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Sample records for neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency

  1. The consequence of passive administration of an anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralizing monoclonal antibody before challenge of chimpanzees with a primary virus isolate.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, A J; Kessler JA, I I; Boots, L J; McKenna, P M; Schleif, W A; Emini, E A; Mark, G E; Katinger, H; Cobb, E K; Lunceford, S M; Rouse, S R; Murthy, K K

    1996-01-01

    The anti-gp41 virus neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5 was infused into chimpanzees, which were then given an intravenous challenge with a primary human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) isolate. In two control animals, the infection was established immediately, as evidenced by positive cell-associated DNA PCR and serum RNA PCR tests within 1 week, seroconversion by 4 weeks, and development of lymphadenopathy in this acute phase. Serum RNA PCR tests were negative in one of the two antibody-infused animals until week 8 and in the other antibody-infused animal until week 12; both animals seroconverted at week 14. The peak of measurable virus-specific serum RNA was delayed until week 16 in one antibody-infused animal. Virus-specific RNA in the other animal did not reach levels comparable to those in the other animals through 1 year of follow-up studies. Virus was isolated from the week 16 blood sample from one infused animal. Virus was not isolated from peripheral blood of the second animal but was isolated from lymph node cells taken at week 36. The infection of untreated chimpanzees with this primary isolate appears robust. Use of this isolate should widen the scope of possible experiments in the chimpanzee model. This antibody infusion study indicates that neutralizing antibody, when present at the time of challenge, affects the timing and level of infection and remains influential after it can no longer be detected in the peripheral circulation. It is possible that preexisting, neutralizing antibodies (passively administered or actively elicited) affect the course of acute-phase virus replication in humans. It remains to be established whether these immunologically mediated early effects will influence the course of HIV-1 disease. PMID:8794312

  2. Aminosugar derivatives as potential anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents.

    PubMed Central

    Karpas, A; Fleet, G W; Dwek, R A; Petursson, S; Namgoong, S K; Ramsden, N G; Jacob, G S; Rademacher, T W

    1988-01-01

    Recent data suggest that aminosugar derivatives which inhibit glycoprotein processing have potential anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity. These inhibitory effects may be due to disruption of cell fusion and subsequent cell-cell transmission of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus. Free virus particles able to bind CD4-positive cells are still produced in the presence of these compounds with only partial reduction of infectivity. We now report a method to score in parallel both the degree of antiviral activity and the effect on cell division of aminosugar derivatives. We find that (i) the compounds 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-L-arabinitol and N-(5-carboxymethyl-1-pentyl)-1,5-imino-L-fucitol partially inhibit the cytopathic effect (giant cell formation, etc.) of HIV and yield of infectious virus; (ii) the compounds N-methyldeoxynojirimycin and N-ethyldeoxynojirimycin reduce the yield of infectious HIV by an order of four and three logarithms, respectively; and (iii) one compound, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin, of the 47 compounds previously screened reduces infectious viral particles by a logarithmic order greater than five at noncytotoxic concentrations. In addition, long-term growth of infected cells in the presence of N-butyldeoxynojirimycin gradually decreases the proportion of infected cells, leading to eventual elimination of HIV from culture. This result suggests that replication is associated with cytolysis. The ability to break the cycle of replication and reinfection has important implications in the chemotherapy of AIDS. PMID:3264071

  3. Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 Require Surprisingly Few Crucial Residues in the Membrane-Proximal External Region of Glycoprotein gp41 To Neutralize HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Zwick, Michael B.; Jensen, Richard; Church, Sarah; Wang, Meng; Stiegler, Gabriela; Kunert, Renate; Katinger, Hermann; Burton, Dennis R.

    2005-01-01

    The conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 is a target of two broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, 2F5 and 4E10, and is an important lead for vaccine design. However, immunogens that bear MPER epitopes so far have not elicited neutralizing antibodies in laboratory animals. One explanation is that the immunogens fail to recreate the proper molecular environment in which the epitopes of 2F5 and 4E10 are presented on the virus. To explore this molecular environment, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis across residues 660 to 680 in the MPER of a pseudotyped variant of HIV-1JR-FL, designated HIV-1JR2, and examined the ability of 2F5 and 4E10 to neutralize the Ala mutant viruses. The results show that the only changes to produce neutralization resistance to 2F5 occurred in residue D, K, or W of the core epitope (LELDKWANL). Likewise, 4E10 resistance arose by replacing one of three residues; two (W and F) were in the core epitope, and one (W) was seven residues C-terminal to these two (NWFDISNWLW). Importantly, no single substitution resulted in resistance of virus to both 2F5 and 4E10. Surprisingly, 8 out of 21 MPER Ala mutants were more sensitive than the parental pseudovirus to 2F5 and/or 4E10. At most, only small differences in neutralization sensitivity to anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody b12 and peptide T20 were observed with the MPER Ala mutant pseudoviruses. These data suggest that MPER substitutions can act locally and enhance the neutralizing activity of antibodies to this region and imply a distinct role of the MPER of gp41 during HIV-1 envelope-mediated fusion. Neutralization experiments showing synergy between and T20 and 4E10 against HIV-1 are also presented. The data presented may aid in the design of antigens that better present the MPER of gp41 to the immune system. PMID:15613352

  4. Pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus immunoglobulin in persons with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, C V; Goodroad, B K; Cummins, L M; Henry, K; Balfour, H H; Rhame, F S

    1997-01-01

    Hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is an intravenous immunoglobulin prepared from HIV-infected asymptomatic donors with a CD4 cell count greater than 400 cells/microl and a high titer of antibody to HIV-1 p24 protein. Twelve persons with AIDS received four doses of HMG (two at 50 mg/kg of body weight and then two at 200 mg/kg) every 28 days. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated by measurement of anti-p24 antibody. HIVIG was well tolerated, and all participants completed the study. Three subjects who were not receiving Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis developed PCP. The mean value for HIVIG clearance was 3.02 ml/kg/day at 50 mg/kg and 3.65 ml/kg/day at 200 mg/kg (P = 0.027); the mean trough antibody titers (reciprocal units) were 1,442 and 4,428, respectively. This study indicates that high titers of anti-p24 antibody can be maintained with a monthly administration schedule of HIVIG and that short-term safety is acceptable. Comparisons to evaluate the therapeutic potential of HIVIG are justified. PMID:9210687

  5. Neutralization Properties of Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses Infecting Chimpanzees and Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Barbian, Hannah J.; Decker, Julie M.; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Galimidi, Rachel P.; West, Anthony P.; Learn, Gerald H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Li, Yingying; Pace, Craig S.; Song, Ruijiang; Huang, Yaoxing; Denny, Thomas N.; Mouquet, Hugo; Martin, Loic; Acharya, Priyamvada; Zhang, Baoshan; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Verrips, C. Theo; Strokappe, Nika M.; Rutten, Lucy; McCoy, Laura E.; Weiss, Robin A.; Brown, Corrine S.; Jackson, Raven; Silvestri, Guido; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Shaw, George M.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ho, David D.; Farzan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bNabs) represent powerful tools to combat human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Here, we examined whether HIV-1-specific bNabs are capable of cross-neutralizing distantly related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) infecting central (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) (SIVcpzPtt) and eastern (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) (SIVcpzPts) chimpanzees (n = 11) as well as western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (SIVgor) (n = 1). We found that bNabs directed against the CD4 binding site (n = 10), peptidoglycans at the base of variable loop 3 (V3) (n = 5), and epitopes at the interface of surface (gp120) and membrane-bound (gp41) envelope glycoproteins (n = 5) failed to neutralize SIVcpz and SIVgor strains. In addition, apex V2-directed bNabs (n = 3) as well as llama-derived (heavy chain only) antibodies (n = 6) recognizing both the CD4 binding site and gp41 epitopes were either completely inactive or neutralized only a fraction of SIVcpzPtt strains. In contrast, one antibody targeting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 (10E8), functional CD4 and CCR5 receptor mimetics (eCD4-Ig, eCD4-Igmim2, CD4-218.3-E51, and CD4-218.3-E51-mim2), as well as mono- and bispecific anti-human CD4 (iMab and LM52) and CCR5 (PRO140, PRO140-10E8) receptor antibodies neutralized >90% of SIVcpz and SIVgor strains with low-nanomolar (0.13 to 8.4 nM) potency. Importantly, the latter antibodies blocked virus entry not only in TZM-bl cells but also in Cf2Th cells expressing chimpanzee CD4 and CCR5 and neutralized SIVcpz in chimpanzee CD4+ T cells, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 3.6 to 40.5 nM. These findings provide new insight into the protective capacity of anti-HIV-1 bNabs and identify candidates for further development to combat SIVcpz infection. PMID:25900654

  6. Evaluation of a 2-minute anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) test using the autologous erythrocyte agglutination technique with populations differing in HIV prevalence.

    PubMed Central

    Sirivichayakul, S; Phanuphak, P; Tanprasert, S; Thanomchat, S; Uneklabh, C; Phutiprawan, T; Mungklavirat, C; Panjurai, Y

    1993-01-01

    A total of 1,800 blood specimens (1,000 from healthy blood donors, 300 from patients with sexually transmitted disease, and 500 from intravenous drug users) were simultaneously tested with anti-human immunodeficiency virus enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits and a newly developed 2-min test for anti-human immunodeficiency virus based on the principle of autologous erythrocyte agglutination (AGEN Biomedical Limited). We found that AGEN's rapid test was as sensitive and specific as the other ELISA kits. PMID:8501246

  7. Multiple Effects of an Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Nucleocapsid Inhibitor on Virus Morphology and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Berthoux, Lionel; Pchoux, Christine; Darlix, Jean-Luc

    1999-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein is a major structural component of the virion core and a key factor involved in proviral DNA synthesis and virus formation. 2,2?-Dithiobenzamides (DIBA-1) and related compounds that are inhibitors of NCp7 are thought to eject zinc ions from NCp7 zinc fingers, inhibiting the maturation of virion proteins. Here, we show that the presence of DIBA-1 at the time of virus formation causes morphological malformations of the virus and reduces proviral DNA synthesis. Thus, it seems that DIBA-1 is responsible for a core-freezing effect, as shown by electron microscopy analyses. DIBA-1 can also directly interfere with the fate of the newly made proviral DNA in a manner independent of its effects on virion core formation. These data strongly suggest that nucleocapsid protein is a prime target for new compounds aimed at inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus and other retroviruses. PMID:10559314

  8. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activities and pharmacokinetics of novel 6-substituted acyclouridine derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, M; De Clercq, E; Iida, S; Tanaka, H; Nitta, I; Ubasawa, M; Takashima, H; Sekiya, K; Umezu, K; Nakashima, H

    1990-01-01

    The novel 6-substituted acyclouridine derivatives 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-phenylthiothymine (HEPT), 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(3-methylphenylthio)thymine (HEPT-M), 6-cyclohexylthio-1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy) methyl]thymine (HEPT-H), and 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-phenylthio-2- thiothymine (HEPT-S) have proved to be potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in a variety of cell systems, including peripheral blood lymphocytes. They are not inhibitory to the replication of HIV-2. HEPT-S emerged as the most active congener, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 1.6 microM for HIV-1 (human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIB) in MT-4 cells. We also examined the pharmacokinetics of the compounds following oral administration to rats. The pharmacokinetic profile varied considerably from one compound to another. The highest concentration in plasma (7.4 micrograms/ml, or 22.8 microM) was achieved by HEPT-S within 30 min after administration of an oral dose of 20 mg/kg of body weight. HEPT-S can be considered a promising candidate for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. PMID:2088190

  9. Unique intracellular activation of the potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus agent 1592U89.

    PubMed Central

    Faletto, M B; Miller, W H; Garvey, E P; St Clair, M H; Daluge, S M; Good, S S

    1997-01-01

    The anabolism of 1592U89, (-)-(1S,4R)-4-[2-amino-6-(cyclopropylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl]-2-cyclo pentene-1-methanol, a selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), was characterized in human T-lymphoblastoid CD4+ CEM cells. 1592U89 was ultimately anabolized to the triphosphate (TP) of the guanine analog (-)-carbovir (CBV), a potent inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. However, less than 2% of intracellular 1592U89 was converted to CBV, an amount insufficient to account for the CBV-TP levels observed. 1592U89 was anabolized to its 5'-monophosphate (MP) by the recently characterized enzyme adenosine phosphotransferase, but neither its diphosphate (DP) nor its TP was detected. The MP, DP, and TP of CBV were found in cells incubated with either 1592U89 or CBV, with CBV-TP being the major phosphorylated species. We confirmed that CBV is phosphorylated by 5'-nucleotidase and that mycophenolic acid increased the formation of CBV-TP from CBV 75-fold. However, mycophenolic acid did not stimulate 1592U89 anabolism to CBV-TP. The adenosine deaminase inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) did not inhibit CBV-TP formation from CBV or 1592U89, whereas the adenylate deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin selectively inhibited 1592U89 anabolism to CBV-TP and reversed the antiviral activity of 1592U89. 1592U89-MP was not a substrate for adenylate deaminase but was a substrate for a distinct cytosolic deaminase that was inhibited by 2'-deoxycoformycin-5'-MP. Thus, 1592U89 is phosphorylated by adenosine phosphotransferase to 1592U89-MP, which is converted by a novel cytosolic enzyme to CBV-MP. CBV-MP is then further phosphorylated to CBV-TP by cellular kinases. This unique activation pathway enables 1592U89 to overcome the pharmacokinetic and toxicological deficiencies of CBV while maintaining potent and selective anti-HIV activity. PMID:9145876

  10. Characterization of a novel anti-human TNF-α murine monoclonal antibody with high binding affinity and neutralizing activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Moo-Young; Park, Sang-Koo; Kim, Chang-Suk; Yoo, Tae Hyoung; Kim, Bongtae; Kim, Min-Soo; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kwag, Won Jae; Lee, Byung-Kyu

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop an anti-human TNF-α mAb, mice were immunized with recombinant human TNF-α. A murine mAb, TSK114, which showed the highest binding activity for human TNF-α was selected and characterized. TSK114 specifically bound to human TNF-α without cross-reactivity with the homologous murine TNF-α and human TNF-β. TSK114 was found to be of IgG1 isotype with κ light chain. The nucleotide sequences of the variable regions of TSK114 heavy and light chains were determined and analyzed for the usage of gene families for the variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments. Kinetic analysis of TSK114 binding to human TNF-α by surface plasmon resonance technique revealed a binding affinity (KD) of ~5.3 pM, which is about 1,000- and 100-fold higher than those of clinically relevant infliximab (Remicade) and adalimumab (Humira) mAbs, espectively. TSK114 neutralized human TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity in proportion to the concentration, exhibiting about 4-fold greater efficiency than those of infliximab and adalimumab in WEHI 164 cells used as an in vitro model system. These results suggest that TSK114 has the potential to be developed into a therapeutic TNF-α-neutralizing antibody with picomolar affinity. PMID:18305396

  11. Multivariate analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralization data.

    PubMed Central

    Nyambi, P N; Nkengasong, J; Lewi, P; Andries, K; Janssens, W; Fransen, K; Heyndrickx, L; Piot, P; van der Groen, G

    1996-01-01

    We report on the use of spectral map analysis of the inter- and intraclade neutralization data of 14 sera of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals and 16 primary isolates, representing genetic clades A to H in group M and group O. This multivariate analysis has been used previously to study the interaction between drugs and receptors and between viruses and antiviral compounds. The analysis reveals the existence of neutralization clusters, not correlated with the known genetic clades. The structural factors that have been identified may correlate with the most important neutralization epitopes. Three key primary HIV-1 isolates, which allow discrimination of sera that are likely or unlikely to neutralize primary isolates from most of the genetic clades, were identified. Our method of analysis will facilitate the evaluation as well as the design of suitable HIV-1 vaccines, which induce high-titer interclade cross-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:8709250

  12. Evaluation of CD4-CD4i Antibody Architectures Yields Potent, Broadly Cross-Reactive Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reagents▿ †

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Foglesong, Christopher P.; Gnanapragasam, Priyanthi N. P.; Klein, Joshua S.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has several adaptations that allow the virus to evade antibody neutralization. Nevertheless, a few broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies as well as reagents containing portions of CD4, the HIV receptor, have demonstrated partial efficacy in suppressing viral replication. One type of reagent designed for improved HIV neutralization fuses the CD4 D1-D2 domains to the variable regions of an antibody recognizing the CD4-induced (CD4i) coreceptor binding site on the gp120 portion of the HIV envelope spike. We designed, expressed, purified, and tested the neutralization potencies of CD4-CD4i antibody reagents with different architectures, antibody combining sites, and linkers. We found that fusing CD4 to the heavy chain of the CD4i antibody E51 yields a bivalent reagent including an antibody Fc region that expresses well, is expected to have a long serum half-life, and has comparable or greater neutralization activity than well-known broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies. A CD4 fusion with the anti-HIV carbohydrate antibody 2G12 also results in a potent neutralizing reagent with more broadly neutralizing activity than 2G12 alone. PMID:19864392

  13. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody titers in injection drug users compared to sexually infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Bongertz, Vera; Ouverney, Elaine Priscilla; Teixeira, Sylvia L M; Silva-de-Jesus, Carlos; Hacker, Mariana A; Morgado, Mariza G; Bastos, Francisco I

    2003-03-01

    Sera from infected injection drug users (IDU) have shown to have antibodies against synthetic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) envelope peptides more frequently. In this study, reactivity of 48 IDU plasma were compared to 60 plasmas obtained from sexually infected individuals (S). The overall reactivity of plasma from IDU compared to S was higher, and the reactivity titers were much higher for IDU plasma than S. IDU plasma also showed a broader antibody response. The higher reactivity titers were observed mainly for the gp41 immunodominant epitope and V3 peptides corresponding to the consensus sequences of HIV-1 subtypes/variants prevalent in Brazil (B, F, C) indicating the specificity in the higher immune response of IDU. PMID:12764435

  14. Synergistic anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 effect of hydroxamate compounds with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine in infected resting human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Malley, S D; Grange, J M; Hamedi-Sangsari, F; Vila, J R

    1994-01-01

    The cellular models generally used in the in vitro evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus compounds are dividing cells. A model constituted by resting lymphocytes may more accurately reflect a drug's future efficacy in humans, since viral DNA synthesis is known to take place in quiescent cells, creating a reservoir of infected cells awaiting activation to complete their viral replication cycle and to produce infectious virions. We report here the activity of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, and two hydroxamates, D-aspartic acid beta-hydroxamate and hydroxycarbamate (hydroxyurea), alone and in various combinations, in an in vitro model based on resting lymphocytes. In our model, resting peripheral blood lymphocytes were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and treated with drugs for 7 days, at which time drugs were removed and the cells were activated by phytohemagglutinin. We show that under these conditions 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, alone or in combination, neither fully inhibit viral production nor protect lymphocytes from the cytopathic effect of viral replication, at concentrations corresponding to the peak plasma levels observed in a typical treatment schedule in humans. In contrast, we report the synergistic effect of treatment by each hydroxamate with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine of infected resting lymphocytes, resulting in the total suppression of viral production, total protection against the cytopathic effect induced by viral replication, and no effect on the ability of the cells to replicate in this cell culture system. PMID:7972000

  15. Lack of enhancing effect of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of human blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Shadduck, P P; Weinberg, J B; Haney, A F; Bartlett, J A; Langlois, A J; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of freshly isolated normal human peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes was examined. Each of 14 HIV antibody-positive human serum samples was found to block the infection of four virus isolates (human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIBa-L [HTLV-IIIBa-L], HTLV-IIIB, D.U. 6587-7, and D.U. 7887-8) at serum dilutions ranging from 10(-1) to 10(-2). Three of these isolates (HTLV-IIIBa-L, D.U. 6587-7, and D.U. 7887-8) infected cultures of monocytes and macrophages rapidly and produced high levels of virus reverse transcriptase and p24 antigen. A fourth virus isolate (HTLV-IIIB) infected the monocytes and macrophages more slowly and produced low levels of viral protein. More dilute HIV antibody-positive sera had no significant effect on the overall level or rate of virus infection or expression. Complement did not appear to influence the course of infection by any combination of antisera or virus examined. Successful HIV-1 infection of the peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes under the conditions tested showed strict dependence on CD4 since a recombinant CD4 polypeptide and an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody effectively blocked the process. Images PMID:1712861

  16. 5-Chloro-2',3'-dideoxy-3'-fluorouridine (935U83), a selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus agent with an improved metabolic and toxicological profile.

