VICINITY OF STANDARD-DESIGN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS-I. WIND-TUNNEL EVALUATION OF DIFFUSIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF A SIMULATED SUBURBAN NEUTRAL ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large meteorological wind tunnel was used to simulate a suburban atmospheric boundary layer. The model-prototype scale was 1:300 and the roughness length was approximately 1.0 m full scale. The model boundary layer simulated full scale dispersion from ground-level and elevated ...

  14. A stochastic perturbation method to generate inflow turbulence in large-eddy simulation models: Application to neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Kosović, B.; Beeck, J. van; Mirocha, J.

    2015-03-15

    Despite the variety of existing methods, efficient generation of turbulent inflow conditions for large-eddy simulation (LES) models remains a challenging and active research area. Herein, we extend our previous research on the cell perturbation method, which uses a novel stochastic approach based upon finite amplitude perturbations of the potential temperature field applied within a region near the inflow boundaries of the LES domain [Muñoz-Esparza et al., “Bridging the transition from mesoscale to microscale turbulence in numerical weather prediction models,” Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 153, 409–440 (2014)]. The objective was twofold: (i) to identify the governing parameters of the method and their optimum values and (ii) to generalize the results over a broad range of atmospheric large-scale forcing conditions, U{sub g} = 5 − 25 m s{sup −1}, where U{sub g} is the geostrophic wind. We identified the perturbation Eckert number, Ec=U{sub g}{sup 2}/ρc{sub p}θ{sup ~}{sub pm}, to be the parameter governing the flow transition to turbulence in neutrally stratified boundary layers. Here, θ{sup ~}{sub pm} is the maximum perturbation amplitude applied, c{sub p} is the specific heat capacity at constant pressure, and ρ is the density. The optimal Eckert number was found for nonlinear perturbations allowed by Ec ≈ 0.16, which instigate formation of hairpin-like vortices that most rapidly transition to a developed turbulent state. Larger Ec numbers (linear small-amplitude perturbations) result in streaky structures requiring larger fetches to reach the quasi-equilibrium solution, while smaller Ec numbers lead to buoyancy dominated perturbations exhibiting difficulties for hairpin-like vortices to emerge. Cell perturbations with wavelengths within the inertial range of three-dimensional turbulence achieved identical quasi-equilibrium values of resolved turbulent kinetic energy, q, and Reynolds-shear stress, . In contrast, large-scale perturbations

  15. Atmospheric Measurements of Neutral Nucleating Clusters (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Eisele, F. L.; Smith, J. N.; Chen, M.; Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; McMurry, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Nanoparticles produced by nucleation can subsequently grow to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within one or two days and hence affect cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric radiation budgets. As an intermediate stage between molecules and nanoparticles, neutral molecular clusters are believed to play an important role in processes that lead to boundary layer nucleation. Therefore, knowledge of chemical composition, concentrations, thermodynamic properties, and evolution of neutral molecular clusters is essential to better elucidate the nucleation mechanism and to reduce the uncertainty in nucleation rates used in global climate models. Here we present laboratory and field measurements from a recently developed chemical ionization mass spectrometer (the Cluster-CIMS) designed to measure atmospheric neutral clusters (Zhao et al., 2010). The sensitivity of the Cluster-CIMS was significantly improved by using a unique conical octopole device in the first vacuum stage for transmitting and focusing ions, which was further confirmed by ion trajectory simulations using SIMION. The ion cluster formation in the atmospheric-pressure inlet was controlled by two processes: neutral ionization and ion-induced clustering (IIC), which can be differentiated from the time independency of the intensity ratio between the cluster and monomer ions. Two methods were employed to separate neutral clusters from the ion-induced clustering. The concentrations and distribution of the neutral nucleating clusters containing up to 4 H2SO4 are estimated from the above methods at three measurement sites in the US (NCAR foothill laboratory, Manitou Forest Observatory, and Atlanta). Typically, the molecular cluster concentrations are well correlated with the concentrations of nanoparticles measured simultaneously during the nucleation event periods. The Cluster-CIMS was employed to measure clusters containing both sulfuric acid and amines in summer 2010 at NCAR foothill laboratory

  16. OGO-6 neutral atmospheric composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeusch, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The continued analysis of data obtained from the neutral atmospheric composition experiment flown on OGO-V6 is discussed. The effort was directed toward the study of five specific areas of interest for which the OGO-V6 data were especially useful.

  17. The neutral-atmosphere temperature instrument.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, N. W.; Niemann, H. B.; Carignan, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    The determination of the temperature of the neutral gas at the location of the satellite is based on measurement of the velocity distribution of the molecular nitrogen. Measurement of the thermal-velocity component in the presence of the free-stream velocity will be obtained through application of the velocity-scan technique and, independently, through use of a baffle technique. A 3-cm diameter spherical sampling chamber with a 0.5-cm diameter precisely knife-edged orifice is located at the satellite equator to permit free diffusion of atmosphere gases between the chamber interior and the atmosphere. The spherical chamber is connected through a high-conductance tube to a quadrupole mass-spectrometer sensor to permit accurate quantitative evaluation of the density of the gas.

  18. Finite-element numerical modeling of atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. N.; Kao, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    A dynamic turbulent boundary-layer model in the neutral atmosphere is constructed, using a dynamic turbulent equation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum derived from the relationship among the turbulent dissipation rate, the turbulent kinetic energy and the eddy viscosity coefficient, with aid of the turbulent second-order closure scheme. A finite-element technique was used for the numerical integration. In preliminary results, the behavior of the neutral planetary boundary layer agrees well with the available data and with the existing elaborate turbulent models, using a finite-difference scheme. The proposed dynamic formulation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum is particularly attractive and can provide a viable alternative approach to study atmospheric turbulence, diffusion and air pollution.

  19. Neutral polyfluoroalkyl substances in the global atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Gawor, A; Shunthirasingham, C; Hayward, S J; Lei, Y D; Gouin, T; Mmereki, B T; Masamba, W; Ruepert, C; Castillo, L E; Shoeib, M; Lee, S C; Harner, T; Wania, F

    2014-03-01

    Concentrations of neutral per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (nPFAS) in the atmosphere are of interest because nPFAS are highly mobile percursors for perfluoroalkyl acids. Two calibration studies in Ontario, Canada and Costa Rica established the feasibility of using XAD 2-resin based passive air samplers (XAD-PAS) to reliably determine long term average air concentrations of nPFAS under temperate and tropical climatic conditions. The temporal and spatial distribution of nPFAS was investigated by analyzing XAD-PAS deployed for one year at between 17 and 46 sites on six continents between 2006 and 2011 as part of the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) study. Higher levels of fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) compared to fluorinated sulfonamides (FOSAs), and fluorinated sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs) were observed at all sites. Urban sites had the highest levels of nPFAS compared to rural and remote sites, which is also apparent in a positive correlation of nPFAS levels with the proximity of a sampling site to areas of high population density. Levels of FOSAs and FOSEs tended to decrease during the six years of measurements, whereas an initial decline in the concentrations of FTOHs from 2006 to 2008 did not continue in 2009 to 2011. A comparison of nPFAS levels measured in national XAD-PAS networks in Costa Rica and Botswana revealed that the GAPS sites in Tapanti and the Kalahari are representative of the more remote regions in those countries. XAD-PAS derived absolute nPFAS levels at GAPS sites are lower than those measured using another PAS, but are within the range of levels measured with active air samplers. Agreement of relative nPFAS composition is better between samplers, suggesting that the discrepancy is due to uncertain sampling rates. PMID:24232015

  20. Altitude distribution of neutral wind responses to external forces in the polar upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, Geonhwa; Lee, Changsup; Song, In-Sun; Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Yong Ha; Wu, Qian

    2016-04-01

    Neutral winds in the polar upper atmosphere are mainly determined, in addtion to solar and auroral heatings, by external forces such as plasma convection driven by magnetospheric electric field and atmospheric waves propagated from the lower atmosphere. In particular, the effects of plasma convection via ion drag also rely on the ion density produced not only by solar production but also by energetic particle precipitation. On the other hand, the atmospheric waves such as gravity wave, planetary wave, and tide, propagating from the lower atmosphere, should deposit energy and momentum into the upper atmosphere and affect the neutral winds in the polar region. Then, which external forces dominate the neutral winds in the polar upper atmosphere? What is the boundary region in which the transition occurs from one to the other forces? In order to address these questions, in this study, the effects of the external forces on the neutral winds are investigated using the observations for the neutral winds by Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) at Jang Bogo Station (JBS), Antarctica. The initial result indicates that the effects of plasma convection dominates the neutral winds even at 97 km altitude but the winds at 87 km altitude seem to be dominated by the lower atmospheric wave effects, regardless of season.

  1. Wind Tunnel Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Tristen; Smits, Alexander; Martinelli, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    To simulate the interaction of large Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in the laboratory, we implement a variant of Counihan's technique [Counihan 1969] in which a combination of a castellated barrier, elliptical vortex generators, and floor roughness elements is used to create an artificial ABL profile in a standard closed loop wind tunnel. To examine the development and formation of the artificial ABL hotwire and SPIV measurements were taken at various downstream locations with changes in wall roughness, wall type, and vortex generator arrangements. It was found possible to generate a boundary layer at Reθ ~106 , with a mean velocity that followed the 1/7 power law of a neutral ABL over rural terrain and longitudinal turbulence intensities and power spectra that compare well with the data obtained for high Reynolds number flat plate turbulent boundary layers [Hultmark et al. 2010]. Supported by Hopewell Wind Power Ltd., and the Princeton Grand Challenges Program.

  2. Wind Tunnel Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Tristen; Smits, Alexander; Martinelli, Luigi

    2012-11-01

    To simulate the interaction of large Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) with the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in the laboratory, we implement a variant of Counihan's technique in which a combination of a castellated barrier, elliptical vortex generators, and floor roughness elements is used to create an artificial ABL profile in a standard closed loop wind tunnel. We report hotwire measurements in a plane normal to the flow direction at various downstream positions and free stream velocities to examine the development and formation of the artificial ABL. It was found possible to generate a boundary layer at Reθ ~106 , with a mean velocity that followed the 1/7 power law of a neutral ABL over rural terrain and longitudinal turbulence intensities and power spectra that compare well with the data obtained by Hultmark in 2010 for high Reynolds number flat plate turbulent boundary layers. Supported by Hopewell Wind Power Ltd., and the Princeton Grand Challenges Program.

  3. The San Marco 3 neutral atmosphere composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelz, D. T.; Newton, G. P.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Clem, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The experimental instrumentation of the San Marco 3 satellite is described along with the calibration and operation. The instrumentation for the following experiments was included: an air density experiment for measuring the instantaneous drag force, and thus the neutral particle total mass density; a neutral atmosphere composition experiment for measuring the densities of helium, atomic and molecular oxygen, molecular nitrogen and argon; and a neutral atmosphere temperature experiment to determine the gas kinetic temperature by measuring molecular nitrogen density variations in an orificed spherical chamber as a function of angle of attack.

  4. Io's neutral clouds: From the atmosphere to the plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Matthew Howard

    2003-10-01

    Since the discovery of sodium thirty years ago, observations of Io's neutral features have provided essential insight into understanding the relationship between the Io's atmosphere and the Io torus, a ring of plasma encircling Jupiter. In this thesis I use observations and models of lo's corona, extended neutral clouds, and fast sodium jet to probe the interactions between the atmosphere, torus, and neutral clouds. A corona and neutral cloud model, based on the model of Wilson and Schneider (1999), has been developed to study neutral loss from Io. Neutrals are ejected from Io's exobase and their trajectories followed under the influence of gravity until lost into the plasma torus. I also developed description of the plasma torus based on Voyager and ground-based observations to accurately determine neutral lifetimes. Mutual eclipsing events between Galilean satellites were used to measure the shape of lo's sodium corona, revealing a corona that is only approximately spherically symmetric around Io. I discovered a previously undetected asymmetry: the sub-Jupiter corona is denser than the anti-Jupiter corona. Modeling implies that sodium source from the sub-Jupiter hemisphere must be twice as large as from the anti-Jupiter hemisphere. The Galileo spacecraft has imaged a remarkable atmospheric escape process occurring in Io's ionosphere. Electrodynamic consequences of Io's motion through Jupiter's magnetosphere drive mega-amp currents through lo's ionosphere; some sodium ions carrying this current are neutralized as they leave the atmosphere. The Galileo images show that the resulting fast sodium jet removes ˜5 × 1025 atoms sec-1 from Io's atmosphere. The source region of the jet is much smaller than Io itself implying that the ionosphere is densest near Io's equator. A model-based comparison of the neutral oxygen and sodium clouds details differences in the morphologies and spatial extent of each: sodium extends only 1/4 the way around Jupiter while oxygen forms a

  5. Simulations of Atmospheric Neutral Wave Coupling to the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    The densities in the E- and F-layer plasmas are much less than the density of background neutral atmosphere. Atmospheric neutral waves are primary sources of plasma density fluctuations and are the sources for triggering plasma instabilities. The neutral atmosphere supports acoustic waves, acoustic gravity waves, and Kelvin Helmholtz waves from wind shears. These waves help determine the structure of the ionosphere by changes in neutral density that affect ion-electron recombination and by neutral velocities that couple to the plasma via ion-neutral collisions. Neutral acoustic disturbances can arise from thunderstorms, chemical factory explosions and intentional high-explosive tests. Based on conservation of energy, acoustic waves grow in amplitude as they propagate upwards to lower atmospheric densities. Shock waves can form in an acoustic pulse that is eventually damped by viscosity. Ionospheric effects from acoustic waves include transient perturbations of E- and F-Regions and triggering of E-Region instabilities. Acoustic-gravity waves affect the ionosphere over large distances. Gravity wave sources include thunderstorms, auroral region disturbances, Space Shuttle launches and possibly solar eclipses. Low frequency acoustic-gravity waves propagate to yield traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID's), triggering of Equatorial bubbles, and possible periodic structuring of the E-Region. Gravity wave triggering of equatorial bubbles is studied numerically by solving the equations for plasma continuity and ion velocity along with Ohms law to provide an equation for the induced electric potential. Slow moving gravity waves provide density depressions on bottom of ionosphere and a gravitational Rayleigh-Taylor instability is initiated. Radar scatter detects field aligned irregularities in the resulting plasma bubble. Neutral Kelvin-Helmholtz waves are produced by strong mesospheric wind shears that are also coincident with the formation of intense E-layers. An

  6. A Reassessment of Prebiotic Organic Synthesis in Neutral Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleaves, H. James; Chalmers, John H.; Lazcano, Antonio; Miller, Stanley L.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2008-04-01

    The action of an electric discharge on reduced gas mixtures such as H2O, CH4 and NH3 (or N2) results in the production of several biologically important organic compounds including amino acids. However, it is now generally held that the early Earth’s atmosphere was likely not reducing, but was dominated by N2 and CO2. The synthesis of organic compounds by the action of electric discharges on neutral gas mixtures has been shown to be much less efficient. We show here that contrary to previous reports, significant amounts of amino acids are produced from neutral gas mixtures. The low yields previously reported appear to be the outcome of oxidation of the organic compounds during hydrolytic workup by nitrite and nitrate produced in the reactions. The yield of amino acids is greatly increased when oxidation inhibitors, such as ferrous iron, are added prior to hydrolysis. Organic synthesis from neutral atmospheres may have depended on the oceanic availability of oxidation inhibitors as well as on the nature of the primitive atmosphere itself. The results reported here suggest that endogenous synthesis from neutral atmospheres may be more important than previously thought.

  7. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  8. A Coupled Ion-Neutral Photochemical Model for the Titan Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, Veronique; Yelle, Roger V.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Hörst, Sarah M.; Lavvas, Panayotis

    2014-11-01

    Recent observations from the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft and the Herschel space observatory drastically increased our knowledge of Titan's chemical composition. The combination of data retrieved by Cassini INMS, UVIS, and CIRS allows deriving the vertical profiles of half a dozen species from 1000 to 100 km, while the HIFI instrument on Herschel reported on the first identification of HNC. Partial data or upper limits are available for almost 20 other CHON neutral species. The INMS and CAPS instruments onboard Cassini also revealed the existence of numerous positive and negative ions in Titan's upper atmosphere. We present the results of a 1D coupled ion-neutral photochemical model intended for the interpretation of the distribution of gaseous species in the Titan atmosphere. The model extends from the surface to the exobase. The atmospheric background, boundary conditions, vertical transport and aerosol opacity are all constrained by the Cassini-Huygens observations. The chemical network includes reactions between hydrocarbons, nitrogen and oxygen bearing species (including some species containing both nitrogen and oxygen, such as NO). It takes into account neutrals and both positive and negative ions with m/z extending up to about 100 u. Ab initio Transition State Theory calculations are performed in order to evaluate the rate coefficients and products for critical reactions. The calculated vertical profiles of neutral and ion species generally agree with the existing observational data; some differences are highlighted. We discuss the chemical and physical processes responsible for the production and loss of some key species. We find that the production of neutral species in the upper atmosphere from electron-ion recombination reactions and neutral-neutral radiative association reactions is significant. In the stratosphere, the vertical profile of (cyano)polyynes is extremely sensitive to their heterogeneous loss on aerosols, a process that remains to be

  9. Ionospheric E-region electron density and neutral atmosphere variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stick, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Electron density deviations from a basic variation with the solar zenith angle were investigated. A model study was conducted in which the effects of changes in neutral and relative densities of atomic and molecular oxygen on calculated electron densities were compared with incoherent scatter measurements in the height range 100-117 km at Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The feasibility of determining tides in the neutral atmosphere from electron density profiles was studied. It was determined that variations in phase between the density and temperature variation and the comparable magnitudes of their components make it appear improbable that the useful information on tidal modes can be obtained in this way.

  10. The Saharan atmospheric boundary layer: Turbulence, stratification and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Parker, Douglas J.; Marsham, John H.; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Marenco, Franco; Mcquaid, James B.

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution large-eddy model simulations, combined with aircraft and radiosonde observations from the Fennec observational campaign are used to describe the vertical structure of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL). The SABL, probably the deepest dry convective boundary layer on Earth, is crucial in controlling the vertical redistribution and long-range transport of dust, heat, water and momentum in the Sahara, with significant implications for the large-scale Saharan heat low and West African monsoon systems. The daytime SABL has a unique structure, with an actively growing convective region driven by high sensible heating at the surface, capped by a weak (≤1K) temperature inversion and a deep, near-neutrally stratified Saharan residual layer (SRL) above it, which is mostly well mixed in humidity and temperature and reaches a height of ~500hPa. Large-eddy model (LEM) simulations were initialized with radiosonde data and driven by surface heat flux observations from Fennec supersite-1 at Bordj Bardji Mokhtar (BBM), southern Algeria. Aircraft observations are used to validate the processes of interest identified in the model, as well as providing unprecedented detail of the turbulent characteristics of the SABL. Regular radiosondes from BBM during June 2011 are used to generate a climatology of the day-time SABL structure, providing further evidence that the processes identified with the LEM are recurrent features of the real SABL. The model is shown to reproduce the typical SABL structure from observations, and different tracers are used to illustrate the penetration of the convective boundary layer into the residual layer above as well as mixing processes internal to the residual layer. Despite the homogeneous surface fluxes and tracer initialization, the large characteristic length-scale of the turbulent eddies leads to large horizontal changes in boundary layer depth (which control the formation of clouds) and significant heterogeneity in tracer

  11. Transport in a field aligned magnetized plasma/neutral gas boundary: the end of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher Michael

    The objective of this dissertation is to characterize the physics of a boundary layer between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas along the direction of a confining magnetic field. A series of experiments are performed at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) at UCLA to study this field aligned Neutral Boundary Layer (NBL) at the end of the plasma. A Lanthanum Hexaboride (LaB6) cathode and semi-transparent anode creates a magnetized, current-free helium plasma which terminates on a neutral helium gas without touching any walls. Probes are inserted into the plasma to measure the basic plasma parameters and study the transport in the NBL. The experiment is performed in the weakly ionized limit where the plasma density (ne) is much less than the neutral density (nn) such that ne/nn < 5%. The NBL is characterized by a field-aligned electric field which begins at the point where the plasma pressure equilibrates with the neutral gas pressure. Beyond the pressure equilibration point the electrons and ions lose their momentum by collisions with the neutral gas and come to rest. An electric field is established self consistently to maintain a current-free termination through equilibration of the different species' stopping rates in the neutral gas. The electric field resembles a collisional quasineutral sheath with a length 10 times the electron-ion collision length, 100 times the neutral collision length, and 10,000 times the Debye length. Collisions with the neutral gas dominate the losses in the system. The measured plasma density loss rates are above the classical cross-field current-free ambipolar rate, but below the anomalous Bohm diffusion rate. The electron temperature is below the ionization threshold of the gas, 2.2 eV in helium. The ions are in thermal equilibrium with the neutral gas. A generalized theory of plasma termination in a Neutral Boundary Layer is applied to this case using a two-fluid, current-free, weakly ionized transport model. The electron

  12. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  13. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  14. A magnetospheric energy principle extended to include neutral atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Akira

    2011-03-15

    The problem of ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of plasmas in a magnetosphere-atmosphere system, in which the unperturbed magnetic field is assumed to be perpendicular to the plasma-atmosphere interface (ionospheric surface), is investigated by means of an extended magnetospheric energy principle. The derivation of the principle and conditions under which it applies to a real terrestrial magnetosphere is given. In the principle, the atmosphere is considered to be a very heavy and compressible gas with finite pressure. A thin ionospheric layer is taken into account as boundary conditions, but energetics within it are neglected. The solid-earth surface is assumed to be a perfectly conducting wall for perturbations. For a perturbation that satisfies either rigid or horizontally free boundary conditions at the plasma-atmosphere interface, the self-adjointness of the force operator is satisfied and an extended magnetospheric energy principle can be developed on the basis of the extended energy principle for fusion plasmas. These two boundary conditions are shown to be realized in the magnetosphere when the ionospheric conductivity is either very large or very small. Whereas in fusion plasmas the perturbed magnetic energy in the vacuum makes a stabilizing contribution to the potential energy, in the magnetosphere the perturbed magnetic energy in the atmosphere makes no such stabilizing contribution. This is due to the difference of the assumed field configurations of the magnetospheric and fusion plasmas. The ionospheric surface makes a destabilizing negative contribution to the potential energy owing to a horizontal plasma displacement on the spherical ionospheric surface. The method is applied to magnetospheric ballooning and interchange instabilities. The existence of a new type of magnetospheric interchange instability is shown and its structure in the magnetosphere-atmosphere system is clarified. Possible consequences of the instabilities and their relevance to

  15. Empirical corrections for atmospheric neutral density derived from thermospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen; Börger, Klaus; Henze, Christina; Löcher, Anno; Eickmans, Marius; Agena, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Accurately predicting satellite positions is a prerequisite for various applications from space situational awareness to precise orbit determination (POD). Given the fact that atmospheric drag represents a dominant influence on the position of low-Earth orbit objects, an accurate evaluation of thermospheric mass density is of great importance to low Earth orbital prediction. Over decades, various empirical atmospheric models have been developed to support computation of density changes within the atmosphere. The quality of these models is, however, restricted mainly due to the complexity of atmospheric density changes and the limited resolution of indices used to account for atmospheric temperature and neutral density changes caused by solar and geomagnetic activity. Satellite missions, such as Challenging Mini-Satellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), provide a direct measurement of non-conservative accelerations, acting on the surface of satellites. These measurements provide valuable data for improving our knowledge of thermosphere density and winds. In this paper we present two empirical frameworks to correct model-derived neutral density simulations by the along-track thermospheric density measurements of CHAMP and GRACE. First, empirical scale factors are estimated by analyzing daily CHAMP and GRACE acceleration measurements and are used to correct the density simulation of Jacchia and MSIS (Mass-Spectrometer-Incoherent-Scatter) thermospheric models. The evolution of daily scale factors is then related to solar and magnetic activity enabling their prediction in time. In the second approach, principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to extract the dominant modes of differences between CHAMP/GRACE observations and thermospheric model simulations. Afterwards an adaptive correction procedure is used to account for long-term and high-frequency differences. We conclude the study by providing recommendations on possible

  16. Applications of large-eddy simulation: Synthesis of neutral boundary layer models

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmstede, W.D.

    1987-12-01

    The object of this report is to describe progress made towards the application of large-eddy simulation (LES), in particular, to the study of the neutral boundary layer (NBL). The broad purpose of the study is to provide support to the LES project currently underway at LLNL. The specific purpose of this study is to lay the groundwork for the simulation of the SBL through the establishment and implementation of model criteria for the simulation of the NBL. The idealistic NBL is never observed in the atmosphere and therefore has little practical significance. However, it is of considerable theoretical interest for several reasons. The report discusses the concept of Rossby-number similarity theory as it applies to the NBL. A particular implementation of the concept is described. Then, the results from prior simulations of the NBL are summarized. Model design criteria for two versions of the Brost LES (BLES) model are discussed. The general guidelines for the development of Version 1 of the Brost model (BV1) were to implement the model with a minimum of modifications which would alter the design criteria as established by Brost. Two major modifications of BLES incorporated into BV1 pertain to the initialization/parameterization of the model and the generalization of the boundary conditions at the air/earth interface. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer for wind energy and wind engineering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Turner, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W6.0m, H2.7m, L=72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL): the stable, unstable, and neutral ABL. The neutral ABL is characterized by a zero potential temperature gradient, which is readily achieved in the FPF by operating when air and floor temperatures are close to equal. The stable and unstable ABLs have positive and negative vertical temperature gradients, respectively, which are more difficult to simulate without direct control of air or test section floor temperature. The test section floor is a 10 inch thick concrete cement slab and has significant thermal mass. When combined with the diurnal temperature variation of the ambient air, it is possible to achieve vertical temperature gradients in the test section, and produce weakly stable or weakly unstable boundary layer. Achievable Richardson numbers and Obukhov lengths are estimated. The different boundary layer profiles were measured, and compared to theoretical atmospheric models. Supported by UNH Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research SURF.

  18. Atmospheric boundary layer over steep surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil A.; Druzhinin, Oleg; Kandaurov, Alexander A.; Ermakova, Olga S.; Ezhova, Ekaterina V.; Esau, Igor; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2014-08-01

    Turbulent air-sea interactions coupled with the surface wave dynamics remain a challenging problem. The needs to include this kind of interaction into the coupled environmental, weather and climate models motivate the development of a simplified approximation of the complex and strongly nonlinear interaction processes. This study proposes a quasi-linear model of wind-wave coupling. It formulates the approach and derives the model equations. The model is verified through a set of laboratory (direct measurements of an airflow by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique) and numerical (a direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique) experiments. The experiments support the central model assumption that the flow velocity field averaged over an ensemble of turbulent fluctuations is smooth and does not demonstrate flow separation from the crests of the waves. The proposed quasi-linear model correctly recovers the measured characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer over the waved water surface.

  19. Evaluating Models of The Neutral, Barotropic Planetary Boundary Layer using Integral Measures: Part I. Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, G. D.; Garratt, J. R.

    Data for the cross-isobaric angle 0, the geostrophic drag coefficient Cg, and the functions A and B of Rossby number similarity theory, obtained from meteorological field experiments, are used to evaluate a range of models of the neutral, barotropic planetary boundary layer. The data give well-defined relationships for 0, Cg, and the integrated dissipation rate over the boundary layer, as a function of the surface Rossby number. Lettau's first-order closure mixing-length model gives an excellent fit to the data; other simple models give reasonable agreement. However more sophisticated models, e.g., higher-order closure, large-eddy simulation, direct numerical simulation and laboratory models, give poor fits to the data. The simplemodels have (at least) one free parameter in their turbulence closure that is matched toatmospheric observations; the more sophisticated models either base their closure onmore general flows or have no free closure parameters. It is suggested that all of theatmospheric experiments that we could locate violate the strict simplifying assumptionsof steady, homogeneous, neutral, barotropic flow required by the sophisticated models.The angle 0 is more sensitive to violations of the assumptions than is Cg.

    The behaviour of the data varies in three latitude regimes. In middle and high latitudes the observed values of A and B exhibit little latitudinal dependence; the best estimates are A = 1.3 and B = 4.4. In lower latitudes the neutral, barotropic Rossby number theory breaks down. The value of B increases towards the Equator; the determination of A is ambiguous - the trend can increase or decrease towards the Equator. Between approximately 5° and 30° latitude, the scatter in the data is thought to be primarily due to the inherent presence of baroclinicity. The presence of the trade-wind inversion, thermal instability and the horizontal component of the Earth's rotation ΩH also contribute.Marked changes in the values of A and B

  20. Regional scale evaporation and the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlange, Marc B.; Eichinger, William E.; Albertson, John D.

    1995-01-01

    In this review we briefly summarize some current models of evaporation and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and discuss new experimental and computational oppurtunities that may aid our understanding of evaporation at these larger scales. In particular, consideration is given to remote sensing of the atmosphere, computational fluid dynamics and the role numerical models can play in understanding land-atmosphere interactions. These powerful modeling and measurement tools are allowing us to visualize and study spatial and temporal scales previously untouched, thereby increasing the oppurtunities to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere interaction.

  1. Development of the convective boundary layer capping with a thick neutral layer in Badanjilin: Observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bo; Lü, Shihua; Ao, Yinhuan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the development of a convective boundary layer (CBL) in the Badanjilin region was investigated by comparing the observation data of two cases. A deep neutral layer capped a CBL that occurred on 30 August 2009. This case was divided into five sublayers from the surface to higher atmospheric elevations: surface layer, mixed layer, inversion layer, neutral layer, and sub-inversion layer. The development process of the CBL was divided into three stages: S1, S2, and S3. This case was quite different from the development of the three-layer CBL observed on 31 August 2009 because the mixed layer of the five-layer CBL (CBL5) eroded the neutral layer during S2. The specific initial structure of the CBL5 was correlated to the synoptic background of atmosphere during nighttime. The three-stage development process of the CBL5 was confirmed by six simulations using National Center for Atmospheric Research (USA) large-eddy simulation (NCAR-LES), and some of its characteristics are presented in detail.

