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Sample records for neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency

  1. Ex Vivo Human Placental Transfer of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Compounds

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    Objective: The transfer of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drugs has been studied in the ex vivo human placental model. There is a paucity of information on the placental transfer of these drugs because of ethical considerations and the expense involved in the use of the non-human primate model. Methods: The standardized ex vivo human placental model was used in these studies and the clearance index in relationship to antipyrine was used to determine the role of transfer of non-nucleosides, nucleosides, and a protease inhibitor. Several of the nucleosides and ritonavir were combined with zidovudine (AZT) to determine the effect of the combinations. Results: All non-nucleosides, nucleosides, and the protease inhibitor were found to cross the human placenta by simple diffusion, although at variable rates. Ritonavir did not diffuse as rapidly as the nucleosides, but some diffusion was noted at peak concentrations. Conclusions: Ex vivo perfusion studies agree with those determined in the non-human primate model and with data from existing clinical trials. PMID:18476157

  2. Neutralization Properties of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses Infecting Chimpanzees and Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Hannah J.; Decker, Julie M.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Galimidi, Rachel P.; West, Anthony P.; Learn, Gerald H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Li, Yingying; Pace, Craig S.; Song, Ruijiang; Huang, Yaoxing; Denny, Thomas N.; Mouquet, Hugo; Martin, Loic; Acharya, Priyamvada; Zhang, Baoshan; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Verrips, C. Theo; Strokappe, Nika M.; Rutten, Lucy; McCoy, Laura E.; Weiss, Robin A.; Brown, Corrine S.; Jackson, Raven; Silvestri, Guido; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Shaw, George M.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ho, David D.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) represent powerful tools to combat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Here, we examined whether HIV-1-specific bNabs are capable of cross-neutralizing distantly related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting central (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) (SIVcpzPtt) and eastern (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) (SIVcpzPts) chimpanzees (n = 11) as well as western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (SIVgor) (n = 1). We found that bNabs directed against the CD4 binding site (n = 10), peptidoglycans at the base of variable loop 3 (V3) (n = 5), and epitopes at the interface of surface (gp120) and membrane-bound (gp41) envelope glycoproteins (n = 5) failed to neutralize SIVcpz and SIVgor strains. In addition, apex V2-directed bNabs (n = 3) as well as llama-derived (heavy chain only) antibodies (n = 6) recognizing both the CD4 binding site and gp41 epitopes were either completely inactive or neutralized only a fraction of SIVcpzPtt strains. In contrast, one antibody targeting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 (10E8), functional CD4 and CCR5 receptor mimetics (eCD4-Ig, eCD4-Igmim2, CD4-218.3-E51, and CD4-218.3-E51-mim2), as well as mono- and bispecific anti-human CD4 (iMab and LM52) and CCR5 (PRO140, PRO140-10E8) receptor antibodies neutralized >90% of SIVcpz and SIVgor strains with low-nanomolar (0.13 to 8.4 nM) potency. Importantly, the latter antibodies blocked virus entry not only in TZM-bl cells but also in Cf2Th cells expressing chimpanzee CD4 and CCR5 and neutralized SIVcpz in chimpanzee CD4+ T cells, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 3.6 to 40.5 nM. These findings provide new insight into the protective capacity of anti-HIV-1 bNabs and identify candidates for further development to combat SIVcpz infection. PMID:25900654

  3. Optimization of Azoles as Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Agents Guided by Free-Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Zeevaart, Jacob G.; Wang, Ligong; Thakur, Vinay V.; Leung, Cheryl S.; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Bailey, Christopher M.; Domaoal, Robert A.; Anderson, Karen S.; Jorgensen, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Efficient optimization of an inactive 2-anilinyl-5-benzyloxadiazole core has been guided by free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations to provide potent non-nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (NNRTIs). An FEP “chlorine scan” was performed to identify the most promising sites for substitution of aryl hydrogens. This yielded NNRTIs 8 and 10 with activities (EC50) of 820 and 310 nM for protection of human T-cells from infection by wild-type HIV-1. FEP calculations for additional substituent modifications and change of the core heterocycle readily led to oxazoles 28 and 29, which were confirmed as highly potent anti-HIV agents with activities in the 10–20 nM range. The designed compounds were also monitored for possession of desirable pharmacological properties by use of additional computational tools. Overall, the trends predicted by the FEP calculations were well borne out by the assay results. FEP-guided lead optimization is confirmed as a valuable tool for molecular design including drug discovery; chlorine scans are particularly attractive since they are both straightforward to perform and highly informative. PMID:18588301

  4. Unique intracellular activation of the potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus agent 1592U89.

    PubMed Central

    Faletto, M B; Miller, W H; Garvey, E P; St Clair, M H; Daluge, S M; Good, S S

    1997-01-01

    The anabolism of 1592U89, (-)-(1S,4R)-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl]-2-cyclo pentene-1-methanol, a selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), was characterized in human T-lymphoblastoid CD4+ CEM cells. 1592U89 was ultimately anabolized to the triphosphate (TP) of the guanine analog (-)-carbovir (CBV), a potent inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. However, less than 2% of intracellular 1592U89 was converted to CBV, an amount insufficient to account for the CBV-TP levels observed. 1592U89 was anabolized to its 5'-monophosphate (MP) by the recently characterized enzyme adenosine phosphotransferase, but neither its diphosphate (DP) nor its TP was detected. The MP, DP, and TP of CBV were found in cells incubated with either 1592U89 or CBV, with CBV-TP being the major phosphorylated species. We confirmed that CBV is phosphorylated by 5'-nucleotidase and that mycophenolic acid increased the formation of CBV-TP from CBV 75-fold. However, mycophenolic acid did not stimulate 1592U89 anabolism to CBV-TP. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) did not inhibit CBV-TP formation from CBV or 1592U89, whereas the adenylate deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin selectively inhibited 1592U89 anabolism to CBV-TP and reversed the antiviral activity of 1592U89. 1592U89-MP was not a substrate for adenylate deaminase but was a substrate for a distinct cytosolic deaminase that was inhibited by 2'-deoxycoformycin-5'-MP. Thus, 1592U89 is phosphorylated by adenosine phosphotransferase to 1592U89-MP, which is converted by a novel cytosolic enzyme to CBV-MP. CBV-MP is then further phosphorylated to CBV-TP by cellular kinases. This unique activation pathway enables 1592U89 to overcome the pharmacokinetic and toxicological deficiencies of CBV while maintaining potent and selective anti-HIV activity. PMID:9145876

  5. Characterization of Human Class-Switched Polymeric (Immunoglobulin M [IgM] and IgA) Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibodies 2F5 and 2G12

    PubMed Central

    Wolbank, Susanne; Kunert, Renate; Stiegler, Gabriela; Katinger, Hermann

    2003-01-01

    We have previously generated human monoclonal anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) antibodies 2F5IgG and 2G12IgG with an exceptional cross-clade neutralizing potential. 2F5IgG and 2G12IgG passively administrated to macaques were able to confer complete protection from both intravenous and mucosal challenge with pathogenic HIV-simian immunodeficiency virus chimeric strains and have shown beneficial effects in a phase-1 clinical trial. We now class-switched 2F5 and 2G12 to the immunoglobulin M (IgM) or IgA isotype, to enforce features like avidity, complement activation, or the potential to neutralize mucosal transmission. For this purpose we expressed functional polymeric 2F5 and 2G12 antibodies in CHO cells and evaluated their anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro. The class switch had a strong impact on the protective potential of 2F5 and 2G12. 2G12IgM inhibited HIV-1 infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures up to 28-fold-more efficiently than the corresponding IgG and neutralized all of the primary isolates tested. The 2F5 and 2G12 antibodies of all isotypes were able to interact with active human serum to inhibit viral infection. Furthermore, we demonstrated that polymeric 2F5 and 2G12 antibodies but not the corresponding IgGs could interfere with HIV-1 entry across a mucosal epithelial layer in vitro. Although polymeric 2F5 antibodies had only limited potential in the standard neutralization assay, the results from the mucosal assay suggest that 2F5 and 2G12 antibodies may have a high potential to prevent natural HIV-1 transmission in vivo. PMID:12634368

  6. In vitro drug combination of 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-E-5-(2-bromovinyl)uracil with anti-human immunodeficiency virus or anticancer nucleosides.

    PubMed Central

    Machida, H; Ashida, N; Ikeda, T; Sakata, S; Baba, M; Shigeta, S

    1992-01-01

    1-beta-D-Arabinofuranosyl-E-5-(2-bromovinyl)uracil (BV-araU) and E-5-(2-bromovinyl)uracil, a metabolite of BV-araU, did not affect either the anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity or the cytotoxicity of azidothymidine in MT-4 and MOLT-4 cells. Similarly, the bromovinyl compounds did not affect the in vitro antitumor activities of arabinosylcytosine, 5-fluorouracil, and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine. The anti-varicella-zoster virus activity of BV-araU was not influenced by azidothymidine, 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine, or arabinosylcytosine, whereas relatively high concentrations of fluorinated antitumor agents enhanced the anti-varicella-zoster virus activity. PMID:1317147

  7. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus synergism by zidovudine (3'-azidothymidine) and didanosine (dideoxyinosine) contrasts with their additive inhibition of normal human marrow progenitor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dornsife, R E; St Clair, M H; Huang, A T; Panella, T J; Koszalka, G W; Burns, C L; Averett, D R

    1991-01-01

    The anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity and hemopoietic toxicity of zidovudine (AZT) and didanosine (dideoxyinosine;ddI), alone and in combination, were assessed in a variety of cell types. AZT was more potent than ddI as an inhibitor of HIV in vitro. Synergistic inhibition of HIV by the combination of these agents was observed in MT4 cells, peripheral blood lymphocytes, and macrophages. Toxicity assessment in vitro by using progenitor (erythroid and granulocyte-macrophage) colony-forming assays with normal human bone marrow showed ddI to be less toxic than AZT. Addition of inhibitory concentrations of ddI to AZT resulted in additive inhibition of progenitor CFUs. These in vitro findings suggest that combinations of ddI and AZT at appropriately modified doses may provide an enhanced degree of selectivity in anti-HIV chemotherapy. PMID:1708977

  8. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody titers in injection drug users compared to sexually infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Bongertz, Vera; Ouverney, Elaine Priscilla; Teixeira, Sylvia L M; Silva-de-Jesus, Carlos; Hacker, Mariana A; Morgado, Mariza G; Bastos, Francisco I

    2003-03-01

    Sera from infected injection drug users (IDU) have shown to have antibodies against synthetic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) envelope peptides more frequently. In this study, reactivity of 48 IDU plasma were compared to 60 plasmas obtained from sexually infected individuals (S). The overall reactivity of plasma from IDU compared to S was higher, and the reactivity titers were much higher for IDU plasma than S. IDU plasma also showed a broader antibody response. The higher reactivity titers were observed mainly for the gp41 immunodominant epitope and V3 peptides corresponding to the consensus sequences of HIV-1 subtypes/variants prevalent in Brazil (B, F, C) indicating the specificity in the higher immune response of IDU. PMID:12764435

  9. Synergistic anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 effect of hydroxamate compounds with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine in infected resting human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Malley, S D; Grange, J M; Hamedi-Sangsari, F; Vila, J R

    1994-01-01

    The cellular models generally used in the in vitro evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus compounds are dividing cells. A model constituted by resting lymphocytes may more accurately reflect a drug's future efficacy in humans, since viral DNA synthesis is known to take place in quiescent cells, creating a reservoir of infected cells awaiting activation to complete their viral replication cycle and to produce infectious virions. We report here the activity of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, and two hydroxamates, D-aspartic acid beta-hydroxamate and hydroxycarbamate (hydroxyurea), alone and in various combinations, in an in vitro model based on resting lymphocytes. In our model, resting peripheral blood lymphocytes were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and treated with drugs for 7 days, at which time drugs were removed and the cells were activated by phytohemagglutinin. We show that under these conditions 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, alone or in combination, neither fully inhibit viral production nor protect lymphocytes from the cytopathic effect of viral replication, at concentrations corresponding to the peak plasma levels observed in a typical treatment schedule in humans. In contrast, we report the synergistic effect of treatment by each hydroxamate with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine of infected resting lymphocytes, resulting in the total suppression of viral production, total protection against the cytopathic effect induced by viral replication, and no effect on the ability of the cells to replicate in this cell culture system. PMID:7972000

  10. Long-lasting enfuvirtide carrier pentasaccharide conjugates with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Huet, Thierry; Kerbarh, Olivier; Schols, Dominique; Clayette, Pascal; Gauchet, Cécile; Dubreucq, Guy; Vincent, Loïc; Bompais, Heidi; Mazinghien, Romain; Querolle, Olivier; Salvador, Arnaud; Lemoine, Jérôme; Lucidi, Bruno; Balzarini, Jan; Petitou, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    Enfuvirtide (also known as Fuzeon, T-20, or DP-178) is an antiretroviral fusion inhibitor which prevents human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from entering host cells. This linear 36-mer synthetic peptide is indicated, in combination with other antiretroviral agents, for the treatment of HIV-1-infected individuals and AIDS patients with multidrug-resistant HIV infections. Although enfuvirtide is an efficient anti-HIV-1 drug, its clinical use is limited by a short plasma half-life, i.e., approximately 2 h, which requires twice-daily subcutaneous injections, often resulting in skin sensitivity reaction side effects at the injection sites. Ultimately, 80% of patients stop enfuvirtide treatment within 6 months because of these side effects. We report on the development of long-lasting enfuvirtide conjugates by the use of the site-specific conjugation of enfuvirtide to an antithrombin-binding carrier pentasaccharide (CP) through polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers of various lengths. These conjugates showed consistent and broad anti-HIV-1 activity in the nanomolar range. The coupling of the CP to enfuvirtide only moderately affected the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity in the presence of antithrombin. Most importantly, one of these conjugates, enfuvirtide-PEG(12)-CP (EP40111), exhibited a prolonged elimination half-life of more than 10 h in rat plasma compared to the half-life of native enfuvirtide, which was 2.8 h. On the basis of the pharmacokinetic properties of antithrombin-binding pentasaccharides, the anticipated half-life of EP40111 in humans would putatively be about 120 h, which would allow subcutaneous injection once a week instead of twice daily. In conclusion, EP40111 is a promising compound with strong potency as a novel long-lasting anti-HIV-1 drug. PMID:19805567

  11. Antibody Specificities Associated with Neutralization Breadth in Plasma from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype C-Infected Blood Donors? †

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Elin S.; Taylor, Natasha; Wycuff, Diane; Moore, Penny L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Puren, Adrian; DeCamp, Allan; Gilbert, Peter B.; Wood, Blake; Montefiori, David C.; Binley, James M.; Shaw, George M.; Haynes, Barton F.; Mascola, John R.; Morris, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Defining the specificities of the anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope antibodies able to mediate broad heterologous neutralization will assist in identifying targets for an HIV-1 vaccine. We screened 70 plasmas from chronically HIV-1-infected individuals for neutralization breadth. Of these, 16 (23%) were found to neutralize 80% or more of the viruses tested. Anti-CD4 binding site (CD4bs) antibodies were found in almost all plasmas independent of their neutralization breadth, but they mainly mediated neutralization of the laboratory strain HxB2 with little effect on the primary virus, Du151. Adsorption with Du151 monomeric gp120 reduced neutralizing activity to some extent in most plasma samples when tested against the matched virus, although these antibodies did not always confer cross-neutralization. For one plasma, this activity was mapped to a site overlapping the CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope and CD4bs. Anti-membrane-proximal external region (MPER) (r = 0.69; P < 0.001) and anti-CD4i (r = 0.49; P < 0.001) antibody titers were found to be correlated with the neutralization breadth. These anti-MPER antibodies were not 4E10- or 2F5-like but spanned the 4E10 epitope. Furthermore, we found that anti-cardiolipin antibodies were correlated with the neutralization breadth (r = 0.67; P < 0.001) and anti-MPER antibodies (r = 0.6; P < 0.001). Our study suggests that more than one epitope on the envelope glycoprotein is involved in the cross-reactive neutralization elicited during natural HIV-1 infection, many of which are yet to be determined, and that polyreactive antibodies are possibly involved in this phenomenon. PMID:19553335

  12. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  13. A molecularly cloned, pathogenic, neutralization-resistant simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVsmE543-3.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, V; Adger-Johnson, D; Campbell, B; Goldstein, S; Brown, C; Elkins, W R; Montefiori, D C

    1997-01-01

    An infectious molecular clone of simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsm was derived from a biological isolate obtained late in disease from an immunodeficient rhesus macaque (E543) with SIV-induced encephalitis. The molecularly cloned virus, SIVsmE543-3, replicated well in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages and resisted neutralization by heterologous sera which broadly neutralized genetically diverse SIV variants in vitro. SIVsmE543-3 was infectious and induced AIDS when inoculated intravenously into pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Two of four infected macaques developed no measurable SIV-specific antibody and succumbed to a wasting syndrome and SIV-induced meningoencephalitis by 14 and 33 weeks postinfection. The other two macaques developed antibodies reactive in Western blot and virus neutralization assays. One macaque was sacrificed at 1 year postinoculation, and the survivor has evidence of immunodeficiency, characterized by persistently low CD4 lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood. Plasma samples from these latter animals neutralized SIVsmE543-3 but with much lower efficiency than neutralization of other related SIV strains, confirming the difficulty by which this molecularly cloned virus is neutralized in vitro. SIVsmE543-3 will provide a valuable reagent for studying SIV-induced encephalitis, mapping determinants of neutralization, and determining the in vivo significance of resistance to neutralization in vitro. PMID:8995688

  14. Molecular basis of in vitro affinity maturation and functional evolution of a neutralizing anti-human GM-CSF antibody.

    PubMed

    Eylenstein, Roy; Weinfurtner, Daniel; Härtle, Stefan; Strohner, Ralf; Böttcher, Jark; Augustin, Martin; Ostendorp, Ralf; Steidl, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    X-ray structure analysis of 4 antibody Fab fragments, each in complex with human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), was performed to investigate the changes at the protein-protein binding interface during the course of in vitro affinity maturation by phage display selection. The parental antibody MOR03929 was compared to its derivatives MOR04252 (CDR-H2 optimized), MOR04302 (CDR-L3 optimized) and MOR04357 (CDR-H2 and CDR-L3 optimized). All antibodies bind to a conformational epitope that can be divided into 3 sub-epitopes. Specifically, MOR04357 binds to a region close to the GM-CSF N-terminus (residues 11-24), a short second sub-epitope (residues 83-89) and a third at the C-terminus (residues 112-123). Modifications introduced during affinity maturation in CDR-H2 and CDR-L3 led to the establishment of additional hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts, respectively, providing a rationale for the observed improvement in binding affinity and neutralization potency. Once GM-CSF is complexed to the antibodies, modeling predicts a sterical clash with GM-CSF binding to GM-CSF receptor ? and ? chain. This predicted mutually exclusive binding was confirmed by a GM-CSF receptor ? chain ligand binding inhibition assay. Finally, high throughput sequencing of clones obtained after affinity maturation phage display pannings revealed highly selected consensus sequences for CDR-H2 as well for CDR-L3, which are in accordance with the sequence of the highest affinity antibody MOR04357. The resolved crystal structures highlight the criticality of these strongly selected residues for high affinity interaction with GM-CSF. PMID:26406987

  15. A broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Purtscher, M; Trkola, A; Gruber, G; Buchacher, A; Predl, R; Steindl, F; Tauer, C; Berger, R; Barrett, N; Jungbauer, A

    1994-12-01

    We have established a hybridoma clone, designated 2F5, secreting a neutralizing human monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The epitope of MAb 2F5 was mapped to amino acid sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala on the ectodomain of gp41. In this study different in vitro test systems were used to characterize the neutralizing properties of MAb 2F5. In syncytium inhibition assays, fusion inhibition experiments, and neutralization assays on different HIV-susceptible cells (H9, U937, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells) MAb 2F5 showed broad-spectrum neutralizing capacity against HIV-1 laboratory isolates IIIB, MN, RF, and SF2. In addition, primary isolates from AIDS patients were also neutralized. PMID:7888224

  16. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a Potent, Orally Bioavailable, and Selective Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 with Broad-Spectrum Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2005-01-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades and diverse geographic origin (geometric mean 90% inhibitory concentration of 2.0 nM). Maraviroc was active against 200 clinically derived HIV-1 envelope-recombinant pseudoviruses, 100 of which were derived from viruses resistant to existing drug classes. There was little difference in the sensitivity of the 200 viruses to maraviroc, as illustrated by the biological cutoff in this assay (= geometric mean plus two standard deviations [SD] of 1.7-fold). The mechanism of action of maraviroc was established using cell-based assays, where it blocked binding of viral envelope, gp120, to CCR5 to prevent the membrane fusion events necessary for viral entry. Maraviroc did not affect CCR5 cell surface levels or associated intracellular signaling, confirming it as a functional antagonist of CCR5. Maraviroc has no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity and is highly selective for CCR5, as confirmed against a wide range of receptors and enzymes, including the hERG ion channel (50% inhibitory concentration, >10 ?M), indicating potential for an excellent clinical safety profile. Studies in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models predicted maraviroc to have human pharmacokinetics consistent with once- or twice-daily dosing following oral administration. Clinical trials are ongoing to further investigate the potential of using maraviroc for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:16251317

  17. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a potent, orally bioavailable, and selective small-molecule inhibitor of chemokine receptor CCR5 with broad-spectrum anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2005-11-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades and diverse geographic origin (geometric mean 90% inhibitory concentration of 2.0 nM). Maraviroc was active against 200 clinically derived HIV-1 envelope-recombinant pseudoviruses, 100 of which were derived from viruses resistant to existing drug classes. There was little difference in the sensitivity of the 200 viruses to maraviroc, as illustrated by the biological cutoff in this assay (= geometric mean plus two standard deviations [SD] of 1.7-fold). The mechanism of action of maraviroc was established using cell-based assays, where it blocked binding of viral envelope, gp120, to CCR5 to prevent the membrane fusion events necessary for viral entry. Maraviroc did not affect CCR5 cell surface levels or associated intracellular signaling, confirming it as a functional antagonist of CCR5. Maraviroc has no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity and is highly selective for CCR5, as confirmed against a wide range of receptors and enzymes, including the hERG ion channel (50% inhibitory concentration, >10 microM), indicating potential for an excellent clinical safety profile. Studies in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models predicted maraviroc to have human pharmacokinetics consistent with once- or twice-daily dosing following oral administration. Clinical trials are ongoing to further investigate the potential of using maraviroc for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS. PMID:16251317

  18. Role of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Structure in the Induction of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Benjelloun, F.; Lawrence, P.; Verrier, B.; Genin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Very soon after the discovery of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) toward human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, it became apparent that characterization of these NAbs would be an important step in finding a cure for or a vaccine to eradicate HIV-1. Since the initial description of broadly cross-clade NAbs naturally produced in HIV-1 patients, numerous studies have described new viral targets for these antibodies. More recently, studies concerning new groups of patients able to control their viremia, such as long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) or elite controllers, have described the generation of numerous envelope-targeted NAbs. Recent studies have marked a new stage in research on NAbs with the description of antibodies obtained from a worldwide screening of HIV-positive patients. These studies have permitted the discovery of NAb families with great potential for both neutralization and neutralization breadth, such as PG, PGT, CH, and highly active agonistic anti-CD4 binding site antibodies (HAADs), of which VRC01 and its variants are members. These antibodies are able to neutralize more than 80% of circulating strains without any autoreactivity and can be rapidly integrated into clinical trials in order to test their protective potential. In this review, we will focus on new insights into HIV-1 envelope structure and their implications for the generation of potent NAbs. PMID:23015715

  19. Quantitation of HLA Proteins Incorporated by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Assessment of Neutralizing Activity of Anti-HLA Antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Lakhashe, Samir K.; Thakar, Madhuri R.; Bharucha, K. E.; Paranjape, Ramesh S.

    2008-01-01

    Human anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies were assessed for neutralizing activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) carrying HLA alleles with matching specificity. Multiparous women carrying anti-HLA antibodies were identified. Plasma samples from those women were confirmed as having antibodies that specifically bound to HLA proteins expressed on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of their husbands. A primary HIV-1 isolate was cultured in the husband's PBMCs so that the virus carried matching HLA alleles. To determine the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of anti-HLA antibodies, the infectivity of the virus for GHOST cells (which express green fluorescent protein after HIV infection) was investigated in the presence of a plasma sample positive for the respective anti-HLA antibody. A neutralization assay was also performed using purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) from two plasma samples, and two plasma samples were investigated in the presence of complement. The prerequisite for anti-HLA antibody-mediated neutralization is incorporation of HLA proteins by HIV-1. Therefore, the extent of incorporation of HLA proteins by the primary HIV-1 isolate was estimated. The ratios of HLA class I protein to HIV-1 capsid (p24) protein cultured in the PBMCs of two healthy individuals were 0.017 and 0.054. These ratios suggested that the HIV-1 strain used in the assay incorporated more HLA proteins than gp160 trimers. Anti-HLA antibody-positive plasma was found to contain antibodies that specifically reacted to HIV-1 carrying cognate HLA alleles. However, incubation of HIV-1 with anti-HLA antibody- positive plasma or purified IgG did not show a reduction in viral infectivity. HIV-1-neutralizing activity was also not detected in the presence of complement. This study shows that HIV-1 primary isolates cultured in PBMCs contain significant amounts of HLA proteins. However, the binding of antibodies to those HLA proteins does not mediate a reduction in viral infectivity. PMID:17942547

  20. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 2 gp120.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, S; Matsumi, S; Yoshimura, K; Morikita, T; Murakami, T; Takatsuki, K

    1995-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were obtained by immunizing mice with synthetic peptides corresponding to the third variable (V3) or the third conserved (C3) domain of the external envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2ROD). One MAb, designated B2C, which was raised against V3 peptide NKI26, bound to the surface of HIV-2-infected cells but not to their uninfected counterparts. B2C was capable of neutralizing cell-free and cell-associated virus infection in an isolate-specific fashion. The antibody-binding epitope was mapped to a 6-amino-acid peptide in the V3 variable domain which had the core sequence His-Tyr-Gln. Two MAbs, 2H1B and 2F19C, which were raised against the C3 peptide TND27 reacted with gp120 of HIV-2ROD in a Western immunoblot assay. The C3 epitopes recognized by these two MAbs appeared inaccessible because of their poor reactivity in a surface immunofluorescence assay. Although partial inhibition of syncytium formation was observed in the presence of the anti-C3 MAbs, their neutralizing activity appeared weak. Finally, the effects of these MAbs against CD4-gp120 binding were assessed. Partial inhibition of CD4-gp120 binding was observed in the presence of high concentrations of B2C. On the other hand, no inhibition of CD4-gp120 binding was observed in the presence of anti-C3 MAbs. Since complete neutralization could be achieved at a concentration corresponding to that of partial binding inhibition by B2C, some different mechanisms may be involved in the B2C-mediated neutralization. These results, taken together, indicated that analogous to the function of the V3 region of HIV-1, the V3 region of HIV-2ROD contained at least a type-specific fusion-inhibiting neutralizing epitope. In this respect, the V3 sequence of HIV-2 may be a useful target in an animal model for HIV vaccine development. PMID:7538171

  1. An investigation of the breadth of neutralizing antibody response in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    B?czkowski, Pawe? M; Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Litster, Annette; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-03-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are believed to comprise an essential component of the protective immune response induced by vaccines against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. However, relatively little is known about the role of NAbs in controlling FIV infection and subsequent disease progression. Here, we present studies where we examined the neutralization of HIV-luciferase pseudotypes bearing homologous and heterologous FIV envelope proteins (n = 278) by sequential plasma samples collected at 6 month intervals from naturally infected cats (n = 38) over a period of 18 months. We evaluated the breadth of the NAb response against non-recombinant homologous and heterologous clade A and clade B viral variants, as well as recombinants, and assessed the results, testing for evidence of an association between the potency of the NAb response and the duration of infection, CD4(+) T lymphocyte numbers, health status and survival times of the infected cats. Neutralization profiles varied significantly between FIV-infected cats and strong autologous neutralization, assessed using luciferase-based in vitro assays, did not correlate with the clinical outcome. No association was observed between strong NAb responses and either improved health status or increased survival time of infected animals, implying that other protective mechanisms were likely to be involved. Similarly, no correlation was observed between the development of autologous NAbs and the duration of infection. Furthermore, cross-neutralizing antibodies were evident in only a small proportion (13 %) of cats. PMID:25395594

  2. Adenovirus-Vectored Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Directed Against gp120 Prevent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Acquisition in Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Jackson, Andrew; Beloor, Jagadish; Kumar, Priti; Sutton, Richard E

    2015-09-01

    Despite nearly three decades of research, a safe and effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has yet to be achieved. More recently, the discovery of highly potent anti-gp160 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) has garnered renewed interest in using antibody-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. Here, we encoded bNAbs in first-generation adenoviral (ADV) vectors, which have the distinctive features of a large coding capacity and ease of propagation. A single intramuscular injection of ADV-vectorized bNAbs in humanized mice generated high serum levels of bNAbs that provided protection against multiple repeated challenges with a high dose of HIV-1, prevented depletion of peripheral CD4(+) T cells, and reduced plasma viral loads to below detection limits. Our results suggest that ADV vectors may be a viable option for the prophylactic and perhaps therapeutic use of bNAbs in humans. PMID:25953321

  3. Use of Seroconversion Panels To Estimate Delay in Detection of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibodies by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay of Pooled Compared to Singleton Serum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Novack, Lena; Galai, Noya; Yaari, Arieh; Orgel, Mordechai; Shinar, Eilat; Sarov, Batia

    2006-01-01

    The transfusion of unsafe blood worldwide accounts for 5 to 15% of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, most of which occur in sub-Saharan Africa. While developed countries now apply PCR testing of pooled samples, some developing countries still do not have universal screening policies. More efficient low-cost procedures for the screening of pooled samples have the potential to encourage mass screening efforts in resource-poor settings. The aim of this study was to estimate the delay in the detection of HIV antibodies in pooled serum samples compared to that in singleton serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and to evaluate the risk of transfusion-transmitted HIV infection during the window period. Serial blood samples obtained from five HIV seroconversion panels were mixed with HIV-seronegative blood samples to create pools of 6, 12, 16, 24, 32, and 48 samples. The delay in detection of the first anti-HIV antibody-positive sample in tests with pooled samples was calculated for each pool size and compared to that obtained by testing of singleton samples and statistically evaluated by a robust log-linear regression analysis. The risk of a false-negative (FN) result caused by dilution was estimated by use of the incidence risk/window period model. The additional risk of transmission related to ELISA screening of pooled samples for HIV did not exceed 9% of the current risk of an FN result (estimated to be 1/1,067,000). The countries with virus prevalence rates in donors of less than 15% are expected to save up to 30% in the number of tests. ELISA screening of pooled samples could be considered in settings where the testing of blood supplies for HIV is not routinely done. PMID:16891511

  4. Neutralizing IgG at the Portal of Infection Mediates Protection against Vaginal Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Katja; Veazey, Ronald S.; Warrier, Ranjit; Hraber, Peter; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A.; Buffa, Viviana; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies may have critical importance in immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, the amount of protective antibody needed at mucosal surfaces has not been fully established. Here, we evaluated systemic and mucosal pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of 2F5 IgG and 2F5 Fab fragments with respect to protection against vaginal challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus-BaL in macaques. Antibody assessment demonstrated that 2F5 IgG was more potent than polymeric forms (IgM and IgA) across a range of cellular and tissue models. Vaginal challenge studies demonstrated a dose-dependent protection for 2F5 IgG and no protection with 2F5 Fab despite higher vaginal Fab levels at the time of challenge. Animals receiving 50 or 25 mg/kg of body weight 2F5 IgG were completely protected, while 3/5 animals receiving 5 mg/kg were protected. In the control animals, infection was established by a minimum of 1 to 4 transmitted/founder (T/F) variants, similar to natural human infection by this mucosal route; in the two infected animals that had received 5 mg 2F5 IgG, infection was established by a single T/F variant. Serum levels of 2F5 IgG were more predictive of sterilizing protection than measured vaginal levels. Fc-mediated antiviral activity did not appear to influence infection of primary target cells in cervical explants. However, PK studies highlighted the importance of the Fc portion in tissue biodistribution. Data presented in this study may be important in modeling serum levels of neutralizing antibodies that need to be achieved by either vaccination or passive infusion to prevent mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection in humans. PMID:23966410

  5. Neutralizing IgG at the portal of infection mediates protection against vaginal simian/human immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katja; Veazey, Ronald S; Warrier, Ranjit; Hraber, Peter; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Buffa, Viviana; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Shaw, George M; Shattock, Robin J

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies may have critical importance in immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, the amount of protective antibody needed at mucosal surfaces has not been fully established. Here, we evaluated systemic and mucosal pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of 2F5 IgG and 2F5 Fab fragments with respect to protection against vaginal challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus-BaL in macaques. Antibody assessment demonstrated that 2F5 IgG was more potent than polymeric forms (IgM and IgA) across a range of cellular and tissue models. Vaginal challenge studies demonstrated a dose-dependent protection for 2F5 IgG and no protection with 2F5 Fab despite higher vaginal Fab levels at the time of challenge. Animals receiving 50 or 25 mg/kg of body weight 2F5 IgG were completely protected, while 3/5 animals receiving 5 mg/kg were protected. In the control animals, infection was established by a minimum of 1 to 4 transmitted/founder (T/F) variants, similar to natural human infection by this mucosal route; in the two infected animals that had received 5 mg 2F5 IgG, infection was established by a single T/F variant. Serum levels of 2F5 IgG were more predictive of sterilizing protection than measured vaginal levels. Fc-mediated antiviral activity did not appear to influence infection of primary target cells in cervical explants. However, PK studies highlighted the importance of the Fc portion in tissue biodistribution. Data presented in this study may be important in modeling serum levels of neutralizing antibodies that need to be achieved by either vaccination or passive infusion to prevent mucosal acquisition of HIV-1 infection in humans. PMID:23966410

  6. Plaque-reduction assays for human and simian immunodeficiency virus neutralization.

    PubMed

    Nordqvist, Anna; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2005-01-01

    Research on HIV vaccines, as well as studies on HIV pathogenesis in human and SIV in the macaque model, require the availability of simple and standardized assays for quantification of neutralizing antibodies to primary virus isolates. We have recently developed and standardized assays using human cell lines engineered to express CD4 and co-receptors for HIV and SIV entry. One cell line originated from a glioma (U87) and the other from an osteosarcoma (HOS). Both cell lines and their derivatives form monolayer cultures, a prerequisite for counting plaques. HIV-infected U87.CD4-CCR5 or -CXCR4 cells form syncytia, that is, plaques that can be stained with hematoxylin and enumerated by light microscopy. In addition to CD4 and co-receptors (most often used CCR5 and CXCR6 by SIV), GHOST(3) cells have been engineered to express the green fluorescent protein following virus infection. Infected cells show green fluorescence and can be enumerated by fluorescence microscopy. Neutralization is determined by the ability of a serum to reduce the number of plaque-forming units (PFU) relative to controls exposed to medium or negative serum. Both assays are run in microtiter format and neutralization is evaluated after 3 d. Intra-assay variation has been used for estimation of the cutoff for neutralization. Testing 15 serum-virus combinations in the U87.CD4 assay and four serum-virus combinations in the GHOST(3) assay revealed that standard deviation of differences ranged from 9.1% to 9.9% in the two assays. This allowed the use of a cutoff >3 SD; that is, 30% neutralization. Virus titration experiments showed that neutralization results were dependent on virus dose and therefore the neutralization assays should be performed with a virus dose of 10-100 PFU/well. The assays have high specificity and reproducibility, and are simple and sensitive high-throughput assays. PMID:16061983

  7. Human erythrocytes bearing electroinserted CD4 neutralize infection in vitro by primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Tosi, P F; Schwartz, D; Sharma, U; Mouneimne, Y; Hannig, J; Li, G; McKinley, G; Grieco, M; Flexner, C W; Lazarte, J; Norse, D; Nicolau, C; Volsky, D J

    1996-06-01

    Human erythrocytes bearing electroinserted full-length CD4 (RBC-CD4) can bind and fuse with a laboratory strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) or with T cells infected by HIV-1. Here we show that RBC-CD4 neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in an assay of cocultivation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infected persons with uninfected PBMC. RBC-CD4 inhibited viral p24 core antigen accumulation in these cocultures up to 10,000-fold compared with RBC alone. Viral p24 accumulation was inhibited equally well when measured in culture supernatants or in call extracts. The inhibition was dose-dependent and long-lived. Two types of recombinant CD4 tested in parallel were largely ineffective. The neutralization of primary HIV-1 by RBC-CD4 in vitro was demonstrated in PBMC cultures from 21 of a total of 23 patients tested at two independent sites. RBC-CD4 may offer a route to blocking HIV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:8639857

  8. Differential regulation of cellular tropism and sensitivity to soluble CD4 neutralization by the envelope gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Stamatatos, L; Werner, A; Cheng-Mayer, C

    1994-01-01

    Using recombinant and mutant viruses generated between two human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates that display differences in cell tropism and sensitivity to soluble CD4 neutralization, we show that these two properties of the virus are regulated by different mechanisms. Whereas there is an association between V3 loop conformation and a particular cellular tropism, soluble CD4 neutralization sensitivity appears to be determined by amino acid differences in the C2 domain of the envelope gp120 that modulate the stability of gp120-gp41 association. Our findings further illustrate the importance of functional interactions among different regions of the envelope gp120 in regulating the biological phenotypes of human immunodeficiency virus and suggest that additional probing of the V3 loop with monoclonal antibodies may identify specific structural features of this loop that determine cell tropism. Images PMID:8035496

  9. Autologous neutralizing antibodies to the transmitted/founder viruses emerge late after simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac251 infection of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wendy W; Rahman, Ishita; Hraber, Peter; Coffey, Rory T; Nevidomskyte, Daiva; Giri, Ayush; Asmal, Mohammed; Miljkovic, Svetlana; Daniels, Marcus; Whitney, James B; Keele, Brandon F; Hahn, Beatrice H; Korber, Bette T; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Letvin, Norman L

    2010-06-01

    While the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkey is an important animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of humans, much remains to be learned about the evolution of the humoral immune response in this model. In HIV-1 infection, autologous neutralizing antibodies emerge 2 to 3 months after infection. However, the ontogeny of the SIV-specific neutralizing antibody response in mucosally infected animals has not been defined. We characterized the kinetics of the autologous neutralizing antibody response to the transmitted/founder SIVmac251 using a pseudovirion-based TZM-bl cell assay and monitored env sequence evolution using single-genome amplification in four rhesus animals that were infected via intrarectal inoculations. We show that the SIVmac251 founder viruses induced neutralizing antibodies at 5 to 8 months after infection. Despite their slow emergence and low titers, these neutralizing antibodies selected for escape mutants that harbored substitutions and deletions in variable region 1 (V1), V2, and V4 of Env. The neutralizing antibody response was initially focused on V4 at 5 to 8 months after infection and then targeted V1/V2 and V4 by 16 months. These findings reveal a striking delay in the development of neutralizing antibodies in SIVmac-infected animals, thus raising questions concerning the suitability of SIVmac251 as a challenge strain to screen AIDS vaccines that elicit neutralizing antibodies as a means to prevent virus acquisition. They also illustrate the capacity of the SIVmac quasispecies to modify antigenic determinants in response to very modest titers of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20357097

  10. Resistance to neutralization by broadly reactive antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 glycoprotein conferred by a gp41 amino acid change.

    PubMed Central

    Thali, M; Charles, M; Furman, C; Cavacini, L; Posner, M; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1994-01-01

    A neutralization-resistant variant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that emerged during in vitro propagation of the virus in the presence of neutralizing serum from an infected individual has been described. A threonine-for-alanine substitution at position 582 in the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of the variant virus was responsible for the neutralization-resistant phenotype (M.S. Reitz, Jr., C. Wilson, C. Naugle, R. C. Gallo, and M. Robert-Guroff, Cell 54:57-63, 1988). The mutant virus also exhibited reduced sensitivity to neutralization by 30% of HIV-1-positive sera that neutralized the parental virus, suggesting that a significant fraction of the neutralizing activity within these sera can be affected by the amino acid change in gp41 (C. Wilson, M. S. Reitz, Jr., K. Aldrich, P. J. Klasse, J. Blomberg, R. C. Gallo, and M. Robert-Guroff, J. Virol. 64:3240-3248, 1990). It is shown here that the change of alanine 582 to threonine specifically confers resistance to neutralizing by antibodies directed against both groups of discontinuous, conserved epitopes related to the CD4 binding site on the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Only minor differences in binding of these antibodies to wild-type and mutant envelope glycoproteins were observed. Thus, the antigenic structure of gp120 can be subtly affected by an amino acid change in gp41, with important consequences for sensitivity to neutralization. Images PMID:7507184

  11. Comparative studies on mucosal and intravenous transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVsm): the kinetics of evolution to neutralization resistance are related to progression rate of disease.

    PubMed

    Laurén, Anna; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2006-03-01

    The kinetics of appearance of autologous neutralizing antibodies were studied in cynomolgus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVsm) by the intravenous (IV) route (six monkeys) or the intrarectal (IR) route (ten monkeys). The SIVsm inoculum virus and reisolates obtained at 2 weeks, 3 or 4 months and later than 1 year were tested in a GHOST(3) cell line-based plaque-reduction assay with autologous sera collected at the same sampling times. All monkeys developed a neutralizing-antibody response to the inoculum virus, those infected by the IV route earlier than monkeys infected by the IR route. Animals were divided into progressor (P), slow-progressor (SP) and long-term non-progressor (LTNP) monkeys, based on progression rate. In P monkeys, neutralization escape could be demonstrated by 3 months post-infection. Neutralization-resistant variants also emerged in SP and LTNP monkeys, but were much delayed compared with P monkeys. Evolution of neutralization resistance was also demonstrated by a positive-control serum in the heterologous reaction. Pooled sera from four LTNP monkeys showed a broad neutralizing capacity, including neutralization of escape variants. These results from a large group of infected monkeys showed that SIV evolves to neutralization resistance in the infected host and that the kinetics of this evolution are related to the route of transmission and the progression rate of SIV disease. The results suggest an important role for neutralizing antibodies in controlling viraemia. Although this control is transient in the infected host, neutralization resistance is relative and variant viruses may be neutralized by a broadly cross-neutralizing serum pool. PMID:16476980

  12. Sequential immunization with V3 peptides from primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 produces cross-neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates with a matching narrow-neutralization sequence motif.

    PubMed

    Eda, Yasuyuki; Takizawa, Mari; Murakami, Toshio; Maeda, Hiroaki; Kimachi, Kazuhiko; Yonemura, Hiroshi; Koyanagi, Satoshi; Shiosaki, Kouichi; Higuchi, Hirofumi; Makizumi, Keiichi; Nakashima, Toshihiro; Osatomi, Kiyoshi; Tokiyoshi, Sachio; Matsushita, Shuzo; Yamamoto, Naoki; Honda, Mitsuo

    2006-06-01

    An antibody response capable of neutralizing not only homologous but also heterologous forms of the CXCR4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) MNp and CCR5-tropic primary isolate HIV-1 JR-CSF was achieved through sequential immunization with a combination of synthetic peptides representing HIV-1 Env V3 sequences from field and laboratory HIV-1 clade B isolates. In contrast, repeated immunization with a single V3 peptide generated antibodies that neutralized only type-specific laboratory-adapted homologous viruses. To determine whether the cross-neutralization response could be attributed to a cross-reactive antibody in the immunized animals, we isolated a monoclonal antibody, C25, which neutralized the heterologous primary viruses of HIV-1 clade B. Furthermore, we generated a humanized monoclonal antibody, KD-247, by transferring the genes of the complementary determining region of C25 into genes of the human V region of the antibody. KD-247 bound with high affinity to the "PGR" motif within the HIV-1 Env V3 tip region, and, among the established reference antibodies, it most effectively neutralized primary HIV-1 field isolates possessing the matching neutralization sequence motif, suggesting its promise for clinical applications involving passive immunizations. These results demonstrate that sequential immunization with B-cell epitope peptides may contribute to a humoral immune-based HIV vaccine strategy. Indeed, they help lay the groundwork for the development of HIV-1 vaccine strategies that use sequential immunization with biologically relevant peptides to overcome difficulties associated with otherwise poorly immunogenic epitopes. PMID:16699036

  13. Immunoglobulin G3 from Polyclonal Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Immune Globulin Is More Potent than Other Subclasses in Neutralizing HIV Type 1†

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Orit; Golding, Hana; King, Lisa R.; Eller, Nancy; Frazier, Doug; Golding, Basil; Scott, Dorothy E.

    2001-01-01

    Passive antibody prophylaxis against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been accomplished in primates, suggesting that this strategy may prove useful in humans. While antibody specificity is crucial for neutralization, other antibody characteristics, such as subclass, have not been explored. Our objective was to compare the efficiencies of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses from polyclonal human HIV immune globulin (HIVIG) in the neutralization of HIV-1 strains differing in coreceptor tropism. IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 were enriched from HIVIG by using protein A-Sepharose. All three subclasses bound major HIV-1 proteins, as shown by Western blot assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In HIV-1 fusion assays using X4, R5, or X4R5 envelope-expressing effector cells, IgG3 more efficiently blocked fusion. In neutralization assays with cell-free viruses using X4 (LAI, IIIB), R5 (BaL), and X4R5 (DH123), a similar hierarchy of neutralization was found: IgG3 > IgG1 > IgG2. IgG3 has a longer, more flexible hinge region than the other subclasses. To test whether this is important, IgG1 and IgG3 were digested with pepsin to generate F(ab?)2 fragments or with papain to generate Fab fragments. IgG3 F(ab?)2 fragments were still more efficient in neutralization than F(ab?)2 of IgG1. However, Fab fragments of IgG3 and IgG1 demonstrated equivalent neutralization capacities and the IgG3 advantage was lost. These results suggest that the IgG3 hinge region confers enhanced HIV-neutralizing ability. Enrichment and stabilization of IgG3 may therefore lead to improved HIVIG preparations. The results of this study have implications for the improvement of passive immunization with polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies and suggest that HIV-1 vaccines which induce high-titer IgG3 responses could be advantageous. PMID:11413323

  14. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ...SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50 Anti-Human...

  15. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ...SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50 Anti-Human...

  16. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ...SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50 Anti-Human...

  17. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ...SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50 Anti-Human...

  18. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ...SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50 Anti-Human...