    PubMed Central

    Daluge, S M; Purifoy, D J; Savina, P M; St Clair, M H; Parry, N R; Dev, I K; Novak, P; Ayers, K M; Reardon, J E; Roberts, G B

    1994-01-01

    5-Chloro-2',3'-dideoxy-3'-fluorouridine (935U83) is a selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agent. When tested in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes against fresh clinical isolates of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) obtained from patients naive to AZT (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine [zidovudine]), 935U83 inhibited virus growth with an average 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.8 microM; corresponding IC50s were 0.10 microM for FLT (3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine) and 0.23, 0.49, and 0.03 microM for the approved agents AZT, ddI (2',3'-dideoxyinosine), and ddC (2',3'-dideoxycytosine), respectively. Importantly, 935U83 retained activity against HIV strains that were resistant to AZT, ddI, or ddC. Of additional interest, we were unable to generate virus which was resistant to 935U83 by passaging either HXB2 (AZT-sensitive) or RTMC (AZT-resistant) strains in the presence of high concentrations of 935U83. The anabolic profile of 935U83 was similar to that of AZT, and 935U83 triphosphate was a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Pharmacokinetic evaluation showed good oral bioavailability (86% in mice and 60% in monkeys) and less extensive metabolism to the glucuronide relative to AZT. 935U83 showed low toxicity. In an in vitro assay for toxicity to a human erythrocyte progenitor, erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E), the IC50 for 935U83 (> 400 microM) was more than 1,000-fold those of FLT (0.07 microM) and AZT (0.30 microM). Mild reversible reductions in erythrocytes and associated parameters were seen in mice dosed orally with 2,000 mg of 935U83 per kg per day for 1 and 6 months. In monkeys dosed orally with up to 700 mg/kg/day for 1 and 6 months, the only possible treatment-related finding was cataracts in 1 of 12 animals given the intermediate dose of 225 mg/kg/day. At the highest doses in mice and monkeys, maximal concentrations in plasma were more than 100-fold the anti-HIV IC50s against clinical isolates. This safety profile in animals compares very favorably with that of any of the anti-HIV drugs approved to date and has led us to begin evaluation of 935U83 in patients with HIV infection. PMID:7526782

  17. Molecular basis of in vitro affinity maturation and functional evolution of a neutralizing anti-human GM-CSF antibody.

    PubMed

    Eylenstein, Roy; Weinfurtner, Daniel; Härtle, Stefan; Strohner, Ralf; Böttcher, Jark; Augustin, Martin; Ostendorp, Ralf; Steidl, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    X-ray structure analysis of 4 antibody Fab fragments, each in complex with human granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), was performed to investigate the changes at the protein-protein binding interface during the course of in vitro affinity maturation by phage display selection. The parental antibody MOR03929 was compared to its derivatives MOR04252 (CDR-H2 optimized), MOR04302 (CDR-L3 optimized) and MOR04357 (CDR-H2 and CDR-L3 optimized). All antibodies bind to a conformational epitope that can be divided into 3 sub-epitopes. Specifically, MOR04357 binds to a region close to the GM-CSF N-terminus (residues 11-24), a short second sub-epitope (residues 83-89) and a third at the C-terminus (residues 112-123). Modifications introduced during affinity maturation in CDR-H2 and CDR-L3 led to the establishment of additional hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts, respectively, providing a rationale for the observed improvement in binding affinity and neutralization potency. Once GM-CSF is complexed to the antibodies, modeling predicts a sterical clash with GM-CSF binding to GM-CSF receptor α and β chain. This predicted mutually exclusive binding was confirmed by a GM-CSF receptor α chain ligand binding inhibition assay. Finally, high throughput sequencing of clones obtained after affinity maturation phage display pannings revealed highly selected consensus sequences for CDR-H2 as well for CDR-L3, which are in accordance with the sequence of the highest affinity antibody MOR04357. The resolved crystal structures highlight the criticality of these strongly selected residues for high affinity interaction with GM-CSF. PMID:26406987

  18. Regiospecific synthesis and anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity of novel 5-substituted N-alkylcarbamoyl and N,N-dialkylcarbamoyl 1,2,3-triazole-TSAO analogues.

    PubMed

    Velzquez, S; Alvarez, R; Prez, C; Gago, F; De Clercq, E; Balzarini, J; Camarasa, M J

    1998-11-01

    Several 5-N-alkyl and 5-N,N-dialkylcarbamoyl substituted analogues of the anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 lead compound [1-[2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]-5- (N,N-dimethylcarbamoyl)-1,2,3-triazole]-3'-spiro-5"-(4"-amino-1",2"- oxathiole-2",2"-dioxide) have been prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of HIV-1 replication. A new regiospecific synthetic procedure is described. The compounds were prepared by cycloaddition of the appropriate glycosylazide to 2-oxoalkylidentriphenyl-phosphoranes, followed by treatment with primary or secondary amines, to yield, exclusively, 5-substituted 1,2,3-triazole-TSAO analogues. Several 5-substituted 1,2,3-triazole-TSAO derivatives proved to be potent inhibitors of HIV-1 replication with higher antiviral selectivity than that of the parent TSAO prototype. PMID:9865386

  19. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  20. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus effects of dextran sulfate are strain dependent and synergistic or antagonistic when dextran sulfate is given in combination with dideoxynucleosides.

    PubMed Central

    Busso, M E; Resnick, L

    1990-01-01

    The effects of three molecular weight ranges of dextran sulfate on five different human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolates (from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), alone and in combination with dideoxynucleosides, were investigated in vitro. The higher the molecular weight range of dextran sulfate, the more potent the activity as assessed by a quantitative syncytium formation assay. Although all five HIV isolates had similar susceptibilities to the inhibitory effects of dideoxynucleosides, the two clinical isolates of HIV (HIV type 1 [HIV-1] TM and SP) exhibited a pattern of reduced susceptibility to dextran sulfate when compared with the two cloned isolates (HIV-1 WMF and HIV-2 ROD) and a prototype laboratory strain (HIV-1 IIIB). In combination with dideoxynucleosides, the high-molecular-weight range of dextran sulfate (500,000) resulted in an antagonistic response directed against the two clinical isolates of HIV (HIV-1 TM and SP) when the antiviral concentrations of dextran sulfate were in the ineffective range. Additive or synergistic effects were seen with the other three HIV isolates and all five HIV isolates when the low-molecular-weight range of dextran sulfate (8,000) was used. The results of these studies raise issues on the impact of drug-resistant strains on disease progression and the use of dextran sulfate in combination with nucleoside analogs for the clinical management of HIV disease. PMID:2291665

  1. The Phthalocyanine Prototype Derivative Alcian Blue Is the First Synthetic Agent with Selective Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity Due to Its gp120 Glycan-Binding Potential?

    PubMed Central

    Franois, Katrien O.; Pannecouque, Christophe; Auwerx, Joeri; Lozano, Virginia; Prez-Prez, Maria-Jsus; Schols, Dominique; Balzarini, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Alcian Blue (AB), a phthalocyanine derivative, is able to prevent infection by a wide spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus strains in various cell types [T cells, (co)receptor-transfected cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells]. With the exception of herpes simplex virus, AB is inactive against a broad variety of other (DNA and RNA) viruses. Time-of-addition studies show that AB prevents HIV-1 infection at the virus entry stage, exactly at the same time as carbohydrate-binding agents do. AB also efficiently prevents fusion between persistently HIV-1-infected HUT-78 cells and uninfected (CD4+) lymphocytes, DC-SIGN-directed HIV-1 capture, and subsequent transmission to uninfected (CD4+) T lymphocytes. Prolonged passaging of HIV-1 at dose-escalating concentrations of AB resulted in the selection of mutant virus strains in which several N-glycans of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope were deleted and in which positively charged amino acid mutations in both gp120 and gp41 appeared. A mutant virus strain in which four N-glycans were deleted showed a 10-fold decrease in sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of AB. These data suggest that AB is likely endowed with carbohydrate-binding properties and can be considered an important lead compound in the development of novel synthetic nonpeptidic antiviral drugs targeting the glycans of the envelope of HIV. PMID:19721061

  2. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine efficacy and FIV neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, James K.; Pu, Ruiyu; Martin, Marcus M.; Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Zwijnenberg, Raphael; Yamamoto, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    A HIV-1 tier system has been developed to categorize the various subtype viruses based on their sensitivity to vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies (NAbs): tier 1 with greatest sensitivity, tier 2 being moderately sensitive, and tier 3 being the least sensitive to NAbs (Mascola et al., J Virol 2005; 79:10103-7). Here, we define an FIV tier system using two related FIV dual-subtype (A+D) vaccines: the commercially available inactivated infected-cell vaccine (Fel-O-Vax® FIV) and its prototype vaccine solely composed of inactivated whole viruses. Both vaccines afforded combined protection rates of 100% against subtype-A tier-1 FIVPet, 89% against subtype-B tier-3 FIVFC1, 61% against recombinant subtype-A/B tier-2 FIVBang, 62% against recombinant subtype-F′/C tier-3 FIVNZ1, and 40% against subtype-A tier-2 FIVUK8 in short-duration (37–41 weeks) studies. In long-duration (76–80 weeks) studies, the commercial vaccine afforded a combined protection rate of at least 46% against the tier-2 and tier-3 viruses. Notably, protection rates observed here are far better than recently reported HIV-1 vaccine trials (Sanou et al., The Open AIDS 2012; 6:246-60). Prototype vaccine protection against two tier-3 and one tier-2 viruses was more effective than commercial vaccine. Such protection did not correlate with the presence of vaccine-induced NAbs to challenge viruses. This is the first large-scale (228 laboratory cats) study characterizing short- and long-duration efficacies of dual-subtype FIV vaccines against heterologous subtype and recombinant viruses, as well as FIV tiers based on in vitro NAb analysis and in vivo passive-transfer studies. These studies demonstrate that not all vaccine protection is mediated by vaccine-induced NAbs. PMID:23800540

  3. Principal neutralizing domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope protein.

    PubMed Central

    Javaherian, K; Langlois, A J; McDanal, C; Ross, K L; Eckler, L I; Jellis, C L; Profy, A T; Rusche, J R; Bolognesi, D P; Putney, S D

    1989-01-01

    The principal neutralizing determinant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is located in the external envelope protein, gp120, and has previously been mapped to a 24-amino acid-long sequence (denoted RP135). We show here that deletion of this sequence renders the envelope unable to elicit neutralizing antibodies. In addition, using synthetic peptide fragments of RP135, we have mapped the neutralizing determinant to 8 amino acids and found that a peptide of this size elicits neutralizing antibodies. This sequence contains a central Gly-Pro-Gly that is generally conserved between different HIV-1 isolates and is flanked by amino acids that differ from isolate to isolate. Antibodies elicited by peptides from one isolate do not neutralize two different isolates, and a hybrid peptide, consisting of amino acid sequences from two isolates, elicits neutralizing antibodies to both isolates. By using a mixture of peptides of this domain or a mixture of such hybrid peptides the type-specificity of the neutralizing antibody response to this determinant can perhaps be overcome. Images PMID:2771954

  4. Synthesis, characterization, and anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity of water-soluble salts of polyoxotungstate anions with covalently attached organic groups.

    PubMed

    Weeks, M S; Hill, C L; Schinazi, R F

    1992-04-01

    The cesium and tetramethylammonium (TMA) salts of polyoxotungstate anions with covalently attached organosilyl groups of formula [(RSi)2O]SiW11O39(4-), where R = CH2CH2COCH3, (CH2)3CN, and CH==CH2 (1-R, cesium salt, unless otherwise noted) have been prepared, purified, and spectroscopically characterized. The water solubility (25 degrees C) of these 10 new compounds ranges from 0.14 mM to 2.16 mM. All appear to be stable in aqueous media over a period of several hours as assessed by 1H NMR. The activities (EC50) of the new compounds against human immunodeficiency virus in primary human lymphocytes range from 3.3 microM to 39.0 microM. Their toxicities (IC50) are all greater than 100 microM. The inhibition constants of the new compounds against purified virion-derived HIV-1 reverse transcriptase are in the 1-10 microM range. PMID:1373190

  5. Mature Dendritic Cells Infected with Canarypox Virus Elicit Strong Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus CD8+ and CD4+ T-Cell Responses from Chronically Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Engelmayer, Jose; Larsson, Marie; Lee, Andrew; Lee, Marina; Cox, William I.; Steinman, Ralph M.; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant canarypox virus vectors containing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) sequences are promising vaccine candidates, as they replicate poorly in human cells. However, when delivered intramuscularly the vaccines have induced inconsistent and in some cases transient antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses in seronegative volunteers. An attractive way to enhance these responses would be to target canarypox virus to professional antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). We studied (i) the interaction between canarypox virus and DCs and (ii) the T-cell responses induced by DCs infected with canarypox virus vectors containing HIV-1 genes. Mature and not immature DCs resisted the cytopathic effects of canarypox virus and elicited strong effector CD8+ T-cell responses from chronically infected HIV+ individuals, e.g., cytolysis, and secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and β-chemokines. Furthermore, canarypox virus-infected DCs were >30-fold more efficient than monocytes and induced responses that were comparable to those induced by vaccinia virus vectors or peptides. Addition of exogenous cytokines was not necessary to elicit CD8+ effector cells, although the presence of CD4+ T cells was required for their expansion and maintenance. Most strikingly, canarypox virus-infected DCs were directly able to stimulate HIV-specific, IFN-γ-secreting CD4 helper responses from bulk as well as purified CD4+ T cells. Therefore, these results suggest that targeting canarypox virus vectors to mature DCs could potentially elicit both anti-HIV CD8+ and CD4+ helper responses in vivo. PMID:11160718

  6. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene therapy in human central nervous system-based cells: an initial approach against a potential viral reservoir.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, M; Duke, H; BouHamdan, M; Pomerantz, R J

    2000-01-20

    Studies have demonstrated that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of central nervous system (CNS)-based cells in vivo results in a series of devastating clinical conditions collectively termed acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex (ADC). Gene therapy for these neurovirological disorders necessitates utilization of a vector system that can mediate in vivo delivery and long-term expression of an antiretroviral transgene in nondividing/postmitotic CNS cellular elements. The present studies focus on the transfer of an anti-HIV-1 gene to primary isolated CNS microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) and neuronal-based cells, for its effects in protecting these cells from HIV-1 infection. By using an HIV-1-based vector system, it was possible to efficiently transduce and maintain expression of a marker transgene, beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal), in human CNS MVECs, human fetal astrocytes, plus immature and mature (differentiated) NT2 cells. Significant transduction of the marker gene, beta-Gal, in CNS-based cells prompted the utilization of this system with an anti-HIV-1 gene therapeutic construct, RevM10, a trans-dominant negative mutant Rev protein. Initially, it was not possible to generate any HIV-1 vector particles with the RevM10 gene in the transducing construct, because of inhibitory effects on the HIV-1 vector by this gene product. However, the vector could be partially rescued by adding an additional construct that supplied wild-type rev, in trans, during a multiple construct transfection in the packaging 293T cells. Thus, it was possible to significantly improve the titer of RevM10-expressing viral particles generated from these cells. Moreover, this RevM10 vector transduced the neuronal precursor cell line NT2, retinoic acid-differentiated human neurons (hNT) from the precursor cells, and primary isolated human brain MVECs with high efficiency. RevM10 generated from the HIV-1-based vector system potently inhibited replication of diverse HIV-1 strains in human CNS MVECs and neuronal cells. The data generated from these studies represent an initial approach for future development of anti-HIV-1 gene therapy in the CNS. PMID:10680847

  7. Role of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Structure in the Induction of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Benjelloun, F.; Lawrence, P.; Verrier, B.; Genin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Very soon after the discovery of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) toward human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, it became apparent that characterization of these NAbs would be an important step in finding a cure for or a vaccine to eradicate HIV-1. Since the initial description of broadly cross-clade NAbs naturally produced in HIV-1 patients, numerous studies have described new viral targets for these antibodies. More recently, studies concerning new groups of patients able to control their viremia, such as long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) or elite controllers, have described the generation of numerous envelope-targeted NAbs. Recent studies have marked a new stage in research on NAbs with the description of antibodies obtained from a worldwide screening of HIV-positive patients. These studies have permitted the discovery of NAb families with great potential for both neutralization and neutralization breadth, such as PG, PGT, CH, and highly active agonistic anti-CD4 binding site antibodies (HAADs), of which VRC01 and its variants are members. These antibodies are able to neutralize more than 80% of circulating strains without any autoreactivity and can be rapidly integrated into clinical trials in order to test their protective potential. In this review, we will focus on new insights into HIV-1 envelope structure and their implications for the generation of potent NAbs. PMID:23015715

  8. Roles and Mechanisms of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitor Ritonavir and Other Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Drugs in Endothelial Dysfunction of Porcine Pulmonary Arteries and Human Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinwen; Chai, Hong; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) drugs on pulmonary endothelial function. Porcine pulmonary arteries or human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAECs) were incubated with eight HAART drugs [ritonavir, indinavir, lopinavir, zidovudine (AZT), abacavir, stavudine, didanosine (ddI), and lamivudine] individually or in combination [three HAART drugs (3-plex; indinavir, stavudine, and ddI)] at their clinical plasma concentrations for 24 hours. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in response to bradykinin was reduced significantly by the ritonavir in a concentration-dependent manner. Five other HAART drugs (indinavir, lamivudine, abacavir, AZT, and ddI) and the 3-plex significantly also impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in response to bradykinin. Five HAART drugs (ritonavir, indinavir, lamivudine, abacavir, and AZT) significantly decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and increased superoxide anion levels in both vessels and HPAECs. Furthermore, both ritonavir and AZT substantially activated ERK2 in HPAECs. Additionally, the antioxidants ginsenoside Rb1 and ginkgolide A effectively reversed HAART drug-induced vasomotor dysfunction and eNOS down-regulation. Inhibition of ERK1/2 also partially blocked ritonavir- and AZT-induced down-regulation of eNOS and vasomotor dysfunction. Thus, HAART drugs significantly impair endothelial functions of porcine pulmonary arteries and HPAECs, which may be mediated by eNOS down-regulation, oxidative stress, and ERK1/2 activation. These findings suggest that HAART drugs may contribute to the high incidence of pulmonary artery hypertension in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. PMID:19218343

  9. Quantitation of HLA Proteins Incorporated by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Assessment of Neutralizing Activity of Anti-HLA Antibodies▿

    PubMed Central

    Lakhashe, Samir K.; Thakar, Madhuri R.; Bharucha, K. E.; Paranjape, Ramesh S.