  2. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF; Turner, DD; Chilson, P; Blumberg, WG; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M; Jacobsen, EP; Wharton, S

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  3. Probing neutral atmospheric collision complexes with anion photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrold, Caroline

    Photodetachment of anionic precursors of neutral collision complexes offers a way to probe the effects of symmetry-breaking collision events on the electronic structure of normally transparent molecules. We have measured the anion photoelectron imaging (PEI) spectra of a series of O2- X complexes, where X is a volatile organic molecule with atmospheric relevance, to determine how the electronic properties of various X molecules affect the low-lying electronic structure of neutral O2 undergoing O2 - X collisons. The study was motivated by the catalog of vibrational and electronic absorption lines induced by O2 - O2, O2 - N2, and other collisions. The energies of electronic features observed in the anion PEI spectra of O2- X (X = hexane, hexene, isoprene and benzene) relative to O2- PEI spectroscopic features indicate that photodetachment of the anion does indeed access a repulsive part of the O2 - X potential. In addition, the spectra of the various complexes show an interesting variation in the intensities of transitions to the excited O2(1Δg) . X and O2(1Σg+) . X states relative to the ground O2(3Σg-) . X state. With X = non-polar species such as hexane, the relative intensities of transitions to the triplet and singlet states of O2 . X are very similar to those of isolated O2, while the relative intensity of the singlet band decreases and becomes lower in energy relative to the triplet band for X = polar molecules. A significant enhancement in the intensities of the singlet bands is observed for complexes with X = isoprene and benzene, both of which have low-lying triplet states. The role of the triplet states in isoprene and benzene, and the implications for induced electronic absorption in O2 undergoing collisions with these molecules, are explored. National Science Foundation NSF CHE 1265991.

  4. Description of substorms in the tail incorporating boundary layer and neutral line effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Nishida, A.

    1988-01-01

    A description of the substorm expansion phase that includes the formation of a neutral line in the relatively near-earth portion of the tail plasma sheet and phenomena observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) is proposed. Specifically, it is proposed that substorm onset results from the formation of a neutral line within the preexisting source region for the PSBL. The source region is presumably the tail current sheet, which is suggested to extend well earthward of 80 earth radii. Both before and after the neutral line forms, auroral field-aligned currents and large ion flows remain confined to the PSBL earthward of the source region.

  5. Investigation of Rossby-number similarity in the neutral boundary layer using large-eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmstede, W.D.; Cederwall, R.T.; Meyers, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    One special case of particular interest, especially to theoreticians, is the steady-state, horizontally homogeneous, autobarotropic (PLB), hereafter referred to as the neutral boundary layer (NBL). The NBL is in fact a 'rare' atmospheric phenomenon, generally associated with high-wind situations. Nevertheless, there is a disproportionate interest in this problem because Rossby-number similarity theory provides a sound approach for addressing this issue. Rossby-number similarity theory has rather wide acceptance, but because of the rarity of the 'true' NBL state, there remains an inadequate experimental database for quantifying constants associated with the Rossby-number similarity concept. Although it remains a controversial issue, it has been proposed that large-eddy simulation (LES) is an alternative to physical experimentation for obtaining basic atmospherc 'data'. The objective of the study reported here is to investigate Rossby-number similarity in the NBL using LES. Previous studies have not addressed Rossby-number similarity explicitly, although they made use of it in the interpretation of their results. The intent is to calculate several sets of NBL solutions that are ambiguous relative to the their respective Rossby numbers and compare the results for similarity, or the lack of it. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions over West Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A systemic analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer behavior during some evening transitions over West Texas was done using the data from an extensive array of instruments which included small and large aperture scintillometers, net radiometers, and meteorological stations. The analysis also comp...

  7. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE ARCTIC: WINTERTIME BOUNDARY-LAYER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The wintertime arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated with micro-meteorological and SF6 tracer measurements collected in Prudhoe Bay, AK. he flat, snow-covered tundra surface at this site generates a very small (0.03 cm) surface roughness. he relatively warm maritime ...

  8. Turbulence and diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskett, Ronald L.

    1990-05-01

    This conference addressed recent theoretical advancements of turbulence and diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Activities were centered on the technical sessions of the conference. Sessions addressed clouds and the marine atmospheric boundary layer, field experimental techniques, physical and numerical simulations, transport and diffusion, surface properties, general boundary layer, stratified turbulence and turbulence in complex terrain. A jointly authored poster on an evaluation of the ARAC emergency response models with and without on-site sound detection and ranging systems (sodars) which measure vertical wind profiles was presented. Several scientists commented on our work and some requested further information. In addition, there was a workshop on dispersion around groups of buildings and a tour of Riso National Laboratory. Developments relevant to our work included work on dispersion model evaluation, especially using Monte Carlo random walk techniques, parameterizations of mixing height and turbulence from remote sensing systems such as sodars and radars, and measurements and parameterizations of enhanced turbulence around groups of buildings.

  9. Atmospheric boundary layer processes during a total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Prabhu, A.; Narahari Rao, K.; Narasimha, R.

    1980-01-01

    The total solar eclipse that occurred over the southern part of India on February 16, 1980, gave a unique opportunity to study the earth's atmospheric boundary layer. The meteorological experiments during the 1980 solar eclipse were conducted at Raichur, India (16/sup 0/12'N, 77/sup 0/21'E) located in the state of Karnataka, approximately 400-m above sea level. The main objective was to determine the changes in the earth's atmosphere during and immediately after the eclipse. The goal was to study the changes in the momentum and heat fluxes in the boundary layer due to the eclipse. Measurements were made for 2 days prior to and 1 day after the day of the eclipse to determine background characteristics of the boundary layer which might be site-dependent.

  10. A computational study of particulate emissions from an open pit quarry under neutral atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvester, S. A.; Lowndes, I. S.; Hargreaves, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The extraction of minerals from surface mines and quarries can produce significant fugitive dust emissions as a result of site activities such as blasting, road haulage, loading, crushing and stockpiling. If uncontrolled, these emissions can present serious environmental, health, safety and operational issues impacting both site personnel and the wider community. The dispersion of pollutant emissions within the atmosphere is principally determined by the background wind systems characterized by the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This paper presents an overview of the construction and solution of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to replicate the development of the internal ventilation regime within a surface quarry excavation due to the presence of a neutral ABL above this excavation. This model was then used to study the dispersion and deposition of fugitive mineral dust particles generated during rock blasting operations. The paths of the mineral particles were modelled using Lagrangian particle tracking. Particles of four size fractions were released from five blast locations for eight different wind directions. The study concluded that dependent on the location of the bench blast within the quarry and the direction of the wind, a mass fraction of between 0.3 and 0.6 of the emitted mineral particles was retained within the quarry. The retention was largest when the distance from the blast location to the downwind pit boundary was greatest.

  11. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  12. Transport in a field-aligned magnetized plasma and neutral gas boundary: the end of the plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher; Gekelman, Walter

    2012-10-01

    A series of experiments at the Enormous Toroidal Plasma Device (ETPD) at UCLA study the Neutral Boundary Layer (NBL) between a magnetized plasma and a neutral gas in the direction of the confining field. A lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathode and semi-transparent anode create a current-free, weakly ionized (ne/nn<5%), helium plasma (B˜250 G, Rplasma=10cm, ne<10^12cm^3, Te<3eV, and Ti˜Tn) that terminates on helium gas without touching any walls. Probes inserted into the plasma measure the basic plasma parameters in the NBL. The NBL begins where the plasma and neutral gas pressures equilibrate and the electrons and ions come to rest through collisions with the neutral gas. A field-aligned electric field (δφ/kTe˜1) is established self-consistently to maintain a current-free termination and dominates transport in the NBL, similar to a sheath but with a length L˜10λei˜10^2λen˜10^5λD. A two-fluid weakly-ionized transport model describes the system. A generalized Ohm's Law correctly predicts the electric field observed. The pressure balance criteria and magnitude of the termination electric field are confirmed over a scaling of parameters. The model can also be used to describe the atmospheric termination of aurora or fully detached gaseous divertors.

  13. Particle motion in atmospheric boundary layers of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Iversen, J. D.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To study the eolian mechanics of saltating particles, both an experimental investigation of the flow field around a model crater in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel and numerical solutions of the two- and three-dimensional equations of motion of a single particle under the influence of a turbulent boundary layer were conducted. Two-dimensional particle motion was calculated for flow near the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. For the case of Earth both a turbulent boundary layer with a viscous sublayer and one without were calculated. For the case of Mars it was only necessary to calculate turbulent boundary layer flow with a laminar sublayer because of the low values of friction Reynolds number; however, it was necessary to include the effects of slip flow on a particle caused by the rarefied Martian atmosphere. In the equations of motion the lift force functions were developed to act on a single particle only in the laminar sublayer or a corresponding small region of high shear near the surface for a fully turbulent boundary layer. The lift force functions were developed from the analytical work by Saffman concerning the lift force acting on a particle in simple shear flow.

  14. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric boundary layer with application to wind farm dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggy, Scott B.

    With the recent push for renewable energy sources, wind energy has emerged as a candidate to replace some of the power produced by traditional fossil fuels. Recent studies, however, have indicated that wind farms may have a direct effect on local meteorology by transporting water vapor away from the Earth's surface. Such turbulent transport could result in an increased drying of soil, and, in turn, negatively affect the productivity of land in the wind farm's immediate vicinity. This numerical study will analyze four scenarios with the goal of understanding turbulence transport in the wake of a turbine: the neutrally-stratified boundary layer with system rotation, the unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer, and wind turbine simulations of these previous two cases. For this work, the Ekman layer is used as an approximation of the atmospheric boundary layer and the governing equations are solved using a fully-parallelized direct numerical simulation (DNS). The in-depth studies of the neutrally and unstably-stratified boundary layers without introducing wind farm effects will act to provide a concrete background for the final study concerning turbulent transport due to turbine wakes. Although neutral stratification rarely occurs in the atmospheric boundary layer, it is useful to study the turbulent Ekman layer under such conditions as it provides a limiting case when unstable or stable stratification are weak. In this work, a thorough analysis was completed including turbulent statistics, velocity and pressure autocorrelations, and a calculation of the full turbulent energy budget. The unstably-stratified atmospheric boundary layer was studied under two levels of heating: moderate and vigorous. Under moderate stratification, both buoyancy and shearing contribute significantly to the turbulent dynamics. As the level of stratification increases, the role of shearing is shown to diminish and is confined to the near-wall region only. A recent, multi

  15. Equilibrium Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow: Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation with Balanced Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xuhui; Huo, Qing; Kang, Ling; Song, Yu

    2014-09-01

    Forcing relationships in steady, neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) flow are thoroughly analyzed. The ABL flow can be viewed as balanced between a forcing and a drag term. The drag term results from turbulent stress divergence, and above the ABL, both the drag and the forcing terms vanish. In computational wind engineering applications, the ABL flow is simulated not by directly specifying a forcing term in the ABL but by specifying boundary conditions for the simulation domain. Usually, these include the inflow boundary and the top boundary conditions. This `boundary-driven' ABL flow is dynamically different from its real counterpart, and this is the major reason that the simulated boundary-driven ABL flow does not maintain horizontal homogeneity. Here, first a dynamical approach is proposed to develop a neutrally stratified equilibrium ABL flow. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software (Fluent 6.3) with the standard - turbulence model is employed, and by applying a driving force profile, steady equilibrium ABL flows are simulated by the model. Profiles of wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) derived using this approach are reasonable in comparison with the conventional logarithmic law and with observational data respectively. Secondly, the equilibrium ABL profiles apply as inflow conditions to simulate the boundary-driven ABL flow. Simulated properties between the inlet and the outlet sections across a fetch of 10 km are compared. Although profiles of wind speed, TKE, and its dissipation rate are consistently satisfactory under higher wind conditions, a deviation of TKE and its dissipation rate between the inlet and outlet are apparent (7-8 %) under lower wind-speed conditions (2 m s at 10 m). Furthermore, the simulated surface stress systematically decreases in the downwind direction. A redistribution of the pressure field is also found in the simulation domain, which provides a different driving pattern from the realistic case in

  16. Immersed boundary methods for high-resolution simulation of atmospheric boundary-layer flow over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Katherine Ann

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  17. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A

    2010-05-12

    use of flux (non-zero) boundary conditions. This anabatic flow set-up is further coupled to atmospheric physics parameterizations, which calculate surface fluxes, demonstrating that the IBM can be coupled to various land-surface parameterizations in atmospheric models. Additionally, the IB method is extended to three dimensions, using both trilinear and inverse distance weighted interpolations. Results are presented for geostrophic flow over a three-dimensional hill. It is found that while the IB method using trilinear interpolation works well for simple three-dimensional geometries, a more flexible and robust method is needed for extremely complex geometries, as found in three-dimensional urban environments. A second, more flexible, immersed boundary method is devised using inverse distance weighting, and results are compared to the first IBM approach. Additionally, the functionality to nest a domain with resolved complex geometry inside of a parent domain without resolved complex geometry is described. The new IBM approach is used to model urban terrain from Oklahoma City in a one-way nested configuration, where lateral boundary conditions are provided by the parent domain. Finally, the IB method is extended to include wall model parameterizations for rough surfaces. Two possible implementations are presented, one which uses the log law to reconstruct velocities exterior to the solid domain, and one which reconstructs shear stress at the immersed boundary, rather than velocity. These methods are tested on the three-dimensional canonical case of neutral atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat terrain.

  18. Problems in the simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flows. [natural wind environment in atmospheric boundary layer for aerospace and aeronautical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    The realistic simulation of flow in the atmospheric boundary layers at heights greater than two kilometers is discussed. Information concerning horizontally homogeneous and statistically stationary atmospheric boundary layer flows is presented. The problems related to the incorporation of the information into atmospheric wind simulation programs are analyzed. The information which the meteorologist must acquire in order to provide a basis for improving the simulation of atmospheric boundary flows is explained.

  19. Crossing the Boundaries in Planetary Atmospheres - From Earth to Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Genio, Anthony Del

    2013-01-01

    The past decade has been an especially exciting time to study atmospheres, with a renaissance in fundamental studies of Earths general circulation and hydrological cycle, stimulated by questions about past climates and the urgency of projecting the future impacts of humankinds activities. Long-term spacecraft and Earth-based observation of solar system planets have now reinvigorated the study of comparative planetary climatology. The explosion in discoveries of planets outside our solar system has made atmospheric science integral to understanding the diversity of our solar system and the potential habitability of planets outside it. Thus, the AGU Chapman Conference Crossing the Boundaries in Planetary Atmospheres From Earth to Exoplanets, held in Annapolis, MD from June 24-27, 2013 gathered Earth, solar system, and exoplanet scientists to share experiences, insights, and challenges from their individual disciplines, and discuss areas in which thinking broadly might enhance our fundamental understanding of how atmospheres work.

  20. Effects of mesoscale surface inhomogeneities on atmospheric boundary layer transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    Defining the nature of turbulent transfer over horizontally inhomogeneous surfaces remains one of the challenges in meteorology. Because the transfer of energy and momentum through the atmospheric boundary layer forms part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models (GCMs), the problem is important. Over the last two decades, advances in sensor and computer technology wave made good point measurements of turbulent fluxes fairly routine. A fundamental question with respect to climate models, however, is how such point measurements are related to average fluxes over the area of a GCM grid box. In this paper we will use data from the field program to depict the evolution of the boundary layer over adjacent, sharply contrasting surface types on two separate occasions. We will then use simple scaling based on the observations to argue that sub-gridscale motions would often be likely to significantly alter the estimates and resulting parameterizations of GCM-scale surface fluxes in the region.

  1. Dynamic Turbulence Modelling in Large-eddy Simulations of the Cloud-topped Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, M. P.; Mansour, N. N.; Ackerman, A. S.; Stevens, D. E.

    2003-01-01

    The use of large eddy simulation, or LES, to study the atmospheric boundary layer dates back to the early 1970s when Deardor (1972) used a three-dimensional simulation to determine velocity and temperature scales in the convective boundary layer. In 1974 he applied LES to the problem of mixing layer entrainment (Deardor 1974) and in 1980 to the cloud-topped boundary layer (Deardor 1980b). Since that time the LES approach has been applied to atmospheric boundary layer problems by numerous authors. While LES has been shown to be relatively robust for simple cases such as a clear, convective boundary layer (Mason 1989), simulation of the cloud-topped boundary layer has proved more of a challenge. The combination of small length scales and anisotropic turbulence coupled with cloud microphysics and radiation effects places a heavy burden on the turbulence model, especially in the cloud-top region. Consequently, over the past few decades considerable effort has been devoted to developing turbulence models that are better able to parameterize these processes. Much of this work has involved taking parameterizations developed for neutral boundary layers and deriving corrections to account for buoyancy effects associated with the background stratification and local buoyancy sources due to radiative and latent heat transfer within the cloud (see Lilly 1962; Deardor 1980a; Mason 1989; MacVean & Mason 1990, for example). In this paper we hope to contribute to this effort by presenting a number of turbulence models in which the model coefficients are calculated dynamically during the simulation rather than being prescribed a priori.

  2. Large-Eddy Simulation of a Neutral Boundary Layer on a Nested Grid Using Explicit Filtering and Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfriend, L.; Chow, F. K.; Vanella, M.; Balaras, E.

    2013-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is a popular technique for studying the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) on small domains. ABL simulations often use structured nested grids to scale the solution from the mesoscale to local scales, but using LES on non-uniform grids generates additional errors. The grid refinement interfaces in nested grids can reflect resolved energy and create interpolation errors. This study investigates the use of explicit filtering and reconstruction to mitigate grid interface errors in LES of a neutral boundary layer. The domain is split in the streamwise direction into two equally sized structured grids, one fine and one coarse, with periodic boundaries in the streamwise and spanwise directions. This simply nested, idealized test case allows observation of the effects of the grid interfaces. Explicit filtering is found to reduce accumulation of resolved energy at the fine-to-coarse interface and improve the shape of coherent structures, compared to basic LES. Additional reconstruction of the subfilter velocity is shown to further the improvements of explicit filtering. These results inform the use of LES to simulate the ABL on block-structured non-uniform grids, from typical nested grids to more complex cartesian AMR grids for urban boundary layers.

  3. Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Dynamics with Constant Bowen Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porporato, Amilcare

    2009-08-01

    Motivated by the observation that the diurnal evolution of sensible and latent heat fluxes tends to maintain a constant Bowen ratio, we derive approximate solutions of the ordinary differential equations of a simplified atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) model. Neglecting the early morning transition, the potential temperature and specific humidity of the mixed layer are found to be linearly related to the ABL height. Similar behaviour is followed by the inversion strengths of temperature and humidity at the top of the ABL. The potential temperature of the mixed layer depends on the entrainment parameter and the free-atmosphere temperature lapse rate, while the specific humidity also depends on the free-atmosphere humidity lapse rate and the Bowen ratio. The temporal dynamics appear only implicitly in the evolution of the height of the boundary layer, which in turn depends on the time-integrated surface sensible heat flux. Studying the limiting behaviour of the Bowen ratio for very low and very large values of net available energy, we also show how the tendency to maintain constant Bowen ratio during midday hours stems from its relative insensitivity to the atmospheric conditions for large values of net available energy. The analytical expression for the diurnal evolution of the ABL obtained with constant Bowen ratio is simple and provides a benchmark for the results of more complex models.

  4. Methods for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John S.

    1999-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency response program which provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. This report reviews methodologies for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), which were investigated for use in the next generation of ARAC diagnostic and dispersion models. The ABL height, hABL, is an essential parameter in atmospheric dispersion modeling, controlling the extent of the vertical mixing of pollutants near the surface. Although eventually instrumentation (radiosonde, lidar, sodar, etc.) may provide accurate means for determining hABL, at present the availability of such data is too limited to provide a general capability for ARAC. The current operational ARAC diagnostic models use a fixed value of hABL for any given time. ARAC's new models support a horizontally-varying atmospheric boundary layer height, which is used to generate meteorological (mean wind, temperature, etc.) and turbulence fields. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods to derive the ABL height for all atmospheric stability regimes. One of our key requirements is to provide approaches which are applicable to routinely available data, which may be of limited temporal and spatial resolution. The final objective is to generate a consistent set of meteorological and turbulence or eddy diffusivity fields to drive the new ARAC dispersion model. A number of alternative definitions of the atmospheric boundary layer exist, leading to different approaches to deriving hABL. The definitions are based on either the turbulence characteristics of the atmosphere or the vertical structure of one or more meteorological variables. Most diagnostic analyses determine hABL from profiles of temperature or occasionally wind. A class of methods of considerable current interest are based on Richardson number criteria. Prognostic methods calculate the

  5. The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Harpold, Daniel N.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carrigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Holmes, Vincent; Kellogg, James; Jaeger, Ferzan; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) is designed to measure the composition, structure, and variability of the upper atmosphere of Mars. The NGIMS complements two other instrument packages on the MAVEN spacecraft designed to characterize the neutral upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and the solar wind input to this region of the atmosphere. The combined measurement set is designed to quantify atmosphere escape rates and provide input to models of the evolution of the martian atmosphere. The NGIMS is designed to measure both surface reactive and inert neutral species and ambient ions along the spacecraft track over the 125-500 km altitude region utilizing a dual ion source and a quadrupole analyzer.

  6. A method to estimate the neutral atmospheric density near the ionospheric main peak of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hong; Ye, Yu Guang; Wang, Jin Song; Nielsen, Erling; Cui, Jun; Wang, Xiao Dong

    2016-04-01

    A method to estimate the neutral atmospheric density near the ionospheric main peak of Mars is introduced in this study. The neutral densities at 130 km can be derived from the ionospheric and atmospheric measurements of the Radio Science experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The derived neutral densities cover a large longitude range in northern high latitudes from summer to late autumn during 3 Martian years, which fills the gap of the previous observations for the upper atmosphere of Mars. The simulations of the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Mars global circulation model can be corrected with a simple linear equation to fit the neutral densities derived from the first MGS/RS (Radio Science) data sets (EDS1). The corrected simulations with the same correction parameters as for EDS1 match the derived neutral densities from two other MGS/RS data sets (EDS2 and EDS3) very well. The derived neutral density from EDS3 shows a dust storm effect, which is in accord with the Mars Express (MEX) Spectroscopy for Investigation of Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars measurement. The neutral density derived from the MGS/RS measurements can be used to validate the Martian atmospheric models. The method presented in this study can be applied to other radio occultation measurements, such as the result of the Radio Science experiment on board MEX.

  7. Aerosol Variations in Boundary Atmospheres: Review and Prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Shi, Guangyu

    Atmospheric aerosols play important roles in climate and atmospheric chemistry: They scatter sunlight, provide condensation nuclei for cloud droplets, and participate in heterogeneous chemical reactions. To enable better understanding of the vertical physical, chemical and optical feathers of the aerosols in East Asia, using some atmospheric and aerosol measurement instruments on board a kind of tethered-balloon system, a series of measurements were operated in some typical areas of East Asia, including Dunhuang, which is located in the source origin district of Asian dust and Beijing, which is the representative of large inland city during the years of 2002-2011. Mineral compositions carried by the airborne particles were analyzed as well as the microbial components, meanwhile the Lidar data were compared to the direct measurements in order to get the correlation between the optical properties of the particles and their physical and chemical variations in the boundary atmosphere. Moreover, the simultaneous observations over the districts of China, Japan and Korea, and even Pakistan supported by an international cooperative project are highly expected, in order to know the changes of the chemical, physical and even optical and radiation properties of the atmospheric aerosols during their long-range transport.

  8. Linking atmospheric composition data across data types and national boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Martin; Lyapina, Olga; Schröder, Sabine; Stein, Olaf; Mallmann, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The field of atmospheric composition research involves the management of data sources from various disciplines such as meteorology, chemistry, (radiation) physics, emission inventories, etc. The output from global and regional chemistry climate models, chemistry transport models, and air quality models presents considerable challenges due to the manifold variables of interest and the multitude of diagnostics needed in order to interpret the results. Furthermore, many observations of atmospheric composition exist from different platforms involving different geometries, time resolutions, size spectra, etc. Due to the fact that few observation networks are globally coordinated, various representations of data formats and metadata definitions exist. For example, there is no unique agreement on chemical species names and in many networks, national languages are used to document the data. We will present a summary of the issues involving global interoperability of atmospheric composition data including the aspects of data volume, data compexity and metadata standardisation, and we will demonstrate various activities carried out in Jülich and internationally to overcome these challenges. Specifically, we will describe the current implementation and plans for the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service boundary condition service (http://ows-server.iek.fz-juelich.de), the design of the JOIN web interface (https://join.fz-juelich.de), and the activities for building an ontology of atmospheric composition vocabulary (https://ontology.geodab.eu/).

  9. Atmospheric surface and boundary layers of the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Three phases of work were performed: design of and preparation for the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2-A); execution of the ABLE 2-A field program; and analysis of the ABLE 2-A data. Three areas of experiment design were dealt with: surface based meteorological measurements; aircraft missions; and project meteorological support. The primary goal was to obtain a good description of the structure of the atmosphere immediately above the rain forest canopy (top of canopy to a few thousand meters), to describe this region during the growing daytime phase of the boundary layer; and to examine the nighttime stratified state. A secondary objective was to examine the role that deep convective storms play in the vertical transport of heat, water vapor, and other trace gases. While significant progress was made, much of the analysis remains to be done.

  10. Eulerian dispersion modeling with WRF-LES of plume impingement in neutrally and stably stratified turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunalee, Christopher G.; Kosović, Branko; Bieringer, Paul E.

    2014-12-01

    The vast range of space-time scales associated with turbulent flow adjacent to rugged terrain is especially problematic to predictive dispersion modeling in atmospheric boundary layers (ABLs) partly due to the presence of non-linear flow features (e.g., recirculation zones, diffusion enhancement, etc.). It has been suggested that in such ABLs, explicitly modeling large turbulent eddies, through large-eddy simulation (LES), may help to curtail predicted concentration errors. In this work, passive scalars were introduced into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) LES model for the purpose of simulating scalar plume interaction with an isolated terrain feature. Using measurements from the Cinder Cone Butte (CCB) field campaign, we evaluate the ability of WRF-LES to realistically simulate the impingement of Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) plumes onto CCB in both neutrally and stably stratified environments. Simulations reveal relatively accurate scalar trajectories with respect to thermal stability, including complex patterns such as plume splitting below the hill dividing streamline. Statistical accuracy varied with case study, but for the neutral case we recorded greater than 50% of predicted 1 h averaged surface concentrations within a factor of 2 of the observations. This metric, along with several others, indicates a performance accuracy similar to, or slightly better than, alternative Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes models. For the stably stratified case, the spatial distribution of surface concentrations was captured well; however, a positive concentration bias was observed which degraded quantitative accuracy scores. The variable accuracy of the WRF-LES model with respect to thermal stability is similar to what has been observed in regulatory analytical models (i.e., concentration under predictions in neutral environments and concentration over predictions in stable environments). Possible sources of error and uncertainty included the omission of mesoscale wind

  11. Behaviour of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroni, I.; Argentini, S.

    2009-09-01

    The Antarctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer presents characteristics which are substantially different from the mid-latitudes ABLs. On the Antarctic plateau two different extreme situations are observed. During the summer a mixing height develops during the warmer hours of the day although the sensible heat flux is reduced compared to that at mid-latitudes. During the winter a long lived stable boundary layer is continuously present, the residual layer is never observed, consequently the inversion layer is connected at the free atmosphere. To understand the stable ABL process the STABLEDC (Study of the STAble Boundary Layer Environmental at Dome C) experimental field was held at Concordia, the French Italian plateau station at Dome C, during 2005. In the same period the RMO (Routine Measurements Observations) started. The data included turbulence data at the surface, temperature profiles by a microwave profiler (MTP-5P), a mini-sodar and radio-soundings. In this work we will show the results of a comparison of the ABL height at Concordia (3233 m a.s.l) during the summer and the winter using direct measurements and parameterization. The winter ABL height was estimated directly using experimental data (radio-soundings and radiometer temperature and wind velocity profiles) and different methods proposed in literature. The stable ABL height was also estimated using the formulation proposed by Zilitinkevich et al. (2007) for the long-lived stable boundary layer. The correlation of ABL height with the temperature and wind speed is also shown. The summer mixing height was instead estimated by mini-sodar data and compared with the height given by the model suggested by Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) which use as input the turbulence data.

  12. Segregation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer - A Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugi, Ralph; Berger, Martina; Zelger, Michael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Rohrer, Franz; Holland, Frank; Lu, Keding; Tsokankunku, Anywhere; Sörgel, Matthias; Kramm, Gerhard; Mölders, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Segregation is a well known topic in technical chemistry and means an incomplete mixing of the reactants. Incomplete mixing reduces the rate of reaction which is of utmost importance in technical chemistry but has been payed less attention in atmospheric chemistry. Different observational and modelling studies on chemical reactions in the turbulent and convective atmospheric boundary layer are analysed for the influences of segregation in the systems NO ‑ NO2 ‑ O3 and OH + V OCs (with main focus on isoprene). Also some estimates on reactions like HO2 + NO (an important recycling mechanism for OH) will be given. Especially, different terms of the intensity of segregation IS (correlation coefficients, standard deviations of mixing ratios) are compared and are related to characteristics of the flow regimes, such as mixing conditions and Damköhler numbers. Also influences of fluctuations of actinic fluxes are discussed which influence the mostly photo chemically driven reactions that were investigated.

  13. CONSTRUCTION OF NATURAL NEUTRALIZATION FACILITIES FOR ALKALINE TUNNEL SEEPAGE USING ATMOSPHERIC CARBON DIOXIDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Yoshinobu; Igarashi, Toshihumi; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Okawa, Ryo

    Neutralization with liquefied carbon dioxide for alkaline tunnel seepage after construction is one of the issues to be solved by considering the costs of gas and neutralization units and management in the long run. One promising method is to neutralize it by natural processes using atmospheric carbon dioxide. In this study, the hydrological survey and dissolution experiments of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the laboratory and in situ conditions were conducted. Based on the results, natural neutralization facilities using atmospheric carbon dioxide were constructed. The pH of the effluent from the facilities was reduced by 0.13 to 0.18, indicating that the double film theory was effective in predicting the reduction of pH.