  19. Human monoclonal antibody 2G12 defines a distinctive neutralization epitope on the gp120 glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Trkola, A; Purtscher, M; Muster, T; Ballaun, C; Buchacher, A; Sullivan, N; Srinivasan, K; Sodroski, J; Moore, J P; Katinger, H

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized human monoclonal antibody 2G12 to the gp120 surface glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). This antibody potently and broadly neutralizes primary and T-cell line-adapted clade B strains of HIV-1 in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell-based assay and inhibits syncytium formation in the AA-2 cell line. Furthermore, 2G12 possesses neutralizing activity against strains from clade A but not from clade E. Complement- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-activating functions of 2G12 were also defined. The gp120 epitope recognized by 2G12 was found to be distinctive; binding of 2G12 to LAI recombinant gp120 was abolished by amino acid substitutions removing N-linked carbohydrates in the C2, C3, V4, and C4 regions of gp120. This gp120 mutant recognition pattern has not previously been observed, indicating that the 2G12 epitope is unusual. consistent with this, antibodies able to block 2G12 binding to recombinant gp120 were not detected in significant quantities in 16 HIV-positive human serum samples. PMID:8551569

  20. Insertion of primary syncytium-inducing (SI) and non-SI envelope V3 loops in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) LAI reduces neutralization sensitivity to autologous, but not heterologous, HIV-1 antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Hogervorst, E; de Jong, J; van Wijk, A; Bakker, M; Valk, M; Nara, P; Goudsmit, J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of V3 loops from naturally occurring viruses on the neutralization sensitivity of a molecularly cloned virus. A selection of well-defined syncytium-inducing (SI) and non-SI V3 loops of a single human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individual (H594) and the V3 regions of two SI laboratory strains were inserted in an infectious molecular clone of human immunodeficiency type 1 LAI. Neutralization was performed with a heterologous serum pool and autologous patient serum, using the virus reduction neutralization assay and peripheral blood lymphocytes as target cells. High sensitivity of the chimeric viruses containing the laboratory strain V3 regions to neutralization by H594 sequential sera as well as the heterologous serum pool was found. A statistically significant correlation between the sensitivities of these viruses was seen. In contrast, insertion of the primary isolate NSI and SI envelope V3 loops significantly reduced the neutralization by autologous serum but not by the heterologous serum pool. No correlation was found between the neutralization of the viruses with laboratory strain-derived V3 regions and the viruses with primary isolate V3 domains. We conclude that heterologous antibodies are able to neutralize infectious molecular clones with V3 loops of both SI and NSI viruses, regardless of whether they originated from laboratory strains or primary isolates. However, serum of patient H594 discriminated between the two types of viruses and showed reduced neutralization of the viruses with the autologous NSI and SI primary isolate V3 loops. These results indicated that the neutralization sensitivity of the viruses depended on the capacity of the V3 region to influence the conformation of the virus envelope. These V3-dependent conformational changes partially explain the neutralization sensitivity of laboratory strains and the relative neutralization resistance of primary isolates. PMID:7666535

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtype B Ancestral Envelope Protein Is Functional and Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies in Rabbits Similar to Those Elicited by a Circulating Subtype B Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Doria-Rose, N. A.; Learn, G. H.; Rodrigo, A. G.; Nickle, D. C.; Li, F.; Mahalanabis, M.; Hensel, M. T.; McLaughlin, S.; Edmonson, P. F.; Montefiori, D.; Barnett, S. W.; Haigwood, N. L.; Mullins, J. I.

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a difficult target for vaccine development, in part because of its ever-expanding genetic diversity and attendant capacity to escape immunologic recognition. Vaccine efficacy might be improved by maximizing immunogen antigenic similarity to viruses likely to be encountered by vaccinees. To this end, we designed a prototype HIV-1 envelope vaccine using a deduced ancestral state for the env gene. The ancestral state reconstruction method was shown to be >95% accurate by computer simulation and 99.8% accurate when estimating the known inoculum used in an experimental infection study in rhesus macaques. Furthermore, the deduced ancestor gene differed from the set of sequences used to derive the ancestor by an average of 12.3%, while these latter sequences were an average of 17.3% different from each other. A full-length ancestral subtype B HIV-1 env gene was constructed and shown to produce a glycoprotein of 160 kDa that bound and fused with cells expressing the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. This Env was also functional in a virus pseudotype assay. When either gp160- or gp140-expressing plasmids and recombinant gp120 were used to immunize rabbits in a DNA prime-protein boost regimen, the artificial gene induced immunoglobulin G antibodies capable of weakly neutralizing heterologous primary HIV-1 strains. The results were similar for rabbits immunized in parallel with a natural isolate, HIV-1 SF162. Further design efforts to better present conserved neutralization determinants are warranted. PMID:16103173

  2. Immunodeficiency disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that affect T cells may cause repeated Candida (yeast) infections. Inherited combined immunodeficiency affects both T cells ... infections (including some forms of pneumonia or repeated yeast infections) Tests used to help diagnose an immunodeficiency ...

  3. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  4. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  5. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  6. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  7. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  8. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-01-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization. PMID:9311792

  9. INTRACELLULAR BOVINE CYTOKINE ANALYSIS WITH ANTI-HUMAN CYTOKINE MABS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular cytokines has proven useful for assay of human and rodent immune cell function. Limited availability of commercial mAbs to bovine cytokines has prevented application of this method to bovine immune cells. We have used anti-human IFN-gamma and IL-8 mAbs to ...

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) Continues to Evolve in Presence of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies More than Ten Years after Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chaillon, Antoine; Braibant, Martine; Hué, Stéphane; Bencharif, Samia; Enard, David; Moreau, Alain; Samri, Assia; Agut, Henri; Barin, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolution of HIV-1 and its immune escape to autologous neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) during the acute/early phases of infection have been analyzed in depth in many studies. In contrast, little is known about neither the long-term evolution of the virus in patients who developed broadly Nabs (bNabs) or the mechanism of escape in presence of these bNabs. Results We have studied the viral population infecting a long term non progressor HIV-1 infected patient who had developed broadly neutralizing antibodies toward all tier 2/3 viruses (6 clades) tested, 9 years after infection, and was then followed up over 7 years. The autologous neutralization titers of the sequential sera toward env variants representative of the viral population significantly increased during the follow-up period. The most resistant pseudotyped virus was identified at the last visit suggesting that it represented a late emerging escape variant. We identified 5 amino acids substitutions that appeared associated with escape to broadly neutralizing antibodies. They were V319I/S, R/K355T, R/W429G, Q460E and G/T463E, in V3, C3 and V5 regions. Conclusion This study showed that HIV-1 may continue to evolve in presence of both broadly neutralizing antibodies and increasing autologous neutralizing activity more than 10 years post-infection. PMID:22957000

  11. Functional role of the V1/V2 region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 in infection of primary macrophages and soluble CD4 neutralization.

    PubMed Central

    Koito, A; Harrowe, G; Levy, J A; Cheng-Mayer, C

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the influence of the V1/V2 region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 on certain biologic properties of the virus. We observed that on the genomic background of the T-cell-line-tropic strain, HIV-1SF2mc, both the V1 and V2 domains of the macrophage-tropic strain, HIV-1SF162mc, in addition to the required V3 domain, are necessary to attain full macrophage tropism. Furthermore, the V2 domain modulates the sensitivity of HIV-1 to soluble CD4 neutralization. Structural studies of recombinant and mutant envelope glycoproteins suggest that the function of the V1/V2 region is to interact with the V3 domain and confer on the envelope gp120 of HIV-1SF2mc a conformation more similar to that of the macrophage-tropic strain HIV-1SF162mc. The conformation of the envelope gp120 appears to be strain specific and plays an important role in determining HIV-1 tissue tropism and sensitivity to soluble CD4 neutralization. Images PMID:8139010

  12. Specific cellular immune response and neutralizing antibodies in goats immunized with native or recombinant envelope proteins derived from human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIB and in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men.

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, K; Robey, W G; Putney, S; Arthur, L; Nara, P; Fischinger, P; Gallo, R C; Wong-Staal, F; Ranki, A

    1987-01-01

    Animals immunized with native or recombinant envelope proteins from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, formerly referred to as human T-lymphotropic virus type III) human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIB and naturally HIV-infected men were assessed for neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immunity toward the virus. Immunization of rabbits or goats with the native external envelope glycoprotein gp120 or with corresponding recombinant proteins elicited strictly type-specific neutralizing antibodies. A broad, group-specific cellular immune response to gp120 and to three different HIV isolates was seen in goats immunized with the native gp120 but not in animals immunized with the nonglycosylated recombinant envelope proteins. In HIV-infected people, no T-cell response was seen, even though their T-cell response toward other foreign antigens was intact. The results show type- and group-specific epitopes on gp120, some of which may be of importance for the development of a vaccine against HIV infection. Images PMID:2440037

  13. Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes act as super immunogens and elicit potent, broadly neutralizing antibodies against clinically relevant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Killick, Mark A; Grant, Michelle L; Cerutti, Nichole M; Capovilla, Alexio; Papathanasopoulos, Maria A

    2015-11-17

    The ability to induce a broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) response following vaccination is regarded as a crucial aspect in developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The bNAbs target the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) which is exposed on the virus surface, thereby preventing cell entry. To date, conventional vaccine approaches such as the use of Env-based immunogens have been unsuccessful. We expressed, purified, characterized and evaluated the immunogenicity of several unique HIV-1 subtype C Env immunogens in small animals. Here we report that vaccine immunogens based on Env liganded to a two domain CD4 variant, 2dCD4(S60C) are capable of consistently eliciting potent, broadly neutralizing antibody responses in New Zealand white rabbits against a panel of clinically relevant HIV-1 pseudoviruses. This was irrespective of the Env protein subtype and context. Importantly, depletion of the anti-CD4 antibodies appeared to abrogate the neutralization activity in the rabbit sera. Taken together, this data suggests that the Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes described here are "super" immunogens, and potentially immunofocus antibody responses to a unique epitope spanning the 2dCD4(60C). Recent data from the two available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, Ibalizumab and CD4-Ig (and bispecific variants thereof) have highlighted that the use of these broad and potent entry inhibitors could circumvent the need for a conventional vaccine targeting HIV-1. Overall, the ability of the unique Env-2dCD4(S60C) complexes to elicit potent bNAb responses has not been described previously, reinforcing that further investigation for their utility in preventing and controlling HIV-1/SIV infection is warranted. PMID:26432912

  14. A Yeast Glycoprotein Shows High-Affinity Binding to the Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody 2G12 and Inhibits gp120 Interactions with 2G12 and DC-SIGN?

    PubMed Central

    Luallen, Robert J.; Fu, Hu; Agrawal-Gamse, Caroline; Mboudjeka, Innocent; Huang, Wei; Lee, Fang-Hua; Wang, Lai-Xi; Doms, Robert W.; Geng, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) protein contains numerous N-linked carbohydrates that shield conserved peptide epitopes and promote trans infection by dendritic cells via binding to cell surface lectins. The potent and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2G12 binds a cluster of high-mannose-type oligosaccharides on the gp120 subunit of Env, revealing a conserved and highly exposed epitope on the glycan shield. To find an effective antigen for eliciting 2G12-like antibodies, we searched for endogenous yeast proteins that could bind to 2G12 in a panel of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycosylation knockouts and discovered one protein that bound weakly in a ?pmr1 strain deficient in hyperglycosylation. 2G12 binding to this protein, identified as Pst1, was enhanced by adding the ?mnn1 deletion to the ?pmr1 background, ensuring the exposure of terminal ?1,2-linked mannose residues on the D1 and D3 arms of high-mannose glycans. However, optimum 2G12 antigenicity was found when Pst1, a heavily N-glycosylated protein, was expressed with homogenous Man8GlcNAc2 structures in ?och1 ?mnn1 ?mnn4 yeast. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of this form of Pst1 showed high affinity for 2G12, which translated into Pst1 efficiently inhibiting gp120 interactions with 2G12 and DC-SIGN and blocking 2G12-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 pseudoviruses. The high affinity of the yeast glycoprotein Pst1 for 2G12 highlights its potential as a novel antigen to induce 2G12-like antibodies. PMID:19264785

  15. Scorpion-Toxin Mimics of CD4 in Complex with Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp120: Crystal Structures, Molecular Mimicry, and Neutralization Breadth

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Stricher, Francois; Martin, Loic; Decker, Julie M.; Majeed, Shahzad; Barthe, Phillippe; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Robinson, James; Roumestand, Christian; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Shaw, George M.; Vita, Claudio; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-07-19

    The binding surface on CD4 for the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein has been transplanted previously onto a scorpion-toxin scaffold. Here, we use X-ray crystallography to characterize atomic-level details of gp120 with this transplant, CD4M33. Despite known envelope flexibility, the conformation of gp120 induced by CD4M33 was so similar to that induced by CD4 that localized measures were required to distinguish ligand-induced differences from lattice variation. To investigate relationships between structure, function, and mimicry, an F23 analog of CD4M33 was devised. Structural and thermodynamic analyses showed F23 to be a better molecular mimic of CD4 than CD4M33. F23 also showed increased neutralization breadth, against diverse isolates of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVcpz. Our results lend insight into the stability of the CD4 bound conformation of gp120, define measures that quantify molecular mimicry as a function of evolutionary distance, and suggest how such evaluations might be useful in developing mimetic antagonists with increased neutralization breadth.

  16. Structure-Based Design of a Protein Immunogen that Displays an HIV-1 gp41 Neutralizing Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-06-27

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K{sub d} of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  17. Design of a novel cyclotide-based CXCR4 antagonist with anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Aboye, Teshome L.; Ha, Helen; Majumber, Subhabrata; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Shekhtman, Alexander; Neamati, Nouri; Camarero, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report for the first time the design and synthesis of a novel cyclotide able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 viral replication by selectively targeting cytokine receptor CXCR4. This was accomplished by grafting a series of topologically modified CVX15 based peptides onto the loop 6 of cyclotide MCoTI-I. The most active compound produced in this study was a potent CXCR4 antagonist (EC50 ? 20 nM) and an efficient HIV-1 cell-entry blocker (EC50 ? 2 nM). This cyclotide also showed high stability in human serum thereby providing a promising lead compound for the design of a novel type of peptide-based anti-cancer and anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:23151033

  18. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... incisions made in the mother’s abdomen and uterus. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune System: ...

  19. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Ivan K; Shearer, William T

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders represent pediatric emergencies due to absence of adaptive immune responses to infections. The conditions result from either intrinsic defects in T-cell development (ie, severe combined immunodeficiency disease [SCID]) or congenital athymia (eg, complete DiGeorge anomaly). Hematopoietic stem cell transplant provides the only clinically approved cure for SCID, although gene therapy research trials are showing significant promise. For greatest survival, patients should undergo transplant before 3.5 months of age and before the onset of infections. Newborn screening programs have yielded successful early identification and treatment of infants with SCID and congenital athymia in the United States. PMID:26454313

  20. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  1. Primary immunodeficiencies: 2009 update

    PubMed Central

    Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Fischer, Alain; Geha, Raif. S.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chapel, Helen; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Hammartröm, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D.; Puck, Jennifer; Roifman, Chaim; Seger, Reinhard; Wedgwood, Josiah

    2009-01-01

    More than 50 years after Ogdeon Bruton’s discovery of congenital agammaglobulinemia, human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) continue to unravel novel molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern development and function of the human immune system. This report provides the updated classification of PIDs, that has been compiled by the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) Expert Committee of Primary Immunodeficiencies after its biannual meeting, in Dublin (Ireland) in June 2009. Since the appearance of the last classification in 2007, novel forms of PID have been discovered, and additional pathophysiology mechanisms that account for PID in humans have been unraveled. Careful analysis and prompt recognition of these disorders is essential to prompt effective forms of treatment and thus to improve survival and quality of life in patients affected with PIDs. PMID:20004777

  2. Space Flight Immunodeficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, William T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has had sufficient concern for the well-being of astronauts traveling in space to create the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), which is investigating several areas of biomedical research including those of immunology. As part of the Immunology, Infection, and Hematology Team, the co-investigators of the Space Flight Immunodeficiency Project began their research projects on April 1, 1998 and are now just into the second year of work. Two areas of research have been targeted: 1) specific immune (especially antibody) responses and 2) non-specific inflammation and adhesion. More precise knowledge of these two areas of research will help elucidate the potential harmful effects of space travel on the immune system, possibly sufficient to create a secondary state of immunodeficiency in astronauts. The results of these experiments are likely to lead to the delineation of functional alterations in antigen presentation, specific immune memory, cytokine regulation of immune responses, cell to cell interactions, and cell to endothelium interactions.

  3. Emergent neutrality.

    PubMed

    Holt, Robert D

    2006-10-01

    Community ecology is in a current state of creative ferment, stimulated by the development of neutral models of community organization. Here, I reflect on recent papers by Scheffer and van Nes, and by Gravel et al., which illuminate how neutrality can emerge from ecological and evolutionary processes, thus suggesting ways to unify neutral and niche perspectives. PMID:16901580

  4. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePLUS

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Human Immunodeficiency ...

  5. Anti-(human LFA-1) monoclonal antibodies bind P815 murine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Palisson, M J; Altemeyer, A; Moosbrugger, I; Warter, S; Hauptmann, G; Bischoff, P

    1992-01-01

    Using anti-CD11a and anti-CD18 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed respectively against the alpha and the beta chains of LFA-1, we obtained an important and specific staining of P815 murine tumour cells. Both ascitic and cultured cells displayed a positive staining. Other murine tumours of haematopoietic origin, as well as lymphocytes or lymphoblasts from DBA/2 mice, were not labelled by the same monoclonal antibodies. These results were surprising since, to our knowledge, no case of cross-reaction between species has been reported with LFA-1. Moreover, competition assays showed that epitopes recognized by the two anti-CD11a antibodies were different from those identified by H35.89.9, a mAb raised against the murine LFA-1 alpha chain. Using allogeneic cytotoxic T lymphocytes, we also showed that anti-(human LFA-1) mAbs were unable to block the lysis of P815 by these effector cells. Thus, the putative functional properties of these structures, as well as their importance from an antigeneic point of view, remain to be assessed. PMID:1373342

  6. Diphtheria-toxin based anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin for targeting human CCR4(+) cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Wei, Min; Zhang, Huiping; Chen, Hongyuan; Germana, Sharon; Huang, Christene A; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Wang, Zhirui

    2015-08-01

    CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) has attracted much attention as a promising therapeutic drug target for CCR4(+) tumor cells and Tregs. CCR4 is expressed on some tumor cells such as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), adult peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). CCR4 is also expressed on majority of Tregs, mainly effector Tregs. In this study we have successfully developed three versions of diphtheria-toxin based anti-human CCR4 immunotoxins (monovalent, bivalent and single-chain fold-back diabody). Binding analysis by flow cytometry showed that all three versions of the anti-human CCR4 immunotoxins bound to the human CCR4(+) tumor cell line as well as CCR4(+) human PBMC. The bivalent isoform bound stronger than its monovalent counterpart and the single-chain foldback diabody isoform was the strongest among the three versions. In vitro efficacy analysis demonstrated that the bivalent isoform was 20 fold more potent in inhibiting cellular proliferation and protein synthesis in human CCR4(+) tumor cells compared to the monovalent anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin. The single-chain fold-back diabody isoform was 10 fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart and 200 fold more potent than its monovalent counterpart. The in vivo efficacy was assessed using a human CCR4(+) tumor-bearing mouse model. The immunotoxin significantly prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor ?(-/-) (NSG) mice injected with human CCR4(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells compared with the control group. This novel anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin is a promising drug candidate for targeting human CCR4(+) tumor cells and Tregs in vivo. PMID:25958791

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  8. Strong, specific anti-human leukemia antisera prepared with the use of purified cell membrane antigen.

    PubMed

    Negoro, S; Seon, B K

    1981-07-01

    Two rabbits immunized with 15 micrograms of a purified human thymus leukemia-associated antigen preparation and boosted once with the same amount of the antigen preparation yielded antisera that showed strong specificity for human leukemic T-cells without any prior absorptions. These antisera from the two rabbits showed a 50% killing of cells at antiserum dilutions of 5700- and 1600-fold, respectively, against JM, a leukemic T-cell line, and slightly weaker activity against MOLT-4, another leukemia T-cell line. These antisera, without any absorption, showed no or minimal reaction against two nonmalignant B-cell lines (RPMI 1788 and RPMI 8057), a leukemic non-T, non-B-cell line (NALM-16), a leukemic pre-B-cell line (NALM-1), normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, and T-cells isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes. Antiserum 7557, which showed the higher antibody activity, was further studied by an absorption test using various human cell lines. The antiserum showed strong activity against all three leukemic T-cell lines tested, i.e., CCRF-CEM, RPMI 8402, and CCRF-HSB-2, whereas it showed no significant activity against other cell lines which included two leukemic non-T, non-B-cell lines (KM-3 and NALM-6), NALM-1 and RPMI 1788. These are the first anti-human leukemia antisera, except for monoclonal hybridoma antibodies, that showed good specificity for leukemia cells without prior absorption. The present procedure of immunizing animals with a small amount of human thymus leukemia-associated antigen preparation isolated from cell membrane will also be useful for obtaining strong, specific antisera of other cell membrane antigens. PMID:6972802

  9. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Hacein-Bey Abina, S; Touzot, F; Cavazzana, M

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy has effectively entered Medicine via the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Because hematopoietic stem cells are accessible and because it was understood that genetic correction of lymphocyte progenitor cells carrying a genetic defect impairing differentiation, could result in the production of long-lived T lymphocytes, it was reasoned that ex vivo gene transfer in hematopoietic cells could lead to disease phenotype correction. Retroviral vectors were designed to ex vivo transduce such cells. This has indeed been shown to lead to sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiency associated with two forms of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) for now more than ten years. Occurrence in some patients of genotoxicity related to retroviral vectors integration close to and transactivation of oncogenes has led to the development of retroviral vectors devoid of its enhancer element. Results of recent trials performed for several forms of PID indeed suggest that their use is both safe and efficacious. It is thus anticipated that their application to the treatment of many more life threatening PID will be developed over the coming years. PMID:25708106

  10. Cross-reactivity of anti-human cytokine monoclonal antibodies used as a tool to identify novel immunological biomarkers in domestic ruminants.

    PubMed

    Dorneles, E M S; Araújo, M S S; Teixeira-Carvalho, A; Martins-Filho, O A; Lage, A P

    2015-01-01

    Eleven commercially available PE-labeled anti-human (IL-1-?, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-?, IL-17A, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-13) and anti-mouse (IL-10, TNF-?) cytokine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were tested for cross-reactivity with cattle, goat, and sheep cytokines. Cross-reactivity was assessed by comparative analysis with the standard reactivity of the target species. Our data demonstrated that anti-human IL-1-?, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A and IL-10 mAbs cross-react with all ruminant species tested. Anti-human IL-5 mAb showed a strong cross-reactivity with cattle and goat IL-5, while anti-human TNF-? mAb showed a selective cross-reactivity with goat TNF-?. No cross-reactivity with the ruminant cytokines was observed for anti-human IL-12 and IL-13 mAbs or for the two anti-mouse cytokine mAbs tested. The present study demonstrated the cross-reactivity of various anti-human cytokine mAbs with cattle, sheep, and goat cytokines, increasing the range of immunological biomarkers for studies in veterinary medicine. PMID:25730032

  11. Immunotherapy for primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Wood, Philip

    2012-05-01

    The 2 most commonly encountered primary immunodeficiency syndromes in adult practice are antibody deficiency disorders and hereditary angioedema.Immunologic therapy for these disorders has significantly improved patient management. Therapy with immunoglobulin leads to improvement in overall quality of life. With increasing survival rates and decreasing levels of life-threatening infections in patients with primary antibody deficiencies, disease complications are more commonly encountered. Treatment of these complications with monoclonal antibody therapy seems promising and is likely to increase in the future. More recently,several additional agents have become available, including novel drugs targeted at different elements of the disease process. PMID:22703850

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A A When HIV is first contracted, there may be ... 1–6 weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can ...

  13. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  14. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, J B

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade, an increase in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a substantial impact on childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vertical transmission of HIV from mother to infant accounts for the vast majority of these cases. Identification of HIV-infected pregnant women needs to be impoved so that appropriate therapy can be initiated for both mothers and infants. While recent data demonstrate a dramatic decrease in HIV transmission from a subset of women treated with zidovudine during pregnancy, further efforts at reducing transmission are desperately needed. This review focuses on vertically transmitted HIV infection in children, its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, natural history, and clinical manifestations including infectious and noninfectious complications. An overview of the complex medical management of these children ensues, including the use of antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis is reviewed, along with the important role of other supportive therapies. PMID:8894346

  15. Current Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Teuber, Suzanne S.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2006-01-01

    Since the original description of X-linked agammaglobulinemia in 1952, the number of independent primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) has expanded to more than 100 entities. By definition, a PID is a genetically determined disorder resulting in enhanced susceptibility to infectious disease. Despite the heritable nature of these diseases, some PIDs are clinically manifested only after prerequisite environmental exposures but they often have associated malignant, allergic, or autoimmune manifestations. PIDs must be distinguished from secondary or acquired immunodeficiencies, which are far more common. In this review, we will place these immunodeficiencies in the context of both clinical and laboratory presentations as well as highlight the known genetic basis. PMID:17162365

  16. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46...610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. ...evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection when tested under §...

  17. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46...610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. ...evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection when tested under §...

  18. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ...Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected...Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected...Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately...

  19. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... true Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46...610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. ...evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection when tested under §...

  20. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46...610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. ...evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection when tested under §...

  1. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46...610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. ...evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection when tested under §...

  2. Warts and All: HPV in Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Holland, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) is almost universal and eventually asymptomatic, but pathologic infection with HPV is severe, recurrent, and recalcitrant to therapy. It is also an underappreciated manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Mutations in EVER1, EVER2, GATA2, CXCR4, and DOCK8 are typically associated with extensive HPV infections, whereas several other primary immune defects have severe HPV much less frequently. We review immunodeficiencies with severe HPV infections and the mechanisms underlying them. PMID:23036745

  3. Original Contribution Confidence Intervals for Biomarker-based Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    E-print Network

    Cole, Stephen R.

    , acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; CI, confidence interval; HIV, human immunodeficiency virus; STARHSOriginal Contribution Confidence Intervals for Biomarker-based Human Immunodeficiency Virus biologic specimens can be used to estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence using a two

  4. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection and prospects for control.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, D. D.; Kaplan, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    In just six years after the initial description of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, much has been learned about the etiologic agent, the human immunodeficiency virus. The pathogenic mechanisms utilized by this virus to infect selectively and persistently T4+ lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages, leading to immunodeficiency and neurologic dysfunction, are slowly becoming clear. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection is essential for the rational design of therapeutic and preventive strategies to combat this deadly virus. PMID:3324508

  5. Marketed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, antihypertensives, and human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors: as-yet-unused weapons of the oncologists’ arsenal

    PubMed Central

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsironi, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that several pharmacological agents that have long been used for the management of various diseases unrelated to cancer exhibit profound in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. This is of major clinical importance, since it would possibly aid in reassessing the therapeutic use of currently used agents for which clinicians already have experience. Further, this would obviate the time-consuming process required for the development and the approval of novel antineoplastic drugs. Herein, both pre-clinical and clinical data concerning the antineoplastic function of distinct commercially available pharmacological agents that are not currently used in the field of oncology, ie, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antihypertensive agents, and anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents inhibiting viral protease, are reviewed. The aim is to provide integrated information regarding not only the molecular basis of the antitumor function of these agents but also the applicability of the reevaluation of their therapeutic range in the clinical setting. PMID:26056460

  6. Common Variable Immunodeficiency: Diagnosis, Management, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Jordan K; Gelfand, Erwin W

    2015-11-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) refers to a grouping of antibody deficiencies that lack a more specific genetic or phenotypic classification. It is the immunodeficiency classification with the greatest number of constituents, likely because of the numerous ways in which antibody production can be impaired and the frequency in which antibody production becomes impaired in human beings. CVID comprises a heterogeneous group of rare diseases. Consequently, CVID presents a significant challenge for researchers and clinicians. Despite these difficulties, both our understanding of and ability to manage this grouping of complex immune diseases has advanced significantly over the past 60 years. PMID:26454311

  7. [Acute polyradiculoneuritis and acquired immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Scaff, M; Rabello, G D; Marchiori, P E

    1989-03-01

    A 50-year-old man with positive test for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by enzyme-linked-immunoassy and Western-blot, without clinical manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), developed acute polyradiculoneuritis and was treated by plasmapheresis with improvement. We believe that chemical homologies of antigenic determinants between HIV and P2 protein of peripheral nervous system and myelin basic protein may induce crossed-reaction, thus developing acute polyradiculoneuritis and central nervous system involvement, respectively. The nervous system involvement hy HIV also occur in the HI-viremy, seric conversion alone, and AIDS with or without oportunistic infections. PMID:2764748

  8. Brucella abortus conjugated with a gp120 or V3 loop peptide derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 induces neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies, and the V3-B. abortus conjugate is effective even after CD4+ T-cell depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Golding, B; Inman, J; Highet, P; Blackburn, R; Manischewitz, J; Blyveis, N; Angus, R D; Golding, H

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with loss of function and numbers of CD4+ T-helper cells. In order to bypass the requirement for CD4+ cells in antibody responses, we have utilized heat-inactivated Brucella abortus as a carrier. In this study we coupled a 14-mer V3 loop peptide (V3), which is homologous to 9 of 11 amino acids from the V3 loop of HIV-1 MN, and gp120 from HIV-1 SF2 to B. abortus [gp120(SF2)-B. abortus]. Our results showed that specific antibody responses, dominated by immunoglobulin G2a in BALB/c mice, were induced by these conjugates. Sera from the immunized mice bound native gp120 expressed on the surfaces of cells infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus gp160 vector (VPE16). Sera from mice immunized with gp120(SF2)-B. abortus inhibited binding of soluble CD4 to gp120, whereas sera from mice immunized with V3-B. abortus were ineffective. Sera from mice immunized with either conjugate were capable of blocking syncytium formation between CD4+ CEM cells and H9 cells chronically infected with the homologous virus. Sera from mice immunized with gp120(SF2)-B. abortus were more potent than sera from mice immunized with V3-B. abortus in inhibiting syncytia from heterologous HIV-1 laboratory strains. Importantly, in primary and secondary responses, V3-B. abortus evoked anti-HIV MN antibodies in mice depleted of CD4+ cells, and sera from these mice were able to inhibit syncytia. These findings indicate that B. abortus can provide carrier function for peptides and proteins from HIV-1 and suggest that they could be used for immunization of individuals with compromised CD4+ T-cell function. PMID:7745677

  9. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ...public comment on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research. Patient-Focused Drug Development...interested in obtaining patient input on the impact of HIV on daily life, available therapies to treat...

  10. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ...meeting entitled ``Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Patient-Focused Drug Development and HIV Cure Research,'' published in the Federal Register...perspective on current approaches to managing HIV, symptoms experienced because of HIV or its...

  11. Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadagno, David; And Others

    This article reports results from a survey among women at risk for contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as well as transmitting it in a vertical (to offspring) and horizontal (sexual partner or intravenous [IV] drug usage) mode. Little is known about the extent of HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, and IV drug usage for women at risk for…

  12. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Christian; Madshus, Inger Helene; Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo ; Stang, Espen

    2012-12-10

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  13. Observations after human immunodeficiency virus immunization and challenge of human immunodeficiency virus seropositive and seronegative chimpanzees.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, C J; Peters, R; Gravell, M; Johnson, B K; Jensen, F C; Carlo, D J; Salk, J

    1991-01-01

    Two human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive chimpanzees (A-3 and A-86c) infected 4 yr earlier with HIV, along with one uninfected animal (A-36), were inoculated intramuscularly three times in a year with a gamma-irradiated gp120-depleted HIV immunogen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Both previously infected animals promptly developed an anamnestic humoral antibody response after the first dose, and the uninfected animal developed a primary humoral response to the first dose and then an anamnestic response to the second dose. Although HIV had been recovered repeatedly from the seropositive animals, they became persistently virus-culture negative at the time of or just before the first inoculation of the immunogen. Intravenous challenge with 40 chimpanzee-infectious-doses of a heterologous HIV strain (HIVIIIB) was done 4 mo after the third inoculation in the three treated chimpanzees and in an untreated control animal (A-189a). The immunized naive animal (A-36) and the unimmunized control (A-189a) became infected, and virus has been isolated from their peripheral blood mononuclear cells for greater than 2 yr after challenge. However, the two previously infected chimpanzees (A-3 and A-86c) resisted challenge and have remained virus negative by peripheral blood mononuclear cell cocultivation for greater than 2 yr of observation after challenge; moreover, no evidence of reinfection was detectable by PCR. Despite the in vivo resistance, however, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the resistant animals (A-3, A-86c) remained susceptible to infection by HIV in vitro. These findings reveal that a state of immunity can develop and/or be induced to control and/or prevent HIV infection in the chimpanzees. In the absence of any detectable level of neutralizing antibody in A-3 and a low level in A-86c, the patterns of the responses to challenge seen in the four animals suggest that the cell-mediated immune mechanism must have played a significant role in the resistant chimpanzees both in control of their HIV infection and in their resistance to challenge. Images PMID:2014254

  14. Familial hepatopulmonary syndrome in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S N; Condliffe, A; Griffiths, W; Baxendale, H; Kumararatne, D S

    2015-04-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) comprises a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies which lead to a range of complications, including infectious, neoplastic and inflammatory disorders. This report describes monozygotic twin brothers with CVID who developed cryptogenic liver disease and subsequently hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS). This is the second report of the association of HPS and CVID. Its occurrence in two identical twins implicates a genetic basis. PMID:25708586

  15. Problems of Prophylaxis of Secondary Immunodeficiency States.

    PubMed

    Pershin, Boris B.; Kuzmin, Sergey N.; Medvedev, Vladimir Ya.; Tolstov, Dmitry V.

    1999-12-01

    An attempt is made in this paper to draw up some results of long-term studies conducted by the "Immunoprophylaxis" Center of RANS on such studies. The results of mass and individual studies among 250 thousand blue- and white-collar workers in Russian industrial enterprises are processed in the data bank of the Center, including an analysis of the immunological reactions of 30 thousand individuals studied. An analysis of the results shows that secondary immunodeficiency is encountered in 30% of the people occupied in industrial positions, in 40% of professional athletes and in more than 60% of the children studied. It should be emphasized that in enterprises where there is substantial excessive environmental harm, the frequency of development of immunodeficiency also exceeded the 60% mark. There are many reasons for the development of immunological deficiency and they depend on a large number of factors. Among them, in the first place, is the anthropogenic effect on the environment, which results in contamination of working zones, the earth, water and, as a consequence, food products, the use of which inevitably results in immunodepression. A special place in this problem is occupied by stress, which accompanies almost any professional activity. There is no doubt concerning the opinion that normal functioning of the immune system provides a sufficiently effective "interdiction" against the development of many diseases. Immune deficiency "opens the door" to illness. In other words, immunodeficiency is a detonator for the growth of a pathology. PMID:12687143

  16. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  17. Pharmacological Inhibition of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hakimeh; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a member of the retroviridae family of viruses and causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in domestic and non-domestic cats worldwide. Genome organization of FIV and clinical characteristics of the disease caused by the virus are similar to those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Both viruses infect T lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and their replication cycle in infected cells is analogous. Due to marked similarity in genomic organization, virus structure, virus replication and disease pathogenesis of FIV and HIV, infection of cats with FIV is a useful tool to study and develop novel drugs and vaccines for HIV. Anti-retroviral drugs studied extensively in HIV infection have targeted different steps of the virus replication cycle: (1) inhibition of virus entry into susceptible cells at the level of attachment to host cell surface receptors and co-receptors; (2) inhibition of fusion of the virus membrane with the cell membrane; (3) blockade of reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA; (4) interruption of nuclear translocation and viral DNA integration into host genomes; (5) prevention of viral transcript processing and nuclear export; and (6) inhibition of virion assembly and maturation. Despite much success of anti-retroviral therapy slowing disease progression in people, similar therapy has not been thoroughly investigated in cats. In this article we review current pharmacological approaches and novel targets for anti-lentiviral therapy, and critically assess potentially suitable applications against FIV infection in cats. PMID:22754645

  18. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Bruno M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Cruz, Juliano C. M.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  19. Additive Effect of Neutralizing Antibody and Antiviral Drug Treatment in Preventing Virus Escape and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Peter; Senn, Beatrice M.; Klenerman, Paul; Kalinke, Ulrich; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    2000-01-01

    Poorly cytopathic or noncytopathic viruses can escape immune surveillance and establish a chronic infection. Here we exploited the strategy of combining antiviral drug treatment with the induction of a neutralizing antibody response to avoid the appearance of neutralization-resistant virus variants. Despite the fact that H25 immunoglobulin transgenic mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus mounted an early neutralizing antibody response, the virus escaped from neutralization and persisted. After ribavirin treatment of H25 transgenic mice, the appearance of neutralization-resistant virus was prevented and virus was cleared. Thus, the combination of virus-neutralizing antibodies and chemotherapy efficiently controlled the infection, whereas each defense line alone did not. Similar additive effects may be unexpectedly efficient and beneficial in humans after infections with persistent viruses such as hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus and possibly human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:10846070

  20. [Skin symptoms associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Tamási, Béla; Marschalkó, Márta; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2015-01-01

    The recently observed accelerated increase of human immunodeficiency virus infection in Hungary poses a major public concern for the healthcare system. Given the effective only but not the curative therapy, prevention should be emphasized. Current statistics estimate that about 50% of the infected persons are not aware of their human immunodeficiency virus-positivity. Thus, early diagnosis of the infection by serological screening and timely recognition of the disease-associated symptoms are crucial. The authors' intention is to facilitate early infection detection with this review on human immunodeficiency virus-associated skin symptoms, and highlight the significance of human immunodeficiency virus care in the everyday medical practice. PMID:25544049

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral background plays a major role in development of resistance to protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, R E; Gong, Y F; Greytok, J A; Bechtold, C M; Terry, B J; Robinson, B S; Alam, M; Colonno, R J; Lin, P F

    1996-01-01

    The observed in vitro and in vivo benefit of combination treatment with anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents prompted us to examine the potential of resistance development when two protease inhibitors are used concurrently. Recombinant HIV-1 (NL4-3) proteases containing combined resistance mutations associated with BMS-186318 and A-77003 (or saquinavir) were either inactive or had impaired enzyme activity. Subsequent construction of HIV-1 (NL4-3) proviral clones containing the same mutations yielded viruses that were severely impaired in growth or nonviable, confirming that combination therapy may be advantageous. However, passage of BMS-186318-resistant HIV-1 (RF) in the presence of either saquinavir or SC52151, which represented sequential drug treatment, produced viable viruses resistant to both BMS-186318 and the second compound. The predominant breakthrough virus contained the G48V/A71T/V82A protease mutations. The clone-purified RF (G48V/A71T/V82A) virus, unlike the corresponding defective NL4-3 triple mutant, grew well and displayed cross-resistance to four distinct protease inhibitors. Chimeric virus and in vitro mutagenesis studies indicated that the RF-specific protease sequence, specifically the Ile at residue 10, enabled the NL4-3 strain with the triple mutant to grow. Our results clearly indicate that viral genetic background will play a key role in determining whether cross-resistance variants will arise. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8643685

  2. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... (78 FR 21613), FDA published a document that announced the disease ] areas for meetings in fiscal... Federal Register document for public comment that was published on September 24, 2012 (77 FR 58849), and a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused...

  3. Development of a complete human anti-human transferrin receptor C antibody as a novel marker of oral dysplasia and oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kentaro; Nakahata, Shingo; Shimosaki, Shunsuke; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kondo, Yuudai; Baba, Takashi; Taki, Tomohiko; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Kurosawa, Gene; Sudo, Yukio; Okada, Seiji; Sakoda, Sumio; Morishita, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Up to 20% of oral dysplasia cases have been suggested to undergo malignant transformation to OSCC; however, there are no methods to predict OSCC development. In this study, to identify the genes associated with oral dysplasia progression, we performed genomic copy number analyses of genomic DNA samples isolated from primary oral dysplasia and OSCC via the microdissection method and found elevated expression of transferrin receptor C (TfR1/TFRC) with genomic amplification in oral dysplasia and OSCC. The expression rate of TFRC in OSCC was significantly higher than that in dysplasia, suggesting that OSCC disease progression might be related to TFRC expression. Additionally, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo impacts of a newly established anti-human TFRC monoclonal antibody, which was isolated from a human cDNA library using the phage-display method, on cell proliferation and survival. The anti-TFRC antibody blocked the interaction between transferrin and TFRC and consequently inhibited iron uptake, leading to the iron deprivation-mediated suppression of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Moreover, we demonstrated that the anti-TFRC antibody efficiently inhibited tumor growth in a murine xenograft OSCC model. Therefore, we suggest our developed complete human anti-human TFRC antibody as a useful, novel treatment for oral dysplasia and OSCC. PMID:24890018

  4. Endemic mycosis complicating human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sarosi, G A; DAvies, S F

    1996-01-01

    Persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus are prone to the development of many fungal diseases. Normal hosts with intact immunity usually recover from infection by these less-invasive fungi. In persons with compromised T-cell-mediated immunity, however, widespread dissemination from a pulmonary focus occurs. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of the three major North American mycoses, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis. In most cases, amphotericin B is the initial drug of choice, followed by one of the azoles for lifelong maintenance therapy. PMID:8732733

  5. Barrier methods for human immunodeficiency virus prevention.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Ellen F; Hoesley, Craig J

    2014-12-01

    Condoms remain the most effective barrier against the sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Male condoms have proven to be 80% to 90% effective, and female condoms have similar results. Poor adherence and improper use limit their effectiveness. In addition to condoms, microbicides are a promising barrier against HIV transmission. More than 50 candidate topical microbicide compounds have undergone preclinical or clinical testing in the last 10 years, but there are currently no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds. Rectal microbicides are also being developed, as anal receptive sex is an effective mode of HIV transmission. PMID:25455315

  6. Humoral Primary Immunodeficiencies in Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Nayan, Smriti; Alizadehfar, Reza; Desrosiers, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) may be the primary presenting symptom for primary immunodeficiencies (PID). PID can affect the humoral or the cellular immune system. This paper provides an overview of PID which affect the humoral immune system, with details around the diagnostic criteria, the epidemiology, the subtypes, the clinical manifestations, underlying molecular mechanisms, methods to screen for PID and the management of CRS in the context of PID. A high clinical suspicion of PID is required when assessing patients with CRS who are refractory to maximal medical therapy. PMID:26149586

  7. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiencies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-10-14

    Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; Graft Versus Host Disease; X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; Familial Erythrophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Hyper IgM Syndrome; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome; Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome

  8. Neonatal Screening for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Population-based newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and related disorders has been instituted in five states, with several more planning to add this testing to their newborn screening panels. This review summarizes the rationale, development, and implementation of SCID screening programs to date and highlights current and future challenges. Recent findings Early results of T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) testing newborns in pilot states indicate that this addition to the newborn screening panel can be successfully integrated into state public health programs. The TREC test has clinical validity and TRECs, as predicted, are an excellent biomarker of poor T-cell lymphocyte production in the thymus or increased lymphocyte loss resulting in T-cell lymphopenia. A variety of cases with typical SCID genotypes and other conditions have been detected in a timely manner and referred for appropriate early treatment. Summary Early detection of primary immunodeficiency is recognized as important for avoiding infectious complications that compromise outcomes. Routine screening of all newborns with the TREC test, implemented as part of an integrated public health program, can achieve pre-symptomatic diagnosis of SCID and other disorders with T-cell lymphopenia, allowing prompt and effective treatment and leading to a better understanding of the spectrum of these disorders and how to manage them. PMID:22001765

  9. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  10. Neutral pion number fluctuations

    E-print Network

    Elena Kokoulina

    2011-10-13

    Neutral pion number fluctuations have been measured in proton interactions at U-70 accelerator (IHEP, Protvino). The experiment is carried out on the SVD-2 setup. Charged and neutral particles are registered simultaneously. The reconstruction of $\\pi ^0$-mesons is fulfilled by means of observed gamma quanta at the electromagnetic calorimeter. The corrections on the setup acceptance, triggering, efficiencies of detectors and the reconstruction algorithm are included. The multiplicity distributions of the neutral pions have permitted to define the scaled variance, $\\omega $, for $\\pi ^0$-mesons. The revealed sharp growth of fluctuations of the neutral pion number at total meson multiplicities more than 22 can indicate the Bose-Einstein condensate formation.