    2008-01-01

    Human anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies were assessed for neutralizing activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) carrying HLA alleles with matching specificity. Multiparous women carrying anti-HLA antibodies were identified. Plasma samples from those women were confirmed as having antibodies that specifically bound to HLA proteins expressed on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of their husbands. A primary HIV-1 isolate was cultured in the husband's PBMCs so that the virus carried matching HLA alleles. To determine the HIV-1-neutralizing activity of anti-HLA antibodies, the infectivity of the virus for GHOST cells (which express green fluorescent protein after HIV infection) was investigated in the presence of a plasma sample positive for the respective anti-HLA antibody. A neutralization assay was also performed using purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) from two plasma samples, and two plasma samples were investigated in the presence of complement. The prerequisite for anti-HLA antibody-mediated neutralization is incorporation of HLA proteins by HIV-1. Therefore, the extent of incorporation of HLA proteins by the primary HIV-1 isolate was estimated. The ratios of HLA class I protein to HIV-1 capsid (p24) protein cultured in the PBMCs of two healthy individuals were 0.017 and 0.054. These ratios suggested that the HIV-1 strain used in the assay incorporated more HLA proteins than gp160 trimers. Anti-HLA antibody-positive plasma was found to contain antibodies that specifically reacted to HIV-1 carrying cognate HLA alleles. However, incubation of HIV-1 with anti-HLA antibody- positive plasma or purified IgG did not show a reduction in viral infectivity. HIV-1-neutralizing activity was also not detected in the presence of complement. This study shows that HIV-1 primary isolates cultured in PBMCs contain significant amounts of HLA proteins. However, the binding of antibodies to those HLA proteins does not mediate a reduction in viral infectivity. PMID:17942547

  10. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 2 gp120.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, S; Matsumi, S; Yoshimura, K; Morikita, T; Murakami, T; Takatsuki, K

    1995-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were obtained by immunizing mice with synthetic peptides corresponding to the third variable (V3) or the third conserved (C3) domain of the external envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2ROD). One MAb, designated B2C, which was raised against V3 peptide NKI26, bound to the surface of HIV-2-infected cells but not to their uninfected counterparts. B2C was capable of neutralizing cell-free and cell-associated virus infection in an isolate-specific fashion. The antibody-binding epitope was mapped to a 6-amino-acid peptide in the V3 variable domain which had the core sequence His-Tyr-Gln. Two MAbs, 2H1B and 2F19C, which were raised against the C3 peptide TND27 reacted with gp120 of HIV-2ROD in a Western immunoblot assay. The C3 epitopes recognized by these two MAbs appeared inaccessible because of their poor reactivity in a surface immunofluorescence assay. Although partial inhibition of syncytium formation was observed in the presence of the anti-C3 MAbs, their neutralizing activity appeared weak. Finally, the effects of these MAbs against CD4-gp120 binding were assessed. Partial inhibition of CD4-gp120 binding was observed in the presence of high concentrations of B2C. On the other hand, no inhibition of CD4-gp120 binding was observed in the presence of anti-C3 MAbs. Since complete neutralization could be achieved at a concentration corresponding to that of partial binding inhibition by B2C, some different mechanisms may be involved in the B2C-mediated neutralization. These results, taken together, indicated that analogous to the function of the V3 region of HIV-1, the V3 region of HIV-2ROD contained at least a type-specific fusion-inhibiting neutralizing epitope. In this respect, the V3 sequence of HIV-2 may be a useful target in an animal model for HIV vaccine development. PMID:7538171

  11. Synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by combinations of human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Laal, S; Burda, S; Gorny, M K; Karwowska, S; Buchbinder, A; Zolla-Pazner, S

    1994-01-01

    The ability of antibodies to the V3 region and the CD4-binding domain (CD4bd) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to act in synergy to neutralize HIV has been demonstrated previously. However, synergy between antibodies to other HIV-1 epitopes has not been studied. We have used 21 combinations of human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against different epitopes of the gp120 and gp41 proteins of HIV-1 to evaluate their ability to act in synergy to neutralize HIV-1. Combinations of anti-V3 and anti-CD4bd antibodies, anti-V3 and anti-gp120 C-terminus antibodies, anti-CD4bd and anti-C-terminus antibodies, anti-V3 and anti-gp41 antibodies, and anti-CD4bd and anti-gp41 antibodies were tested. Our results show that some, but not all anti-V3 antibodies can act in synergy with anti-CD4bd antibodies. In addition, for the first time, antibodies to the C-terminus region have been found to act in synergy with the anti-CD4bd antibodies. Various anti-CD4bd MAbs also act in synergy when used together. The use of such cocktails of human MAbs for passive immunization against HIV-1 may prove to be important for therapy in postexposure settings and for prevention of maternal-fetal transmission of the virus. The results also provide information on the types of antibodies that should be elicited by an effective vaccine. PMID:7514683

  12. Neutralizing antibody-independent containment of immunodeficiency virus challenges by DNA priming and recombinant pox virus booster immunizations.

    PubMed

    Robinson, H L; Montefiori, D C; Johnson, R P; Manson, K H; Kalish, M L; Lifson, J D; Rizvi, T A; Lu, S; Hu, S L; Mazzara, G P; Panicali, D L; Herndon, J G; Glickman, R; Candido, M A; Lydy, S L; Wyand, M S; McClure, H M

    1999-05-01

    Eight different protocols were compared for their ability to raise protection against immunodeficiency virus challenges in rhesus macaques. The most promising containment of challenge infections was achieved by intradermal DNA priming followed by recombinant fowl pox virus booster immunizations. This containment did not require neutralizing antibody and was active for a series of challenges ending with a highly virulent virus with a primary isolate envelope heterologous to the immunizing strain. PMID:10229229

  13. Neutralization breadth and potency of serum derived from recently human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected Thai individuals.

    PubMed

    Chaitaveep, Nithinart; Utachee, Piraporn; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Karasavvan, Nicos; Takeda, Naokazu; Kameoka, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Neutralizing antibody responses play important roles in controlling several viral infections including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Potent and broad neutralizing antibody responses have been reported in some HIV-1-infected individuals; therefore, elucidating the mechanisms underlying neutralizing antibody responses will provide important information for the development of anti-HIV-1 vaccines. We herein performed a comparative study on the neutralization breadth and potency of serum samples collected from Thai individuals recently and chronically infected with HIV-1. Neutralization tests using a series of envelope glycoproteins (Env)-recombinant viruses revealed that although several serum samples derived from recently infected individuals did not show any HIV-1-specific neutralizing activity, the remaining serum samples exhibited neutralizing activity not only for recombinant viruses with CRF01_AE Env, but also for viruses with subtypes B and C Env. Furthermore, some serum samples derived from recently infected individuals showed the neutralization potency. Our results may provide a deeper insight into the characteristics of neutralizing antibody responses that develop during the course of HIV-1 infection among individuals in Thailand. PMID:26774333

  14. An investigation of the breadth of neutralizing antibody response in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M.; Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Litster, Annette; Willett, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are believed to comprise an essential component of the protective immune response induced by vaccines against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. However, relatively little is known about the role of NAbs in controlling FIV infection and subsequent disease progression. Here, we present studies where we examined the neutralization of HIV-luciferase pseudotypes bearing homologous and heterologous FIV envelope proteins (n = 278) by sequential plasma samples collected at 6 month intervals from naturally infected cats (n = 38) over a period of 18 months. We evaluated the breadth of the NAb response against non-recombinant homologous and heterologous clade A and clade B viral variants, as well as recombinants, and assessed the results, testing for evidence of an association between the potency of the NAb response and the duration of infection, CD4+ T lymphocyte numbers, health status and survival times of the infected cats. Neutralization profiles varied significantly between FIV-infected cats and strong autologous neutralization, assessed using luciferase-based in vitro assays, did not correlate with the clinical outcome. No association was observed between strong NAb responses and either improved health status or increased survival time of infected animals, implying that other protective mechanisms were likely to be involved. Similarly, no correlation was observed between the development of autologous NAbs and the duration of infection. Furthermore, cross-neutralizing antibodies were evident in only a small proportion (13 %) of cats. PMID:25395594

  15. Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibody Gene Transfer Protects Nonhuman Primates from Mucosal Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Kevin O.; Wang, Lingshu; Joyce, M. Gordon; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Cheng, Cheng; Ko, Sung-Youl; Kong, Wing-Pui; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Duan, Lijie; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Donaldson, Mitzi; Xu, Ling; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Todd, John-Paul; Baltimore, David; Roederer, Mario; Haase, Ashley T.; Kwong, Peter D.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) can prevent lentiviral infection in nonhuman primates and may slow the spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Although protection by passive transfer of human bnAbs has been demonstrated in monkeys, durable expression is essential for its broader use in humans. Gene-based expression of bnAbs provides a potential solution to this problem, although immune responses to the viral vector or to the antibody may limit its durability and efficacy. Here, we delivered an adeno-associated viral vector encoding a simianized form of a CD4bs bnAb, VRC07, and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. The expressed antibody circulated in macaques for 16 weeks at levels up to 66 μg/ml, although immune suppression with cyclosporine (CsA) was needed to sustain expression. Gene-delivered simian VRC07 protected against simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection in monkeys 5.5 weeks after treatment. Gene transfer of an anti-HIV antibody can therefore protect against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates when the host immune responses are controlled. IMPORTANCE Sustained interventions that can prevent HIV-1 infection are needed to halt the spread of the HIV-1 pandemic. The protective capacity of anti-HIV antibody gene therapy has been established in mouse models of HIV-1 infection but has not been established for primates. We show here a proof-of-concept that gene transfer of anti-HIV antibody genes can protect against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates when host immune responses are controlled. PMID:26041300

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 elite neutralizers: individuals with broad and potent neutralizing activity identified by using a high-throughput neutralization assay together with an analytical selection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Simek, Melissa D; Rida, Wasima; Priddy, Frances H; Pung, Pham; Carrow, Emily; Laufer, Dagna S; Lehrman, Jennifer K; Boaz, Mark; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Miiro, George; Birungi, Josephine; Pozniak, Anton; McPhee, Dale A; Manigart, Olivier; Karita, Etienne; Inwoley, Andr; Jaoko, Walter; Dehovitz, Jack; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Paris, Robert; Walker, Laura M; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Fast, Patricia E; Burton, Dennis R; Koff, Wayne C

    2009-07-01

    The development of a rapid and efficient system to identify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals with broad and potent HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibody responses is an important step toward the discovery of critical neutralization targets for rational AIDS vaccine design. In this study, samples from HIV-1-infected volunteers from diverse epidemiological regions were screened for neutralization responses using pseudovirus panels composed of clades A, B, C, and D and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Initially, 463 serum and plasma samples from Australia, Rwanda, Uganda, the United Kingdom, and Zambia were screened to explore neutralization patterns and selection ranking algorithms. Samples were identified that neutralized representative isolates from at least four clade/CRF groups with titers above prespecified thresholds and ranked based on a weighted average of their log-transformed neutralization titers. Linear regression methods selected a five-pseudovirus subset, representing clades A, B, and C and one CRF01_AE, that could identify top-ranking samples with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) neutralization titers of >or=100 to multiple isolates within at least four clade groups. This reduced panel was then used to screen 1,234 new samples from the Ivory Coast, Kenya, South Africa, Thailand, and the United States, and 1% were identified as elite neutralizers. Elite activity is defined as the ability to neutralize, on average, more than one pseudovirus at an IC(50) titer of 300 within a clade group and across at least four clade groups. These elite neutralizers provide promising starting material for the isolation of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to assist in HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:19439467

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Elite Neutralizers: Individuals with Broad and Potent Neutralizing Activity Identified by Using a High-Throughput Neutralization Assay together with an Analytical Selection Algorithm▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Simek, Melissa D.; Rida, Wasima; Priddy, Frances H.; Pung, Pham; Carrow, Emily; Laufer, Dagna S.; Lehrman, Jennifer K.; Boaz, Mark; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Miiro, George; Birungi, Josephine; Pozniak, Anton; McPhee, Dale A.; Manigart, Olivier; Karita, Etienne; Inwoley, André; Jaoko, Walter; DeHovitz, Jack; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Paris, Robert; Walker, Laura M.; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Fast, Patricia E.; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a rapid and efficient system to identify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals with broad and potent HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibody responses is an important step toward the discovery of critical neutralization targets for rational AIDS vaccine design. In this study, samples from HIV-1-infected volunteers from diverse epidemiological regions were screened for neutralization responses using pseudovirus panels composed of clades A, B, C, and D and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Initially, 463 serum and plasma samples from Australia, Rwanda, Uganda, the United Kingdom, and Zambia were screened to explore neutralization patterns and selection ranking algorithms. Samples were identified that neutralized representative isolates from at least four clade/CRF groups with titers above prespecified thresholds and ranked based on a weighted average of their log-transformed neutralization titers. Linear regression methods selected a five-pseudovirus subset, representing clades A, B, and C and one CRF01_AE, that could identify top-ranking samples with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) neutralization titers of ≥100 to multiple isolates within at least four clade groups. This reduced panel was then used to screen 1,234 new samples from the Ivory Coast, Kenya, South Africa, Thailand, and the United States, and 1% were identified as elite neutralizers. Elite activity is defined as the ability to neutralize, on average, more than one pseudovirus at an IC50 titer of 300 within a clade group and across at least four clade groups. These elite neutralizers provide promising starting material for the isolation of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to assist in HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:19439467

  18. Epitopes for Broad and Potent Neutralizing Antibody Responses during Chronic Infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Avishek; Lavine, Christine L.; Wang, Pengcheng; Lipchina, Inna; Goepfert, Paul A.; Shaw, George M.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Easterbrook, Philippa; Robinson, James E.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Yang, Xinzhen

    2009-01-01

    Neutralizing antibody (nAb) response is sporadic and has limited potency and breadth during infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In rare cases, broad and potent nAbs are actually induced in vivo. Identifying specific epitopes targeted by such broad and potent nAb response is valuable in guiding the design of a prophylactic vaccine aimed to induce nAb. In this study, we have defined neutralizing epitope usage in 7 out of 17 subjects with broad and potent nAbs by using targeted mutagenesis in known neutralizing epitopes of HIV-1 glycoproteins and by using in vitro depletion of serum neutralizing activity by various recombinant HIV-1 glycoproteins. Consistent with recent reports, the CD4 binding site (CD4BS) is targeted by nAbs in vivo (4 of the 7 subjects with defined neutralizing epitopes). The new finding from this study is that epitopes in the gp120 outer domain are also targeted by nAbs in vivo (5 of the 7 subjects). The outer domain epitopes include glycan-dependent epitopes (2 subjects), conserved non-linear epitope in the V3 region (2 subjects), and a CD4BS epitope composed mainly of the elements in the outer domain (1 subject). Importantly, we found indication for epitope poly-specificity, a dual usage of the V3 and CD4BS epitopes, in only one subject. This study provides a more complete profile of epitope usage for broad and potent nAb responses during HIV-1 infection. PMID:19922969

  19. A conformational switch in human immunodeficiency virus gp41 revealed by the structures of overlapping epitopes recognized by neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S; Brunel, Florence M; Cardoso, Rosa M; Stanfield, Robyn L; Dawson, Philip E; Burton, Dennis R; Zwick, Michael B; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-09-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (gp41) is critical for viral fusion and infectivity and is the target of three of the five known broadly neutralizing HIV type 1 (HIV-1) antibodies, 2F5, Z13, and 4E10. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Fab fragment of Z13e1, an affinity-enhanced variant of monoclonal antibody Z13, in complex with a 12-residue peptide corresponding to the core epitope (W(670)NWFDITN(677)) at 1.8-A resolution. The bound peptide adopts an S-shaped conformation composed of two tandem, perpendicular helical turns. This conformation differs strikingly from the alpha-helical structure adopted by an overlapping MPER peptide bound to 4E10. Z13e1 binds to an elbow in the MPER at the membrane interface, making relatively few interactions with conserved aromatics (Trp672 and Phe673) that are critical for 4E10 recognition. The comparison of the Z13e1 and 4E10 epitope structures reveals a conformational switch such that neutralization can occur by the recognition of the different conformations and faces of the largely amphipathic MPER. The Z13e1 structure provides significant new insights into the dynamic nature of the MPER, which likely is critical for membrane fusion, and it has significant implications for mechanisms of HIV-1 neutralization by MPER antibodies and for the design of HIV-1 immunogens. PMID:19515770

  20. Autologous antibody response against the principal neutralizing domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolated from infected humans.

    PubMed Central

    Holmbck, K; Kusk, P; Hulgaard, E F; Bugge, T H; Scheibel, E; Lindhardt, B O

    1993-01-01

    High titers of neutralizing antibodies in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are directed primarily against the third hypervariable domain (V3) of the virion envelope glycoprotein gp120. This region has been designated the principal neutralizing domain of HIV-1. Because the frequency and significance of autologous V3 antibodies in natural infection are not fully clarified, we have cloned, sequenced, and expressed the V3 domain from virus of HIV-1-infected patients to test the autologous and heterologous V3 antibody response. The resulting recombinant Escherichia coli V3 fusion proteins reacted strongly with both autologous and heterologous patient antibodies in Western blots. Thirty-one different V3 fragments were cloned from 24 hemophiliac patients with different immunological and clinical statuses. Antibody reactivity against the autologous V3 fusion proteins was detected in all serum samples except one; moreover, all serum samples contained antibody reactivity against a vast majority of heterologous fusion proteins despite significant amino acid variability in V3. The results suggest that V3 antibodies are highly prevalent; further, we find no association between the stage of the HIV-1 infection and the presence of V3 antibodies. Images PMID:8437232

  1. Studies on antiretroviral drug concentrations in breast milk: validation of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method for the determination of 7 anti-human immunodeficiency virus medications.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Naser L; White, Nicole; Bridges, Arlene S; Abdel-Megeed, Mohamed F; Mohamed, Tarek M; Moselhy, Said S; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2008-10-01

    Studying the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs in breast milk has important implications for the health of both the mother and the infant, particularly in resource-poor countries. Breast milk is a highly complex biological matrix, yet it is necessary to develop and validate methods in this matrix, which simultaneously measure multiple analytes, as women may be taking any number of drug combinations to combat human immunodeficiency virus infection. Here, we report a novel extraction method coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry for the accurate, precise, and specific measurement of 7 antiretroviral drugs currently prescribed to infected mothers. Using 200 microL of human breast milk, simultaneous quantification of lamivudine (3TC), stavudine (d4T), zidovudine (ZDV), nevirapine (NVP), nelfinavir (NFV), ritonavir, and lopinavir was validated over the range of 10-10,000 ng/mL. Intraday accuracy and precision for all analytes were 99.3% and 5.0 %, respectively. Interday accuracy and precision were 99.4 % and 7.8%, respectively. Cross-assay validation with UV detection was performed using clinical breast milk samples, and the results of the 2 assays were in good agreement (P = 0.0001, r = 0.97). Breast milk to plasma concentration ratios for the different antiretroviral drugs were determined as follows: 3TC = 2.96, d4T = 1.73, ZDV = 1.17, NVP = 0.82, and NFV = 0.21. PMID:18758393

  2. Serum neutralization of feline immunodeficiency virus is markedly dependent on passage history of the virus and host system.