  14. Coupled groundwater-atmosphere modeling: effects on atmospheric boundary layer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, F. K.; Maxwell, R. M.; Kollet, S. J.; Daniels, M. H.; Rihani, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Newly-developed coupled land-atmosphere models which incorporate both subsurface and atmospheric moisture dynamics have the potential to change our understanding of the hydrologic cycle. This presentation describes the effects of coupled groundwater-atmosphere modeling on simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer. Both field observations and simulations indicate strong sensitivity of atmospheric dynamics to land-surface conditions, in particular surface soil moisture. Simulations of atmospheric flow in Owens Valley (California) and in the Riviera Valley (Switzerland) show strong sensitivity to land-surface conditions, thus motivating the need for more accurate representations of soil moisture. In addition to influences from weather and seasonal changes, soil moisture dynamics respond to diurnal heat fluxes on the land surface. Using our new fully-coupled groundwater-atmosphere model, we have demonstrated correlations of soil moisture and land-surface heat fluxes with groundwater fluctuations on short, diurnal time scales. By explicitly calculating groundwater dynamics for our domain of interest, we are able to produce realistic time- and space-varying soil moisture distributions that naturally correspond to variations in topography and surface evaporation. Simulations in idealized and real watersheds are shown to illustrate these effects. The observed variations in surface moisture distribution have large impacts on the moisture and temperature structure in the atmosphere, leading to changes in boundary layer depth and convective motions as compared to standard soil moisture representations. Our coupled model framework will allow detailed investigation of the complex cycle of land-atmosphere processes affecting moisture distributions in the subsurface and the atmosphere.

  15. Cometary atmospheres: Modeling the spatial distribution of observed neutral radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    Progress on modeling the spatial distributions of cometary radicals is described. The Monte Carlo particle-trajectory model was generalized to include the full time dependencies of initial comet expansion velocities, nucleus vaporization rates, photochemical lifetimes and photon emission rates which enter the problem through the comet's changing heliocentric distance and velocity. The effect of multiple collisions in the transition zone from collisional coupling to true free flow were also included. Currently available observations of the spatial distributions of the neutral radicals, as well as the latest available photochemical data were re-evaluated. Preliminary exploratory model results testing the effects of various processes on observable spatial distributions are also discussed.

  16. Structure of the neutral upper atmosphere of Mars - Results from Viking 1 and Viking 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1976-01-01

    Neutral mass spectrometers carried on the aeroshells of Viking 1 and Viking 2 indicate that carbon dioxide is the major constituent of the Martian atmosphere over the height range 120 to 200 kilometers. The atmosphere contains detectable concentrations of nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, molecular oxygen, atomic oxygen, and nitric oxide. The upper atmosphere exhibits a complex and variable thermal structure and is well mixed to heights in excess of 120 kilometers.

  17. First observation of the fourth neutral polarization point in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Gabor; Bernath, Balazs; Suhai, Bence; Barta, Andras; Wehner, Rudiger

    2002-10-01

    In the clear sky there are three commonly known loci, the Arago, Babinet, and Brewster neutral points, where the skylight is unpolarized. These peculiar celestial points, bearing the names of their discoverers, have been the subject of many ground-based investigations, because their positions are sensitive indicators of the amount and type of atmospheric turbidity. According to theoretical considerations and computer simulations, there should exist an additional neutral point approximately opposite to the Babinet point, which can be observed only at higher altitudes in the air or space. Until now, this anonymous fourth neutral point has not been observed during air- or space-borne polarimetric experiments and has been forgotten, in spite of the fact that the neutral points were a basic tool in atmospheric research for a century. Here, we report on the first observation of this fourth neutral point from a hot air balloon. Using 180-field-of-view imaging polarimetry, we could observe the fourth neutral point at 450, 550, and 650 nm from different altitudes between 900 and 3500 m during and after sunrise at approximately 2240 below the anti-solar point along the anti-solar meridian, depending on the wavelength and solar elevation. We show that the fourth neutral point exists at the expected location and has characteristics similar to those of the Arago, Babinet, and Brewster points. We discuss why the fourth neutral point has not been observed in previous air- or space-borne polarimetric experiments. 2002 Optical Society of America

  18. Neutral Mass Spectrometry for Venus Atmosphere and Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The nature of the divergent evolution of the terrestrial planets Venus, Earth, and Mars is a fundamental problem in planetary science that is most relevant to understanding the characteristics of small planets we are likely to discover in extrasolar systems and the number of such systems that may support habitable environments. For this reason, the National Research Council's Decadal Survey gives Venus exploration high priority. That report was the basis of the NASA selection of Venus as one of four prime mission targets for the recently initiated New Frontiers Program. If the Decadal Survey priorities are to be realized, in situ Venus exploration must remain a high priority. Remote sensing orbital and in situ atmospheric measurements from entry probe or balloon platforms might be realized under the low cost Discovery missions while both atmospheric and landed surface measurements are envisioned with the intermediate class missions of the New Frontiers Program.

  19. Neutral Mass Spectrometry for Venus Atmosphere and Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The assignment is to make precise (better than 1 %) measurements of isotope ratios and accurate (5-10%) measurements of abundances of noble gas and to obtain vertical profiles of trace chemically active gases from above the clouds all the way down to the surface. Science measurement objectives are as follows: 1) Determine the composition of Venus atmosphere, including trace gas species and light stable isotopes; 2) Accurately measure noble-gas isotopic abundance in the atmosphere; 3) Provide descent, surface, and ascent meteorological data; 4) Measure zonal cloud-level winds over several Earth days; 5) Obtain near-IR descent images of the surface from 10-km altitude to the surface; 6) Accurately measure elemental abundances & mineralogy of a core from the surface; and 7) Evaluate the texture of surface materials to constrain weathering environment.

  20. Interaction between the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, G.-T.

    1974-01-01

    The two-layer system of an atmosphere over water bodies is reduced to a single-layer problem. Values of the interfacial quantities, such as the friction velocity, the surface velocity, the angles, alpha and beta, between the surface shear stress and the geostrophic wind velocity and the surface wind velocity, respectively, and the surface roughness, all of which depend upon external parameters, such as the geostrophic wind and stratifications, are obtained. The geostrophic drag coefficient, the geostrophic wind coefficient, and the angles alpha, and beta, of the turbulent flow at the sea-air interface are functions of a dimensionless number, mfG/kg, with S sub 1 and S sub 2 as two free stratification parameters. The surface roughness is uniquely determined from the geostrophic wind rather than from the wind profile in the boundary layer.

  1. Acid–base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Modi; Titcombe, Mari; Jiang, Jingkun; Jen, Coty; Kuang, Chongai; Fischer, Marc L.; Eisele, Fred L.; Siepmann, J. Ilja; Hanson, David R.; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Climate models show that particles formed by nucleation can affect cloud cover and, therefore, the earth's radiation budget. Measurements worldwide show that nucleation rates in the atmospheric boundary layer are positively correlated with concentrations of sulfuric acid vapor. However, current nucleation theories do not correctly predict either the observed nucleation rates or their functional dependence on sulfuric acid concentrations. This paper develops an alternative approach for modeling nucleation rates, based on a sequence of acid–base reactions. The model uses empirical estimates of sulfuric acid evaporation rates obtained from new measurements of neutral molecular clusters. The model predicts that nucleation rates equal the sulfuric acid vapor collision rate times a prefactor that is less than unity and that depends on the concentrations of basic gaseous compounds and preexisting particles. Predicted nucleation rates and their dependence on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations are in reasonable agreement with measurements from Mexico City and Atlanta. PMID:23091030

  2. Nonequilibrium Behavior of the Daytime Atmospheric Boundary Layer, from LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, Balaji; Brasseur, James; McCandless, Tyler; Haupt, Sue

    2014-11-01

    LES of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat topography is universally developed as an equilibrium ABL with steady surface heat flux Q0 and steady unidirectional ``geostrophic'' wind vector Vg above a capping inversion, where Vg also defines a spatially uniform transverse mean pressure gradient. The LES approaches a quasiequilibrium state characterized statistically by the ratio of boundary layer depth to Obukhov length scale. In contrast, the true daytime ABL is driven by surface heat flux increases to peak mid-day and drops in the afternoon, and by mesoscale wind vectors Ug that change in magnitude and direction during the day. We study the consequences of mesoscale weather on ABL dynamics by forcing ABL LES with a WRF simulation of the Midwest during 3 days of frontal passage over Kansas. Assuming horizontal homogeneity, we derive the relationship between Ug and Vg and study ABL response with systematic variation in Q0 and the magnitude and direction of Ug. Interesting results include: (1) asymmetry nonequilibrium diurnal response of the ABL; (2) directional changes in surface layer winds relevant to wind turbine function; and (3) changes in ABL stability state arising solely from changes in the direction of Ug. Supported by DOE. Computer resources by NSF/XSEDE.

  3. Neutral atmosphere near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2016-07-01

    The paper discusses the formation and dynamics of the rarefied gas envelope near the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Ganymede. Being the most massive icy moon, Ganymede can form a rarefied exosphere with a relatively dense near-surface layer. The main parent component of the gas shell is water vapor, which enters the atmosphere due to thermal degassing, nonthermal radiolysis, and other active processes and phenomena on the moon's icy surface. A numerical kinetic simulation is performed to investigate, at the molecular level, the formation, chemical evolution, and dynamics of the mainly H2O- and O2-dominant rarefied gas envelopes. The ionization processes in these rarefied gas envelopes are due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the Sun and the magnetospheric plasma. The chemical diversity of the icy moon's gas envelope is attributed to the primary action of ultraviolet solar photons and plasma electrons on the rarefied gas in the H2O- or O2-dominant atmosphere. The model is used to calculate the formation and development of the chemical diversity in the relatively dense near-surface envelope of Ganymede, where an important contribution comes from collisions between parent molecules and the products of their photolysis and radiolysis.

  4. Response of the atmospheric boundary layer to changes in surfaces fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owinoh, A. Z.; Hunt, J. C.; Orr, A.; Clark, P.

    2003-04-01

    The response of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to varying surface fluxes such as surface heat fluxes and roughness changes is a common element in several problems in mesoscale dynamics. We study some of these problems by reducing the complexity of the physical processes that are relevant to mechanism of interest so that analytical solutions can be obtained. Our presentation begins with the examination of the time dependent response and the influence of a 2-D low hill on the flow in a neutral boundary layer to a uniform surface heat flux switched at time, t=0. Analytical solutions for changes in temperature, mean wind and shear stress profiles in the ABL are sought. The modelled profiles are compared with those obtained from the UK Unified Model run on a idealised mode at 12km horizontal resolution. To understand the time and spatial dependence, perturbations are analysed of stratified ABL equations as they pass over areas where there is sharply differing surface heat flux and roughness; a situation freqently observed between rural and urban areas, or across coastline or across sea-ice boundaries. New estimates are derived for the transition distance and how the fluxes, temperature and velocity, vary in the transition distance zone. These simple estimates are compared with Rider et al. (1963) experimental data. Rider N. E., Philip J. R. &Bradley E. F. (1963), The horizontal transport of heat and moisture - A micrometeorological study. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc, 89, 507-531.

  5. The vertical turbulence structure of the coastal marine atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M.; Smedman, A.S. )

    1993-03-15

    The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere along a shoreline has been investigated using data from tower and aircraft measurements performed along the Baltic coast in the southeast of Sweden. Two properties make the Baltic Sea particularly interesting. It is surrounded by land in all directions within moderate advection distances, and it features a significant annual lag in sea surface temperature as compared with inland surface temperature. The present data were collected mostly during spring or early summer, when the water is cool, i.e., with a stably or neutrally stratified marine boundary layer usually capped by an inversion. Substantial daytime heating over the land area results in a considerable horizontal thermal contrast. Measurements were made on a small island, on a tower with a good sea fetch, and with an airborne instrument package. The profile data from the aircraft is from 25 slant soundings performed in connection to low level boundary layer flights. The results from the profiles are extracted through filtering techniques on individual time (space) series (individual profiles), applying different normalization and finally averaging over all or over groups of profiles. The land-based data are from a low tower situated on the shoreline of a small island with a wide sector of unobstructed sea fetch. Several factors are found that add to the apparent complexity of the coastal marine environment: the state of the sea appears to have a major impact on the turbulence structure of the surface layer, jet-shaped wind speed profiles were very common at the top of the boundary layer (in about 50% of the cases) and distinct layers with increased turbulence were frequently found well above the boundary layer (in about 80% of the cases). The present paper will concentrate on a description of the experiment, the analysis methods, and a general description of the boundary layer turbulence structure over the Baltic Sea. 40 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Coherent structures in the Es layer and neutral middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Knížová, Petra Koucká; Potužníková, Kateřina

    2015-12-01

    The present paper shows results from the summer campaign performed during geomagnetically quiet period from June 1 to August 31, 2009. Within time-series of stratospheric and mesospheric temperatures at pressure levels 10-0.1 hPa, mesospheric winds measured in Collm, Germany, and the sporadic E-layer parameters foEs and hEs measured at the Pruhonice station we detected specific coherent wave-bursts in planetary wave domain. Permanent wave-like activity is observed in all analyzed data sets. However, the number of wave-like structures persistent in large range of height from the stratosphere to lower ionosphere is limited. The only coherent modes that are detected on consequent levels of the atmosphere are those corresponding to eigenmodes of planetary waves.

  7. Vegetation-atmosphere interactions and boundary layer cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Jeffrey Michael

    2000-07-01

    A study of vegetation-atmosphere interactions and boundary layer cumulus clouds (``BLcu'') in terms of seasonal trends (i.e., heat and moisture tendencies) and short-term events (specifically the modification of in situ air masses) is presented. In the northeastern U.S., in response to increasing insolation and sensible heat flux, both the mixed layer height (zi) and lifting condensation level (LCL) peak (~1300 and 1700 m) just before the start of the growing season. With the commencement of transpiration, the Bowen ratio (β) falls abruptly (from greater than 3 to less than 1) as additional moisture is transpired into the boundary layer, and zi and the LCL decrease. By late spring, boundary layer cumulus cloud frequency increases sharply, as the mixed layer approaches a new equilibrium. At Harvard Forest during 1995, afternoon net carbon uptake (Fco2 ) was 52% greater on days with boundary layer cumulus clouds than clear days. For 1996-1998, afternoon Fco2 was also enhanced, especially during dry periods. The same enhancement, albeit reduced, was observed at a northern jack pine site during the BOREAS project, despite very different phenological, hydrological, and climatological regimes. Sixteen frontal sequences affecting the northeastern U.S. were analyzed in terms of local and regional contributions to the temperature and moisture tendency equations. A composite of sequences featuring the daily appearance of BLcu indicates a diminished role for entrainment and other external forcings due to the daily occurrence of a rapid growth phase in ML diurnal evolution subsequent to day 1. From the sequence minimum (day 2) in temperature and moisture, surface flux convergence accounts for about 50% of the overall net moistening and heating of the mixed layer. Model sensitivity tests show that changes in subsidence and γ θν affect ML processes most on day 1; dining subsequent days, the rapid growth phase dominates the ML growth equation, and reduces the impact of these

  8. Large-eddy simulation of very-large-scale motions in atmospheric boundary-layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jiannong; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    In the last few decades, laboratory experiments and direct numerical simulations of turbulent boundary layers, performed at low to moderate Reynolds numbers, have found very-large-scale motions (VLSMs) in the logarithmic and outer regions. The size of VLSMs was found to be 10-20 times as large as the boundary-layer thickness. Recently, few studies based on field experiments examined the presence of VLSMs in neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flows, which are invariably at very high Reynolds numbers. Very large scale structures similar to those observed in laboratory-scale experiments have been found and characterized. However, it is known that field measurements are more challenging than laboratory-based measurements, and can lack resolution and statistical convergence. Such challenges have implications on the robustness of the analysis, which may be further adversely affected by the use of Taylor's hypothesis to convert time series to spatial data. We use large-eddy simulation (LES) to investigate VLSMs in atmospheric boundary-layer flows. In order to make sure that the largest flow structures are properly resolved, the horizontal domain size is chosen to be much larger than the standard domain size. It is shown that the contributions to the resolved turbulent kinetic energy and shear stress from VLSMs are significant. Therefore, the large computational domain adopted here is essential for the purpose of investigating VLSMs. The spatially coherent structures associated with VLSMs are characterized through flow visualization and statistical analysis. The instantaneous velocity fields in horizontal planes give evidence of streamwise-elongated flow structures of low-speed fluid with negative fluctuation of the streamwise velocity component, and which are flanked on either side by similarly elongated high-speed structures. The pre-multiplied power spectra and two-point correlations indicate that the scales of these streak-like structures are very large. These features

  9. Kinetic modeling of Europa's neutral atmosphere and pick-up ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, V.; Rubin, M.; Borovikov, D.; Jia, X.; Combi, M. R.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2013-12-01

    Europa was the highest priority outer planet exploration target in the 2007 NASA Science Plan, the 2006 Solar System Exploration Roadmap, and the 2003 planetary sciences Decadal Survey. The in-depth exploration of the plasma environment of Jupiter's moon Europa and investigation of its interaction with moon's surface and atmosphere remains a central objective of any proposed Europa Jupiter System Mission. The neutral species in Europa's atmosphere are mostly provided by ion sputtering of the water ice surface. Energetic ions and electrons from the Jovian magnetosphere produce molecular oxygen O2, the dominant species in Europa's atmosphere. Very close to the moon's surface the probability for collisional interaction between the species is close to the limit for a surface bound exosphere. The main loss mechanisms for neutrals are electron impact ionization, photoionization, as well as escape when neutral particles leave Europa's Hill sphere at roughly 8.7 Europa radii. The neutral and plasma environment of Europa are a tightly coupled system. A detailed study of this system requires coupled models of both the plasma and neutral environment. In this study we use coupled state-of-the-art computer models developed at the University of Michigan. In particular we include the BATSRUS MHD code of the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) and the Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (AMPS) model based on the DSMC method that both have well proven heritage in numerous space applications. In this investigation we calculate the plasma distribution in the vicinity of Europa at different locations along its orbit. The energetic ion flux derived from these calculations is used for simulation of the neutral particle sputtering that form Europa's atmosphere. The subsequent ionization of these neutral particles is the source of the pick-up ions. Populations of the neutrals and ions are calculated by tracing trajectories of the individual particles with accounting for both Europa

  10. Visualization of the flow field around a generic destroyer model in a simulated turbulent atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinger, William K.

    1987-06-01

    An experimental flow visualization study was performed on a rectangular block and other elements that could be assembled in the form of a generic destroyer ship model. The purpose of the study was to visually analyze the flow field around the model in a simulated open ocean atmospheric boundary layer. To ensure correct simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer, both velocity profile and longitudinal turbulence intensities were matched. For the actual flow visualization studies, two techniques were used. During the on-body portion of the study, the ultraviolet lighting/fluorescent minituft technique was used. For the off-body portion, helium bubble system, with a neutral density centrifuge, was utilized. Both techniques produced excellent photographic results and allowed for direct comparison of the flow fields using the two flow visualization techniques.

  11. Turbulence in a convective marine atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Atlas, D.; Yeh, E.-N.

    1986-01-01

    The structure and kinetic energy budget of turbulence in the convective marine atmospheric boundary layer as observed by aircraft during a cold air outbreak have been studied using mixed layer scaling. The results are significantly different from those of previous studies under conditions closer to free convection. The normalized turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent transport are about twice those found during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX). This implies that for a given surface heating the present case is dynamically more active. The difference is mainly due to the greater importance of wind shear in the present case. This case is closer to the roll vortex regime, whereas AMTEX observed mesoscale cellular convection which is closer to free convection. Shear generation is found to provide a significant energy source, in addition to buoyancy production, to maintain a larger normalized turbulent kinetic energy and to balance a larger normalized dissipation. The interaction between turbulent pressure and divergence (i.e., pressure scrambling) is also found to transfer energy from the vertical to the horizontal components, and is expected to be stronger in roll vortices than in m esoscale cells. The sensible heat flux is found to fit well with a linear vertical profile in a clear or subcloud planetary boundary layer (PBL), in good agreement with the results of Lenschow et al., (1980). The heat flux ratio between the PBL top and the surface, derived from the linear fitted curve, is approximately -0.14, in good agreement with that derived from the lidar data for the same case. Near the PBL top, the heat flux profiles are consistent with those of Deardoff (1979) and Deardorff et al. (1980).

  12. Structure and composition of the neutral upper atmosphere of Mars from the MAVEN NGIMS investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Elrod, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Bougher, S. W.; Stone, S. W.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) provides sensitive detections of neutral gas and ambient ion composition. NGIMS measurements of nine atomic and molecular neutral species, and their variation with altitude, latitude, and solar zenith angle are reported over several months of operation of the MAVEN mission. Sampling NGIMS signals from multiple neutral species every several seconds reveals persistent and unexpectedly large amplitude density structures. The scale height temperatures are mapped over the course of the first few months of the mission from high down to midlatitudes. NGIMS measurements near the homopause of 40Ar/N2 ratios agree with those reported by the Sample Analysis at Mars investigation and allow the altitude of the homopause for the most abundant gases to be established.

  13. Structure and Composition of the Neutral Upper Atmosphere of Mars from the MAVEN NGIMS Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Stone, S. W.; Elrod, M. K.; Fox, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) on the MAVEN mission is designed to characterize the state of the upper atmosphere and its response to perturbations from the sun and from lower atmosphere. These measurements complement other instruments on the MAVEN spacecraft and support the MAVEN science goal [Jakosky et al., 2015] of understanding atmospheric escape and over the course of martian history. We report NGIMS measurements of the neutral composition of multiple atomic and molecular species over hundreds of orbits since the science phase of this mission began late in 2014. Ion measurements from NGIMS are reported separately in other contributions to this session. The wide dynamic range, the high temporal resolution, and the use of two different ion source configurations of the NGIMS instrument [Mahaffy et al., 2014] allows neutral density structure and its variability to be characterized in detail. Large amplitude wave structure is observed on the lowest altitude portion of many orbits that dissipates at higher altitudes. Although this structure puts scatter in the retrieval of scale height temperatures these are nevertheless robustly secured by averaging over several orbits. The variability of the upper atmosphere temperature with latitude and local solar time is reported. The deep dip campaign approach to the homopause allows the mixing ratio of the major gases in the lower atmosphere to be measured. We compare these mixing ratios with those reported by the Sample Analysis at Mars investigation and previous Viking measurements. Jakosky, B. M., et al. (2015), The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Mission, Space Sci Rev, 21. Mahaffy, P. R., et al. (2014), The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission, Space Sci Rev, 185, DOI: 10.1007/s11214-11014-10091-11211.

  14. Scaling laws of turbulence intermittency in the atmospheric boundary layer: the role of stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradisi, Paolo; Cesari, Rita; Allegrini, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Bursting and intermittent behavior is a fundamental feature of turbulence, especially in the vicinity of solid obstacles. This is associated with the dynamics of turbulent energy production and dissipation, which can be described in terms of coherent motion structures. These structures are generated at random times and remain stable for long times, after which they become suddenly unstable and undergo a rapid decay event. This intermittent behavior is described as a birth-death point process of self-organization, i.e., a sequence of critical events. The Inter-Event Time (IET) distribution, associated with intermittent self-organization, is typically a power-law decay, whose power exponent is known as complexity index and characterizes the complexity of the system, i.e., the ability to develop self-organized, metastable motion structures. We use a method, based on diffusion scaling, for the estimation of system's complexity. The method is applied to turbulence velocity data in the atmospheric boundary layer. A neutral condition is compared with a stable one, finding that the complexity index is lower in the neutral case with respect to the stable one. As a consequence, the crucial birth-death events are more rare in the stable case, and this could be associated with a less efficient transport dynamics.

  15. Numerical study of the anode boundary layer in atmospheric pressure arc discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, I. L.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Reisgen, U.

    2016-03-01

    The anode boundary layer in atmospheric pressure arc discharges is studied numerically on the basis of the hydrodynamic (diffusion) equations for plasma components. The governing equations are formulated in a unified manner without the assumptions of thermal equilibrium, ionization equilibrium or quasi-neutrality. For comparison, a quasi-neutral model of the anode layer is also considered. The numerical computations are performed for an argon arc at typical values of the current density in anode layers (500-2000 A cm-2). The results of numerical modelling show that the common collisionless model of the sheath fails to describe the sheath region for the problem under consideration. For this reason, a detailed analysis of the anode sheath is performed using the results of unified modelling. In addition, the distributions of plasma parameters in the anode layer are analysed and the basic characteristics of the layer (anode voltage drop, sheath voltage drop, anode layer thickness, sheath thickness, heat flux to the anode) are calculated. Our results are found to be in good agreement with the existing theoretical predictions and experimental data. The dependence of the anode layer characteristics on the current density is also discussed.

  16. 1D-coupled photochemical model of neutrals, cations and anions in the atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrijevic, M.; Loison, J. C.; Hickson, K. M.; Gronoff, G.

    2016-04-01

    Many models with different characteristics have been published so far to study the chemical processes at work in Titan's atmosphere. Some models focus on neutral species in the stratosphere or ionic species in the ionosphere, but few of them couple all the species throughout the whole atmosphere. Very few of these emphasize the importance of uncertainties in the chemical scheme and study their propagation in the model. We have developed a new 1D-photochemical model of Titan's atmosphere coupling neutral species with positive and negative ions from the lower atmosphere up to the ionosphere and have compared our results with observations to have a comprehensive view of the chemical processes driving the composition of the stratosphere and ionosphere of Titan. We have updated the neutral, positive ion and negative ion chemistry and have improved the description of N2 photodissociation by introducing high resolution N2 absorption cross sections. We performed for the first time an uncertainty propagation study in a fully coupled ion-neutral model. We determine how uncertainties on rate constants on both neutral and ionic reactions influence the model results and pinpoint the key reactions responsible for this behavior. We find very good agreement between our model results and observations in both the stratosphere and in the ionosphere for most neutral compounds. Our results are also in good agreement with an average INMS mass spectrum and specific flybys in the dayside suggesting that our chemical model (for both neutral and ions) provides a good approximation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as a whole. Our uncertainty propagation study highlights the difficulty to interpret the INMS mass spectra for masses 14, 31, 41 and we identified the key reactions responsible for these ambiguities. Despite an overall improvement in the chemical model, disagreement for some specific compounds (HC3N, C2H5CN, C2H4) highlights the role that certain physical processes could play

  17. Energetic neutral atoms measured by the interstellar boundary explorer (IBEX): Evidence for multiple heliosheath populations

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F. A.; Dayeh, M. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokół, J. M.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) provide powerful diagnostics about the origin of the progenitor ion populations and the physical mechanisms responsible for their production. In this paper, we extend the work of Desai et al. and Fuselier et al. and combine and compare ENA spectra from the first 3 yr of observations by the IBEX-Hi and -Lo ENA imagers along the lines-of-sight (LOSs) from the inner heliosphere through to the locations of Voyager 1 and 2 with results from an updated physics-based model of the three-dimensional heliosphere and its constituent ion populations. Our results show that (1) IBEX ENA fluxes and spectra above ∼0.7 keV measured along the LOSs of the Voyagers are consistent with several models in which the parent pickup ion (PUI) populations originate in the inner heliosheath, and (2) a significant fraction of lower energy ENAs between ∼0.1-0.5 keV may originate from interstellar neutral gas charge-exchanging with a non-thermalized (hot) population of PUIs in the outer heliosheath beyond the heliopause. We discuss the implications of ENAs observed by IBEX originating from distinct parent populations as well as from two distinct locations in the heliospheric interface. These results indicate that ENA spectral measurements at various energies can be used to remotely probe distinct physical processes operating in vastly different regions of the distant heliosphere.

  18. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures. PMID:23736241

  19. Urban atmospheric boundary layer height by aerosol lidar and ceilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. H.; Park, M. S.; Park, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of urban atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height on January, April, July and October 2014 using the gradient method by a ceilometer with a wavelength of 910 nm and an aerosol lidar with a wavelength of 532 and 1064 nm installed at two urban sites (Gwanghwamun and Jungnang) in Korea are analyzed. The Gwanghwamun site located at urban commercial area is 10 km apart from the Jungnang site located at urban residential area. The ABL height is determined by a height with a strong gradient of vertical backscatter intensity. It is found that the ABL height at both sites show a similar pattern and has a strong diurnal variation with a steep increase at 09-12 KST with a maximum in the late afternoon. And it is not determined clearly and the correlation between the ABL height by a ceilometer and that by an aerosol lidar is relatively low in case of high PM10 concentration such as Asian dust, haze and smog. Uncertainty of ABL height is also found to be strongly affected by the weather phenomena such as rain, haze or fog.

  20. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  1. Simultaneous profiling of the Arctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, S.; Jonassen, M.; Reuder, J.

    2009-04-01

    The structure of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer (AABL) and the heat and moisture fluxes between relatively warm water and cold air above non-sea-ice-covered water (such as fjords, leads and polynyas) are of great importance for the sensitive Arctic climate system. So far, such processes are not sufficiently resolved in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. Especially for regions with complex topography as the Svalbard mountains and fjords the state and diurnal evolution of the AABL is not well known yet. Knowledge can be gained by novel and flexible measurement techniques such as the use of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). An UAV can perform vertical profiles as well as horizontal surveys of the mean meteorological parameters: temperature, relative humidity, pressure and wind. A corresponding UAV called Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO) has been developed at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Bergen in cooperation with Müller Engineering (www.pfump.org) and the Paparazzi Project (http://paparazzi.enac.fr). SUMO will be used under Arctic conditions in March/April 2009. This time the special purpose will be to send two SUMOs simultaneously on mission; one over the ice and snow-covered land surface and the other one above the open water of Isfjorden. This will be the first step of future multiple UAV operations in so called "swarms" or "flocks". With this, corresponding measurements of the diurnal evolution of the AABL can be achieved with minimum technical efforts and costs.

  2. BIOGENIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons are ubiquitous trace atmospheric constituents yet they control the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere. Both anthropogenic and biogenic processes contribute to the release of hydrocarbons to the atmosphere. In this manuscript, the state of the science ...