  11. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  12. Protection of human immunodeficiency virus type 2-exposed seronegative macaques from mucosal simian immunodeficiency virus transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Putkonen, P; Mäkitalo, B; Böttiger, D; Biberfeld, G; Thorstensson, R

    1997-01-01

    At present it is not known which form of immunity would be most effective against infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To evaluate the possible role of cellular immunity, we examined whether four HIV type 2-exposed but seronegative macaques developed cellular immune responses and determined whether these exposed macaques were resistant to mucosal transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Following intrarectal challenge with SIV, 2 monkeys were protected against detectable SIV replication and another showed suppressed viral replication compared to 14 persistently infected controls. The two protected monkeys demonstrated SIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes before as well as after SIV challenge. Here we provide evidence that activation of the cell-mediated arm of the immune system only, without antibody formation, can control SIV replication in macaques. The results imply that vaccines that stimulate a strong and broad cellular immune response could prevent mucosal HIV transmission. PMID:9188561

  13. Feline immunodeficiency virus: an interesting model for AIDS studies and an important cat pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Bendinelli, M; Pistello, M; Lombardi, S; Poli, A; Garzelli, C; Matteucci, D; Ceccherini-Nelli, L; Malvaldi, G; Tozzini, F

    1995-01-01

    The lentivirus feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a widespread pathogen of the domestic cat that is mainly transmitted through bites, although other means of transmission are also possible. Its prevalence ranges from 1 to 10% in different cat populations throughout the world, thus representing a large reservoir of naturally infected animals. FIV resembles the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in many respects. Similarities include the structural features of the virion, the general organization and great variability of the genome, the life cycle in the infected host, and most importantly, the pathogenic potential. Infection is associated with laboratory signs of immunosuppression as well as with a large variety of superinfections, tumors, and neurological manifestations. Our understanding of FIV is steadily improving and is providing important clues to the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency-inducing lentiviruses. The cellular receptor for FIV is different from the feline equivalent of the human CD4 molecule used by HIV; nevertheless, the major hallmark of infection is a progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes as in HIV infection. The mechanisms by which FIV escapes the host's immune responses are being actively investigated. FIV causes lysis of infected T cells and also appears to predispose these cells to apoptosis. Infection of macrophages and other cell types has also been documented. For reasons yet to be understood, antibody-mediated neutralization of fresh FIV isolates is very inefficient both in vitro and in vivo. Vaccination studies have provided some encouraging results, but the difficulties encountered appear to match those met in HIV vaccine development. FIV susceptibility to antiviral agents is similar to that of HIV, thus providing a valuable system for in vivo preclinical evaluation of therapies. It is concluded that in many respects FIV is an ideal model for AIDS studies. PMID:7704896

  14. Mutations in IRF8 and Human Dendritic Cell Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, Sophie; Salem, Sandra; Bustamante, Jacinta; Bigley, Venetia; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Azevedo, Joana; Fortin, Anny; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Ceron-Gutierrez, Lourdes; Bacon, Chris; Menon, Geetha; Trouillet, Céline; McDonald, David; Carey, Peter; Ginhoux, Florent; Alsina, Laia; Zumwalt, Timothy J; Kong, Xiaofei; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Butler, Karina; Hubeau, Marjorie; Feinberg, Jacqueline; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Cant, Andrew; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Doffinger, Rainer; Talesnik, Eduardo; Grumach, Anete; Duarte, Alberto; Abarca, Katia; Moraes-Vasconcelos, Dewton; Burk, David; Berghuis, Albert; Geissmann, Frédéric; Collin, Matthew; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Gros, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic analysis of human primary immunodeficiencies has defined the contribution of specific cell populations and molecular pathways in host defense against infections. Disseminated infection caused by BCG vaccines is an early manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies, such as severe combined immunodeficiency. In many affected individuals, the etiology of disseminated BCG disease is unexplained. Methods We investigated an infant presenting with features of severe immunodeficiency, including early-onset disseminated BCG disease, requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We also studied two otherwise healthy adults with a history of disseminated but curable BCG disease in childhood. We characterized the monocyte and dendritic cells compartments in these three persons and sequenced candidate genes, mutation of which could plausibly confer susceptibility to BCG disease. Results We detected two distinct disease-causing mutations affecting the transcriptional regulator IRF8. Both K108A and T80A mutations impair IRF8 transcriptional activity by disrupting IRF8 interaction with DNA. Mutation K108E was associated with an autosomal recessive severe immunodeficiency with a complete lack of circulating monocytes and dendritic cells. Mutation T80A was associated with an autosomal dominant milder immunodeficiency and a selective depletion of CD11c+ CD1c+ circulating dendritic cells. Conclusions These findings define a new class of human primary immunodeficiency, affecting the differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes. They also demonstrate that human IRF8 is critically required for the development of monocytes and dendritic cells and for anti-mycobacterial immunity. PMID:21524210

  15. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F; Jeggo, Penny A; Martin, Olga A

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of ? histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  16. Immunodeficiency in Vici syndrome: a heterogeneous phenotype.

    PubMed

    Finocchi, Andrea; Angelino, Giulia; Cantarutti, Nicoletta; Corbari, Maurizio; Bevivino, Elsa; Cascioli, Simona; Randisi, Francesco; Bertini, Enrico; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo

    2012-02-01

    Vici syndrome is a rare congenital multisystem disorder characterized by agenesis of the corpus callosum, hypotonia, developmental delay, hypopigmentation, cataract, cardiomyopathy, and immunological abnormalities. Recurrent infections, mainly affecting the respiratory tract, have been reported in the majority of cases, representing an important risk factor for morbidity and mortality. The immunological phenotype of patients is extremely variable, ranging from a combined immunodeficiency to nearly normal immunity. We report on a new patient with Vici syndrome, in whom we have extensively investigated immunological features. Despite a mild impairment of the cellular compartment, a defect of humoral immunity was found, requiring treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. A wider knowledge of immune system abnormalities of Vici syndrome will help to plan strategies for treatment and prevention of infections, such as immunoglobulin replacement and antimicrobial prophylaxis, resulting in improved survival rates. PMID:21965116

  17. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Budding?

    PubMed Central

    Luttge, Benjamin G.; Shehu-Xhilaga, Miranda; Demirov, Dimiter G.; Adamson, Catherine S.; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Stephen, Andrew G.; Fisher, Robert J.; Freed, Eric O.

    2008-01-01

    Infection of domestic cats with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is an important model system for studying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection due to numerous similarities in pathogenesis induced by these two lentiviruses. However, many molecular aspects of FIV replication remain poorly understood. It is well established that retroviruses use short peptide motifs in Gag, known as late domains, to usurp cellular endosomal sorting machinery and promote virus release from infected cells. For example, the Pro-Thr/Ser-Ala-Pro [P(T/S)AP] motif of HIV-1 Gag interacts directly with Tsg101, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport I (ESCRT-I). A Tyr-Pro-Asp-Leu (YPDL) motif in equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), and a related sequence in HIV-1, bind the endosomal sorting factor Alix. In this study we sought to identify and characterize FIV late domain(s) and elucidate cellular machinery involved in FIV release. We determined that mutagenesis of a PSAP motif in FIV Gag, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Tsg101 expression, and overexpression of a P(T/S)AP-binding fragment of Tsg101 (TSG-5?) each inhibited FIV release. We also observed direct binding of FIV Gag peptides to Tsg101. In contrast, mutagenesis of a potential Alix-binding motif in FIV Gag did not affect FIV release. Similarly, expression of the HIV-1/EIAV Gag-binding domain of Alix (Alix-V) did not disrupt FIV budding, and FIV Gag peptides showed no affinity for Alix-V. Our data demonstrate that FIV relies predominantly on a Tsg101-binding PSAP motif in the C terminus of Gag to promote virus release in HeLa cells, and this budding mechanism is highly conserved in feline cells. PMID:18094166

  19. Primary Immunodeficiencies Associated with EBV Disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects nearly all humans and usually is asymptomatic, or in the case of adolescents and young adults, it can result in infectious mononucleosis. EBV-infected B cells are controlled primarily by NK cells, iNKT cells, CD4 T cells, and CD8 T cells. While mutations in proteins important for B cell function can affect EBV infection of these cells, these mutations do not result in severe EBV infection. Some genetic disorders affecting T and NK cell function result in failure to control EBV infection, but do not result in increased susceptibility to other virus infections. These include mutations in SH2D1A, BIRC4, ITK, CD27, MAGT1, CORO1A, and LRBA. Since EBV is the only virus that induces proliferation of B cells, the study of these diseases has helped to identify proteins critical for interactions of T and/or NK cells with B cells. Mutations in three genes associated with hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis, PRF1, STXBP2, and UNC13D, can also predispose to severe chronic active EBV disease. Severe EBV infection can be associated with immunodeficiencies that also predispose to other viral infections and in some cases other bacterial and fungal infections. These include diseases due to mutations in PIK3CD, PIK3R1, CTPS1, STK4, GATA2, MCM4, FCGR3A, CARD11, ATM, and WAS. In addition, patients with severe combined immunodeficiency, which can be due to mutations in a number of different genes, are at high risk for various infections as well as EBV B cell lymphomas. Identification of proteins important for control of EBV may help to identify new targets for immunosuppressive therapies. PMID:26424649

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Persidsky, Y.; Limoges, J.; McComb, R.; Bock, P.; Baldwin, T.; Tyor, W.; Patil, A.; Nottet, H. S.; Epstein, L.; Gelbard, H.; Flanagan, E.; Reinhard, J.; Pirruccello, S. J.; Gendelman, H. E.

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is neuroinvasive and commonly causes cognitive and motor deficits during the later stages of viral infection. (referred to as HIV dementia). The mechanism(s) for disease revolves around secretory products produced from immune-activated brain macrophages/microglia. Recently, we developed an animal model system for HIV dementia that contains xenografts of HIV-1-infected cells inoculated into brains of mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). This animal system was used to quantitatively evaluate HIV-induced neuropathology. Xenografts of HIV-1-infected human monocytes (placed into the putamen and cortex of SCID mice) remained viable for 5 weeks. HIV-1 p24 antigen expression in mouse brain was persistent. Progressive inflammatory responses (including astrogliosis and cytokine production), which began at 3 days, peaked at day 12. The range of astrocyte proliferative reactions exceeded the inoculation site by > 1000 microns. Brains with virus-infected monocytes showed a > or = 1.6-fold increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (staining distribution and intensity) as compared with similarly inoculated brains with uninfected control monocytes. These findings paralleled the accumulation and activation of murine microglia (increased branching of cell processes, formation of microglial nodules, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 expression). An inflammatory reaction of human monocytes (as defined by HLA-DR, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression) and neuronal injury (apoptosis) also developed after virus-infected monocyte xenograft placement into mouse brain tissue. These data, taken together, demonstrate that this SCID mouse model of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis can reproduce key aspects of disease (virus-infected macrophages, astrocytosis, microglial activation, and neuronal damage). This model may serve as an important means for therapeutic development directed toward improving mental function in HIV-infected subjects with cognitive and motor dysfunction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:8780406

  1. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:26235050

  2. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:26235050

  3. Experimental sialodacryoadenitis virus infection in severe combined immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Percy, D H; Williams, K L; Croy, B A

    1991-01-01

    Mice with a severe combined immunodeficiency in B and T lymphocytes and natural killer cells (SCID-beige) were inoculated intranasally with sialodacryoadenitis (SDA) virus, a coronavirus of rats. Animals were killed at designated intervals and tissues were examined for evidence of viral infection by light microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy. Based on these criteria, there was no evidence that these immunodeficient mice were susceptible to infection with SDA virus. PMID:1653101

  4. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    E-print Network

    Kunkel, W.B.

    2012-01-01

    kV atomic hydrogen and deuterium injection systems. Totalof the injection and capture of energetic neutral hydrogeninjection systems, for three initial deuterium-ion-species compositions and three equivalent hydrogen-

  5. Is dispersal neutral?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Winsor H; McPeek, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal is difficult to quantify and often treated as purely stochastic and extrinsically controlled. Consequently, there remains uncertainty about how individual traits mediate dispersal and its ecological effects. Addressing this uncertainty is crucial for distinguishing neutral versus non-neutral drivers of community assembly. Neutral theory assumes that dispersal is stochastic and equivalent among species. This assumption can be rejected on principle, but common research approaches tacitly support the 'neutral dispersal' assumption. Theory and empirical evidence that dispersal traits are under selection should be broadly integrated in community-level research, stimulating greater scrutiny of this assumption. A tighter empirical connection between the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape dispersal will enable richer understanding of this fundamental process and its role in community assembly. PMID:24962790

  6. Policy on Gender Neutral Housing Policy on Gender-Neutral

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Gender Neutral Housing 10/01/2013 Policy on Gender-Neutral Housing I. Purpose and Scope Gender-neutral housing gives students the option to reside with another student, regardless of sex, gender, gender identity or gender expression. II. Definitions Gender-neutral housing is defined

  7. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Vance D.; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to abnormalities in systemic immune function, patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the pre-AIDS syndromes have significant abnormalities in the distribution of T-cell subsets in the intestinal tract. Such immune deficits predispose such patients to opportunistic infections and tumors, many of which involve the gastrointestinal tract. For example, Candida albicans often causes stomatitis and esophagitis. Intestinal infections with parasites (Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia) or bacteria (Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare) are associated with severe diarrhea and malabsorption, whereas viruses like cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus cause mucosal ulcerations. Clinically debilitating chronic diarrhea develops in many AIDS patients for which no clear cause can be identified. Enteric pathogens like Salmonella and Campylobacter can be associated with bacteremias. Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma involving the intestinal tract are now well-recognized complications of AIDS. Although AIDS is not associated with a pathognomonic liver lesion, opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma or lymphoma may involve the liver. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:3825111

  8. Immunodeficiency and laser magnetic therapy in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maati, Moufagued; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Avdoshin, V. P.

    1996-11-01

    The importance of immunodeficiency problem has increased last time not only due to AIDS appearance, but also to a great extent as a result of the development and active practical use of the methods of immunology parameters investigations. Al great pharmaceutical firms are organizing the process of creating the drugs, influencing on the different phases of immunity, but unfortunately, the problem of their adverse effect and connected complications is till today a milestone. A great number of investigations, proving a good effect of laser-magnetic therapy concerning immune system have been done today. There is, in particular, changing of blood counts and immunologic tests after intravenous laser irradiation of blood. Intravenous laser irradiation of blood results in increasing of lymphocytes, T-immuno stimulation, stabilization of t-lymphocyte subpopulation, increasing of t-lymphocyte helper activity and decreasing of suppressor one.Under this laser action number of circulating immune complexes is decreased, and blood serum bactericide activity and lisozyme number are increased.

  9. Reduced intensity transplantation for primary immunodeficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Veys, Paul

    2011-06-22

    Studies so far indicate that reduced intensity transplantation (RIT) may have an important role in treating patients with primary immunodeficiency disease (PID). Unlike more standard approaches, such regimens can be used without severe toxicity in patients with severe pulmonary or hepatic disease. RIT also offers the advantage that long-term sequelae such as infertility or growth retardation may be avoided or reduced. RIT appears to be most appropriate for those patients with significant co-morbidities (eg T cell deficiencies) and those undergoing unrelated donor haematopoietic cell transplantation. More studies are required using pharmacokinetic monitoring (eg busulphan, treosulfan and alemtuzumab) and varying stem cell sources to optimise graft vs marrow reactions and minimise graft vs host disease. In certain PID patients RIT will be the "first step" towards establishing donor cell engraftment; second infusions of donor stem cells, donor lymphocyte infusions, or a second myeloablative HCT, which appears to be well tolerated, may be required in some patients with low level donor chimerism or graft rejection. PMID:22053273

  10. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  11. [Neonatal screening of severe combined immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, C; Mirallié, S; Pierres, C; Dert, C; Clément, M-C; Mahlaoui, N; Durand-Zaleski, I; Fischer, A; Audrain, M

    2015-06-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) are a group of inherited diseases of the immune system characterized by profound abnormalities of T-cell development. Infants with SCID require prompt clinical intervention to prevent life-threatening infection and studies show significantly improved survival in babies diagnosed at birth based on previous family history. SCID follows the criteria for population-based newborn screening because it is asymptomatic at birth and fatal within the 1st year of life if there is no intervention, the confirmation of the disease is easy, there is a curative treatment, and it is known that early hematopoietic stem cell transplantation significantly improves survival, the quality of immune reconstitution, and quality of life. Quantification of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) in DNA extracted from Guthrie samples is a sensitive and specific screening test for SCID. We conducted a nationwide prospective study of neonatal screening of SCID in a population of 200,000 French newborns over a period of 2 years. The objective was to study the clinical utility and the cost-effectiveness ratio, and to demonstrate that universal SCID screening could result in a substantial benefit to detect individuals, making screening relatively cost-effective in spite of the low incidence of the disease. PMID:25896629

  12. Reduced intensity transplantation for primary immunodeficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    Veys, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Studies so far indicate that reduced intensity transplantation (RIT) may have an important role in treating patients with primary immunodeficiency disease (PID). Unlike more standard approaches, such regimens can be used without severe toxicity in patients with severe pulmonary or hepatic disease. RIT also offers the advantage that long-term sequelae such as infertility or growth retardation may be avoided or reduced. RIT appears to be most appropriate for those patients with significant co-morbidities (eg T cell deficiencies) and those undergoing unrelated donor haematopoietic cell transplantation. More studies are required using pharmacokinetic monitoring (eg busulphan, treosulfan and alemtuzumab) and varying stem cell sources to optimise graft vs marrow reactions and minimise graft vs host disease. In certain PID patients RIT will be the “first step” towards establishing donor cell engraftment; second infusions of donor stem cells, donor lymphocyte infusions, or a second myeloablative HCT, which appears to be well tolerated, may be required in some patients with low level donor chimerism or graft rejection. PMID:22053273

  13. Lentiviral gene therapy against human immunodeficiency virus type 1, using a novel human TRIM21-cyclophilin A restriction factor.

    PubMed

    Chan, Emma; Schaller, Torsten; Eddaoudi, Ayad; Zhan, Hong; Tan, Choon Ping; Jacobsen, Marianne; Thrasher, Adrian J; Towers, Greg J; Qasim, Waseem

    2012-11-01

    TRIM5? (tripartite motif-containing protein-5, isoform ?)-cyclophilin A fusion proteins are anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) restriction factors that have evolved in certain nonhuman primates over millions of years and protect against HIV and related viruses. Restriction by TRIM5?CypA is potent and highly resistant to viral escape by mutation and, in combination with a suitable gene delivery platform, offers the possibility of novel therapeutic approaches against HIV. Here we report that lentiviral vector delivery of human mimics of TRIM5?-cyclophilin A (TRIM5CypA) fusion proteins afforded robust and durable protection against HIV-1, but resulted in downregulation of host cell antiviral responses mediated by endogenous TRIM5?. We found that substitution of TRIM5? RING, B-box, and coiled-coil domains with similar domains from a related TRIM protein, TRIM21, produced a novel and equally potent inhibitor of HIV-1. Both TRIM5CypA and TRIM21CypA inhibited transduction by HIV-1-derived viral vectors and prevented propagation of replication-competent HIV-1 in human cell lines and in primary human T cells. Restriction factor-modified T cells exhibited preferential survival in the presence of wild-type HIV. Restriction was dependent on proteasomal degradation and was reversed in the presence of the cyclophilin inhibitor cyclosporin. Importantly, TRIM21CypA did not disturb endogenous TRIM5?-mediated restriction of gammaretroviral infection. Furthermore, endogenous TRIM21 antiviral activity was assessed by measuring inhibition of adenovirus-antibody complexes and was found to be preserved in all TRIMCypA-modified groups. We conclude that lentivirus-mediated expression of the novel chimeric restriction factor TRIM21CypA provides highly potent protection against HIV-1 without loss of normal innate immune TRIM activity. PMID:22909012

  14. Development of a Comprehensive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Screening Algorithm for Discovery and Preclinical Testing of Topical Microbicides?

    PubMed Central

    Lackman-Smith, Carol; Osterling, Clay; Luckenbaugh, Katherine; Mankowski, Marie; Snyder, Beth; Lewis, Gareth; Paull, Jeremy; Profy, Albert; Ptak, Roger G.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Watson, Karen M.; Cummins, James E.; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte E.

    2008-01-01

    Topical microbicides are self-administered, prophylactic products for protection against sexually transmitted pathogens. A large number of compounds with known anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibitory activity have been proposed as candidate topical microbicides. To identify potential leads, an in vitro screening algorithm was developed to evaluate candidate microbicides in assays that assess inhibition of cell-associated and cell-free HIV-1 transmission, entry, and fusion. The algorithm advances compounds by evaluation in a series of defined assays that generate measurements of relative antiviral potency to determine advancement or failure. Initial testing consists of a dual determination of inhibitory activity in the CD4-dependent CCR5-tropic cell-associated transmission inhibition assay and in the CD4/CCR5-mediated HIV-1 entry assay. The activity is confirmed by repeat testing, and identified actives are advanced to secondary screens to determine their effect on transmission of CXCR4-tropic viruses in the presence or absence of CD4 and their ability to inhibit CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic envelope-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. In addition, confirmed active compounds are also evaluated in the presence of human seminal plasma, in assays incorporating a pH 4 to 7 transition, and for growth inhibition of relevant strains of lactobacilli. Leads may then be advanced for specialized testing, including determinations in human cervical explants and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells against primary HIV subtypes, combination testing with other inhibitors, and additional cytotoxicity assays. PRO 2000 and SPL7013 (the active component of VivaGel), two microbicide products currently being evaluated in human clinical trials, were tested in this in vitro algorithm and were shown to be highly active against CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 infection. PMID:18316528

  15. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  16. Immunoassay for detection of antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus and human immunodeficiency virus in serum.

    PubMed

    Otsyula, M G; Yee, J A; Suleman, M A; Marx, P A; Jennings, M B

    1996-04-01

    We developed a simple, inexpensive, rapid assay for the detection of antibodies to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serum. The immunoassay uses inactivated SIV and HIV-1 gp41 transmembrane recombinant protein as antigenic adsorbents on a nitrocellulose filter membrane. Diluted serum, with the addition of Protein-A-Gold, is gravity-filtered through the filter membrane, blocked, and buffer-washed. Antibodies to HIV or SIV or both in serum bind to the appropriate antigen, and the resulting antigen-antibody complex reacts with Protein-A-Gold to produce a readable pink color. Field evaluation of the test on 30 human and 70 nonhuman primate sera in Kenya and Zaire indicated that the test had at least 93 and 90% correlation with Western blot sensitivity and specificity respectively. Prior refrigeration of the test kit and incubation of sera during testing were not required. This result indicates that the test may be a rapid, economical, and simple test for detecting HIV, SIV, or both in serum. This immunoassay can be useful for carrying out HIV and SIV serosurveys in countries with limited or no laboratory facilities. PMID:8723237

  17. Structure-Activity Relationships in the Binding of Chemically Derivatized CD4 to gp120 from Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    E-print Network

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1a) is the primary cause of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).1,2 Among 20 Immunodeficiency Virus Hui Xie,#,3 Danny Ng,§,| Sergey N. Savinov,§, Barna Dey, Peter D. Kwong, Richard Wyatt, Amos

  18. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import via Vpr-Importin {alpha} interactions as a novel HIV-1 therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nonaka, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Yoshie; Matsuda, Go; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsuyama, Megumi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Kato, Shingo; Aida, Yoko

    2009-03-20

    The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. One such target is the interaction between Vpr, one of the accessory gene products of HIV-1 and Importin {alpha}, which is crucial, not only for the nuclear import of Vpr, but also for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. We have identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner. Analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that hematoxylin specifically inhibited nuclear import step of pre-integration complex. Thus, hematoxylin is a new anti-HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the interaction between viral protein and the cellular factor may provide a new strategy for HIV-1 therapy.

  19. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Results Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the patients with posterior versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. The most common ocular manifestation was retinal microvasculopathy (15.0%), followed by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (14.2%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (9.4%), cytomegalovirus retinitis (3.1%), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (2.4%), and blepharitis (1.6%). Retinal microvasculopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis were common in patients with CD4+ counts <200 cells/µL, while keratoconjunctivitis sicca and conjunctival microvasculopathy were common in patients with CD4+ counts of 200 to 499 cells/µL. There was a significant (p < 0.05) association between ocular manifestation and CD4+ count or age. Conclusions The introduction of HAART has changed the landscape of ocular presentations in patients with AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. We found that CD4+ count and age >35 years were independent risk factors for developing ocular manifestations. PMID:26240508

  20. Antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lortholary, O; Dupont, B

    1997-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with almost all types of immunodeficiencies. These infections may be nosocomial (aspergillosis) or community acquired (cryptococcosis), or both (candidiasis). Endemic mycoses such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and penicilliosis may infect many immunocompromised hosts in some geographic areas and thereby create major public health problems. With the wide availability of oral azoles, antifungal prophylactic strategies have been extensively developed. However, only a few well-designed studies involving strict criteria have been performed, mostly in patients with hematological malignancies or AIDS. In these situations, the best dose and duration of administration of the antifungal drug often remain to be determined. In high-risk neutropenic or bone marrow transplant patients, fluconazole is effective for the prevention of superficial and/or systemic candidal infections but is not always able to prolong overall survival and potentially selects less susceptible or resistant Candida spp. Primary prophylaxis against aspergillosis remains investigative. At present, no standard general recommendation for primary antifungal prophylaxis can be proposed for AIDS patients or transplant recipients. However, for persistently immunocompromised patients who previously experienced a noncandidal systemic fungal infection, prolonged suppressive antifungal therapy is often indicated to prevent a relapse. Better strategies for controlling immune deficiencies should also help to avoid some potentially life-threatening deep mycoses. When prescribing antifungal prophylaxis, physicians should be aware of the potential emergence of resistant strains, drug-drug interactions, and the cost. Well-designed, randomized, multicenter clinical trials in high-risk immunocompromised hosts are urgently needed to better define how to prevent severe invasive mycoses. PMID:9227863

  1. Role of a Putative gp41 Dimerization Domain in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Membrane Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Deng, Y; Li, Q; Dey, A; Moore, J; Lu, M

    2010-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into a target cell entails a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates the fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. A trimer-of-hairpins structure formed by the association of two heptad repeat (HR) regions of the gp41 ectodomain has been implicated in a late step of the fusion pathway. Earlier native and intermediate states of the protein are postulated to mediate the antiviral activity of the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NAbs), but the details of these structures remain unknown. Here, we report the identification and crystal structure of a dimerization domain in the C-terminal ectodomain of gp41 (residues 630 to 683, or C54). Two C54 monomers associate to form an asymmetric, antiparallel coiled coil with two distinct C-terminal {alpha}-helical overhangs. This dimer structure is conferred largely by interactions within a central core that corresponds to the sequence of enfuvirtide. The mutagenic alteration of the dimer interface severely impairs the infectivity of Env-pseudotyped viruses. Moreover, the C54 structure binds tightly to both the 2F5 and 4E10 NAbs and likely represents a potential intermediate conformation of gp41. These results should enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of the gp41 fusogenic structural transitions and thereby guide rational, structure-based efforts to design new fusion inhibitors and vaccine candidates intended to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  2. Feline immunodeficiency virus vaccination: characterization of the immune correlates of protection.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, M J; Flynn, J N

    1996-01-01

    Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines derived from the FL4 cell line protect cats against challenge with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). To investigate the correlates of protective immunity induced by WIV, we established an immunization regimen which protected a proportion of the vaccinates against challenge. A strong correlation was observed between high virus neutralizing antibody titers and protection following challenge. To investigate further the immune mechanisms responsible for immunity, all of the vaccinates were rechallenged 35 weeks following the initial challenge. Results of virus isolation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells indicated that 9 of 10 vaccinates were protected from viremia following the second challenge, suggesting that vaccine-induced immunity to FIV persisted for at least 8 months. However, more stringent analysis for evidence of infection revealed that 5 of 10 vaccinates harbored virus in lymphoid tissues. Unlike the protection observed immediately following vaccination, which correlated positively with virus neutralizing antibody titer, the ability to resist a second challenge with FIV was more closely correlated with the induction of Env-specific cytotoxic T-cell activity. The results indicate that both virus-specific humoral immunity and cellular immunity play a role in the protection induced in cats by WIV immunization but their relative importance may be dependent on the interval between vaccination and exposure to virus. PMID:8892875

  3. Failure of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immune globulin to protect chimpanzees against experimental challenge with HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, A M; Horowitz, B; Baker, L; Shulman, R W; Ralph, H; Valinsky, J; Cundell, A; Brotman, B; Boehle, W; Rey, F

    1988-01-01

    To assess the possible efficacy of passive immunization against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) an immune globulin was prepared from plasma of HIV-seropositive donors selected to be among those having the top 12.5% of virus-neutralizing antibody titers. The immune globulin was treated with pepsin to render it intravenously tolerable. The preparation, which we termed HIVIG, neutralized 100 tissue culture 50% infective doses (TCID50) of HIV at an average dilution of 1:1000 in neutralization tests in vitro. During preparation HIVIG was subjected to virus inactivation and removal procedures that in theory resulted in a reduction in HIV infectivity by a factor of 10(25). At a dose of 9-10 ml/kg of body weight both the virus-inactivated source plasma and the final immunoglobulin preparation were noninfective and without adverse effect in two chimpanzees. Two chimpanzees inoculated intravenously with HIVIG at 1 ml/kg and two inoculated with 10 ml/kg were challenged intravenously 1 day later with 400 TCID50 of the same strain of HIV (HTLV-IIIb) used in neutralization assays in vitro. All animals became infected. Incubation periods to virus isolation (by cocultivation with human mononuclear cells) in HIVIG recipients did not differ significantly from the incubation period seen in a control animal that received a normal anti-HIV-free immunoglobulin. These findings may have implications for understanding the failure of experimental vaccines to protect against HIV challenge in chimpanzee experiments. Images PMID:3413127

  4. Epidemiology of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and human immunodeficiency virus infection in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gayle, H D; D'Angelo, L J

    1991-04-01

    The epidemiology of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) in adolescents is important for purposes of prevention and car, since sexual and drug behavior is formed during this period. For 1990 the Centers for Disease Control reports .4% of AIDS cases are among adolescents 13-19 years old; this figure has steadily risen since 1982. 53% of the reported AIDS cases were from New York, Florida, California, Texas, Puerto Rico, and New Jersey, and has remained stable since 1984. 72% were from metropolitan areas of 1 million population, with a small decreasing trend between 1986-88. 75% of reported cases occurred between 17-19 years, and usually among males (80%) and ethnic minorities (36% African Americans and 18% Hispanics). The sex ratio dropped from 4:1 to 3:1 in 1988. Modes of transmission; indicator diseases and mortality; HIV seroprevalence data; risk of HIV transmission in adolescents; knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behavior; research needs; and prevention are discussed. From the studies available, it is reported that adolescents are aware that sexual intercourse and sharing IV drug needles are the main modes of HIV transmission. HIV transmission is more likely to be associated with homosexual contact. Misconceptions are that one could tell if a person were infected with HIV. Knowledge does not always translate to appropriate behavior. Perceived risk does decrease risky behavior, i.e., through abstinence or condom use. More information was desired. Research needs were identified as lagging behind present knowledge of children and adults, and necessary in clinical, epidemiologic, behavioral, and prevention aspects. The natural history of infection is limited to studies of hemophilia, where infected adolescents may have a lower rate of progression to AIDS or a longer incubation period or higher tolerance to severe immunodeficiency. Questions arise concerning the unique factors, such as hormonal changes, that influence the clinical course of the infection. Health care models need to be assessed. Identification of subpopulations that are at the highest risk is needed, i.e., the influence of the crack cocaine epidemic on HIV transmission. Prevention is seen in terms of new creative approaches, comprehensive school and nonschool health education, and behavioral techniques to avoid risky behavior throughout the health community. PMID:2062630

  5. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  6. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ...Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis...Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis...for reducing unexpected transmission of HIV, HBV and HCV from deceased and living...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  8. 76 FR 72417 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis...Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis...for reducing unexpected transmission of HIV, HBV and HCV from deceased and living...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866...In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification . The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy On this ... Glossary definitions Reviewed August 2014 What is T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy? T-cell ...

  13. 78 FR 33848 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral...Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infection: Developing Antiretroviral...early virologic changes for studies in heavily treatment-experienced...for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. It does not create or...

  14. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  15. Primary immunodeficiency update: Part I. Syndromes associated with eczematous dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Dominique C; Freeman, Alexandra F; Cowen, Edward W

    2015-09-01

    In the past decade, the availability of powerful molecular techniques has accelerated the pace of discovery of several new primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) and revealed the biologic basis of other established PIDs. These genetic advances, in turn, have facilitated more precise phenotyping of associated skin and systemic manifestations and provide a unique opportunity to better understand the complex human immunologic response. These continuing medical education articles will provide an update of recent advances in PIDs that may be encountered by dermatologists through their association with eczematous dermatitis, infectious, and non-infectious cutaneous manifestations. Part I will discuss new primary immunodeficiencies that have an eczematous dermatitis. Part II will focus on primary immunodeficiencies that greatly increase susceptibility to fungal infection and the noninfectious presentations of PIDs. PMID:26282794

  16. Recurrent Fevers for the Pediatric Immunologist: It's Not All Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are disorders of the innate immune system, characterized by systemic inflammation independent of infection and autoreactive antibodies or antigen-specific T cells. Similar to immunodeficiencies, these immune dysregulatory diseases have unique presentations, genetics, and available therapies. Given the presentation of fevers, rashes, and mucosal symptoms in many of the disorders, the allergist/immunologist is the appropriate medical home for these patients: to appropriately rule out immunodeficiencies, evaluate for allergic disease, and diagnose and treat recurrent fever disorders. However, many practicing physicians are unfamiliar with the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of autoinflammatory disorders. This review will focus on understanding the signs and symptoms of classic autoinflammatory disorders, introduce newly described monogenic and polygenic disorders, and address the approach to the patient with recurrent fevers to distinguish autoinflammation from immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. PMID:26707379

  17. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Anthony A.; Rosenthal, David G.; Bender Ignacio, Rachel; Chu, Helen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in immunocompromised hosts is a fulminant syndrome of immune activation with high rates of mortality that may be triggered by infections or immunodeficiency. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder is necessary to prevent progression to multiorgan failure and death. We report a case of HLH in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus, disseminated histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. We discuss management of acutely ill patients with HLH and treatment of the underlying infection versus initiation of HLH-specific chemotherapy. PMID:26566535

  18. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  19. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  20. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  1. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  2. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)...

  3. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  4. Targeted radiotherapy potentiates the cytotoxicity of a novel anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody and the adenovirus encoding soluble TRAIL in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Arafat, Waleed; Zhou, Tong; Naoum, George E; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2015-12-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) induces a death signal following binding to death receptors (DR4, DR5). We have developed a novel anti-human DR-5 monoclonal antibody (TRA-8) and adenoviral encoding TRAIL (Ad/TRAIL). Herein, we are testing the combined effect of radiotherapy and TRA-8 or Ad TRAIL in prostate cancer cells. Human prostate cancer cell lines LnCap, PC-3 and DU145 were used in this study. Cells were treated either with TRA-8 alone or Ad/TRAIL, radiation alone, or a combination of each at different doses and intervals. Cell survival using the MTS assay and colony forming assay were used to determine radiosensitization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect bax and bcl-2. Real-time PCR was performed on mRNA of treated prostate cancer cell lines. Finally, a murine model of subcutaneous prostate cancer was used to evaluate the in vivo effect. Cell survival assays detected by MTS assay showed that prostate cell lines treated with a combination of radiation and TRA-8 showed significantly lower survival than cells treated with either radiation or TRA-8 alone. Colony forming assay and cell proliferation assays showed increased killing after combination treatment with TRA-8 or Ad/TRAIL and radiation, than either single agent alone. Mechanistic studies showed that the killing effect was due to induction of apoptosis mostly by increased expression of bax in TRA-8 or Ad/TRAIL treated cells. Additionally, RT-PCR showed an increased copy number of bax in most cells treated with TRA-8 and radiation. It is concluded that radiation and TRA-8 or Ad/TRAIL produced a synergistic effect in refractory prostrate cancer. PMID:26385392

  5. Structural Basis for Broad and Potent Neutralization of HIV-1 by Antibody VRC01

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tongqing; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dai, Kaifan; Finzi, Andrés; Kwon, Young Do; Scheid, Johannes F.; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ling; Yang, Yongping; Zhu, Jiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Sodroski, Joseph; Shapiro, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-08-26

    During HIV-1 infection, antibodies are generated against the region of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein that binds CD4, the primary receptor for HIV-1. Among these antibodies, VRC01 achieves broad neutralization of diverse viral strains. We determined the crystal structure of VRC01 in complex with a human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 gp120 core. VRC01 partially mimics CD4 interaction with gp120. A shift from the CD4-defined orientation, however, focuses VRC01 onto the vulnerable site of initial CD4 attachment, allowing it to overcome the glycan and conformational masking that diminishes the neutralization potency of most CD4-binding-site antibodies. To achieve this recognition, VRC01 contacts gp120 mainly through immunoglobulin V-gene regions substantially altered from their genomic precursors. Partial receptor mimicry and extensive affinity maturation thus facilitate neutralization of HIV-1 by natural human antibodies.

  6. Absence of cytotoxic antibody to human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in humans and its induction in animals after infection or immunization with purified envelope glycoprotein gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, P.L.; Robey, W.G.; Gonda, M.A.; Carter, S.G.; Fischinger, P.J.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) was assessed in humans and chimpanzees, which are capable of infection with human immunodeficiency virus isolate HTLV-IIIb, and examined in the goat after immunization with the major viral glycoprotein (gp120) of HTLV-IIIb. In infected humans no antibody mediating ACC was observed regardless of the status of disease. Even healthy individuals with high-titer, broadly reactive, neutralizing antibodies has no ACC. In contrast, chimpanzees infected with HTLV-IIIb, from whom virus could be isolated, not only had neutralizing antibody but also antibodies broadly reactive in ACC, even against distantly related human immunodeficiency virus isolates, as well as against their own reisolated virus. In the goat, the gp120 of HTLV-IIIb induced a highly type-specific response as measured by both ACC and flow cytofluorometry of live infected H9 cells. Normal human cells were not subject to ACC by animal anti-HTLV-III gp120-specific sera. Induction of ACC and neutralizing antibody were closely correlated in the animal experimental models but not in humans. The presence of ACC in gp120-inoculated goats and HTLV-III-infected chimpanzees represent a qualitative difference that may be important in the quest for the elicitation of a protective immunity in humans.

  7. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  8. Between detection and neutralization.

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  9. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blank, Merle L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  10. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  11. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  12. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free Exercise and…

  13. The Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic, Washington, DC.

    This document presents findings of the Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic. The executive summary lists 20 major findings and recommendations which together comprise a comprehensive national strategy for managing the HIV epidemic. The commission recommends: (1) replacement of the obsolete term "AIDS"…

  14. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  15. Toxicity of oral radiotherapy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.; Fried, P.R.

    1987-03-01

    Although radiotherapy is a standard form of management of head and neck tumors, treatment of the oral cavity in patients who have the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has produced unacceptable toxicity. Five such patients are described as a warning of enhanced toxicity of oral radiotherapy in this patient population.

  16. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. PMID:25577549

  17. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus, as well as neuropsychiatric abnormalities in the brain. (TW)

  18. 1. Introduction The treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    E-print Network

    Gini, Giuseppina

    1. Introduction The treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection is a well-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, have a significant role in the treatment of HIV infection [5]. A series of 2-amino-6- arylsulfonylbenzonitriles are also known as effective anti-HIV-1 agents [6]. Finally

  19. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26011426

  20. Subject Control of the Literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that analyzed the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms used to index the literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Subject access to the AIDSLINE database developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is examined, and changes in subject headings that reflect the growth of the field are analyzed. (12…

  1. Myopericarditis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome diagnosed by gallium scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cregler, L.L.; Sosa, I.; Ducey, S.; Abbey, L. )

    1990-07-01

    Myocarditis is among the cardiac complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and, yet, is often not discovered until autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy has been employed in diagnosing this entity, but few data are available about its diagnostic accuracy and value. Here, the authors report two cases of myopericarditis as diagnosed by gallium scan.

  2. Frequent transmission of immunodeficiency viruses among bobcats and pumas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Boyce, W.M.; Riley, S.P.D.; Roelke, M.E.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which emerged in humans after cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from nonhuman primates, immunodeficiency viruses of the family Lentiviridae represent species-specific viruses that rarely cross species barriers to infect new hosts. Among the Felidae, numerous immunodeficiency-like lentiviruses have been documented, but only a few cross-species transmissions have been recorded, and these have not been perpetuated in the recipient species. Lentivirus seroprevalence was determined for 79 bobcats (Lynx rufus) and 31 pumas (Puma concolor) from well-defined populations in Southern California. Partial genomic sequences were subsequently obtained from 18 and 12 seropositive bobcats and pumas, respectively. Genotypes were analyzed for phylogenic relatedness and genotypic composition among the study set and archived feline lentivirus sequences. This investigation of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in bobcats and pumas of Southern California provides evidence that cross-species infection has occurred frequently among these animals. The data suggest that transmission has occurred in multiple locations and are most consistent with the spread of the virus from bobcats to pumas. Although the ultimate causes remain unknown, these transmission events may occur as a result of puma predation on bobcats, a situation similar to that which fostered transmission of HIV to humans, and likely represent the emergence of a lentivirus with relaxed barriers to cross-species transmission. This unusual observation provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the ecological, behavioral, and molecular conditions that favor repeated transmissions and persistence of lentivirus between species. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Gene-Based Vaccination with a Mismatched Envelope Protects against Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Flatz, Lukas; Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Shi, Wei; Bao, Saran; Todd, John-Paul; Asmal, Mohammed; Shen, Ling; Donaldson, Mitzi; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Gall, Jason G. D.; Pinschewer, Daniel D.; Letvin, Norman L.; Rao, Srinivas; Mascola, John R.; Roederer, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The RV144 trial demonstrated that an experimental AIDS vaccine can prevent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in humans. Because of its limited efficacy, further understanding of the mechanisms of preventive AIDS vaccines remains a priority, and nonhuman primate (NHP) models of lentiviral infection provide an opportunity to define immunogens, vectors, and correlates of immunity. In this study, we show that prime-boost vaccination with a mismatched SIV envelope (Env) gene, derived from simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239, prevents infection by SIVsmE660 intrarectally. Analysis of different gene-based prime-boost immunization regimens revealed that recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) prime followed by replication-defective lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (rLCMV) boost elicited robust CD4 and CD8 T-cell and humoral immune responses. This vaccine protected against infection after repetitive mucosal challenge with efficacies of 82% per exposure and 62% cumulatively. No effect was seen on viremia in infected vaccinated monkeys compared to controls. Protection correlated with the presence of neutralizing antibodies to the challenge viruses tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that a vaccine expressing a mismatched Env gene alone can prevent SIV infection in NHPs and identifies an immune correlate that may guide immunogen selection and immune monitoring for clinical efficacy trials. PMID:22593152

  4. Gene-based vaccination with a mismatched envelope protects against simian immunodeficiency virus infection in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Flatz, Lukas; Cheng, Cheng; Wang, Lingshu; Foulds, Kathryn E; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Shi, Wei; Bao, Saran; Todd, John-Paul; Asmal, Mohammed; Shen, Ling; Donaldson, Mitzi; Schmidt, Stephen D; Gall, Jason G D; Pinschewer, Daniel D; Letvin, Norman L; Rao, Srinivas; Mascola, John R; Roederer, Mario; Nabel, Gary J

    2012-08-01

    The RV144 trial demonstrated that an experimental AIDS vaccine can prevent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in humans. Because of its limited efficacy, further understanding of the mechanisms of preventive AIDS vaccines remains a priority, and nonhuman primate (NHP) models of lentiviral infection provide an opportunity to define immunogens, vectors, and correlates of immunity. In this study, we show that prime-boost vaccination with a mismatched SIV envelope (Env) gene, derived from simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239, prevents infection by SIVsmE660 intrarectally. Analysis of different gene-based prime-boost immunization regimens revealed that recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) prime followed by replication-defective lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (rLCMV) boost elicited robust CD4 and CD8 T-cell and humoral immune responses. This vaccine protected against infection after repetitive mucosal challenge with efficacies of 82% per exposure and 62% cumulatively. No effect was seen on viremia in infected vaccinated monkeys compared to controls. Protection correlated with the presence of neutralizing antibodies to the challenge viruses tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that a vaccine expressing a mismatched Env gene alone can prevent SIV infection in NHPs and identifies an immune correlate that may guide immunogen selection and immune monitoring for clinical efficacy trials. PMID:22593152

  5. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  6. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  7. Improbability of Effective Vaccination Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Because of Its Intracellular Transmission and Rectal Portal of Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, Albert B.

    1992-09-01

    The worldwide effort to produce a vaccine against AIDS continues to disregard the fact that even human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immunity are ineffective against virus within cells without viral antigens on the cell membrane-and that much of HIV infection is transmitted in this manner. According to a recent report, a simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine that protected monkeys against an intravenous challenge with cell-free virus was, as predicted, ineffective against an intravenous challenge with the same amount of virus in infected cells. Moreover, antibody and HIV have been found to coexist in cell-free plasma from asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Excluding direct introduction of HIV into the bloodstream, the most common and efficient form of transmission of HIV infection is by receptive anal intercourse, and semen contains large numbers of infected cells per milliliter. Recent reports showing that colorectal cells can be persistently infected by HIV and that HIV RNA and cDNA are present in the cells of the colon of dead AIDS patients indicate that either cell-free or intracellular HIV has the capacity to multiply at the portal of entry in the colorectal area without interference from neutralizing antibodies. The available data provide no basis for testing any HIV vaccine in human beings either before or after infection. The main challenge is to find a way to kill cells with chromosomally integrated HIV cDNA without harming normal cells, perhaps by identifying repressor proteins that might be produced by the cells with integrated HIV cDNA and thus could become specific targets for cell-killing drugs.

  8. A Critical Review of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection--And Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome-Related Research: The Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Janice M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the research literature related to nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), human immunodeficiency virus infection, and care of people with AIDS. Gaps in knowledge and negative, fearful attitudes were identified; negative fears and attitudes decreased with the gain in accurate…

  9. Transactivation of human immunodeficiency virus promoter by human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, R T; Wood, C; Balachandran, N

    1989-01-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are often infected with a number of other heterologous viruses in addition to the initial human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and these agents could act as potential reactivating agents of latent HIV. A new antigenically distinct herpesvirus, designated human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), has recently been isolated from patients with AIDS and has been shown to infect a number of different human cells, specifically human T cells, B cells, and glial cells. Since these are some of the same cells that harbor the AIDS virus, it is quite important to determine any interaction between this new herpesvirus and HIV. In this report, we demonstrate that HHV-6 can trans-activate the HIV promoter in human T-cell lines as measured by the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase. This indicates that stimulation of HIV gene expression by HHV-6 could play a role in HIV pathogenesis. Images PMID:2911127

  10. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  11. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  12. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  13. Detection of plasma viremia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals at all clinical stages.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, L Z; Werner, A; Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    Free virus (virus not present within cells) was detected in the plasma of all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals studied. Plasma samples from asymptomatic individuals and individuals with HIV disease were tested. The levels of virus varied, but high virus titers correlated directly with HIV-related symptoms and low CD4+ lymphocyte counts. Effective detection of infectious virus depended on the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for p24 core antigen and culture conditions in which plasma was added to mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes within 3 h of venipuncture. When there were delays in the time to culturing of plasma, neutralizing antibodies and perhaps other factors present in the plasma were found to reduce the efficiency of virus recovery. Plasma stored at -70 degrees C for several months maintained a stable level of free virus. These results suggest that measurement of HIV present in plasma under optimal conditions could be an efficient way of monitoring the clinical state of an individual and the effects of antiviral therapy. PMID:8094395

  14. Chemokine-adjuvanted electroporated DNA vaccine induces substantial protection from simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutzler, M A; Wise, M C; Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M A; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D G; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P A; Weiner, D B

    2016-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG responses in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P<0.01) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared with only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where six of nine animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P<0.001). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  15. Increased suppressor T cells in probable transmitters of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Seage, G R; Horsburgh, C R; Hardy, A M; Mayer, K H; Barry, M A; Groopman, J E; Jaffe, H W; Lamb, G A

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate behavioral and immunologic factors related to transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by homosexual intercourse, we studied a population of 329 homosexual/bisexual men (155 partner-pairs) seen in a community health center and medical outpatient clinic. Logistic regression analysis showed that behavioral risk factors for infection in the 130 HIV-infected men included: receptive anal intercourse (OR 4.6, 95% CI-1.8, 12.1); receptive fisting (OR 2.5, CI-1.1, 7.0); nitrite use (OR 2.3, CI-1.2, 4.6); history of gonorrhea or syphilis (OR 2.3, CI-1.4, 3.9); and history of sexual contact with men from areas with many AIDS cases (OR 1.9, CI-1.0, 3.5). Comparing seven men who were probable transmitters of HIV and 11 men who had not transmitted HIV to their uninfected partners despite unprotected insertive anal intercourse, we found no differences in HIV isolation from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, circulating HIV antigen detection, or presence of neutralizing antibody to HIV. Helper T-cell numbers were not significantly different between the two groups, but transmitters had more suppressor T-cells than did nontransmitters. PMID:2530906

  16. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  17. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Wyand, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.