    PubMed Central

    Baldinotti, F; Matteucci, D; Mazzetti, P; Giannelli, C; Bandecchi, P; Tozzini, F; Bendinelli, M

    1994-01-01

    Sera from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats exhibited extremely low levels of neutralizing antibodies against virus passaged a few times in vitro (low passage), when residual infectivity was assayed in the CD3+ CD4- CD8- MBM lymphoid cell line or mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. By sharp contrast, elevated titers of highly efficient neutralizing activity against FIV were measured, by use of high-passage virus, in assays on either the fibroblastoid CrFK or MBM cell line. However, high-passage virus behaved the same as low-passage virus after one in vivo passage in a specific-pathogen-free cat and reisolation. Subneutralizing concentrations of infected cat sera enhanced the production of low-passage virus by MBM cells, an effect not seen with high-passage virus in CrFK cells. These qualitative and quantitative discrepancies could not be attributed to differences in the amount of immunoreactive viral material, to the amount of infectious virus present in the viral stocks, or to the presence of anti-cell antibodies. The observed effects were most likely due to the different passage history of the viral preparations used. The observation that neutralizing antibodies detected with high-passage virus were broadly cross-reactive in assays with CrFK cells but isolate specific in MBM cells suggests also that the cell substrate can influence the result of FIV neutralization assays. This possibility could not be tested directly because FIV adapted to grow in CrFK cells had little infectivity for lymphoid cells and vice versa. In vitro exposure to infected cat sera had little or no effect on the ability of in vivo-passaged FIV to infect cats. These data reveal no obvious relationship between titers against high-passage virus and ability to block infectivity of FIV in cats and suggest caution in the use of such assays to measure vaccine efficacy. In conclusion, by contrast with what has been previously reported for the use of CrFK cells and high-passage virus, both natural and experimental infections of cats with FIV generate poor neutralizing antibody responses with regard to in vivo protection. PMID:8207831

  3. Structural requirements for potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and sperm-immobilizing activities of cyclohexenyl thiourea and urea non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Osmond J; Venkatachalam, Taracad K; Mao, Chen; Qazi, Sanjive; Uckun, Fatih M

    2002-12-01

    The current pandemic of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has created an urgent need for a new type of microbicide, one that is both a spermicide and a virucide. In a systematic effort to identify a non-detergent-type antiviral spermicide, we have rationally designed and synthesized a series of cyclohexenyl thiourea (CHET) nonnucleoside inhibitors (NNIs) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with sperm-immobilizing activity (SIA). To gain further insight into the structural requirements for the optimal activity of these dual-function NNIs, we compared the effects of thiazolyl, benzothiazolyl, and pyridyl ring substitutions and functionalization with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups as well as the importance of thiourea and urea moieties of 15 heterocyclic ring-substituted NNIs. RT activity and p24 antigen production in HIV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used as markers of viral replication. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used for evaluating SIA of CHET compounds. The rabbit model was used for evaluation of in vivo mucosal toxicity and contraceptive activity of the lead NNIs. Three CHET-NNIs with a bromo, chloro, or methyl substitution at the 5 position of the pyridyl ring exhibited potent anti-HIV activity at nanomolar concentrations (IC(50) = 3-5 nM) and SIA at micromolar concentrations (EC(50) = 45-96 micro M). The dual-function CHET-NNIs were potent inhibitors of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains with genotypic and phenotypic NNI resistance. Upon substitution of the sulfur atom of the thiourea moiety with an oxygen atom, the most striking difference noted was a 38-fold reduction in time required for 50% sperm immobilization (T(1/2)). A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis was used in deriving regression equations between 20 physicochemical properties and SIA of NNIs. QSAR analysis showed that the T(1/2) values positively correlated with values for molecular refractivity (r = 0.88), hydrophobicity (r = 0.72), atomic polarizability (r = 0.70), and principal moment of inertia (r = 0.63) of spermicidal NNIs. A stepwise multiple regression model to describe the relationship of T(1/2) values with these four regressors provided excellent predictability (r = 0.93). Exposure of semen to thiourea/urea NNIs either alone or in combination at the time of artificial insemination led to marked or complete inhibition of pregnancy in rabbits as assessed by the number of embryo implants versus corpora lutea on Day 8 of pregnancy. Repeated intravaginal application of a gel-microemulsion with and without 0.5%, 1%, and 2% CHET-NNI or its urea analog either alone or in combination did not induce mucosal toxicity. We hypothesize that the gain of spermicidal function by CHET-NNIs is due to their metabolic oxidation to urea analogs by sperm. Three reaction pathways are discussed. The extremely rapid SIA of the urea analog as well as the broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity of spermicidal CHET-NNIs together with their lack of mucosal toxicity and the marked ability to reduce in vivo fertility is particularly useful for the clinical development of a dual-function spermicidal microbicide. The cyclohexenyl pyridyl NNIs, especially N-[2-(1-cyclohexenyl)ethyl] N'-[2-(5-bromopyridyl)]-thiourea in combination with the urea analog, show unique clinical potential as anti-HIV spermicides aimed at curbing the sexual transmission of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 while providing effective fertility control for women. PMID:12444075

  4. The site of an immune-selected point mutation in the transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 does not constitute the neutralization epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C; Reitz, M S; Aldrich, K; Klasse, P J; Blomberg, J; Gallo, R C; Robert-Guroff, M

    1990-01-01

    We previously reported the in vitro generation of a neutralization-resistant variant of the molecularly cloned isolate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HXB2D. The molecular basis for the resistance was shown to be a point mutation in the env gene, causing the substitution of threonine for alanine at position 582 of gp41. Here, we show the variant to be resistant to syncytium inhibition as well as to neutralization by the immune-selecting serum. Moreover, 30% of HIV-positive human sera able to neutralize the parental virus have significantly decreased ability to neutralize the variant. As the A-to-T substitution thus has general relevance to the interaction of HIV-1 with the host immune system, we investigated further the biologic and immunologic bases for the altered properties. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the 582 region failed to compete in infectivity, neutralization, or syncytium inhibition assays and did not elicit neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, human antibodies, affinity purified on synthetic peptide resins, bound to gp41 and peptides from the 582 region but did not possess neutralizing antibody activity. Some viral constructs in which the AVERY sequence in the 582 region was altered by site-directed mutagenesis were not infectious, indicating that the primary structure in this region is crucial for viral infectivity. Constructs predicted to possess a local secondary structure similar to that of the variant nevertheless behaved like the parental virus and remained neutralization sensitive. These results suggest that the requirements for neutralization resistance in this region are very precise. Our results with synthetic peptides show that the 582 region does not by itself constitute a neutralization epitope. Moreover, the degree of flexibility in amino acid substitution which allows maintenance of neutralization sensitivity suggests that position 582 does not form part of a noncontiguous neutralization epitope. The basis for neutralization resistance of the immune-selected variant is more likely a conformational change altering a neutralization epitope at a distant site. PMID:2352323

  5. Generation of a neutralization-resistant CCR5 tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) molecular clone, a derivative of SHIV-89.6.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yuki; Yoneda, Mai; Otsuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yuji; Kato, Fumihiro; Matsuura, Kanako; Kikukawa, Minako; Matsushita, Shuzo; Hishiki, Takayuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we reported that a new genetically diverse CCR5 (R5) tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) adapted to rhesus monkeys became more neutralization resistant to SHIV-infected plasma than did the parental SHIV-KS661 clone. Here, to clarify the significance of the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV in a macaque model, we initially investigated the precise neutralization phenotype of the SHIVs, including SHIV-MK38 molecular clones, using SHIV-MK38-infected plasma, a pooled plasma of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, soluble CD4 and anti-HIV-1 neutralizing mAbs, the epitopes of which were known. The results show that SHIV-KS661 had tier 1 neutralization sensitivity, but monkey-adapted R5 tropic SHIV-MK38 acquired neutralization resistance similar to that of tier 2 or 3 as a clone virus. Sequence analysis of the env gene suggested that the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV-MK38 was acquired by conformational changes in Env associated with the net charge and potential N-linked glycosylation sites. To examine the relationship between neutralization phenotype and stably persistent infection in monkeys, we performed in vivo rectal inoculation experiments using a SHIV-MK38 molecular clone. The results showed that one of three rhesus monkeys exhibited durable infection with a plasma viral load of 105 copies ml- 1 despite the high antibody responses that occurred in the host. Whilst further improvements are required in the development of a challenge virus, it will be useful to generate a neutralization-resistant R5 tropic molecular clone of the SHIV-89.6 lineage commonly used for vaccine development - a result that can be used to explore the foundation of AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:26850058

  6. Evidence for non-V3-specific neutralizing antibodies that interfere with gp120/CD4 binding in human immunodeficiency virus 1-infected humans.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, C Y; Nara, P; Chamat, S; Caralli, V; Ryskamp, T; Haigwood, N; Newman, R; Köhler, H

    1991-01-01

    Total anti-gp120 antibodies (total anti-gp120 Abs) were purified from a pool of four human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) sera by affinity chromatography on a gp120SF2-Sepharose column and exhibited both type- and group-specific neutralizing activities. To dissect the epitope specificity of the group-specific neutralizing antibodies, CD4 attachment site-specific antibodies (CD4-site Abs) were isolated from total anti-gp120 Abs by using a CD4-blocked gp120SF2-Sepharose column. The CD4-site Abs exhibited group-specific neutralizing activities. Another approach to dissecting type- and group-specific neutralizing activities of total anti-gp120 Abs was to separate the third variable region (V3)-specific antibodies (V3-region Abs) from non-V3-region-specific antibodies (non-V3 Abs). The results indicated that V3-region Abs exhibited type-specific neutralizing activities, whereas non-V3 Abs exhibited group-specific neutralizing activities. By comparing the neutralizing activities of V3-region Abs to those of non-V3 Abs, we concluded that V3-region Abs are more effective than non-V3 Abs in neutralizing a specific HIV isolate. Collectively, this study indicates that group-specific neutralizing anti-gp120 antibodies are specific for the CD4 attachment site. PMID:2068099

  7. A predominant group-specific neutralizing epitope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 maps to residues 342 to 511 of the envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Berkower, I; Murphy, D; Smith, C C; Smith, G E

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant native human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins gp160 and gp120 (residues 1 to 511) expressed in insect cells quantitatively adsorbed the group-specific neutralizing antibodies found in human sera. However, these antibodies were not adsorbed by envelope fragment 1 to 471 or 472 to 857 or by both fragments sequentially, even though together they add up to the full-length gp160 sequence. A hybrid envelope glycoprotein was constructed with residues 342 to 511 of the HIV-1 sequence and residues 1 to 399 of the simian immunodeficiency virus type 1 sequence to vary the HIV-1 sequence while preserving its conformation. This hybrid glycoprotein quantitatively adsorbed human neutralizing antibodies, while native simian immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein did not. These results identify a new neutralizing epitope that depends on conformation and maps to residues 342 to 511 of gp120. It overlaps the extended CD4-binding site but is distinct from the V3 loop described previously (K. Javaherian et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:6768-6772, 1989; J. R. Rusche et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85:3198-3202). Since it is conserved among diverse HIV-1 isolates, this new epitope may be a suitable target for future vaccine development. Images PMID:1717712

  8. Rapid Development of gp120-Focused Neutralizing B Cell Responses during Acute Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection of African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Joshua D.; Himes, Jonathon E.; Armand, Lawrence; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Martinez, David R.; Colvin, Lisa; Beck, Krista; Overman, R. Glenn; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial phases of acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection may be critical for development of effective envelope (Env)-specific antibodies capable of impeding the establishment of the latent pool of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells, preventing virus-induced immune hyperactivation to limit disease progression and blocking vertical virus transmission. However, the initial systemic HIV-1 Env-specific antibody response targets gp41 epitopes and fails to control acute-phase viremia. African-origin, natural simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) hosts do not typically progress to AIDS and rarely postnatally transmit virus to their infants, despite high milk viral loads. Conversely, SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RMs), Asian-origin nonnatural SIV hosts, sustain pathogenic SIV infections and exhibit higher rates of postnatal virus transmission. In this study, of acute SIV infection, we compared the initial systemic Env-specific B cell responses of AGMs and RMs in order to probe potential factors influencing the lack of disease progression observed in AGMs. AGMs developed higher-magnitude plasma gp120-specific IgA and IgG responses than RMs, whereas RMs developed more robust gp140-directed IgG responses. These gp120-focused antibody responses were accompanied by rapid autologous neutralizing responses during acute SIV infection in AGMs compared to RMs. Moreover, acute SIV infection elicited a higher number of circulating Env-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood of AGMs than in the blood of RMs. These findings indicate that AGMs have initial systemic Env-specific B cell responses to SIV infection distinct from those of a nonnatural SIV host, resulting in more functional SIV-specific humoral responses, which may be involved in impairing pathogenic disease progression and minimizing postnatal transmission. IMPORTANCE Due to the worldwide prevalence of HIV-1 infections, development of a vaccine to prevent infection or limit the viral reservoir remains an important goal. HIV-1-infected humans, as well as SIV-infected nonnatural SIV hosts, develop pathogenic infections and readily transmit the virus to their infants. Conversely, natural SIV hosts do not develop pathogenic infections and rarely transmit the virus to their infants. The immunologic factors contributing to these favorable outcomes in natural SIV hosts could prove invaluable for directing HIV-1 vaccine and therapy design. This study identified distinctions in the specificity and function of the initial systemic SIV envelope-specific B cell response that developed during acute SIV infection in natural and nonnatural SIV host species. Identification of distinct acute B cell responses in natural SIV hosts may inform vaccine strategies seeking to elicit similar responses prior to or during the initial phases of acute HIV-1 infection. PMID:26157116

  9. Impact of amino acid substitutions in the V2 and C2 regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF01_AE envelope glycoprotein gp120 on viral neutralization susceptibility to broadly neutralizing antibodies specific for the CD4 binding site

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a functionally conserved, important target of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies. Two neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, IgG1 b12 (b12) and VRC01, are broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies which recognize conformational epitopes that overlap the CD4bs of Env gp120; however, many CRF01_AE viruses are resistant to neutralization mediated by these antibodies. We examined the mechanism underlying the b12 resistance of the viruses using CRF01_AE Env (AE-Env)-recombinant viruses in this study. Results Our results showed that an amino acid substitution at position 185 in the V2 region of gp120 played a crucial role in regulating the b12 susceptibility of AE-Env-recombinant viruses by cooperating with 2 previously reported potential N-linked glycosylation (PNLG) sites at positions 186 (N186) and 197 (N197) in the V2 and C2 regions of Env gp120. The amino acid residue at position 185 and 2 PNLG sites were responsible for the b12 resistance of 21 of 23 (>91%) AE-Env clones tested. Namely, the introduction of aspartic acid at position 185 (D185) conferred b12 susceptibility of 12 resistant AE-Env clones in the absence of N186 and/or N197, while the introduction of glycine at position 185 (G185) reduced the b12 susceptibility of 9 susceptible AE-Env clones in the absence of N186 and/or N197. In addition, these amino acid mutations altered the VRC01 susceptibility of many AE-Env clones. Conclusions We propose that the V2 and C2 regions of AE-Env gp120 contain the major determinants of viral resistance to CD4bs antibodies. CRF01_AE is a major circulating recombinant form of HIV-1 prevalent in Southeast Asia. Our data may provide important information to understand the molecular mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of CRF01_AE viruses to CD4bs antibodies. PMID:24758333

  10. Maternofetal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1: the role of antibodies to the V3 primary neutralizing domain.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, A; Goldstein, H; Calvelli, T; Devash, Y; Rubinstein, R; Soeiro, R; Lyman, W

    1993-01-01

    The increase in the number of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected children is a direct consequence of the heterosexual spread of the disease to women and the growing number of HIV-positive i.v. drug users. It is not known how the majority of infants born to HIV-1-infected women escape HIV-1 infection, and, for those infected, the timing of HIV-1 transmission has yet to be determined. In addition, the role of maternal antibodies in the prevention of HIV-1 transmission to the fetus is unclear. We have previously demonstrated a correlation between vertical transmission and the absence of high-affinity/avidity antibodies to a peptide, KRI-HIGPGRAFYT, which corresponds to a region of the primary neutralizing domain of the gp120 V3 loop of HIVMN (MN-PND). The present study examines the correlation between the presence of these high affinity antibodies in women completing a pregnancy or undergoing an elective abortion and the detection of HIV-1 infection in their aborted fetuses. In several instances, transmission occurred despite high-affinity antibodies to the MN-PND. We have, therefore, evaluated the reactivity of sera to different MN-PND variants. In one infant born to a mother with high-affinity/avidity antibodies to KRI-HIGPGRAFYT (classic MN-PND), the infected baby developed antibodies to an MN-PND variant peptide against which his mother did not mount a humoral immune response during pregnancy. This finding indicates that fetal infection with MN-PND escape mutants arising during pregnancy may occur during a period when the mother is serologically negative. PMID:8433879

  11. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  12. Evidence that Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Contamination in TZM-bl Cells Does Not Affect the Outcome of Neutralizing Antibody Assays with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Emily J.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David; Montefiori, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The TZM-bl cell line that is commonly used to assess neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was recently reported to be contaminated with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) (Y. Takeuchi, M. O. McClure, and M. Pizzato, J. Virol. 82:12585-12588, 2008), raising questions about the validity of results obtained with this cell line. Here we confirm this observation and show that HIV-1 neutralization assays performed with a variety of serologic reagents in a similar cell line that does not harbor MLV yield results that are equivalent to those obtained in TZM-bl cells. We conclude that MLV contamination has no measurable effect on HIV-1 neutralization when TZM-bl cells are used as targets for infection. PMID:19474095

  13. Hyperimmune antisera against synthetic peptides representing the glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 can mediate neutralization and antibody-dependent cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bjrling, E; Broliden, K; Bernardi, D; Utter, G; Thorstensson, R; Chiodi, F; Norrby, E

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-five 13- to 35-amino-acid-long peptides representing regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), strain SBL6669, envelope proteins were evaluated for their immunogenic activity in guinea pigs. The peptides were selected to provide homologous representation of sites in the HIV-1 envelope proteins that were previously documented to have a particular immunogenic importance. A number of the HIV-2 peptides were found to be capable of inducing strain SBL6669 neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) antibodies. Two overlapping peptides covering amino acids 311-337 representing the central and C-terminal part of the variable third (V3) region, terminology according to Modrow et al. [Modrow, S., Hahn, B., Shaw, G. M., Gallo, R. C., Wong-Staal, F. & Wolf, H. (1987) J. Virol. 61, 570-578], showed the most pronounced capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. One of the peptides (amino acids 318-337) also induced antibodies mediating ADCC. Two additional regions in the large glycoprotein, gp125, containing linear sites reacting with neutralizing antibodies were identified (amino acids, 119-137 and 472-509). The transmembrane protein, gp36, of HIV-2 harbored two regions of importance for induction of neutralizing antibodies (amino acids 595-614 and 714-729). ADCC activity was induced by two additional gp125-specific peptides (amino acids 291-311 and 446-461). Thus, except for the single V3-specific site there was no correlation between linear immunogenic sites stimulating neutralizing antibody and ADCC activity. These findings pave the way for development of synthetic vaccines against HIV-2 and possibly also simian immunodeficiency virus infections. The capacity of such a product to induce protective immunity can be evaluated in macaque monkeys. Images PMID:2068087

  14. Replication and neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 lacking the V1 and V2 variable loops of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J; Sullivan, N; Desjardin, E; Parolin, C; Robinson, J; Wyatt, R; Sodroski, J

    1997-01-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutant lacking the V1 and V2 variable loops in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein replicated in Jurkat lymphocytes with only modest delays compared with the wild-type virus. Revertants that replicated with wild-type efficiency rapidly emerged and contained only a few amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins compared with the parent virus. Both the parent and revertant viruses exhibited increased sensitivity to neutralization by antibodies directed against the V3 loop or a CD4-induced epitope on gp120 but not by soluble CD4 or an antibody against the CD4 binding site. This result demonstrates the role of the gp120 V1 and V2 loops in protecting HIV-1 from some subsets of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9371651

  15. Adaptation to persistent growth in the H9 cell line renders a primary isolate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 sensitive to neutralization by vaccine sera.