  3. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Feedbacks in Boundary Current Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    The focus of this dissertation is on studying ocean-atmosphere (OA) interactions in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) and Kuroshio Extension (KE) region using satellite observations and the Scripps Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Regional (SCOAR) model. Within SCOAR, a new technique is introduced by implementing an interactive 2-D spatial smoother within the SST-flux coupler to remove the mesoscale SST field felt by the atmosphere. This procedure allows large-scale SST coupling to be preserved while extinguishing the mesoscale eddy impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This technique provides insights to spatial-scale dependence of OA coupling, and the impact of mesoscale features on both the ABL and the surface ocean. For the HCS, the use of downscaled forcing from SCOAR, as compared to NCEP Reanalysis 2, proves to be more appropriate in quantifying wind-driven upwelling indices along the coast of Peru and Chile. The difference in their wind stress distribution has significant impact on the wind-driven upwelling processes and total upwelling transport along the coast. Although upwelling induced by coastal Ekman transport dominates the wind-driven upwelling along coastal areas, Ekman pumping can account for 30% of the wind-driven upwelling in several coastal locations. Control SCOAR shows significant SST-wind stress coupling during fall and winter, while Smoothed SCOAR shows insignificant coupling throughout, indicating the important role of ocean mesoscale eddies on air-sea coupling in HCS. The SST-wind stress coupling however, did not produce any rectified response on the ocean eddies. Coupling between SST, wind speed and latent heat flux is insignificant on large-scale coupling and full coupling mode. On the other hand, coupling between these three variables are significant on the mesoscale for most of the model run, which suggests that mesoscale SST affects latent heat through direct flux anomalies as well as indirectly through stability changes on the

  4. Rocket experiment in a coupling process between neutral atmosphere and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Liu, H.; Abe, T.; Ono, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Saito, A.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, M. Y.

    Rocket experiment is carried out to investigate a coupling process between neutral atmosphere and plasma of thermosphere and ionosphere at Kagoshima Space Center KSC of JAXA The rocket launch window is in the evening of July 31 - August 15 2007 Momentum transfer through collisional process of the neutral atmosphere and the plasma is a basic problem of atmospheric circulation and super rotation in the low latitude thermosphere and a medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbance MS-TID occurring in the mid-latitude ionosphere but the direct observation is not yet performed In the rocket experiment we observe plasma drift velocity plasma density and temperature and its fluctuations electric field magnetic field and neutral wind The neutral winds are estimated from the movements of Lithium clouds which are released at altitudes between 150km and 300km and scatter sunlight by resonance scattering with wavelength of 670 nm The Lithium clouds are observed by CCD imagers on ground The plan of rocket experiment ground observation system and science objectives are presented

  5. Europa's atmospheric neutral escape: Importance of symmetrical O2 charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dols, Vincent J.; Bagenal, Fran; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Crary, Frank J.; Delamere, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    We model the interaction of the jovian magnetospheric plasma with the atmosphere of Europa using a multi-species chemistry model where the atmospheric distributions of H2 and O2 are prescribed. The plasma flow is idealized as an incompressible flow around a conducting obstacle. We compute changes in plasma composition resulting from this interaction as well as the reaction rates integrated over the simulation domain for several upstream plasma conditions (ion density, ion temperature and flow velocity). We show that for all cases, the main atmospheric loss process is a cascade of symmetrical charge exchanges on O2, which results in the ejection of neutrals. The production rate of ejected neutrals is about an order of magnitude larger than the production of ions. This conclusion is relevant to future missions to Europa that aim to detect fast neutrals. The neutral ejection resulting from this charge exchange creates an oxygen cloud around the orbit of the moon that is very extended radially but also very tenuous, and has not yet been directly detected.

  6. LES of oscillating boundary layers under neutrally stratified and unstably stratified conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juha, Mario; Zhang, Jie; Tejada-Martinez, Andres

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented from LES of open channel flow driven by an oscillating pressure gradient with zero surface shear stress. The flow is representative of an oscillating tidal boundary layer. Under neutrally stratified conditions, during certain phases of the oscillating pressure gradient, the flow develops large scale secondary structures, characterized by full-depth regions (or limbs) of negative and positive wall-normal velocity fluctuations. These structures are similar but less coherent than the classical Couette cells found in Couette flow driven by parallel no-slip plates moving in opposite direction. Unstable stratification will be imposed by a constant cooling flux at the surface and an adiabatic bottom wall. The effect of the surface cooling on the large scale secondary structures and the overall turbulence statistics will be investigated. The analysis will be performed in terms of the Rayleigh number (Ra), representative of the importance of surface buoyancy relative to shear, and the Rossby number (Ro), representative of the importance of the turbulence throughout the water column. For example, in unstratified conditions, if Ro is relatively small, turbulence stress is expected to be important only near the bottom of the boundary layer. Support from the US National Science Foundation and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. First steps of neutral hydrocarbon cluster formation in Titan's atmosphere: a laboratory kinetics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgalais, J.

    2015-10-01

    Titan's dense atmosphere is the siege of a complex photo-chemistry initiated by the dissociation of its two most abundant components, nitrogen N2 and methane CH4. This cold chemistry generates a plethora of hydrocarbons and nitriles and takes part in the production of a thick orange haze. The detection of heavy neutrals and positive ions in Titan's upper atmosphere by the Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) embarked onboard Cassini [1] and measurements of significant amounts of negative ions with masses up to 13 000 amu with the Cassini Plasma and Electron Spectrometer (CAPS/ELS) [2] suggest that low temperature chemical reactions and physical processes occurring at high altitudes near 1000 km could be the haze source. This haze material could act as a nucleus for the condensation of organic vapors in Titan's stratosphere and troposphere.

  8. Incorporation of the planetary boundary layer in atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Wyngaard, John; Pielke, Roger; Krueger, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: perspectives on planetary boundary layer (PBL) measurements; current problems of PBL parameterization in mesoscale models; and convective cloud-PBL interactions.

  9. Neutral winds of the middle atmosphere observed at Arecibo using a Doppler Rayleigh lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepley, Craig A.

    1994-12-01

    We present our observations of the neutral winds of the tropical middle atmosphere that we made over a 2-year period at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. The technique involves the use of a Doppler Rayleigh lidar that measures the spectral shift of the backscattered laser light up to 60 km altitude. We generally find the winds to have discernible patterns although we also observe a high degree of daily variability. We discuss these seasonal patterns and the daily variability and compare our measurements with balloon radiosonde measurements and with models of the tropical middle atmosphere.

  10. Trends In Modelling Neutral-Atmospheric Electromagnetic Delays in a 'Big Data' World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M. C.; Nikolaidou, T.

    2015-12-01

    Modelling the delay suffered by electromagnetic waves while they cross the neutral-atmosphere is of fundamental importance for several applications that help enhancing our understanding of the Earth system. Initially, this modelling was based on climatological models derived from sparse data sets. An improvement in models followed as more observing techniques became available, and denser networks started to be developed. Somehow in parallel, and more recently, investigation efforts started to be concentrated on the use of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, from where neutral-atmospheric delay parameters can derived through ray-tracing. There are a few limitations in both approaches. Models based on climatology are based on sparse data covering a certain period of time, whereas NWP models although based on more realistic data, are provided on intervals that range several hours. A third way is about to be engaged, and it can be seen as a natural development due to an increase in the number of sensors and an enhancement of their geographical distribution, generating a continuous flow of data, being them both satellite-based and ground-based. The question that is posed ahead of us is on how to make use of these huge data sets, which will provide the best possible representation of the neutral-atmosphere at any given time, as readily and as accurately as possible. This situation fits well within what today is known as big data. This paper will explore and discuss scenarios that have potential to open new trends in modeling the neutral-atmospheric delay. They include near real-time empirical model updates, sequential improvement of Marini mapping function coefficients (e.g., within a VMF) and a self-feeding. The discussion and simulations that will be shown cover the whole planet. The pros and cons of each approach will be discussed in comparison with what is done today. Simulations show potential improvement of up to 25% under certain circumstances.

  11. Acoustic and gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere, generated by severe storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balachandran, N. K.

    1983-01-01

    Gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and their propagation in the ionosphere and the study of infrasonic signals from thunder were investigated. Doppler shifts of the order of 0.1 Hz are determined and they provide high-resolution measurements of the movements in the ionosphere. By using an array of transmitters with different frequencies and at different locations, the horizontal and vertical propagation vectors of disturbances propagating through the ionosphere are determined.

  12. Neutral polyfluoroalkyl substances in the atmosphere over the northern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Lai, Senchao; Song, Junwei; Song, Tianli; Huang, Zhijiong; Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Guicheng; Zheng, Junyu; Mi, Wenying; Tang, Jianhui; Zou, Shichun; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Xie, Zhiyong

    2016-07-01

    Neutral Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in the atmosphere were measured during a cruise campaign over the northern South China Sea (SCS) from September to October 2013. Four groups of PFASs, i.e., fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), fluorotelomer acrylates (FTAs), fluorooctane sulfonamides (FOSAs) and fluorooctane sulfonamidoethanols (FASEs), were detected in gas samples. FTOHs was the predominant PFAS group, accounting for 95.2-99.3% of total PFASs (ΣPFASs), while the other PFASs accounted for a small fraction of ΣPFASs. The concentrations of ΣPFASs ranged from 18.0 to 109.9 pg m(-3) with an average of 54.5 pg m(-3). The concentrations are comparable to those reported in other marine atmosphere. Higher concentrations of ΣPFASs were observed in the continental-influenced samples than those in other samples, pointing to the substantial contribution of anthropogenic sources. Long-range transport is suggested to be a major pathway for introducing gaseous PFASs into the atmosphere over the northern SCS. In order to further understand the fate of gaseous PFASs during transport, the atmospheric decay of neutral PFASs under the influence of reaction with OH radicals and atmospheric physical processes were estimated. Concentrations of 8:2 FTOH, 6:2 FTOH and MeFBSE from selected source region to the atmosphere over the SCS after long-range transport were predicted and compared with the observed concentrations. It suggests that the reaction with OH radicals may play an important role in the atmospheric decay of PFAS during long-range transport, especially for shorted-lived species. Moreover, the influence of atmospheric physical processes on the decay of PFAS should be further considered. PMID:27112727

  13. Simultaneous profiling of the Arctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, S.; Jonassen, M.; Reuder, J.

    2009-09-01

    The structure of the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer (AABL) and the heat and moisture fluxes between relatively warm water and cold air above non-sea-ice-covered water (such as fjords, leads and polynyas) are of great importance for the sensitive Arctic climate system (e.g. Andreas and Cash, 1999). So far, such processes are not sufficiently resolved in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models (e.g. Tjernström et al., 2005). Especially for regions with complex topography as the Svalbard mountains and fjords the state and diurnal evolution of the AABL is not well known yet. Knowledge can be gained by novel and flexible measurement techniques such as the use of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). An UAV can perform vertical profiles as well as horizontal surveys of the mean meteorological parameters: temperature, relative humidity, pressure and wind. A corresponding UAV, called Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO), has been developed at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Bergen in cooperation with Müller Engineering (www.pfump.org) and the Paparazzi Project (http://paparazzi.enac.fr). SUMO has been used under Arctic conditions at Longyear airport, Spitsbergen in March/April 2009. Besides vertical profiles up to 1500 m and horizontal surveys at flight levels of 100 and 200 m, SUMO could measure vertical profiles for the first time simultaneously in a horizontal distance of 1 km; one over the ice and snow-covered land surface and the other one above the open water of Isfjorden. This has been the first step of future multiple UAV operations in so called "swarms” or "flocks”. With this, corresponding measurements of the diurnal evolution of the AABL can be achieved with minimum technical efforts and costs. In addition, the Advanced Research Weather Forecasting model (AR-WRF version 3.1) has been run in high resolution (grid size: 1 km). First results of a sensitivity study where ABL schemes have been tested and compared with

  14. Controls on the Time Scale of Carbonate Neutralization of Carbon Dioxide Released to the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Cao, L.

    2007-12-01

    Once released to the atmosphere, carbon dioxide is removed on a range of time scales. On the time scale of years to centuries, carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere is dominated by transport processes within the ocean. On the time scale of hundreds of thousands of years, carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere is dominated by processes related to the weathering of silicate rocks on land. Between these time scales, carbon dioxide removal is dominated by interactions involving carbonate minerals both on land and in the sea. Net dissolution of carbonate minerals (on land or in the sea) increases ocean alkalinity to an extent that exceeds the amount of carbon addition; the result is a transfer of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean and moderation of the effects of added carbon on ocean chemical parameters such as pH and carbonate mineral saturation. There has been some controversy over how fast equilibration with carbonate minerals can neutralize carbon acidity, with claims ranging from the extreme and untenable claim that this process is essentially instantaneous to more plausible claims that the equilibration time scale may approach 10 kyr. Even within the domain of informed discourse, estimates of the carbonate neutralization timescale can vary by an order-of-magnitude. Here, in an effort to understand the sources of the lack of consensus on this issue, we examine how various processes (e.g., ocean transport, sediment pore water diffusion, carbonate-mineral dissolution, and carbonate weathering on land) influence the time scale for carbonate neutralization of carbon dioxide releases to the atmosphere.

  15. Loss cone boundary measurement using diagnostic neutral beam and neutral particle analyzer in a compact helical system

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, H.; Ida, K.; Okamura, S.; Isobe, M.; Akiyama, R.; Yoshimura, Y.

    2004-10-01

    A horizontally scannable diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) has been installed on the compact helical system (CHS) in order to study the confinement of energetic ions with different pitch angles by varying the injection angle. The DNB has been designed to provide energetic ions as a test particle source with (1) no heating to background plasma and (2) small divergence angle. A charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer (NPA) to measure energetic ions injected by the DNB is also scannable and varies the observation angle on the equatorial plane in CHS. A combination of horizontally scannable DNB and NPA provides information on whether the energetic ions with different pitch angle are confined in the plasma or immediately lost. The experimental results are consistent with the prediction of single particle full orbit calculation in CHS.

  16. CIRCULARITY OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON OF ENHANCED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM (ENA) FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H. O.; Higdon, D. M.; Larsen, B. A.; Möbius, E. E-mail: dhigdon@lanl.gov; and others

    2013-10-10

    As a sharp feature in the sky, the ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission is a key signature for understanding the interaction of the heliosphere and the interstellar medium through which we are moving. Over five nominal IBEX energy passbands (0.7, 1.1, 1.7, 2.7, and 4.3 keV), the ribbon is extraordinarily circular, with a peak location centered at ecliptic (λ{sub RC}, β{sub RC}) = (219.°2 ± 1.°3, 39.°9 ± 2.°3) and a half cone angle of φ{sub C} = 74.°5 ± 2.°0. A slight elongation of the ribbon, generally perpendicular to the ribbon center-heliospheric nose vector and with eccentricity ∼0.3, is observed over all energies. At 4.3 keV, the ribbon is slightly larger and displaced relative to lower energies. For all ENA energies, a slice of the ribbon flux peak perpendicular to the circular arc is asymmetric and systematically skewed toward the ribbon center. We derive a spatial coherence parameter δ{sub C} ≤ 0.014 that characterizes the spatial uniformity of the ribbon over its extent in the sky and is a key constraint for understanding the underlying processes and structure governing the ribbon ENA emission.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Soil and Atmospheric Conditions on the Momentum, Mass, and Thermal Boundary Layers Above the Land Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Schulte, P.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of soil conditions (i.e. soil type, saturation) and atmospheric forcings (i.e. velocity, temperature, relative humidity) on the momentum, mass, and temperature boundary layers. The atmospheric conditions tested represent those typically found in semi-arid and arid climates and the soil conditions simulate the three stages of evaporation. The data generated will help identify the importance of different soil conditions and atmospheric forcings with respect to land-atmospheric interactions which will have direct implications on future numerical studies investigating the effects of turbulent air flow on evaporation. The experimental datasets generated for this study were performed using a unique climate controlled closed-circuit wind tunnel/porous media facility located at the Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) at the Colorado School of Mines. The test apparatus consisting of a 7.3 m long porous media tank and wind tunnel, were outfitted with a sensor network to carefully measure wind velocity, air and soil temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and soil air pressure. Boundary layer measurements were made between the heights of 2 and 500 mm above the soil tank under constant conditions (i.e. wind velocity, temperature, relative humidity). The soil conditions (e.g. soil type, soil moisture) were varied between datasets to analyze their impact on the boundary layers. Experimental results show that the momentum boundary layer is very sensitive to the applied atmospheric conditions and soil conditions to a much less extent. Increases in velocity above porous media leads to momentum boundary layer thinning and closely reflect classical flat plate theory. The mass and thermal boundary layers are directly dependent on both atmospheric and soil conditions. Air pressure within the soil is independent of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity - wind velocity and soil

  18. Precipitation of energetic neutral atoms and induced non-thermal escape fluxes from the Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V.

    2014-08-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms, produced through charge exchange collisions between solar wind ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated for the Martian atmosphere. Connections between parameters of precipitating fast ions and resulting escape fluxes, altitude-dependent energy distributions of fast atoms and their coefficients of reflection from the Mars atmosphere, are established using accurate cross sections in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Distributions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules, induced by precipitating particles, have been obtained and applied for computations of the non-thermal escape fluxes. A new collisional database on accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections, required for description of the energy-momentum transfer in collisions of precipitating particles and production of non-thermal atmospheric atoms and molecules, is reported with analytic fitting equations. Three-dimensional MC simulations with accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections have been carried out to track large ensembles of energetic atoms in a time-dependent manner as they propagate into the Martian atmosphere and transfer their energy to the ambient atoms and molecules. Results of the MC simulations on the energy-deposition altitude profiles, reflection coefficients, and time-dependent atmospheric heating, obtained for the isotropic hard sphere and anisotropic quantum cross sections, are compared. Atmospheric heating rates, thermalization depths, altitude profiles of production rates, energy distributions of SH atoms and molecules, and induced escape fluxes have been determined.

  19. Radiative ion-ion neutralization: a new gas-phase atmospheric pressure ion transduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric J; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2012-06-01

    All atmospheric pressure ion detectors, including photo ionization detectors, flame ionization detectors, electron capture detectors, and ion mobility spectrometers, utilize Faraday plate designs in which ionic charge is collected and amplified. The sensitivity of these Faraday plate ion detectors are limited by thermal (Johnson) noise in the associated electronics. Thus approximately 10(6) ions per second are required for a minimal detection. This is not the case for ion detection under vacuum conditions where secondary electron multipliers (SEMs) can be used. SEMs produce a cascade of approximately 10(6) electrons per ion impinging on the conversion dynode. Similarly, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) can generate approximately 10(6) electrons per photon. Unlike SEMs, however, PMTs are evacuated and sealed so that they are commonly used under atmospheric pressure conditions. This paper describes an atmospheric pressure ion detector based on coupling a PMT with light emitted from ion-ion neutralization reactions. The normal Faraday plate collector electrode was replaced with an electrode "needle" used to concentrate the anions as they were drawn to the tip of the needle by a strong focusing electric field. Light was emitted near the surface of the electrode when analyte ions were neutralized with cations produced from the anode. Although radiative-ion-ion recombination has been previously reported, this is the first time ions from separate ionization sources have been combined to produce light. The light from this radiative-ion-ion-neutralization (RIIN) was detected using a photon multiplier such that an ion mobility spectrum was obtained by monitoring the light emitted from mobility separated ions. An IMS spectrum of nitroglycerin (NG) was obtained utilizing RIIN for tranducing the mobility separated ions into an analytical signal. The implications of this novel ion transduction method are the potential for counting ions at atmospheric pressure and for obtaining ion

  20. Interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with Europa: Constraints on the neutral atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saur, J.; Strobel, D. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1998-09-01

    A three-dimensional plasma model was developed to understand the sources and sinks that maintain Europa's neutral atmosphere and to study the interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with this atmosphere and the formation of an ionosphere. The model includes self-consistently the feedback of the plasma action on the atmosphere through mass balance. Suprathermal torus ions with a contribution from thermal ions sputter O2 from the water ice surface, and thermal torus ions remove the O2 atmosphere by sputtering. For an oxygen column density of 5×1018m-2 the calculated intensities of the oxygen lines OI 130.4 nm and 135.6 nm produced by electron impact dissociation agree with observations by the Hubble Space Telescope [Hall et al., 1995]. Mass balance is also consistent with this column density, with a net atmospheric mass loss of 50 kgs-1. For a given neutral atmosphere and magnetospheric conditions, the electrodynamic model computes self-consistently plasma density, plasma velocity, electron temperature of the thermal and the suprathermal population, electric current and electric field in the vicinity of Europa, with the assumption of a constant homogeneous Jovian magnetic field. Europa's ionosphere is created by electron impact ionization where the coupling of the ionosphere with the energy reservoir of the plasma torus by electron heat conduction supplies the energy to maintain ionization. The calculated distribution of electron densities with a maximum value of nearly 104cm-3 is in general agreement with densities derived by Kliore et al. [1997] from the Galileo spacecraft radio occultations. The Alfvénic current system closed by the ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductivities carries a total current of 7×105A in each Alfvén wing.

  1. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Modeling for Combined Meteorology and Air Quality Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric Eulerian grid models for mesoscale and larger applications require sub-grid models for turbulent vertical exchange processes, particularly within the Planetary Boundary Layer (PSL). In combined meteorology and air quality modeling systems consistent PSL modeling of wi...

  2. Pollutant Plume Dispersion in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over Idealized Urban Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Colman C. C.; Liu, Chun-Ho

    2013-05-01

    The Gaussian model of plume dispersion is commonly used for pollutant concentration estimates. However, its major parameters, dispersion coefficients, barely account for terrain configuration and surface roughness. Large-scale roughness elements (e.g. buildings in urban areas) can substantially modify the ground features together with the pollutant transport in the atmospheric boundary layer over urban roughness (also known as the urban boundary layer, UBL). This study is thus conceived to investigate how urban roughness affects the flow structure and vertical dispersion coefficient in the UBL. Large-eddy simulation (LES) is carried out to examine the plume dispersion from a ground-level pollutant (area) source over idealized street canyons for cross flows in neutral stratification. A range of building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratios, covering the regimes of skimming flow, wake interference, and isolated roughness, is employed to control the surface roughness. Apart from the widely used aerodynamic resistance or roughness function, the friction factor is another suitable parameter that measures the drag imposed by urban roughness quantitatively. Previous results from laboratory experiments and mathematical modelling also support the aforementioned approach for both two- and three-dimensional roughness elements. Comparing the UBL plume behaviour, the LES results show that the pollutant dispersion strongly depends on the friction factor. Empirical studies reveal that the vertical dispersion coefficient increases with increasing friction factor in the skimming flow regime (lower resistance) but is more uniform in the regimes of wake interference and isolated roughness (higher resistance). Hence, it is proposed that the friction factor and flow regimes could be adopted concurrently for pollutant concentration estimate in the UBL over urban street canyons of different roughness.

  3. An Experimental Study of the Statistical Scaling of Turbulent Surface Pressure in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, G. W.; Murray, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) produces fluctuations in the static pressure. The instantaneous pressure at a point depends on an integral over the entire flow; therefore, the effects from turbulence far aloft may be felt at the earth's surface. The statistics of fluctuating pressure at the surface have been studied extensively in the context of wall-bounded engineering-type flows. At best, these neutral flows are a special case of the thermally-stratified ABL, but relatively few experimental studies have considered pressure at the ground under various stability conditions. Here the scaling of pressure statistics at the surface, particularly the spectral density, is reported over a range of convective and stable conditions for both inner and outer turbulence parameters. Measurements of turbulent surface pressure were made using low-frequency microphones buried flush to the ground in a field near Laramie, Wyoming. Simultaneous measurements from three near-surface sonic anemometers and a 50-meter wind tower give estimates of the mean surface-layer parameters. The normalization of the pressure spectrum with the inner scales collapses the spectra along the high-frequency viscous power-law band. The wall shear stress, Obukhov length, L, and horizontal integral scale, λ, are identified as outer scaling parameters for the surface pressure spectrum from an integral solution employing a Monin-Obukhov-similar profile and a simple model of inhomogeneous surface-layer turbulence. Normalization with the outer scales collapses the spectra at low frequencies. Spectral scaling also reveals trends with λ/L in the low-frequency region for both convective and stable boundary layers.

  4. Dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer during the 1980 total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S

    1981-01-01

    An atmospheric boundary layer experiment was conducted at Raichur, India to study the variations in the surface shear stress, heat flux and the meteorological processes that take place during a total solar eclipse. Interesting results were observed regarding the evolution of the planetary boundary layer. Changes in atmospheric stability from unstable to stable to unstable were observed during different phases of the eclipse. Downward propagation of negative heat flux associated with decreasing scales of convective eddies was also observed during the eclipse.

  5. Wind sensing in an atmospheric boundary layer by means of micropulse coherent Doppler lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, V. A.; Smalikho, I. N.

    2016-07-01

    An algorithm is developed and computer simulation of wind sensing by means of micropulse coherent Doppler lidars (CDLs) in the atmospheric boundary layer is conducted for low values of the signalto- noise (SNR) ratio. The accuracy of lidar wind measurements is studied numerically for parameters of micropulse Stream Line CDLs. Optimal parameters of the measurements and processing data obtained at low SNR, which allow reconstructing vertical profiles of the wind velocity vector with required accuracy within an entire atmospheric boundary layer, are determined.

  6. Neutral and charged clusters in the atmosphere - Their importance and potential role in heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment is presented of current knowledge concerning the role and importance of neutral and charged clusters in atmospheric heterogeneous catalysis, with a view to the recommendation of future studies needed for progress in the quantification of aerosol formation and catalytic reactivity. It is established that nucleation from the gaseous to the aerosol state commences via the formation of clusters among molecules participating in the phase-transformation process. Nucleation may proceed in some cases by way of the formation of prenucleation embryos, which then evolve through the energy barrier and undergo phase transformation. In other cases, cluster-cluster interaction among neutral particles or stagewise building of alternate-sign ion clusters may be important in the gas-to-particle conversion process.

  7. VARIATIONS IN THE HELIOSPHERIC POLAR ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX OBSERVED BY THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Janzen, P. H.; Allegrini, F.; McComas, D. J. E-mail: paul.janzen@umontana.edu E-mail: dmccomas@swri.org; and others

    2012-03-10

    The ecliptic poles are observed continuously by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX); thus, it is possible to discern temporal variations in the energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the outer heliosphere on timescales much shorter than the time it takes for IBEX to generate a full sky map (six months). Observations indicate that the ENA flux from the polar directions incident at Earth has been steadily decreasing for the two-year period from 2008 December through 2011 February. Over the IBEX-Hi energy range, the decrease in flux is energy dependent, varying at the south ecliptic pole from no drop at 0.71 keV, to 70% at 1.1 keV. At higher energies the drop ranges between 10% and 50%. The decline observed at the north ecliptic pole is as high as 48%, also at 1.1 keV. The trend correlates with the steady decline in solar wind dynamic pressure observed at 1 AU between 2005 and 2009, the likely period when solar wind protons that provide the source for ENAs observed by IBEX would have been outbound from the Sun. We propose a method by which the correlation between the 1 AU solar wind dynamic pressure and the ENA-derived pressure within the inner heliosheath (IHS) can be used to estimate the distance to the termination shock and the thickness of the IHS in the direction of the ecliptic poles. Our new analysis based on IBEX data shows the TS distances to be 110 AU and 134 AU at the south and north poles, respectively, and the corresponding IHS thicknesses to be 55 AU and 82 AU. Our analysis is consistent with the notion that the observed ENA fluxes originate in the IHS and their variations are driven by the solar wind as it evolves through the solar cycle.

  8. SEPARATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Schwadron, N. A.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E. E-mail: harald.kucharek@unh.edu

    2011-04-10

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon, which has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux over a narrow region {approx}20{sup 0} wide, a factor of 2-3 higher than the more globally distributed ENA flux. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the distributed flux by applying a transparency mask over the ribbon and regions of high emissions, and then solve for the distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum shows a knee between {approx}1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the distributed flux does not show a clear knee and more closely conforms to a power law over much of the sky. Consistent with previous analyses, the slope of the power law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. The knee in the energy spectrum of the ribbon suggests that its source plasma population is generated via a distinct physical process. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. The heliotail may be identified in maps of globally distributed flux as a broad region of low flux centered {approx}44{sup 0}W of the interstellar downwind direction, suggesting heliotail deflection by the interstellar magnetic field.

  9. Latitudinal and Energy Dependence of Energetic Neutral Atom Spectral Indices Measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Pogorelov, N.; Schwadron, N. A.; Zank, G. P.; Zirnstein, E. J.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the latitudinal and energy dependence of the globally distributed 0.5-6 keV energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) during the first 3 yrs of the mission. Our results are: (1) the ENA spectral indices at the two lowest energies (0.89 and 1.47 keV) exhibit no clear trend with ecliptic latitude θ, while those at ˜2.29 and ˜3.41 keV exhibit a clear latitudinal pattern; flatter spectra occur above 60° latitude and steeper spectra occur ±30° of the equator. (2) The latitudinal dependence of the spectral indices at different energies can be represented by the cosine function γ ={{a}0}+{{a}1}cos ({{a}2}θ ) with unique offsets, amplitudes, and phase angles; the higher energy ENA indices transition to successively larger amplitudes within ±45° of the equator. Our results confirm the previously reported latitudinal organization of the ENA spectra and their remarkable similarity to that of the solar wind (SW) speed observed by Ulysses in the inner heliosphere. While earlier studies showed that the ˜0.5-6 keV globally distributed ENA spectral indices could be represented as single power laws over much of the sky, our new results indicate that this is an over-simplification because the spectral indices have an energy and latitude dependence. This dependence is an important factor that must be taken into consideration by models and simulations that seek to map the IBEX ENA observations back to the latitudinal profile of the SW speed structure observed in the inner heliosphere.

  10. One-dimensional simulation of temperature and moisture in atmospheric and soil boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, R. D.; Santhanam, K.

    1981-01-01

    Meteorologists are interested in modeling the vertical flow of heat and moisture through the soil in order to better simulate the vertical and temporal variations of the atmospheric boundary layer. The one dimensional planetary boundary layer model of is modified by the addition of transport equations to be solved by a finite difference technique to predict soil moisture.