  18. Neurogenic bladder in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, V; Valls, J; Espuña, M; Pérez, A; Barranco, M A; Carretero, P

    1995-01-01

    We have performed a urodynamic study on 3 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), presenting with a neurogenic bladder. The first patient had an ascending myelitis of probable herpetic origin, the second patient had a cerebral abscess caused by Toxoplasma gondii, and the third patient had an AIDS dementia complex. The urodynamic study showed an areflexic detrusor in the first 2 patients, and a hyperreflexic detrusor in the third patient. PMID:7647807

  19. Ralstonia pickettii-Induced Ataxia in Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Marion; Medaille, Christine; Simon, Meredith; Serre, Stéphanie; Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2009-01-01

    We report here the characterization of an asymmetric ataxia syndrome (head tilt and circling, with death in the most severe cases) demonstrated by profoundly immunodeficient mice housed at the Institut Curie SPF facility. The immune system of the affected mice had been genetically modified so that they were deficient in both B and T cells. Extensive bacteriologic, parasitic, serologic, and histopathologic analysis of the affected animals and their healthy controls led us to identify Ralstonia pickettii as the causative agent of the ataxic syndrome. The outbreak was managed through a test-and-cull process. Even though they also carried Ralstonia pickettii, immunocompetent mice that were kept in the same facility, did not show any of the signs that were expressed by their immunodeficient counterparts. This case highlights the difficulty of maintaining immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice in the same microbiologic unit and the importance of enlarging the spectrum of health monitoring to opportunistic agents when investigating clinical cases in populations of immunocompromised rodents. PMID:19389312

  20. A nonsense mutation in IKBKB causes combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mousallem, Talal; Yang, Jialong; Urban, Thomas J.; Wang, Hongxia; Adeli, Mehdi; Parrott, Roberta E.; Roberts, Joseph L.; Goldstein, David B.; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the molecular etiologies of primary immunodeficiencies has led to important insights into the development and function of the immune system. We report here the cause of combined immunodeficiency in 4 patients from 2 different consanguineous Qatari families with similar clinical and immunologic phenotypes. The patients presented at an early age with fungal, viral, and bacterial infections and hypogammaglobulinemia. Although their B- and T-cell numbers were normal, they had low regulatory T-cell and NK-cell numbers. Moreover, patients’ T cells were mostly CD45RA+-naive cells and were defective in activation after T-cell receptor stimulation. All patients contained the same homozygous nonsense mutation in IKBKB (R286X), revealed by whole-exome sequencing with undetectable IKK? and severely decreased NEMO proteins. Mutant IKK?(R286X) was unable to complex with IKK?/NEMO. Immortalized patient B cells displayed impaired I?B? phosphorylation and NF?B nuclear translocation. These data indicate that mutated IKBKB is the likely cause of immunodeficiency in these 4 patients. PMID:25139357

  1. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: An Update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Al-Herz, Waleed; Bousfiha, Aziz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chapel, Helen; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Fischer, Alain; Franco, Jose Luis; Geha, Raif S.; Hammarström, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Notarangelo, Luigi Daniele; Ochs, Hans Dieter; Puck, Jennifer M.; Roifman, Chaim M.; Seger, Reinhard; Tang, Mimi L. K.

    2011-01-01

    We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiency diseases, compiled by the ad hoc Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. As compared to the previous edition, more than 15 novel disease entities have been added in the updated version. For each disorders, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This updated classification is meant to help in the diagnostic approach to patients with these diseases. PMID:22566844

  2. Neutralization tests on the SERT 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutralization test data obtained on the SERT 2 spacecraft are presented. Tests included ion beam neutralization of a thruster by a close (normal design) neutralizer as well as by a distant (1 meter) neutralizer. Parameters affecting neutralization, such as neutralizer bias voltage, neutralizer anode voltage, local spacecraft plasma density, and solar array voltage configuration were varied and changes in plasma potentials were measured. A plasma model is presented as an approximation of observed results.

  3. Epstein-Barr and human immunodeficiency viruses in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgello, S.

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma was examined. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from 12 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumors was used as substrate for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Targets for amplification were the EBNA-1 region of EBV, the gag region of HIV, and a single copy cellular sequence as a control. The cases studied were autopsy and surgical specimens collected between the years 1985 and 1989. By the working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, five had large cell, four had mixed large and small cleaved cell, two had small cleaved cell, and one had an unclassified histology. Epstein-Barr virus was detected in 6 of 12 tumors studied. Human immunodeficiency virus was not detected in any of the tumors. The presence of EBV was not correlated with any particular histologic tumor type. It is concluded that EBV, not HIV, can be detected in a large percentage (50%) of AIDS-related primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas. This viral association may be significant in light of the demonstrated ability of EBV to induce lymphoid tumors in experimental mammalian systems. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1323221

  4. Protein Microarrays: A New Tool for the Study of Autoantibodies in Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jacob M.; Utz, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is highly coincident with immunodeficiency. In a small but growing number of primary immunodeficiencies, autoantibodies are diagnostic of a given disease and implicated in disease pathogenesis. In order to improve our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in immunodeficiencies and to discover novel autoantibodies, new proteomic tools are needed. Protein microarrays have the ability to screen for reactivity to hundreds to many thousands of unique autoantigens simultaneously on a single chip using minimal serum input. Here, we review different types of protein microarrays and how they can be useful in framing the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies. PMID:25904912

  5. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is established by powering the conversion step by renewable energy and recapturing the CO2 emitted after combustion, ultimately from the surrounding air to cover emissions from distributed source. Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU) coupled to P2G thus creates a CO2-neutral energy system based on synthetic hydrocarbon fuel. It would enable a circular economy where the carbon cycle is closed by recovering the CO2 emitted after reuse of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel. The critical step, technically as well as economically, is the conversion of feedstock CO2/H2O into syngas rather than the capture of CO2 from ambient air.

  6. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in their physics and their technology, or in any case they are considered to be adequately covered by these other authors.

  7. ADS-J1 Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Entry by Interacting with the gp41 Pocket Region and Blocking Fusion-Active gp41 Core Formation?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongtao; Qi, Zhi; Guo, Angi; Mao, Qinchao; Lu, Hong; An, Xiuli; Xia, Chenglai; Li, Xiaojuan; Debnath, Asim K.; Wu, Shuguang; Liu, Shuwen; Jiang, Shibo

    2009-01-01

    We previously identified a small-molecule anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) compound, ADS-J1, using a computer-aided molecular docking technique for primary screening and a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as a secondary screening method. In the present study, we demonstrated that ADS-J1 is an HIV-1 entry inhibitor, as determined by a time-of-addition assay and an HIV-1-mediated cell fusion assay. Further mechanism studies confirmed that ADS-J1 does not block gp120-CD4 binding and exhibits a marginal interaction with the HIV-1 coreceptor CXCR4. However, ADS-J1 inhibited the fusion-active gp41 core formation mimicked by peptides derived from the viral gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR), as determined by ELISA, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and circular dichroism analysis. Moreover, using a surface plasmon resonance assay, we found that ADS-J1 could bind directly to IQN17, a trimeric peptide containing the gp41 pocket region, resulting in the conformational change of IQN17 and the blockage of its interaction with a short D peptide, PIE7. The positively charged residue (K574) located in the gp41 pocket region is critical for the binding of ADS-J1 to NHR. These results suggest that ADS-J1 may bind to the viral gp41 NHR region through its hydrophobic and ionic interactions with the hydrophobic and positively charged resides located in the pocket region, subsequently blocking the association between the gp41 NHR and CHR regions to form the fusion-active gp41 core, thereby inhibiting HIV-1-mediated membrane fusion and virus entry. PMID:19786602

  8. Is science metaphysically neutral?

    PubMed

    Fry, Iris

    2012-09-01

    This paper challenges the claim that science is metaphysically neutral upheld by contenders of the separation of peacefully co-existent science and religion and by evolutionary theists. True, naturalistic metaphysical claims can neither be refuted nor proved and are thus distinct from empirical hypotheses. However, metaphysical assumptions not only regulate the theoretical and empirical study of nature, but are increasingly supported by the growing empirical body of science. This historically evolving interaction has contributed to the development of a naturalistic worldview that renounces the necessity of a transcendent god and of purposeful design. The thesis presented here differs not only from the claims of the "separatists" and of evolutionary theists. In pointing to the metaphysical aspects of science, I also criticize the failure of some evolutionary naturalists to distinguish between empirical and metaphysical contentions. Most important, based on the examination of science suggested here, creationists' false accusation that science is only a naturalistic dogma is refuted. Finally, the difficulties involved in the position endorsed here for the public support of evolution are acknowledged, taking into account the high religious profile of the American society and the social and political context in the US and in other countries. PMID:22771725

  9. Computational Prediction of Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody Epitopes from Neutralization Activity Data

    E-print Network

    Ferguson, Andrew

    Computational Prediction of Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody Epitopes from Neutralization Vaccine Initiative Neutralizing Antibody Center, and Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Abstract Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies effective against the majority of circulating isolates

  10. An Alteration of Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Leads to Reduced CCR5 Dependence and CD4 Independence?

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Brian M.; Foulke, J. Scott; Flinko, Robin; Heredia, Alonso; DeVico, Anthony; Reitz, Marvin

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection requires functional interactions of the viral surface (gp120) glycoprotein with cell surface CD4 and a chemokine coreceptor (usually CCR5 or CXCR4) and of the viral transmembrane (gp41) glycoprotein with the target cell membrane. Extensive genetic variability, generally in gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, can result in altered coreceptor use, fusion kinetics, and neutralization sensitivity. Here we describe an R5 HIV variant that, in contrast to its parental virus, infects T-cell lines expressing low levels of cell surface CCR5. This correlated with an ability to infect cells in the absence of CD4, increased sensitivity to a neutralizing antibody recognizing the coreceptor binding site of gp120, and increased resistance to the fusion inhibitor T-20. Surprisingly, these properties were determined by alterations in gp41, including the cytoplasmic tail, a region not previously shown to influence coreceptor use. These data indicate that HIV infection of cells with limiting levels of cell surface CCR5 can be facilitated by gp41 sequences that are not exposed on the envelope ectodomain yet induce allosteric changes in gp120 that facilitate exposure of the CCR5 binding site. PMID:18353949

  11. Neutral current interactions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Alexandre; /Oxford U.

    2007-07-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) long-baseline experiment has been actively collecting beam data since 2005, having already accumulated 3 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT). The several million neutrinos per year observed at the Near detector may improve the existing body of knowledge of neutrino cross-sections and the Near-Far comparison of the observed energy spectrum neutral current events constrains oscillations into sterile neutrinos. MINOS capabilities of observing neutral current neutrino events are described and the employed methodology for event selection is discussed, along with preliminary results obtained. An outlook on the expected neutral current related contributions from MINOS is also presented.

  12. The Antiparticles of Neutral Bosons

    E-print Network

    Walton A. Perkins

    2013-11-15

    With the advent of the ability to create and study antihydrogen, we think it is appropriate to consider the possibility that antiphotons might not be identical to photons. First of all, we will look at the experimental evidence concerning multiple neutral pions and multiple photons. Because of its internal structure, the neutral kaon is not identical to its antiparticle. We will consider internal structures for the neutral pion and photon for which the antiparticle differs from the particle. Interestingly, the antiphoton thus created from neutrinos does not interact with electrons because its neutrinos have the wrong helicity.

  13. Direction Neutral Language Transformation with Metamodels

    E-print Network

    Gogolla, Martin - Fachbereich 3

    Direction Neutral Language Transformation with Metamodels Martin Gogolla University of Bremen in a direction neutral way and opens the possibility for bidirectionality. Analogously, semantical objects can: descriptive transformation specification, direction neutral transformations, separation of syntax

  14. Mechanisms of Hemagglutinin Targeted Influenza Virus Neutralization

    E-print Network

    Mechanisms of Hemagglutinin Targeted Influenza Virus Neutralization Boerries Brandenburg1 , Wouter of America Abstract Human monoclonal antibodies have been identified which neutralize broad spectra neutralizing antibodies to critical processes in the viral life cycle. HA- stem binding antibodies can act

  15. Trustworthiness as a Limitation on Network Neutrality

    E-print Network

    Schneider, Fred B.

    591 Trustworthiness as a Limitation on Network Neutrality Aaron J. Burstein* Fred B. Schneider** I TRUSTWORTHINESS THROUGH THE NETWORK NEUTRALITY DEBATE ..................................... C. Trustworthiness as a Limitation in Network Neutrality Rules

  16. Neutrality and Self-Adaptation Christian Igel

    E-print Network

    Igel, Christian

    Neutrality and Self-Adaptation Christian Igel (christian, Institut f¨ur Neuroinformatik, Ruhr-Universit¨at Bochum, 44780 Bochum Abstract. Neutral genotype of external control neutrality allows a variation of the search distribution independent of phenotypic changes

  17. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus... Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus...of any program or activity relating to infection with the HIV, information...

  18. Inactivation of simian immunodeficiency virus by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Jurkiewicz, E; Villas-Boas, M; Silva, J L; Weber, G; Hunsmann, G; Clegg, R M

    1995-01-01

    The inactivation of the simian immunodeficiency viruses SIVmac251 and SIVagm by pressures of 150 and 250 MPa was determined. The extent of inactivation depended on the time that the virus was subjected to compression as well as the level of the pressure and at 150 Mpa reached 5 log10 dilution units after approximately 10 hr. The inactivations, which were uniformly carried out at room temperature, were independent of the concentration of the virus. Possible applications of pressure inactivation for molecular biological and clinical use are discussed. PMID:7624347

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Vpx-Gag Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Pancio, Heather A.; Ratner, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Incorporation of Vpx into human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) virus-like particles is mediated by the Gag polyprotein. We have identified residues 15 to 40 of Gag p6 and residues 73 to 89 of Vpx as being necessary for virion incorporation. In addition, we show enhanced in vitro binding of Vpx to a chimeric HIV-1/HIV-2 Gag construct containing residues 2 to 49 of HIV-2 p6 and demonstrate that the presence of residues 73 to 89 of Vpx allows for in vitro binding to HIV-2 Gag. PMID:9573303

  20. Noninvasive coronary imaging for atherosclerosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Ahmed M; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z; Pettigrew, Roderic I; Hadigan, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors as well as aspects of HIV infection and its therapy contribute to the increased coronary artery disease observed in HIV. Advances in noninvasive imaging methodologies in both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide opportunities to evaluate coronary artery atherosclerosis in ways not possible by conventional invasive x-ray angiography. Application of these techniques may prove very useful in the study of atherosclerosis in many diseases, such as HIV. PMID:21939819

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: The Spectrum Beyond AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Brain C.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1981, the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has emerged as the major infectious epidemic of our time. It is the most profound manifestation of infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Since 1984, serologic methods have existed to detect antibody to HIV. Several other clinical entities have been detected and are attributable to HIV infection. Appropriate counsel must accompany antibody testing. The author discusses the acute seroconversion event, as well as asymptomatic carrier status, including generalized lymphadenopathy. He also reviews the symptomatic states that do not meet the surveillance definition of AIDS, including treatments where available. PMID:21263801

  2. Morphology and Immunohistochemical Phenotype of the Thymus in Secondary Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Struchko, G Yu; Merkulova, L M; Moskvichev, E V; Kostrova, O Yu; Mikhailova, M N; Drandrova, E G

    2015-10-01

    The thymus of outbred male rats 5 months after splenectomy (experimental secondary immunodeficiency) was studied by common histological and immunohistochemical methods using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to CD3, CD30, CD68, synaptophysin, to S100, p53, bcl-2, and Ki-67 proteins. Removal of the spleen led to acute involution of the thymic parenchyma, which was replaced by the adipose tissue and was associated with restructuring of the thymopoietic and nonthymopoietic components of the gland, changes in cellular composition and antigenic phenotype of the lobular cortical and medullary matter, and by reduction of cell proliferation. PMID:26519276

  3. Effect of cacao husk extract on human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Unten, S; Ushijima, H; Shimizu, H; Tsuchie, H; Kitamura, T; Moritome, N; Sakagami, H

    1991-12-01

    A sodium hydroxide extract from cacao husk inhibited the cytopathic effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) against HTLV-1-transformed T-cell lines MT-2 and MT-4. It also inhibited syncytium formation between HIV-infected and uninfected lymphoblastoid T-cell line, MOLT-4. The anti-HIV activity was concentrated by membrane filter fractionation to a fraction with molecular weight of 100-300 KDa. Anti-HIV activity of the extract was attributable to interference with the virus adsorption, rather than to inhibition of the virus replication after adsorption. PMID:1367748

  4. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Infectivity and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1988-02-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) results in a profound immunosuppression due predominantly to a selective depletion of helper/inducer T lymphocytes that express the receptor for the virus (the CD4 molecule). HIV also has tropism for the brain leading to neuropsychiatric abnormalities. Besides inducing cell death, HIV can interfere with T4 cell function by various mechanisms. The monocyte serves as a reservoir for HIV and is relatively refractory to its cytopathic effects. HIV can exist in a latent or chronic form which can be converted to a productive infection by a variety of inductive signals.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus can productively infect cultured human glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng-Mayer, C; Rutka, J T; Rosenblum, M L; McHugh, T; Stites, D P; Levy, J A

    1987-01-01

    Six isolates of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) showed differences in their ability to productively infect glioma-derived cell lines and early-passage human brain cell cultures. Susceptibility to HIV infection correlated well with the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein. The CD4 molecule was expressed on some, but not all, of the brain-derived cells; however, no correlation was observed between CD4 protein expression and susceptibility to virus infection. The results show that HIV can productively infect human brain cells, particularly those of glial origin, and suggest that these cell types in the brain can harbor the virus. Images PMID:3472222

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus gag and protease: partners in resistance

    E-print Network

    Fun, Axel; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Verheyen, Jens; Nijhuis, Monique

    2012-08-06

    sulfonamide inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartyl protease. J Virol 1995, 69:5228–5235. 21. Kempf DJ, Marsh KC, Denissen JF, McDonald E, Vasavanonda S, Flentge CA, Green BE, Fino L, Park CH, Kong XP, et al: ABT-538 is a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus... Outpatient Study Investigators. N Engl J Med 1998, 338:853–860. 31. Kempf DJ, Marsh KC, Kumar G, Rodrigues AD, Denissen JF, McDonald E, Kukulka MJ, Hsu A, Granneman GR, Baroldi PA, Sun E, Pizzuti D, Plattner JJ, Norbeck DW, Leonard JM: Pharmacokinetic...

  7. Energy distribution and flux of fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral beam source

    E-print Network

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Energy distribution and flux of fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral beam of the fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral beam source were measured. Positive ions into fast neutrals. The neutral energy distribution was always shifted to lower energies compared

  8. Robust Neutralizing Antibodies Elicited by HIV-1 JRFL Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yu; Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; McKee, Krisha; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Host cell-mediated proteolytic cleavage of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 precursor glycoprotein into gp120 and gp41 subunits is required to generate fusion-competent envelope glycoprotein (Env) spikes. The gp120-directed broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNabs) isolated from HIV-infected individuals efficiently recognize fully cleaved JRFL Env spikes; however, nonneutralizing gp120-directed monoclonal antibodies isolated from infected or vaccinated subjects recognize only uncleaved JRFL spikes. Therefore, as an immunogen, cleaved spikes that selectively present desired neutralizing epitopes to B cells may elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. Accordingly, we inoculated nonhuman primates (NHPs) with plasmid DNA encoding transmembrane-anchored, cleaved JRFL Env or by electroporation (EP). Priming with DNA expressing soluble, uncleaved gp140 trimers was included as a comparative experimental group of NHPs. DNA inoculation was followed by boosts with soluble JRFL gp140 trimers, and control NHPs were inoculated with soluble JRFL protein trimers without DNA priming. In the TZM-bl assay, elicitation of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 tier 1 isolates was robust following the protein boost. Neutralization of tier 2 isolates was detected, but only in animals primed with plasmid DNA and boosted with trimeric protein. Using the more sensitive A3R5 assay, consistent neutralization of both clade B and C tier 2 isolates was detected from all regimens assessed in the current study, exceeding levels achieved by our previous vaccine regimens in primates. Together, these data suggest a potential advantage of B cell priming followed by a rest interval and protein boosting to present JRFL Env spikes to the immune system to better generate HIV-1 cross-clade neutralizing antibodies. PMID:24067980

  9. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    1990-01-01

    Provides update on what is currently known about neurobehavioral correlates of infection with human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1), causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Discusses methodological and theoretical issues complicating interpretation of existing data and suggests strategies for future research in this area. (NB)

  14. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: An Update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Al-Herz, Waleed; Bousfiha, Aziz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chatila, Talal; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Franco, Jose Luis; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Holland, Steven M.; Klein, Christoph; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D.; Oksenhendler, Erik; Picard, Capucine; Puck, Jennifer M.; Sullivan, Kate; Tang, Mimi L. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) compiled by the Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. In comparison to the previous version, more than 30 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. In addition, we have added a table of acquired defects that are phenocopies of PIDs. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This classification is the most up-to-date catalog of all known PIDs and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases. PMID:24795713

  15. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): Testing...for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): Testing...for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and...

  16. Intratypic Recombination among Lineages of Type 1 Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Emerging during Chronic Infection of an Immunodeficient Patient

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chen-Fu; Chen, Hour-Young; Jorba, Jaume; Sun, Hui-Chih; Yang, Su-Ju; Lee, Hsiang-Chi; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Chen, Pei-Jer; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Utama, Andi; Pallansch, Mark; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Kew, Olen; Yang, Jyh-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    We determined the complete genomic sequences of nine type 1 immunodeficient vaccine-derived poliovirus (iVDPV) isolates obtained over a 337-day period from a poliomyelitis patient from Taiwan with common variable immunodeficiency. The iVDPV isolates differed from the Sabin type 1 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) strain at 1.84% to 3.15% of total open reading frame positions and had diverged into at least five distinct lineages. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the chronic infection was initiated by the fifth and last OPV dose, given 567 days before onset of paralysis, and that divergence of major lineages began very early in the chronic infection. Key determinants of attenuation in Sabin 1 had reverted in the iVDPV isolates, and representative isolates of each lineage showed increased neurovirulence for PVR-Tg21 transgenic mice. None of the isolates had retained the temperature-sensitive phenotype of Sabin 1. All isolates were antigenic variants of Sabin 1, having multiple amino acid substitutions within or near neutralizing antigenic sites 1, 2, and 3a. Antigenic divergence of the iVDPV variants from Sabin 1 followed two major independent evolutionary pathways. The emergence of distinct coreplicating lineages suggests that iVDPVs can replicate for many months at separate sites in the gastrointestinal tract. Some isolates had mosaic genome structures indicative of recombination across and within lineages. iVDPV excretion apparently ceased after 30 to 35 months of chronic infection. The appearance of a chronic VDPV excretor in a tropical, developing country has important implications for the strategy to stop OPV immunization after eradication of wild polioviruses. PMID:16188964

  17. Contact of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected and uninfected CD4+ T lymphocytes is highly cytolytic for both cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heinkelein, M; Sopper, S; Jassoy, C

    1995-01-01

    Individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) experience a marked loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, leading to fatal immunodeficiency. The mechanisms causing the depletion of these cells are not yet understood. In this study, we observed that CD4+ T lymphocytes from HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected and uninfected individuals rapidly lysed B lymphoblasts expressing the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surface and Jurkat cells expressing the complete virus. Contact of uninfected CD4+ T cells with envelope glycoprotein-expressing cells also resulted in the lysis of the uninfected CD4+ T cells. Cytolysis did not require priming or in vitro stimulation of the CD4+ T cells and was not restricted by major histocompatibility complex molecules. Cytotoxicity was inhibited by soluble CD4 and anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies that block binding of CD4 to gp120. In addition, neutralizing anti-CD4 and anti-gp120 monoclonal antibodies which block postbinding membrane fusion events and syncytium formation also inhibited cell lysis, suggesting that identical mechanisms in HIV-infected cultures underlie cell-cell fusion and the cytolysis observed. However, cytotoxicity was not always accompanied by the formation of visible syncytia. Rapid cell lysis after contact of uninfected and HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells may explain CD4+ T-cell depletion in the absence of detectable syncytia in infected individuals. Moreover, because of its vigor, lysis of envelope-expressing targets by contact with unprimed CD4+ T lymphocytes may at first glance resemble antigen-specific immune responses and should be excluded when cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses in infected individuals and vaccinees are evaluated. PMID:7474110

  18. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVagm Dynamics in African Green Monkeys?

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Gautam, Rajeev; Gaufin, Thaidra; Pattison, Melissa; Barnes, Mary; Monjure, Christopher; Stoulig, Crystal; Dufour, Jason; Cyprian, Wayne; Silvestri, Guido; Miller, Michael D.; Perelson, Alan S.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the lack of disease progression in natural simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) hosts are still poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that SIV-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) avoid AIDS due to virus replication occurring in long-lived infected cells, we infected six animals with SIVagm and treated them with potent antiretroviral therapy [ART; 9-R-(2-phosphonomethoxypropyl) adenine (tenofovir) and beta-2,3-dideoxy-3-thia-5-fluorocytidine (emtricitabine)]. All AGMs showed a rapid decay of plasma viremia that became undetectable 36 h after ART initiation. A significant decrease of viral load was observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestine. Mathematical modeling of viremia decay post-ART indicates a half-life of productively infected cells ranging from 4 to 9.5 h, i.e., faster than previously reported for human immunodeficiency virus and SIV. ART induced a slight but significant increase in peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts but no significant changes in CD4+ T-cell levels in lymph nodes and intestine. Similarly, ART did not significantly change the levels of cell proliferation, activation, and apoptosis, already low in AGMs chronically infected with SIVagm. Collectively, these results indicate that, in SIVagm-infected AGMs, the bulk of virus replication is sustained by short-lived cells; therefore, differences in disease outcome between SIVmac infection of macaques and SIVagm infection of AGMs are unlikely due to intrinsic differences in the in vivo cytopathicities between the two viruses. PMID:18216122

  19. Cardiac dysfunction in patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J. E.; Slife, D. M.; Anders, G. T.; Bailey, S. R.; Blanton, H. M.; McAllister, C. K.; Latham, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    To confirm the presence of cardiac dysfunction in a group of patients seropositive for the human immunodeficiency virus with either dyspnea on exertion or a reduced anaerobic threshold, 9 patients with no history of opportunistic infection underwent exercise right-sided heart catheterization. When compared with 13 control patients previously exercised in the same manner, the patients showed elevated exercise pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (14.6 +/- 3.3 mm of mercury versus 9.9 +/- 3.3 mm of mercury; P less than .005) and right atrial pressure (10.1 +/- 2.1 mm of mercury versus 4.7 +/- 3.2 mm of mercury; P less than .001) at a similar exercise oxygen consumption and cardiac index. Of the 9 patients, 8 had at least 1 catheterization value outside the 95% confidence limits for the control group and 4 patients had multiple abnormalities. Values for blood CD4 lymphocytes were 0.2 x 10(9) per liter or more for 7 of the 9. One patient underwent endomyocardial biopsy with findings consistent with a cardiomyopathy. We conclude that cardiac disease may occur at any immunologic stage of human immunodeficiency virus infection. These observations suggest an effect of this disease on the heart. Images PMID:1771874

  20. The genetic basis of severe combined immunodeficiency and its variants

    PubMed Central

    Tasher, Diana; Dalal, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndromes are characterized by a block in T lymphocyte differentiation that is variably associated with abnormal development of other lymphocyte lineages (B and/or natural killer [NK] cells), leading to death early in life unless treated urgently by hematopoietic stem cell transplant. SCID comprises genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous conditions, of which the genetic basis for approximately 85% of the underlying immunologic defects have been recently elucidated. A major obstacle in deciphering the pathogenesis of SCID syndromes is that different mutations in a single gene may give rise to distinct clinical conditions and that a similar clinical phenotype can result from mutations in different genes. Mutation analysis is now an important component of the complete evaluation of a patient with SCID since it has a dramatic impact on many aspects of this potentially life-threatening disease such as genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis, modalities of treatment, and, eventually, prognosis. Dr Robert Good, one of the founders of modern immunology, described the SCID syndrome as “experiments of nature.” By understanding the cellular and genetic basis of these immunodeficiency diseases and, eventually, normal immunity, we optimize the “bedside to research laboratory and back again” approach to medicine. PMID:23776382

  1. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  2. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pakfetrat, Atessa; Falaki, Farnaz; Delavarian, Zahra; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Sanatkhani, Majid; Zabihi Marani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a ?2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration. Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%). The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+. Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. PMID:25745611

  3. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  4. Detection of pulmonary complications in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Touw, Catharina M L; van de Ven, Annick A; de Jong, Pim A; Terheggen-Lagro, Suzanne; Beek, Erik; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; van Montfrans, Joris M

    2010-08-01

    Touw CML, van de Ven AA, de Jong PA, Terheggen-Lagro S, Beek E, Sanders EAM, van Montfrans JM. Detection of pulmonary complications in common variable immunodeficiency. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2010: 21: 793-805. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S Pulmonary complications are frequently observed in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We reviewed the literature related to radiologic imaging techniques and pulmonary function tests (PFT) for diagnosing pulmonary complications in CVID. Scientific publications related to CVID (or primary hypogammaglobulinemia), pulmonary complications, PFT, chest X-ray (CXR), and high-resolution computed tomography scan (HRCT) were detected in PubMed, Embase and in reference lists of selected articles. Twenty-six articles including 1047 patients (587 patients with CVID) were reviewed. Up to 73% of CVID patients develop chronic structural pulmonary complications, of which bronchiectasis and bronchial wall thickening are most frequently detected. HRCT is the most sensitive method for identification of structural abnormalities, detecting pulmonary complications that were missed on CXR and PFT in 2-59% of patients. On PFT, obstructive flow-volume curves were most commonly found, eventually occurring in 50-94% of patients. HRCT is an important diagnostic tool for pulmonary complications in CVID at the time of diagnosis and at regular time-points during follow-up, with the proper follow-up interval yet to be determined. PMID:19912551

  5. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia as the first manifestation of severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jo?czyk-Potoczna, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Lidia; Br?borowicz, Anna; Bartkowska-?niatkowska, Alicja; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by the absence of functional T lymphocytes and impairment of adaptive immunity. While heterogeneity of the genetic background in SCID leads to the variability of immune phenotypes, most of affected newborns appear healthy but within the first few months they develop life-threatening opportunistic respiratory or gastrointestinal tract infections. The objective of the study was to define the presenting features and etiology of infections in children with SCID. We retrospectively reviewed five children in whom the diagnosis of SCID had been established in our pediatric immunology clinic over the last 10-year period. A viral respiratory tract infection was the first manifestation of SCID in all the children studied. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia was recognized in as many as 4 cases and coronavirus pulmonary infection was diagnosed in one case, whereas Pneumocystis jiroveci was identified as a co-pathogen in one CMV-infected patient. Severe combined immunodeficiency is a pediatric emergency condition and given the significant impact of pulmonary CMV infection in SCID children, establishing an accurate etiological diagnosis is of essential importance in instituting the specific treatment and improving the outcome. PMID:26155153

  6. Lentiviral vectors for the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Farinelli, Giada; Capo, Valentina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    In the last years important progress has been made in the treatment of several primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs) with gene therapy. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy indeed represents a valid alternative to conventional transplantation when a compatible donor is not available and recent success confirmed the great potential of this approach. First clinical trials performed with gamma retroviral vectors were promising and guaranteed clinical benefits to the patients. On the other hand, the outcome of severe adverse events as the development of hematological abnormalities highlighted the necessity to develop a safer platform to deliver the therapeutic gene. Self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors (LVVs) were studied to overcome this hurdle through their preferable integration pattern into the host genome. In this review, we describe the recent advancements achieved both in vitro and at preclinical level with LVVs for the treatment of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), ADA deficiency (ADA-SCID), Artemis deficiency, RAG1/2 deficiency, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (?chain deficiency, SCIDX1), X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. PMID:24619149

  7. Novel assay to detect increased level of neutralizing anti-interferon gamma autoantibodies in non-tuberculous mycobacterial patients.

    PubMed

    Shima, Kenjiro; Sakagami, Takuro; Tanabe, Yoshinari; Aoki, Nobumasa; Moro, Hiroshi; Koya, Toshiyuki; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Ei-ichi; Narita, Ichiei

    2014-01-01

    Subjects exposed to non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) species do not always develop an active disease, which likely reflects underlying host susceptibility factors. Recent reports have shown that anti interferon gamma (IFN-?) neutralizing autoantibodies (IFN-? Ab) are associated with the development of disseminated NTM in patients without known evidence of immunodeficiency. The purpose of this study is to establish the screening method if subjects have IFN-? Ab. Whole blood was obtained from patients with disseminated NTM, those with pulmonary NTM, and healthy controls. The neutralizing capacity to IFN-? activity was assessed as an inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activation of Transcription 1 (STAT-1) phosphorylation in leukocyte after stimulation with exogenous IFN-? by flow cytometer. The strength of phosphorylation was described as STAT1 phosphorylation index. Antigen capture assay was performed to measure the relative titer of Immunoglobulin-G fraction of IFN-? Ab. STAT1 phosphorylation by IFN-? was significantly inhibited in the leukocytes from patients with disseminated NTM compared to that in healthy subjects, while this inhibition was not observed in patients with pulmonary NTM. All subjects with inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation had high titer of Immunoglobulin-G that reacted with IFN-? in the antigen capture assay. The measurement of STAT1 phosphorylation index in whole blood leukocytes and antigen capture assay are simple and useful method for detection of anti-IFN-? neutralizing autoantibodies, and is valuable in the pathophysiological diagnosis of disseminated NTM patients without obvious immunodeficiency. PMID:24462426

  8. Passive sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants and adaptation in new hosts.

    PubMed

    Frater, A J; Edwards, C T T; McCarthy, N; Fox, J; Brown, H; Milicic, A; Mackie, N; Pillay, T; Drijfhout, J W; Dustan, S; Clarke, J R; Holmes, E C; Zhang, H T; Pfafferott, K; Goulder, P J; McClure, M O; Weber, J; Phillips, R E; Fidler, S

    2006-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity is a major obstacle for the design of a successful vaccine. Certain viral polymorphisms encode human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-associated immune escape, potentially overcoming limited vaccine protection. Although transmission of immune escape variants has been reported, the overall extent to which this phenomenon occurs in populations and the degree to which it contributes to HIV-1 viral evolution are unknown. Selection on the HIV-1 env gene at transmission favors neutralization-sensitive variants, but it is not known to what degree selection acts on the internal HIV-1 proteins to restrict or enhance the transmission of immune escape variants. Studies have suggested that HLA class I may determine susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, but a definitive role for HLA at transmission remains unproven. Comparing populations of acute seroconverters and chronically infected patients, we found no evidence of selection acting to restrict transmission of HIV-1 variants. We found that statistical associations previously reported in chronic infection between viral polymorphisms and HLA class I alleles are not present in acute infection, suggesting that the majority of viral polymorphisms in these patients are the result of transmission rather than de novo adaptation. Using four episodes of HIV-1 transmission in which the donors and recipients were both sampled very close to the time of infection we found that, despite a transmission bottleneck, genetic variants of HIV-1 infection are transmitted in a frequency-dependent manner. As HIV-1 infections are seeded by unique donor-adapted viral variants, each episode is a highly individual antigenic challenge. Host-specific, idiosyncratic HIV-1 antigenic diversity will seriously tax the efficacy of immunization based on consensus sequences. PMID:16809328

  9. Adaptation of Subtype A Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope to Pig-Tailed Macaque Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Humes, Daryl; Overbaugh, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection of macaques to HIV-1 infection in humans depends on how closely SHIVs mimic HIV-1 transmission, pathogenesis, and diversity. Circulating HIV-1 strains are predominantly subtypes C and A and overwhelmingly require CCR5 for entry, yet most SHIVs incorporate CXCR4-using subtype B envelopes (Envs). While pathogenic subtype C-based SHIVs have been constructed, the subtype A-based SHIVs (SHIV-As) constructed to date have been unable to replicate in macaque cells. To understand the barriers to SHIV-A replication in macaque cells, HIVAQ23/SIVvif was constructed by engineering a CCR5-tropic subtype A provirus to express SIV vif, which counters the macaque APOBEC3G restriction. HIVAQ23/SIVvif replicated poorly in pig-tailed macaque (Ptm) lymphocytes, but viruses were adapted to Ptm lymphocytes. Two independent mutations in gp120, G312V (V3 loop) and A204E (C2 region), were identified that increased peak virus levels by >100-fold. Introduction of G312V and A204E to multiple subtype A Envs and substitution of G312 and A204 with other residues increased entry into Ptm cells by 10- to 100-fold. G312V and A204E Env variants continued to require CCR5 for entry but were up to 50- and 200-fold more sensitive to neutralization by IgG1b12 and soluble CD4 and had a 5- to 50-fold increase in their ability to utilize Ptm CD4 compared to their wild-type counterparts. These findings identify the inefficient use of Ptm CD4 as an unappreciated restriction to subtype A HIV-1 replication in Ptm cells and reveal amino acid changes to gp120 that can overcome this barrier. PMID:21325401

  10. Superinfection of cats with feline immunodeficiency virus subtypes A and B.

    PubMed

    Okada, S; Pu, R; Young, E; Stoffs, W V; Yamamoto, J K

    1994-12-01

    The ability of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) isolates from subtypes A and B to superinfect cats and cell cultures was tested. Three specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats were first inoculated with 10 ID50 of subtype B virus (FIVBang) and 30 weeks later inoculated with 100 ID50 of subtype A virus (FIVPet). On the basis of subtype-specific PCR analysis, both FIV subtypes were detected in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of two of three cats from 9 to 30 weeks following the second inoculation. Only the first virus was detected in the bone marrow (BM) cells of these two cats until 30 weeks following the second inoculation, at which time the second virus was finally detected in their BM cells. Both cats developed significant virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies to the second virus by 15 weeks following the second inoculation; but only one cat had high VN titers to the first virus, which remained at the same level even after the second inoculation. The two control cats inoculated with only the second virus developed VN titers specifically to the second virus and were consistently PCR positive for the virus in PBLs and BM cells starting 9 weeks postinoculation. Thus a delay in BM infection with the second virus was observed in the two superinfected cats. In contrast, one of three cats had neither VN antibodies to the second virus nor PCR signal of the second virus in its PBLs, BM, and lymph node throughout the 30 weeks of study and it appeared to be resistant to superinfection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7888234

  11. Rapid Tests and the Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Júnior, Walter Lins; Ramos de Araújo, Paulo Sérgio; Dias de Andrade, Luiz; Aguiar Dos Santos, Ana Maria; Lopes da Silva, Maria Almerice; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Medeiros, Zulma

    2015-11-01

    After the emergence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the number of visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-HIV/AIDS coinfections has increased worldwide. Herein, we assessed the usefulness of an rK39-based immunochromatographic test (rK39 ICT) (DiaMed-IT LEISH(®); DiaMed AG, Cressier-sur-Morat, Switzerland) and a latex agglutination test (KAtex; Kalon Biological, Guildford, United Kingdom) for urinary antigen detection to diagnose VL in 15 HIV/AIDS patients from northeastern Brazil. VL diagnosis was based on clinical findings, cytology, serology, parasite DNA, and/or urinary antigen detection. VL was confirmed in seven out of 15 HIV/AIDS patients. Only three patients were positive in bone marrow cytology, three patients were conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive, while six were real-time PCR positive. All patients were direct agglutination test (DAT) (Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) positive; of these, four were positive by rK39 ICT and five by KAtex. Large-scale studies are needed to validate the use of the KAtex in the national public health laboratory network in Brazil, aiming at improving the diagnosis of VL in HIV/AIDS patients in this country. PMID:26416105

  12. SPECIAL FEATURE Neutral Community Ecology1

    E-print Network

    Holyoak, Marcel

    SPECIAL FEATURE Neutral Community Ecology1 Interest in neutral community models has grown rapidly and abundance. It behooves us to realize that neutral models raise unanswered questions about the forces into population models, the neutral models discussed in this feature are among the vanguard of formal quantitative

  13. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  14. SHORT REVIEW Statistical tests of selective neutrality

    E-print Network

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    SHORT REVIEW Statistical tests of selective neutrality in the age of genomics RASMUS NIELSEN. Keywords: Darwinian selection, neutral evolution, nonsyn- onymous mutations, statistical tests, synonymous are selectively neutral, testing the neutral hypothesis has been one of the prime objectives of molecular

  15. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  16. Advances in neutralizing amine technology

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, J.G.; Lehrer, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    Corrosion and fouling above the water dewpoint has been reported in many crude unit overheads and on the upper trays of crude towers. Field studies were conducted which show that these problems are commonly caused by deposition of amine and/or ammonia hydrochloride salts. Since these salts can deposit only if their equilibrium vapor pressures are exceeded, salt volatility is a major criterion of neutralizer selection. A survey of the literature indicates that amine salt volatility has not been considered in a quantitative manner until now. Knudsen effusion measurements have been used to determine equilibrium vapor pressure functions for the hydrochloride salts of five commonly applied neutralizers and ammonia. A spreadsheet was developed to utilize these vapor pressure functions along with crude unit operating conditions to predict salt dewpoints in crude units. To address the needs of crude units where salt deposition is not avoidable with traditional neutralizers, a research program was conducted to develop new neutralizers which form more volatile hydrochloride salts. Case histories are presented which discuss results of field trials with traditional and novel neutralizers.

  17. Lymph Node Co-Infection of Mycobacterium Avium Complex and Cytomegalovirus in an Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hedjazi, Arya; Hosseini, Marzieh; Hoseinzadeh, Amin

    2013-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are known to have an increased tendency for developing opportunistic infections. However, there are no reports of simultaneous lymph node involvement of cytomegalovirus and Mycobacterium avium complex in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient. We report a 31-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain and tenderness and weight loss. He died a few hours after admission. Autopsy studies showed coinfection of cytomegalovirus, Mycobacterium avium complex and human immunodeficiency virus. Our case emphasizes the need to be careful in evaluating opportunistic infections in severely immunodepressed acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. This case report is the first manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in this patient. PMID:24470953

  18. Neutral hydrogen in galactic fountains

    E-print Network

    C. M. Booth; Tom Theuns

    2007-08-02

    Simulations of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy, in which supernovae power a galactic fountain, reproduce the observed velocity and 21cm brightness statistics of galactic neutral hydrogen (HI). The simulated galaxy consists of a thin HI disk, similar in extent and brightness to that observed in the Milky Way, and extra-planar neutral gas at a range of velocities due to the galactic fountain. Mock observations of the neutral gas resemble the HI flux measurements from the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn (LAB) HI, survey, including a high-velocity tail which matches well with observations of high-velocity clouds. The simulated high-velocity clouds are typically found close to the galactic disk, with a typical line-of-sight distance of 13kpc from observers on the solar circle. The fountain efficiently cycles matter from the centre of the galaxy to its outskirts at a rate of around 0.5 M_sun/yr

  19. Tiered categorization of a diverse panel of HIV-1 Env pseudoviruses for assessment of neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Michael S; Janes, Holly; Hawkins, Natalie; Grandpre, Lauren E; Devoy, Colleen; Giri, Ayush; Coffey, Rory T; Harris, Linda; Wood, Blake; Daniels, Marcus G; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Lapedes, Alan; Polonis, Victoria R; McCutchan, Francine E; Gilbert, Peter B; Self, Steve G; Korber, Bette T; Montefiori, David C; Mascola, John R

    2010-02-01

    The restricted neutralization breadth of vaccine-elicited antibodies is a major limitation of current human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) candidate vaccines. In order to permit the efficient identification of vaccines with enhanced capacity for eliciting cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and to assess the overall breadth and potency of vaccine-elicited NAb reactivity, we assembled a panel of 109 molecularly cloned HIV-1 Env pseudoviruses representing a broad range of genetic and geographic diversity. Viral isolates from all major circulating genetic subtypes were included, as were viruses derived shortly after transmission and during the early and chronic stages of infection. We assembled a panel of genetically diverse HIV-1-positive (HIV-1(+)) plasma pools to assess the neutralization sensitivities of the entire virus panel. When the viruses were rank ordered according to the average sensitivity to neutralization by the HIV-1(+) plasmas, a continuum of average sensitivity was observed. Clustering analysis of the patterns of sensitivity defined four subgroups of viruses: those having very high (tier 1A), above-average (tier 1B), moderate (tier 2), or low (tier 3) sensitivity to antibody-mediated neutralization. We also investigated potential associations between characteristics of the viral isolates (clade, stage of infection, and source of virus) and sensitivity to NAb. In particular, higher levels of NAb activity were observed when the virus and plasma pool were matched in clade. These data provide the first systematic assessment of the overall neutralization sensitivities of a genetically and geographically diverse panel of circulating HIV-1 strains. These reference viruses can facilitate the systematic characterization of NAb responses elicited by candidate vaccine immunogens. PMID:19939925

  20. Investigating antibody neutralization of lyssaviruses using lentiviral pseudotypes: a cross-species comparison

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Edward; Temperton, Nigel J.; Marston, Denise A.; McElhinney, Lorraine M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Weiss, Robin A.