    PubMed Central

    Wrin, T; Loh, T P; Vennari, J C; Schuitemaker, H; Nunberg, J H

    1995-01-01

    Seven diverse primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were examined and found to be refractory to neutralization by antisera to recombinant gp120 (rgp120) protein from HIV-1 MN. This stands in marked contrast to the sensitivity exhibited by certain laboratory-adapted viruses. To understand the difference between primary and laboratory-adapted viruses, we adapted the primary virus ACH 168.10 to growth in the FDA/H9 cell line. ACH 168.10 was chosen because the V3 region of gp120 closely matches that of MN. After 4 weeks, infection became evident. The virus (168A) replicated in FDA/H9 cells with extensive cytopathic effect but was unchanged in sensitivity to antibody-mediated neutralization. Thus, growth in cell lines is not sufficient to render primary virus sensitive to neutralization. The 168A virus was, however, partially sensitive to CD4 immunoadhesin (CD4-Ig). Adaptation was continued to produce a persistently infected FDA/H9 culture that displayed minimal cytopathic effect. The virus (168C) was now sensitive to neutralization by MN rgp120 vaccine sera and by MN-specific monoclonal antibodies and showed increased sensitivity to HIVIG and CD4-Ig. 168C encoded three amino acid changes in gp120, including one within the V3 loop (I-166-->R, I-282-->N, G-318-->R). MN-specific monoclonal antibodies bound equally to the surface of cells infected with either neutralization-resistant or -sensitive virus. The coincidence of changes in neutralization sensitivity with changes in cell tropism and cytopathic effect suggests a common underlying mechanism(s) acting through the whole of the envelope protein complex. PMID:7983734

  16. Induction of Neutralizing Antibodies to T-Cell Line-Adapted and Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates with a Prime-Boost Vaccine Regimen in Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Lubeck, Michael; Xu, Serena; Burda, Sherri; Natuk, Robert J.; Sinangil, Faruk; Steimer, Kathelyn; Gallo, Robert C.; Eichberg, Jorg W.; Matthews, Thomas; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    1998-01-01

    Five chimpanzees were immunized by administration of one or more intranasal priming doses of one to three recombinant adenoviruses containing a gp160 insert from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) MN (HIV-1MN) followed by one or more boosts of recombinant HIV-1SF2 gp120 delivered intramuscularly with MF59 adjuvant. This regimen resulted in humoral immune responses in three of five animals. Humoral responses included immunochemically active anti-HIV-1 antibodies (Abs) directed to recombinant gp120 and neutralizing Abs reactive with T-cell-line-adapted HIV-1MN and HIV-1SF2. In addition, neutralizing activity was detected to the two homologous primary isolates and to two of three heterologous primary isolates which, like the immunizing strains, can use CXCR4 as a coreceptor for infection. The three animals with detectable neutralizing Abs and a fourth exhibiting the best cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response were protected from a low-dose intravenous challenge with a cell-free HIV-1SF2 primary isolate administered 4 weeks after the last boost. Animals were rested for 46 weeks and then rechallenged, without a boost, with an eightfold-higher challenge dose of HIV-1SF2. The three animals with persistent neutralizing Abs were again protected. These data show that a strong, long-lived protective Ab response can be induced with a prime-boost regimen in chimpanzees. The data suggest that in chimpanzees, the presence of neutralizing Abs correlates with protection for animals challenged intravenously with a high dose of a homologous strain of HIV-1, and they demonstrate for the first time the induction of neutralizing Abs to homologous and heterologous primary isolates. PMID:9444999

  17. Effect of the maturation of neutralizing antibodies on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope evolution in HIV-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Nie, Jianhui; Jiao, Yanmei; Li, Lan; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Wu, Hao; Wang, Youchun

    2016-03-01

    Delineating the course of NAb (neutralizing antibody) development in natural infection may provide clues for NAb-targeted HIV-1 vaccine design. Two subjects, A (non-neutralizer) and E (neutralizer), were chosen from 75 HIV-1 positive subjects of a MSM (men who have sex with men) cohort to investigate the key events of virus evolution in the development course of neutralizing antibodies. Pseudovirus quasispecies (at least 10 strains) were generated for each time points of the infection course. The diversity and divergence of the env quasispecies per time point for subject E were significantly higher than those for subject A (p<0.05). Compared with subject A, the gp160 derived from subject E acquired longer V1V2 region and more N-glycans during the development of neutralizing antibodies. The developing course of neutralizing antibody lagged behind the virus evolution, of which the pseudoviruses could only been neutralized by the latter time-point sera. The neutralization-driven evolution of the virus for subject E was mostly mapped to the C1-C3 region of gp160. Through site-directed mutagenesis, some key sites and region were identified to be associated with the virus escape, including: Q85P, H183P, K340E, L365S, L369I, I372V and insertions of 355N in C3 and NITDEVKIG in V1 region. PMID:26706846

  18. A neutralizing monoclonal antibody previously mapped exclusively on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 recognizes an epitope in p17 sharing the core sequence IEEE.

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, E; Tisminetzky, S G; D'Agaro, P; Baralle, F E

    1997-01-01

    We report here that a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb 1575) mapped to the conserved putative intracellular region from amino acid residues 735 to 752 (735-752 region) of gp41 also recognizes a region in an extracellular portion of p17. Both epitopes have a core recognition sequence (IEEE) in a nonhomologous context. The IEEE motif found in HIV-1 p17 is located in a region known as HGP-30 (residues 86 to 115) which has been previously associated with virus neutralization, cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity, and mother-to-child transmission. An analysis of available gp41 and p17 sequences demonstrates that in these regions both IEEE sequences are highly conserved in different HIV-1 clades. The presence of the IEEE epitope in p17 allows us to explain some unexpected neutralizing characteristics of MAb 1575. In addition, the gp41 735-752 region has been previously reported both in intra- and extracellular locations. Our results suggest that the extracellular location was the result of cross-reactivity with p17. PMID:9032383

  19. A Conformational Switch in Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Revealed by the Structures of Overlapping Epitopes Recognized by Neutralizing Antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Brunel, Florence M.; Cardoso, Rosa M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Dawson, Philip E.; Burton, Dennis R.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (gp41) is critical for viral fusion and infectivity and is the target of three of the five known broadly neutralizing HIV type 1 (HIV-1) antibodies, 2F5, Z13, and 4E10. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Fab fragment of Z13e1, an affinity-enhanced variant of monoclonal antibody Z13, in complex with a 12-residue peptide corresponding to the core epitope (W670NWFDITN677) at 1.8-Å resolution. The bound peptide adopts an S-shaped conformation composed of two tandem, perpendicular helical turns. This conformation differs strikingly from the α-helical structure adopted by an overlapping MPER peptide bound to 4E10. Z13e1 binds to an elbow in the MPER at the membrane interface, making relatively few interactions with conserved aromatics (Trp672 and Phe673) that are critical for 4E10 recognition. The comparison of the Z13e1 and 4E10 epitope structures reveals a conformational switch such that neutralization can occur by the recognition of the different conformations and faces of the largely amphipathic MPER. The Z13e1 structure provides significant new insights into the dynamic nature of the MPER, which likely is critical for membrane fusion, and it has significant implications for mechanisms of HIV-1 neutralization by MPER antibodies and for the design of HIV-1 immunogens. PMID:19515770

  20. Induction of Neutralizing Antibodies and Gag-Specific Cellular Immune Responses to an R5 Primary Isolate of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Montefiori, David C.; Safrit, Jeffrey T.; Lydy, Shari L.; Barry, Ashley P.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Vo, Ha T. T.; Klein, Michel; Tartaglia, James; Robinson, Harriet L.; Rovinski, Benjamin

    2001-01-01

    The ability to generate antibodies that cross-neutralize diverse primary isolates is an important goal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine development. Most of the candidate HIV-1 vaccines tested in humans and nonhuman primates have failed in this regard. Past efforts have focused almost entirely on the envelope glycoproteins of a small number of T-cell line-adapted strains of the virus as immunogens. Here we assessed the immunogenicity of noninfectious virus-like particles (VLP) consisting of Gag, Pro (protease), and Env from R5 primary isolate HIV-1Bx08. Immunogens were delivered to rhesus macaques in the form of either purified VLP, recombinant DNA and canarypox (ALVAC) vectors engineered to express VLP, or a combination of these products. Seroconversion to Gag and Pro was detected in all of the immunized animals. Antibodies that could neutralize HIV-1Bx08 were detected in animals that received (i) coinoculations with DNABx08 and VLPBx08, (ii) DNABx08 followed by ALVACBx08 boosting, and (iii) VLPBx08 alone. The neutralizing antibodies were highly strain specific despite the fact that they did not appear to be directed to linear epitopes in the V3 loop. Virus-specific cellular immune responses also were generated, as judged by the presence of Gag-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells. These cellular immune responses required the inclusion of DNABx08 in the immunization modality, since few or no IFN-γ-producing cells were detected in animals that received either VLPBx08 or ALVACBx08 alone. The results demonstrate the feasibility of generating neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses that target an R5 primary HIV-1 isolate by vaccination in primates. PMID:11390589

  1. Impact of glycosylation on antigenicity of simian immunodeficiency virus SIV239: induction of rapid V1/V2-specific non-neutralizing antibody and delayed neutralizing antibody following infection with an attenuated deglycosylated mutant.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Chie; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A; Yamamoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Yasuo; Nagai, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Kazuyasu

    2008-02-01

    Infection of rhesus macaques with a deglycosylation mutant, Delta5G, derived from SIV239, a pathogenic clone of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), led to robust acute-phase viral replication followed by a chronic phase with undetectable viral load. This study examined whether humoral responses in Delta5G-infected animals played any role in the control of infection. Neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were elicited more efficiently in Delta5G-infected animals than in SIV239-infected animals. However, functional nAb measured by 90% neutralization was prominent in only two of the five Delta5G-infected animals, and only at 8 weeks post-infection (p.i.), when viral loads were already below 10(4) copies ml(-1). These results suggest a minimal role for nAbs in the control of the primary infection. In contrast, whilst Ab responses to epitopes localized to the variable loops V1/V2 were detected in all Delta5G-infected animals at 3 weeks p.i., this response was associated with a concomitant reduction in Ab responses to epitopes in gp41 compared with those in SIV239-infected animals. These results suggest that the altered surface glycosylation and/or conformation of viral spikes induce a humoral response against SIV that is distinct from the response induced by SIV239. More interestingly, whereas V1/V2-specific Abs were induced in all animals, these Abs were associated with vigorous Delta5G-specific virion capture ability in only two Delta5G-infected animals that exhibited a functional nAb response. Thus, whereas the deglycosylation mutant infection elicited early virion capture and subsequent nAbs, the responses differed among animals, suggesting the existence of host factors that may influence the functional humoral responses against human immunodeficiency virus/SIV. PMID:18198387

  2. Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 directed against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region protect against mucosal challenge by simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIVBa-L.

    PubMed

    Hessell, Ann J; Rakasz, Eva G; Tehrani, David M; Huber, Michael; Weisgrau, Kimberly L; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Koff, Wayne C; Poignard, Pascal; Watkins, David I; Burton, Dennis R

    2010-02-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1, located at the C terminus of the gp41 ectodomain, is conserved and crucial for viral fusion. Three broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs), 2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1, are directed against linear epitopes mapped to the MPER, making this conserved region an important potential vaccine target. However, no MPER antibodies have been definitively shown to provide protection against HIV challenge. Here, we show that both MAbs 2F5 and 4E10 can provide complete protection against mucosal simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge in macaques. MAb 2F5 or 4E10 was administered intravenously at 50 mg/kg to groups of six male Indian rhesus macaques 1 day prior to and again 1 day following intrarectal challenge with SHIV(Ba-L). In both groups, five out of six animals showed complete protection and sterilizing immunity, while for one animal in each group a low level of viral replication following challenge could not be ruled out. The study confirms the protective potential of 2F5 and 4E10 and supports emphasis on HIV immunogen design based on the MPER region of gp41. PMID:19906907

  3. Sustained Delivery of a Broadly Neutralizing Antibody in Nonhuman Primates Confers Long-Term Protection against Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Kevin O.; Pegu, Amarendra; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Zeng, Ming; Joyce, M. Gordon; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Ko, Sung-Youl; Chen, Xuejun; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Haase, Ashley T.; Todd, John-Paul; Bao, Saran; Kwong, Peter D.; Rao, Srinivas S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pathogen-specific neutralizing antibodies protect against many viral infections and can potentially prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in humans. However, neutralizing antibodies have so far only been shown to protect nonhuman primates (NHP) against lentiviral infection when given shortly before challenge. Thus, the clinical utility and feasibility of passive antibody transfer to confer long-term protection against HIV-1 are still debated. Here, we investigate the potential of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody to provide long-term protection in a NHP model of HIV-1 infection. A human antibody was simianized to avoid immune rejection and used to sustain therapeutic levels for ∼5 months. Two months after the final antibody administration, animals were completely protected against viral challenge. These findings demonstrate the feasibility and potential of long-term passive antibody for protection against HIV-1 in humans and provide a model to test antibody therapies for other diseases in NHP. IMPORTANCE Antibodies against HIV are potential drugs that may be able to prevent HIV infection in humans. However, the long-term protective capacity of antibodies against HIV has not been assessed. Here, we repetitively administered a macaque version of a human anti-HIV antibody to monkeys, after which the antibody persisted in the blood for >5 months. Moreover, the antibody could be sustained at protective levels for 108 days, conferring protection 52 days after the last dose in a monkey model of HIV infection. Thus, passive antibody transfer can provide durable protection against infection by viruses that cause AIDS in primates. PMID:25787288

  4. Characterization of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to linear and conformation-dependent epitopes within the first and second variable domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120.

    PubMed Central

    McKeating, J A; Shotton, C; Cordell, J; Graham, S; Balfe, P; Sullivan, N; Charles, M; Page, M; Bolmstedt, A; Olofsson, S

    1993-01-01

    A number of linear and conformation-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been mapped to the first and second variable (V1 and V2) domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120. The majority of these MAbs are as effective at neutralizing HIV-1 infectivity as MAbs to the V3 domain and the CD4 binding site. The linear MAbs bind to amino acid residues 162 to 171, and changes at residues 183/184 (PI/SG) and 191/192/193 (YSL/GSS) within the V2 domain abrogate the binding of the two conformation-dependent MAbs, 11/68b and CRA-4, respectively. Surprisingly, a change at residue 435 (Y/H or Y/S), in a region of gp120 near the CD4 binding site (M. Kowalski, J. Potz, L. Basiripour, T. Dorfman, W. C. Goh, E. Terwilliger, A. Dayton, C. Rosen, W. Haseltine, and J. Sodroski, Science 237:1351-1355, 1987; L. A. Lasky, G. M. Nakamura, D. H. Smith, C. Fennie, C. Shimasaki, E. Patzer, P. Berman, T. Gregory, and D. Capon, Cell 50:975-985, 1987; and U. Olshevsky, E. Helseth, C. Furman, J. Li, W. Haseltine, and J. Sodroski, J. Virol. 64:5701-5707, 1990), abrogated gp120 recognition by both of the conformation-dependent MAbs. However, both MAbs 11/68b and CRA-4 were able to bind to HIV-1 V1V2 chimeric fusion proteins expressing the V1V2 domains in the absence of C4, suggesting that residues in C4 are not components of the epitopes but that amino acid changes in C4 may affect the structure of the V1V2 domains. This is consistent with the ability of soluble CD4 to block 11/68b and CRA-4 binding to both native cell surface-expressed gp120 and recombinant gp120 and suggests that the binding of the neutralizing MAbs to the virus occurs prior to receptor interaction. Since the reciprocal inhibition, i.e., antibody inhibition of CD4-gp120 binding, was not observed, the mechanism of neutralization is probably not a blockade of virus-receptor interaction. Finally, we demonstrate that linear sequences from the V2 region are immunogenic in HIV-1-infected individuals, suggesting that the primary neutralizing response may be directed to both V2 and V3 epitopes. PMID:7687306

  5. Insertion of primary syncytium-inducing (SI) and non-SI envelope V3 loops in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) LAI reduces neutralization sensitivity to autologous, but not heterologous, HIV-1 antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Hogervorst, E; de Jong, J; van Wijk, A; Bakker, M; Valk, M; Nara, P; Goudsmit, J

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of V3 loops from naturally occurring viruses on the neutralization sensitivity of a molecularly cloned virus. A selection of well-defined syncytium-inducing (SI) and non-SI V3 loops of a single human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individual (H594) and the V3 regions of two SI laboratory strains were inserted in an infectious molecular clone of human immunodeficiency type 1 LAI. Neutralization was performed with a heterologous serum pool and autologous patient serum, using the virus reduction neutralization assay and peripheral blood lymphocytes as target cells. High sensitivity of the chimeric viruses containing the laboratory strain V3 regions to neutralization by H594 sequential sera as well as the heterologous serum pool was found. A statistically significant correlation between the sensitivities of these viruses was seen. In contrast, insertion of the primary isolate NSI and SI envelope V3 loops significantly reduced the neutralization by autologous serum but not by the heterologous serum pool. No correlation was found between the neutralization of the viruses with laboratory strain-derived V3 regions and the viruses with primary isolate V3 domains. We conclude that heterologous antibodies are able to neutralize infectious molecular clones with V3 loops of both SI and NSI viruses, regardless of whether they originated from laboratory strains or primary isolates. However, serum of patient H594 discriminated between the two types of viruses and showed reduced neutralization of the viruses with the autologous NSI and SI primary isolate V3 loops. These results indicated that the neutralization sensitivity of the viruses depended on the capacity of the V3 region to influence the conformation of the virus envelope. These V3-dependent conformational changes partially explain the neutralization sensitivity of laboratory strains and the relative neutralization resistance of primary isolates. PMID:7666535

  6. Fine definition of the epitope on the gp41 glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 for the neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5.