  11. Middle atmospheric ion chemistry during energetic particle events, and impacts on the neutral chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnhuber, M.; Winkler, H.; Wieters, N.; Kazeminejad, S.; Wissing, J. M.; Kallenrode, M.-B.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    2009-04-01

    It is well established that solar proton events (SPEs) are sources of distinct chemical disturbances in the Earth's polar atmosphere. While the observed SPE caused production of NOx, and the subsequent destruction of ozone can be reproduces quite well by atmospheric models using basic parametrizations for NOx and HOx release as a function of the particle impact ionisation rate, there are significant differences between measurements and model predictions concerning several other chemical compounds. For instance, during the October 2003 SPE, measurements of a number of species were obtained from the MIPAS instrument on-board the ENVISAT satellite. These measurements show significant enhancements of HNO3 and N2O5 as well as an increase of several chlorine species, i.e., ClO, HOCl and ClONO2. Atmospheric models cannot reproduce these chemical effects if only production of NOx and HOx is considered. The impact of positive and negative ion chemistry on the neutral composition of the middle atmosphere is investigated combining model results from the University of Bremen Ion Chemistry model UBIC with different neutral stratosphere-mesosphere models, particularly the new Bremen three-dimensional Chemistry and Transport model of the middle atmosphere. Focus of the investigation will be the impact of negative ion chemistry on the activation of chlorine radicals, and on the partitioning of NOy species. Model results will be compared to measurement data of different satellite instruments (HALOE, MIPAS, MLS) for several large SPEs (e.g., the July 2000, Oct/Nov 2003, and January 2005 events) to show that the observed chlorine activation and the increase of HNO3 can be reproduced much better if full negative ion chemistry is considered additionally to the NOx and HOx production.

  12. FLUID MODELING OF ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Study of convective boundary layer (CBL) processes has depended largely upon laboratory analogs for many years. The pioneering work of Willis and Deardorff (1974) and some 35 subsequent papers by the same authors showed that much useful research could be accomplished with a re...

  13. Trends in modelling neutral-atmospheric electromagnetic delays in a `big data' world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Marcelo

    Modelling the delay suffered by electromagnetic waves while they cross the neutral-atmosphere is of fundamental importance for several applications that help enhancing our understanding of the Earth system. Initially, this modelling was based on climatological models derived from sparse data sets. An improvement in models followed as more observing techniques became available, and denser networks started to be developed. In this category, for example, we can include models and mapping functions due to Saastamoinen, Hopfield, as well as empirical models such as UNB3. Somehow in parallel, and more recently, investigation efforts started to be concentrated on the use of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, from where neutral-atmospheric delay parameters can derived through ray-tracing. Computationally more expensive this approach has led to the development of the Vienna Mapping Functions (VMF), which are provided based on several NWP models such as the ECMWF, NOAA and CMC. VMF services have been developed and can be used in support to the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), which is a component of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The use of NWPs changed the paradigm from the use of simple model equations to the derivation of the delay directly from a huge amount of data. There are a few limitations in both approaches. Models based on climatology are based on sparse data covering a certain period of time, whereas NWP models although based on more realistic data, are provided on intervals that range several hours. A third way is about to be engaged, and it can be seen as a natural development due to an increase in the number of sensors and an enhancement of their geographical distribution, generating a continuous flow of data, being them both satellite-based and ground-based. The question that is posed ahead of us is on how to make use of these huge data sets, which will provide the best possible representation of the neutral-atmosphere

  14. The open-source neutral-mass spectrometer on Atmosphere Explorer-C, -D, and -E.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Potter, W. E.; Hickman, D. R.; Mauersberger, K.

    1973-01-01

    The open-source mass spectrometer will be used to obtain the number densities of the neutral atmospheric gases in the mass range 1 to 48 amu at the satellite location. The ion source has been designed to allow gas particles to enter the ionizing region with the minimum practicable number of prior collisions with surfaces. This design minimizes the loss of atomic oxygen and other reactive species due to reactions with the walls of the ion source. The principal features of the open-source spectrometer and the laboratory calibration system are discussed.

  15. Early Observations of the Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere of Mars by MAVEN’s Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, Mehdi; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Elrod, Meredith

    2015-04-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Mission is designed to characterize the source region of escaping atoms in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. The NGIMS instrument is a quadrupole analyzer with a mass rang of 2-150 Da. It utilizes a dual ion source in order to measure both surface reactive neutrals (using the Open Source Neutral mode - OSN), inert neutrals (using the Closed Source Neutral mode - CSN), and thermal ions (using the Open Source Ion mode - OSI) at altitudes below 500 km.In the first few months of the MAVEN mission, NGIMS alternated on sequential orbits between measurement sequences that focus on fully characterizing neutral species (using the CSN/OSN modes) and ions (using the CSN/OSI modes). The collected data revealed the substantial structure present in both neutral and ion densities with spatial scales of hundreds of kilometers along the spacecraft track. The data also brought to light the sharp contrast between the day side and night side atmospheric profiles of neutrals and ions in both total density and relative abundance.

  16. The Neutral Mass Spectrometer on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Richard Hodges, R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Harpold, Daniel N.; Holmes, Vincent; Johnson, Christopher S.; Kellogg, James; Kimvilakani, Patrick; Lefavor, Matthew; Hengemihle, Jerome; Jaeger, Ferzan; Lyness, Eric; Maurer, John; Nguyen, Daniel; Nolan, Thomas J.; Noreiga, Felix; Noriega, Marvin; Patel, Kiran; Prats, Benito; Quinones, Omar; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence; Weidner, Edwin; Woronowicz, Michael; Gundersen, Cynthia; Battel, Steven; Block, Bruce P.; Arnett, Ken; Miller, Ryan; Cooper, Curt; Edmonson, Charles

    2014-12-01

    The Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) of the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission is designed to measure the composition and variability of the tenuous lunar atmosphere. The NMS complements two other instruments on the LADEE spacecraft designed to secure spectroscopic measurements of lunar composition and in situ measurement of lunar dust over the course of a 100-day mission in order to sample multiple lunation periods. The NMS utilizes a dual ion source designed to measure both surface reactive and inert species and a quadrupole analyzer. The NMS is expected to secure time resolved measurements of helium and argon and determine abundance or upper limits for many other species either sputtered or thermally evolved from the lunar surface.

  17. The Neutral Mass Spectrometer on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Hodges, R. Richard; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Harpold, Daniel N.; Holmes, Vincent; Johnson, Christopher S.; Kellogg, James; Kimvilakani, Patrick; Lefavor, Matthew; Hengemihle, Jerome; Jaeger, Ferzan; Lyness, Eric; Maurer, John; Nguyen, Daniel; Nolan, Thomas; Noreiga, Felix; Noreiga, Marvin; Patel, Kiran; Prats, Benito; Quinones, Omar; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence; Weidner, Edwin; Woronowicz, Michael; Gundersen, Cynthia (Inventor); Battel, Steven; Block, Bruce P.; Arnett, Ken; Miller, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) of the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission is designed to measure the composition and variability of the tenuous lunar atmosphere. The NMS complements two other instruments on the LADEE spacecraft designed to secure spectroscopic measurements of lunar composition and in situ measurement of lunar dust over the course of a 100-day mission in order to sample multiple lunation periods. The NMS utilizes a dual ion source designed to measure both surface reactive and inert species and a quadrupole analyzer. The NMS is expected to secure time resolved measurements of helium and argon and determine abundance or upper limits for many other species either sputtered or thermally evolved from the lunar surface.

  18. Titan's atmospheric sputtering and neutral torus produced by magnetospheric and pick-up ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, M.; Smith, H. T.; Johnson, R. E.; Shematovich, V.; Leblanc, F.; Ledvina, S.; Luhmann, J. H.

    As Titan does not possess an intrinsic magnetic field, Kronian magnetospheric ions can penetrate Titan's exobase as can locally produced pick-up ions (e.g. Shematovich et al. 2003). This can cause atmospheric loss and heating of the exobase region. Penetration by slowed and deflected magnetospheric ions and by the pick-up ions is described here using a 3-D Monte Carlo model (Michael et al. 2004). The incident ions can lead to the production of fast neutrals that collide with other atmospheric neutrals producing the ejection of both atomic and molecular nitrogen and heating. The recently calculated dissociation cross sections of N2 are used in the present model (Tully and Johnson 2002). The incident flux of slowed magnetospheric N+ ions and pick-up C2H5+ ions is estimated from the work of Brecht et al. (2000). These ions, which have energies less than 1.2 keV, were shown to be more efficient in ejecting material from Titan's atmosphere than the non-deflected co-rotating ions used earlier (Lammer et al. 1993). The loss rates are comparable or larger than those produced by photo-dissociation. Exobse heating rates are given and the loss rates of N and N2 are then used as a source of nitrogen for the Titan neutral torus. If atmospheric sputtering is important this torus will contain both atomic and molecular nitrogen and, therefore, will provide a distributed source of both atomic and molecular nitrogen ions that will be readily detected by Cassini (Smith et al. 2004) Acknowledgment: This work is supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program and by the CAPS-Cassini Instrument. Brecht, S.H., J.G. Luhmann, and D.J. Larson, J. Geophys. Res., 105, 13119, 2000. Lammer, H., and S.J. Bauer,. Planet. Space Sci., 41, 657, 1993. Shematovich, V.I.,et al, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 5086, 10.1029/2003JE002096, 2003. Michael, M. et al., submitted, Icarus, 2004. Smith, H.T., et al., Titan Aeronomy Workshop, Paris, January 7-9, 2004. Tully, C., R.E. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 6556

  19. The Neutral Atmosphere Parameters on Measurements Using the Artificial Periodic Irregularities. Techniques, processing, results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmacheva, Ariadna V.; Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev; Kalinina, Elena E.

    The measurements with the aid of the artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) were begun in 1990. The APIs are created in the ionosphere illuminated by a high power HF radio wave of a frequency below the critical one. The APIs diagnostics is based upon observation of the Bragg backscatter of the pulsed probe radio waves from the periodic structure. The amplitudes and phases of the probe signals back scattered by the APIs are measured. At the E-region heights the APIs relax in the ambipolar diffusion process. Based on this fact we could determine the neutral atmosphere parameters suggesting that the processes of isothermal on small scales (3-5 km) and the electron, ion and neutral temperatures are equal at the E-region heights. The atmospheric height scale H and the neutral atmospheric temperature T are determined on the height dependence of the relaxation times tau(z). The altitude step is about 3 km. Whole height interval of the measurements of τ is equal to about 20-30 km. Selecting small height intervals step by step we obtain altitude dependences T(z), nu(z) and rho(z). Such a way was employed because the steady state is achieved on the scales 20-30 km for a long time. We obtained a lot of information about dynamical phenomena in the lower thermosphere. These results are presented in the report. Firstly, there were temperature profiles with minimum about 100-140 K above 100 km in the equinoctial periods. But in summer of 1999 temperature maximum was observed on z = 100 km. Secondary, there were often profiles with the wave-like variations and with the vertical scale of about to 4-6 km. The temporal variations of the atmospheric parameters had periods from 15 minutes to some hours. These variations caused by the propagation of the internal gravity and tide waves. Planetary waves produce the longer temporal variations. Thirdly, we observed some cases of the instability growth. The dependencies of the atmospheric parameters on the solar and geomagnetic activity

  20. Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) for the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd T.; Hodges, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission currently scheduled for launch in early 2013 aboard a Minotaur V will orbit the moon at a nominal periselene of 50 km to characterized the lunar atmosphere and dust environment. The science instrument payload includes a neutral mass spectrometer as well as an ultraviolet spectrometer and a dust detector. Although to date only He, Ar-40, K, Na and Rn-222 have been firmly identified in the lunar exosphere and arise from the solar wind (He), the lunar regolith (K and Na) and the lunar interior (Ar-40, Rn-222), upper limits have been set for a large number of other species, LADEE Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) observations will determine the abundance of several species and substantially lower the present upper limits for many others. Additionally, LADEE NMS will observe the spatial distribution and temporal variability of species which condense at nighttime and show peak concentrations at the dawn terminator (e,g, Ar-40), possible episodic release from the lunar interior, and the results of sputtering or desorption processes from the regolith. In this presentation, we describe the LADEE NMS hardware and the anticipated science results.

  1. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  2. Observations of Mars Neutral Atmosphere during the Polar Night by the Mars Express Radio Science Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, G. L.; Pätzold, M.; Tellmann, S.; Häusler, B.; Hinson, D. P.

    2006-09-01

    The Radio Science Experiment on Mars Express (MaRS) sounds the Martian atmophere and ionosphere making use of spacecraft radio signals at 3.6 and 13 cm-wavelength and an Earth-Mars occultation geometry. Vertical profiles of pressure, temperature, and density in the neutral atmosphere are obtained with an altitude resolution of only a few hundred meters. The elliptical orbit of Mars Express permits examination of a large range of local times and locations and therefore can be used to investigate latitudinal, diurnal, and seasonal variations of Mars atmosphere. Daytime atmospheric profiles collected from both hemispheres since March 2004 allow us to study the development of the atmosphere in the early morning and the polar night. The second occultation season, December 2004, produced 32 profiles located in the southern polar latitudes at an average solar longitude of about 130°. Approximately 30 profiles obtained during the fourth occultation season, July 2005-April 2006, provide data on the north polar region at latitudes above 70° and a solar longitude of about 271°. The polar night at 75° north shows a 142-145 K isothermal atmosphere up to an altitude of 40 km, which is at or close to the condensation line of CO2. A similar behavior is observed during the southern polar night at 80° south, but with a significant warming at longitudes passing through Hellas. Model calculations of a Martian General Circulation Model (GCM) developed by the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique de C.N.R.S. (LMD) support the interpretation of the observed atmospheric phenomena. The MaRS investigation is funded by the DLR Grant 50QP9909 and by the NASA Mars Program.

  3. Turbulent kinetics of a large wind farm and their impact in the neutral boundary layer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Na, Ji Sung; Koo, Eunmo; Munoz-Esparza, Domingo; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Linn, Rodman; Lee, Joon Sang

    2015-12-28

    High-resolution large-eddy simulation of the flow over a large wind farm (64 wind turbines) is performed using the HIGRAD/FIRETEC-WindBlade model, which is a high-performance computing wind turbine–atmosphere interaction model that uses the Lagrangian actuator line method to represent rotating turbine blades. These high-resolution large-eddy simulation results are used to parameterize the thrust and power coefficients that contain information about turbine interference effects within the wind farm. Those coefficients are then incorporated into the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model in order to evaluate interference effects in larger-scale models. In the high-resolution WindBlade wind farm simulation, insufficient distance between turbines createsmore » the interference between turbines, including significant vertical variations in momentum and turbulent intensity. The characteristics of the wake are further investigated by analyzing the distribution of the vorticity and turbulent intensity. Quadrant analysis in the turbine and post-turbine areas reveals that the ejection motion induced by the presence of the wind turbines is dominant compared to that in the other quadrants, indicating that the sweep motion is increased at the location where strong wake recovery occurs. Regional-scale WRF simulations reveal that although the turbulent mixing induced by the wind farm is partly diffused to the upper region, there is no significant change in the boundary layer depth. The velocity deficit does not appear to be very sensitive to the local distribution of turbine coefficients. However, differences of about 5% on parameterized turbulent kinetic energy were found depending on the turbine coefficient distribution. Furthermore, turbine coefficients that consider interference in the wind farm should be used in wind farm parameterization for larger-scale models to better describe sub-grid scale turbulent processes.« less

  4. Turbulent kinetics of a large wind farm and their impact in the neutral boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Ji Sung; Koo, Eunmo; Munoz-Esparza, Domingo; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Linn, Rodman; Lee, Joon Sang

    2015-12-28

    High-resolution large-eddy simulation of the flow over a large wind farm (64 wind turbines) is performed using the HIGRAD/FIRETEC-WindBlade model, which is a high-performance computing wind turbine–atmosphere interaction model that uses the Lagrangian actuator line method to represent rotating turbine blades. These high-resolution large-eddy simulation results are used to parameterize the thrust and power coefficients that contain information about turbine interference effects within the wind farm. Those coefficients are then incorporated into the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model in order to evaluate interference effects in larger-scale models. In the high-resolution WindBlade wind farm simulation, insufficient distance between turbines creates the interference between turbines, including significant vertical variations in momentum and turbulent intensity. The characteristics of the wake are further investigated by analyzing the distribution of the vorticity and turbulent intensity. Quadrant analysis in the turbine and post-turbine areas reveals that the ejection motion induced by the presence of the wind turbines is dominant compared to that in the other quadrants, indicating that the sweep motion is increased at the location where strong wake recovery occurs. Regional-scale WRF simulations reveal that although the turbulent mixing induced by the wind farm is partly diffused to the upper region, there is no significant change in the boundary layer depth. The velocity deficit does not appear to be very sensitive to the local distribution of turbine coefficients. However, differences of about 5% on parameterized turbulent kinetic energy were found depending on the turbine coefficient distribution. Furthermore, turbine coefficients that consider interference in the wind farm should be used in wind farm parameterization for larger-scale models to better describe sub-grid scale turbulent processes.

  5. The dependence of modeled OI 1356 and N2 Lyman Birge Hopfield auroral emissions on the neutral atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.; Torr, M. R.; Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    The sensitivity of selected auroral emissions to anticipated changes in the neutral atmosphere was investigated from the results of a series of sensitivity studies conducted using an auroral emission code developed by Richards and Torr (1990). In particular, the behavior of OI 1356 and two Lyman Birge Hopfield (LBH) bands and their ratios to each other with changing atmospheric composition was examined. It was found that, for anticipated average uncertainties in the neutral atmosphere (factor 2 at auroral altitudes), the resultant change in the modeled intensities is comparable to or less than the uncertainty in the neutral atmosphere. The variation in the I 1356/I 1838 ratio over the equivalent of a solar cycle is less than 50 percent, and the summer-to-winter changes are approximately a factor of 2.

  6. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  7. Modelling of atmospheric boundary-layer flow in complex terrain with different forest parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez Arroyo, R.; Sanz Rodrigo, J.; Gankarski, P.

    2014-06-01

    This work explores the accuracy of two approaches that account for the effects of the forest canopy on the wind flow by using a RANS-based model. The first approach implements additional terms in the RANS equations (canopy model), whilst the second one uses large values of roughness length and a zero-plane displacement height. The model uses a limited-length-scale k-epsilon turbulence closure that considers processes occurring in the Atmospheric Boundary-Layer (ABL) such as the Coriolis effects. Both the forest and the ABL implementations are compared with experimental data obtained from 118 m high met masts installed in a large mountain- range site with mixed forest characteristics for neutral stability cases. In order to perform a meaningful comparison at multiple mast locations, a novel methodology is presented which allows the selection of a velocity bin for a given wind direction and a stability class that minimizes the error of using short-term measurement periods at some masts compared to long-term wind statistics from a reference mast. Based on the outcome of the model validation it is possible to conclude that more consistent results are obtained by the canopy model since it reduces the uncertainty in the selection of correct input parameters in the large-roughness approach. The errors in the vertical profiles of velocity and turbulence intensity are reduced by the forest model by almost 63% and 11%, respectively, compared to the standard configuration (no forest). The large-roughness method reduces the error in the velocity profiles by 54% while the predictions of turbulence intensity are barely improved.

  8. Watershed Scale Shear Stress From Tethersonde Wind Profile Measurements Under Near Neutral and Unstable Atmospheric Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlange, M. B.; Katul, G. G.

    1995-04-01

    Mean wind speed profiles were measured in the atmospheric surface layer, using a tethersonde system, above the Ojai Valley Watershed in southern California. The valley is mainly planted with mature avocado and orange trees. The surface shear stress and latent and sensible heat fluxes were measured above the trees which are up to 9 m in height. Near-neutral wind speed profile measurements allowed the determination of the watershed surface roughness (z0 = 1.4 m) and the momentum displacement height (d0 = 7.0 m). The wind speed measurements obtained under unstable atmospheric stability were analyzed using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. New stability correction functions proposed based on theory and experiments of Kader-Yaglom as well as the now classic Businger-Dyer type functions were tested. The watershed shear stress values calculated using the surface layer wind speed profiles with the new Monin-Obukhov stability functions were found to be improved in comparison with the values obtained with the Businger-Dyer functions under strongly unstable stability conditions. The Monin-Obukhov model with the Businger-Dyer stability correction function underpredicted the momentum flux by 25% under strongly unstable stability conditions, while the new Kader-Yaglom formulation compared well on average (R2 = 0.77) with the surface eddy correlation measurements for all atmospheric stability conditions. The unstable 100-m drag coefficient was found to be u*2/V1002 = 0.0182.

  9. Topography Modeling in Atmospheric Flows Using the Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, A. S.; Senocak, I.; Mansour, N. N.; Stevens, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Numerical simulation of flow over complex geometry needs accurate and efficient computational methods. Different techniques are available to handle complex geometry. The unstructured grid and multi-block body-fitted grid techniques have been widely adopted for complex geometry in engineering applications. In atmospheric applications, terrain fitted single grid techniques have found common use. Although these are very effective techniques, their implementation, coupling with the flow algorithm, and efficient parallelization of the complete method are more involved than a Cartesian grid method. The grid generation can be tedious and one needs to pay special attention in numerics to handle skewed cells for conservation purposes. Researchers have long sought for alternative methods to ease the effort involved in simulating flow over complex geometry.

  10. Temporal Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Community Composition in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, J. B.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Fierer, N.

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for significant microbial influences on atmospheric chemistry, cloud condensation, and ice nuclei concentrations, with known health impacts, yet we have a limited understanding of the types, abundances, and spatiotemporal dynamics of bacteria and fungi in the atmosphere. Here we use culture-independent molecular approaches, including targeted gene sequencing and quantitative PCR, to characterize bacterial and fungal community composition and abundance in the atmospheric boundary layer. We present results from 32 air samples, collected via vacuum filtration at 10 m and 250 m on the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower (Erie, CO) between November 2013 and April 2014. Samples were collected at night, and each sample was integrated over consecutive nights for approximately two weeks. Significant temporal shifts in bacterial and fungal community composition were observed over the course of the study, corresponding to changing bacterial and fungal concentrations. Within the same sampling time periods, bacterial and fungal communities from the near-surface atmosphere (10 m) were generally similar to those aloft (250 m), although coupled temporal and altitudinal effects were observed in some cases, particularly for fungi. Overall, our results indicate that bacterial and fungal communities exhibit minimal vertical stratification throughout the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer but show a high degree of variability on two-week timescales. This study paves the way for further research into the connections between boundary layer microbiology, atmospheric dynamics, emissions, and local meteorology.

  11. Analytical damped-oscillator models for unsteady atmospheric boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical flows are dynamical systems that are evolving nonlinearly with time. Non-stationary shear and buoyancy forces are the main sources that drive the unsteadiness of such flows. However, due to their inherent complexity, most previous studies focused on steady-state conditions. In these boundary layers, the pressure gradient, buoyancy, Coriolis, and friction forces interact. The mean PDEs governing the unsteady version of the problem, which emerges when these forces are not in equilibrium, are solvable only for a limited set of forcing variability modes, and the resulting solutions are intricate and difficult to interpret. Here we derive a simpler physical model that reduces the governing RANS equations into a first-order ODE with non-constant coefficients. The origin of the non-stationarity of turbulence can be buoyant stabilization/destabilization and/or unsteady pressure gradient. The reduced model is straightforward and solvable for arbitrary turbulent viscosity variability, and it captures LES results for linearly variable buoyancy and pressure gradient pretty well. The suggested model is thus general and will be useful for elucidating some features of the diurnal cycle, for short-term wind forecast, and in meteorological applications. NSF-PDM under AGS-10266362. Simulations performed at NCAR, and Della server at Princeton University. Cooperative Institute for Climate Science, NOAA-Princeton University under NA08OAR4320752.

  12. Horton, pipe hydraulics, and the atmospheric boundary layer (The Robert E. Horton Memorial Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1993-01-01

    The early stages of Horton's scientific career which provided the opportunity and stimulus to delve into the origins of some contemporary concepts on the atmospheric boundary layer are reviewed. The study of Saph and Schoder provided basis for the experimental verification and validation of similarity by Blasius, Staton and Pannel, and for the subsequent developments that led to the present understanding of the turbulent boundary layer. Particular attention is given to incorporation of similarity and scaling in the analysis of turbulent flow.

  13. Observations of Wind Profile of Marine Atmosphere Boundary Layer by Shipborne Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Yin, Jiaping; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Hongwei; Song, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Kailin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system is so good as to prove the feasibility of the marine atmosphere boundary layer detection. A ship-mounted Coherent Doppler lidar was used to measure the wind profile and vertical velocity in the boundary layer over the Yellow sea in 2014. Furthermore, for the purpose of reducing the impact of vibration during movement and correcting the LOS velocity, the paper introduces the attitude correction algorithm and comparison results.

  14. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  15. The groundwater land-surface atmosphere connection: Soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Chow, Fotini Katopodes; Kollet, Stefan J.

    2007-12-01

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can simulate spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-h period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land-surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  16. Venus upper atmosphere neutral composition - Preliminary results from the Pioneer Venus orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H. B.; Hartle, R. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Spencer, N. W.; Hunten, D. M.; Carignan, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements in situ of the neutral composition and temperature of the thermosphere of Venus are being made with a quadrupole mass spectrometer on the Pioneer Venus orbiter. The presence of many gases, including the major constituents CO2, CO, N2, O, and He has been confirmed. Carbon dioxide is the most abundant constituent at altitudes below about 155 kilometers in the terminator region. Above this altitude atomic oxygen is the major constituent, with O/CO2 ratios in the upper atmosphere being greater than was commonly expected. Isotope ratios of O and C are close to terrestrial values. The temperature inferred from scale heights above 180 kilometers is about 400 K on the dayside near the evening terminator at a solar zenith angle of about 69 deg. It decreases to about 230 K when the solar zenith angle is about 90 deg.

  17. Characterizations of strip-line microwave micro atmospheric plasma and its application to neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, Ken; Terashima, Kazuo

    2009-07-15

    In this work, we estimate the plasma parameters of strip-line microwave micro atmospheric plasma (SMMAP) such as rotational temperature (T{sub r}) both from OH and N{sub 2} rotational transitions (610-770 and 770-980 K in Ar, respectively), electron density (N{sub e}) from Stark broadening (about 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3} in mixture of Ar and H{sub 2}), and the distribution of electric field before ignition of SMMAP (5x10{sup 4} V/m at maximum, and applied voltage less than 5 V). Since the lower applied voltage of SMMAP might enable us to conduct efficient processing without electrostatic damage (ESD), we applied jet-type SMMAP to neutralization. The result of neutralization showed that it can reduce surface charge from +-1000 to +-100 V for 0.2 s at 10 W with Ar gas flow within 4 V offset voltage, which provides efficient plasma processing without ESD.

  18. The Influence of Solar Proton Events in Solar Cycle 23 on the Neutral Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; vonKonig, Miriam; Anderson, John; Roble, Raymond G.; McPeters, Richard D.; Fleming, Eric L.; Russell, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can cause changes in constituents in the Earth's middle atmosphere. The highly energetic protons cause ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which lead to the production of HO(x) (H, OH, HO2) and NO(y) (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The HO(x) increases lead to short-lived ozone decreases in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere due to the short lifetimes of the HO, constituents. The NO(x) increases lead to long-lived stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of NO(y) constituents in this region. Solar cycle 23 was quite active with SPEs and very large fluxes of high energy protons occurred in July and November 2000, November 200 1, and April 2002. Smaller, but still substantial, proton fluxes impacted the Earth during other months in the 1997-2003 time period. The impact of the very large SPEs on the neutral middle atmosphere during solar cycle 23 will be discussed, including the HO(x), NO(y), ozone variations and induced atmospheric transport changes. Two multi-dimensional models, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Two-dimensional (2D) Model and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM), were used in computing the influence of the SPEs. The results of the GSFC 2D Model and the TIME-GCM will be shown along with comparisons to the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments.

  19. An Estimation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Energy Dissipation Rate Based on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Similarity Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Arya, S. Pal; Shaohua, Shen; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Proctor, Fred H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Algorithms are developed to extract atmospheric boundary layer profiles for turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and energy dissipation rate (EDR), with data from a meteorological tower as input. The profiles are based on similarity theory and scalings for the atmospheric boundary layer. The calculated profiles of EDR and TKE are required to match the observed values at 5 and 40 m. The algorithms are coded for operational use and yield plausible profiles over the diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  20. Analysis of system coupling - search for common scaling domains within solar, geomagnetic, ionospheric and neutral atmosphere data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosna, Zbysek

    Ionosphere is variable over wide range of periods from minutes to tens of years and more. Primarily the system is influenced by solar and geomagnetic activity, however processes taking place in the neutral atmosphere contribute also to the resulting ionospheric behavior. The paper presents scaling analysis of the solar, geomagnetic and neutral atmosphere parameters together with ionospheric parameters. First the dominant periodicities are detected in each time series and attributed to the particular process, then removed/filtered out from the data. Residual time series are further analyzed in order to find common scaling domains that may indicate strong system couplings.