    2008-01-01

    Cross-neutralization between rabies virus (RABV) and two European bat lyssaviruses (EBLV-1 and -2) was analysed using lentiviral pseudotypes as antigen vectors. Glycoprotein (G-protein) cDNA from RABV challenge virus standard-11 (CVS-11) and EBLV-1 and -2 were cloned and co-expressed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or murine leukemia virus (MLV) gag–pol and packageable green fluorescent protein (GFP) or luciferase reporter genes in human cells. The harvested lentiviral (HIV) vector infected over 40?% of baby hamster kidney (BHK) target cells, providing high-titre pseudotype stocks. Tests on blinded antibody-positive (n=15) and -negative (n=45) sera, predetermined by the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test approved by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Office International des Epizooties (OIE), revealed that the CVS-11 pseudotype assay had 100?% concordance with FAVN and strongly correlated with neutralization titres (r2=0.89). Cross-neutralization tests using sera from RABV-vaccinated humans and animals on pseudotypes with CVS-11, EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 envelopes showed that the relative neutralization titres correlated broadly with the degree of G-protein diversity. Pseudotypes have three major advantages over live-virus neutralization tests: (i) they can be handled in low-biohazard-level laboratories; (ii) the use of reporter genes such as GFP or ?-galactosidase will allow the assay to be undertaken at low cost in laboratories worldwide; (iii) each assay requires <10??l serum. This robust microassay will improve our understanding of the protective humoral immunity that current rabies vaccines confer against emerging lyssaviruses, and will be applicable to surveillance studies, thus helping to control the spread of rabies. PMID:18753230

  1. The 2015 IUIS Phenotypic Classification for Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Bousfiha, Aziz; Jeddane, Leïla; Al-Herz, Waleed; Ailal, Fatima; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chatila, Talal; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Franco, Jose Luis; Gaspar, H Bobby; Holland, Steven M; Klein, Christoph; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D; Oksenhendler, Eric; Picard, Capucine; Puck, Jennifer M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Tang, Mimi L K

    2015-11-01

    There are now nearly 300 single-gene inborn errors of immunity underlying phenotypes as diverse as infection, malignancy, allergy, auto-immunity, and auto-inflammation. For each of these five categories, a growing variety of phenotypes are ascribed to Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PID), making PIDs a rapidly expanding field of medicine. The International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) PID expert committee (EC) has published every other year a classification of these disorders into tables, defined by shared pathogenesis and/or clinical consequences. In 2013, the IUIS committee also proposed a more user-friendly, phenotypic classification, based on the selection of key phenotypes at the bedside. We herein propose the revised figures, based on the accompanying 2015 IUIS PID EC classification. PMID:26445875

  2. Apelin peptides block the entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    PubMed

    Zou, M X; Liu, H Y; Haraguchi, Y; Soda, Y; Tatemoto, K; Hoshino, H

    2000-05-01

    The orphan G protein-coupled receptor APJ has been shown to be a coreceptor for human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV) strains. We have determined that some HIV and SIV strains use APJ as a coreceptor to infect the brain-derived NP-2/CD4 cells. Because apelin is an endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor, we examined the inhibitory effects of apelin peptides on HIV infection, and found that the apelin peptides inhibit the entry of some HIV-1 and HIV-2 into the NP-2/CD4 cells expressing APJ. The inhibitory efficiency has been found to be in the order of apelin-36>apelin-17>apelin-13>apelin-12. PMID:10802050

  3. Eosinophilia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andrew; Serpa, Jose A

    2015-09-01

    Eosinophilia is not uncommonly encountered in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), particularly at initiation of care or among those with advanced disease. The clinical manifestation most commonly associated with eosinophilia in this patient population is skin rash. Management of these patients is challenging due to a paucity of data evaluating diagnostic testing and therapeutic strategies. Patients born in or with significant travel to parasite-endemic countries are more likely to have tissue-invasive helminthes, such as Strongyloides or Schistosoma. Patients without such risk factors are unlikely to have parasitic infections and frequently will have self-resolution of eosinophilia. When a detailed history, physical exam, and diagnostic work-up are unrevealing, we sometimes consider empirical therapy with ivermectin. Praziquantel may also be considered for those at risk for schistosomiasis. PMID:26126686

  4. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in wild Pallas' cats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith A; Munkhtsog, Bariushaa; Troyer, Jennifer L; Ross, Steve; Sellers, Rani; Fine, Amanda E; Swanson, William F; Roelke, Melody E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-03-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a feline lentivirus related to HIV, causes immune dysfunction in domestic and wild cats. The Pallas' cat is the only species from Asia known to harbor a species-specific strain of FIV designated FIV(Oma) in natural populations. Here, a 25% seroprevalence of FIV is reported from 28 wild Mongolian Pallas' cats sampled from 2000 to 2008. Phylogenetic analysis of proviral RT-Pol from eight FIV(Oma) isolates from Mongolia, Russia, China and Kazakhstan reveals a unique monophyletic lineage of the virus within the Pallas' cat population, most closely related to the African cheetah and leopard FIV strains. Histopathological examination of lymph node and spleen from infected and uninfected Pallas' cats suggests that FIV(Oma) causes immune depletion in its' native host. PMID:19926144

  5. Resource utilization patterns in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Okello, D O

    1994-12-01

    A survey in 1991 of resource use patterns and factors affecting the cost of care for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, revealed that drugs constitute 97% of the mean cost of care of affected individuals in the outpatient and 37% in hospitalized patients. The cost of drugs per treatment episode was Ug.Sh.5785.00 in the outpatient and Ug.Sh.8309.00 for inpatients. (The exchange rate for 1991 was US$ = Ug.Sh.910.00). Analysis of an attempt to provide essential drugs for the growing number of AIDS subjects shows that drugs alone could consume the entire health budget of the Ministry of Health in Uganda. There is therefore need to critically consider options to control the high cost for drugs in AIDS care. PMID:7705257

  6. Seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus among inpatient pretrial detainees.

    PubMed

    Schwartz-Watts, D; Montgomery, L D; Morgan, D W

    1995-01-01

    Medical records of inpatients discharged from a forensic unit in Columbia, South Carolina, from January 1991 to December 1991 were reviewed to determine the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity. Results were linked to age, gender, ethnicity, history of intravenous drug use, and Axis I diagnoses. HIV status was obtained for 74 percent of patients 18 to 55 years of age. The incidence of HIV seropositivity among patients tested was 5.5 percent, which is greater than 40 times the incidence for the general population in South Carolina. Intravenous drug use was reported for 33 percent of the seropositive males. We conclude that inpatient pretrial detainees are at increased risk for HIV infection. HIV testing should be mandated at all facilities housing detainees. Further studies are needed to determine any factors about these patients that can be linked to seropositivity. PMID:8605412

  7. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in the mouse. Pathology, reconstitution, neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    Custer, R. P.; Bosma, G. C.; Bosma, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Histologic findings in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) were remarkably uniform, consisting of lymphopenia, a rudimentary thymic medulla without cortex, relatively empty splenic follicles and lymph nodes, and undeveloped bronchial and gastrointestinal lymphocytic foci. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter studies revealed a few T cells (apparently nonfunctional) in thymus and spleen; interestingly, these cells seemed highly disposed to neoplasia, because thymic T-cell lymphomas were observed in 41 of 269 mice. No pre-B or B cells could be identified. Cells of the myeloid lineage appeared normal. Reconstitution of lymphoid tissues was achieved after intravenous injection of histocompatible bone marrow cells. Images Figure 1 p467-a Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2412448

  8. Renal transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive children.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Mignon I; Kala, Udai K

    2015-04-01

    Renal transplantation is being performed in adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and increasingly in paediatric patients as well. A multidisciplinary team involving an infectious disease professional is required to assist with HIV viral-load monitoring and in choosing the most appropriate highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Drug interactions complicate immunosuppressant therapy and require careful management. The acute rejection rates appear to be similar in adults to those in noninfective transplant recipients. Induction with basiliximab and calcineurin-based immunosuppression appears to be safe and effective in these recipients. Prophylaxis is advised for a variety of infections and may need life-long administration, especially in children. Organ shortage remains a significant problem, and kidneys from deceased HIV-positive donors have been used successfully in a small study population. Overall, with careful planning and close follow-up, successful renal transplantation for paediatric HIV-infected recipients is possible. PMID:24691821

  9. Identification of a central DNA flap in feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Whitwam, T; Peretz, M; Poeschla, E

    2001-10-01

    A duplication of the polypurine tract (PPT) at the center of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome (the cPPT) has been shown to prime a separate plus-strand initiation and to result in a plus-strand displacement (DNA flap) that plays a role in nuclear import of the viral preintegration complex. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that infects nondividing cells, causes progressive CD4(+) T-cell depletion, and has been used as a substrate for lentiviral vectors. However, the PPT sequence is not duplicated elsewhere in the FIV genome and a central plus-strand initiation or strand displacement has not been identified. Using Southern blotting of S1 nuclease-digested FIV preintegration complexes isolated from infected cells, we detected a single-strand discontinuity at the approximate center of the reverse-transcribed genome. Primer extension analyses assigned the gap to the plus strand, and mapped the 5' terminus of the downstream (D+) segment to a guanine residue in a purine-rich tract in pol (AAAAGAAGAGGTAGGA). RACE experiments then mapped the 3' terminus of the upstream plus (U+)-strand segment to a T nucleotide located 88 nucleotides downstream of the D+ strand 5' terminus, thereby identifying the extent of D+ strand displacement and the central termination sequence of this virus. Unlike HIV, the FIV cPPT is significantly divergent in sequence from its 3' counterpart (AAAAAAGAAAAAAGGGTGG) and contains one and in some cases two pyrimidines. An invariant thymidine located -2 to the D+ strand origin is neither required nor optimal for codon usage at this position. Although the mapped cPPTs of FIV and HIV-1 act in cis, they encode homologous amino acids in integrase. PMID:11533203

  10. Transplantation Outcomes for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sung-Yun; Logan, Brent R.; Griffith, Linda M.; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Parrott, Roberta E.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Kapoor, Neena; Hanson, Imelda C.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Jyonouchi, Soma; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Small, Trudy N.; Burroughs, Lauri; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Haight, Ann E.; Grizzle, Audrey; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Chan, Ka Wah; Fuleihan, Ramsay L.; Haddad, Elie; Loechelt, Brett; Aquino, Victor M.; Gillio, Alfred; Davis, Jeffrey; Knutsen, Alan; Smith, Angela R.; Moore, Theodore B.; Schroeder, Marlis L.; Goldman, Frederick D.; Connelly, James A.; Porteus, Matthew H.; Xiang, Qun; Shearer, William T.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Cowan, Morton J.; O’Reilly, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium was formed to analyze the results of hematopoietic-cell transplantation in children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other primary immunodeficiencies. Factors associated with a good transplantation outcome need to be identified in order to design safer and more effective curative therapy, particularly for children with SCID diagnosed at birth. METHODS We collected data retrospectively from 240 infants with SCID who had received transplants at 25 centers during a 10-year period (2000 through 2009). RESULTS Survival at 5 years, freedom from immunoglobulin substitution, and CD3+ T-cell and IgA recovery were more likely among recipients of grafts from matched sibling donors than among recipients of grafts from alternative donors. However, the survival rate was high regardless of donor type among infants who received transplants at 3.5 months of age or younger (94%) and among older infants without prior infection (90%) or with infection that had resolved (82%). Among actively infected infants without a matched sibling donor, survival was best among recipients of haploidentical T-cell–depleted transplants in the absence of any pretransplantation conditioning. Among survivors, reduced-intensity or myeloablative pre-transplantation conditioning was associated with an increased likelihood of a CD3+ T-cell count of more than 1000 per cubic millimeter, freedom from immunoglobulin substitution, and IgA recovery but did not significantly affect CD4+ T-cell recovery or recovery of phytohemagglutinin-induced T-cell proliferation. The genetic subtype of SCID affected the quality of CD3+ T-cell recovery but not survival. CONCLUSIONS Transplants from donors other than matched siblings were associated with excellent survival among infants with SCID identified before the onset of infection. All available graft sources are expected to lead to excellent survival among asymptomatic infants. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and others.) PMID:25075835

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus contains an epitope immunoreactive with thymosin. cap alpha. /sub 1/ and the 30-amino acid synthetic p17 group-specific antigen peptide HGP-30

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Naylor, C.W.; Badamchian, M.; Wada, S.; Goldstein, A.L.; Wang, S.S.; Sun, D.K.; Thornton, A.H.; Sarin, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have reported that an antiserum prepared against thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ (which shares a region of homology with the p17 protein of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated human immunodeficiency virus) effectively neutralized the AIDs virus and prevented its replication in H9 cells. Using HPLC and immunoblot analysis, they have identified from a clone B, type III human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-IIIB) extracts a protein with a molecular weight of 17,000 that is immunoreactive with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was found in retroviral extracts from a number of nonhuman species including feline, bovine, simian, gibbon, and murine retroviruses. Heterologous antiserum prepared against a 30-amino acid synthetic peptide analogue (HGP-30) does not cross-react with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ but does react specifically with the p17 protein of the AIDS virus in a manner identical to that seen with an HTLV-IIIB p17-specific monoclonal antibody. The demonstration that this synthetic analogue is immunogenic and that antibodies to HGP-30 cross-react not only with synthetic peptide but also with the HTLV-IIIB p17 viral protein provides an additional, and potentially more specific, candidate for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine for AIDS. In addition, the p17 synthetic peptide (HGP-3) may prove to be useful in a diagnostic assay for the detection of AIDS virus infection in seronegative individuals.

  12. Inhibition of expression of delayed hypersensitivity by neutralizing monoclonal anti-T-cell fibronectin antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Mandy, S; Feng, Z; Canfield, L S; Mandy, K; Quan, X; Rowehl, R A; Khan, M Y; Akiyama, S K; Godfrey, H P

    1994-01-01

    T-cell fibronectin (FN) is a unique cellular FN that is rapidly synthesized by memory T cells in response to antigen. Monoclonal anti-T-cell FN antibodies have been used to clarify the role of T-cell FN in the in vivo expression of delayed hypersensitivity. IgGl(kappa) mouse anti-human T-cell FN monoclonal antibodies 231 and 248 recognized epitopes on the FN cell-binding domain, were cross-reactive with plasma FN, and neutralized human and guinea-pig T-cell FN monocyte agglutinating activity. When injected intradermally together with tuberculin or 30 min before topical application of reactive sensitizer, antibody 231 significantly decreased macroscopic expression of guinea-pig delayed hypersensitivity at 24 hr in a dose-dependent manner. Similar doses of antibody 248 caused a slight statistically non-significant enhancement of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) expression. Inhibition of visible skin responses was not associated with qualitative or quantitative changes in cellular infiltrates at the reaction site. Antibody 231 modulated expression of delayed hypersensitivity in a qualitatively and quantitatively similar manner to the FN-binding mycobacterial antigen 85 proteins. This is consistent with anti-T-cell FN and antigen 85 acting on the same molecule in vivo. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7875739

  13. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  14. HIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity in rabbits vaccinated with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-like gag-env particles

    SciTech Connect

    Haffar, O.K.; Smithgall, M.D.; Moran, P.A.; Travis, B.M.; Zarling, J.M.; Hu, S.L. )

    1991-08-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-like gag-env particles produced in mammalian cells were inoculated into two New Zealand white rabbits. In parallel, two control rabbits were inoculated with the homologous HIV-1 virions inactivated by ultraviolet light (uv) and psoralen treatments. The humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV-1 were evaluated for both groups of animals. Recombinant particles elicited humoral immunity that was specific for all the viral structural proteins. The antibodies recognized both denatured and nondenatured proteins. Moreover, the sera neutralized the in vitro infectivity of the homologous virus in CEM cells. Importantly, the recombinant particles also generated a T helper response by priming with the HIV proteins. Similar results were observed with inactivated virus immunization. Therefore, the authors results suggest that the recombinant HIV-like particles elicit functional humoral immunity as well as cellular immunity and represent a novel vaccine candidate for AIDS.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus disease in California. Effects of the 1993 expanded case definition of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, J A; Tabnak, F; Kuan, J; Rutherford, G W

    1996-01-01

    On January 1, 1993, the case definition of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in adults and adolescents used for monitoring the AIDS epidemic in California was expanded to include persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with CD4 T-lymphocyte counts of less than 200 x 10(6) per liter (< 200 per mm3), pulmonary tuberculosis, recurrent pneumonia, or invasive cervical cancer. To assess the implications of this revision on AIDS case reporting in California, we compared cases reported through the end of 1994 based on 1 or more of the 4 new AIDS-defining conditions added in 1993 to cases reported based on pre-1993 AIDS-defining opportunistic infections and cancers. The 4 new conditions included in the 1993 expanded AIDS case definition accounted for a 23% increase in cumulative AIDS cases reported in California by the end of 1993, a 170% increase in the number of cases reported during 1993, and an 88% increase in the number of patients with AIDS living at the end of 1993. The number of cases reported in 1993 (19,629) was 124% more than that reported in 1992 (8,780) and 69% more than that reported in 1994 (11,587). The proportion of cases among women, injection-drug users, and African Americans also increased as a result of this change in the case definition. The expansion of the case definition may have resulted in a peak or plateau in the AIDS incidence in California because of reporting earlier in the HIV disease progression. The expanded case definition has enhanced the usefulness of AIDS surveillance data for targeting secondary prevention efforts, but more behavioral and HIV serosurveys are still needed to adequately target primary HIV prevention efforts. Images Figure 1. PMID:8775725

  16. Infected Lives: A Heideggerian Phenomenological Study of Young African American Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Women

    E-print Network

    Peltzer, Jill Nicole

    2012-05-31

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection continues to be a significant health concern for African American women, as they comprise 64% of HIV-positive women in the US. The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to explore...

  17. Differential Levels of Soluble Inflammatory Markers by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Controller Status and Demographics

    E-print Network

    Li, Jonathan Z.

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 elite controllers (ECs) represent an ideal population to study the effects of HIV persistence on chronic inflammation in the absence of antiretroviral therapy (ART).

  18. Developing Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Policies for Schools of Nursing: A Practical Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Kay K.

    1989-01-01

    Nursing schools are urged to create and equip task forces to formulate policy concerning Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Guidelines are given for selection of task force members and for content of policy. (Author/MSE)

  19. Impairment of Cd4+ T Cell Responses during Chronic Virus Infection Prevents Neutralizing Antibody Responses against Virus Escape Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, Adrian; Hunziker, Lukas; Klenerman, Paul; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    2001-01-01

    We have shown previously that neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) are important contributors to the long-term immune control of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection, particularly if cytotoxic T cell responses are low or absent. Nevertheless, virus escape from the nAb response due to mutations within the surface glycoprotein gene may subsequently allow the virus to persist. Here we show that most of the antibody-escape viral mutants retain their immunogenicity. We present evidence that the failure of the infected host to mount effective humoral responses against emerging neutralization-escape mutants correlates with the rapid loss of CD4+ T cell responsiveness during the establishment of viral persistence. Similar mechanisms may contribute to the persistence of some human pathogens such as hepatitis B and C viruses, and human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:11157050

  20. Prevention of immunodeficiency virus induced CD4+ T-cell depletion by prior infection with a non-pathogenic virus

    SciTech Connect

    TerWee, Julie A.; Carlson, Jennifer K.; Sprague, Wendy S.; Sondgeroth, Kerry S.; Shropshire, Sarah B.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2008-07-20

    Immune dysregulation initiated by a profound loss of CD4+ T-cells is fundamental to HIV-induced pathogenesis. Infection of domestic cats with a non-pathogenic lentivirus prevalent in the puma (puma lentivirus, PLV or FIV{sub PCO}) prevented peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell depletion caused by subsequent virulent FIV infection. Maintenance of this critical population was not associated with a significant decrease in FIV viremia, lending support to the hypothesis that direct viral cytopathic effect is not the primary cause of immunodeficiency. Although this approach was analogous to immunization with a modified live vaccine, correlates of immunity such as a serum-neutralizing antibody or virus-specific T-cell proliferative response were not found in protected animals. Differences in cytokine transcription profile, most notably in interferon gamma, were observed between the protected and unprotected groups. These data provide support for the importance of non-adaptive enhancement of the immune response in the prevention of CD4+ T-cell loss.

  1. Evolution of Circulating Wild Poliovirus and of Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus in an Immunodeficient Patient: a Unifying Model

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilin, Gene V.; Cherkasova, Elena A.; Lipskaya, Galina Y.; Kew, Olen M.; Agol, Vadim I.

    2000-01-01

    We determined nucleotide sequences of the VP1 and 2AB genes and portions of the 2C and 3D genes of two evolving poliovirus lineages: circulating wild viruses of T geotype and Sabin vaccine-derived isolates from an immunodeficient patient. Different regions of the viral RNA were found to evolve nonsynchronously, and the rate of evolution of the 2AB region in the vaccine-derived population was not constant throughout its history. Synonymous replacements occurred not completely randomly, suggesting the need for conservation of certain rare codons (possibly to control translation elongation) and the existence of unidentified constraints in the viral RNA structure. Nevertheless the major contribution to the evolution of the two lineages came from linear accumulation of synonymous substitutions. Therefore, in agreement with current theories of viral evolution, we suggest that the majority of the mutations in both lineages were fixed as a result of successive sampling, from the heterogeneous populations, of random portions containing predominantly neutral and possibly adverse mutations. As a result of such a mode of evolution, the virus fitness may be maintained at a more or less constant level or may decrease unless more-fit variants are stochastically generated. The proposed unifying model of natural poliovirus evolution has important implications for the epidemiology of poliomyelitis. PMID:10906191

  2. From neutral currents to weak vector bosons

    E-print Network

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    12 From neutral currents to weak vector bosons The unification of weak and electromagnetic is an isosinglet. The Higgs mechanism is invoked to give mass to the W bosons. At the same time, the two neutral

  3. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...parties and all parties agree that the neutral may serve. (b) A neutral who serves as a conciliator, facilitator, or mediator serves at the will of the parties. (c) With consent of the parties, the Federal Maritime Commission Dispute...

  4. Neutral Hydrogen in Galaxy Groups

    E-print Network

    N. P. F. McKay; C. G. Mundell; S. Brough; D. A. Forbes; D. G. Barnes

    2002-12-10

    We present preliminary results from a study of the neutral hydrogen (HI) properties of an X-ray selected sample of nearby loose galaxy groups. This forms part of a multi-wavelength investigation (X-ray, optical and radio) of the formation and evolution of galaxies within a group environment. Some initial findings of an ATNF Parkes Multibeam wide-area neutral hydrogen imaging survey of 17 nearby galaxy groups include two new, potentially isolated clouds of HI in the NGC 1052 and NGC 5044 groups and significant amounts of HI within the group virial radii of groups NGC 3557 and IC 1459 - two groups with complex X-ray structures that suggest they may still be in the act of virialisation. Here we present ATCA high-resolution synthesis-imaging follow-up observations of the distribution and kinematics of HI in these four groups.

  5. Coulomb Blockade with Neutral Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Alex; Gefen, Yuval

    2015-04-01

    We study transport through a quantum dot in the fractional quantum Hall regime with filling factors ? =2 /3 and ? =5 /2 , weakly coupled to the leads. We account for both injection of electrons to or from the leads, and quasiparticle rearrangement processes between the edge and the bulk of the quantum dot. The presence of neutral modes introduces topological constraints that modify qualitatively the features of the Coulomb blockade (CB). The periodicity of CB peak spacings doubles and the ratio of spacing between adjacent peaks approaches (in the low temperature and large dot limit) a universal value: 2 ?1 for ? =2 /3 and 3 ?1 for ? =5 /2 . The corresponding CB diamonds alternate their width in the direction of the bias voltage and allow for the determination of the neutral mode velocity, and of the topological numbers associated with it.

  6. The beam driven plasma neutralizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrey, E.; Holmes, A.

    2013-02-01

    The improvement of the efficiency of neutral beam systems to be compatible with the economic requirements of fusion power plants is a key theme in the European research programme. A novel plasma neutralizer, in which the negative ion beam itself is the source of the plasma, is described. Its success depends on the confinement of the free electrons generated by stripping from the beam and their generation of additional plasma. The device requires no additional power in contrast to the photoneutralizer, presently the main device of research interest. Although the efficiency of the plasma device is not as high as the photoneutralizer it is essentially of a low technological risk, inherently reliable and will not require a significant R&D programme to demonstrate.

  7. Baroclinic neutrality and the tropopause

    SciTech Connect

    Lindzen, R.S. )

    1993-04-15

    It is noted that the atmosphere has a baroclinically neutral state that permits strong temperature gradients at the ground. In this state, the concentrated potential vorticity gradient at the ground is separated from the concentrated potential vorticity gradient at the tropopause by a region where the potential vorticity gradient is zero. The resulting basic state is analogous to the basic state in the Eady problem. A minimum meridional wavenumber is established by the width of the subtropical jet, and neutrality is established by moving the tropopause to a sufficient height so that the total wavenumber corresponds to the short-wave cutoff in the Eady problem. The resulting height is approximately the observed tropopause height. 30 refs.

  8. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  9. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  10. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  11. Global Structure of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody IgG1 b12 is Asymmetric

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish, F.; Solanki, A; Boone, C; Krueger, J

    2010-01-01

    Human antibody IgG1 b12 is one of the four antibodies known to neutralize a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus-1. The crystal structure of this antibody displayed an asymmetric disposition of the Fab arms relative to its Fc portion. Comparison of structures solved for other IgG1 antibodies led to a notion that crystal packing forces entrapped a 'snap-shot' of different conformations accessible to this antibody. To elucidate global structure of this unique antibody, we acquired small-angle X-ray scattering data from its dilute solution. Data analysis indicated that b12 adopts a bilobal globular structure in solution with a radius of gyration and a maximum linear dimension of {approx}54 and {approx}180 {angstrom}, respectively. Extreme similarity between its solution and crystal structure concludes that non-flexible, asymmetric shape is an inherent property of this rare antibody.

  12. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon (San Diego, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  13. Priming Effects for Affective vs. Neutral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leslie A.; Rabin, Laura; Wyatt, Gwinne; Frohlich, Jonathan; Vardy, Susan B.; Dimitri, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Affective and Neutral Tasks (faces with negative or neutral content, with different lighting and orientation) requiring reaction time judgments of poser identity were administered to 32 participants. Speed and accuracy were better for the Affective than Neutral Task, consistent with literature suggesting facilitation of performance by affective…

  14. THE NEUTRAL DIVERGENCE OF QUANTITATIVE TRAITS

    E-print Network

    Walsh, Bruce

    11 THE NEUTRAL DIVERGENCE OF QUANTITATIVE TRAITS There are some enterprises in which a careful for neutral characters, as isolated demes or species recurrently acquire and become fixed for independent mutations. Here, we explore neutral factors that can drive the evolutionary dynamics of the among

  15. Regenerable Field Emission Cathode for Spacecraft Neutralization

    E-print Network

    King, Lyon B.

    Regenerable Field Emission Cathode for Spacecraft Neutralization Jason M. Makela, Robert L a cathode for propellant ionization. However, a neutralizer is still necessary to maintain spacecraft neutrality, because an operating FEEP thruster will still cause a global charge imbalance on a spacecraft

  16. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  17. RESEARCH ARTICLE Natural Selection Constrains Neutral

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jianzhi

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Natural Selection Constrains Neutral Diversity across A Wide Range of Species * tsackton@oeb.harvard.edu Abstract The neutral theory of molecular evolution predicts that the amount of neutral polymorphisms within a species will increase proportionally with the census population size (Nc

  18. Fluid Neutral Momentum Transport Reference Problem

    E-print Network

    Budny, Robert

    Fluid Neutral Momentum Transport Reference Problem D. P. Stotler, PPPL S. I. Krasheninnikov, UCSD 1 Summary Type of problem: kinetic or fluid neutral transport Physics or algorithm stressed: thermal force, although these pro- cesses may be significant in a physical situation. The resulting fluid neutral

  19. On neutral vowels in Hungarian Adamantios Gafos

    E-print Network

    Benus, Stefan

    On neutral vowels in Hungarian Adamantios Gafos , Stefan Benus New York University, Department.edu ABSTRACT Neutral vowels are vowels that may intervene between the trigger and target of a harmony pattern been devoted to the low-level phonetic properties of neutral vowels. We examine a prototypical example

  20. Energetic neutral atoms from solar flares

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Hugh

    Energetic neutral atoms from solar flares H. S. Hudson SSL, UC Berkeley #12;Berkeley April 9, 2009 9, 2009 Where do flare ENAs come from? Neutralization and re-ionization on open field lines: Mikic & Lee, 2006 Neutralization and re-ionization on closed field lines: Dennis & Schwartz, 1989 http

  1. OUTPUT REGULATION OF NONLINEAR NEUTRAL SYSTEMS

    E-print Network

    Fridman, Emilia

    OUTPUT REGULATION OF NONLINEAR NEUTRAL SYSTEMS Emilia Fridman1 Department of Electrical Engineering of neutral type nonlinear systems is considered. Reg- ulator equations are derived, which generalize Francis-Byrnes-Isidori equations to the case of neutral systems. It is shown that, under standard assumptions, the reg- ulator

  2. EVOLUTION ON NEUTRAL NETWORKS IN GENETIC PROGRAMMING

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Chapter 14 EVOLUTION ON NEUTRAL NETWORKS IN GENETIC PROGRAMMING Wolfgang Banzhaf1 and Andre Leier1, CANADA Abstract We examine the behavior of an evolutionary search on neutral networks in a simple linear-folding problems and in Genetic Programming, observe parameters of neutral networks and discuss the population

  3. Risk of tuberculosis in immigrant Asians: culturally acquired immunodeficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Finch, P. J.; Millard, F. J.; Maxwell, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Study of the 620 Asian immigrants with tuberculosis notified in the Wandsworth area of south London between 1973 and 1988 showed a bimodal pattern of tuberculosis notifications: in 1977 there was a peak among Asians from East Africa, and in 1981 a peak among those from the Indian subcontinent. There was a mean lag time of five years between clinical presentation and immigration. Logit analysis showed that, although overall more men had tuberculosis than women, glandular tuberculosis was more common among women of all groups, and pulmonary tuberculosis was more common among Hindu women than Hindu men. Both subgroups of Asians had a substantially higher incidence of tuberculosis than white people, particularly at extrapulmonary sites. Hindus were also at a significantly greater risk of tuberculosis at all sites than Muslims (Hindu:Muslim risk ratio 5.5 for women and 3.7 for men). The increased susceptibility to tuberculosis of Hindus, particularly Hindu women, may be related to a culturally acquired immunodeficiency caused by vegetarianism and associated vitamin deficiency. Images PMID:1871690

  4. Mapping the Small RNA Content of Simian Immunodeficiency Virions (SIV)

    PubMed Central

    Brameier, Markus; Ibing, Wiebke; Höfer, Katharina; Montag, Judith; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Motzkus, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that regulatory small non-coding RNAs are not only components of eukaryotic cells and vesicles, but also reside within a number of different viruses including retroviral particles. Using ultra-deep sequencing we have comprehensively analyzed the content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV), which were compared to mock-control preparations. Our analysis revealed that more than 428,000 sequence reads matched the SIV mac239 genome sequence. Among these we could identify 12 virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) that were highly abundant. Beside known retrovirus-enriched small RNAs, like 7SL-RNA, tRNALys3 and tRNALys isoacceptors, we also identified defined fragments derived from small ILF3/NF90-associated RNA snaR-A14, that were enriched more than 50 fold in SIV. We also found evidence that small nucleolar RNAs U2 and U12 were underrepresented in the SIV preparation, indicating that the relative number or the content of co-isolated exosomes was changed upon infection. Our comprehensive atlas of SIV-incorporated small RNAs provides a refined picture of the composition of retrovirions, which gives novel insights into viral packaging. PMID:24086438

  5. Intracellular Accumulation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Saye H.; Hoggard, Patrick G.; Williams, Ian; Meaden, E. Rhiannon; Newton, Philippa; Wilkins, Edmund G.; Smith, Alan; Tjia, John F.; Lloyd, Judy; Jones, Kevin; Beeching, Nick; Carey, Peter; Peters, Barry; Back, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of the protease inhibitors (PIs) saquinavir (SQV), ritonavir (RTV), and indinavir (IDV) was determined in 50 human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. Following extraction, PIs were quantified by mass spectrometry. Paired plasma and intracellular samples were collected over a full dosing interval from patients (13 on SQV, 6 on RTV, 8 on IDV, 16 on SQV plus RTV, 7 on IDV plus RTV) with a plasma viral load of <400 copies/ml. Data were expressed as intracellular/plasma drug concentration ratios. A hierarchy of intracellular accumulation was demonstrated by the following medians: 9.45 for SQV > 1.00 for RTV > 0.51 for IDV. Coadministration of RTV did not boost ratios of SQV or IDV within the cell or in plasma, although absolute plasma and intracellular SQV concentrations were increased by RTV. Seven individuals receiving SQV in hard-gel capsule form (median, 32 months) had higher intracellular/plasma drug ratios than all other patients receiving SQV (median, 17.62 versus 4.83; P = 0.04), despite consistently low plasma SQV concentrations. How this occurs may provide insight into the mechanisms that limit adequate drug penetration into sanctuary sites. PMID:12234849

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus in a tribal family: Issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dimpal; Bharti, Ankit; Pandya, Ipsa; Naik, Eknath; Marfatia, Yogesh S

    2014-01-01

    A 35-year-old married tribal female presented with well-defined crusted ulcers with purulent exudates on the right side of the face involving both lips and right forearm since last 6 months. On investigation, she turned out to be human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive with CD4 count of 7 cell/mm(3) and also having probable abdominal tuberculosis (TB) as suggested by ultrasonography abdomen. Her husband and son were also found to be HIV positive. Her skin lesions were suggestive of cutaneous TB. She was started on antituberculosis treatment (ATT), antiretroviral treatment (ART), and injectable antibiotics. As her skin lesions failed to respond after 1 month, herpes simplex virus infection was suspected as a cause of ulceration, and she was given oral acyclovir therapy to which she responded well and later she was discharged. She stopped both ART and ATT and came with recurrence of skin lesions after 1½ month. Her husband left her for another woman. The purpose of reporting this case is to discuss the issues related to HIV infection affecting all the members of a tribal family. PMID:26396450

  7. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  8. Selective destruction of cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a variant of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  9. Decreased albumin mRNA in immunodeficient wasted' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Buczek, N.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.E. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-03-15

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive gene wst (wst/wst) develop a wasting syndrome' that leads to death by 28-32 days of age. These mice have faulty repair of damage induced by ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency at secretory sites, and neurologic abnormalities. In addition to a progressively more apparent wasted phenotype, wst/wst mice show other features of failure to thrive and malnutrition. Daily body weights of the animals revealed a loss in weight between 25 and 30 days of age, a time during which normal littermates were progressively and rapidly gaining weight. Albumin mRNA levels were measured by dilution dot blot hybridizations of liver-derived RNA preparations from wasted mice, littermates, and parental controls. In all wasted mice, albumin mRNA levels were reduced 5 to 10 fold compared to controls. Northern blots revealed that the albumin mRNA present in wasted mice was normal in length though reduced in amount. These results suggest there may be a relationship between low albumin synthesis and the wasting syndrome of the wst/wst mouse.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of the brain.

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, W J; Berger, J R; Kaderman, R; Tornatore, C S; Major, E O

    1993-01-01

    Direct infection of the central nervous system by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the causative agent of AIDS, was not appreciated in the early years of the AIDS epidemic. Neurological complications associated with AIDS were largely attributed to opportunistic infections that arose as a result of the immunocompromised state of the patient and to depression. In 1985, several groups succeeded in isolating HIV-1 directly from brain tissue. Also that year, the viral genome was completely sequenced, and HIV-1 was found to belong to a neurotropic subfamily of retrovirus known as the Lentivirinae. These findings clearly indicated that direct HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system played a role in the development of AIDS-related neurological disease. This review summarizes the clinical manifestations of HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system and the related neuropathology, the tropism of HIV-1 for specific cell types both within and outside of the nervous system, the possible mechanisms by which HIV-1 damages the nervous system, and the current strategies for diagnosis and treatment of HIV-1-associated neuropathology. Images PMID:8269391

  11. Antibody production and protection against influenza virus in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, S J; Barry, D W; Kind, P

    1978-01-01

    The roles of T and B cells in the immune response to influenza virus were studied by using mice deficient in either T cells (athymic nude) or immunoglobulin production (CBA/N). The serological responses of these mice to either whole or disrupted A/Aichi/2/68 influenza virus vaccines were examined, and the protective effect of these inoculations was tested by challenge infection with mouse-adapted A/Aichi/2/68 influenza virus. In contrast to normal mice, neither strain of immunodeficient mouse produced detectable serum antibody after inoculation with either type of vaccine. CBA/N mice immunized with intact virus vaccine were protected, however, against subsequent lethal challenge. CBA/N mice inoculated with disrupted virus vaccine and nude mice inoculated with either disrupted or whole virus vaccine were not protected against viral challenge. Evidence of immunological memory was observed in CBA/N and nude mice that had survived live virus challenge after immunization with inactivated vaccine. PMID:307534

  12. Common variable immunodeficiency presenting with persistent parvovirus B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sarah T M; Schmidt, Kara M; Cost, Karen M; Marshall, Gary S

    2012-12-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection in healthy hosts is self-limited, but persistent infection has been described in patients with cellular immune defects. A 6-year-old boy presented with a 6-month history of weight loss and malaise and a 1-month history of fever and polyarticular arthritis. Parvovirus DNA was detected in plasma at 10 300 copies/mL. Levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, IgG-1, and IgG-2 were low, and antibody responses to vaccine antigens were impaired. HIV antibody and DNA polymerase chain reaction were negative, and the patient had normal immunophenotype, mitogen stimulation response, CD40 ligand and inducible costimulator expression, transmembrane activator and CAML interactor sequencing, genomic analysis, and fluorescent in situ hybridization for deletions at 22q11.2. Common variable immunodeficiency was diagnosed and replacement therapy with immune globulin intravenous was initiated. The parvovirus DNA level declined by half over 3 months and was undetectable at 15 months. Constitutional symptoms improved but arthritis persisted and eosinophilic fasciitis eventually developed. This case demonstrates that persistent parvovirus infection may be a presenting feature of humoral immune deficiency and can mimic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The infection may respond to immune globulin intravenous therapy. PMID:23129076

  13. [Immune response to antibiotics in patients with secondary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Meroni, P L

    1994-08-01

    A biological response modifier (BRM) has been defined as an agent able to modulate effector mechanisms or mediators of host defence. Some antibiotic molecules have been shown to display a BRM like activity, being able to enhance immune responses (certain cephalosporins), to synergize with the immune effectors (macrolides, quinolones) or alternatively, to depress immune functions (tetracyclines or antimycotic drugs). The BRM-like activity of different antibiotic molecules has been widely reported in in vitro studies as well as ex vivo in experimental animal models. Only recently some Authors have approached the problem by investigating whether the in vivo administration of antibiotic was able to affect different immune effector functions, either in healthy subjects or in patients. The main question in the field is the possible clinical impact of the connections between antibiotics and the immune system, particularly in subjects with acquired immunodeficiency in whom the impairment of the immune responses leads to increased susceptibility to infectious processes. Ex vivo data seem to suggest that cefodizime, one of the newest third-generation cephalosporins, is able to enhance phagocyte and mononuclear cell functions in healthy volunteers, thus confirming the possibility of combining an antibacterial efficacy with the ability to restore or enhance immune responses. Comparable data in studies investigating the effect of cefodizime on immune functions in immunocompromised patients such as elderly subjects, hemodialyzed or diabetic patients, BPCO subjects, patients undergoing surgical stress and patients with multiple myeloma are more important from a practical clinical point of view.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7861203

  14. Natural simian immunodeficiency virus transmission in mandrills: a family affair?

    PubMed Central

    Fouchet, David; Verrier, Delphine; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Souquière, Sandrine; Makuwa, Maria; Kazanji, Mirdad; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Pontier, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how pathogens spread and persist in the ecosystem is critical for deciphering the epidemiology of diseases of significance for global health and the fundamental mechanisms involved in the evolution of virulence and host resistance. Combining long-term behavioural and epidemiological data collected in a naturally infected mandrill population and a Bayesian framework, the present study investigated unknown aspects of the eco-epidemiology of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), the recent ancestor of HIV. Results show that, in contrast to what is expected from aggressive and sexual transmission (i.e. the two commonly accepted transmission modes for SIV), cases of SIVmnd-1 subtype were significantly correlated among related individuals (greater than 30% of the observed cases). Challenging the traditional view of SIV, this finding suggests the inheritance of genetic determinants of susceptibility to SIV and/or a role for behavioural interactions among maternal kin affecting the transmission of the virus, which would highlight the underappreciated role of sociality in the spread of infectious diseases. Outcomes of this study also provide novel insights into the role of host social structure in the evolution of pathogens. PMID:22673358

  15. Role of liver transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepak; Agarwal, Kosh

    2015-11-21

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality amongst human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. Chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, drug-induced hepatotoxicity related to combined anti-retro-viral therapy, alcohol related liver disease and non-alcohol related fatty liver disease appear to be the leading causes. It is therefore, anticipated that more HIV-positive patients with ESLD will present as potential transplant candidates. HIV infection is no longer a contraindication to liver transplantation. Key transplantation outcomes such as rejection and infection rates as well as medium term graft and patient survival match those seen in the non-HIV infected patients in the absence of co-existing HCV infection. HIV disease does not seem to be negatively impacted by transplantation. However, HIV-HCV co-infection transplant outcomes remain suboptimal due to recurrence. In this article, we review the key challenges faced by this patient cohort in the pre- and post-transplant period. PMID:26604639

  16. Genotypic Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    There are 16 approved human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drugs belonging to three mechanistic classes: protease inhibitors, nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. HIV-1 resistance to these drugs is caused by mutations in the protease and RT enzymes, the molecular targets of these drugs. Drug resistance mutations arise most often in treated individuals, resulting from selective drug pressure in the presence of incompletely suppressed virus replication. HIV-1 isolates with drug resistance mutations, however, may also be transmitted to newly infected individuals. Three expert panels have recommended that HIV-1 protease and RT susceptibility testing should be used to help select HIV drug therapy. Although genotypic testing is more complex than typical antimicrobial susceptibility tests, there is a rich literature supporting the prognostic value of HIV-1 protease and RT mutations. This review describes the genetic mechanisms of HIV-1 drug resistance and summarizes published data linking individual RT and protease mutations to in vitro and in vivo resistance to the currently available HIV drugs. PMID:11932232

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders: Mind the gap.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Justin C; Steiner, Joseph; Sacktor, Ned; Nath, Avi

    2010-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs) remain among the most common disorders in people infected with HIV, even in an era when potent antiretroviral therapy is widely deployed. This review discusses the clinical features of HANDs and the implications for more effective treatment. With the improved survival of individuals treated with antiretrovirals, comorbid conditions are increasingly salient, including particularly coinfection with hepatitis C and the effects of aging. This review attempts to answer why there appears to be a therapeutic gap between the salutary effects of antiretroviral regimens and normalization of neurological function. A second gap is found in the understanding of the pathophysiology of HANDs. This review addresses this and discusses the animal models that have helped to elucidate these mechanisms. Although triggered by productive HIV infection of brain macrophages, aberrant and sustained immune activation appears to play a major role in inducing HANDs, and may explain the often incomplete neurological response to highly active antiretroviral therapy. Novel therapies aimed at persistent central nervous system inflammation will be needed to close this gap. PMID:20517932

  18. Proteinuria in paediatric patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Giacomet, Vania; Erba, Paola; Di Nello, Francesca; Coletto, Sonia; Viganò, Alessandra; Zuccotti, GianVincenzo

    2013-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people kidney disease is as an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Clinical features of kidney damage in HIV-infected patients range from asymptomatic microalbuminuria to nephrotic syndrome. The lack of specific clinical features despite the presence of heavy proteinuria may mask the renal involvement. Indeed, it is important in HIV patients to monitor renal function to early discover a possible kidney injury. After the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, mortality and morbidity associated to HIV-infection have shown a substantial reduction, although a variety of side effects for long-term use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, including renal toxicity, has emerged. Among more than 20 currently available antiretroviral agents, many of them can occasionally cause reversible or irreversible nephrotoxicity. At now, three antiretroviral agents, i.e., indinavir, atazanavir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate have a well established association with direct nephrotoxicity. This review focuses on major causes of proteinuria and other pathological findings related to kidney disease in HIV-infected children and adolescents. PMID:24303454

  19. Selective Destruction Of Cells Infected With The Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Thomas E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-03-28

    Compositions and methods for selectively killing a cell containing a viral protease are disclosed. The composition is a varient of a protein synthesis inactivating toxin wherein a viral protease cleavage site is interposed between the A and B chains. The variant of the type II ribosome-inactivating protein is activated by digestion of the viral protease cleavage site by the specific viral protease. The activated ribosome-inactivating protein then kills the cell by inactivating cellular ribosomes. A preferred embodiment of the invention is specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and uses ricin as the ribosome-inactivating protein. In another preferred embodiment of the invention, the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein is modified by attachment of one or more hydrophobic agents. The hydrophobic agent facilitates entry of the variant of the ribosome-inactivating protein into cells and can lead to incorporation of the ribosome-inactivating protein into viral particles. Still another preferred embodiment of the invention includes a targeting moiety attached to the variants of the ribosome-inactivating protein to target the agent to HIV infectable cells.

  20. RAG1/2 knockout pigs with severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiao; Guo, Xiaogang; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhao, Bentian; Ouyang, Zhen; Liu, Zhaoming; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Quanmei; Yi, Xiaoling; Schambach, Axel; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Yang, Dongshan; Yang, Huaqiang; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-08-01

    Pigs share many physiological, biochemical, and anatomical similarities with humans and have emerged as valuable large animal models for biomedical research. Considering the advantages in immune system resemblance, suitable size, and longevity for clinical practical and monitoring purpose, SCID pigs bearing dysfunctional RAG could serve as important experimental tools for regenerative medicine, allograft and xenograft transplantation, and reconstitution experiments related to the immune system. In this study, we report the generation and phenotypic characterization of RAG1 and RAG2 knockout pigs using transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Porcine fetal fibroblasts were genetically engineered using transcription activator-like effector nucleases and then used to provide donor nuclei for somatic cell nuclear transfer. We obtained 27 live cloned piglets; among these piglets, 9 were targeted with biallelic mutations in RAG1, 3 were targeted with biallelic mutations in RAG2, and 10 were targeted with a monoallelic mutation in RAG2. Piglets with biallelic mutations in either RAG1 or RAG2 exhibited hypoplasia of immune organs, failed to perform V(D)J rearrangement, and lost mature B and T cells. These immunodeficient RAG1/2 knockout pigs are promising tools for biomedical and translational research. PMID:24973446

  1. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of CD8+ lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G A; Reubel, G H; Pedersen, N C

    1996-01-01

    To determine the lymphoid target cells of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in vivo, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and lymph node lymphocytes (LNL) were positively selected (>97% purity) for surface expression of CD4, CD8, or CD20 and then analyzed for SIV provirus using semiquantitative DNA amplification. We found provirus in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes but none in CD20+ lymphocytes. During acute SIV infection (< or = 214 days postinoculation), the percentage of PBL and LNL CD4+ cells containing proviral DNA ranged from 0.2 to 20% and from 0.2 to 2%, respectively. Proviral burden in the CD8+ population of either PBL or LNL ranged from 0.01 to 0.2%. Virus isolation by cocultivation was positive for both CD4+ and CD8+ purified populations. No difference in proviral burden was observed between PBL and LNL subsets during acute SIV infection. Up to 19.4% of positively selected CD8+ cells also expressed CD4, and thus the provirus may reside within a dual-positive population. This dual-positive population may represent activated lymphocytes that are particularly susceptible to infection and may provide an opportunity for virus entry into the CD8+ CD4- lymphocytes in vivo. PMID:8764081

  2. The structure of a neutralized virus: canine parvovirus complexed with neutralizing antibody fragment

    E-print Network

    Baker, Timothy S.