    PubMed

    Parker, C E; Deterding, L J; Hager-Braun, C; Binley, J M; Schülke, N; Katinger, H; Moore, J P; Tomer, K B

    2001-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), in combination with proteolytic protection assays, has been used to identify the functional epitope on human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp41 for the broadly neutralizing anti-gp41 human monoclonal antibody 2F5. In this protection assay-based procedure, a soluble gp140 protein with a stabilizing intermolecular disulfide bond between the gp120 and gp41 subunits (SOS gp140) was affinity bound to immobilized 2F5 under physiological conditions. A combination of proteolytic enzymatic cleavages was then performed to remove unprotected residues. Residues of SOS gp140 protected by their binding to 2F5 were then identified based on their molecular weights as determined by direct MALDI-MS of the immobilized antibody beads. The epitope, NEQELLELDKWASLWN, determined by this MALDI-MS protection assay approach consists of 16 amino acid residues near the C terminus of gp41. It is significantly longer than the ELDKWA core epitope previously determined for 2F5 by peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This new knowledge of the structure of the 2F5 epitope may facilitate the design of vaccine antigens intended to induce antibodies with the breadth and potency of action of the 2F5 monoclonal antibody. PMID:11602730

  7. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA, but also Nonantibody Factors, Account for In Vitro Neutralization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Primary Isolates by Serum and Plasma of HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burrer, Renaud; Salmon-Ceron, Dominique; Richert, Sophie; Pancino, Gianfranco; Spiridon, Gabriella; Haessig, Sandrine; Roques, Virginie; Barre-Sinoussi, Francoise; Aubertin, Anne-Marie; Moog, Christiane

    2001-01-01

    The factors present in serum and plasma samples of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients that are responsible for the neutralization of four HIV type 1 (HIV-1) primary isolates in vitro have been analyzed. Purification of immunoglobulins (Ig) by affinity chromatography showed that the activities were mostly attributable to IgG and less frequently to IgA. For two samples, we have shown that the high-level and broad-spectrum inhibitory activity was essentially caused by non-Ig factors interfering with the measurement of antibody-specific neutralizing activity. PMID:11333928

  8. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA, but also nonantibody factors, account for in vitro neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by serum and plasma of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Burrer, R; Salmon-Ceron, D; Richert, S; Pancino, G; Spiridon, G; Haessig, S; Roques, V; Barre-Sinoussi, F; Aubertin, A M; Moog, C

    2001-06-01

    The factors present in serum and plasma samples of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients that are responsible for the neutralization of four HIV type 1 (HIV-1) primary isolates in vitro have been analyzed. Purification of immunoglobulins (Ig) by affinity chromatography showed that the activities were mostly attributable to IgG and less frequently to IgA. For two samples, we have shown that the high-level and broad-spectrum inhibitory activity was essentially caused by non-Ig factors interfering with the measurement of antibody-specific neutralizing activity. PMID:11333928

  9. Potent and synergistic neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 primary isolates by hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin combined with monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 2G12.

    PubMed Central

    Mascola, J R; Louder, M K; VanCott, T C; Sapan, C V; Lambert, J S; Muenz, L R; Bunow, B; Birx, D L; Robb, M L

    1997-01-01

    Three antibody reagents that neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates were tested for magnitude and breadth of neutralization when used alone or in double or triple combinations. Hyperimmune anti-HIV immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is derived from the plasma of HIV-1-infected donors, and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 2F5 and 2G12 bind to distinct regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. The antibodies were initially tested against a panel of 15 clade B HIV-1 isolates, using a single concentration that is achievable in vivo (HIVIG, 2,500 microg/ml; MAbs, 25 microg/ml). Individual antibody reagents neutralized many of the viruses tested, but antibody potency varied substantially among the viruses. The virus neutralization produced by double combinations of HIVIG plus 2F5 or 2G12, the two MAbs together, or the triple combination of HIVIG, 2F5, and 2G12 was generally equal to or greater than that predicted by the effect of individual antibodies. Overall, the triple combination displayed the greatest magnitude and breadth of neutralization. Synergistic neutralization was evaluated by analyzing data from dose-response curves of each individual antibody reagent compared to the triple combination and was demonstrated against each of four viruses tested. Therefore, combinations of polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HIV antibodies can produce additive or synergistic neutralization of primary HIV-1 isolates. Passive immunotherapy for treatment or prophylaxis of HIV-1 should consider mixtures of potent neutralizing antibody reagents to expand the magnitude and breadth of virus neutralization. PMID:9311792

  10. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  11. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  12. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  13. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  14. 21 CFR 660.50 - Anti-Human Globulin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anti-Human Globulin. 660.50 Section 660.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.50...

  15. Differential CD4/CCR5 Utilization, gp120 Conformation, and Neutralization Sensitivity between Envelopes from a Microglia-Adapted Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Its Parental Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Julio; LaBranche, Celia C.; González-Scarano, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infects and induces syncytium formation in microglial cells from the central nervous system (CNS). A primary isolate (HIV-1BORI) was sequentially passaged in cultured microglia, and the isolate recovered (HIV-1BORI-15) showed high levels of fusion and replicated more efficiently in microglia (J. M. Strizki, A. V. Albright, H. Sheng, M. O'Connor, L. Perrin, and F. González-Scarano, J. Virol. 70:7654–7662, 1996). The parent and adapted viruses used CCR5 as coreceptor. Recombinant viruses demonstrated that the syncytium-inducing phenotype was associated with four amino acid differences in the V1/V2 region of the viral gp120 (J. T. C. Shieh, J. Martin, G. Baltuch, M. H. Malim, and F. González-Scarano, J. Virol. 74:693–701, 2000). We produced luciferase-reporter, env-pseudotyped viruses using plasmids containing env sequences from HIV-1BORI, HIV-1BORI-15, and the V1/V2 region of HIV-1BORI-15 in the context of HIV-1BORI env (named rBORI, rB15, and rV1V2, respectively). The pseudotypes were used to infect cells expressing various amounts of CD4 and CCR5 on the surface. In contrast to the parent recombinant, the rB15 and rV1V2 pseudotypes retained their infectability in cells expressing low levels of CD4 independent of the levels of CCR5, and they infected cells expressing CD4 with a chimeric coreceptor containing the third extracellular loop of CCR2b in the context of CCR5 or a CCR5 Δ4 amino-terminal deletion mutant. The VH-rB15 and VH-rV1V2 recombinant viruses were more sensitive to neutralization by a panel of HIV-positive sera than was VH-rBORI. Interestingly, the CD4-induced 17b epitope on gp120 was more accessible in the rB15 and rV1V2 pseudotypes than in rBORI, even before CD4 binding, and concomitantly, the rB15 and rV1V2 pseudotypes were more sensitive to neutralization with the human 17b monoclonal antibody. Adaptation to growth in microglia—cells that have reduced expression of CD4 in comparison with other cell types—appears to be associated with changes in gp120 that modify its ability to utilize CD4 and CCR5. Changes in the availability of the 17b epitope indicate that these affect conformation. These results imply that the process of adaptation to certain tissue types such as the CNS directly affects the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with cell surface components and with humoral immune responses. PMID:11264346

  16. Limited contribution of mucosal IgA to Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-specific neutralizing antibody response and virus envelope evolution in breast milk of SIV-infected, lactating rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Permar, Sallie R; Wilks, Andrew B; Ehlinger, Elizabeth P; Kang, Helen H; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Coffey, Rory T; Carville, Angela; Letvin, Norman L; Seaman, Michael S

    2010-08-01

    Breast milk transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains an important mode of infant HIV acquisition. Interestingly, the majority of infants remain uninfected during prolonged virus exposure via breastfeeding, raising the possibility that immune components in milk prevent mucosal virus transmission. HIV-specific antibody responses are detectable in the milk of HIV-infected women and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected monkeys; however, the role of these humoral responses in virus neutralization and local virus quasispecies evolution has not been characterized. In this study, four lactating rhesus monkeys were inoculated with SIVmac251 and monitored for SIV envelope-specific humoral responses and virus evolution in milk and plasma throughout infection. While the kinetics and breadth of the SIV-specific IgG and IgA responses in milk were similar to those in plasma, the magnitude of the milk responses was considerably lower than that of the plasma responses. Furthermore, a neutralizing antibody response against the inoculation virus was not detected in milk samples at 1 year after infection, despite a measurable autologous neutralizing antibody response in plasma samples obtained from three of four monkeys. Interestingly, while IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin in milk, the milk SIV envelope-specific IgA response was lower in magnitude and demonstrated more limited neutralizing capacity against a T-cell line-adapted SIV compared to those of the milk IgG response. Finally, amino acid mutations in the envelope gene product of SIV variants in milk and plasma samples occurred in similar numbers and at similar positions, indicating that the humoral immune pressure in milk does not drive distinct virus evolution in the breast milk compartment. PMID:20519381

  17. Limited Contribution of Mucosal IgA to Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV)-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Response and Virus Envelope Evolution in Breast Milk of SIV-Infected, Lactating Rhesus Monkeys▿

    PubMed Central

    Permar, Sallie R.; Wilks, Andrew B.; Ehlinger, Elizabeth P.; Kang, Helen H.; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Coffey, Rory T.; Carville, Angela; Letvin, Norman L.; Seaman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Breast milk transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains an important mode of infant HIV acquisition. Interestingly, the majority of infants remain uninfected during prolonged virus exposure via breastfeeding, raising the possibility that immune components in milk prevent mucosal virus transmission. HIV-specific antibody responses are detectable in the milk of HIV-infected women and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected monkeys; however, the role of these humoral responses in virus neutralization and local virus quasispecies evolution has not been characterized. In this study, four lactating rhesus monkeys were inoculated with SIVmac251 and monitored for SIV envelope-specific humoral responses and virus evolution in milk and plasma throughout infection. While the kinetics and breadth of the SIV-specific IgG and IgA responses in milk were similar to those in plasma, the magnitude of the milk responses was considerably lower than that of the plasma responses. Furthermore, a neutralizing antibody response against the inoculation virus was not detected in milk samples at 1 year after infection, despite a measurable autologous neutralizing antibody response in plasma samples obtained from three of four monkeys. Interestingly, while IgA is the predominant immunoglobulin in milk, the milk SIV envelope-specific IgA response was lower in magnitude and demonstrated more limited neutralizing capacity against a T-cell line-adapted SIV compared to those of the milk IgG response. Finally, amino acid mutations in the envelope gene product of SIV variants in milk and plasma samples occurred in similar numbers and at similar positions, indicating that the humoral immune pressure in milk does not drive distinct virus evolution in the breast milk compartment. PMID:21041730

  18. Analysis and validation of the phosphorylated metabolites of two anti-human immunodeficiency virus nucleotides (stavudine and didanosine) by pressure-assisted CE-ESI-MS/MS in cell extracts: sensitivity enhancement by the use of perfluorinated acids and alcohols as coaxial sheath-liquid make-up constituents.

    PubMed

    Bezy, Vincent; Chaimbault, Patrick; Morin, Philippe; Unger, Steve E; Bernard, Marie-Charlotte; Agrofoglio, Luigi A

    2006-06-01

    A CE method utilizing triple quadrupole electrospray (ES) MS (MS/MS) detection was developed and validated for the simultaneous measurement of nucleoside 5'-triphosphate and 5'-monophosphate anabolites of the anti-HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) didanosine (ddAMP, ddATP) and stavudine (d4TMP, d4TTP), among a pool of 14 endogenous 5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphate nucleosides. These compounds were spiked and extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) which are the sites of HIV replication and drug action. An acetic acid/ammonia buffer (pH 10, ionic strength of 40 mM) was selected as running electrolyte, and the separation was performed by the simultaneous application of a CE voltage of +30 kV and an overimposed pressure of 28 mbar (0.4 psi). The application of pressure assistance was needed to provide stable ES conditions for successful coupling. The coupling was carried out with a modified sheath-flow interface, with one uninterrupted capillary (80 cmx 50 microm id; 192 microm od) in a dimension that fits into the ESI needle to get a stable ion spray. Some CE-MS parameters such as overimposed pressure, sheath-liquid composition, sheath-liquid and sheath-gas flow rates, ES voltage, and the CE capillary position were optimized in order to obtain an optimal sensitivity. The use of perfluorinated alcohols and acids in the coaxial sheath-liquid make-up (2,2,2-trifluoroethanol + 0.2 mM tridecafluoroheptanoic acid) appeared to provide the best MS sensitivity and improve the stability of spray. The linearity of the CE-MS and CE-MS/MS methods was checked under these conditions. Validation parameters such as accuracy, intraday and interday precision, and LOQs were determined in CE-MS/MS mode. Finally, the quantitation of d4T-TP and ddA-TP was validated in this CE-MS/MS system. PMID:16786481

  19. Studies of neutralizing monoclonal antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase: antagonistic and synergistic effects in reactions performed in the presence of nucleoside and nonnucleoside inhibitors, respectively.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z; Li, X; Quan, Y; Parniak, M A; Wainberg, M A

    1996-01-01

    We have assessed interactions between the reverse transcriptase (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (1E8) that hinders binding of deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrates. Steady-state reactions with homopolymeric template-primers revealed that 1E8 antagonized inhibition of RT activity mediated by 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine triphosphate and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine triphosphate. However, an additive or synergistic inhibition of RT polymerase activity was noted when 1E8 and the nonnucleoside RT inhibitors nevirapine and delavirdine were studied. Chain elongation and dNTP incorporation studies using an HIV-1 genome-derived heteropolymeric template and either oligodeoxynucleotide or tRNA3(Lys) as the primer yielded results consistent with the above observations. 1E8 also increased pausing at certain sites during synthesis of negative-strand, strong-stop DNA, whether or not ddNTP and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors were present. PMID:8642696

  20. Neutralization activity in a geographically diverse East London cohort of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients: clade C infection results in a stronger and broader humoral immune response than clade B infection.

    PubMed

    Dreja, Hanna; O'Sullivan, Eithne; Pade, Corinna; Greene, Kelli M; Gao, Hongmei; Aubin, Keith; Hand, James; Isaksen, Are; D'Souza, Carl; Leber, Werner; Montefiori, David; Seaman, Michael S; Anderson, Jane; Orkin, Chloe; McKnight, Aine

    2010-11-01

    The array of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) subtypes encountered in East London, an area long associated with migration, is unusually heterogeneous, reflecting the diverse geographical origins of the population. In this study it was shown that viral subtypes or clades infecting a sample of HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-positive individuals in East London reflect the global pandemic. The authors studied the humoral response in 210 treatment-naïve chronically HIV-1-infected (>1 year) adult subjects against a panel of 12 viruses from six different clades. Plasmas from individuals infected with clade C, but also plasmas from clade A, and to a lesser degree clade CRF02_AG and CRF01_AE, were significantly more potent at neutralizing the tested viruses compared with plasmas from individuals infected with clade B. The difference in humoral robustness between clade C- and B-infected patients was confirmed in titration studies with an extended panel of clade B and C viruses. These results support the approach to develop an HIV-1 vaccine that includes clade C or A envelope protein (Env) immunogens for the induction of a potent neutralizing humoral response. PMID:20685933

  1. Immunization of Rabbits with Highly Purified, Soluble, Trimeric Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Glycoprotein Induces a Vigorous B Cell Response and Broadly Cross-Reactive Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Quinnan, Gerald V.; Onabajo, Olusegun; Zhang, Pengfei; Yan, Lianying; Mattapallil, Joseph J.; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Ming; Lu, Min; Montefiori, David; LaBranche, Celia; Broder, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we described induction of cross-reactive HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits using a soluble HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein (Env) in an adjuvant containing monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and QS21 (AS02A). Here, we compared different forms of the same HIV-1 strain R2 Env for antigenic and biophysical characteristics, and in rabbits characterized the extent of B cell induction for specific antibody expression and secretion and neutralizing responses. The forms of this Env that were produced in and purified from stably transformed 293T cells included a primarily dimeric gp140, a trimeric gp140 appended to a GCN4 trimerization domain (gp140-GCN4), gp140-GCN4 with a 15 amino acid flexible linker between the gp120 and gp41 ectodomain (gp140-GCN4-L), also trimeric, and a gp140 with the flexible linker purified from cell culture supernatants as either dimer (gp140-L(D)) or monomer (gp140-L(M)). Multimeric states of the Env proteins were assessed by native gel electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation. The different forms of gp140 bound broadly cross-reactive neutralizing (BCN) human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) similarly in ELISA and immunoprecipitation assays. All Envs bound CD4i mAbs in the presence and absence of sCD4, as reported for the R2 Env. Weak neutralization of some strains of HIV-1 was seen after two additional doses in AS02A. Rabbits that were given a seventh dose of gp140-GCN4-L developed BCN responses that were weak to moderate, similar to our previous report. The specificity of these responses did not appear similar to that of any of the known BCN human mAbs. Induction of spleen B cell and plasma cells producing immunoglobulins that bound trimeric gp140-GCN4-L was vigorous, based on ELISpot and flow cytometry analyses. The results demonstrate that highly purified gp140-GCN4-L trimer in adjuvant elicits BCN responses in rabbits accompanied by vigorous B cell induction. PMID:24846288

  2. Scorpion-Toxin Mimics of CD4 in Complex with Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp120: Crystal Structures, Molecular Mimicry, and Neutralization Breadth

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Stricher, Francois; Martin, Loic; Decker, Julie M.; Majeed, Shahzad; Barthe, Phillippe; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Robinson, James; Roumestand, Christian; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Shaw, George M.; Vita, Claudio; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-07-19

    The binding surface on CD4 for the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein has been transplanted previously onto a scorpion-toxin scaffold. Here, we use X-ray crystallography to characterize atomic-level details of gp120 with this transplant, CD4M33. Despite known envelope flexibility, the conformation of gp120 induced by CD4M33 was so similar to that induced by CD4 that localized measures were required to distinguish ligand-induced differences from lattice variation. To investigate relationships between structure, function, and mimicry, an F23 analog of CD4M33 was devised. Structural and thermodynamic analyses showed F23 to be a better molecular mimic of CD4 than CD4M33. F23 also showed increased neutralization breadth, against diverse isolates of HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVcpz. Our results lend insight into the stability of the CD4 bound conformation of gp120, define measures that quantify molecular mimicry as a function of evolutionary distance, and suggest how such evaluations might be useful in developing mimetic antagonists with increased neutralization breadth.