  1. Radon dispersion modeling and dose assessment for uranium mine ventilation shaft exhausts under neutral atmospheric stability.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dong; Wang, Hanqing; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Liu, Zehua; Mo, Shunquan

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the roles of atmospheric wind profiles in the neutral atmosphere and surface roughness parameters in a complex terrain were examined to determine their impacts on radon ((222)Rn) dispersion from an actual uranium mine ventilation shaft. Simulations were completed on (222)Rn dispersion extending from the shaft to a vulnerable distance, near the location of an occupied farmhouse. The eight dispersion scenarios for the ventilation shaft source included four downwind velocities (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 m s(-1)) and two underlying surface roughness characteristics (0.1 m and 1.0 m). (222)Rn distributions and elevated pollution regions were identified. Effective dose estimation methods involving a historical weighting of wind speeds in the direction of interest coupled to the complex dispersion model were proposed. Using this approach, the radiation effects on the residents assumed to be outside at the location of the farm house 250 m downwind from the ventilation shaft outlet were computed. The maximum effective dose rate calculated for the residents at the outside of the farm house was 2.2 mSv y(-1), which is less than the low limit action level of 3-10 mSv y(-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) occupational exposure action level for radon. PMID:24378730

  2. Lagrangian stochastic modeling of pollutant dispersion in the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer - application to an urban area over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattal, Eyal; Gavze, Ehud

    2014-05-01

    The modeling of pollutant dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer depends on an adequate description of the turbulent processes. Since turbulence is a multi-scale phenomenon characterized by a high degree of disorder, a statistical approach is needed. Among the statistical approaches, Lagrangian stochastic particle models provide a well established theoretical framework for the description of pollutant dispersion in different atmospheric boundary layer scenarios. Usually turbulent structure in the surface layer is described in terms of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) using universal relationships between scaling parameters. These relationships have been shown to be valid in the case of horizontal homogeneity for stationary turbulence. The description of the turbulent processes above rough surfaces, such as over canopies, is a more complex case. For the urban canopy it was found that under developed stationary turbulence conditions MOST relations are approximately valid (in some cases, with extensions). An even more complex case is that of rough surfaces over topography, as no similarity theory has been established to properly describe the turbulence exchange over heterogeneous surfaces in complex terrain. We show Lagrangian stochastic model simulations based on MOST against measurements in urban canopy over complex terrain. Comparison gives good agreement with direct tracer measurements, in cases of neutral and convective stratifications. It is shown that in conditions of developed stationary turbulence, at most areas, there is in an agreement with MOST predictions. However, in very low wind conditions the turbulent nocturnal boundary layer is not necessarily stationary and is spatially non-homogeneous. This results in larger horizontal velocity standard deviation than expected in regular stable regime, as manifested in the pollutant pattern.

  3. Regional-scale evaluation of a land surface scheme from atmospheric boundary layer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noilhan, J.; Donier, S.; LacarrèRe, P.; Sarrat, C.; Le Moigne, P.

    2011-01-01

    The study describes an evaluation of three configurations of the Interactions Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface scheme fully coupled with the Meso-NH mesoscale atmospheric model. The ability of the modeling system to correctly reproduce the screen-level variables as well as the boundary layer characteristics is examined for more than 30 clear convective days monitored during the CERES 2005 and 2007 field campaigns. For the horizontal resolution considered (8 km), this study shows that the boundary layer characteristics and the low-level variables are better simulated when the subgrid-scale surface process variability is simulated explicitly using the so-called "tiling method." An additional improvement is brought when the CO2 diurnal cycle is used interactively because of the physical link between the stomatal conductance used both for CO2 assimilation and plant transpiration. The parameterization of this link between CO2 and evaporation fluxes improves the simulation of the Bowen ratio and therefore of the atmospheric boundary layer. The last part of the paper discusses the realism of the simulated regional field of CO2 when the carbon configuration is activated in the mesoscale model. Large regional variability of CO2 within the atmospheric boundary layer is found in response to the spatial and seasonal variability of CO2 surface fluxes with respect to the three main land covers in the area: pine forest, extensive winter (wheat), and summer (maize) crops.

  4. Stability of atmospheric CO2 levels across the Triassic/Jurassic boundary.

    PubMed

    Tanner, L H; Hubert, J F; Coffey, B P; McInerney, D P

    2001-06-01

    The Triassic/Jurassic boundary, 208 million years ago, is associated with widespread extinctions in both the marine and terrestrial biota. The cause of these extinctions has been widely attributed to the eruption of flood basalts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. This volcanic event is thought to have released significant amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere, which could have led to catastrophic greenhouse warming, but the evidence for CO2-induced extinction remains equivocal. Here we present the carbon isotope compositions of pedogenic calcite from palaeosol formations, spanning a 20-Myr period across the Triassic/Jurassic boundary. Using a standard diffusion model, we interpret these isotopic data to represent a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations of about 250 p.p.m. across the boundary, as compared with previous estimates of a 2,000-4,000 p.p.m. increase. The relative stability of atmospheric CO2 across this boundary suggests that environmental degradation and extinctions during the Early Jurassic were not caused by volcanic outgassing of CO2. Other volcanic effects-such as the release of atmospheric aerosols or tectonically driven sea-level change-may have been responsible for this event. PMID:11395765

  5. Approximate analytical solution to diurnal atmospheric boundary-layer growth under well-watered conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The system of governing equations of a simplified slab model of the uniformly-mixed, purely convective, diurnal atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is shown to allow immediate solutions for the potential temperature and specific humidity as functions of the ABL height and net radiation when expressed i...

  6. Pilot project of measuring and computing system for mesoscale monitoring of atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, V. A.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Telminov, A. E.; Komarov, A. I.; Kobzev, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Conception of design of measuring and computing system for monitoring atmospheric boundary layer is proposed. The system includes: stationary measuring complex consisting of four multiple-elevation ultrasonic weather stations and mobile measuring complex consisting of transportable weather station, touch probing system of weather data profile based on unmanned aerial vehicle and also Raman scattering gas analyzer, and new modification mercury gas analyzer.

  7. Measurements of atmospheric hydrocarbons and biogenic emission fluxes in the Amazon boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, P. R.; Greenberg, J. P.; Westberg, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Tropospheric mixing ratios of methane, C2-C10 hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide were measured over the Amazon tropical forest near Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, in July and August 1985. The measurements, consisting mostly of altitude profiles of these gases, were all made within the atmospheric boundary layer up to an altitude of 1000 m above ground level. Data characterize the diurnal hydrocarbon composition of the boundary layer. Biogenic emissions of isoprene control hydroxyl radical concentrations over the forest. Biogenic emission fluxes of isoprene and terpenes are estimated to be 25,000 micrograms/sq m per day and 5600 micrograms/sq m per day, respectively. This isoprene emission is equivalent to 2 percent of the net primary productivity of the tropical forest. Atmospheric oxidation of biogenic isoprene and terpenes emissions from the Amazon forest may account for daily increases of 8-13 ppb for carbon monoxide in the planetary boundary layer.

  8. Investigating TIME-GCM Atmospheric Tides for Different Lower Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Lu, G.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.

    2013-12-01

    It has been recently established that atmospheric tides generated in the lower atmosphere significantly influence the geospace environment. In order to extend our knowledge of the various coupling mechanisms between the different atmospheric layers, we rely on model simulations. Currently there exist two versions of the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM), i.e. GSWM02 and GSWM09, which are used as a lower boundary (ca. 30 km) condition for the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) and account for the upward propagating atmospheric tides that are generated in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. In this paper we explore the various TIME-GCM upper atmospheric tidal responses for different lower boundary conditions and compare the model diagnostics with tidal results from satellite missions such as TIMED, CHAMP, and GOCE. We also quantify the differences between results associated with GSWM02 and GSWM09 forcing and results of TIMEGCM simulations using Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) data as a lower boundary condition.

  9. Measurements and Parametrizations of the Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Height at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroni, Ilaria; Argentini, Stefania; Petenko, Igor; Sozzi, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    An experimental campaign, Study of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Environmental at Dome C, was held during 2005 at the French-Italian station of Concordia at Dome C. Ground-based remote sensors, as well as in situ instrumentation, were used during the experimental campaign. The measurements allowed the direct estimation of the polar atmospheric boundary-layer height and the test of several parametrizations for the unstable and stable boundary layers. During the months of January and February, weak convection was observed while, during the polar night, a long-lived stable boundary layer occurred continuously. Under unstable stratification the mixing-layer height was determined using the sodar backscattered echoes and potential temperature profiles. The two estimations are highly correlated, with the mixing height ranging between 30 and 350 m. A simple prognostic one-dimensional model was used to estimate the convective mixing-layer height, with the correlation coefficient between observations and model results being 0.66. The boundary-layer height under stable conditions was estimated from radiosounding profiles as the height where the critical Richardson number is reached; values between 10 and 150 m were found. A visual inspection of potential temperature profiles was also used as further confirmation of the experimental height; the results of the two methods are in good agreement. Six parametrizations from the literature for the stable boundary-layer height were tested. Only the parametrization that considers the long-lived stable boundary layer and takes into account the interaction of the stable layer with the free atmosphere is in agreement with the observations.

  10. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Investigating boundary layer climatology in arid regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzooqi, Mohamed Al; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Armstrong, Peter; Molini, Annalisa

    2014-05-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature in the boundary layer over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main features however, desert ABLs present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as the transport of dust and pollutants, and turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat and water vapor in hyper-arid regions. In this study, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4oN, 54.6o E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013. We compare different methods for the estimation of the ABL height from Ceilometer data such as, classic variance-, gradient-, log gradient- and second derivation-methods as well as recently developed techniques such as the Bayesian Method and Wavelet covariance transform. Our goal is to select the most suited technique for describing the climatology of the ABL in desert environments. Comparison of our results with radiosonde observations collected at the nearby airport of Abu Dhabi indicate that the WCT and the Bayesian method are the most suitable tools to accurately identify the ABL height in all weather conditions. These two methods are used for the definition of diurnal and seasonal climatologies of the boundary layer conditional to different atmospheric stability classes.

  11. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary layer experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P.; Bonin, T. A.; Newman, J. F.; Turner, D. D.; Chilson, P. B.; Wainwright, C. E.; Blumberg, W. G.; Mishra, S.; Carney, M.; Jacobsen, E. P.; Wharton, Sonia; Newsom, Rob K.

    2015-10-23

    This paper presents an overview of the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE), which included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was conducted as a collaborative effort between the University of Oklahoma (OU), the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the ARM program. LABLE can be considered unique in that it was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost, multi-agency collaboration. Graduate students served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments aimed at examining boundary-layer processes. The main objective of LABLE was to study turbulent phenomena in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere over heterogeneous terrain using a variety of novel atmospheric profiling techniques. Several instruments from OU and LLNL were deployed to augment the suite of in-situ and remote sensing instruments at the ARM site. The complementary nature of the deployed instruments with respect to resolution and height coverage provides a near-complete picture of the dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper provides an overview of the experiment including i) instruments deployed, ii) sampling strategies, iii) parameters observed, and iv) student involvement. To illustrate these components, the presented results focus on one particular aspect of LABLE, namely the study of the nocturnal boundary layer and the formation and structure of nocturnal low-level jets. During LABLE, low-level jets were frequently observed and they often interacted with mesoscale atmospheric disturbances such as frontal passages.

  12. A Diagnostic Diagram to Understand the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer at High Wind Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Long time series of offshore meteorological measurements in the lower marine atmospheric boundary layer show dynamical regimes and variability that are forced partly by interaction with the underlying sea surface and partly by the passage of cloud systems overhead. At low wind speeds, the dynamics and stability structure of the surface layer depend mainly on the air-sea temperature difference and the measured wind speed at a standard height. The physical processes are mostly understood and the quantified through Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity theory. At high wind speeds different dynamical regimes become dominant. Breaking waves contribute to the atmospheric loading of sea spray and water vapor and modify the character of air-sea interaction. Downdrafts and boundary layer rolls associated with clouds at the top of the boundary layer impact vertical heat and momentum fluxes. Data from offshore meteorological monitoring sites will typically show different behavior and the regime shifts depending on the local winds and synoptic conditions. However, the regular methods to interpret time series through spectral analysis give only a partial view of dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer. Also, the spectral methods have limited use for boundary layer and mesoscale modellers whose geophysical diagnostics are mostly anchored in directly measurable quantities: wind speed, temperature, precipitation, pressure, and radiation. Of these, wind speed and the air-sea temperature difference are the most important factors that characterize the dynamics of the lower atmospheric boundary layer and they provide a dynamical and thermodynamic constraint to frame observed processes, especially at high wind speeds. This was recognized in the early interpretation of the Froya database of gale force coastal winds from mid-Norway (Andersen, O.J. and J. Lovseth, Gale force maritime wind. The Froya data base. Part 1: Sites and instrumentation. Review of the data base, Journal of Wind

  13. COMSOL Modeling of Transport of Neutral Radicals to Substrate Surfaces Located Downstream from an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Lekobou, William; Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    An Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma (APWIP) Reactor generates a significant number of charged particles and neutral radicals. In our work the carrier gas is argon and the precursor molecule is acetylene. The APWIP is generated by corona discharges associated with an array of high voltage metal needles facing a grounded metal screen. Neutral radical transport downstream from the grounded screen to the substrate via diffusion and convection will be modeled with COMSOL, a finite element software package. Substrates will include objects with various shapes and characteristic dimensions that range from nanometers to centimeters. After the model is validated against canonical problems with known solutions, thin film deposition rates will be compared with experimentally measured results. Substrate geometries will include discs, spheres, fibers and highly porous surfaces such as those found on asphalt road surfaces. A single generic neutral radical will be used to represent the entire family of neutral radicals resulting from acetylene bond scission by free electron impact.

  14. Sea ice edge position impact on the atmospheric boundary layer temperature structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavina, Elena; Repina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Processes happening in the Arctic region nowadays strongly influence global climate system; the polar amplification effect can be considered one of the main indicators of ongoing changes. Dramatic increase in amount of ice-free areas in the Arctic Ocean, which took place in 2000s, is one of the most significant examples of climate system dynamic in polar region. High amplitude of changes in Arctic climate, both observed and predicted, and existing inaccuracies of climate and weather forecasting models, enforce the development of a more accurate one. It is essential to understand the physics of the interaction between atmosphere and ocean in the Northern Polar area (particularly in boundary layer of the atmosphere) to improve the models. Ice conditions have a great influence on the atmospheric boundary layer in the Arctic. Sea ice inhibits the heat exchange between atmosphere and ocean water during the polar winter, while the heat exchange above the ice-free areas increases rapidly. Due to those significant temperature fluctuations, turbulence of heat fluxes grows greatly. The most intensive interaction takes place at marginal ice zones, especially in case of the cold outbreak - intrusion of cooled air mass from the ice to free water area. Still, thermal structure and dynamic of the atmosphere boundary layer are not researched and described thoroughly enough. Single radio sounding observations from the planes being done, bur they do not provide high-resolution data which is necessary for study. This research is based on continuous atmosphere boundary layer temperature and sea ice observation collected in the Arctic Ocean during the two NABOS expeditions in August and September in 2013 and 2015, as well as on ice conditions satellite data (NASA TEAM 2 and VASIA 2 data processing). Atmosphere temperature data has been obtained with Meteorological Temperature Profiler MTP-5 (ATTEX, Russia). It is a passive radiometer, which provides continuous data of atmospheric

  15. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  16. Influence of a Two-scale Surface Roughness on a Neutral Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Mejean, Patrick; Perkins, Richard J.

    2008-04-01

    Flow in the urban boundary layer is strongly influenced by the surface roughness, which is composed principally of isolated buildings or groups of buildings. Previous research has shown that the flow regime depends on the characteristic height of these obstacles ( H), and the spacing between them ( W). In reality, the urban boundary layer contains roughness elements with a wide range of length scales; in many practical situations these can be classified into large-scale roughness—buildings, or groups of buildings—and small-scale roughness, such as street furniture and elements on the façades and roofs. It is important to understand how the small-scale roughness might modify mass and momentum transfer in the urban boundary layer, but relatively little information is available concerning the potential interaction between large- and small-scale roughness elements in the different flow regimes. This problem has been studied using wind-tunnel experiments, by measuring vertical velocity profiles over a two-dimensional obstacle array, adding small-scale roughness elements to the top of larger parallel square bars. The experiments were performed for different cavity aspect ratios: the results show that the small-scale roughness increases the turbulence intensities and the momentum transfer when the large-scale obstacles are closely packed ( H/ W > 1) but it has very little effect for more widely-spaced obstacles ( H/ W < 1).

  17. Neutral Atmospheric Influences of the Solar Proton Events in October-November 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Labow, Gordon J.; Fleming, Eric L.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Russell, James M.

    2005-01-01

    The large solar storms in October-November 2003 caused solar proton events (SPEs) at the Earth and impacted the middle atmospheric polar cap regions. Although occurring near the end of the maximum of solar cycle 23, the fourth largest period of SPES measured in the past 40 years happened 28-31 October 2003. The highly energetic protons associated with the SPEs produced ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which led to the production of odd hydrogen (HO(sub x)) and odd nitrogen (NO(sub y)). NO(sub x) (NO + NO2) was observed by the UARS HALOE instrument to increase over 20 ppbv throughout the Southern Hemisphere polar lower mesosphere. The NOAA 16 SBUV/2 instrument measured a short-term ozone depletion of 40% in the Southern Hemisphere polar lower mesosphere, probably a result of the HO(sub x) increases. SBUV/2 observations showed ozone depletions of 5-8% in the southern polar upper stratosphere lasting days beyond the events, most likely a result of the NO(sub y) enhancements. Longer-term Northern Hemisphere polar total ozone decreases of >0.5% were predicted to last for over 8 months past the events with the Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional model. Although the production of NO(sub y) constituents is the same in both hemispheres, the NO(sub y) constituents have a much larger impact in the northern than the southern polar latitudes because of the seasonal differences between the two hemispheres. These observations and model computations illustrate the substantial impact of solar protons on the polar neutral middle atmosphere.

  18. A Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Translated into a Neutral Gas Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Jun'ichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ando, Hirotoshi; Arai, Mamiko; Katayama, Seri; Takahashi, Toshiki

    2014-10-01

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact toroid dominantly with poloidal magnetic field. Because of its simply-connected configuration, an FRC can be translated axially along a gradient of guide magnetic field, and trapped in a confinement region with quasi-static external magnetic field. FRC translation experiments have been performed several facilities. Translation speed of those translated FRCs is comparable with super-Alfvenic speed of approximately 200 km/s. In this experiments, FRC translation has been performed on the FAT (FRC Amplification via Translation) facility. Achieved translation speed in the case of translation into a confinement chamber maintained as the vacuum state is in the range from 130 to 210 km/s. On the other hand, FRC translation into a statically filled deuterium gas atmosphere has also been performed. In the case of translation into filled neutral gas, FRC translation speed is approximately 80 km/s and the separatrix volume has extremely expanded compared with the case of a vacuum state. The phenomenon suggests the presence of regeneration process of translation kinetic energy back into the internal plasma energy during the translation process. This work was partially supported by ``Nihon University Symbolic Project.'' The authors gratefully acknowledge contributions from Nac Image Technology Inc. on the fast camera measurements.

  19. Perspective ground-based method for diagnostics of the lower ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, N. V.; Grigoriev, G. I.; Tolmacheva, A. V.

    We present a new perspective ground-based method for diagnostics of the ionosphere and atmosphere parameters. The method uses one of the numerous physical phenomena observed in the ionosphere illuminated by high-power radio waves. It is a generation of the artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) in the ionospheric plasma. The APIs were found while studying the effects of ionospheric high-power HF modification. It was established that the APIs are formed by a standing wave that occurs due to interference between the upwardly radiated radio wave and its reflection off the ionosphere. The API studies are based upon observation of the Bragg backscatter of the pulsed probe radio wave from the artificial periodic structure. Bragg backscatter occurs if the spatial period of the irregularities is equal to half a wavelength of the probe signal. The API techniques makes it possible to obtain the following information: the profiles of electron density from the lower D-region up to the maximum of the F-layer; the irregular structure of the ionosphere including split of the regular E-layer, the sporadic layers; the vertical velocities in the D- and E-regions of the ionosphere; the turbulent velocities, turbulent diffusion coefficients and the turbopause altitude; the neutral temperatures and densities at the E-region altitudes; the parameters of the internal gravity waves and their spectral characteristics; the relative concentration of negative oxygen ions in the D-region. Some new results obtained by the API technique are discussed .

  20. Calibration of the Neutral Mass Spectrometer for the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Hodges, R. R.; Harpold, D. N.; King, T. T.; Jaeger, F.; Raaen, E.; Lyness, E.; Collier, M.; Benna, M.

    2012-01-01

    Science objectives of the LADEE Mission are to (1) determine the composition, and time variability of the tenuous lunar atmosphere and (2) to characterize the dust environment and its variability. These studies will extend the in-situ characterization of the environment that were carried out decades ago with the Apollo missions and a variety of ground based studies. The focused LADEE measurements will enable a more complete understanding of dust and gas sources and sinks. Sources of gas include UV photo-stimulated desorption, sputtering by plasma and micrometeorites, as well as thermal release of species such as argon from the cold service or venting from the lunar interior. Sinks include recondensation on the surface and escape through a variety of mechanisms. The LADEE science payload consists of an Ultraviolet Spectrometer, a Neutral Mass Spectrometer, and a Dust Detector. The LADEE orbit will include multiple passes at or below 50 km altitude and will target repeated sampling at the sunrise terminator where exospheric density will be highest for some thermally released species. The science mission will be implemented in approximately three months to allow measurements to be made over a period of one or more lunations In addition to the science mission NASA will use this mission to demonstrate optical communication technology away from low Earth orbit.

  1. Wind velocity measurements in the neutral boundary layer above hilly prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugita, Michiaki; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1990-01-01

    The Flint Hills region in eastern Kansas is characterized by a strongly dissected rolling to hilly terrain with an average about 25 m of relief between steep ridges and valleys, and with ridges typically separated by distances of the order of 600 m. Intensive radiosonde observations during summer and fall of 1987 allowed the determination of some aspects of the wind regime in the region. For an assumed ground-surface reference of 330 m above sea level (asl), analysis of neutral profiles yielded a value z(0) of about 1.05 m, approximately. Good agreement was obtained between the values of friction velocity derived from wind profiles and values determined independently from the corresponding humidity profiles.

  2. Modelled suppression of boundary-layer clouds by plants in a CO2-rich atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Vanheerwaarden, C.; Lelieveld, J.

    2013-12-01

    We will present and discuss a conceptual modelling framework that can facilitate the understanding of the interactions between land processes and atmospheric boundary layer dynamics/chemistry at diurnal scales. This framework has been successful applied to the interpretation of field experiments, but also to identify the non-linear relations that occur at larger spatial and temporal scales. We will then discuss in depth the link between shallow cumulus and vegetation exchange of water and carbon dioxide. Cumulus clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer play a key role in the hydrologic cycle, in the onset of severe weather by thunderstorms, and in modulating the Earth's reflectivity and climate. How these clouds respond to climate change, in particular over land, and how they interact with the carbon cycle is poorly understood. It is expected that as a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 the plant stomata will close leading to lower latent heat fluxes and higher sensible heat fluxes. During the presentation, we will show that this causes a decline in boundary layer cloud formation in middle latitudes. This could be partly counteracted by the greater ability of a warmer atmosphere to take up water and by a growth in biomass due to CO2 fertilization. Our results are based on a new soil-water-atmosphere-plant model supported by comprehensive observational evidence, from which we identify the dominant atmospheric responses to plant physiological processes. They emphasize the intricate connection between biological and physical aspects of the climate system and the relevance of short-term and small-scale processes in establishing this connection

  3. Impact of soil water property parameterization on atmospheric boundary layer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenca, Richard H.; Ek, Michael; Mahrt, Larry

    1996-03-01

    Both the form of functional relationships applied for soil water properties and the natural field-scale variability of such properties can significantly impact simulation of the soil-plant-atmosphere system on a diurnal timescale. Various input parameters for soil water properties including effective saturation, residual water content, anerobiosis point, field capacity, and permanent wilting point are incorporated into functions describing soil water retention, hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity, sorptivity, and the plant sink function. The perception of the meaning of these values and their variation within a natural environment often differs from the perspective of the soil physicist, plant physiologist, and atmospheric scientist. This article investigates the sensitivity of energy balance and boundary layer simulation to different soil water property functions using the Oregon State University coupled atmosphere-plant-soil (CAPS) simulation model under bare soil conditions. The soil parameterizations tested in the CAPS model include those of Clapp and Hornberger [1978], van Genuchten [1980], and Cosby et al. [1984] using initial atmospheric conditions from June 16, 1986 in Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment-Modélisation du Bilan Hydrique (HAPEX-MOBILHY). For the bare soil case these results demonstrate unexpected model sensitivity to soil water property parameterization in partitioning all components of the diurnal energy balance and corresponding boundary layer development.

  4. Modelled suppression of boundary-layer clouds by plants in a CO2-rich atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arellano, Jordi Vilà-Guerau; van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2012-10-01

    Cumulus clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer play a key role in the hydrologic cycle, in the onset of severe weather by thunderstorms and in modulating Earth's reflectivity and climate. How these clouds respond to climate change, in particular over land, and how they interact with the carbon cycle are poorly understood. It is expected that as a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations the plant stomata will close, leading to lower latent heat fluxes and higher sensible heat fluxes. Here we show that this causes a decline in boundary-layer cloud formation in middle latitudes. This could be partly counteracted by the greater ability of a warmer atmosphere to take up water and by a growth in biomass due to CO2 fertilization. Our results are based on a new soil-water-atmosphere-plant model supported by comprehensive observational evidence, from which we identify the dominant atmospheric responses to plant physiological processes. They emphasize the intricate connection between biological and physical aspects of the climate system and the relevance of short-term and small-scale processes in establishing this connection.

  5. A Sensitivity Analysis of the Nocturnal Boundary-Layer Properties to Atmospheric Emissivity Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Mario B.; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2010-02-01

    A one-dimensional model for the mean potential temperature within the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) was used to assess the sensitivity of three NBL properties (height, thermal stratification strength, and near-surface cooling) to three widely used atmospheric emissivity formulations. The calculations revealed that the NBL height is robust to the choice of the emissivity function, though this is not the case for NBL Richardson number and near-surface cooling rate. Rather than endorse one formulation, our analysis highlights the importance of atmospheric emissivity in modelling the radiative properties of the NBL especially for clear-sky conditions.

  6. Complex measurements of aerosol and ion characteristics in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikas, Iu. E.; Kolomiets, S. M.; Kornienko, V. I.; Mirme, A. A.; Sal'm, Ia. I.; Sergeev, I. Ia.; Tammet, Kh. F.

    Results of a comprehensive study of the characteristics of atmospheric ions and aerosols in the boundary layer during the summer season are reported. A study is also made of the kinetics of aerosol formation under conditions of high artificial ionization of the air by alpha and UV radiation. A high degree of correlation is shown to exist between atmospheric concentrations of medium ions and fine (less than 0.01 micron) aerosol. The results obtained support the radiation-chemical mechanism of aerosol formation.

  7. Observed Changes in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Properties at Memphis International Airport During August 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity Program, Langley Research Center embarked on a series of field measurements of wake vortex characteristics and associated atmospheric boundary layer properties. One measurement period was at the Memphis International Airport in August 1995. Atmospheric temperature, humidity, winds, turbulence, radiation, and soil properties were measured from a variety of sensor systems and platforms including sodars, profilers, aircraft and towers. This research focused on: (1) changes that occurred in tower data during sunrise and sunset transitions, (2) vertical variation of temperature and cross-head winds at selected times utilizing combinations of sensors, and (3) changes measured by an OV-10 aircraft during approaches and level flights. Significant but not unusual changes are documented and discussed in terms of expected boundary layer behavior. Questions on measurement and prediction of these changes from existing and near-term capabilities are discussed in the context of a future Aircraft Vortex Spacing System.

  8. Evolution of energetic neutral atom spectra as measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer during its first seven years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, Maher A.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; McComas, David; Schwadron, Nathan; Desai, Mihir; Zirnstein, Eric J.

    2016-07-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission continues to provide remote Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) measurements produced by charge exchange between energetic protons and interstellar neutrals at the edge of our heliosphere. Using the first seven years of IBEX-Hi ENA measurements (January 2009 through December 2015), we examine the evolution of the spectral slopes in four different energy bands, namely, ˜0.7-1.1 keV, ˜1.1-1.7 keV, ˜1.7-2.7 keV, and ˜2.7-4.3 keV, across different regions of the sky. Results show that spectral slopes at each energy band are characterized with unique distribution properties (e.g., width, shape, and mode), which vary in time at different rates and in both directions (distribution modes increase or decrease). We attempt to explain these results in context of ENA source regions, solar wind temporal variations, and changes in the heliosheath thickness and its plasma properties. These results provide insights into ENA production mechanisms, properties of their plasma progenitors, and how they relate to changes in the solar wind.

  9. The effect of new interstellar medium parameters on the heliosphere and energetic neutral atoms from the interstellar boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Zirnstein, E. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Funsten, H. O.

    2014-03-20

    We present new results from three-dimensional simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) using recent observations by NASA's Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) mission estimates of the velocity and temperature of the LISM. We investigate four strengths of the LISM magnetic field, from 1 to 4 μG, and adjust the LISM proton and hydrogen densities so that the distance to the termination shock (TS) in the directions of the Voyager spacecraft is just below 90 AU, and the density of hydrogen at the TS is close to 0.09 cm{sup –3} in the nose direction. The orientation of the magnetic field is chosen to point toward the center of the ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux seen in the IBEX data. Our simulations show that the plasma and neutral properties in the outer heliosheath vary considerably as a function of the LISM magnetic field strength. We also show that the heliotail points downwind in all cases, though its structure is strongly affected by the external magnetic field. Comparison and consistency between the simulated ENA flux and the circularity of the ribbon as measured by IBEX are most consistent with a LISM magnetic field strength aligned with the center of the ribbon and a magnitude in the range 2.5-3 μG.

  10. Implementation of a convective atmospheric boundary layer scheme in a tropospheric chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-Y.; Pyle, J. A.; Sanderson, M. G.; Bridgeman, C.

    1999-10-01

    A convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) scheme for the transport of trace gases in the lower troposphere has been implemented from the Community Climate Model, Version 2 [Hack et al., 1993] into a tropospheric chemistry transport model [Wang, 1998]. The atmospheric boundary layer scheme includes the calculation of atmospheric radiative transfer, surface energy balance, and land surface temperature and has a specified annual variation of sea surface temperature. The calculated diurnal variation of the height of the boundary layer is similar to the results of Troen and Mahrt [1986] and is in a good agreement with Holtslag and Boville [1993]. The modeled height of the boundary layer shows a seasonal shift between land and sea in the Northern Hemisphere. In summer (June-July-August), the height of the boundary layer is deeper over land (850-2250 m) and shallower over sea (50-850 m); while in winter (December-January-February), it is shallower over land (50-850 m) and deeper over sea (850-2850 m). The coupled ABL-chemical transport model is verified against measurements of radon 222 and methane. Comparison of the coupled model with a non-ABL model indicates significant differences between these model simulations and a better agreement between the coupled model and measurements. There is a significant effect on the trace gas distribution when the ABL model is compared with the non-ABL schemes. For example, the ABL scheme shows more O3 transported from the middle troposphere down to the surface, while more CO is pumped up from the surface into the middle troposphere. The seasonal cycle of modeled CH4 is significantly improved with the inclusion of the new ABL scheme, especially in regions which are not remote from methane sources.