    The structure of a neutralized virus: canine parvovirus complexed with neutralizing antibody of neutralizing antibodies that prevent virus particles from infecting target cells. The mechanism of neutralization is notwell understood. We therefore stud- ied the structure of canine parvovirus (CPV) complexed

  3. Results on intense beam focusing and neutralization from the neutralized beam experimenta...

    E-print Network

    Gilson, Erik

    Results on intense beam focusing and neutralization from the neutralized beam experimenta... P. K December 2003; published online 23 April 2004 Experimental techniques to provide active neutralization for space-charge-dominated beams as well as to prevent uncontrolled ion beam neutralization by stray

  4. Exploring non-neutral Landscapes with neutrality-based Local Search

    E-print Network

    Matthieu, Basseur

    Exploring non-neutral Landscapes with neutrality-based Local Search Matthieu Basseur, Adrien Go which artificially adds neutrality in search landscapes by discretizing the evaluation function. Some values). In particular, we focused on the ways to handle neutrality [4]. To achieve this, we introduced

  5. Network neutrality, search neutrality, and the never-ending conflict between efficiency and fairness

    E-print Network

    Odlyzko, Andrew M.

    Network neutrality, search neutrality, and the never-ending conflict between efficiency://www.dtc.umn.edu/odlyzko Revised version, January 17, 2009 Abstract. Network neutrality as such may fade from public interest on society mean that no fixed set of rules can work indefinitely. Should net neutrality or some similar set

  6. Multicusp Trap as Model of Plasma Neutralizer for ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V.A.; Dubrovin, M.M.; Kosarev, P.M.; Skovoroda, A.A.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Terent'ev, A.A.; Yanchenkov, S.V.; Zhil'tsov, V.A.; Zubarev, V.F.

    2005-01-15

    Increasing the negative ions beam neutralization efficiency in NBI system is rather attractive. It is known, that neutralization efficiency of negative ion beam on plasma is higher than on gas. The model of plasma neutralizer for ITER NBI system - PNX-U facility is described here. Obtained experimental results give that chosen conception is promising and plasma neutralizer allows essential improvement of NBI system.

  7. Gas Flow Measurements of a Novel Geometry for Neutral Beam Neutralizers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirkle, David Ross

    The gas flow characteristics of a novel geometry (pumped neutralizer) for decreasing the flow of gas from neutral beam neutralizers were measured and compared with a conventional (passive) neutralizer. A passive neutralizer is typically a duct attached to the ion source. For the pumped neutralizer the top and bottom surfaces of the duct are replaced by a Venetian blind geometry which opens into ballast vacuum pumping volumes. With guidance from a Monte Carlo program which models gas flow at low pressure, a one-half scale model with pumped neutralizer geometry was built and compared to a passive neutralizer with comparable dimensions. With the vanes on the pumped neutralizer opened to 55 degrees, the line density of the pumped neutralizer was 1.6 times less than the passive neutralizer. The amount of gas flowing from the exit of the pumped neutralizer was from 2 to 5 times less than the amount flowing from the pumped neutralizer. Hence, the pumped neutralizer geometry appears to be a promising method of limiting the flow of gas from neutral beam gas cell neutralizers.

  8. Replication of an acutely lethal simian immunodeficiency virus activates and induces proliferation of lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fultz, P N

    1991-01-01

    A variant of simian immunodeficiency virus from sooty mangabey monkeys (SIVsmm), termed SIVsmmPBj14, was previously identified and shown to induce acute disease and death within 1 to 2 weeks of inoculation of pig-tailed macaques and mangabey monkeys (P. N. Fultz, H. M. McClure, D. C. Anderson, and W. M. Switzer, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 5:397-409, 1989). SIVsmmPBj14 differed from its parent virus, SIVsmm9, not only in pathogenicity but also in multiple in vitro properties. As a first approach to understanding the biological and molecular mechanisms responsible for the acute disease and death induced by this variant, virus-host cell interactions of SIVsmmPBj14 and SIVsmm9 were studied. Initial rates of replication of the two viruses were identical in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal pig-tailed macaques and mangabey monkeys, but SIVsmmPBj14 infection always resulted in higher yields of virus than did SIVsmm9 infection, as assessed by levels of reverse transcriptase activity in culture supernatants. Surprisingly, despite its cytopathicity for macaque and mangabey CD4+ cells, replication of SIVsmmPBj14 was accompanied by up to 10-fold increases in number of viable cells compared with cell numbers in uninfected or SIVsmm9-infected cultures. Furthermore, SIVsmmPBj14 was shown to infect and replicate in resting PBMC just as efficiently as in mitogen-stimulated PBMC, irrespective of whether exogenous interleukin-2 (IL-2) or antibodies that neutralized IL-2 were added to culture media. Accumulation of virus in culture supernatants of resting PBMC preceded by several days the appearance of activated cells which expressed the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit (CD25), suggesting that activation of cells was not essential for replication. The ability to activate and to induce simian PBMC to proliferate appeared specific for the acutely lethal variant because incorporation of [3H]thymidine by PBMC from naive animals was observed only upon incubation with concentrated, heat-inactivated SIVsmmPBj14 and not with other viruses. Both CD4(+)- and CD8(+)-enriched cell populations proliferated in response to SIVsmmPBj14. These results are consistent with in vivo observations and suggest that the abilities both to replicate in resting cells and to induce lymphocytes to proliferate may contribute to the extreme virulence of SIVsmmPBj14. Images PMID:1870205

  9. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  10. Standardization of sensitive human immunodeficiency virus coculture procedures and establishment of a multicenter quality assurance program for the AIDS Clinical Trials Group. The NIH/NIAID/DAIDS/ACTG Virology Laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Hollinger, F B; Bremer, J W; Myers, L E; Gold, J W; McQuay, L

    1992-01-01

    An independent quality assurance program has been established by the Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for monitoring virologic assays performed by nearly 40 laboratories participating in multicenter clinical trials in the United States. Since virologic endpoints are important in evaluating the timing and efficacy of therapeutic interventions, it is imperative that virologic measurements be accurate and uniform. When the quality assurance program was initially created, fewer than 40% of the laboratories could consistently recover human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HIV-infected patients. By comparing coculture procedures in the more competent laboratories with those in laboratories who were struggling to isolate virus, optimal conditions were established and nonessential reagents and practices were eliminated. Changes were rapidly introduced into a laboratory when experience dictated that such modifications would result in a favorable outcome. Isolation of HIV was enhanced by optimizing the numbers and ratios of patient and donor cells used in cultures, by standardizing PBMC separation procedures, by using fresh rather than frozen donor PBMCs, by processing whole blood within 24 h, and by using natural delectinated interleukin 2 instead of recombinant interleukin 2 products in existence at that time. Delays of more than 8 h in the addition of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated donor cells to freshly separated patient PBMCs reduced recovery. Phytohemagglutinin in cocultures and the addition of Polybrene and anti-human alpha interferon to media were not important in HIV isolation. The introduction of a consensus protocol based on this information brought most laboratories quickly into compliance. In addition, monthly monitoring has successfully maintained proficiency among the laboratories, a process that is critical for the scientific integrity of collaborative multicenter trials. Problems which might not be appreciated for months are now being resolved early, before data can be compromised unknowingly. This consensus protocol is recommended for any laboratory attempting to isolate HIV for the purpose of standardizing recovery and for accessing virologic endpoints in clinical trials. PMID:1629336

  11. Neutral gas dynamics in fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-06-01

    Fireballs are local discharge phenomena on positively biased electrodes in partially ionized plasmas. Electrons, energized at a double layer, heat neutral gas which expands. The gas pressure exceeds the plasma pressure, hence becomes important to the stability and transport in fireballs. The flow of gas moves the electrode and sensors similar to a mica pendulum. Flow speed and directions are measured. A fireball gun has been developed to partially collimate the flow of hot gas and heat objects in its path. New applications of fireballs are suggested.

  12. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and black Americans: special psychosocial issues.

    PubMed Central

    Mays, V M; Cochran, S D

    1987-01-01

    Approximately 25 percent of persons diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been black. This paper examines three areas of concern when focusing on AIDS in the black population: differences from whites in patterns of transmission of the infection, cultural factors that may affect health education efforts, and ethnically relevant issues in the provision of medical care to black persons with AIDS. Recognition of these differences is important in developing appropriate AIDS-related services for the black population. First, the epidemiologic pattern of infection in the black population differs from whites. Although they represent only 12 percent of the American population, blacks make up nearly one-quarter of reported AIDS cases. Currently, it is estimated that between 1 and 1.4 percent of the black population may be infected with the human T-lymphotropic virus/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV), a rate estimated to be three times that of whites. In addition, epidemiologic patterns of viral transmission in the black community suggest a greater incursion into the heterosexual population. Second, educational interventions designed to slow the rate of infection need to be sensitive to cultural and behavioral differences between blacks and whites who are at increased risk for acquiring or transmitting an HTLV-III/LAV infection. These include possible differences in perceptions of being at risk and actual risk behaviors. Third, in caring for black AIDS patients there are psychological, sociocultural, and medical care issues that are relevant. Research findings specific to health care for blacks are reviewed with particular reference to concerns that might arise in the treatment of black persons with AIDS. Recommendations for research and health education efforts in the black community are presented. PMID:3104981

  13. Pulmonary Manifestations of Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jesenak, Milos; Banovcin, Peter; Jesenakova, Barbora; Babusikova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are inherited disorders in which one or several components of immune system are decreased, missing, or of non-appropriate function. These diseases affect the development, function, or morphology of the immune system. The group of PID comprises more than 200 different disorders and syndromes and the number of newly recognized and revealed deficiencies is still increasing. Their clinical presentation and complications depend on the type of defects and there is a great variability in the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes. A variation of clinical presentation across various age categories is also presented and children could widely differ from adult patients with PID. Respiratory symptoms and complications present a significant cause of morbidity and also mortality among patients suffering from different forms of PIDs and they are observed both in children and adults. They can affect primarily either upper airways (e.g., sinusitis and otitis media) or lower respiratory tract [e.g., pneumonia, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, and interstitial lung diseases (ILDs)]. The complications from lower respiratory tract are usually considered to be more important and also more specific for PIDs and they determinate patients’ prognosis. The spectrum of the causal pathogens usually demonstrates typical pattern characteristic for each PID category. The respiratory signs of PIDs can be divided into infectious (upper and lower respiratory tract infections and complications) and non-infectious (ILDs, bronchial abnormalities – especially bronchiectasis, malignancies, and benign lymphoproliferation). Early diagnosis and appropriate therapy can prevent or at least slow down the development and course of respiratory complications of PIDs. PMID:25121077

  14. Ensuring accurate testing for human immunodeficiency virus in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Kyaw, Latt Latt; Wada, Koji; Oo, Khin Yi; Tin, Htay Htay; Yoshihara, Namiko

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem Until 2005, the quality of rapid diagnostic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing was not monitored and no regular technical support was provided to hospital laboratories in Myanmar. Approach The national reference laboratory introduced a national external quality assessment scheme. The scheme involved (i) training laboratory technicians in HIV testing and in the requirements of the quality assessment system; (ii) implementing a biannual proficiency panel testing programme; (iii) on-site assessments of poorly-performing laboratories to improve testing procedures; and (iv) development of national guidelines. Local setting In 2011, a total of 422 public hospitals in Myanmar had laboratories providing HIV tests. In addition, private laboratories supported by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) conducted HIV testing. Relevant changes The scheme was started in 65 public laboratories in 2005. In 2012, it had expanded nationwide to 347 laboratories, including 33 NGO laboratories. During the expansion of the scheme, laboratory response rates were greater than 90% and the proportion of laboratories reporting at least one aberrant result improved from 9.2% (6/65) in 2005 to 5.4% (17/316) in 2012. Lessons learnt National testing guidelines and a reference laboratory are needed to successfully implement quality assurance of HIV testing services. On-site assessments are crucial for all participating laboratories and the only source for insight on the causes of aberrant results; lessons that the reference laboratory can share nationally. Proficiency testing helps laboratory technicians to maintain HIV testing skills by ensuring that they regularly encountered HIV-positive samples. PMID:25558106

  15. Cancer incidence in New York State acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, B; Wang, Z; Schymura, M J; Kahn, A; Fordyce, E J

    2001-09-15

    To identify cancers that occur at higher rates in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, the cancer experience of New York State (NYS) AIDS patients aged 15-69 years who were diagnosed between 1981 and 1994 was compared with that of the NYS general population. Sex and HIV risk group-specific standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), post-AIDS relative risks, and trends of relative risks were calculated to determine cancer risk. Among non-AIDS-related cancers, elevated SIRs were found for Hodgkin's disease (male, 8.0; female, 6.4; heterosexually infected males, 31.3); cancer of the rectum, rectosigmoid, and anus (male, 3.3; female, 3.0); trachea, bronchus, and lung (male, 3.3; female, 7.5); and brain and central nervous system (male, 3.1; female, 3.4; heterosexually infected females, 23.8) cancers. Moreover, significant trends of increasing relative risks from the pre-AIDS to the post-AIDS period were found for cancers of the rectum, rectosigmoid, and anus; trachea, bronchus, and lung; skin; and connective tissues (all sites, p < 0.05) among males. For AIDS-related cancers in women, invasive cervical cancer had an overall SIR of 9.1 (95% confidence interval: 6.9, 10.8) and a post-AIDS relative risk of 6.5 (95% confidence interval: 4.1, 9.7). This population-based registry linkage analysis evaluates cancer risk in AIDS patients by sex and risk factors and adds evidence that HIV-associated immunosuppression increases the risks of specific types of cancer. PMID:11549560

  16. Acute kidney injury in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, J.; Gupta, T.; Prakash, S.; Rathore, S. S.; Usha; Sunder, S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important cause of hospitalization and morbidity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. However, the data on AKI in such patients is limited. The aim of the present study was to analyze the incidence, causes and outcome of AKI in HIV-positive patients from our antiretroviral therapy centre. All HIV-positive patients were evaluated for evidence of clinical AKI. AKI was noted in 138/3540 (3.9%) patients. Of 138 AKI patients, 96 (69.6%) had acquired immuno deficiency syndrome and 42 (30.4%) were HIV seropositive. Majority of AKI patients belonged to AKI network (AKIN) Stage II (42%) or III (48.5%) at presentation. Prerenal, intrinsic and postrenal AKI were noted in 53.6%, 44.2% and 2.2% of cases, respectively. Hypovolemia (44.2%) and sepsis (14.5%) contributed to AKI in vast majority of cases. AKI was multifactorial (volume depletion, sepsis and drugs) in 39% of patients. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was the most common intrinsic lesion. Acute interstitial nephritis and diffuse endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis were noted in five and two cases, respectively. In-hospital mortality was 24.64%. Lower CD4 count, decreased serum albumin level and Stage 4 WHO disease were associated with higher mortality. At 3 months or more follow-up complete recovery of renal function, chronic kidney disease Stage 3-5 and progression to end stage renal disease were noted in 58.69%, 14.5% and 2.2% of cases, respectively. Thus, prerenal factors and ischemic ATN were the most common cause of AKI in HIV-infected patients. Recovery of renal function was seen in 59% of cases, but AKI had high in-hospital mortality. PMID:25838645

  17. Inducible human immunodeficiency virus type 1 packaging cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, H; Rabson, A B; Kaul, M; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    Packaging cell lines are important tools for transferring genes into eukaryotic cells. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based packaging cell lines are difficult to obtain, in part owing to the problem that some HIV-1 proteins are cytotoxic in a variety of cells. To overcome this, we have developed an HIV-1-based packaging cell line which has an inducible expression system. The tetracycline-inducible expression system was utilized to control the expression of the Rev regulatory protein, which in turn controls the expression of the late proteins including Gag, Pol, and Env. Western blotting (immunoblotting) demonstrated that the expression of p24gag and gp120env from the packaging cells peaked on days 6 and 7 postinduction. Reverse transcriptase activity could be detected by day 4 after induction and also peaked on days 6 and 7. Defective vector virus could be propagated, yielding titers as high as 7 x 10(3) CFU/ml, while replication-competent virus was not detectable at any time. Thus, the cell line should enable the transfer of specific genes into CD4+ cells and should be a useful tool for studying the biology of HIV-1. We have also established an inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line which could be used to propagate HIV-1 vectors that require only Env in trans. The env-minus vector virus titer produced from the Env-expressing cells reached 2 x 10(4) CFU/ml. The inducible HIV-1 Env-expressing cell line should be a useful tool for the study of HIV-1 Env as well. PMID:8676479

  18. Special Issues Involving Periprosthetic Infection in Immunodeficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tornero, Eduard; Riba, Josep; Garcia-Ramiro, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Chronic systemic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease (CKD), liver cirrhosis, neoplasia, etc. have been clearly associated with high rates of SWI. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these observations are still under investigation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing problem in our society. Many of these patients will require an arthroplasty and it appears that the prosthetic infection risk for these types of patients is much higher than in the normal population. The risk of complications due to infection seems to be lower in patients with kidney transplants than in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Both prophylaxis and treatment of infection in patients with CKD should be carried out with a strict monitoring of potentially nephrotoxic antibiotics. The literature on the prognosis and risk of infection in patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplant is scarce and occasionally contradictory. The optimal time for the surgery should be determined by taking into account the immunological state of the patient and should be avoided, as much as possible, during the first year after the HSCT. Child’s classification system is the most widely used method of stratifying the surgical risk for patients with cirrhosis; the infection appeared to be associated in a statistically significant way with advanced age and a Child B pre-operative classification. The prevention of prosthetic joint infections in HIV-infected patients should not be significantly different from the prevention for any other patient. Those patients that receive adequate antiretroviral treatment and periodic laboratory control show infection rates and periprosthetic complications that are similar to those for patients not affected by HIV. Therefore, the patient’s level of immunodeficiency is the most important prognostic factor for prosthetic infection. The particular immunological condition of these patients can lead to infections due to particular microorganisms that immunocompetent patients do not have to deal with. Of all possibilities, because of their frequency and difficulty to treat, infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus and fungus are highlighted. PMID:23919096

  19. Lymphoid organs function as major reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, G; Graziosi, C; Butini, L; Pizzo, P A; Schnittman, S M; Kotler, D P; Fauci, A S

    1991-01-01

    The total number of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected circulating CD4+ T lymphocytes is considered to be a reflection of the HIV burden at any given time during the course of HIV infection. However, the low frequency of HIV-infected circulating CD4+ T lymphocytes and the low level or absence of plasma viremia in the early stages of infection do not correlate with the progressive immune dysfunction characteristic of HIV infection. In this study, we have determined whether HIV-infected circulating CD4+ T lymphocytes are a correct reflection of the total pool of HIV-infected CD4+ T cells (i.e., HIV burden). To this end, HIV burden has been comparatively analyzed in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues (lymph nodes, adenoids, and tonsils) from the same patients. The presence of HIV-1 DNA in mononuclear cells isolated simultaneously from peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues of the same patients was determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification. We found that the frequency of HIV-1-infected cells in unfractionated or sorted CD4+ cell populations isolated from lymphoid tissues was significantly higher (0.5-1 log10 unit) than the frequency in peripheral blood. Comparable results were obtained in five HIV seropositive patients in the early stages of disease and in one patient with AIDS. These results demonstrate that a heavy viral load does reside in the lymphoid organs, indicating that they may function as major reservoirs for HIV. In addition, the finding of a heavy viral load in the lymphoid organs of patients in the early stages of disease may explain the progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and the immune dysfunction associated with the early stages of HIV infection. Images PMID:1682922

  20. Stability of the gorilla microbiome despite simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Andrew H; Peeters, Martine; Ayouba, Ahidjo; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Esteban, Amadine; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ochman, Howard

    2015-02-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have been discovered in over 45 primate species; however, the pathogenic potential of most SIV strains remains unknown due to difficulties inherent in observing wild populations. Because those SIV infections that are pathogenic have been shown to induce changes in the host's gut microbiome, monitoring the microbiota present in faecal samples can provide a noninvasive means for studying the effects of SIV infection on the health of wild-living primates. Here, we examine the effects of SIVgor, a close relative of SIVcpz of chimpanzees and HIV-1 of humans, on the gut bacterial communities residing within wild gorillas, revealing that gorilla gut microbiomes are exceptionally robust to SIV infection. In contrast to the microbiomes of HIV-1-infected humans and SIVcpz-infected chimpanzees, SIVgor-infected gorilla microbiomes exhibit neither rises in the frequencies of opportunistic pathogens nor elevated rates of microbial turnover within individual hosts. Regardless of SIV infection status, gorilla microbiomes assort into enterotypes, one of which is compositionally analogous to those identified in humans and chimpanzees. The other gorilla enterotype appears specialized for a leaf-based diet and is enriched in environmentally derived bacterial genera. We hypothesize that the acquisition of this gorilla-specific enterotype was enabled by lowered immune system control over the composition of the microbiome. Our results indicate differences between the pathology of SIVgor and SIVcpz/HIV-1 infections, demonstrating the utility of investigating host microbial ecology as a means for studying disease in wild primates of high conservation priority. PMID:25545295

  1. Human Immunodeficiencies Related to Defective APC/T Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kallikourdis, Marinos; Viola, Antonella; Benvenuti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    The primary event for initiating adaptive immune responses is the encounter between T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the T cell area of secondary lymphoid organs and the formation of highly organized intercellular junctions referred to as immune synapses (IS). In vivo live-cell imaging of APC–T cell interactions combined to functional studies unveiled that T cell fate is dictated, in large part, by the stability of the initial contact. Immune cell interaction is equally important during delivery of T cell help to B cells and for the killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. The critical role of contact dynamics and synapse stability on the immune response is well illustrated by human immune deficiencies in which disease pathogenesis is linked to altered adhesion or defective cross-talk between the synaptic partners. The Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a severe primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp), a scaffold that promotes actin polymerization and links TCR stimulation to T cell activation. Absence or mutations in WASp affects intercellular APC–T cell communications by interfering with multiple mechanisms on both sides of the IS. The warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, and myelokathexis (WHIM) syndrome is caused by mutations in CXCR4, a chemokine receptor that in mutant form leads to impairment of APC–T cell interactions. Present evidences suggest that other recently characterized primary immune deficiencies caused by mutation in genes linked to actin cytoskeletal reorganization, such as WIP and DOCK8, may also depend on altered synapse stability. Here, we will discuss in details the mechanisms of disturbed APC–T cell interactions in WAS and WHIM. Moreover, we will summarize the evidence pointing to a compromised conjugate formation in WIP, DOCK8, and X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. PMID:26379669

  2. Diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus infection using citrated whole blood.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, U K; Song, H F; Willingham, F F; Hannig, J; Flexner, C; Farzadegan, H; Nicolau, C; Schwartz, D H

    1997-01-01

    Standard isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) requires 5 to 20 ml of blood, and the centrifugal separation of PBMC is expensive and time-consuming. Whole-blood coculture techniques use small sample volumes, do not require centrifugation, and allow measurement of the total viral burden in peripheral circulation. We compared the results of citrated whole-blood coculture with those obtained by the standard AIDS Clinical Trials Group PBMC semiquantitative culture method and reverse transcription-PCR quantitation of plasma HIV-1 RNA levels. PBMC cocultures were also set up with added erythrocytes (RBCs) to determine if the presence of RBCs affects the replication of HIV-1 in vitro. The mean number of cells required for a p24-positive PBMC coculture was approximately seven times greater than that required for a positive citrated whole-blood coculture (P < 0.01). At volumes of 100, 50, and 25 microl, the sensitivities of the whole-blood coculture were 94.5, 93.6, and 87.3%, respectively. The PBMC culture in the presence of added RBCs was more sensitive than PBMC coculture alone. The citrated whole-blood coculture was simple to perform, produced a reliable diagnosis of HIV infection in adult volunteers, was more sensitive than previously reported techniques even in half the culture time, and showed less variability than the PBMC coculture. Citrated whole-blood coculture may be a useful and efficient tool for diagnosing infection with HIV-1. PMID:9144360

  3. Leishmania and human immunodeficiency virus coinfection: the first 10 years.

    PubMed Central

    Alvar, J; Cañavate, C; Gutiérrez-Solar, B; Jiménez, M; Laguna, F; López-Vélez, R; Molina, R; Moreno, J

    1997-01-01

    Over 850 Leishmania-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection cases have been recorded, the majority in Europe, where 7 to 17% of HIV-positive individuals with fever have amastigotes, suggesting that Leishmania-infected individuals without symptoms will express symptoms of leishmaniasis if they become immunosuppressed. However, there are indirect reasons and statistical data demonstrating that intravenous drug addiction plays a specific role in Leishmania infantum transmission: an anthroponotic cycle complementary to the zoonotic one has been suggested. Due to anergy in patients with coinfection, L. infantum dermotropic zymodemes are isolated from patient viscera and a higher L. infantum phenotypic variability is seen. Moreover, insect trypanosomatids that are currently considered nonpathogenic have been isolated from coinfected patients. HIV infection and Leishmania infection each induce important analogous immunological changes whose effects are multiplied if they occur concomitantly, such as a Th1-to-Th2 response switch; however, the consequences of the viral infection predominate. In fact, a large proportion of coinfected patients have no detectable anti-Leishmania antibodies. The microorganisms share target cells, and it has been demonstrated in vitro how L. infantum induces the expression of latent HIV-1. Bone marrow culture is the most useful diagnostic technique, but it is invasive. Blood smears and culture are good alternatives. PCR, xenodiagnosis, and circulating-antigen detection are available only in specialized laboratories. The relationship with low levels of CD4+ cells conditions the clinical presentation and evolution of disease. Most patients have visceral leishmaniasis, but asymptomatic, cutaneous, mucocutaneous, diffuse cutaneous, and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis can be produced by L. infantum. The digestive and respiratory tracts are frequently parasitized. The course of coinfection is marked by a high relapse rate. There is a lack of randomized prospective treatment trials; therefore, coinfected patients are treated by conventional regimens. Prophylactic therapy is suggested to be helpful in preventing relapses. PMID:9105756

  4. Exercise and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales; Jackson, Catherine G. R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1995-01-01

    The human immune system is highly efficient and remarkably protective when functioning properly. Similar to other physiological systems, it functions best when the body is maintained with a balanced diet, sufficient rest and a moderately stress-free lifestyle. It can be disrupted by inappropriate drug use and extreme emotion or exertion. The functioning of normal or compromised immune systems can be enhanced by properly prescribed moderate exercise conditioning regimens in healthy people, and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)-infected patients but not in others who unable to complete an interval training program. Regular exercise conditioning in healthy people reduces cardiovascular risk factors, increases stamina, facilitates bodyweight control, and reduces stress by engendering positive feelings of well-being. Certain types of cancer may also be suppressed by appropriate exercise conditioning. Various exercise regimens are being evaluated as adjunct treatments for medicated patients with the HIV-1 syndrome. Limited anecdotal evidence from patients suggests that moderate exercise conditioning is per se responsible for their survival well beyond expectancy. HIV-1-infected patients respond positively, both physiologically and psychologically, to moderate exercise conditioning. However, the effectiveness of any exercise treatment programme depends on its mode, frequency, intensity and duration when prescribed o complement the pathological condition of the patient. The effectiveness of exercise conditioning regimens in patients with HIV-1 infection is reviewed in this article. In addition, we discuss mechanisms and pathways, involving the interplay of psychological and physiological factors, through which the suppressed immune system can be enhanced. The immune modulators discussed are endogenous opioids, cytokines, neurotransmitters and other hormones. Exercise conditioning treatment appears to be more effective when combined with other stress management procedures.

  5. Inhibition of purified CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells by human immunodeficiency virus 1 or gp120 mediated by endogenous transforming growth factor beta 1

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells, stringently purified from the peripheral blood of 20 normal donors, showed an impaired survival and clonogenic capacity after exposure to either heat-inactivated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) 1 (strain IIIB) or cross-linked envelope gp120. Cell cycle analysis, performed at different times in serum-free liquid culture, showed an accumulation in G0/G1 in HIV-1- or gp120- treated cells and a progressive increase of cells with subdiploid DNA content, characteristic of apoptosis. In blocking experiments with anti- transforming growth factor (TGF) beta 1 neutralizing serum or TGF-beta 1 oligonucleotides, we demonstrated that the HIV-1- or gp120-mediated suppression of CD34+ cell growth was almost entirely due to an upregulation of endogenous TGF-beta 1 produced by purified hematopoietic progenitors. Moreover, by using a sensitive assay on the CCL64 cell line, increased levels of bioactive TGF-beta 1 were recovered in the culture supernatant of HIV-1/gp120-treated CD34+ cells. Anti-TGF-beta 1 neutralizing serum or TGF-beta 1 oligonucleotides were also effective in inducing a significant increase of the plating efficiency of CD34+ cells, purified from the peripheral blood of three HIV-1-seropositive individuals, suggesting that a similar mechanism may be also operative in vivo. The relevance of these findings to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1-related cytopenias is discussed. PMID:8551249

  6. Instabilities in Neutral and Non-Neutral Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Un-Hak

    The objective of the research reported herein was to develop theories and conduct numerical investigations of some specific plasma instabilities. This thesis consists of two distinct parts--parametric instabilities in non -neutral plasma (the first part) and drift instabilities in neutral plasmas (the second part). Chapter I presents a discussion of the historical background in experiments and theoretical development of non-neutral plasmas related to the free electron laser (a new, powerful and coherent source of electromagnetic radiation). In Chapter II, an analysis of the parametric excitation of fast and slow space-charge waves in a cylindrical metallic waveguide filled with relativistic beam electrons is presented. The pump wave in the laboratory reference frame consists of a static, spatially periodic axial electric field. Formulas are derived for the temporal growth rate and frequency of the backscattered fast space-charge wave in both the laboratory and beam frames. The effects of a uniform axial magnetic field of arbitrary magnitude on the amplitude gain and frequency enhancement are studied. In Chapter III, parametric decay of a longitudinal electrostatic pump wave into two space-charge waves in a cylindrical metallic waveguide partially filled with relativistic beam electrons is analyzed. The dependence of the amplitude gain factor and frequency enhancement on the ratio of beam radius to waveguide radius is studied numerically. In Chapter IV, theoretical determination of the dispersion curve and electrostatic potential for drift waves in a quadrupole plasma is carried out. Linear theory is employed to derive and solve numerically an equation for the eigenvalue (frequency omega) and the eigenfunction (electrostatic potential) as a function of the distance along a magnetic field line for each given value of the axial wave number k_{ rm z}. Chapter V presents the general theory of Landau resonances which will permit calculation of the growth or damping rate of electrostatic waves in the magnetic quadrupole. In Chapter VI, electrostatic drift waves with frequency small compared to the ion cyclotron frequency in a plasma confined by a magnetic quadrupole are considered. An equation is derived for the growth or damping rate due to wave-particle (Landau) resonances with the effects of temperature gradients and finite Larmor radius included. The ion Landau damping rate and the net growth rate of the fundamental drift mode in the UMIST quadrupole are then calculated.

  7. Toward effective HIV vaccination: induction of binary epitope reactive antibodies with broad HIV neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; Nitti, Giovanni; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Jin, Lei; Symersky, Jindrich; Boivin, Stephane; Sienczyk, Marcin; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl V; Paul, Sudhir

    2009-10-30

    We describe murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised by immunization with an electrophilic gp120 analog (E-gp120) expressing the rare ability to neutralize genetically heterologous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains. Unlike gp120, E-gp120 formed covalent oligomers. The reactivity of gp120 and E-gp120 with mAbs to reference neutralizing epitopes was markedly different, indicating their divergent structures. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides and electrophilic peptide analogs indicated binary recognition of two distinct gp120 regions by anti-E-gp120 mAbs, the 421-433 and 288-306 peptide regions. Univalent Fab and single chain Fv fragments expressed the ability to recognize both peptides. X-ray crystallography of an anti-E-gp120 Fab fragment revealed two neighboring cavities, the typical antigen-binding cavity formed by the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and another cavity dominated by antibody heavy chain variable (V(H)) domain framework (FR) residues. Substitution of the FR cavity V(H) Lys-19 residue by an Ala residue resulted in attenuated binding of the 421-433 region peptide probe. The CDRs and V(H) FR replacement/silent mutation ratios exceeded the ratio for a random mutation process, suggesting adaptive development of both putative binding sites. All mAbs studied were derived from V(H)1 family genes, suggesting biased recruitment of the V gene germ line repertoire by E-gp120. The conserved 421-433 region of gp120 is essential for HIV binding to host CD4 receptors. This region is recognized weakly by the FR of antibodies produced without exposure to HIV, but it usually fails to induce adaptive synthesis of neutralizing antibodies. We present models accounting for improved CD4-binding site recognition and broad HIV neutralizing activity of the mAbs, long sought goals in HIV vaccine development. PMID:19726674

  8. Toward Effective HIV Vaccination INDUCTION OF BINARY EPITOPE REACTIVE ANTIBODIES WITH BROAD HIV NEUTRALIZING ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; Nitti, Giovanni; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Jin, Lei; Symersky, Jindrich; Boivin, Stephane; Sienczyk, Marcin; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl V.; Paul, Sudhir

    2009-11-23

    We describe murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised by immunization with an electrophilic gp120 analog (E-gp120) expressing the rare ability to neutralize genetically heterologous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains. Unlike gp120, E-gp120 formed covalent oligomers. The reactivity of gp120 and E-gp120 with mAbs to reference neutralizing epitopes was markedly different, indicating their divergent structures. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides and electrophilic peptide analogs indicated binary recognition of two distinct gp120 regions by anti-E-gp120 mAbs, the 421-433 and 288-306 peptide regions. Univalent Fab and single chain Fv fragments expressed the ability to recognize both peptides. X-ray crystallography of an anti-E-gp120 Fab fragment revealed two neighboring cavities, the typical antigen-binding cavity formed by the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and another cavity dominated by antibody heavy chain variable (VH) domain framework (FR) residues. Substitution of the FR cavity VH Lys-19 residue by an Ala residue resulted in attenuated binding of the 421-433 region peptide probe. The CDRs and VH FR replacement/silent mutation ratios exceeded the ratio for a random mutation process, suggesting adaptive development of both putative binding sites. All mAbs studied were derived from VH1 family genes, suggesting biased recruitment of the V gene germ line repertoire by E-gp120. The conserved 421-433 region of gp120 is essential for HIV binding to host CD4 receptors. This region is recognized weakly by the FR of antibodies produced without exposure to HIV, but it usually fails to induce adaptive synthesis of neutralizing antibodies. We present models accounting for improved CD4-binding site recognition and broad HIV neutralizing activity of the mAbs, long sought goals in HIV vaccine development.

  9. Analysis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region Arrayed on Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Particles

    PubMed Central

    Phogat, S; K, Svehla; M, Tang; A, Spadaccini; J, Muller; J, Mascola; Berkower; R, Wyatt

    2009-01-01

    Vaccine immunogens derived from the envelope glycoproteins of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that elicit broad neutralizing antibodies remains an elusive goal. The highly conserved 30 amino acid membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV gp41 contains the hydrophobic epitopes for two rare HIV-1 broad cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, 2F5 and 4E10. Both these antibodies possess relatively hydrophobic HCDR3 loops and demonstrate enhanced binding to their epitopes in the context of the native gp160 precursor envelope glycoprotein by the intimate juxtaposition of a lipid membrane. The Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) S1 protein forms nanoparticles that can be utilized both as an immunogenic array of the MPER and to provide the lipid environment needed for enhanced 2F5 and 4E10 binding. We show that recombinant HBsAg particles with MPER (HBsAg-MPER) appended at the C-terminus of the S1 protein are recognized by 2F5 and 4E10 with high affinity compared to positioning the MPER at the N-terminus or the extracellular loop (ECL) of S1. Addition of C-terminal hydrophobic residues derived from the HIV-1 Env transmembrane region further enhances recognition of the MPER by both 2F5 and 4E10. Delipidation of the HBsAg-MPER particles decreases 2F5 and 4E10 binding and subsequent reconstitution with synthetic lipids restores optimal binding. Inoculation of the particles into small animals raised cross-reactive antibodies that recognize both the MPER and HIV-1 gp160 envelope glycoproteins expressed on the cell surface; however, no neutralizing activity could be detected. Prime:boost immunization of the HBsAg-MPER particles in sequence with HIV envelope glycoprotein proteoliposomes (Env-PLs) did not raise neutralizing antibodies that could be mapped to the MPER region. However, the Env-PLs did raise anti-Env antibodies that had the ability to neutralize selected HIV-1 isolates. The first generation HBsAg-MPER particles represent a unique means to present HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein neutralizing determinants to the immune system. PMID:18155743

  10. Detailed Atomic Structure of Neutral and Near-Neutral Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Paul; Hibbert, Alan

    2011-05-11

    This paper highlights the issues which need to be addressed in undertaking accurate calculations of multi-electron atoms and ions, particularly at or near the neutral end of an isoelectronic sequence. We illustrate the processes through two calculations--of transitions in Cl I and Sn II--and discuss the convergence of our results as well as updating previous work. In particular, in the case of Cl I, we propose new identifications of the levels involved in certain transitions which are important in determining the abundance of chlorine in the inter-stellar medium (ISM), while in singly ionised tin, our calculations suggest a re-evaluation of the the abundance of tin in the ISM. We also confirm recent identification of Sn II lines seen in tokamak plasmas.

  11. Invariant natural killer (iNK) T cell deficiency in patients with common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, D A; Avery, D T; Fewings, N L; Berglund, L J; Wong, S; Riminton, D S; Adelstein, S; Tangye, S G

    2009-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a B cell immunodeficiency disorder characterized frequently by failure of memory B cell development and antibody secretion. A unifying cellular pathogenesis for CVID has not been forthcoming, but given the immunoregulatory role of invariant NK (iNK) T cells and their absence in several other immunodeficiencies, we quantified these cells in the blood of 58 CVID patients. There was a marked decrease in the proportion of iNK T cells in CVID patients compared with controls. This was particularly notable in those with low isotype-switched memory B cells, but subset analysis demonstrated no difference when stratified by specific clinical features. We propose that the decreased proportion of iNK T cells in CVID might be linked to the failure of memory B cell generation, which may contribute to reduced antibody production in these patients. PMID:19664144

  12. Impaired production of interleukins in patients with cell-mediated immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Paganelli, R; Aiuti, F; Beverley, P C; Levinsky, R J

    1983-01-01

    The poor mitogen response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) of lymphocytes from three patients with cell-mediated immunodeficiencies was restored to normal when supernatants containing interleukin 2 (IL-2) were added. One of three children with severe combined immunodeficiency also showed a partial response. There was no improvement in the normal mitogenic response of the lymphocytes from patients with either the X linked or common variable forms of hypogammaglobulinaemia. All three patients with cell-mediated immunodeficiencies showed gross imbalance in the ratio of helper/inducer (OKT4+) to suppressor/cytotoxic (OKT8+) T cells. The PHA stimulated culture supernatant from one of these patients failed to induce proliferation of a cytolytic continuous T cell line. Our data suggests that the underlying defect in these patients may be a failure in production of interleukins but not in the acquisition of IL-2 receptors. PMID:6601554

  13. Immunodeficiency in a Child with Rapadilino Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Vollebregt, M. M. G.; Malfroot, A.; De Raedemaecker, M.; van der Burg, M.; van der Werff ten Bosch, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Rapadilino syndrome is a genetic disease characterized by a characteristic clinical tableau. It is caused by mutations in RECQL4 gene. Immunodeficiency is not described as a classical feature of the disease. We present a 2-year-old girl with Rapadilino syndrome with important lymphadenopathies and pneumonia due to disseminated Mycobacterium lentiflavum infection. An immunological work-up showed several unexpected abnormalities. Repeated blood samples showed severe lymphopenia. Immunophenotyping showed low T, B, and NK cells. No Treg cells were seen. T cell responses to stimulations were insufficient. The IL12/IL23 interferon gamma pathway was normal. Gamma globulin levels and vaccination responses were low. With this report, we aim to stress the importance of screening immunodeficiency in patients with RECQL4 mutations for immunodeficiency and the need to further research into its physiopathology. PMID:26064716

  14. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  15. Three designs for a magnetic trap that will simultaneously confine neutral atoms and a non-neutral plasma

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    Three designs for a magnetic trap that will simultaneously confine neutral atoms and a non-neutral for the simultaneous confinement of neutral atoms and a non-neutral plasma in close proximity. One design uses axially is required for confinement of the rotating non-neutral plasma, and the magnetic minimum traps the neutral

  16. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual...Consent § 1.487 Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or...

  17. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual...Consent § 1.487 Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or...

  18. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  19. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  20. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  1. 38 CFR 1.487 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient... the human immunodeficiency virus to the spouse or sexual partner of the patient. (a) Subject to... determine whether the patient is infected with such virus, identified as being a sexual partner of...

  2. 38 CFR 1.486 - Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure of information related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. 1.486 Section 1... immunodeficiency virus to public health authorities. (a) In the case of any record which is maintained...

  3. Nonlinear Neutral Inclusions: Assemblages of Spheres

    E-print Network

    Silvia Jiménez; Bogdan Vernescu; William Sanguinet

    2012-06-14

    If a neutral inclusion is inserted in a matrix containing a uniform applied electric field, it does not disturb the field outside the inclusion. The well known Hashin coated sphere is an example of a neutral coated inclusion. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing neutral inclusions from nonlinear materials. In particular, we discuss assemblages of coated spheres and the two-dimensional analogous problem of assemblages of coated disks.

  4. Ergonomically neutral arm support system

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J; Chung, Jeffrey Y; Dellinges, Steven; Lafever, Robin E

    2005-08-02

    An ergonomic arm support system maintains a neutral position for the forearm. A mechanical support structure attached to a chair or other mounting structure supports the arms of a sitting or standing person. The system includes moving elements and tensioning elements to provide a dynamic balancing force against the forearms. The support structure is not fixed or locked in a rigid position, but is an active dynamic system that is maintained in equipoise by the continuous operation of the opposing forces. The support structure includes an armrest connected to a flexible linkage or articulated or pivoting assembly, which includes a tensioning element such as a spring. The pivoting assembly moves up and down, with the tensioning element providing the upward force that balances the downward force of the arm.

  5. After treatment ends: neutral time.

    PubMed

    Hurt, G J; McQuellon, R P; Barrett, R J

    1994-01-01

    For persons diagnosed with cancer, the remission period may be marked by increased anxiety and distress. While the medical team may view remission as an eagerly anticipated milestone, the decreased medical surveillance during this time can cause a heightened fear of recurrence for the patient. One author has called this period of remission "neutral time," a time characterized by uncertainty. The safety signal hypothesis, developed by Martin Seligman, may help to explain the anxiety experienced by some patients during the remission period. Because cancer is frequently a silent disease with no overt symptoms, patients in remission often have no safety signal to indicate that the disease will not return. A case study is presented and discussed in light of these two concepts. PMID:7697080

  6. Site Neutral Payments: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Dresevic, Adrienne; Rojas, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    A site neutral payment policy would entail CMS paying the same rate for the same healthcare service regardless of the location in which the service is provided. From the government's perspective, the reason behind this policy is potentially billions of dollars in savings. The rationale for using various payment systems is that there are different costs associated with providing healthcare services in different locations. Each payment system has a separate methodology for determining rates for services based on these costs. Hospitals may choose to prepare early for the inevitable through accurate cost reporting, shifting certain ancillary services to more appropriate outpatient, off site locations, and participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program. PMID:26571969

  7. Neutral Vlasov kinetic theory of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tronci, Cesare; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-02-15

    The low-frequency limit of Maxwell equations is considered in the Maxwell-Vlasov system. This limit produces a neutral Vlasov system that captures essential features of plasma dynamics, while neglecting radiation effects. Euler-Poincaré reduction theory is used to show that the neutral Vlasov kinetic theory possesses a variational formulation in both Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates. By construction, the new model recovers all collisionless neutral models employed in plasma simulations. Then, comparisons between the neutral Vlasov system and hybrid kinetic-fluid models are presented in the linear regime.

  8. Reciprocal modulations between p53 and Tat of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C J; Wang, C; Friedman, D J; Pardee, A B

    1995-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) after a long clinical latency. This disease is associated with a spectrum of cancers. Here we report that wild-type p53 is a potent suppressor of Tat, a major transactivator of HIV-1. Reciprocally, Tat inhibits the transcription of p53. Downregulation of p53 by upregulated tat may be important for the establishment of productive viral infection in a cell and also may be involved in the development of AIDS-related malignancies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777531

  9. Immune dysregulation in human immunodeficiency virus infection: know it, fix it, prevent it?

    PubMed Central

    Boasso, A.; Shearer, G. M.; Chougnet, C.