  3. Specific N-linked and O-linked glycosylation modifications in the envelope V1 domain of simian immunodeficiency virus variants that evolve in the host alter recognition by neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chackerian, B; Rudensey, L M; Overbaugh, J

    1997-10-01

    During progression to AIDS in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Mne-infected macaques, viral variants are selected that encode sequences with serine and threonine changes in variable region 1 (V1) of the surface component of the viral envelope protein (Env-SU). Because these serine and threonine amino acid changes are characteristic of sites for O-linked and N-linked glycosylation, we examined whether they were targets for modification by carbohydrates. For this purpose, we used several biochemical methods for analyzing the Env-SU protein encoded by chimeras of SIVMneCL8 and envelope sequences cloned from an SIVMneCL8-infected Macaca nemestrina during clinical latency and just after the onset of AIDS. The addition of an N-linked glycan was demonstrated by changes in the electrophoretic mobility of Env-SU, and this was verified by specific glycanase digestions and a detailed analysis of the molecular mass of partially purified Env-SU by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Molecular mass calculations by MALDI-TOF MS also demonstrated an increased mass, from 102.3 to 103.5 kDa, associated with serine and threonine residues predicted to be O-linked glycosylation sites. Together, these data provide the first direct evidence that the carbohydrate profile of Env-SU is distinct in SIV variants that evolve during infection of the host. Moreover, our studies show that these changes in glycosylation in V1 were directly associated with changes in antigenicity. Specifically, serine and threonine changes in V1 allowed the virus to escape neutralization by macaque sera that contained antibodies that could neutralize the parental virus, SIVMneCL8. The escape from antibody recognition appeared to be influenced by either O-linked or N-linked carbohydrate additions in V1. Moreover, when glycine residues were engineered at the positions where serine and threonine changes evolve in V1 of SIVMneCL8, there was no change in antigenicity compared to SIVMneCL8. This suggests that the amino acids in V1 are not part of the linear epitope recognized by neutralizing antibody. More likely, V1-associated carbohydrates mask the major neutralizing epitope of SIV. These experiments indicate that the selection of novel glycosylation sites in the V1 region of envelope during the course of disease is driven by humoral immune responses. PMID:9311856

  4. Neutralizing antibodies directed against the V3 loop select for different escape variants in a virus with mutated reverse transcriptase (M184V) than in wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Inouye, P; Cherry, E; Hsu, M; Zolla-Pazner, S; Wainberg, M A

    1998-06-10

    The M184V substitution in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) encodes high-level resistance to the (-)-enantiomer of 2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine (3TC) and low-level resistance to each of 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) and 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI). This mutation also results in decreased HIV replication fitness in primary cells, diminished RT processivity, and increased RT fidelity. To assess the effect of this substitution on genetic variation in the HIV env region, we cultured both M184V-containing and wild-type BH10 in MT-4 cells in the presence of the neutralizing monoclonal antibody 447-52D, targeted to the GPGR epitope within the V3 loop of gp120. Outgrowth of viruses resistant to neutralization was followed by sequence analysis of the V3 loop by standard methodology. Wild-type HIV first showed escape after 15-22 days in culture. Sequence analysis revealed an arginine-to-lysine change within the GPGR epitope in the V3 loop (R20K, AGA --> AAA) in six of six clones sequenced after day 36. In contrast, M184V-containing HIV first showed escape between days 25 and 32 and sequence analysis revealed an aspartate-to-tyrosine change at amino acid 5 in V3 (N5Y; AAC --> TAC) in two of six clones at day 36 and in five of five clones at day 55. Similar results were obtained in two independent antibody selection protocols. The escape mutation in the wild type is consistent with the G --> A hypermutation observed in wild-type HIV-1, recently shown to cause an initial M184I change (before M184V) in 3TC-treated patients. In contrast, the N5Y substitution seen with M184V-containing HIV-1 is an A --> T transversion in V3. PMID:9643373

  5. A Yeast Glycoprotein Shows High-Affinity Binding to the Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody 2G12 and Inhibits gp120 Interactions with 2G12 and DC-SIGN▿

    PubMed Central

    Luallen, Robert J.; Fu, Hu; Agrawal-Gamse, Caroline; Mboudjeka, Innocent; Huang, Wei; Lee, Fang-Hua; Wang, Lai-Xi; Doms, Robert W.; Geng, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) protein contains numerous N-linked carbohydrates that shield conserved peptide epitopes and promote trans infection by dendritic cells via binding to cell surface lectins. The potent and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2G12 binds a cluster of high-mannose-type oligosaccharides on the gp120 subunit of Env, revealing a conserved and highly exposed epitope on the glycan shield. To find an effective antigen for eliciting 2G12-like antibodies, we searched for endogenous yeast proteins that could bind to 2G12 in a panel of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycosylation knockouts and discovered one protein that bound weakly in a Δpmr1 strain deficient in hyperglycosylation. 2G12 binding to this protein, identified as Pst1, was enhanced by adding the Δmnn1 deletion to the Δpmr1 background, ensuring the exposure of terminal α1,2-linked mannose residues on the D1 and D3 arms of high-mannose glycans. However, optimum 2G12 antigenicity was found when Pst1, a heavily N-glycosylated protein, was expressed with homogenous Man8GlcNAc2 structures in Δoch1 Δmnn1 Δmnn4 yeast. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of this form of Pst1 showed high affinity for 2G12, which translated into Pst1 efficiently inhibiting gp120 interactions with 2G12 and DC-SIGN and blocking 2G12-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 pseudoviruses. The high affinity of the yeast glycoprotein Pst1 for 2G12 highlights its potential as a novel antigen to induce 2G12-like antibodies. PMID:19264785

  6. A yeast glycoprotein shows high-affinity binding to the broadly neutralizing human immunodeficiency virus antibody 2G12 and inhibits gp120 interactions with 2G12 and DC-SIGN.

    PubMed

    Luallen, Robert J; Fu, Hu; Agrawal-Gamse, Caroline; Mboudjeka, Innocent; Huang, Wei; Lee, Fang-Hua; Wang, Lai-Xi; Doms, Robert W; Geng, Yu

    2009-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) protein contains numerous N-linked carbohydrates that shield conserved peptide epitopes and promote trans infection by dendritic cells via binding to cell surface lectins. The potent and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2G12 binds a cluster of high-mannose-type oligosaccharides on the gp120 subunit of Env, revealing a conserved and highly exposed epitope on the glycan shield. To find an effective antigen for eliciting 2G12-like antibodies, we searched for endogenous yeast proteins that could bind to 2G12 in a panel of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycosylation knockouts and discovered one protein that bound weakly in a Delta pmr1 strain deficient in hyperglycosylation. 2G12 binding to this protein, identified as Pst1, was enhanced by adding the Delta mnn1 deletion to the Delta pmr1 background, ensuring the exposure of terminal alpha1,2-linked mannose residues on the D1 and D3 arms of high-mannose glycans. However, optimum 2G12 antigenicity was found when Pst1, a heavily N-glycosylated protein, was expressed with homogenous Man(8)GlcNAc(2) structures in Delta och1 Delta mnn1 Delta mnn4 yeast. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of this form of Pst1 showed high affinity for 2G12, which translated into Pst1 efficiently inhibiting gp120 interactions with 2G12 and DC-SIGN and blocking 2G12-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 pseudoviruses. The high affinity of the yeast glycoprotein Pst1 for 2G12 highlights its potential as a novel antigen to induce 2G12-like antibodies. PMID:19264785

  7. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of feline bone marrow cells and haematopoietic progenitor cells using anti-human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Araghi, Atefeh; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Atyabi, Nahid; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Elham

    2014-04-01

    There is a paucity of species-specific antibodies available for feline haematopoietic conditions. The purpose of this study was to broaden the panel of antibodies available for use in the immunophenotypic characterisation of feline haematopoietic cells by testing clones of anti-human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on normal, neoplastic and cultured feline haematopoietic progenitors to determine cross-reactivity to feline counterparts. In this study, 24 clones of anti-human mAbs were tested on normal or neoplastic feline bone marrow and peripheral blood cells. Six of these mAbs, including anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)61, anti-CD18, anti-CD14, anti-CD235a, anti-CD41 and anti-CD29, cross-reacted with normal feline bone marrow cells, whereas anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 cross-reacted with the blast cells in the bone marrow of two cats with myelodysplastic syndrome, and anti-CD71, anti-235a, anti-41 and anti-42 cross-reacted with immature erythroid cells in a cat with erythroleukaemia. In a feline immunodeficiency virus-positive cat, bone marrow cells were labelled with anti-CD33, anti-14 and anti-45. Anti-CD18, anti-CD14, anti-CD41 and anti-CD61 also reacted with the peripheral blood cells of the healthy cats. The feline haematopoietic progenitors formed colonies in the methylcellulose-based semisolid medium with significant enrichment of colony-forming unit-granulocyte, monocyte and burst-forming unit-erythroid. A panel of six anti-feline mAbs (anti-CD21-like, anti-T lymphocytes, anti-CD172a, anti-granulocyte, anti-CD45-like and anti-CD18) and eight anti-human antibodies (anti-CD71, anti-CD33, anti-CD235a, anti-CD41, anti-CD61, anti-CD117, anti-CD38 and anti-CD34) were used for the immunophenotypic characterisation of the feline bone marrow progenitors. CD45, CD33, CD235a and CD18 were expressed by the feline haematopoietic progenitor cells, with the highest expression level for CD45. PMID:24065708

  8. Structure-Based Design of a Protein Immunogen that Displays an HIV-1 gp41 Neutralizing Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-06-27

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K{sub d} of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  9. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physicians patient education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • ... HIV Testing • For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the ...

  10. Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity of Thiol-Ene Carbosilane Dendrimers and Their Potential Development as a Topical Microbicide.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Javier; Díaz, Laura; Galán, Marta; Maly, Marek; Gómez, Rafael; Javier de la Mata, F; Jiménez, José L; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles

    2015-10-01

    The concept of a "microbicide" was born out of the lack of a vaccine against HIV and the difficulty of women in ensuring the use of preventive prophylaxis by their partners, especially in developing countries. Approaches using polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers have shown promise in the development of new microbicides. We have developed and evaluated two anionic carbosilane dendrimers with sulfonate and carboxylate terminal groups, G2-STE16 and G2-CTE16. Both dendrimers showed high biosafety in human epithelial cell lines derived from the vagina and in primary blood human cells (PBMCs). The dendrimers not only have a greater capacity to block the entry of different X4- and R5-HIV-1 isolates into epithelial cells but also prevent the HIV-1 infection of activated PBMCs. The treatment of epithelial cells with different carbosilane dendrimers did not produce changes in the activation or proliferation of PBMCs or in the expression of CD4, CCR5 or CXCR4. Computational modeling showed significantly higher affinities for the complexes G2-STE16/gp120 and G2-CTE16/gp120. Moreover, no irritation or vaginal lesions were detected in female BALB/c mice after vaginal administration of the dendrimers. Summing up, G2-STE16 and G2-CTE16 are easy to synthesize and compatible with functional groups, and the purification steps are easy and short. Our results have clearly demonstrated that these dendrimers have high potency as a topical microbicide against HIV-1 infection. PMID:26502641

  11. Design of a novel cyclotide-based CXCR4 antagonist with anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Aboye, Teshome L.; Ha, Helen; Majumber, Subhabrata; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Shekhtman, Alexander; Neamati, Nouri; Camarero, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we report for the first time the design and synthesis of a novel cyclotide able to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 viral replication by selectively targeting cytokine receptor CXCR4. This was accomplished by grafting a series of topologically modified CVX15 based peptides onto the loop 6 of cyclotide MCoTI-I. The most active compound produced in this study was a potent CXCR4 antagonist (EC50 ≈ 20 nM) and an efficient HIV-1 cell-entry blocker (EC50 ≈ 2 nM). This cyclotide also showed high stability in human serum thereby providing a promising lead compound for the design of a novel type of peptide-based anti-cancer and anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. PMID:23151033

  12. Synthetic multimeric peptides derived from the principal neutralization domain (V3 loop) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 bind to galactosylceramide and block HIV-1 infection in a human CD4-negative mucosal epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Yahi, N; Sabatier, J M; Baghdiguian, S; Gonzalez-Scarano, F; Fantini, J

    1995-01-01

    The glycosphingolipid galactosylceramide (GalCer), which binds gp120 with high affinity and specificity, is a potential alternative receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in some CD4-negative neural and epithelial human cells, including the human colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. In the present study, we demonstrate that synthetic multibranched peptides derived from the consensus sequence of the HIV-1 V3 loop block HIV-1 infection in HT-29 cells. The most active peptide was an eight-branched multimer of the motif Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg-Ala-Phe which at a concentration of 1.8 microM induced a 50% inhibition of HIV-1 infection in competition experiments. This peptide was not toxic to HT-29 cells, and preincubation with HIV-1 did not affect viral infectivity, indicating that the antiviral activity was not due to a nonspecific virucidal effect. Using a high-performance thin-layer chromatography binding assay, we found that multibranched V3 peptides recognized GalCer and inhibited binding of recombinant gp120 to the glycosphingolipid. In addition, these peptides abolished the binding of an anti-GalCer monoclonal antibody to GalCer on the surface of live HT-29 cells. These data provide additional evidence that the V3 loop is involved in the binding of gp120 to the GalCer receptor and show that multibranched V3 peptides are potent inhibitors of the GalCer-dependent pathway of HIV-1 infection in CD4-negative mucosal epithelial cells. PMID:7983725

  13. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Ivan K; Shearer, William T

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders represent pediatric emergencies due to absence of adaptive immune responses to infections. The conditions result from either intrinsic defects in T-cell development (ie, severe combined immunodeficiency disease [SCID]) or congenital athymia (eg, complete DiGeorge anomaly). Hematopoietic stem cell transplant provides the only clinically approved cure for SCID, although gene therapy research trials are showing significant promise. For greatest survival, patients should undergo transplant before 3.5 months of age and before the onset of infections. Newborn screening programs have yielded successful early identification and treatment of infants with SCID and congenital athymia in the United States. PMID:26454313

  14. Laser neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, O.G.

    1986-06-17

    Laser photodetachment of the excess electron to neutralize relativistic ions offers many advantages over the more conventional collisional methods using gases or thin foils as the neutralization agents. Probably the two most important advantages of laser photodetachment are the generation of a compact and low divergence beam, and the production of intense neutral beams at very high efficiency (approximately 90%). The high intensities or high current densities of the neutral beam result from the fixed maximum divergence that can be added to the beam by photodetachment of the charge using laser intensity of fixed wavelength and incident angle. The high neutralization efficiency is possible because there is no theoretical maximum to the neutralization efficiency, although higher efficiencies require higher laser powers and, therefore, costs. Additional advantages include focusability of the laser light onto the ion beam to maximize its efficacy. There certainly is no residual gas left in the particle beam path as is typical with gas neutralizers. The photodetachment process leaves the neutral atoms in the ground state so there is no excited state fluorescence to interfere with the subsequent beam sensing. Finally, since the beams to be neutralized are very high powered, for a large range of neutralization efficiencies the neutral beam can be increased more by increasing the power to the laser neutralizer than by adding an equal amount of power to the primary accelerator. 26 figs.

  15. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  16. Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  17. ELPylated anti-human TNF therapeutic single-domain antibodies for prevention of lethal septic shock.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Udo; Plagmann, Ingo; Malchow, Sven; Sack, Markus; Floss, Doreen M; Kruglov, Andrei A; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in multiple inflammatory diseases. The detrimental activity of TNF can be blocked by various antagonists, and commercial therapeutics based upon this principle have been approved for treatment of diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and psoriasis. In a search for new, improved anti-inflammatory therapeutics we have designed a single-domain monoclonal antibody (V(H) H), which recognizes TNF. The antibody component (TNF-V(H) H) is based upon an anti-human TNF Camelidae heavy-chain monoclonal antibody, which was linked to an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). We demonstrate that ELP fusion to the TNF-V(H) H enhances accumulation of the fusion protein during biomanufacturing in transgenic tobacco plants. With this study, we show for the first time that this plant-derived anti-human TNF-V(H) H antibody was biologically active in vivo. Therefore, therapeutic application of TNF-V(H) H-ELP fusion protein was tested in humanized TNF mice and was shown to be effective in preventing death caused by septic shock. The in vivo persistence of the ELPylated antibody was ∼24 fold longer than that of non-ELPylated TNF-V(H) H. PMID:20444206

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention.

    PubMed

    Davis, Teaniese Latham; DiClemente, Ralph

    2016-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. Surveillance data from 2012 indicate an estimated 1.2 million people aged 13 years and older were living with HIV infection in the United States, and 12.8% do not know their status. There are approximately 50,000 new HIV infections annually. With no available cure for HIV, primary prevention to reduce incident cases of HIV is essential. Strategies to prevent HIV transmission include reducing sexual risk behavior and needle sharing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has multiple resources available for primary and secondary prevention to reduce disease transmission and severity. PMID:26980130

  19. Acquired immunodeficiency, malabsorption and lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Fischel, B.; Burke, M.; Sasson, E.; Felner, S.

    1990-01-01

    A 66 year old female with a long history of recurrent pulmonary infection presented with a full-blown malabsorption syndrome. She was found to be suffering from acquired immunodeficiency. She later developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the cervical lymph nodes. The possible relationships between immunodeficiency, malabsorption and lymphoma are discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:2349181

  20. Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Biman; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-04-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common primary immunodeficiency of young adolescents and adults which also affects the children. The disease remains largely under-diagnosed in India and Southeast Asian countries. Although in majority of cases it is sporadic, disease may be inherited in a autosomal recessive pattern and rarely, in autosomal dominant pattern. Patients, in addition to frequent sino-pulmonary infections, are also susceptible to various autoimmune diseases and malignancy, predominantly lymphoma and leukemia. Other characteristic lesions include lymphocytic and granulomatous interstitial lung disease, and nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of gut. Diagnosis requires reduced levels of atleast two immunoglobulin isotypes: IgG with IgA and/or IgM and impaired specific antibody response to vaccines. A number of gene mutations have been described in CVID; however, these genetic alterations account for less than 20 % of cases of CVID. Flow cytometry aptly demonstrates a disturbed B cell homeostasis with reduced or absent memory B cells and increased CD21(low) B cells and transitional B cell populations. Approximately one-third of patients with CVID also display T cell functional defects. Immunoglobulin therapy remains the mainstay of treatment. Immunologists and other clinicians in India and other South East Asian countries need to be aware of CVID so that early diagnosis can be made, as currently, majority of these patients still go undiagnosed. PMID:26868026

  1. Space Flight Immunodeficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, William T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has had sufficient concern for the well-being of astronauts traveling in space to create the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), which is investigating several areas of biomedical research including those of immunology. As part of the Immunology, Infection, and Hematology Team, the co-investigators of the Space Flight Immunodeficiency Project began their research projects on April 1, 1998 and are now just into the second year of work. Two areas of research have been targeted: 1) specific immune (especially antibody) responses and 2) non-specific inflammation and adhesion. More precise knowledge of these two areas of research will help elucidate the potential harmful effects of space travel on the immune system, possibly sufficient to create a secondary state of immunodeficiency in astronauts. The results of these experiments are likely to lead to the delineation of functional alterations in antigen presentation, specific immune memory, cytokine regulation of immune responses, cell to cell interactions, and cell to endothelium interactions.