  11. ALADINA - an unmanned research aircraft for observing vertical and horizontal distributions of ultrafine particles within the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altstädter, B.; Platis, A.; Wehner, B.; Scholtz, A.; Wildmann, N.; Hermann, M.; Käthner, R.; Baars, H.; Bange, J.; Lampert, A.

    2015-04-01

    boundary layer, derived from backscatter signals of a portable Raman lidar POLLYXT, allows a quick overview of the current vertical structure of atmospheric particles. Ground-based aerosol number concentrations are consistent with the results from flights in heights of a few metres. In addition, a direct comparison of ALADINA aerosol data and ground-based aerosol data, sampling the air at the same location for more than 1 h, shows comparable values within the range of ± 20 %. MASC was operated simultaneously with complementary flight patterns. It is equipped with the same meteorological instruments that offer the possibility to determine turbulent fluxes. Therefore, additional information about meteorological conditions was collected in the lowest part of the atmosphere. Vertical profiles up to 1000 m in altitude indicate a high variability with distinct layers of aerosol, especially for the small particles of a few nanometres in diameter on 1 particular day. The stratification was almost neutral and two significant aerosol layers were detected with total aerosol number concentrations up to 17 000 ± 3400 cm-3 between 180 and 220 m altitude and 14 000 ± 2800 cm-3 between 550 and 650 m. Apart from those layers, the aerosol distribution was well mixed and reached the total number concentration of less than 8000 ± 1600 cm-3. During another day, the distribution of the small particles in the lowermost ABL was related to the stratification, with continuously decreasing number concentrations from 16 000 ± 3200 cm-3 to a minimum of 4000 ± 800 cm-3 at the top of the inversion at 320 m. Above this, the total number concentration was rather constant. In the region of 500 to 600 m altitude, a significant difference of both CPCs was observed. This event occurred during the boundary layer development in the morning and represents a particle burst within the ABL.

  12. Temporal variation of heat and moisture flux divergence in the FIFE atmospheric boundary layer during spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    A one-day investigation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is reported in which an aircraft monitors the temporal and spatial variations of heat and moisture turbulent-flux divergences. Incoming solar radiation is similar over natural prairie land and agriculturally developed land although the heat and moisture values show significant differences over the surfaces. Other temporal variations are noted which demonstrate that ABL transport of sensible and latent heat is affected by complex variables even under simple synoptic conditions.

  13. Modelling the atmospheric boundary layer for remotely sensed estimates of daily evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurney, R. J.; Blyth, K.; Camillo, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    An energy and moisture balance model of the soil surface was used to estimate daily evaporation from wheat and barley fields in West Germany. The model was calibrated using remotely sensed surface temperature estimates. Complete atmospheric boundary layer models are difficult to use because of the number of parameters involved and a simplified model was used here. The resultant evaporation estimates were compared to eddy correlation evaporation estimates and good agreement was found.

  14. Representation of the grey zone of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnert, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction model forecasts at horizontal grid lengths in the range of 100 to 1 km are now possible. This range of scales is the "grey zone of turbulence". Previous studies, based on large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis from the MésoNH model, showed that some assumptions of some turbulence schemes on boundary-layer structures are not valid. Indeed, boundary-layer thermals are now partly resolved, and the subgrid remaining part of the thermals is possibly largely or completely absent from the model columns. First, some modifications of the equations of the shallow convection scheme have been tested in the MésoNH model and in an idealized version of the operational AROME model at resolutions coarser than 500 m. Secondly, although the turbulence is mainly vertical at mesoscale (> 2 km resolution), it is isotropic in LES (< 100 m resolution). It has been proved by LES analysis that, in convective boundary layers, the horizontal production of turbulence cannot be neglected at resolutions finer than half of the boundary-layer height. Thus, in the grey zone, fully unidirectional turbulence scheme should become tridirectional around 500 m resolution. At Météo-France, the dynamical turbulence is modelled by a K-gradient in LES as well as at mesoscale in both MésoNH and AROME, which needs mixing lengths in the formulation. Vertical and horizontal mixing lengths have been calculated from LES of neutral and convective cases at resolutions in the grey zone.

  15. The structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer as revealed by lidar and Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilts, M. D.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Doviak, R. J.

    1985-02-01

    Results on the structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer based on the analyses of data from the instrumented NSSL-KTVY tower, airborne Doppler lidar, and ground-based Doppler radars are presented. The vertically averaged wind over the boundary layer was found to be insensitive to baroclinicity, supporting the hypothesis of Arya and Wyngaard (1975). The computed momentum flux profiles were affected by baroclinicity. Horizontal wind spectra from lidar, radar, and tower data compared well with each other both in shape and magnitude. A consistent peak found near 4 km in all the computed spectra might have been caused by horizontally symmetric cells with horizontal wavelength 4 times the boundary-layer height as shown in Kuettner (1971) for the case of weak wind shear.

  16. The structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer as revealed by lidar and Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilts, M. D.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Doviak, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on the structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer based on the analyses of data from the instrumented NSSL-KTVY tower, airborne Doppler lidar, and ground-based Doppler radars are presented. The vertically averaged wind over the boundary layer was found to be insensitive to baroclinicity, supporting the hypothesis of Arya and Wyngaard (1975). The computed momentum flux profiles were affected by baroclinicity. Horizontal wind spectra from lidar, radar, and tower data compared well with each other both in shape and magnitude. A consistent peak found near 4 km in all the computed spectra might have been caused by horizontally symmetric cells with horizontal wavelength 4 times the boundary-layer height as shown in Kuettner (1971) for the case of weak wind shear.

  17. On the Impact of Wind Farms on a Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hao; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    With the rapid growth in the number of wind turbines installed worldwide, a demand exists for a clear understanding of how wind farms modify land-atmosphere exchanges. Here, we conduct three-dimensional large-eddy simulations to investigate the impact of wind farms on a convective atmospheric boundary layer. Surface temperature and heat flux are determined using a surface thermal energy balance approach, coupled with the solution of a three-dimensional heat equation in the soil. We study several cases of aligned and staggered wind farms with different streamwise and spanwise spacings. The farms consist of Siemens SWT-2.3-93 wind turbines. Results reveal that, in the presence of wind turbines, the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer is modified, the boundary-layer height is increased, and the magnitude of the surface heat flux is slightly reduced. Results also show an increase in land-surface temperature, a slight reduction in the vertically-integrated temperature, and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of the surface heat flux.

  18. Ammonia Surface-Atmosphere Exchange in the Arctic Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. G.; Wentworth, G.; Tremblay, J. E.; Gagnon, J.; Côté, J. S.; Courchesne, I.

    2014-12-01

    The net flux of ammonia between the ocean and the atmosphere is poorly known on global and regional scales. Data from high-latitude research cruises suggest that deposition from the atmosphere to the surface dominates, but the magnitude and drivers of this flux are not well understood. In the polar marine boundary layer, the surface may be composed of not only open ocean, but also first-year or multi-year sea ice which may be covered with meltponds. To characterize the air-sea exchange of ammonia in the polar marine boundary layer, data were collected aboard the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen between July 10 and Aug 14, 2014 in the Eastern Canadian Arctic. The Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph was used to make hourly measurements of the mixing ratio of gas phase ammonia, and the water-soluble constituents of fine particle matter (PM2.5). Fluorometry was used to measure dissolved ammonium concentrations in the ocean between 0 and 20 m, and in low-salinity melt ponds encountered in regions of extensive sea ice. Observations indicate that the atmosphere contains higher levels of ammonia than are calculated to be in equilibrium with surface reservoirs, implying net deposition of ammonia from the atmosphere. While ammonium levels tended to be higher in melt ponds, the lower water temperatures still mean that these are unlikely to be sources of NH3 to the atmosphere. The disequilibrium between atmospheric and surface reservoirs of ammonia imply relatively large sources to the atmosphere (possibly nearby bird colonies) or high consumption rates in surface waters.

  19. Exploring the Effects of Atmospheric Forcings on Evaporation: Experimental Integration of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Shallow Subsurface.

    PubMed

    Smits, Kathleen; Eagen, Victoria; Trautz, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation is directly influenced by the interactions between the atmosphere, land surface and soil subsurface. This work aims to experimentally study evaporation under various surface boundary conditions to improve our current understanding and characterization of this multiphase phenomenon as well as to validate numerical heat and mass transfer theories that couple Navier-Stokes flow in the atmosphere and Darcian flow in the porous media. Experimental data were collected using a unique soil tank apparatus interfaced with a small climate controlled wind tunnel. The experimental apparatus was instrumented with a suite of state of the art sensor technologies for the continuous and autonomous collection of soil moisture, soil thermal properties, soil and air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. This experimental apparatus can be used to generate data under well controlled boundary conditions, allowing for better control and gathering of accurate data at scales of interest not feasible in the field. Induced airflow at several distinct wind speeds over the soil surface resulted in unique behavior of heat and mass transfer during the different evaporative stages. PMID:26131928

  20. Accuracy Assessment Study of UNB3m Neutral Atmosphere Model for Global Tropospheric Delay Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Ashraf

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric delay is the second major source of error after the ionospheric delay for satellite navigation systems. The transmitted signal could face a delay caused by the troposphere of over 2m at zenith and 20m at lower satellite elevation angles of 10 degrees and below. Positioning errors of 10m or greater can result from the inaccurate mitigation of the tropospheric delay. Many techniques are available for tropospheric delay mitigation consisting of surface meteorological models and global empirical models. Surface meteorological models need surface meteorological data to give high accuracy mitigation while the global empirical models need not. Several hybrid neutral atmosphere delay models have been developed by (University of New Brunswick, Canada) UNB researchers over the past decade or so. The most widely applicable current version is UNB3m, which uses the Saastamoinen zenith delays, Niell mapping functions, and a look-up table with annual mean and amplitude for temperature, pressure, and water vapour pressure varying with respect to latitude and height. This paper presents an assessment study of the behaviour of the UNB3m model compared with highly accurate IGS-tropospheric estimation for three different (latitude/height) IGS stations. The study was performed over four nonconsecutive weeks on different seasons over one year (October 2014 to July 2015). It can be concluded that using UNB3m model gives tropospheric delay correction accuracy of 0.050m in average for low latitude regions in all seasons. The model's accuracy is about 0.075m for medium latitude regions, while its highest accuracy is about 0.014m for high latitude regions.

  1. Investigating the Source, Transport, and Isotope Composition of Water in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffis, T. J.; Schultz, N. M.; Lee, X.

    2011-12-01

    The isotope composition of water (liquid and vapor phases) can provide important insights regarding the source of water used by plants, the origins of atmospheric water vapor, and the sources of carbon dioxide. In recent years there have been significant advances in the ability to quantify the isotope composition of water and water vapor using optical isotope techniques. We have used and helped develop some of these techniques to determine the isotope composition of soil and plant waters, to measure the isoflux of water vapor between the land surface and atmosphere, and to examine the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this presentation we will discuss three related issues: 1) Identification and correction of spectral contamination in soil and plant water samples using optical techniques; 2) The benefits and practical limitations of quantifying the isotope composition of evapotranspiration using the eddy covariance approach; and 3) The scientific value and feasibility of tracking the long-term (seasonal and interannual) behavior of the isotope composition of water vapor and deuterium excess in the atmospheric boundary layer. A few short stories will be provided from experiments conducted in the lab, at the field scale, and from a very tall tower at the University of Minnesota from 2008 to 2011.

  2. Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Dynamics and the Constancy of the Bowen Ratio (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porporato, A.

    2009-12-01

    The diurnal evolution of sensible and latent heat fluxes tends to maintain a constant Bowen ratio, at least for the central part of the day. Using the solutions of the ordinary differential equations of a simplified atmospheric boundary-layer (ABL) model, we find that neglecting the early morning transition the potential temperature and specific humidity of the mixed layer tend to be linearly related to the ABL height. Similar behavior is followed by the inversion strengths of temperature and humidity at the top of the ABL. The potential temperature of the mixed layer depends on the entrainment parameter and the free-atmosphere temperature lapse rate, while the specific humidity also depends on the free-atmosphere humidity lapse rate and the Bowen ratio. The temporal dynamics appear only implicitly in the evolution of the height of the boundary layer, which in turn depends on the time-integrated surface sensible heat flux. Studying the limiting behavior of the Bowen ratio for very low and very large values of net available energy, we also show how the tendency to maintain constant Bowen ratio during midday hours stems from its relative insensitivity to the atmospheric conditions for large values of net available energy. The analytical expression for the diurnal evolution of the ABL obtained with constant Bowen ratio is simple and provides a benchmark for the results of more complex models.

  3. Intercomparison of Martian Lower Atmosphere Simulated Using Different Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, Murali; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Smith, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We use the mesoscale modeling capability of Mars Weather Research and Forecasting (MarsWRF) model to study the sensitivity of the simulated Martian lower atmosphere to differences in the parameterization of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Characterization of the Martian atmosphere and realistic representation of processes such as mixing of tracers like dust depend on how well the model reproduces the evolution of the PBL structure. MarsWRF is based on the NCAR WRF model and it retains some of the PBL schemes available in the earth version. Published studies have examined the performance of different PBL schemes in NCAR WRF with the help of observations. Currently such assessments are not feasible for Martian atmospheric models due to lack of observations. It is of interest though to study the sensitivity of the model to PBL parameterization. Typically, for standard Martian atmospheric simulations, we have used the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) PBL scheme, which considers a correction term to the vertical gradients to incorporate nonlocal effects. For this study, we have also used two other parameterizations, a non-local closure scheme called Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme and a turbulent kinetic energy closure scheme called Mellor- Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) PBL scheme. We will present intercomparisons of the near surface temperature profiles, boundary layer heights, and wind obtained from the different simulations. We plan to use available temperature observations from Mini TES instrument onboard the rovers Spirit and Opportunity in evaluating the model results.

  4. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Stephen; McCabe, Matthew; Griffiths, Alan; Wang, Lixin

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  5. Experimental Study of the EM Transmission Properties of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, T.; Friehe, C.; Anderson, K.

    2003-04-01

    The propagation of electro-magnetic signals over the ocean is primarily affected by atmospheric refraction and scattering from the rough ocean surface. Wave-guides (also known as refractive ducts) occurring in the first tens of meters above the sea surface have been modeled extensively, as they influence communications. However, discrepancies between models and measurements have been detected. Here we study experimentally the structure of the atmospheric refractive index and the ocean surface statistics, pertinent to EM signals scattering. The structure and the dynamics the marine atmospheric boundary layer is profoundly affected by the ocean surface waves, which deform the mean wind flow streamlines. In the presence of gradients of the atmospheric humidity and temperature, the deformation of the streamlines displaces the sheared profiles of these quantities and leads to wave-induced fluctuations of the atmospheric refractive index. As a result, radio and optical signals propagating over the ocean encounter a semi-periodic refractive structure, which along with the turbulence can degrade signal's energy. The wave-induced fluctuations of the refractive index are unique to the oceanic environment. Their structure function does not follow the power 2/3 scaling law, valid for turbulent fluctuations, and thus their influence should be studied separately. We analyze data of atmospheric turbulence, humidity, temperature, and sea surface temperature and waves from the Rough Evaporation Duct experiment, conducted in part from the instrument platform FLIP in the open ocean North of Oahu, Hawaii.

  6. Atmospheric response in aurora experiment: Observations of E and F region neutral winds in a region of postmidnight diffuse aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.; Marshall, T. R.; Mikkelsen, I. S.; Emery, B. A.; Christensen, A.; Kayser, D.; Hecht, J.; Lyons, L.; Walterscheid, R.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Atmospheric Response in Aurora (ARIA) experiment carried out at Poker Flat, Alaska, on March 3, 1992, was to determine the response of the neutral atmosphere to the long-lived, large-scale forcing that is characteristic of the diffuse aurora in the post midnight sector. A combination of chemical release rocket wind measurements, instrumented rocket composition measurements, and ground-based optical measurements were used to characterize the response of the neutral atmosphere. The rocket measurements were made at the end of a 90-min period of strong Joule heating. We focus on the neutral wind measurements made with the rocket. The forcing was determined by running the assimilated mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) analysis procedure developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The winds expected at the latitude and longitude of the experiment were calculated using the spectral thermospheric general circulation model developed at the Danish Meteorological Institute. Comparisons of the observations and the model suggest that the neutral winds responded strongly in two height ranges. An eastward wind perturbation of approximately 100 m/s developed between 140 and 200 km altitude with a peak near 160 km. A southwestward wind with peak magnitude of approximately 150 m/s developed near 115 km altitude. The large amplitude winds at the lower altitude are particularly surprising. They appear to be associated with the upward propagating semidiurnal tide. However, the amplitude is much larger than predicted by any of the tidal models, and the shear found just below the peak in the winds was nominally unstable with a Richardson number of approximately 0.08.

  7. Near-marine boundary layer atmospheric and turbulence measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzur, Tariq; Zeller, John; Magee, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Currently there are extensive modeling and measurement capabilities for the region extending from 100 ft above sea surface to space, but few such capabilities exist for the region extending up to 10 ft above the sea surface. By measuring and characterizing conditions in the marine boundary layer existing below 30 ft above the sea surface such as turbulence and extinction, the optical communication capabilities of maritime vessels when operating at or near the surface may be extended and enhanced. Key physical parameters such as absorption, scattering, and turbulence strength (Cn 2) along the propagation path have a degree of variability on meteorological conditions as well optical wavelength. Modeling of the atmospheric environment is thus critical in order to generate a good understanding of optical propagation through the atmosphere. NUWC is utilizing software provided by MZA to model Cn 2 and resultant beam propagation characteristics through the near-marine boundary layer. We are developing the capability of near-marine boundary layer atmospheric and turbulence measurements and modeling as well as optical laser link testing at outdoor test sites. Measurements are performed with optical laser links (e.g., bit rate error), scintillometer, and particle image velocimetry (PIV) cameras, while turbulence and propagation modeling is achieved using MODTRAN5, ATMTools, NSLOT, LEEDR, and WaveTrain modeling and simulation code. By better understanding the effects of turbulence on optical transmission in the near-marine boundary layer through modeling and experimental measurements, measures can be implemented to reduce the bit error rate and increase data throughput, enabling more efficient and accurate communication link capabilities.

  8. Large-eddy simulation of an infinitely large wind farm in a stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2010-09-01

    When deployed as large arrays, wind turbines interact among themselves and with atmospheric boundary layer. To optimize their geometric arrangements, accurate knowledge of wind-turbine array boundary layer is of great importance. In this study, we integrated large eddy simulation with an actuator line technique, and used it to study the characteristics of wind-turbine wake in an idealized wind farm inside a stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer (SBL). The wind turbines, with a rotor diameter of 112m and a tower height of 119m, were placed in a well-known SBL turbulent case that has a boundary layer height of approximately 180m. The super-geostrophic nocturnal jet near the top of the boundary layer was eliminated due to the energy extraction and the enhanced mixing of momentum. Non-axisymmetric behavior of wake structure was observed in response to the non-uniform incoming turbulence, the Coriolis effects, and the rotational effects induced by blade motions. The turbulence intensity in the simulated turbine wakes was found to reach a maximum at the top-tip level and a downwind distance of approximately 3-5 rotor diameters from the turbines. The Coriolis effects caused a skewed spatial structure and drove certain amount of turbulent energy away from the center of the wake. The SBL height was increased, while the magnitudes of the surface momentum flux and the surface buoyancy flux were reduced by approximately 30%. The wind farm was also found to have a strong effect on area-averaged vertical turbulent fluxes of momentum and heat, which highlights the potential impact of wind farms on local meteorology.

  9. The impact of vegetation on the atmospheric boundary layer and convective storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsengdar John

    1992-01-01

    The impact of vegetation on atmospheric boundary layer and convective storms is examined through the construction and testing of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model. The Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere (LEAF) model is developed using an elevated canopy structure, an above-canopy aerodynamic resistance, two in-canopy aerodynamic resistances, and one stomatal conductance functions. The air temperature and humidity are assumed to be constant in the canopy whereas the wind and radiation follow a specified vertical profile. A simple dump-bucket method is used to parameterize the interception of precipitation and a multi-layer soil model is utilized to handle the vertical transfer of soil water. Evaporation from soil and wet leaves and transpiration from dry leaves are evaluated separately. The solid water uptake is based on soil water potential rather than on the length of roots. Separate energy budgets for vegetation and for the soil are used in order to remove unnecessary assumptions on energy partition between the vegetation and the substrate. Primary parameters are LAI, maximum stomatal conductance, and albedo. Secondary parameters include displacement height and environmental controls on stomatal resistance function. Due to the complexity of the LEAF model, statistical methods are used to improve LEAF model performance. The Multi-response Randomized Bock Permutation (MRBP) procedure is used to guide the choice of model parameter values. The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) is applied to better understand the model behavior in response to the changes in model parameters. Finally, LEAF is used to study the growth of boundary layer and the local thermal circulations generated by surface inhomogeneities. Results show the atmospheric boundary layer is substantially cooler and more moist over unstressed vegetation than over bare dry soil. Thermally forced circulation can result from the juxtaposition of two vegetation types due to different biophysical

  10. The Impact of Vegetation on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Convective Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsengdar John

    The impact of vegetation on atmospheric boundary layer and convective storms is examined through the construction and testing of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model. The Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere (LEAF) model is developed using an elevated canopy structure, an above -canopy aerodynamic resistance, two in-canopy aerodynamic resistances, and one stomatal conductance functions. The air temperature and humidity are assumed to be constant in the canopy whereas the wind and radiation follow a specified vertical profile. A simple dump-bucket method is used to parameterize the interception of precipitation and a multi-layer soil model is utilized to handle the vertical transfer of soil water. Evaporation from soil and wet leaves and transpiration from dry leaves are evaluated separately. The solid water uptake is based on soil water potential rather than on the length of roots. Separate energy budgets for vegetation and for the soil are used in order to remove unnecessary assumptions on energy partition between the vegetation and the substrate. Primary parameters are LAI, maximum stomatal conductance, and albedo. Secondary parameters include displacement height and environmental controls on stomatal resistance function. Due to the complexity of the LEAF model, statistical methods are used to improve LEAF model performance. The Multi-response Randomized Bock Permutation (MRBP) procedure is used to guide the choice of model parameter values. The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) is applied to better understand the model behavior in response to the changes in model parameters. Finally, LEAF is used to study the growth of boundary layer and the local thermal circulations generated by surface inhomogeneities. Results show the atmospheric boundary layer is substantially cooler and more moist over unstressed vegetation than over bare dry soil. Thermally forced circulation can result from the juxtaposition of two vegetation types due to different biophysical

  11. Study of the evening transition to the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer: statistical analysis and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Viana, Samuel; Maqueda, Gregorio; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Turbulence is probably the most important feature dealing with the diffusion of contaminants in the planetary boundary layer. The main characteristics of turbulence are governed, apart from synoptic conditions, by the daily cycle of the Earth surface heating and cooling, so that, simplifying, two configurations are often found: convective and stable. The transition from a diurnal convective boundary layer to a typically stable nocturnal one is not still well understood (Edwards, 2009). Different micrometeorological conditions at sunset or a few hours previously may be critical for the establishment of a strong surface-based stability or a weak one, even for similar synoptic conditions. This work focuses on the characterization of the evening transition which takes place at the atmospheric boundary layer, considering the temporal interval 17.00-23.00 GMT. The methodology includes looking for some relations between meteorological variables, turbulent parameters and particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) concentrations measured by a GRIMM particle monitor (MODEL 365). Observational data (Summer 2009) is provided from permanent instrumentation at the Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere (CIBA) in Valladolid (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000). A 10m height mast equipped with temperature, wind speed and direction, and moisture sensors at several levels are available. Also two sonic anemometers (20 Hz sampling rate) at 1.5 and 10m were deployed in the mast. The database is complemented by a triangle of microbarometers installed next to the surface, and another three microbarometers placed in a 100m meteorological tower at 20, 50 and 100m respectively, which are ideal to study coherent structures present in the boundary layer. Statistical parameters of meteorological variables have been calculated and studied in order to find out connections with the most relevant physical processes. Moreover different cases studies will be analyzed

  12. Atmospheric boundary layer characteristics and land-atmosphere energy transfer in the Third Pole area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Zhu, Z.; Amatya, P. M.; Chen, X.; Hu, Z.; Zhang, L.; Li, M.; Ma, W.

    2015-05-01

    The Tibetan Plateau and nearby surrounding area (the Third Pole area) dramatically impacts the world's environment and especially controls climatic and environmental changes in China, Asia and even in the Northern Hemisphere. Supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and some international organizations, the Third Pole Environment (TPE) Programme is now under way. First, the background of the establishment of the TPE, the establishment and monitoring plans on long-term for the TPE and six comprehensive observation and study stations are introduced. Then the preliminary observational analysis results on atmosphere-land interaction are presented. The study on the regional distribution of land surface heat fluxes is of paramount importance over the heterogeneous landscape of the Third Pole area. A parameterization methodology based on satellite and in situ data is described and tested for deriving the regional surface heat fluxes (net radiation flux, soil heat flux, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux) over the heterogeneous landscape. As a case study, the methodology was applied to the whole Tibetan Plateau area. Eight images of MODIS data and four images of AVHRR data were used for the comparison among winter, spring, summer and autumn, and the annual variation analyses. The derived results were also validated by using the ``ground truth'' measured in the stations of the TPE. The results show that the derived surface heat fluxes in the four different seasons over the Tibetan Plateau area are in good agreement with the ground measurements. The results from AVHRR were also in agreement with MODIS. It is therefore concluded that the proposed methodology is successful for the retrieval of surface heat fluxes using the MODIS data, AVHRR data and in situ data over the Tibetan Plateau area.

  13. Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Stuart; Hacker, Jorg M.; Cole, Jason N.; Hare, Jeffrey; Long, Charles N.; Reynolds, R. M.

    2007-03-01

    Nauru, a small island in the tropical pacific, generates plumes of clouds that may grow to several hundred km length. This study uses observations to examine the mesoscale disturbance of the marine atmospheric boundary layer by the island that produces these cloud streets. Observations of the surface layer were made from two ships in the vicinity of Nauru and from instruments on the island. The structure of the atmospheric boundary layer over the island was investigated using aircraft flights. Cloud production over Nauru was examined using remote sensing instruments. During the day the island surface layer was warmer than the marine surface layer and wind speed was lower than over the ocean. Surface heating forced the growth of a thermal internal boundary layer, above which a street of cumulus clouds formed. The production of clouds resulted in reduced downwelling shortwave irradiance at the island surface. A plume of warm-dry air was observed over the island which extended 15 – 20 km downwind.

  14. Instability of wind turbine wakes immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Camarri, Simone; Porté-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, François

    2015-06-01

    In this work a technique capable to investigate the near-wake stability properties of a wind turbine immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer is presented. Specifically, a 2D local spatial stability analysis is developed in order to take into account typical flow features of real operating wind turbines, such as the presence of the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbulence heterogeneity of the oncoming wind. This stability analysis can be generally applied on either experimental measurements or numerical data. In this paper it was carried out on wind tunnel experiments, for which a downscaled wind turbine is immersed in a turbulent boundary layer. Through spatial stability analysis, the dominant mode in the near wake, i.e. the most amplified one, is characterized and its frequency matches the hub-vortex instability frequency measured in the wind tunnel. As in the case of [10], where an axisymmetric wake condition was investigated, the hub-vortex instability results in a single-helical mode.

  15. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  16. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  17. Charting the Interstellar Magnetic Field causing the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) Ribbon of Energetic Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Seriacopi, D. B.; Wiktorowicz, S. J.; Andersson, B.-G.; Funsten, H. O.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Slavin, J. D.; Hanson, A. J.; Fu, C.-W.

    2015-12-01

    .8}-27.6+23.5 between {B}{POL} and the bulk LSR velocity the local interstellar material indicates a geometry that is consistent with an expanding superbubble. The efficiency of grain alignment in the local interstellar medium has been assessed using stars where both polarization data and hydrogen column density data are available. Nearby stars appear to have larger polarizations than expected based on reddened sightlines, which is consistent with previous results, but uncertainties are large. Optical polarization and color excess E(B - V) data indicate the presence of nearby interstellar dust in the BICEP2 field. Color excess E(B - V) indicates an optical extinction of AV > 0.6 in the BICEP2 field, while the polarization data indicate that AV > 0.09 mag. The IBEX Ribbon ISMF extends to the boundaries of the BICEP2 region.

  18. Preliminary analysis of the Nocturnal Atmospheric Boundary Layer during the experimental campaign CIBA 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagüe, C.; Maqueda, G.; Ramos, D.; Sastre, M.; Viana, S.; Serrano, E.; Morales, G.; Ayarzagüena, B.; Viñas, C.; Sánchez, E.

    2009-04-01

    An Atmospheric Boundary Layer campaign was developed in Spain along June 2008 at the CIBA (Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere) site which is placed on a fairly homogeneous terrain in the centre of an extensive plateau (41°49' N, 4°56' W). Different instrumentation at several levels was available on a new 10m meteorological mast, including temperature and humidity sensors, wind vanes and cup anemometers, as well as one sonic anemometer. Besides, two quartz-based microbarometers were installed at 50 and 100m on the main permanent 100m tower placed at CIBA. Three additional microbarometers were deployed on the surface on a triangular array of approximately 200 m side, and a tethered balloon was used in order to record vertical profiles of temperature, wind and humidity up to 1000m. Finally, a GRIMM particle monitor (MODEL 365), which can be used to continuously measure each six seconds simultaneously the PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 values, was deployed at 1.5m. This work will show some preliminary results from the campaign CIBA 2008, analysing the main physical processes present in the atmospheric Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL), the different stability periods observed and the corresponding turbulent parameters, as well as the coherent structures detected. The pressure perturbations measured from the surface and tower levels make possible to study the main wave parameters from wavelet transform, and compared the structures detected by the microbarometers with those detected in the wind and particles records.