    2010-01-01

    Infection of humans by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes a progressive, multifactorial impairment of the immune system eventually leading to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). No cure or vaccine exists yet against HIV infection. More worrisome is the fact that despite having identified HIV as the cause of the AIDS, we still do not understand what pathogenic mechanisms lead to the debacle of the immune system. In this review we consider the extent and the limits of our knowledge of HIV pathogenesis, and how this knowledge may be used to design preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:19093962

  10. Interaction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Vpx and Invariant Chain

    PubMed Central

    Pancio, Heather A.; Vander Heyden, Nancy; Kosuri, Kavitha; Cresswell, Peter; Ratner, Lee

    2000-01-01

    Vpx is a virion-associated protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency viruses. The yeast two-hybrid system was used to identify invariant chain (Ii) as a cellular protein that interacts with HIV-2 Vpx. Vpx-Ii interaction was confirmed in cell-free reactions using bacterially expressed glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins and by coimmunoprecipitation in transfected and infected cells. In chronically infected cells expressing Vpx, Ii levels were markedly decreased, presumably due to enhanced degradation. These findings suggest that Vpx may disrupt major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation. PMID:10846101

  11. Pharmacologic management of human immunodeficiency virus wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Melissa; Pandit, Neha Sheth

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) wasting have been studied since the 1990s, but the results of these interventions have been difficult to compare because the studies used different HIV wasting definitions and assessed various patient outcomes. Thus, we performed a systematic review of the current literature to identify studies that evaluated pharmacologic management of HIV wasting and to compare and contrast treatment options. Further, we provide a comprehensive review of these treatment options and describe the definition of HIV wasting used in each study, the outcomes assessed, and whether antiretroviral therapy was used during the HIV wasting treatment. Literature searches of the PubMed/Medline (1946-2014) and Google Scholar databases were performed, and a review of the bibliographies of retrieved articles was performed to identify additional references. Only English-language articles pertaining to humans and HIV-infected individuals were evaluated. Thirty-six studies were identified that assessed pharmacologic interventions to treat HIV wasting. Appetite stimulants, such as megestrol acetate, have been shown to increase total body weight (TBW) and body mass index in HIV-infected patients with wasting. Studies evaluating dronabinol showed conflicting data on TBW increases, but the drug may have minimal benefit on body composition compared with other appetite stimulants. Testosterone has been shown to be effective in HIV wasting for those who suffer from hypogonadism. Recombinant human growth hormone has been evaluated for HIV wasting and has shown promising results for TBW and lean body mass increases. Thalidomide has been studied; however, its use is limited due to its toxicities. Although megestrol acetate and dronabinol are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of HIV wasting, it is important to recognize other comorbidities such as depression or hypogonadism that may contribute to the patient's appetite and weight loss. If a patient is diagnosed with hypogonadism and HIV wasting, testosterone would be a good therapeutic option. Although mirtazapine is not FDA approved for the management of HIV wasting, it has been shown to promote weight gain while treating depression symptoms. Mirtazapine may be a promising pharmacologic option in the management of HIV wasting and depression, but further research is needed. PMID:24782295

  12. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  13. A 'second life' agenda. Psychiatric research issues raised by protease inhibitor treatments for people with the human immunodeficiency virus or the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, J G; Ferrando, S

    1997-11-01

    Seldom in the history of medicine has an entire generation of patients with an incurable, progressive, and ultimately fatal disease suddenly been offered the prospect of extended survival and even, perhaps, a "second life." The relatively simultaneous appearance of 2 major treatment developments has created profound changes in therapeutic options and outlook. The first development is an assay of serum levels of human immunodeficiency virus viral copies, providing a critical tool for clinical decision making. The second is the marketing between December 1995 and April 1997 of 4 human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors that, combined with previously available antiviral medications, achieve a new level of efficacy. With the advent of these changes come multiple psychiatric research and policy issues. These include the development of strategies to establish and maintain medication adherence. This is a critical task, given the complexity of combination therapy regimens and the rapid onset of viral resistance to protease inhibitors within days to weeks of missed or suboptimal dosing. The psychological issues to be studied include the process of restructuring lives and expectations in the event of clinical benefit or managing the distress associated with clinical failure. Other research questions include the effects of restored health on the appraisal of human immunodeficiency virus risk behaviors, assessment of effect of neurocognitive functioning, and unanswered questions about psychotropic or protease inhibitor drug interactions due to their shared metabolic pathways. Behavioral scientists can inform provision of care to patients who may be considered difficult to treat, such as those with severe and persistent mental illness or active substance abuse or the homeless. This includes the provision of empirical data regarding individual and situational characteristics that are likely to promote or impede adherence, as well as innovative provision systems. Psychiatry can make notable contributions during this turning point in human immunodeficiency virus therapeutics and research. PMID:9366663

  14. Charged-particle optics for neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabow, Gary

    Electromagnetic manipulation of charged and of neutral particles generally requires very different field geometries due to the orthogonality between charge monopoles and neutral dipoles. This has led to a natural separation between the fields of charged- and neutral-particle optics. We show however that the additional rotational degree of freedom of neutral dipoles can lead to an equivalence between the forces on charge monopoles and neutral dipoles under the action of axially/cylindrically symmetric fields. In this way, we show how to extend and exploit the large set of already developed cylindrically symmetric charged particle optics for use on neutral dipolar particles. The result is a large new class of focusing optics for all neutral particles of non-zero magnetic dipole moments, including neutrons, neutral atoms, and neutral molecules. Apart from the increased variety of focusing optics, such systems possess many advantages over previously existing magnetic neutral particles lenses, including lens strength, accessible aperture area, accuracy, robustness, and much improved ease of fabrication and use. We construct a neutral Rubidium atomic beam with which we experimentally demonstrate three such new focusing lenses, including annular permanent magnetic rings, a "magnetostatic aperture" lens, and a magnetizable lenslet array. As an extension of this result we propose a dynamically variable superconducting lens system for neutrons that is able to focus neutrons with a wide range of energies (from ultra-cold through to thermal). The proposed neutron system compares favorably with existing neutron optics, being in particular substantially more powerful than similar existing refraction-based neutron lenses.

  15. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ?100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor ?-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor ?-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical. PMID:25751125

  16. Twenty-Eight Years of Poliovirus Replication in an Immunodeficient Individual: Impact on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Glynis; Klapsa, Dimitra; Wilton, Thomas; Stone, Lindsay; Minor, Philip D.; Martin, Javier

    2015-01-01

    There are currently huge efforts by the World Health Organization and partners to complete global polio eradication. With the significant decline in poliomyelitis cases due to wild poliovirus in recent years, rare cases related to the use of live-attenuated oral polio vaccine assume greater importance. Poliovirus strains in the oral vaccine are known to quickly revert to neurovirulent phenotype following replication in humans after immunisation. These strains can transmit from person to person leading to poliomyelitis outbreaks and can replicate for long periods of time in immunodeficient individuals leading to paralysis or chronic infection, with currently no effective treatment to stop excretion from these patients. Here, we describe an individual who has been excreting type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus for twenty eight years as estimated by the molecular clock established with VP1 capsid gene nucleotide sequences of serial isolates. This represents by far the longest period of excretion described from such a patient who is the only identified individual known to be excreting highly evolved vaccine-derived poliovirus at present. Using a range of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that the viruses are very virulent, antigenically drifted and excreted at high titre suggesting that such chronic excreters pose an obvious risk to the eradication programme. Our results in virus neutralization assays with human sera and immunisation-challenge experiments using transgenic mice expressing the human poliovirus receptor indicate that while maintaining high immunisation coverage will likely confer protection against paralytic disease caused by these viruses, significant changes in immunisation strategies might be required to effectively stop their occurrence and potential widespread transmission. Eventually, new stable live-attenuated polio vaccines with no risk of reversion might be required to respond to any poliovirus isolation in the post-eradication era. PMID:26313548

  17. Analysis of sequence diversity in hypervariable regions of the external glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, P; Balfe, P; Ludlam, C A; Bishop, J O; Brown, A J

    1990-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences in three hypervariable regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env gene were obtained by sequencing provirus present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected individuals. Single molecules of target sequences were isolated by limiting dilution and amplified in two stages by the polymerase chain reaction, using nested primers. The product was directly sequenced to avoid errors introduced by Taq polymerase during the amplification process. There was extensive variation between sequences from the same individual as well as between sequences from different individuals. Interpatient variability was markedly less in individuals infected from a common source. A high proportion of amino acid substitutions in the hypervariable regions altered the number and positions of potential N-linked glycosylation sites. Sequences in two hypervariable regions frequently contained short (3- to 15-bp) duplications or deletions, and by amplifying peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA containing 10(2) or 10(3) proviral molecules and analyzing the product by high-resolution electrophoresis, the total number and abundance of distinct length variants within an individual could be estimated, providing a more comprehensive analysis of the variants present than would be obtained by sequencing alone. Sequences from many individuals showed frequent amino acid substitutions at certain key positions for neutralizing-antibody and cytotoxic T-cell recognition in the immunodominant loop. The rates of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution in the region of this and flanking regions indicate that strong positive selection for amino acid change is operating in the generation of antigenic diversity. Images PMID:2243378

  18. Twenty-Eight Years of Poliovirus Replication in an Immunodeficient Individual: Impact on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Glynis; Klapsa, Dimitra; Wilton, Thomas; Stone, Lindsay; Minor, Philip D; Martin, Javier

    2015-08-01

    There are currently huge efforts by the World Health Organization and partners to complete global polio eradication. With the significant decline in poliomyelitis cases due to wild poliovirus in recent years, rare cases related to the use of live-attenuated oral polio vaccine assume greater importance. Poliovirus strains in the oral vaccine are known to quickly revert to neurovirulent phenotype following replication in humans after immunisation. These strains can transmit from person to person leading to poliomyelitis outbreaks and can replicate for long periods of time in immunodeficient individuals leading to paralysis or chronic infection, with currently no effective treatment to stop excretion from these patients. Here, we describe an individual who has been excreting type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus for twenty eight years as estimated by the molecular clock established with VP1 capsid gene nucleotide sequences of serial isolates. This represents by far the longest period of excretion described from such a patient who is the only identified individual known to be excreting highly evolved vaccine-derived poliovirus at present. Using a range of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that the viruses are very virulent, antigenically drifted and excreted at high titre suggesting that such chronic excreters pose an obvious risk to the eradication programme. Our results in virus neutralization assays with human sera and immunisation-challenge experiments using transgenic mice expressing the human poliovirus receptor indicate that while maintaining high immunisation coverage will likely confer protection against paralytic disease caused by these viruses, significant changes in immunisation strategies might be required to effectively stop their occurrence and potential widespread transmission. Eventually, new stable live-attenuated polio vaccines with no risk of reversion might be required to respond to any poliovirus isolation in the post-eradication era. PMID:26313548

  19. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  20. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  1. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  2. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  3. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  4. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically…

  5. The Dubious Value of Value Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Hard science is properly value neutral. But when that ideological neutrality extends to the whole university, the traditional foundation crumbles. Steve Balch laments the moral vacuum that now substitutes for fundamental principles, because it is impossible to frame a program of education--especially in the humanities and social sciences--without…

  6. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department...PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  7. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department...PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  8. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department...PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  9. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department...PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  10. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department...PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  11. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  12. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  13. AMNESIA: Analysis and Monitoring for Neutralizing SQL-

    E-print Network

    Orso, Alessandro "Alex"

    AMNESIA: Analysis and Monitoring for Neutralizing SQL- Injection Attacks William Halfond Alessandro for Neutralizing SQL- Injection Attacks William Halfond Alessandro Orso Georgia Institute of Technology This work Insights 1. Code contains enough information to accurately model all legitimate queries. 2. A SQL Injection

  14. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who has received a Finding pursuant to...

  15. Elicitation of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies by presentation of 4E10 and 10E8 epitopes on Norovirus P particles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjiao; Fu, Lu; Shi, Yuhua; Guan, Shanshan; Yang, Lan; Gong, Xin; Yin, He; He, Xiaoqiu; Liu, Dongni; Kuai, Ziyu; Shan, Yaming; Wang, Song; Kong, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Eliciting efficient broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAbs) is a major goal in vaccine development against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Conserved epitopes in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 are a significant target. In this study, Norovirus P particles (NoV PPs) were used as carriers to display conformational 4E10 and 10E8 epitopes in different patterns with an appropriate linker. Immune responses to the recombinant NoV PPs were characterized in guinea pigs and Balb/c mice and could induce high levels of MPER-binding antibodies. Modest neutralizing activities could be detected in sera of guinea pigs but not of Balb/c mice. The 4E10 or 10E8 epitopes dispersed on three loops on the outermost surface of NoV PPs (4E10-loop123 PP or 10E8-loop123 PP) elicited higher neutralizing activities than the equivalent number of epitopes presented on loop 2 only (4E10-3loop2 PP or 10E8-3loop2 PP). The epitopes on different loops of the PP were well-exposed and likely formed an appropriate conformation to induce neutralizing antibodies. Although sera of immunized guinea pigs could neutralize several HIV envelope-pseudoviruses, a vaccine candidate for efficiently inducing HIV-1 BnAbs remains to be developed. PMID:26455781

  16. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup ?3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 ?s. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  17. Disseminated Cryptococcus with ocular cryptococcoma in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient.

    PubMed

    Kresch, Zvi A; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego; Harper, Tiffany; Jamie Miller, G

    2012-06-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus-negative 63-year-old male with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with decreased vision, photophobia and hearing loss. After initial testing seemed consistent with sarcoidosis, he was found to have disseminated Cryptococcus with a cryptococcoma of the left eye. Treatment with systemic anti-fungal therapy improved the patient's condition. PMID:22441587

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  19. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ...) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... Announcement CDC-RFA-PS10-10138, ``Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately... (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations'' to make awards to state and county...

  20. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing and Associated Risk Factors in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Olivia; Wu, Qishan; Ickes, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study documents the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing in a sample of college students and examines associated demographic and behavioral characteristics. Participants: College students aged 18 or older were randomly selected to participate in a health behavior survey at a southeastern university in September…

  1. Central nervous system infection due to Mycobacterium haemophilum in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buppajarntham, Aubonphan; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rutjanawech, Sasinuj; Khawcharoenporn, Thana

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium haemophilum is an environmental organism that rarely causes infections in humans. We report a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who had central nervous system infection due to M. haemophilum. The diagnosis required brain tissue procurement and molecular identification method while the treatment outcome was unfavourable. PMID:24841195

  2. Syphilis? An Unusual Cause of Surgical Emergency in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Man

    PubMed Central

    Bender Ignacio, Rachel A.; Koch, Lisa L.; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Charmie Godornes, B.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a human immunodeficiency virus-infected man undergoing urgent anorectal surgery, with multi-centimeter fungating masses discovered inside the anus. Initial pathology was inconclusive. After the patient developed a disseminated rash postoperatively determined to be secondary syphilis, the anorectal pathology was reviewed and Treponema pallidum DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from the mass. PMID:26213693

  3. Quinacrine-induced psychiatric disturbances in a child with common variable immunodeficiency and chronic giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Genel, Ferah; Erermis, Serpil; Aksu, Guzide; Ozturk, Can; Kutukculer, Necil

    2002-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders due to quinacrine for antiparasitic therapy represent an infrequent, but serious, complication. The remarkable course of a 12-year-old boy with common variable immunodeficiency who developed severe psychiatric reactions following quinacrine therapy for his resistant chronic giardiasis is presented. The broad clinical spectrum of quinacrine-associated neuropsychiatric disturbances has been emphasized for the clinicians. PMID:12415556

  4. The Connections between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: Implications for Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Fox, Ashley; Ferro, Carol; Khawaja, Shazia; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2005-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted with 28 women who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and have experienced childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in order to examine (1) the challenges generated by the experience of sexual abuse and related coping strategies, (2) the impact of the HIV diagnosis on their coping strategies, and (3) the links…

  5. 76 FR 72417 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) through Solid Organ Transplantation'' (76 FR 58517). Written and electronic comments were to be received on or before November 21, 2011... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus...

  6. Evidence for the HIV-1 phenotype switch as a causal factor in acquired immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Glushakova, S; Grivel, J C; Fitzgerald, W; Sylwester, A; Zimmerberg, J; Margolis, L B

    1998-03-01

    Both cellular and humoral immunodeficiency develop in vivo after prolonged infection with HIV-1, but the mechanisms are unclear. Initial infection with HIV-1 is transmitted by macrophage (M)-tropic/non-syncytia-inducing (NSI) viruses, which hyperactivate the immune system, and, in one view, cause immunodeficiency by "exhaustion" of lymphoid tissue. An alternative hypothesis is that immunodeficiency is caused by the replacement of M-tropic viruses by T cell (T)-tropic/syncytia-inducing (SI) viruses, which are known to be highly cytopathic in vitro and emerge late in infected individuals around the time of transition to AIDS (refs. 1, 7-9). To test these two possibilities, we have developed an ex vivo model of humoral immunity to recall antigens using human lymphoid tissue. This tissue supports productive infection with both M- and T-tropic HIV-1 isolates when cultured ex vivo. We found that specific immune responses were enhanced by productive infection of the tissue with M-tropic/NSI HIV-1 isolates, but were blocked by T-tropic/SI HIV-1 isolates. The mechanism involves specific irreversible effect on B-cell activity. Our results support the hypothesis that the phenotype switch to T-tropic viruses is a key determinant of acquired humoral immunodeficiency in patients infected with HIV. PMID:9500611

  7. Molecular Defects in Variant Forms of Mannose-Binding Protein Associated with Immunodeficiency1

    E-print Network

    Molecular Defects in Variant Forms of Mannose-Binding Protein Associated with Immunodeficiency1 by three different naturally occurring point mutations within the collagen-like domain of human mannose-binding protein (MBP; also known as mannose-binding lectin) have been revealed by introduction of analogous

  8. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing and False Disclosures in Heterosexual College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marelich, William D.; Clark, Tonya

    2004-01-01

    The authors assessed factors that motivate individuals to report negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody test results, although they had never been tested. In particular, they investigated sexual intimacy motives associated with the needs for affiliation, sex, and dominance as contributing factors for faulty disclosures. Participants…

  9. Dose response effects of feline immunodeficiency virus PPR strain infection in cats 

    E-print Network

    Hokanson, Regina Marie

    1998-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (F1V) causes an immune phics. deficiency disease in cats similar to HIV-AIDS in humans. FIV-specific antibodies have been found in symptomatic and asymptomatic, domestic and non-domestic, cats world-wide. Little...

  10. LFA-1 IMMUNODEFICIENCY DISEASE Definition of the Genetic Defect and Chromosomal Mapping of a and a

    E-print Network

    Springer, Timothy A.

    LFA-1 IMMUNODEFICIENCY DISEASE Definition of the Genetic Defect and Chromosomal Mapping of a and a Subunits of the Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen 1 (LFA-1) by Complementation in Hybrid Cells, and the *Departments ofPediatrics and Cell Biology, Baylor College ofMedicine, Houston, Texas 77030 Cell adhesion

  11. Array-based sequence capture and next-generation sequencing for the identification of primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Krux, F; Binder, V; Gombert, M; Niehues, T; Feyen, O; Laws, H-J; Borkhardt, A

    2012-03-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are genetic disorders in which components of immunological pathways are either missing or dysregulated. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, testing for genes in conditions with a heterogeneous genetic background seems more promising. We designed a custom microarray with 385K probe capacity to capture exons of 395 human genes, known or predicted to be associated with primary immunodeficiency and immune regulation. Enriched target DNA was sequenced using a GS FLX Titanium 454 platform. The patients selected were likely to have an underlying immunodeficiency. In one patient with hepatosplenomegaly, recurrent infections and an elevated IgM level, sequence analysis of the patient and his two unaffected parents identified ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) as the underlying defect. In a second child with a clinical SCID phenotype, we detected a mutation in the ARTEMIS gene after focusing on SCID-associated genes. 454 sequencing yielded 152,000-397,000 high-quality reads per patient. 78-99% of the targeted nucleotides were covered at least one time, 76-82% at least five times. Array-based sequence capture expands our capacities to sequence large targeted DNA regions in a less laborious and time-consuming approach. Our array was capable to find the underlying genetic defect in two patients with suspected primary immunodeficiency. Upcoming whole-exome sequencing definitely will add more valuable data, but bioinformatical analysis and validation of variants already pose major challenges. PMID:22017423

  12. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LIVE VIRAL AND BACTERIAL VACCINES IN IMMUNODEFICIENT PATIENTS AND THEIR CLOSE-CONTACTS

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, William T.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Ballas, Zuhair; Ballow, Mark; Blaese, R. Michael; Bonilla, Francisco A.; Conley, Mary Ellen; Charlotte-Cunningham-Rundles; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Fuleihan, Ramsay; Gelfand, Erwin W.; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian; Holland, Steven M.; Hong, Richard; Lederman, Howard M.; Malech, Harry L.; Miles, Stephen; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Ochs, Hans D.; Orange, Jordan S.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Routes, John M.; Stiehm, E. Richard; Sullivan, Kathleen; Torgerson, Troy; Winkelstein, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The present uncertainty of which live viral or bacterial vaccines may be given to immune deficient patients and the growing neglect of societal adherence to routine immunizations has prompted the Medical Advisory Committee of the Immune Deficiency Foundation to issue recommendations based upon published literature and the collective experience of the committee members. These recommendations address the concern for immunodeficient patients acquiring infections from healthy individuals who have not been immunized or who are shedding live vaccine-derived viral or bacterial organisms. Such transmission of infectious agents may occur within the hospital, clinic, home, or at any public gathering. Collectively, we define this type transmission as close-contact spread of infectious disease that is particularly relevant in patients with impaired immunity who may develop infection when exposed to individuals carrying vaccine-preventable infectious diseases or who have recently received a live vaccine. Immunodeficient patients who have received therapeutic hematopoietic stem transplantation are also at risk during the time when immune reconstitution is incomplete or while they are on immunosuppressive agents to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease. This review recommends the general education of what is known about vaccine-preventable or vaccine-derived diseases being spread to immunodeficient patients at risk for close-contact spread of infection, and describes the relative risks for a child with severe immunodeficiency. The review also recommends a balance between the need to protect vulnerable individuals with their social needs to integrate into society, attend school, and benefit from peer education. PMID:24582311

  13. Implications of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome for Professionals in the Field of Visual Impairments and Blindness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has significant ocular implications. This article examines: the effect of AIDS on vision, historical and philosophical perspectives on public health education, AIDS education, legal and policy issues of concern to schools and service agencies, and sex education and AIDS-related education of blind and…

  14. Neutral Models of Microbiome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinglong; Sukumaran, Jeet; Wu, Steven; Rodrigo, Allen

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research on host-associated microbial communities (i.e.,microbiomes). Much of this research has focused on surveys of microbial diversities across a variety of host species, including humans, with a view to understanding how these microbiomes are distributed across space and time, and how they correlate with host health, disease, phenotype, physiology and ecology. Fewer studies have focused on how these microbiomes may have evolved. In this paper, we develop an agent-based framework to study the dynamics of microbiome evolution. Our framework incorporates neutral models of how hosts acquire their microbiomes, and how the environmental microbial community that is available to the hosts is assembled. Most importantly, our framework also incorporates a Wright-Fisher genealogical model of hosts, so that the dynamics of microbiome evolution is studied on an evolutionary timescale. Our results indicate that the extent of parental contribution to microbial availability from one generation to the next significantly impacts the diversity of microbiomes: the greater the parental contribution, the less diverse the microbiomes. In contrast, even when there is only a very small contribution from a constant environmental pool, microbial communities can remain highly diverse. Finally, we show that our models may be used to construct hypotheses about the types of processes that operate to assemble microbiomes over evolutionary time. PMID:26200800

  15. The status of neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirner, F.

    1987-11-01

    The situation of particle physics today is quite puzzling. On the one hand, the Standard Model (SM) of strong and electroweak interactions is consistent with all confirmed experimental data but theoretically rather unsatisfactory. On the other hand, none of the many theoretical speculations which try to go beyond the SM has (yet) received the slightest experimental support. The solution to this dilemma can only come from new data: either from the detection of a new particle threshold at high energy colliders, or from the appearance of some small discrepancy in high-precision experiments. A crucial sector for testing the SM and its extensions is that of neutral currents (NC), where an impressive amount of data has been collected in recent years. While waiting for the next generation of experiments, it is certainly useful to take stock of our knowledge, determining the NC parameters as precisely as we can and putting limits on possible deviations from the SM. The present talk contains the results of a recent analysis along these lines: the first part illustrates how a set of 'model-independent' parameters can be extracted from the available NC data, the second part particularizes the analysis to the SM and to some superstring-inspired models with an additional Z' in their low-energy spectrum. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Double Well Neutral Plasma Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilson, Erik; Reimann, Anita; Fajans, Joel

    1997-11-01

    The Malmberg-Penning trap is a nearly ideal device for confining single-species plasmas, and researchers have speculated about modifications(See D. S. Hall and G. Gabrielse, Phys. Rev. Lett.), 77 1962, 1996. that would permit Malmberg-Penning traps to confine neutral plasmas. However, Malmberg-Penning traps provide axial confinement for one species only. Double well traps have long been mentioned, and just as quickly dismissed, as a solution to this problem. It was believed that the two species would immediately fall into their respective electrostatic wells, thereby eliminating their overlap. Recently, however, we showed that it is possible to get a plasma to anti-shield an electrostatic well.(C. Hansen and J. Fajans, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 74, 4209, (1995). Instead of the plasma density increasing in the well, it actually decreases. A scheme proposed by Ordonez(Ordonez, C.A. IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci.), 24, 1378 (1996). uses the anti-shielding effect in a double well trap, but suffers from plasma heating. In this poster we will discuss some alternative schemes, and present collision and heating calculations and experimental data relevant to all anti-shielding schemes.

  17. A neutral zwitterionic molecular solid.

    PubMed

    El-Ghayoury, Abdelkrim; Mézière, Cécile; Simonov, Sergey; Zorina, Leokadiya; Cobián, Manuel; Canadell, Enric; Rovira, Carme; Náfrádi, Bálint; Sipos, Balázs; Forró, László; Batail, Patrick

    2010-12-17

    We report on the acid ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvaleneamidoglycine (EDT-TTF-CO-NH-CH(2)-CO(2)H; 1; EDT-TTF=ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene) and the 1:1 adduct [(EDT-TTF)(·+)-CO-NH-CH(2)-(CO(2))(-)][(EDT-TTF)-CO-NH-CH(2)-(CO(2)H)]·CH(3)OH (2), a new type of hydrogen-bonded, 1:1 acid/zwitterion hybrid embrace of redox peptidics into a two-dimensional architecture, an example of a system deliberately fashioned so that oxidation of ?-conjugated cores toward the radical-cation form would interfere with the activity of the appended ionizable residues in the presence of a templating base during crystal growth. First-principles calculations demonstrate that, notwithstanding preconceived ideas, a metallic state is more stable than the hole-localized alternatives for a neat 1:1 neutral acid/zwitterion hybrid. The inhomogeneous Coulomb field associated with proton-shared, interstacks O-H···O hydrogen bonds between the ionizable residues distributed on both sides of the two-dimensional ?-conjugated framework leads, however, to a weak hole localization responsible for the activated but high conductivity of 1 S cm(-1). This situation is reminiscent of the role of the environment on electron transfer in tetraheme cytochrome c, in which the protonation state of a heme propionate becomes paramount, or ion-gated transport phenomena in biology. These observations open rather intriguing opportunities for the construction of electronic systems at the interface of chemistry and biology. PMID:21031370

  18. Neutral Models of Microbiome Evolution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qinglong; Sukumaran, Jeet; Wu, Steven; Rodrigo, Allen

    2015-07-01

    There has been an explosion of research on host-associated microbial communities (i.e.,microbiomes). Much of this research has focused on surveys of microbial diversities across a variety of host species, including humans, with a view to understanding how these microbiomes are distributed across space and time, and how they correlate with host health, disease, phenotype, physiology and ecology. Fewer studies have focused on how these microbiomes may have evolved. In this paper, we develop an agent-based framework to study the dynamics of microbiome evolution. Our framework incorporates neutral models of how hosts acquire their microbiomes, and how the environmental microbial community that is available to the hosts is assembled. Most importantly, our framework also incorporates a Wright-Fisher genealogical model of hosts, so that the dynamics of microbiome evolution is studied on an evolutionary timescale. Our results indicate that the extent of parental contribution to microbial availability from one generation to the next significantly impacts the diversity of microbiomes: the greater the parental contribution, the less diverse the microbiomes. In contrast, even when there is only a very small contribution from a constant environmental pool, microbial communities can remain highly diverse. Finally, we show that our models may be used to construct hypotheses about the types of processes that operate to assemble microbiomes over evolutionary time. PMID:26200800

  19. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Skylab's success proved that scientific experimentation in a low gravity environment was essential to scientific progress. A more permanent structure was needed to provide this space laboratory. President Ronald Reagan, on January 25, 1984, during his State of the Union address, claimed that the United States should exploit the new frontier of space, and directed NASA to build a permanent marned space station within a decade. The idea was that the space station would not only be used as a laboratory for the advancement of science and medicine, but would also provide a staging area for building a lunar base and manned expeditions to Mars and elsewhere in the solar system. President Reagan invited the international community to join with the United States in this endeavour. NASA and several countries moved forward with this concept. By December 1985, the first phase of the space station was well underway with the design concept for the crew compartments and laboratories. Pictured are two NASA astronauts, at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS), practicing construction techniques they later used to construct the space station after it was deployed.

  20. Antibody-mediated protection against mucosal simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge of macaques immunized with alphavirus replicon particles and boosted with trimeric envelope glycoprotein in MF59 adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Sun, Yide; Kan, Elaine; Legg, Harold; Lian, Ying; Bost, Kristen; Zhou, Fengmin; Goodsell, Amanda; Zur Megede, Jan; Polo, John; Donnelly, John; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Otten, Gillis R; Miller, Christopher J; Vajdy, Michael; Srivastava, Indresh K

    2010-06-01

    We have previously shown that rhesus macaques were partially protected against high-dose intravenous challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(SF162P4) following sequential immunization with alphavirus replicon particles (VRP) of a chimeric recombinant VEE/SIN alphavirus (derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEE] and the Sindbis virus [SIN]) encoding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1(SF162) gp140DeltaV2 envelope (Env) and trimeric Env protein in MF59 adjuvant (R. Xu, I. K. Srivastava, C. E. Greer, I. Zarkikh, Z. Kraft, L. Kuller, J. M. Polo, S. W. Barnett, and L. Stamatatos, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 22:1022-1030, 2006). The protection did not require T-cell immune responses directed toward simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag. We extend those findings here to demonstrate antibody-mediated protection against mucosal challenge in macaques using prime-boost regimens incorporating both intramuscular and mucosal routes of delivery. The macaques in the vaccination groups were primed with VRP and then boosted with Env protein in MF59 adjuvant, or they were given VRP intramuscular immunizations alone and then challenged with SHIV(SF162P4) (intrarectal challenge). The results demonstrated that these vaccines were able to effectively protect the macaques to different degrees against subsequent mucosal SHIV challenge, but most noteworthy, all macaques that received the intramuscular VRP prime plus Env protein boost were completely protected. A statistically significant association was observed between the titer of virus neutralizing and binding antibodies as well as the avidity of anti-Env antibodies measured prechallenge and protection from infection. These results highlight the merit of the alphavirus replicon vector prime plus Env protein boost vaccine approach for the induction of protective antibody responses and are of particular relevance to advancing our understanding of the potential correlates of immune protection against HIV infection at a relevant mucosal portal of entry. PMID:20392857

  1. Pneumococcal meningitis in a young adult female with common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad J.; Said, Sarmad; Quansah, Raphael; Khalillullah, Sayeed; Alozie, Ogechika

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 22 Final Diagnosis: Pneumococcal meningitis Symptoms: Fever • headache • neck stiffness • nuchal rigidity • photophobia Medication: Ceftriaxone Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency associated with hypogammaglobulinemia and other various clinical manifestations. It is a rare disease with a prevalence of CVID is approximately 1: 50,000–200,000. Clinical manifestations of CVID include recurrent bacterial infections, autoimmune, gastrointestinal, lymphoproliferative, granulomatous, and malignancy. Case Report: Twenty-two year-old Hispanic female presented with a throbbing headache, nuchal rigidity, photophobia and a high grade fever. Lumbar puncture with CSF assessment revealed a turbid fluid with WBC of 6937 per uL, polymorphnuclear cells of 81%, protein 248 mg/dL, glucose <3 mg/Dl. CSF antigens were positive for Streptococcus pneumonia and CSF culture grew pansensitive Strepococcus pneumonia. Immunoglobin (Ig) levels of IgA, IgE, IgG and IgM were all decreased. Absolute cell counts of CD3, CD4 and CD8 were all low. Bone marrow biopsy was normocellular. Excisional lymph node biopsy revealed lymph nodes with reactive follicular hyperplasia. Common variable immunodeficiency disease (CVID) was diagnosed based on exclusion. IVIG therapy was given and patient received a two-week course of ceftriaxone. Conclusions: The diagnosis of CVID is made based on the following criteria: 1) Marked decrease of IgG and at least one of the IgM or IgA isotypes. 2) The onset of immunodeficiency at greater than 2 years old. 3) Absence of isohemagglutinins and/or poor response to vaccines 4) Exclusion of other defined causes of hypogammaglobulinemia. A definite diagnosis is often late because it is wrongly assumed that primary immunodeficiencies are extremely rare, hence many patients are already seriously ill at the time of presentation. PMID:24265845

  2. The syndrome of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in primary immunodeficiencies: implications for differential diagnosis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Sebastian Fn; Ammann, Sandra; Al-Herz, Waleed; Bataneant, Mihaela; Dvorak, Christopher C; Gehring, Stephan; Gennery, Andrew; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Gonzalez-Granado, Luis I; Groß-Wieltsch, Ute; Ifversen, Marianne; Lingman-Framme, Jenny; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Mesters, Rolf; Meyts, Isabelle; van Montfrans, Joris M; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Pai, Sung-Yun; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Schuermann, Uta; Schuster, Volker; Seidel, Markus G; Speckmann, Carsten; Stepensky, Polina; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Tesi, Bianca; Vraetz, Thomas; Waruiru, Catherine; Bryceson, Yenan T; Moshous, Despina; Lehmberg, Kai; Jordan, Michael B; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a hyperinflammatory syndrome defined by clinical and laboratory criteria. Current criteria were created to identify patients with familial hemophagocytic lmyphohistiocytosis in immediate need of immunosuppressive therapy. However, these criteria also identify patients with infection-associated hemophagocytic inflammatory states lacking genetic defects typically predisposing to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. These patients include those with primary immunodeficiencies, in whom the pathogenesis of the inflammatory syndrome may be distinctive and aggressive immunosuppression is contraindicated. To better characterize hemophagocytic inflammation associated with immunodeficiencies, we combined an international survey with a literature search and identified 63 patients with primary immunodeficiencies other than cytotoxicity defects or X-linked lymphoproliferative disorders, presenting with conditions fulfilling current criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Twelve patients had severe combined immunodeficiency with <100/?L T cells, 18 had partial T-cell deficiencies; episodes of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis were mostly associated with viral infections. Twenty-two patients had chronic granulomatous disease with hemophagocytic episodes mainly associated with bacterial infections. Compared to patients with cytotoxicity defects, patients with T-cell deficiencies had lower levels of soluble CD25 and higher ferritin concentrations. Other criteria for hemophagocytoc lymphohistiocytosis were not discriminative. Thus: (i) a hemophagocytic inflammatory syndrome fulfilling criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can be the initial manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies; (ii) this syndrome can develop despite severe deficiency of T and NK cells, implying that the pathophysiology is distinct and not appropriately described as "lympho"-histiocytosis in these patients; and (iii) current criteria for hemophagocytoc lymphohistiocytosis are insufficient to differentiate hemophagocytic inflammatory syndromes with different pathogeneses. This is important because of implications for therapy, in particular for protocols targeting T cells. PMID:26022711

  3. The syndrome of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in primary immunodeficiencies: implications for differential diagnosis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Sebastian FN; Ammann, Sandra; Al-Herz, Waleed; Bataneant, Mihaela; Dvorak, Christopher C; Gehring, Stephan; Gennery, Andrew; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Gonzalez-Granado, Luis I; Groß-Wieltsch, Ute; Ifversen, Marianne; Lingman-Framme, Jenny; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Mesters, Rolf; Meyts, Isabelle; van Montfrans, Joris M; Schmid, Jana Pachlopnik; Pai, Sung-Yun; Soler-Palacin, Pere; Schuermann, Uta; Schuster, Volker; Seidel, Markus G.; Speckmann, Carsten; Stepensky, Polina; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Tesi, Bianca; Vraetz, Thomas; Waruiru, Catherine; Bryceson, Yenan T.; Moshous, Despina; Lehmberg, Kai; Jordan, Michael B; Ehl, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is a hyperinflammatory syndrome defined by clinical and laboratory criteria. Current criteria were created to identify patients with familial hemophagocytic lmyphohistiocytosis in immediate need of immunosuppressive therapy. However, these criteria also identify patients with infection-associated hemophagocytic inflammatory states lacking genetic defects typically predisposing to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. These patients include those with primary immunodeficiencies, in whom the pathogenesis of the inflammatory syndrome may be distinctive and aggressive immunosuppression is contraindicated. To better characterize hemophagocytic inflammation associated with immunodeficiencies, we combined an international survey with a literature search and identified 63 patients with primary immunodeficiencies other than cytotoxicity defects or X-linked lymphoproliferative disorders, presenting with conditions fulfilling current criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Twelve patients had severe combined immunodeficiency with <100/?L T cells, 18 had partial T-cell deficiencies; episodes of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis were mostly associated with viral infections. Twenty-two patients had chronic granulomatous disease with hemophagocytic episodes mainly associated with bacterial infections. Compared to patients with cytotoxicity defects, patients with T-cell deficiencies had lower levels of soluble CD25 and higher ferritin concentrations. Other criteria for hemophagocytoc lymphohistiocytosis were not discriminative. Thus: (i) a hemophagocytic inflammatory syndrome fulfilling criteria for hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis can be the initial manifestation of primary immunodeficiencies; (ii) this syndrome can develop despite severe deficiency of T and NK cells, implying that the pathophysiology is distinct and not appropriately described as “lympho”-histiocytosis in these patients; and (iii) current criteria for hemophagocytoc lymphohistiocytosis are insufficient to differentiate hemophagocytic inflammatory syndromes with different pathogeneses. This is important because of implications for therapy, in particular for protocols targeting T cells. PMID:26022711

  4. Rapid High-Level Production of Functional HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Transient Plant Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Yvonne; Sack, Markus; Montefiori, David; Forthal, Donald; Mao, Lingjun; -Abanto, Segundo Hernandez; Urban, Lori; Landucci, Gary; Fischer, Rainer; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6P?140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01) or a single chain antibody construct (m9), for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production. PMID:23533588

  5. Neutral beams for ITER (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.; Feist, J.-H.; Hanada, M.; Heinemann, B.; Inoue, T.; Kussel, E.; Krylov, A.; Lotte, P.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Murdoch, D.; Nagase, A.; Ohara, Y.; Okumura, Y.; Paméla, J.; Panasenkov, A.; Shibata, K.; Tanii, M.; Watson, M.

    1996-03-01

    Neutral beam injection has been the most successful scheme used to heat magnetically confined plasmas studied in controlled nuclear fusion research, and neutral beams are a candidate to heat to ignition the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER). This article describes the system which is presently being designed in Europe, Japan, and Russia, with coordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D0 to the ITER plasma for pulse length of ?1000 s. The proposed injectors each use a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multigrid, multiaperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D-. This will be neutralized in a subdivided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped onto the water-cooled surfaces making up the electrostatic residual ion dump. A water-cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER.

  6. Autoimmune Disease in Primary Immunodeficiency: At the Crossroads of Anti-Infective Immunity and Self-Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Saifi, Maryam; Wysocki, Christian A

    2015-11-01

    The association of autoimmunity and primary immunodeficiency suggests the existence of mechanistic links between development of the various elements of the immune system and the maintenance of self-tolerance. In this review, various monogenic primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are systematically explored, with a specific focus on the impact of these genetic lesions on tolerance, correlating these defects in tolerance with clinical autoimmune and inflammatory syndromes seen in these PIDs. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is explored, and areas are highlighted in which findings in monogenic PID are beginning to illuminate the mechanisms behind these conditions in CVID. PMID:26454316

  7. Mutual neutralization in rare gas halides

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, B.L.; Morgan, W.L.; Bardsley, J.N.

    1983-02-01

    The cross sections for mutual neutralization in Ne/sup +/+F/sup -/, Ar/sup +/+F/sup -/, and K/sup +/+Cl are obtained from two-state close coupling calculations. The Landau--Zener approximation gives adequate results in each case. The rate of neutralization is studied as a function of ambient gas density. Near atmospheric pressure, mutual neutralization is more likely than excimer formation of Ne/sup +/+F/sup -/ collisions, but less likely in Ar/sup +/+F/sup -/ collisions.

  8. Effect of surface roughness of the neutralization grid on the energy and flux of fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral

    E-print Network

    Economou, Demetre J.

    Effect of surface roughness of the neutralization grid on the energy and flux of fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral beam source Alok Ranjan Plasma Processing Laboratory, Department A directional fast neutral beam was extracted from an inductively coupled argon plasma in contact

  9. 47 CFR 64.617 - Neutral Video Communication Service Platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Neutral Video Communication Service Platform. 64...With Disabilities § 64.617 Neutral Video Communication Service Platform. ...Commission are required to utilize the Neutral Video Communication Service Platform to...

  10. 47 CFR 64.617 - Neutral Video Communication Service Platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Neutral Video Communication Service Platform. 64...With Disabilities § 64.617 Neutral Video Communication Service Platform. ...Commission are required to utilize the Neutral Video Communication Service Platform to...

  11. Phonology Project Part II: Laryngeal Neutralization and Syllable Structure

    E-print Network

    Ananian, C. Scott

    Phonology Project Part II: Laryngeal Neutralization and Syllable Structure C. Scott Ananian Andrew Ira Nevins December 2000 Contents 1 Introduction 2 1.1 Laryngeal Neutralization Is the Syllable involved in Neutralization? 12 3.1 Linear Constraints in Klamath

  12. 40 CFR 721.10436 - Amine neutralized phosphated polyesters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Amine neutralized phosphated polyesters (generic). 721.10436 Section...10436 Amine neutralized phosphated polyesters (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as amine neutralized phosphated polyesters (PMN P-99-1217 and...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10436 - Amine neutralized phosphated polyesters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Amine neutralized phosphated polyesters (generic). 721.10436 Section...10436 Amine neutralized phosphated polyesters (generic). (a) Chemical substance...generically as amine neutralized phosphated polyesters (PMN P-99-1217 and...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recent literature OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy On this page: Description ... Glossary definitions Reviewed February 2014 What is neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy? Neutral lipid storage disease ...

  15. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Stephen Luke; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-09-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL and is comparable to the result from CDF in the same channel which uses approximately twice the integrated luminosity.

  16. Solar Neutral Particles - Duration: 43 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  17. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  18. Anion formation by neutral resonant ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, John S.

    2015-10-01

    A collision-radiation model of the cesium plasma that forms within a pitted or recessed sample in a Middleton-type sputter ion source showed that excited states of Cs formed. These excited states of neutral Cs undergo resonant electron transfer with neutral sputtered atoms of AMS samples to produce the accelerated anions. Numerous reported effects from over 30 years are readily explained by this mechanism, including several that puzzled Middleton.

  19. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people's accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge - automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings. PMID:26441761

  20. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets

    PubMed Central

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge – automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings. PMID:26441761

  1. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked immunodeficiency with magnesium defect, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and neoplasia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... called a magnesium transporter, which moves charged atoms (ions) of magnesium (Mg2+) into certain T cells. Specifically, ... deficiency ; gene ; immune system ; immunodeficiency ; infection ; inheritance ; inherited ; ions ; lymphoma ; mutation ; neoplasia ; pneumonia ; population ; prevalence ; protein ; recessive ; ...

  2. Protective effects of passively transferred merozoite-specific antibodies against Theileria equi in horses with severe combined immunodeficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theileria equi immune plasma was infused into young horses (foals) with severe combined immunodeficiency. Although all foals became infected following intravenous challenge with homologous T. equi merozoite stabilate, delayed time-to-peak parasitemia and enhanced survival occurred. Protective effect...

  3. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) shares features of both pathogenic and non-pathogenic infections

    E-print Network

    Greenwood, Edward J. D.; Schmidt, Fabian; Kondova, Ivanela; Niphuis, Henk; Hodara, Vida L.; Clissold, Leah; McLay, Kirsten; Guerra, Bernadette; Redrobe, Sharon; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Lanford, Robert E.; Murthy, Krishna K.; Rouet, François; Heeney, Jonathan L.

    2015-09-11

    The virus-host relationship in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected chimpanzees is thought to be different from that found in other SIV infected African primates. However, studies of captive SIVcpz infected chimpanzees are limited...

  4. Epidemiology of coronary heart disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Triant, Virginia A

    2014-01-01

    As a growing number of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have access to antiretroviral therapy and achieve virologic suppression, the focus of clinical care is shifting from treating the infectious complications of advanced immunodeficiency to managing and preventing chronic disease. The aging of the HIV-positive population and increased rates of chronic disease complications in the setting of HIV infection have increased the impact of noncommunicable diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD). The effect of HIV on CHD is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and antiretroviral medications and is likely due in part to the chronic inflammation and immune activation underlying HIV infection. This article describes the current state of epidemiologic knowledge on CHD in HIV infection. It highlights key studies in the field and summarizes epidemiologic data with respect to traditional and novel CHD risk factors, specialized clinical subgroups, and broader cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:24987859

  5. Optimal conditions for recovery of the human immunodeficiency virus from peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Castro, B A; Weiss, C D; Wiviott, L D; Levy, J A

    1988-01-01

    Optimal conditions for demonstrating the presence of infectious human immunodeficiency virus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMCs) from seropositive individuals involved cocultivation of infected cells with phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PMCs from seronegative donors in the presence of 2 micrograms of Polybrene per ml. The size of the culture vessel also influenced the results; smaller numbers of infected cells were detected under conditions of increased cell density. In addition, an increased normal donor/patient PMC ratio was helpful. The cocultivation approach permitted identification of human immunodeficiency virus in over 90% of seropositive individuals with different clinical conditions. Moreover, reconstruction experiments indicated that this method allows detection of one productively infected CD4+ cell in a population of over 10(6) PMCs. PMID:3266220

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-associated primary effusion lymphoma: An exceedingly rare entity in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sarika; Palekar, Alka; Monaco, Sara E.; Craig, Fiona E.; Bejjani, Ghassan; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2015-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection may involve pleural, pericardial, and peritoneal cavities. PEL involving the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is exceedingly rare, and to our knowledge has only been reported in two cases. We report another case of PEL diagnosed in CSF from a 61-year-old male with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome that presented with neurological symptoms. Imaging studies of his brain showed leptomeningeal/periventricular enhancement, but no mass lesion. His CSF demonstrated human herpesvirus-8 positive pleomorphic lymphoplasmacytoid cells of null cell phenotype. This case highlights that albeit rare, PEL should be included in the differential diagnosis when large atypical cells are encountered in CSF of HIV-positive patients, even when such patients have no history of lymphoma. As in this case, ancillary studies are required to make an accurate diagnosis of PEL in CSF cytology. PMID:26604975

  7. Immunodeficient mouse model for human hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and immune system development

    PubMed Central

    Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D.; Brehm, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human immune systems provide an exciting model to study human immunobiology in an in vivo setting without placing patients at risk. The essential parameter for creation of these “humanized models” is engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that will allow optimal development of human immune systems. However there are a number of strategies to generate humanized mice and specific protocols can vary significantly among different laboratories. Here we describe a protocol for the co-implantation of human HSC with autologous fetal liver and thymic tissues into immunodeficient mice to create a humanized model with optimal human T cell development. This model, often referred to as the Thy/Liv or BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) mouse, develops a functional human immune system, including HLA-restricted human T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. PMID:25062635

  8. Induction of Mucosal and Systemic Immunity to a Recombinant Simian Immunodeficiency Viral Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, T.; Bergmeier, L. A.; Panagiotidi, C.; Tao, L.; Brookes, R.; Klavinskis, L. S.; Walker, P.; Walker, J.; Ward, R. G.; Hussain, L.; Gearing, A. J. H.; Adams, S. E.