  19. Amendment to "Analytical Solution for the Convectively-Mixed Atmospheric Boundary Layer": Inclusion of Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouwersloot, H. G.; de Arellano, J. Vilà-Guerau

    2013-09-01

    In Ouwersloot and Vilà-Guerau de Arellano (Boundary-Layer Meteorol. doi: 10.1007/s10546-013-9816-z , 2013, this issue), the analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height and scalar evolutions are derived for the convective boundary layer, based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer slab models without taking subsidence into account. Here, we include and quantify the added effect of subsidence if the subsidence velocity scales linearly with height throughout the atmosphere. This enables analytical analyses for a wider range of observational cases. As a demonstration, the sensitivity of the boundary-layer height and the potential temperature jump to subsidence and the free tropospheric stability is graphically presented. The new relations show the importance of the temporal distribution of the surface buoyancy flux in determining the evolution if there is subsidence.

  20. How can a dusty cold pool change the diurnal evolution of the Saharan Atmospheric Boundary Layer ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocha, Cécile; Flamant, Cyrille; Berckmans, Julie; Fink, Andreas; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Knippertz, Peter; Lafore, Jean-Philippe; Marnas, Fabien; Marsham, John; Parker, Doug; Rosenberg, Philip; Ryder, Claire; Tulet, Pierre; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the Fennec 2011 Special Observing period, a large and dusty density current (known as a haboob) was observed on the 21 June to cover half of the western part of the Sahara. Thanks to the AROME high resolution model used to forecast this event in real time, two research aircraft (the SAFIRE Falcon and the FAAM BAe 146) operated over Mauritania and Mali on that day, and we are able to document its characteristics in detail. Particularly large dust particles were observed in this haboob. These particles are known to absorb and scatter solar and thermal radiation. The comparison of AROME simulations with and without coupling with dust shows that the radiative impact of the dust induced a decrease of sensible heat fluxes by 200W/m²/AOD and an increase of the temperature in the atmospheric boundary layer by 1°C. Surface fluxes are one of the principal parameters controlling the growth of the boundary layer. However, during the day, the simulation coupled with dust shows a deeper boundary layer (reaching ~5km high) than the simulation without dust. Here, we explore the competition between surface heating and elevated heating in the boundary-layer development.

  1. Effects of solar wind speed on the secondary energetic neutral source of the Interstellar Boundary Explorer ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Funsten, H. O.; Heerikhuisen, J.; McComas, D. J.

    2016-02-01

    The Interstellar Boundary EXplorer (IBEX) ribbon is an intense energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission feature encircling the sky, spanning energies ≤0.5-6 keV. The ribbon may be produced by the "secondary ENA" mechanism, where ENAs emitted from a source plasma population inside the heliosphere propagate outside the heliopause, undergo two charge-exchange events, and become secondary ENAs that may be directed back toward Earth and detected by IBEX. In this scenario, the source plasma population is governed by the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with the interstellar medium and is thus sensitive to the global SW properties. Moreover, this scenario predicts that the distance to the source of secondary ENAs depends on the ENA energy and SW speed, which in turn may affect the shape of the ribbon. In this paper, we use a computational model of the heliosphere with simplified SW boundary conditions to analyze the influence of ENA energy and SW speed, independent of time and latitude, on the global spatial and geometric properties of the ribbon. We find a strong dependence of the simulated ribbon energy spectrum and spatial symmetry on SW speed and ENA energy, and only a slight dependence on ribbon geometry. Our results suggest a significant number of primary ENAs from the inner heliosheath may contribute to the pickup ion source population outside the heliopause, depending on the ENA energy and SW speed. The lack of variation in the simulated ribbon center as a function of ENA energy and SW speed, in contrast to the observations, implies that the asymmetry of the SW plays an important role in determining the position of the ribbon. Comparisons to the IBEX data also signify the ribbon's dependence on the properties of the local interstellar medium, particularly the interstellar magnetic field.

  2. Disturbance of the Boundary Layer at Summit Station, Greenland by an Atmospheric River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, William; Shupe, Mathew; Ralph, Marty

    2014-05-01

    On 11 July 2012, a rare melt episode occurred at Summit Station Greenland. As described by Neff et al. 2014 (Submitted JGR), a major factor in this melt event was an Atmospheric River (AR), a narrow corridor of high water-vapor content. This AR transited the western Atlantic and theen moved up the west coast of Greenland and thence over Greenland. Back trajectories also indicated significant warm air advection from mid-North America during a major heat wave. We present here the boundary layer changes during this event using sodar to distinguish well-mixed from stable periods and relate these to changes in synoptic forcing and resulting changes in radiative forcing by low-level, shallow, warm clouds. A second near-melt episode also occurred on 29 July which provides an opportunity to compare and contrast boundary layer responses in the two cases.

  3. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth

    PubMed Central

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response. PMID:27221757

  4. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-05-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response.

  5. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth.

    PubMed

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response. PMID:27221757

  6. The atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions: an observational and numerical study from two different datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Ander Arrillaga, Jon

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the temporal evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) along the transition period from a diurnal typical convection to a nocturnal more frequently stable situation. This period is known as late afternoon or evening transition, depending on the specific definitions employed by different authors [1]. In order to obtain a proper characterization, we try to learn whether or not the behaviour of these transitional boundary layers is strongly dependent on local conditions. To do so, two sets of evening transitions are studied from data collected at two different experimental sites. These locations correspond to research facilities named CIBA (Spain) and CRA (France), which are the places where atmospheric field campaigns have been conducted during the last years, such as CIBA2008 and BLLAST 2011, respectively. In order to get comparable situations, we focus especially on transitions with weak synoptic forcing, and consider daily astronomical sunset as a reference time. A statistical analysis on main parameters related to the transition is carried out for both locations, and the average behaviour is shown as well as extreme values according to the timing. A similar pattern in the qualitative evolution of many variables is found. Nevertheless, several relevant differences in the progress of key variables are obtained too. Moisture, both from the soil and the air, is thought to have great relevance in explaining many of the differences found between the two sites. Some case studies are explored, focusing on the role played by the atmospheric turbulence. Complementary, numerical experiments are also performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, in order to test the role of humidity, by artificially varying it in some of the simulations. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960.

  7. Countergradient heat transfer in the atmospheric boundary layer over a rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatskiy, A. F.

    2008-04-01

    The nonlocality of the mechanism of turbulent heat transfer in the atmospheric boundary layer over a rough surface manifests itself in the form of bounded areas of countergradient heat transfer, which are diagnosed from analysis of balance items in the transport equation for the variance of temperature fluctuations and from calculation of the coefficients of turbulent momentum and heat transfer invoking the model of “gradient diffusion.” It is shown that countergradient heat transfer in local regions is caused by turbulent diffusion or by the term of the divergence of triple correlation in the balance equation for the temperature variance.

  8. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of the diurnal variations in the convective activities associated with day-by-day changes of surface flux and soil moisture was observed in the beginning of the monsoon season on the central Tibetan plateau (Sugimoto et al., 2008) which indicates the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in determining convective activities over the Tibetan plateau. Detailed interaction processes need to be studied by experiments designed to evaluate a set of hypotheses on mechanisms and linkages of these interactions. A possible function of vegetation to increase precipitation in cases of Tibetan High type was suggested by Yamada and Uyeda (2006). Use of satellite derived plateau scale soil moisture (Wen et al., 2003) enables the verification of these hypotheses (e.g. Trier et al. 2004). To evaluate these feedbacks, the mesoscale WRF model will be used because several numerical experiments are being conducted to improve the soil physical parameterization in the Noah land surface scheme in WRF so that the extreme conditions on the Tibetan plateau could be adequately represented (Van der Velde et al., 2009) such that the impacts on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer can be assessed and improved. The Tibetan Observational Research Platform (TORP) operated by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau (Ma et al., 2008) will be fully utilized to study the characteristics of the plateau climate and different aspects of the WRF model will be evaluated using this extensive observation platform (e.g. Su et al., 2012). Recently, advanced studies on energy budget have been done by combining field and satellite measurements over the Tibetan Plateau (e.g. Ma et al., 2005). Such studies, however, were based on a single satellite observation and for a few days over an annual cycle, which are insufficient to reveal the relation between the land surface energy budget and the Asian monsoon over the Tibetan plateau. Time series analysis of satellite observations will provide the

  9. Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height Evolution with Lidar in Buenos Aires from 2008 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelko, Ezequiel Eduardo; Salvador, Jacobo Omar; Ristori, Pablo Roberto; Pallotta, Juan Vicente; Otero, Lidia Ana; Quel, Eduardo Jaime

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer top height evolution is obtained from 2008 to 2011 in Buenos Aires using the multiwavelength lidar located at CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) (34°33' S; 58°30' W; 17 m asl). Algorithms recognition based on covariance wavelet transform are applied to obtain seasonal statistics. This method is being evaluated for use in the Lidar Network in Argentina and it is being deployed in Patagonia region currently. The technique operates in real time in both low and high aerosol loads and with almost no human supervision.

  10. Effects of turbulent dispersion of atmospheric balance motions of planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shikuo; Huang, Wei; Rong, Pingping

    1992-06-01

    New Reynolds’ mean momentum equations including both turbulent viscosity and dispersion are used to analyze atmospheric balance motions of the planetary boundary layer. It is pointed out that turbulent dispersion with γ 0 will increase depth of Ekman layer, reduce wind velocity in Ekman layer and produce a more satisfactory Ekman spiral lines fit the observed wind hodograph. The wind profile in the surface layer including turbulent dispersion is still logarithmic but the von Karman constant k is replaced by k 1 = √ 1 — k/2, the wind increases a little more rapidly with height.

  11. The effect of the Asian Monsoon to the atmospheric boundary layer over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maoshan; Su, Zhongbo; Chen, Xuelong; Zheng, Donghai; Sun, Fanglin; Ma, Yaoming; Hu, Zeyong

    2016-04-01

    Modulation of the diurnal variations in the convective activities associated with day-by-day changes of surface flux and soil moisture was observed in the beginning of the monsoon season on the central Tibetan plateau (Sugimoto et al., 2008) which indicates the importance of land-atmosphere interactions in determining convective activities over the Tibetan plateau. Detailed interaction processes need to be studied by experiments designed to evaluate a set of hypotheses on mechanisms and linkages of these interactions. A possible function of vegetation to increase precipitation in cases of Tibetan High type was suggested by Yamada and Uyeda (2006). Use of satellite derived plateau scale soil moisture (Wen et al., 2003) enables the verification of these hypotheses (e.g. Trier et al. 2004). To evaluate these feedbacks, the mesoscale WRF model will be used because several numerical experiments are being conducted to improve the soil physical parameterization in the Noah land surface scheme in WRF so that the extreme conditions on the Tibetan plateau could be adequately represented (Van der Velde et al., 2009) such that the impacts on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer can be assessed and improved. The Tibetan Observational Research Platform (TORP) operated by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau (Ma et al., 2008) will be fully utilized to study the characteristics of the plateau climate and different aspects of the WRF model will be evaluated using this extensive observation platform (e.g. Su et al., 2012). Recently, advanced studies on energy budget have been done by combining field and satellite measurements over the Tibetan Plateau (e.g. Ma et al., 2005). Such studies, however, were based on a single satellite observation and for a few days over an annual cycle, which are insufficient to reveal the relation between the land surface energy budget and the Asian monsoon over the Tibetan plateau. Time series analysis of satellite observations will provide the

  12. Boundary Layer Flow Control with a One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Surface Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. Reece; Sherman, Daniel M.; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    1998-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel data have been acquired for planar panels covered by a uniform, glow-discharge surface plasma in atmospheric pressure air known as the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP). Streamwise and spanwise arrays of flush, plasma-generating surface electrodes have been studied in laminar, transitional, and fully turbulent boundary layer flow. Plasma between symmetric streamwise electrode strips caused large increases in panel drag, whereas asymmetric spanwise electrode configurations produced a significant thrust. Smoke wire flow visualization and mean velocity diagnostics show the primary cause of the phenomena to be a combination of mass transport and vortical structures induced by strong paraelectric ElectroHydroDynamic (EHD) body forces on the flow.

  13. An equilibrium model for the coupled ocean-atmosphere boundary layer in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K.-M.; Betts, Alan K.

    1991-01-01

    An atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) model is coupled to an ocean mixed-layer (OML) model in order to study the equilibrium state of the coupled system in the tropics, particularly in the Pacific region. The equilibrium state of the coupled system is solved as a function of sea-surface temperature (SST) for a given surface wind and as a function of surface wind for a given SST. It is noted that in both cases, the depth of the CBL and OML increases and the upwelling below the OML decreases, corresponding to either increasing SST or increasing surface wind. The coupled ocean-atmosphere model is solved iteratively as a function of surface wind for a fixed upwelling and a fixed OML depth, and it is observed that SST falls with increasing wind in both cases. Realistic gradients of mixed-layer depth and upwelling are observed in experiments with surface wind and SST prescribed as a function of longitude.

  14. Influence of a high aerosol concentration on the thermal structure of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, M. N.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Kadygrov, E. N.

    2006-12-01

    The influence of increased concentrations of submicron aerosol produced by forest fires on thermal characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in Moscow and its remote vicinity (the town of Zvenigorod) are analyzed on the basis of regular remote measurements of the ABL temperature profile with the use of MTP-5 profilers. In the air basin of a large city, additional aerosol and accompanying pollutants in early morning hours (at small heights of the Sun) most frequently did not cause substantial changes in the ABL thermal structure. In the locality remote from the megalopolis (Zvenigorod), the atmospheric pollution by aerosol led to noticeable changes in the ABL thermal characteristics. Especially strong changes were observed in the daytime, during the maximum supply of solar radiation. In morning hours, the heating rate of the lower 100-m layer of the polluted air exceeded the heating rate of a relatively pure air by more than one degree. In higher layers, the differences between the rates of temperature changes in a relatively clean atmosphere and in an atmosphere polluted by aerosol (in the suburb) were insignificant.

  15. Isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate in a tropical marine boundary layer

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Joel; Morin, Samuel; Erbland, Joseph; Grannec, Francis; Patey, Matthew D.; Vicars, William; Alexander, Becky; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term observations of the reactive chemical composition of the tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) are rare, despite its crucial role for the chemical stability of the atmosphere. Recent observations of reactive bromine species in the tropical MBL showed unexpectedly high levels that could potentially have an impact on the ozone budget. Uncertainties in the ozone budget are amplified by our poor understanding of the fate of NOx (= NO + NO2), particularly the importance of nighttime chemical NOx sinks. Here, we present year-round observations of the multiisotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate in the tropical MBL at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory. We show that the observed oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate are compatible with nitrate formation chemistry, which includes the BrNO3 sink at a level of ca. 20 ± 10% of nitrate formation pathways. The results also suggest that the N2O5 pathway is a negligible NOx sink in this environment. Observations further indicate a possible link between the NO2/NOx ratio and the nitrogen isotopic content of nitrate in this low NOx environment, possibly reflecting the seasonal change in the photochemical equilibrium among NOx species. This study demonstrates the relevance of using the stable isotopes of oxygen and nitrogen of atmospheric nitrate in association with concentration measurements to identify and constrain chemical processes occurring in the MBL. PMID:23431201

  16. The detection of clouds, aerosols and marine atmospheric boundary layer characteristics from simulated GLAS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2001 as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) will provide continuous laser sounding of the earth's atmosphere from space for the first time. From its polar orbit about 600 km above the surface, GLAS will employ a 40 Hz solid state laser operating at 1064 nm to measure topography to an accuracy of 10 cm. Simultaneously, the atmospheric channels (1064 and 532 nm) of GLAS will provide profiles of atmospheric backscatter from 40 km to the ground with 75 meter vertical resolution (Spinhirne and Palm, 1996). These measurements will give scientists an unprecedented global data set on the vertical structure of clouds and aerosols which will greatly aid research efforts aimed at understanding their effects on climate and their role in climate change (Hartman, 1994). To better understand and predict the performance of the GLAS atmospheric channels, a computer model was developed to simulate the type of signal that the instrument would likely produce. The model uses aircraft lidar data and provides realistic simulated GLAS data sets over large areas spanning a wide range of atmospheric conditions. These simulated GLAS datasets are invaluable for designing and testing algorithms for the retrieval of parameters such as cloud and aerosol layer height, optical depth and extinction cross section. This work is currently proceeding and in this paper we will present results of the cloud and aerosol detection algorithm with emphasis on the detection of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) aerosol. In addition, we use a recently developed technique to ascertain the feasability of estimating MABL moisture and temperature structure from spaceborne systems such as GLAS.

  17. In-situ measurements of neutral temperature in the middle atmosphere by using electrons as proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenes, K. R.; Blix, T. A.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Gumbel, J.; Strelnikov, B.

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a new rocket-borne electron probe for measurements of electron temperature in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The technique is based on the assumption that a thermal equilibrium between electrons and neutrals exists in this region. We can then determine the neutral air temperature with a height resolution of a few hundred meters. Here, we present the measurement principle and the method of converting the measured electron temperature to neutral temperature. Since effects of the supersonically moving payload influence on the measurements, this must be accounted for accordingly in the conversion procedure. For this purpose we have performed aerodynamic simulations to characterize the flow around the probe, and we apply this to the temperature conversion. Data from a flight conducted from Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in July 2003 has been used to test the method, and the first results will be presented here.

  18. Flow around new wind fence with multi-scale fractal structure in an atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Sarah; Lee, Sang-Joon; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    Understanding and controlling atmospheric boundary-layer flows with engineered structures, such as porous wind fences or windbreaks, has been of great interest to the fluid mechanics and wind engineering community. Previous studies found that the regular mono-scale grid fence of 50% porosity and a bottom gap of 10% of the fence height are considered to be optimal over a flat surface. Significant differences in turbulent flow structure have recently been noted behind multi-scale fractal wind fences, even with the same porosity. In this study, wind-tunnel tests on the turbulent flow and the turbulence kinetic energy transport of 1D and 2D multi-scale fractal fences under atmospheric boundary-layer were conducted. Velocity fields around the fractal fences were systematically measured using Particle Image Velocimetry to uncover effects of key parameters on turbulent flows around the fences at a Reynolds number of approximately 3.6x104 based on the free-stream speed and fence height. The turbulent flow structures induced by specific 1D/2D multi-scale fractal wind fences were compared to those of a conventional grid fence. The present results would contribute to the design of new-generation wind fences to reduce snow/sand deposition on critical infrastructure such as roads and bridges.

  19. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface.

  20. THE SIMULATION OF FINE SCALE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER MOTIONS WITH A MESO-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, D.; Kurzeja, R.; Parker, M.

    2009-04-02

    A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Clouds and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) site during a period of several nights in September, 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data was collected from a tower and a sodar and analyzed for turbulent behavior. To study the full range of nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) behavior, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate the ARM-CART NBL field experiment and validated against the data collected from the site. This model was run at high resolution, and is ideal for calculating the interactions among the various motions within the boundary layer and their influence on the surface. The model reproduces adequately the synoptic situation and the formation and dissolution cycles of the low-level jet, although it suffers from insufficient cloud production and excessive nocturnal cooling. The authors suggest that observed heat flux data may further improve the realism of the simulations both in the cloud formation and in the jet characteristics. In a higher resolution simulation, the NBL experiences motion on a range of timescales as revealed by a wavelet analysis, and these are affected by the presence of the LLJ. The model can therefore be used to provide information on activity throughout the depth of the NBL.

  1. Sodar observations of the atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean during ASTEX-91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petenko, I. V.; Bedulin, A. N.; Shurygin, Ye. A.

    1996-10-01

    A complex marine experiment was conducted in autumn 1991 on the research vessel Dmitry Mendelev in association with the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX). A three-axis Doppler sodar designed at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Moscow, was used in this experiment. Total observation time was about 770 hours from 6 October to 23 November. Besides facsimile records illustrating spatial and temporal structure of the turbulence distribution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), routine quantitative measurements of profiles of wind and echo-signal strength were taken. Some main characteristics of the ABL behavior over the ocean were revealed through an analysis of these data as well as the results of other kinds of measurements. An important peculiarity of the ABL observed between the Canary Islands and the Azores was the presence of diurnal variation of convective turbulence strength having a maximum between 04:00 and 07:00 LT. A similar diurnal variation was observed for low-level cloud cover. Occurrence of various types of thermal stratification and their diurnal variation were obtained. Comparison of elevated stable layers and low-level cumulus showed that the lower boundary of clouds correlates well with the height of the bottom of elevated inversion layers (at heights of 200 600 m). Canary and Cabo Verde observations showed that islands strongly affect the ABL structure. The strong effect of a surface water temperature gradient on the ABL stability was observed when crossing the Canary, Azores, and Labrador currents and the Gulf Stream.

  2. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  3. Atmospheric Boundary Layer of a pasture site in Amazônia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade de Araújo Tiburtino Neves, Theomar; Fisch, Gilberto; Raasch, Siegfried

    2013-04-01

    A great effort has been made by the community of micrometeorology and planetary boundary layer for a better description of the properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), such as its height, thermodynamics characteristics and its time evolution. This work aims to give a review of the main characteristics of Atmospheric Boundary Layer over a pasture site in Amazonia. The measurements dataset was carried out from 3 different LBA field campaigns: RBLE 3 (during the dry season from 1993), RaCCI (during the dry-to-wet transition season from 2002) and WetAMC (during the wet season from 1999), collected with tethered balloon, radiosondes and eddy correlation method in a pasture site in the southwestern Amazonia. Different techniques and instruments were used to estimate the ABĹs properties. During the daytime, it was possible to observe that there is an abrupt growth of the Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) between 08 and 11 LT, with a stationary pattern between 14 and 17 LT. The maximum heights at late afternoon were around 1600 m during the dry season, whilst the wet season it only reached 1000 m. This is due to the lower surface turbulent sensible heat flux as the soil is wetter and the partition of energy is completely different between wet to the dry season. For the transition period (RaCCI 2002), it was possible to analyze and compare several estimates from different instruments and methods. It showed that the parcel method overestimates the heights of all measurements (mainly at 14 LT) due to the high incidence of solar radiation and superadiabatic gradients. The profile and Richardson number methods gave results very similar to estimate the height of the CBL. The onset of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) occurs before the sunset (18 LT) and its height is reasonable stable during the night (typical values around 180-250 m). An alternative method (Vmax) which used the height of the maximum windspeed derived from a SODAR instrument during RaCCI 2002 was

  4. Evaporation from soils subjected to natural boundary conditions at the land-atmospheric interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K.; Illngasekare, T.; Ngo, V.; Cihan, A.

    2012-04-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance in semiarid and arid regions. However, there is no agreement on the best methodology to determine evaporation under different boundary conditions at the land surface. This becomes critical in developing models that couples land to the atmosphere. Because it is difficult to measure evaporation from soil, with the exception of using lysimeters, numerous formulations have been proposed to establish a relationship between the rate of evaporation and soil moisture and/or soil temperature and thermal properties. Different formulations vary in how they partition available energy. A need exists to systematically compare existing methods to experimental data under highly controlled conditions not achievable in the field. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmospheric interface to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations for the soil surface boundary conditions to develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. In this study, to better understand the coupled water-vapor-heat flow processes in the shallow subsurface near the land surface, we modified a previously developed theory by Smits et al. [2011] that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for dry soil conditions. The model did not implement fitting parameters such as a vapor enhancement factor that is commonly introduced into the vapor diffusion coefficient as an arbitrary multiplication factor. In order to experimentally test the numerical formulations/code, we performed a two-dimensional physical model experiment under varying boundary conditions using test sand for which the hydraulic and thermal properties were well characterized. Precision data under well-controlled transient heat and

  5. Short term variations of 7Be, 10Be concentrations in atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Takeyasu; Sugihara, Sinji; Morinaga, Ichiro; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Hisao

    2010-04-01

    To compare meteorological conditions, short term variations of atmospheric concentrations of 7Be ( T1/2 = 53.3 days) and 10Be ( T1/2 = 1.5 × 10 6 years) were investigated at Tokyo and Fukuoka, Japan, and Pacific Ocean nearby Japan. Atmospheric concentrations of 7Be and 10Be at anticyclone condition were higher than that at cyclone condition to a factor of 2-10. Because of being influenced by re-suspended components from soil ( 10Be/ 7Be > 1000), temporal variability of 10Be/ 7Be was high in daytime and low in nighttime. But when corrected for re-suspended component using Al concentration as an indicator of soil the 10Be/ 7Be ratio was constant. Comparing 7Be and 10Be concentrations with 212Pb concentration as soil-generated component, we make a conclusion that high 7Be and 10Be concentration air mass is brought into boundary layer by high convection at daytime. Those diurnal variations were not observed in marine boundary layer. When cyclone passed through Fukuoka to Tokyo, which is 12 h behind, 7Be and 10Be concentrations also decreased with 12 h lag between Fukuoka and Tokyo. The 10Be/ 7Be ratio was constant during anticyclone to cyclone condition, and between Tokyo and Fukuoka. We conclude that after stratospheric aerosols enter into the upper troposphere they reside there for a certain period and mix uniformly in horizontal strata; later they are transported down to lower troposphere by anticyclone and penetrate into ground level air at daytime by convective strong mixing of boundary layer.

  6. Structure and Optical Properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer over Dusty Hot Deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalermthai, B.; Al Marzooqi, M.; Basha, G.; Ouarda, T.; Armstrong, P.; Molini, A.

    2014-12-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main common features however, desert boundary layers present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as transport and deposition of dust and pollutants, local wind fields, turbulent fluxes and their impacts on the sustainable development, human health and solar energy harvesting in these regions. In this study, we explore the potential of the joint usage of Lidar Ceilometer backscattering profiles and sun-photometer optical depth retrievals to quantitatively determine the vertical aerosol profile over dusty hot desert regions. Toward this goal, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4425N 54.6163E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013, and the concurrent measurements of aerosol optical depth derived independently from the Masdar Institute AERONET sun-photometer. The main features of the desert ABL are obtained from the ceilometer range corrected backscattering profiles through bi-dimensional clustering technique we developed as a modification of the recently proposed single-profile clustering method, and therefore "directly" and "indirectly" calibrated to obtain a full diurnal cycle climatology of the aerosol optical depth and aerosol profiles. The challenges and the advantages of applying a similar methodology to the monitoring of aerosols and dust over hyper-arid regions are also discussed, together with the issues related to the sensitivity of commercial ceilometers to changes in the solar background.

  7. Neutral and ionic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in atmospheric and dry deposition samples over a source region (Tianjin, China).

    PubMed

    Yao, Yiming; Chang, Shuai; Sun, Hongwen; Gan, Zhiwei; Hu, Hongwei; Zhao, Yangyang; Zhang, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were detected in the atmosphere of a source region in Tianjin, China. Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) were the dominant neutral PFASs in the atmosphere with total concentrations of 93.6-131 pg/m(3) and 8:2 FTOH contributing the most, whereas perfluorooctane sulfonamide derivatives (PFOSAs) were two magnitudes lower or undetected. In comparison, ionic PFASs (perfluoroalkyl carboxyl acids (PFCAs)) in the atmosphere were detected at similar or even higher levels. At wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), the air over influent was found with higher levels of FTOHs than over aeration tank and effluent; whereas in the air over the aeration tank, the concentrations of PFOSAs and nonvolatile ionic PFASs substantially increased, suggesting a possible direct release of ionic PFASs to the atmosphere besides the atmospheric conversion from volatile precursors. In the air phase, a low proportion (1-5%) of PFCAs was subjected to dry deposition in the source region. Interestingly, the dry-deposition-to-bulk-air ratios of PFCA analogues were the lowest at medium chain lengths (C8 and C9) and increased with either shorter or longer chain length. The extraordinary affinity of shorter-chain PFCAs (C6-C7) to particles was presumed to be due to their smaller molecular size favoring the interactions between the carboxyl head groups and specific sorption sites on particulate matter. PMID:26952273

  8. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  9. Atmospheric new particle formation as source of CCN in the Eastern Mediterranean marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Stavroulas, I.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Manninen, H. E.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2015-04-01

    While Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) production associated with atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is thought to be frequent throughout the continental boundary layers, few studies on this phenomenon in marine air exist. Here, based on simultaneous measurement of particle number size distributions, CCN properties and aerosol chemical composition, we present the first direct evidence on CCN production resulting from NPF in the Eastern Mediterranean atmosphere. We show that condensation of both gaseous sulfuric acid and organic compounds from multiple sources leads to the rapid growth of nucleated particles to CCN sizes in this environment during the summertime. Sub-100 nm particles were found to be substantially less hygroscopic than larger particles during the period with active NPF and growth (0.2-0.4 lower κ between the 60 and 120 nm particles), probably due to enrichment of organic material in the sub-100 nm size range. The aerosol hygroscopicity tended to be at minimum just before the noon and at maximum in afternoon, which was very likely due to the higher sulfate to organic ratios and higher degree of oxidation of the organic material during the afternoon. Simultaneously to the formation of new particles during daytime, particles formed in the previous day or even earlier were growing into the size range relevant to cloud droplet activation, and the particles formed in the atmosphere were possibly mixed with long-range transported particles.

  10. Atmospheric new particle formation as a source of CCN in the eastern Mediterranean marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Stavroulas, I.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Manninen, H. E.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2015-08-01

    While cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) production associated with atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is thought to be frequent throughout the continental boundary layers, few studies on this phenomenon in marine air exist. Here, based on simultaneous measurement of particle number size distributions, CCN properties and aerosol chemical composition, we present the first direct evidence on CCN production resulting from NPF in the eastern Mediterranean atmosphere. We show that condensation of both gaseous sulfuric acid and organic compounds from multiple sources leads to the rapid growth of nucleated particles to CCN sizes in this environment during the summertime. Sub-100 nm particles were found to be substantially less hygroscopic than larger particles during the period with active NPF and growth (the value of κ was lower by 0.2-0.4 for 60 nm particles compared with 120 nm particles), probably due to enrichment of organic material in the sub-100 nm size range. The aerosol hygroscopicity tended to be at minimum just before the noon and at maximum in the afternoon, which was very likely due to the higher sulfate-to-organic ratios and higher degree of oxidation of the organic material during the afternoon. Simultaneous with the formation of new particles during daytime, particles formed during the previous day or even earlier were growing into the size range relevant to cloud droplet activation, and the particles formed in the atmosphere were possibly mixed with long-range-transported particles.