    1992-11-01

    Heterosexual transmission through the cervico-vaginal mucosa is the principal route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Africa and is increasing in the United States and Europe. Vaginal immunization with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) had not yet been studied in nonhuman primates. Immune responses in macaques were investigated by stimulation of the genital and gut-associated lymphoid tissue with a recombinant, particulate SIV antigen. Vaginal, followed by oral, administration of the vaccine elicited three types of immunity: (i) gag protein p27-specific, secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the vaginal fluid, (ii) specific CD4^+ T cell proliferation and helper function in B cell p27-specific IgA synthesis in the genital lymph nodes, and (iii) specific serum IgA and IgG, with CD4^+ T cell proliferative and helper functions in the circulating blood.

  9. Studies on the specificity of the vaccine effect elicited by inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Cranage, M P; Polyanskaya, N; McBride, B; Cook, N; Ashworth, L A; Dennis, M; Baskerville, A; Greenaway, P J; Corcoran, T; Kitchin, P

    1993-01-01

    Inactivated, partially purified simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) protected macaques from intravenous challenge with homologous and heterologous strains of SIV that had been grown on human cells but no protection against challenge with monkey peripheral blood mononuclear cell-grown SIVmac was afforded. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 prepared in an analogous way to the SIVmac vaccine on the C8166 human T cell line protected macaques against challenge with human cell-grown SIVmac. These results suggest that protection may be mediated by xenoimmunization with the vaccine cell substrate proteins. All vaccinated macaques had anti-cell antibodies. Major reactivity to MHC class I antigens was found as well as to a 70-kD protein detectable only under nonreducing conditions. PMID:8427714

  10. The case for newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of primary immunodeficiency is recognized as important for avoiding infectious complications that compromise outcomes. In particular, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is fatal in infancy unless affected infants can be diagnosed before the onset of devastating infections and provided with an immune system through allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation, enzyme replacement, or gene therapy. A biomarker of normal T cell development, T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), can be measured in DNA isolated from the dried blood spots routinely obtained for newborn screening; infants identified as lacking TRECs can thus receive confirmatory testing and prompt intervention. Early results of TREC testing of newborns in five states indicate that this addition to the newborn screening panel can be successfully integrated into state public health programs. A variety of cases with typical SCID genotypes and other T lymphocytopenic conditions have been detected in a timely manner and referred for appropriate early treatment. PMID:22236435

  11. Frequency of hyponatremia and nonosmolar vasopressin release in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Vitting, K.E.; Gardenswartz, M.H.; Zabetakis, P.M.; Tapper, M.L.; Gleim, G.W.; Agrawal, M.; Michelis, M.F. )

    1990-02-16

    The frequency and pathophysiology of hyponatremia were studied in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Of 71 hospitalized patients surveyed retrospectively, hyponatremia was observed in 37 (52%). Of 48 patients studied prospectively, 27 (56%) were hyponatremic. In 16 hyponatremic patients, volume status; serum and urine osmolalities; renal, adrenal, and thyroid function; and plasma vasopressin levels were assessed. Urine osmolalities were inappropriately elevated relative to serum osmolalities. Four patients had moderate renal insufficiency. Plasma vasopressin levels, measured by radioimmunoassay, were elevated in 15 patients, with the highest levels seen in patients who died. Hyponatremia of multiple etiologies occurred in a majority of inpatients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, often following the administration of hypotonic fluids, and was associated with a 30% (8/27) short-term mortality.

  12. [Kaposi's disease in a female patient with acquired HIV-negative immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Nikkels, A F; Collignon, J; Moutschen, M P; Paquet, P; Bouillenne, C; Piérard, G E

    1994-12-01

    A 79-year-old woman of Mediterranean ascent suffered from corticosteroid-dependent chronic obstructive lung disease, hypogammaglobulinemia (IgG 1 and 2), decreased CD16 natural killer cell function and non-HIV related CD4 and CD8 lymphopenia. Such immunodeficiency could be either a variant of common variable immunodeficiency or an early stage of the idiopathic CD4 + T lymphocytopenia syndrome. She developed bilateral lesions of Kaposi's sarcoma on the lower extremities resembling the classic European type of the disease. The tumors contained both CD34 + and Factor XIIIa + cells. The HLA-DR5 haplotype was not found. Weekly low intravenous dosages of vinblastine improved the lesions but the patient died from pontic infarction. PMID:7831265

  13. Ability of herpes simplex virus vectors to boost immune responses to DNA vectors and to protect against challenge by simian immunodeficiency virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Amitinder . E-mail: amitinder_kaur@hms.harvard.edu; Sanford, Hannah B.; Garry, Deirdre; Lang, Sabine; Klumpp, Sherry A.; Watanabe, Daisuke; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rosati, Margherita; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.; Knipe, David M.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2007-01-20

    The immunogenicity and protective capacity of replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector-based vaccines were examined in rhesus macaques. Three macaques were inoculated with recombinant HSV vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Tat-Rev-Nef fusion protein of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Three other macaques were primed with recombinant DNA vectors expressing Gag, Env, and a Pol-Tat-Nef-Vif fusion protein prior to boosting with the HSV vectors. Robust anti-Gag and anti-Env cellular responses were detected in all six macaques. Following intravenous challenge with wild-type, cloned SIV239, peak and 12-week plasma viremia levels were significantly lower in vaccinated compared to control macaques. Plasma SIV RNA in vaccinated macaques was inversely correlated with anti-Rev ELISPOT responses on the day of challenge (P value < 0.05), anti-Tat ELISPOT responses at 2 weeks post challenge (P value < 0.05) and peak neutralizing antibody titers pre-challenge (P value 0.06). These findings support continued study of recombinant herpesviruses as a vaccine approach for AIDS.

  14. First-in-Human Evaluation of the Safety and Immunogenicity of a Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 gag Vaccine (HVTN 090)

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Frank, Ian; Elizaga, Marnie L.; Allen, Mary; Frahm, Nicole; Kochar, Nidhi; Li, Sue; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Kalams, Spyros A.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Sheets, Rebecca; Pensiero, Michael; Tremblay, Marc A.; Higgins, Terry J.; Latham, Theresa; Egan, Michael A.; Clarke, David K.; Eldridge, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity evaluation of a highly attenuated, replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 vaccine. Methods.?Sixty healthy, HIV-1-uninfected adults were enrolled in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled dose-escalation study. Groups of 12 participants received rVSV HIV-1 gag vaccine at 5 dose levels (4.6 × 103 to 3.4 × 107 particle forming units) (N = 10/group) or placebo (N = 2/group), delivered intramuscularly as bilateral injections at 0 and 2 months. Safety monitoring included VSV cultures from blood, urine, saliva, and swabs of oral lesions. Vesicular stomatitis virus-neutralizing antibodies, T-cell immunogenicity, and HIV-1 specific binding antibodies were assessed. Results.?Local and systemic reactogenicity symptoms were mild to moderate and increased with dose. No severe reactogenicity or product-related serious adverse events were reported, and all rVSV cultures were negative. All vaccine recipients became seropositive for VSV after 2 vaccinations. gag-specific T-cell responses were detected in 63% of participants by interferon-? enzyme-linked immunospot at the highest dose post boost. Conclusions.?An attenuated replication-competent rVSV gag vaccine has an acceptable safety profile in healthy adults. This rVSV vector is a promising new vaccine platform for the development of vaccines to combat HIV-1 and other serious human diseases. PMID:26199949

  15. Glycosphingolipid Composition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Particles Is a Crucial Determinant for Dendritic Cell-Mediated HIV-1 trans-Infection?

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Steven C.; Archer, Jacob; Gummuluru, Suryaram

    2009-01-01

    Interactions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with dendritic cells (DCs) are multifactorial and presumably require nonredundant interactions between the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 and molecules expressed on the DC surface that define the cellular fate of the virus particle. Surprisingly, neutralization of HIV-1 gp120-dependent binding interactions with DCs was insufficient to prevent HIV-1 attachment. Besides gp120, HIV-1 particles also incorporate host cell-derived proteins and lipids in their particle membrane. In this study, we demonstrate a crucial role for host cell-derived glycosphingolipids (GSLs) for the initial interactions of HIV-1 particles with both immature and mature DCs. Production of HIV-1 particles from virus producer cells treated with ceramide synthase inhibitor fumonisin B1 or glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor 1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP) resulted in the production of virus particles that, although capable of binding previously defined HIV-1 gp120-specific attachment factors CD4, DC-SIGN, and syndecans, were attenuated in their ability to be captured by both immature and mature DCs. Furthermore, GSL-deficient HIV-1 particles were inhibited in their ability to establish productive infections in DC-T-cell cocultures. These studies provide initial evidence for the role of HIV-1 particle membrane-associated GSLs in virus invasion of DCs and also provide additional novel cellular targets, GSL biosynthetic pathways and GSL-dependent HIV-1 interactions with DCs, for development of antiviral therapy. PMID:19193785

  16. Primary immunodeficiency update: Part II. Syndromes associated with mucocutaneous candidiasis and noninfectious cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Pichard, Dominique C; Freeman, Alexandra F; Cowen, Edward W

    2015-09-01

    Several primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have recently been described that confer an elevated risk of fungal infections and noninfectious cutaneous manifestations. In addition, immunologic advances have provided new insights into our understanding of the pathophysiology of fungal infections in established PIDs. We reviewed PIDs that present with an eczematous dermatitis in part I. In part II of this continuing medical education article we discuss updates on PIDs associated with fungal infections, their biologic basis in PIDs, and noninfectious cutaneous manifestations. PMID:26282795

  17. Characterization of regionally associated feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Lagana, Danielle M; Lee, Justin S; Lewis, Jesse S; Bevins, Sarah N; Carver, Scott; Sweanor, Linda L; McBride, Roy; McBride, Caleb; Crooks, Kevin R; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) classically infects felid species with highly divergent species-specific FIVs. However, recent studies have detected an FIV strain infecting both bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in California and Florida. To further investigate this observation, we evaluated FIV from bobcats in Florida (n=25) and Colorado (n=80) between 2008 and 2011. Partial viral sequences from five Florida bobcats cluster with previously published sequences from Florida panthers. We did not detect FIV in Colorado bobcats. PMID:23778629

  18. A novel immunodeficiency syndrome associated with partial trisomy 19p13

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Markus G; Duerr, Celia; Woutsas, Stavroula; Schwerin-Nagel, Anette; Sadeghi, Kambis; Neesen, Jürgen; Uhrig, Sabine; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Pickl, Winfried F; Schwinger, Wolfgang; Urban, Christian; Boztug, Kaan; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Subtelomeric deletions and duplications may cause syndromic disorders that include features of immunodeficiency. To date, no phenotype of immunological pathology has been linked to partial trisomy 19. We report here on two unrelated male patients showing clinical and laboratory signs of immunodeficiency exhibiting a duplication involving Chromosome 19p13. Methods Both patients underwent a detailed clinical examination. Extended laboratory investigations for immune function, FISH and array comparative genome hybridization (CGH) analyses were performed. Results The reported patients were born prematurely with intrauterine growth retardation and share clinical features including neurological impairment, facial dysmorphy and urogenital malformations. Array CGH analyses of both patients showed a largely overlapping terminal duplication affecting Chromosome 19p13. In both affected individuals, the clinical course was marked by recurrent severe infections. Signs of humoral immunodeficiency were detected, including selective antibody deficiency against polysaccharide antigens in patient 1 and reduced IgG1, IgG3 subclass levels and IgM deficiency in patient 2. Class-switched B memory cells were almost absent in both patients. Normal numbers of T cells, B cells and natural killer cells were observed in both boys. Lymphocytic proliferation showed no consistent functional pathology, however, function of granulocytes and monocytes as assessed by oxidative burst test was moderately reduced. Moreover, natural killer cytotoxicity was reduced in both patients. Immunoglobulin substitution resulted in a decreased number and severity of infections and improved thriving in both patients. Conclusions Partial trisomy 19p13 represents a syndromic disorder associating organ malformation and hitherto unrecognised immunodeficiency. PMID:24431329

  19. Localization of simian immunodeficiency virus in the central nervous system of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, A. A.; Smith, M. O.; Munn, R. J.; Martfeld, D. J.; Gardner, M. B.; Marx, P. A.; Dandekar, S.

    1991-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), like the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is a lentivirus that is both immunosuppressive and neurovirulent. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) inoculated with SIV often develop a giant cell encephalitis similar to that seen in humans infected with HIV. The authors examined SIV expression by immunohistochemistry and RNA in situ hybridization in the cerebrum, cerebellum, choroid plexus, and spinal cord from five macaques with and two macaques without giant cell encephalitis. Selected portions of the central nervous system (CNS) also were examined by electron microscopy. Simian immunodeficiency virus was detected in the CNS of all seven monkeys whether or not they had giant cell encephalitis. Both SIV antigen and RNA were present in all levels of the CNS examined. Macrophage/giant cell lesions always contained viral RNA and antigen and were the only sites where viral particles were detected by electron microscopy. However, SIV antigen and RNA also were commonly associated with small vessels, the choroid plexus, and meninges; these were the only locations where virus was detected in animals without giant cell encephalitis. Immunophenotyping showed that the cellular infiltrates consisted primarily of monocyte/macrophages and occasional CD8-positive T cells. Macrophages and T cells also were present in the stroma of the choroid plexus and were intimately associated with vessels in the CNS of SIV-infected but not uninfected macaques. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of the macaque CNS provides an excellent model for studying the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of HIV-1-encephalitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1716047

  20. Mediterranean and immunodeficiency associated Kaposi's sarcoma - Does micromorphology reflect clinical patterns?

    PubMed

    Castelli, E; Wollina, U

    1997-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) follows a different clinical course in Mediterranean and immunodeficiency related cases and has a poorer prognosis in the latter. We investigated 40 patients with Mediterranean and eight with immunodeficiency related KS by histomorphology and immunohistology in comparision to the clinical presentation in order to identify characteristic patterns distinctive for each of these KS forms. We also evaluated oncoprotein activation and phosphotyrosine activity. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), Mallory's phosphotungstick acid hematoxylin (PTAH), Hotchkiss-McManus' periodic acid - Schiff reaction (PAS), Masson's trichrome, Pinkus' orcein-Giemsa, Lapham's method for myelin, Bielschowski-Gomori's silver impregnation for reticular fibres, Bodian's silver impregnation for neurofibrils, and Wartin-Starry silver impregnation for fungi and bacteria. Immunohistochemistry was performed on deparaffinated sections using the microwave technique with avidin-peroxidase and 3-amino-ethyl-carbazole for alpha smooth muscle actin, CD34, phosphotyrosine, p53, and bcl-2. Mediterranean KS was characterized by pseudocapsule formation around nodules, which has been lost in immunodeficiency related KS. The latter, additionally, showed outstanding infiltrative growth with lace-like involvement of subcutaneous fat, colonization of perineuronal-periadnexal adventitial dermis, irregular vascular lacunae encircling vessels and/or adnexa, collections of histiocytoid-like cells, intravascular papillary projections of atypical endothelia cells. Both types could further be characterized by presence of alpha smooth muscle actin and CD34 expressing cells, high levels of phosphotyrosinase in plump spindle cells and variable expression of p53, sometimes coexpressed with phosphotyrosinase indicating cellular activation. The oncoprotein bcl-2 was not detected in this tumor material. The particular clinical features of Mediterranean and immunodeficiency related forms of KS may be reflected, at least in part, in characteristic histomorphological findings. PMID:21590045

  1. Nontropical pyomyositis as a cause of subacute, multifocal myalgia in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, R.F.; Sprenger, H.G.; Mooyaart, E.L.; Tamsma, J.T.; Kengen, R.A.; Weits, J. )

    1990-11-01

    We report a case of nontropical pyomyositis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection, in which severe myalgia was the presenting symptom over several weeks. Multifocal muscle lesions were identified by gallium scanning and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The epidemiology, possible pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic imaging, and therapy are reviewed. Early suspicion of nontropical pyomyositis in severely immunocompromised patients with cryptic myalgia is recommended.

  2. Characterization of a Large Panel of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 gp120 and Isolation of Novel Neutralizing Antibodies against the V3 Loop

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yali; Shi, Heliang; Banasik, Marisa; Lin, Feng; Rohl, Kari; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C.; Cho, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the induction of potent, cross-clade neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) in rabbits using gp120 based on an M-group consensus sequence. To better characterize these antibodies, 93 hybridomas were generated, which represent the largest panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) ever generated from a vaccinated rabbit. The single most frequently recognized epitope of the isolated mAbs was at the very C-terminal end of the protein (APTKAKRRVVEREKR), followed by the V3 loop. A total of seven anti-V3 loop mAbs were isolated, two of which (10A3 and 10A37) exhibited neutralizing activity. In contrast to 10A3 and most other anti-V3 loop nAbs, 10A37 was atypical with its epitope positioned more towards the C-terminal half of the loop. To our knowledge, 10A37 is the most potent and broadly neutralizing anti-V3 loop mAb induced by vaccination. Interestingly, all seven anti-V3 loop mAbs competed with PGT121, suggesting a possibility that early induction of potent anti-V3 loop antibodies could prevent induction of more broadly neutralizing PGT121-like antibodies that target the conserved base of the V3 loop stem. PMID:26039641

  3. Consensus on context-specific strategies for reducing the stigma of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Zambézia Province, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Mukolo, Abraham; Torres, Isabel; Bechtel, Ruth M.; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo E.

    2014-01-01

    Stigma has been implicated in poor outcomes of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) care. Reducing stigma is important for HIV prevention and long-term treatment success. Although stigma reduction interventions are conducted in Mozambique, little is known about the current nature of stigma and the efficacy and effectiveness of stigma reduction initiatives. We describe action research to generate consensus on critical characteristics of HIV stigma and anti-stigma interventions in Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Qualitative data gathering methods, including indepth key-informant interviews, community interviews and consensus group sessions, were utilized. Delphi methods and the strategic options development analysis technique were used to synthesize qualitative data. Key findings are that stigma enacted by the general public might be declining in tandem with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Mozambique, but there is likely excessive residual fear of HIV disease and community attitudes that sustain high levels of perceived stigma. HIV-positive women accessing maternal and child health services appear to shoulder a disproportionate burden of stigma. Unintentional biases among healthcare providers are currently the critical frontier of stigmatization, but there are few interventions designed to address them. Culturally sensitive psychotherapies are needed to address psychological distress associated with internalized stigma and these interventions should complement current supports for voluntary counseling and testing. While advantageous for defining stakeholder priorities for stigma reduction efforts, confirmatory quantitative studies of these consensus positions are needed before the launch of specific interventions. PMID:24527744

  4. Is human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome decreasing among Brazilian injection drug users? Recent findings and how to interpret them.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Francisco I; Bongertz, Vera; Teixeira, Sylvia Lopes; Morgado, Mariza G; Hacker, Mariana A

    2005-02-01

    We briefly review findings from Brazilian settings where the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic among injection drug users (IDUs) seems to be decreasing, highlighting recent findings from Rio de Janeiro and discussing methodological alternatives. Former analyses using serologic testing algorithm for recent HIV seroconversion have shown that HIV incidence has been low in IDUs recruited by two different surveys carried out in Rio, where low injection frequencies and infection rates have been found among new injectors. The proportion of AIDS cases among IDUs in Rio has been fairly modest, compared to São Paulo and especially to the southernmost states. Notwithstanding, the interpretation of findings from serial surveys constitutes a challenge, magnified in the assessment of HIV spread among IDUs due to the dynamic nature of the drug scenes and limitations of sampling strategies targeting hard-to-reach populations. Assessment of epidemic trends may profit from the triangulation of data, but cannot avert biases associated with sampling errors. Efforts should be made to triangulate data from different sources, besides exploring specific studies from different perspectives. In an attempt to further assess the observed trends, we carried out original analyses using data from Brazilian AIDS databank. PMID:15867971

  5. Pulsating Ion and Neutral Polar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, L. C.; Schunk, R. W.

    2007-12-01

    New simulations at Utah State University using the 3-D neutral and ion polar wind code with realistic convection and precipitation inputs for a large geomagnetic storm have been conducted. The model solves for five species; H+, O+, Hs, Os, and e- in a background neutral atmosphere. The simulation shows a pulsing of the total particle outflow on the order of hours, with large outflows occurring over spatially separated areas, principally in the auroral oval. The neutral steam outflows (the neutral polar wind) are produced in charge exchange reactions between the ion polar wind and the background thermal and geocoronal neutrals. The neutral hydrogen stream total hemispheric number flux is highly correlated to the electron precipitation energy input, the H+ and O+ ions show large upward and downward fluxes related to the amount of heating added to the auroral oval by the precipitating electrons, and the neutral oxygen stream particles show a downward total number flux at all times due to a lack of kinetic affects in the model. Ionosphere/magnetosphere coupling through mass, momentum, and energy transport has been calculated as a flow from an entire polar cap region in terms of the number of particles per second. This number is typically on the order of 1025 particles/sec for H+, and 1025-1026 particle/sec for O+, which is consistent with the model results. Also, the outflow flux at high-latitudes has been shown, using satellite data, to vary temporally by as much as four orders of magnitude, and the model results also demonstrate the temporal variability of the vertical flows.

  6. Simian Virus 40 Infection in the Spinal Cord of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Immunosuppressed Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Kaliyaperumal, Saravanan; Wüthrich, Christian; Westmoreland, Susan V; Koralnik, Igor J

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an often-fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS that usually develops in immunocompromised individuals because of reactivation of quiescent JC virus (JCV). There are only a few reports of JCV infection in the human spinal cord. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy-like demyelinating lesions have been documented in the brains of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques. To determine whether simian virus 40 (SV40) can infect and cause PML lesions in spinal cords of immunosuppressed macaques, we examined archival spinal cord samples from 15 simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus monkeys with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and SV40 infection of the brain. Among those, 6 (40%) had SV40-infected cells in the spinal cord, including 1 with PML-like lesions, 1 with PML-like lesions and meningoencephalitis, 2 with meningoencephalitis, 1 with gray matter gliosis, and 1 with no lesions. One animal with a large PML-like lesion had extensive demyelination and SV40 infection of astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and meningeal cells. None of the 6 animals had SV40-infected spinal cord neurons. These observations indicate that, like JCV in immunosuppressed humans, SV40 can infect glial cells and cause PML-like lesions in the spinal cord of immunosuppressed rhesus macaques. Rhesus macaques could serve as an animal model to study polyomavirus infection and pathogenesis in the spinal cord. PMID:26469249

  7. Common variable immunodeficiency diagnosed during the treatment of bronchial asthma: Unusual cause of wheezing

    PubMed Central

    Akaba, Tomohiro; Kondo, Mitsuko; Toriyama, Midori; Kubo, Ayako; Hara, Kaori; Yamada, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Kentaro; Tamaoki, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency in adults and children. We herein report a case of CVID, who was misdiagnosed with asthma due to wheezing episodes and relatively late onset. A 51-year-old woman had suffered from recurrent upper and lower airway infection for recent 2 years. She repeated wheezing attacks and was treated as asthma exacerbation triggered by infection. She was referred to our hospital for investigation and treatment. Lung function tests showed no reversibility of FEV1 by ?-adrenergic agonist, but the increase of V50/V25. Chest CT showed slight to moderate bronchial wall thickening and bronchiectasis. After that, she suffered from pneumonia with wheezing attacks twice a month, and immunodeficiency was strongly suspected. Her blood tests showed marked decreases of all classes of immunoglobulin and nearly lack of memory B cells, NKT cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. She was diagnosed with CVID, and was treated with replacement of gammaglobulin. Thereafter, her wheezing episodes with infection were remarkably improved. Because the delay of diagnosis with CVID likely causes poor mortality and morbidity, a possibility of CVID should be considered in patients with frequent asthma-like symptoms due to recurrent airway infection.

  8. Novel Genome-Editing Tools to Model and Correct Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Ott de Bruin, Lisa M.; Volpi, Stefano; Musunuru, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and other severe non-SCID primary immunodeficiencies (non-SCID PID) can be treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, but when histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-matched donors are lacking, this can be a high-risk procedure. Correcting the patient’s own HSCs with gene therapy offers an attractive alternative. Gene therapies currently being used in clinical settings insert a functional copy of the entire gene by means of a viral vector. With this treatment, severe complications may result due to integration within oncogenes. A promising alternative is the use of endonucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 to introduce a double-stranded break in the DNA and thus induce homology-directed repair. With these genome-editing tools a correct copy can be inserted in a precisely targeted “safe harbor.” They can also be used to correct pathogenic mutations in situ and to develop cellular or animal models needed to study the pathogenic effects of specific genetic defects found in immunodeficient patients. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these endonucleases in gene correction and modeling with an emphasis on CRISPR/Cas9, which offers the most promise due to its efficacy and versatility. PMID:26052330

  9. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Sparger, Ellen E. Dubie, Robert A.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Cole, Kelly S.; Chang, W.L.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2008-05-10

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus.

  10. Risks and prevention of severe RS virus infection among children with immunodeficiency and Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masaaki; Morio, Tomohiro; Ito, Shuichi; Morimoto, Akira; Ota, Setsuo; Mizuta, Koichi; Iwata, Tsutomu; Hara, Toshiro; Saji, Tsutomu

    2014-08-01

    By the age of two years, almost all infants are infected with the Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). One of the main causes of hospitalizations for bronchiolitis and pneumonia at this age is RSV infection. In addition to well-known risks for severe RSV disease, such as prematurity, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and congenital heart disease, immunodeficiencies, chromosomal abnormalities such as Down's syndrome or neuromuscular diseases have also been identified as risks. While the medical needs for RSV prevention in these risk groups are high, clinical evidence to support this is limited. Palivizumab was recently approved in Japan for prophylaxis in children with immunodeficiency or Down's syndrome. A clinical guidance protocol for the prevention of RSV infection using Palivizumab in these risk groups is provided here on the basis of a review of the available literature and on expert opinion. Thus, the present article reviews the published literature related to RSV infections in infants and children with immunodeficiencies or Down's syndrome in order to outline the risks, pathology and physiology of severe RSV disease in these patient groups. The purpose of this article is to facilitate understanding of the medical scientific bases for the clinical guidance. PMID:24929631

  11. Efficacy of ST-246 versus lethal poxvirus challenge in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Grosenbach, Douglas W.; Berhanu, Aklile; King, David S.; Mosier, Stacie; Jones, Kevin F.; Jordan, Robert A.; Bolken, Tove’ C.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    The threat of smallpox as a bioweapon and the emerging threat of human monkeypox, among other poxviral diseases, highlight the need for effective poxvirus countermeasures. ST-246, which targets the F13L protein in vaccinia virus and its homologs in other orthopoxvirus species, provides full protection from lethal poxviral disease in numerous animal models and seems to be safe in humans. All previous evaluations of ST-246 efficacy have been in immunocompetent animals. However, the risk of severe poxviral disease is greater in immunodeficient hosts. Here we report on the efficacy of ST-246 in preventing or treating lethal poxviral disease in immunodeficient mice. After lethal challenge with the Western Reserve strain of vaccinia, Nude, SCID, and JH knockout mice additionally depleted of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were not fully protected by ST-246, although survival was significantly extended. However, CD4+ T cell deficient, CD8+ T cell deficient, JH knockout, and JH knockout mice also deficient for CD4+ or CD8+ T cells survived lethal challenge when treated with ST-246 starting on the day of challenge. Delaying treatment until 72 h after infection reduced ST-246 efficacy in some models but provided full protection from lethal challenge in most. These findings suggest that ST-246 may be effective in controlling smallpox or other pathogenic orthopoxviruses in some immunodeficient human populations for whom the vaccine is contraindicated. PMID:20080762

  12. Rev proteins of human and simian immunodeficiency virus enhance RNA encapsidation.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Sabine; Blissenbach, Maik; Grewe, Bastian; Konietzny, Rebecca; Grunwald, Thomas; Uberla, Klaus

    2007-04-01

    The main function attributed to the Rev proteins of immunodeficiency viruses is the shuttling of viral RNAs containing the Rev responsive element (RRE) via the CRM-1 export pathway from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. This restricts expression of structural proteins to the late phase of the lentiviral replication cycle. Using Rev-independent gag-pol expression plasmids of HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus and lentiviral vector constructs, we have observed that HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus Rev enhanced RNA encapsidation 20- to 70-fold, correlating well with the effect of Rev on vector titers. In contrast, cytoplasmic vector RNA levels were only marginally affected by Rev. Binding of Rev to the RRE or to a heterologous RNA element was required for Rev-mediated enhancement of RNA encapsidation. In addition to specific interactions of nucleocapsid with the packaging signal at the 5' end of the genome, the Rev/RRE system provides a second mechanism contributing to preferential encapsidation of genomic lentiviral RNA. PMID:17432934

  13. Impact of valency of a glycoprotein B-specific monoclonal antibody on neutralization of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Adalbert; Krauss, Jürgen; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M; Däumer, Martin P; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Dittmer, Ulf; Schneweis, Karl E; Jäger, Dirk; Roggendorf, Michael; Arndt, Michaela A E

    2011-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B (gB) is an integral part of the multicomponent fusion system required for virus entry and cell-cell fusion. Here we investigated the mechanism of viral neutralization by the monoclonal antibody (MAb) 2c, which specifically recognizes the gB of HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Binding of MAb 2c to a type-common discontinuous epitope of gB resulted in highly efficient neutralization of HSV at the postbinding/prefusion stage and completely abrogated the viral cell-to-cell spread in vitro. Mapping of the antigenic site recognized by MAb 2c to the recently solved crystal structure of the HSV-1 gB ectodomain revealed that its discontinuous epitope is only partially accessible within the observed multidomain trimer conformation of gB, likely representing its postfusion conformation. To investigate how MAb 2c may interact with gB during membrane fusion, we characterized the properties of monovalent (Fab and scFv) and bivalent [IgG and F(ab')(2)] derivatives of MAb 2c. Our data show that the neutralization capacity of MAb 2c is dependent on cross-linkage of gB trimers. As a result, only bivalent derivatives of MAb 2c exhibited high neutralizing activity in vitro. Notably, bivalent MAb 2c not only was capable of preventing mucocutaneous disease in severely immunodeficient NOD/SCID mice upon vaginal HSV-1 challenge but also protected animals even with neuronal HSV infection. We also report for the first time that an anti-gB specific monoclonal antibody prevents HSV-1-induced encephalitis entirely independently from complement activation, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and cellular immunity. This indicates the potential for further development of MAb 2c as an anti-HSV drug. PMID:21123390

  14. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  15. NEUTRALIZED TRANSPORT OF HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS E. Henestroza #

    E-print Network

    Gilson, Erik

    NEUTRALIZED TRANSPORT OF HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS E. Henestroza # , S. S. Yu, S. Eylon, P.K. Roy, A at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source

  16. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haselton, Halsey H. (Knoxville, TN); Stirling, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  17. A comparative immunogenicity study in rabbits of disulfide-stabilized, proteolytically cleaved, soluble trimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp140, trimeric cleavage-defective gp140 and monomeric gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Beddows, Simon; Franti, Michael; Dey, Antu K.; Kirschner, Marc; Iyer, Sai Prasad N.; Fisch, Danielle C.; Ketas, Thomas; Yuste, Eloisa; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Klasse, Per Johan; Maddon, Paul J.; Olson, William C.; Moore, John P. . E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu

    2007-04-10

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex, a homotrimer containing gp120 surface glycoprotein and gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein subunits, mediates the binding and fusion of the virus with susceptible target cells. The Env complex is the target for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and is the basis for vaccines intended to induce NAbs. Early generation vaccines based on monomeric gp120 subunits did not confer protection from infection; one alternative approach is therefore to make and evaluate soluble forms of the trimeric Env complex. We have directly compared the immunogenicity in rabbits of two forms of soluble trimeric Env and monomeric gp120 based on the sequence of HIV-1{sub JR-FL}. Both protein-only and DNA-prime, protein-boost immunization formats were evaluated, DNA-priming having little or no influence on the outcome. One form of trimeric Env was made by disrupting the gp120-gp41 cleavage site by mutagenesis (gp140{sub UNC}), the other contains an intramolecular disulfide bond to stabilize the cleaved gp120 and gp41 moieties (SOSIP.R6 gp140). Among the three immunogens, SOSIP.R6 gp140 most frequently elicited neutralizing antibodies against the homologous, neutralization-resistant strain, HIV-1{sub JR-FL}. All three proteins induced NAbs against more sensitive strains, but the breadth of activity against heterologous primary isolates was limited. When antibodies able to neutralize HIV-1{sub JR-FL} were detected, antigen depletion studies showed they were not directed at the V3 region but were targeted at other, undefined gp120 and also non-gp120 epitopes.

  18. Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2013-02-26

    The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

  19. Device-dependent color neutralization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Mizuho; Yamaguchi, Yasushi

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses a method to neutralize the influence of printed colors using the additive color mixing model. The method is developed for Picture Illusion by Overlap, an image hiding method for printed materials which requires no computation in revealing the hidden image. In Picture Illusion by Overlap, a color image is hidden into two different color images. When the two images are printed onto slides and stacked together, the hidden image appears to the viewers' eyes. The color neutralization enables the image hiding operation by reducing the influence of the hidden pixels within the two images. Some experiments are made to verify the effect of the color neutralization method and the illusion scheme.

  20. Device-dependent color neutralization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Mizuho; Yamaguchi, Yasushi

    2004-12-01

    This paper discusses a method to neutralize the influence of printed colors using the additive color mixing model. The method is developed for Picture Illusion by Overlap, an image hiding method for printed materials which requires no computation in revealing the hidden image. In Picture Illusion by Overlap, a color image is hidden into two different color images. When the two images are printed onto slides and stacked together, the hidden image appears to the viewers' eyes. The color neutralization enables the image hiding operation by reducing the influence of the hidden pixels within the two images. Some experiments are made to verify the effect of the color neutralization method and the illusion scheme.

  1. Neutral-beam-injection systems for reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Pyle, R.V.

    1983-06-01

    Increasing effort is being put into engineering designs of reactors and reactor-like magnetic confinement experiments. A central question concerns the methods of heating, fueling, and maintaining the plasmas, functions that primarily are now performed by neutral beams. Planning in the USA does not include the use of neutral beams on tokamaks in the 1990's and beyond. Tandem mirrors, however, will use energetic beams (sloshing ion beams) in the end plugs to produce electrostatic potentials that will confine plasma ions. These systems will be based on the production, acceleration, transport, and neutralization of negative hydrogen-ion (D/sup -/), multiampere beams with energies of 200-to 500-keV. In addition, lower-energy D and T beams may be used. These systems must operate steady state, with high reliability, and be compatible with radiation from a D-T burning plasma.

  2. False memories of emotional and neutral words.

    PubMed

    El Sharkawy, Jennifer; Groth, Katarina; Vetter, Céline; Beraldi, Anna; Fast, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    This study used the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to investigate the direction and the extent to which emotional valence in semantic word lists influences the formation of false memories (FM). The experimental paradigm consisted of 1) a study phase (learning of neutral and negative lists of words semantically associated to a non-presented critical lure (CL), 2) a free recall phase, and 3) a recognition phase. Participants had to indicate whether the displayed item was "new" (new item or non-studied CL) or "old" (studied list item). CL associated with negative word lists elicited significantly more FM than CL associated with neutral word lists. This finding is in contrast to previous work showing that emotional words elicit fewer FM than neutral words. The results of our study also suggest that valence is capable of influencing emotional memory in terms of encoding and retrieval processes. PMID:18413909

  3. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  4. Ion-neutral chemical reactions between ultracold localized ions and neutral molecules with single-particle resolution

    E-print Network

    Schiller, Stephan

    Ion-neutral chemical reactions between ultracold localized ions and neutral molecules with single images of the 9 Be+ ion ensemble. The observed reaction rates are in agreement with the Langevin ion-neutral. INTRODUCTION Chemical reactions between trapped molecular ions and neutral reactants are of significant

  5. Implementation of a 3D halo neutral model in the TRANSP code and application to projected neutral-beam-heated

    E-print Network

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Implementation of a 3D halo neutral model in the TRANSP code and application to projected neutral: medley@pppl.gov Abstract A 3D halo neutral code developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for the National Spherical Torus experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U). The 3D halo neutral code uses a "beam-in-a-box" model

  6. Complexes of Neutralizing and Non-Neutralizing Affinity Matured Fabs with a Mimetic of the Internal Trimeric

    E-print Network

    Clore, G. Marius

    Complexes of Neutralizing and Non-Neutralizing Affinity Matured Fabs with a Mimetic of the Internal related monovalent Fabs, one (Fab 8066) broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of HIV-1 subtype B and C viruses, and the other (Fab 8062) non-neutralizing, representing the extremes of this series, were

  7. Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER LANL-Park and Wurden Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER

    E-print Network

    Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam for ITER LANL-Park and Wurden 2 Intense Diagnostic Neutral Beam Alamos, NM 87545 Executive Summary An intense pulsed diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) is proposed to enable active spectroscopic diagnostics on ITER. The proposed intense neutral beam source will employ

  8. Neutral naturalness from orbifold Higgs models.

    PubMed

    Craig, Nathaniel; Knapen, Simon; Longhi, Pietro

    2015-02-13

    We present a general class of natural theories in which the Higgs boson is a pseudo-Goldstone boson in an orbifolded gauge theory. The symmetry protecting the Higgs boson at low energies is an accidental global symmetry of the quadratic action, rather than a full continuous symmetry. The lightest degrees of freedom protecting the weak scale carry no standard model (SM) quantum numbers and interact with visible matter principally through the Higgs portal. This opens the door to the systematic study of "neutral naturalness": natural theories with SM-neutral states that are as yet untested by the LHC. PMID:25723206

  9. Neutral Dense Quark Matter at Intermediate Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lianyi; Jin, Meng; Zhuang, Pengfei

    In two flavor neutral quark matter the uniform color superconducting state suffers the chromomagnetic instability at zero temperature. While this instability is extended to low temperature, it is fully cured above a turning temperature. There is a continuous phase transition from some non-uniform phase to the uniform 2SC/g2SC phase at the turning temperature. The introduction of the LOFF state removes the strange temperature behavior of the diquark condensate and significantly changes the phase diagram of neutral dense quark matter.

  10. Neutralization escape mutants define a dominant immunogenic neutralization site on hepatitis A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, J.T.; Lemon, S.M.

    1987-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus is an hepatotrophic human picornavirus which demonstrates little antigenic variability. To topologically map immunogenic sites on hepatitis A virus which elicit neutralizing antibodies, eight neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were evaluated in competition immunoassays employing radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and HM-175 virus. Whereas two antibodies (K3-4C8 and K3-2F2) bound to intimately overlapping epitopes, the epitope bound by a third antibody (B5-B3) was distinctly different as evidenced by a lack of competition between antibodies for binding to the virus. The other five antibodies variably blocked the binding of both K3-4C8-K3-2F2 and B5-B3, suggesting that these epitopes are closely spaced and perhaps part of a single neutralization immunogenic site. Several combinations of monoclonal antibodies blocked the binding of polyclonal human convalescent antibody by greater than 96%, indicating that the neutralization epitopes bound by these antibodies are immunodominant in humans. Spontaneously arising HM-175 mutants were selected for resistance to monoclonal antibody-mediated neutralization. Neutralization resistance was associated with reduced antibody binding. These results suggest that hepatitis A virus may differ from poliovirus in possessing a single, dominant neutralization immunogenic site and therefore may be a better candidate for synthetic peptide or antiidiotype vaccine development.

  11. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, B. A.; Pace, D. C.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  12. Human Rhinovirus Presenting 4E10 Epitope of HIV-1 MPER Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies in Human ICAM-1 Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guohua; Tu, Xiongying; Bharaj, Preeti; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Junli; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2015-10-01

    Attempts at eliciting neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 have generally failed. Computationally designed epitope-scaffold platforms allow transplantation of structural epitopes to scaffold proteins. Human rhinovirus (HRV) allows such engrafting of HIV-1 epitopes on the surface scaffold proteins. However, since HRV infects only humans and great apes, the efficacy of chimeric HRV-based live viral vaccines is difficult to assess in animal models. Here, we used human ICAM-1 transgenic (hICAM-1 Tg) mice that support productive HRV infection to assess the efficacy of chimeric HRV expressing the HIV-1 membrane proximal external region (MPER) epitope, 4E10. Intranasal immunization with chimeric HRV in transgenic mice effectively induced antibodies that recognized 4E10 peptide as well as HIV-1 Env trimer. Importantly, the immunized mouse sera were able to neutralize HIV strains including those belonging to clades B and C. Moreover, intranasal immunization could bypass pre-existing immunity to HRV. Thus, chimeric HRV appears to provide a viable vaccine vehicle for HIV-1 immunization in humans. PMID:26061648

  13. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 V1/V2 domain with broadly neutralizing antibody PG9

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Pancera, Marie; Carrico, Chris; Gorman, Jason; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Khayat, Reza; Louder, Robert; Pejchal, Robert; Sastry, Mallika; Dai, Kaifan; O?Dell, Sijy; Patel, Nikita; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Diwanji, Devan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Kwon, Young Do; Lee, Doyung; Louder, Mark K.; Moquin, Stephanie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Walker, Laura M.; Phogat, Sanjay; Wyatt, Richard; Orwenyo, Jared; Wang, Lai-Xi; Arthos, James; Bewley, Carole A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Schief, William R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2012-12-13

    Variable regions 1 and 2 (V1/V2) of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope glycoprotein are critical for viral evasion of antibody neutralization, and are themselves protected by extraordinary sequence diversity and N-linked glycosylation. Human antibodies such as PG9 nonetheless engage V1/V2 and neutralize 80% of HIV-1 isolates. Here we report the structure of V1/V2 in complex with PG9. V1/V2 forms a four-stranded {beta}-sheet domain, in which sequence diversity and glycosylation are largely segregated to strand-connecting loops. PG9 recognition involves electrostatic, sequence-independent and glycan interactions: the latter account for over half the interactive surface but are of sufficiently weak affinity to avoid autoreactivity. The structures of V1/V2-directed antibodies CH04 and PGT145 indicate that they share a common mode of glycan penetration by extended anionic loops. In addition to structurally defining V1/V2, the results thus identify a paradigm of antibody recognition for highly glycosylated antigens, which - with PG9 - involves a site of vulnerability comprising just two glycans and a strand.

  14. ICAN: High power neutral beam generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustaizis, S. D.; Lalousis, P.; Perrakis, K.; Auvray, P.; Larour, J.; Ducret, J. E.; Balcou, P.

    2015-10-01

    During the last few years there is an increasing interest on the development of alternative high power new negative ion source for Tokamak applications. The proposed new neutral beam device presents a number of advantages with respect to: the density current, the acceleration voltage, the relative compact dimension of the negative ion source, and the coupling of a high power laser beam for photo-neutralization of the negative ion beam. Here we numerically investigate, using a multi-fluid 1-D code, the acceleration and the extraction of high power ion beam from a Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID). The diode configuration will be coupled to a high power device capable of extracting a current up to few kA with an accelerating voltage up to MeV. An efficiency of up to 92% of the coupling of the laser beam, is required in order to obtain a high power, up to GW, neutral beam. The new high energy, high average power, high efficiency (up to 30%) ICAN fiber laser is proposed for both the plasma generation and the photo-neutralizer configuration [1].

  15. Semiconductor etching by hyperthermal neutral beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K. (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An at-least dual chamber apparatus and method in which high flux beams of fast moving neutral reactive species are created, collimated and used to etch semiconductor or metal materials from the surface of a workpiece. Beams including halogen atoms are preferably used to achieve anisotropic etching with good selectivity at satisfactory etch rates. Surface damage and undercutting are minimized.

  16. CP violation in neutral kaon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Buchalla, G.

    1997-05-01

    A brief review of the theoretical status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is presented. We focus on three important topics: {epsilon}, {epsilon}`/{epsilon} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{anti {nu}}.

  17. Esterase activity of zinc neutral proteases.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, B; Vallee, B L

    1976-01-13

    The hydrolysis of a series of depsipeptides demonstrates that the zinc neutral endopeptidases of bacteria are active esterases. Esters such as BzGly-OPhe-Ala, BzGly-OLeu-Ala, and FA-Gly-OLeu-NH2 are hydrolyzed at rates three- to eightfold slower than are their exact peptide analogues, when hydrolyzed by thermolysin, Bacillus subtilis neutral protease and the neutral protease from Aeromonas proteolytica. Ester hydrolysis by zinc neutral proteases follows the characteristic preference for hydrophobic amino acids adjacent to the site of cleavage, discerned from the hydrolysis of peptide substrates. Removal of zinc from thermolysin abolishes the esterase activity of the native enzyme. Among the metals examined, only Co2+ and Zn2+ restore esterase activity to any significant extent, Co2+ restoring 50% and Zn2+ 100% of the native thermolysin activity. The hydrolysis of esters and peptides by thermolysin does not differ with respect to either the binding or catalytic steps. Substrate specificity, pH-rate profiles, inhibitor, and deuterium isotope effects are identical for both types of substrates. PMID:2276

  18. Method of purifying neutral organophosphorus extractants

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Naperville, IL); Chiarizia, Renato (Rome, IT)

    1988-01-01

    A method for removing acidic contaminants from neutral mono and bifunctional organophosphorous extractants by contacting the extractant with a macroporous cation exchange resin in the H.sup.+ state followed by contact with a macroporous anion exchange resin in the OH.sup.- state, whereupon the resins take up the acidic contaminants from the extractant, purifying the extractant and improving its extraction capability.

  19. If It's Neutral, It's Not Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Taking a media ecology perspective, this article argues that technology cannot be neutral, because it is a form of change, and it has an inherent bias based on the properties of its materials and methods. Additionally, the application of a technology is an intrinsic part of the technology itself, as is technique, instructions, software, or…

  20. SODA ASH TREATMENT OF NEUTRALIZED MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilization of acid mine drainage (AMD) streams as a source of potable and industrial water has become a major goal of several proposed AMD treatment schemes. From among the various schemes available, the lime neutralization/soda ash softening process was selected for use at Alto...