  2. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  3. IL-10 production in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Huang, R; Danon, M; Mayer, L; Cunningham-Rundles, C

    1998-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency, (CVI) is a heterogeneous primary immunodeficiency disease in which there are T and B cell defects. Since IL-10 in conjunction with anti-CD40 promotes secretion of IgG, IgA, and IgM by CVI B cells, these studies were performed to investigate IL-10 production in CVI. Mitogen or anti-CD3 stimulated CVI peripheral blood mononuclear cells, or isolated T cells produced an insignificant amount of IL-10 over background levels. CVI monocyte IL-10 production was substantial and greater than that of normal controls. Anti-IL-10-neutralizing antibody strongly enhanced CVI T cell proliferative responses to PHA, but only to an insignificant extent, soluble antigens. IL-2 plus anti-IL-10 enhanced CVI proliferative responses to antigens significantly more over baseline than for cells of similarly tested normal controls. These data suggest that CVI T cell secretion of IL-10 is deficient, but that monocyte-derived IL-10, plus a relative lack of IL-2 production, could contribute to the defects of cell proliferation in this disorder. PMID:9557163

  4. Feline immunodeficiency virus latency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite highly effective anti-retroviral therapy, HIV is thought to persist in patients within long-lived cellular reservoirs in the form of a transcriptionally inactive (latent) integrated provirus. Lentiviral latency has therefore come to the forefront of the discussion on the possibility of a cure for HIV infection in humans. Animal models of lentiviral latency provide an essential tool to study mechanisms of latency and therapeutic manipulation. Of the three animal models that have been described, the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cat is the most recent and least characterized. However, several aspects of this model make it attractive for latency research, and it may be complementary to other model systems. This article reviews what is known about FIV latency and chronic FIV infection and how it compares with that of other lentiviruses. It thereby offers a framework for the usefulness of this model in future research aimed at lentiviral eradication. PMID:23829177

  5. Feline immunodeficiency virus latency.

    PubMed

    McDonnel, Samantha J; Sparger, Ellen E; Murphy, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Despite highly effective anti-retroviral therapy, HIV is thought to persist in patients within long-lived cellular reservoirs in the form of a transcriptionally inactive (latent) integrated provirus. Lentiviral latency has therefore come to the forefront of the discussion on the possibility of a cure for HIV infection in humans. Animal models of lentiviral latency provide an essential tool to study mechanisms of latency and therapeutic manipulation. Of the three animal models that have been described, the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cat is the most recent and least characterized. However, several aspects of this model make it attractive for latency research, and it may be complementary to other model systems. This article reviews what is known about FIV latency and chronic FIV infection and how it compares with that of other lentiviruses. It thereby offers a framework for the usefulness of this model in future research aimed at lentiviral eradication. PMID:23829177

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Uma; Sengupta, Nilanjan; Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta; Roy, Keshab Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients. PMID:22028995

  7. Inhibitory effects of Korean medicinal plants and camelliatannin H from Camellia japonica on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Cheol; Hur, Jong Moon; Park, Ju Gwon; Hatano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takashi; Miyashiro, Hirotsugu; Min, Byung Sun; Hattori, Masao

    2002-08-01

    To identify substances with anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity in traditional medicines, 101 extracts of Korean medicinal plants were screened for their inhibitory effects on HIV type 1 protease (PR). The enzyme activity was determined by HPLC. Of the extracts tested, strong inhibitory effects were observed in the acetone extracts of the pericarp and leaves of Camellia japonica, the water extract of the leaves of Sageretia theezans and the methanol extract of the aerial part of Sophora flavescens. Camelliatannin H from the pericarp of C. japonica, showed a potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 PR with IC(50) of 0.9 microM. PMID:12203260

  8. Priming of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) CD8^+ Cytotoxic T Cells in vivo by Carrier-Free HIV Synthetic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Mary Kate; Weinhold, Kent J.; Scearce, Richard M.; Washburn, Eileen M.; Clark, Cynthia A.; Palker, Thomas J.; Haynes, Barton F.

    1991-11-01

    The generation of antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a critical component of the immune response to viral infections. A safe and nontoxic vaccine for AIDS would optimally use a carrier-free synthetic peptide immunogen containing only components of HIV necessary for induction of protective immune responses. We report that hybrid synthetic peptides containing either a HIV envelope gp120 T-cell determinant (T1) or the envelope gp41 fusion domain (F) N-terminal to HIV CTL determinants are capable of priming murine CD8^+, major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted anti-HIV CTLs in vivo. These data demonstrate that carrier-free, nonderivatized synthetic peptides can be used in vivo to induce anti-HIV CTL responses.

  9. Antiviral Drugs for Viruses Other Than Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Razonable, Raymund R.

    2011-01-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M2 protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-? and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess antihuman immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects. PMID:21964179

  10. Anti-Human VEGF Repebody Effectively Suppresses Choroidal Neovascularization and Vascular Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Da-Eun; Ryou, Jeong-Hyun; Oh, Jong Rok; Han, Jung Woo; Park, Tae Kwann; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness among people over the age of 60. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a major role in pathological angiogenesis in AMD. Herein, we present the development of an anti- human VEGF repebody, which is a small-sized protein binder consisting of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules. The anti-VEGF repebody selected through a phage-display was shown to have a high affinity and specificity for human VEGF. We demonstrate that this repebody effectively inhibits in vitro angiogenic cellular processes, such as proliferation and migration, by blocking the VEGF-mediated signaling pathway. The repebody was also shown to have a strong suppression effect on choroidal neovascularization (CNV) and vascular leakage in vivo. Our results indicate that the anti-VEGF repebody has a therapeutic potential for treating neovascular AMD as well as other VEGF-involved diseases including diabetic retinopathy and metastatic cancers. PMID:27015541

  11. Anti-human CD138 monoclonal antibodies and their bispecific formats: generation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Zou, Jianxuan; Zong, Yunhui; Meng, Huimin; An, Gangli; Yang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Syndecan-1 (CD138), a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, acts as a co-receptor for growth factors and chemokines and is a molecular marker associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition during development and carcinogenesis. In this study, we generated two specific mouse anti-human CD138 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, clone ID: 480CT5.4.3, 587CT7.3.6.5) using hybridoma technology and identified their immunological characteristics. After hybridoma sequencing, the single-chain variable fragments (ScFvs) cloned from two hybridoma cells were combined with anti-CD3 OKT-3 ScFv to generate two recombinant bispecific antibodies (h-STL002, m-STL002) against CD138 and CD3 molecules, respectively. The bispecific antibodies were able to specifically target CD138 + multiple myeloma (MM) cells and CD3 + T cells, and showed the potent cytotoxicity against MM RPMI-8226 cell line through T cell activation. However, these bispecific antibodies without T cells did not cause toxic side effect on MM cells. Overall, the two hybridoma clones and their bispecific formats have great potential to promote diagnosis and immunotherapy of plasma cell malignancy. PMID:26954291

  12. Suppression of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in vivo by 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine.

    PubMed Central

    Egberink, H; Borst, M; Niphuis, H; Balzarini, J; Neu, H; Schellekens, H; De Clercq, E; Horzinek, M; Koolen, M

    1990-01-01

    The acyclic purine nucleoside analogue 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine [PMEA; formerly referred to as 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine] is a potent and selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and of Moloney murine sarcoma virus-induced tumor formation in mice. In the latter system PMEA has stronger antiretroviral potency and selectivity than 3'-azido-3'-thymidine (AZT). We have now investigated the effect of the drug in cats infected with the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). In vitro, PMEA was found to efficiently block FIV replication in feline thymocytes (50% effective dose, 0.6 microM). When administered to cats at doses of 20, 5, or 2 mg/kg per day, PMEA caused a dose-dependent suppression of FIV replication and virus-specific antibody production. Seropositive field cats with signs of opportunistic infection (gingivitis, stomatitis, and diarrhea) showed clinical improvement during PMEA therapy (5 mg/kg per day) and recurrence of the disease after treatment was discontinued. Thus, FIV infection in cats is an excellent model to test the efficacy of selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents in vivo. Images PMID:2158102

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Eirini; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a serious and relatively frequent complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that may associate with increased morbidity and mortality and may prove difficult to manage, especially in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). PMID:25337392

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults ... 1–6 weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can ...

  15. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Human Immunodeficiency ...

  16. Actin cytoskeletal defects in immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Moulding, Dale A; Record, Julien; Malinova, Dessislava; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the cytoskeleton in mounting a successful immune response is evident from the wide range of defects that occur in actin-related primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). Studies of these PIDs have revealed a pivotal role for the actin cytoskeleton in almost all stages of immune system function, from hematopoiesis and immune cell development, through to recruitment, migration, intercellular and intracellular signaling, and activation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. The major focus of this review is the immune defects that result from mutations in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene (WAS), which have a broad impact on many different processes and give rise to clinically heterogeneous immunodeficiencies. We also discuss other related genetic defects and the possibility of identifying new genetic causes of cytoskeletal immunodeficiency. PMID:24117828

  17. Genetic variability in human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Alizon, M; Montagnier, L

    1987-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been established. In addition to the nucleic acid variations responsible for the restriction map polymorphism, isolates of HIV differ significantly at the protein level, especially in the envelope, in terms of amino acid substitutions and reciprocal insertions-deletions. In this investigation, molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the genomes of 2 HIV isolates obtained from patients in Zaire were carried out. The 1st isolate was recovered in 1983 from a 24-year-old woman with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); the 2nd was isolated in 1985 from a 7-year-old boy with AIDS-related complex (ARC). The genetic organization of these isolates was identical to that found in other HIV isolates from the US and Europe, particularly in terms of the conservation of the central region located between the pol and env genes composed of a series of overlapping open reading frames. There were, however, substantial differences in the primary structure of the viral proteins, with env being more variable than the gag and pol genes. Alignment of the envelopes revealed hypervariable domains with a great number of mutations and reciprocal insertions and deletions. Overall, this analysis suggests that the African and American HIV infections have a common origin given their identical genetic organization. The sequence variability reflects a divergent evolutionary process, and the fact that the 2 Zairian isolates were more divergent than American isolates studied by others indicates a longer evolution of HIV in Africa. An essential research goal is to identify the HIV envelope domains responsible for the virus-cellular surface antigen interaction since an immune response against these epitopes could elicit neutralizing antibodies for use in a vaccine. PMID:3439717

  18. Characterization of a surrogate murine antibody to model anti-human CD3 therapies

    PubMed Central

    Dépis, Fabien; Hatterer, Eric; Ballet, Romain; Daubeuf, Bruno; Cons, Laura; Glatt, Sophie; Reith, Walter; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Dean, Yann

    2013-01-01

    Fc-modified anti-human CD3ε monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are in clinical development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. These next generation mAbs have completed clinical trials in patients with type-1 diabetes and inflammatory bowel disease demonstrating a narrow therapeutic window. Lowered doses are ineffective, yet higher pharmacologically-active doses cause an undesirable level of adverse events. Thus, there is a critical need for a return to bench research to explore ways of improving clinical outcomes. Indeed, we recently reported that a short course of treatment affords synergy, providing long-term disease amelioration when combining anti-mouse CD3 and anti-mouse tumor necrosis factor mAbs in experimental arthritis. Such strategies may widen the window between risk and benefit; however, to more accurately assess experimentally the biology and pharmacology, reagents that mimic the current development candidates were required. Consequently, we engineered an Fc-modified anti-mouse CD3ε mAb, 2C11-Novi. Here, we report the functional characterization of 2C11-Novi demonstrating that it does not bind FcγR in vitro and elicits little cytokine release in vivo, while maintaining classical pharmacodynamic effects (CD3-TCR downregulation and T cell killing). Furthermore, we observed that oral administration of 2C11-Novi ameliorated progression of remitting-relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalitis in mice, significantly reducing the primary acute and subsequent relapse phase of the disease. With innovative approaches validated in two experimental models of human disease, 2C11-Novi represents a meaningful tool to conduct further mechanistic studies aiming at exploiting the immunoregulatory properties of Fc-modified anti-CD3 therapies via combination therapy using parenteral or oral routes of administration. PMID:23751612

  19. A monovalent anti-human CD28 domain antibody antagonist: preclinical efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Suchard, Suzanne J; Davis, Patricia M; Kansal, Selena; Stetsko, Dawn K; Brosius, Ruth; Tamura, James; Schneeweis, Lumelle; Bryson, James; Salcedo, Theodora; Wang, Haiqing; Yang, Zheng; Fleener, Catherine A; Ignatovich, Olga; Plummer, Christopher; Grant, Steven; Nadler, Steven G

    2013-11-01

    Targeting the CD28-CD80/86 pathway with an anti-CD28 antagonist is a promising alternative to current therapies for autoimmunity. However, attempts at generating conventional anti-CD28 mAbs lacking stimulatory activity has been challenging. In this study, we describe anti-human CD28 receptor antagonist domain Abs (dAbs) that are specific for human CD28. These dAbs are potent inhibitors of T cell activation, with an EC50 of 35 ± 14 ng/ml for inhibition of proliferation. The EC50 of 53 ± 11 ng/ml in an ex vivo CD28 receptor occupancy assay corresponds with in vitro functional activity, suggesting a direct correlation. The anti-CD28 dAb is equipotent in the inhibition of CD80- and CD86-mediated T cell proliferation and does not interfere with CTLA-4-mediated downmodulation of CD86 expression on APCs. The anti-CD28 dAbs are monomeric and do not demonstrate any evidence of agonism or costimulatory activity. In cynomolgus monkeys, the anti-CD28 dAb demonstrated pharmacodynamic activity, as measured by the inhibition of a T cell-dependent Ab response, without evidence of T cell depletion or cytokine release. Furthermore, there was a strong correlation between systemic exposure, duration, and extent of CD28 receptor occupancy, and pharmacodynamic activity. Taken together, these data support clinical evaluation of this novel anti-CD28 dAb for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:24081989

  20. Activities of Masked 2?,3?-Dideoxynucleoside Monophosphate Derivatives against Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Resting Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aquaro, Stefano; Wedgwood, Orson; Yarnold, Christopher; Cahard, Dominique; Pathinara, Ranjith; McGuigan, Christopher; Calio', Raffaele; de Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2000-01-01

    The anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity of aryloxyphosphoramidate protides of a number of anti-HIV nucleoside analogues was assessed in resting primary monocyte-macrophages (M/M). While 2?,3?-dideoxythymidine (d4T), 2?,3?-dideoxyadenosine (ddA), and 2?,3?-dideoxy-2?,3?-didehydroadenosine (d4A) protides showed an anti-HIV activity that was 25- to 625-fold greater than the parent nucleotides d4T, ddA, and d4A, respectively, other aryloxyphosphoramidate protides showed similar or even lower anti-HIV activities than their parent compounds. This variable anti-HIV effect is most likely related to the different dynamics of intracellular nucleoside monophosphate release from the protides. Our results indicate the potential advantage of therapeutic use of this approach for some nucleotide analogues to affect HIV replication in M/M, one of the major reservoirs of HIV in vivo. PMID:10602742

  1. Primary immunodeficiencies underlying fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Cypowyj, Sophie; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review We review the primary immunodeficiencies underlying an increasing variety of superficial and invasive fungal infections. We also stress that the occurrence of such fungal infections should lead physicians to search for the corresponding single-gene inborn errors of immunity. Finally, we suggest that other fungal infections may also result from hitherto unknown inborn errors of immunity, at least in some patients with no known risk factors. Recent findings An increasing number of primary immunodeficiencies are being shown to underlie fungal infectious diseases in children and young adults. Inborn errors of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase complex (chronic granulomatous disease), severe congenital neutropenia and leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I confer a predisposition to invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. More rarely, inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlie endemic mycoses. Inborn errors of IL-17 immunity have recently been shown to underlie chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of CARD9 immunity underlie deep dermatophytosis and invasive candidiasis. Summary Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, deep dermatophytosis, pneumocystosis, and endemic mycoses can all be caused by primary immunodeficiencies. Each type of infection is highly suggestive of a specific type of primary immunodeficiency. In the absence of overt risk factors, single-gene inborn errors of immunity should be sought in children and young adults with these and other fungal diseases. PMID:24240293

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  3. Cross-reactivity of anti-human cytokine monoclonal antibodies used as a tool to identify novel immunological biomarkers in domestic ruminants.

    PubMed

    Dorneles, E M S; Araújo, M S S; Teixeira-Carvalho, A; Martins-Filho, O A; Lage, A P

    2015-01-01

    Eleven commercially available PE-labeled anti-human (IL-1-α, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-17A, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-13) and anti-mouse (IL-10, TNF-α) cytokine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were tested for cross-reactivity with cattle, goat, and sheep cytokines. Cross-reactivity was assessed by comparative analysis with the standard reactivity of the target species. Our data demonstrated that anti-human IL-1-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A and IL-10 mAbs cross-react with all ruminant species tested. Anti-human IL-5 mAb showed a strong cross-reactivity with cattle and goat IL-5, while anti-human TNF-α mAb showed a selective cross-reactivity with goat TNF-α. No cross-reactivity with the ruminant cytokines was observed for anti-human IL-12 and IL-13 mAbs or for the two anti-mouse cytokine mAbs tested. The present study demonstrated the cross-reactivity of various anti-human cytokine mAbs with cattle, sheep, and goat cytokines, increasing the range of immunological biomarkers for studies in veterinary medicine. PMID:25730032

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus vaccine an update

    PubMed Central

    Beena, VT; Choudhary, Kanaram; Rajeev, R; Sivakumar, R; Heera, R; Padmakumar, SK

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in late1980s, the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has reached pandemic proportions, representing a global developmental and public health threat. Finding of a safe, globally effective and affordable HIV vaccine offers the best hope for the future control of the disease pandemic. Significant progress has been made over the past years in the areas of basic virology, immunology, and pathogenesis of HIV/AIDS and the development of anti-retroviral drugs. However, the search for an HIV vaccine faces formidable scientific challenges related to the high genetic variability of the virus, the lack of immune correlates of protection, limitations with the existing animal models and logistical problems associated with the conduct of multiple clinical trials. Most of the vaccine approaches developed so far aim at inducing cell-mediated immune responses. Multiple vaccine concepts and vaccination strategies have been tested, including DNA vaccines, subunit vaccines, live vectored recombinant vaccines, various prime-boost vaccine combinations and vaccine based on broadly neutralizing human anti-HIV Antibody 2G12. This article reviews the state of the art in HIV vaccine research, summarizes the results obtained so far and discusses the challenges to be met in the development of a successful HIV vaccine. PMID:23798835

  5. Immunodeficiency induced by child abuse.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, T; Tanegashima, A; Yamamoto, H; Saijoh, K

    1998-12-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old girl who died from sepsis from cellulitis of the neck caused by a right ear injury. The autopsy findings showed severe involution of the thymus and atrophy of lymphoid tissues. The impairment of T- and B-cell functions was demonstrated both histologically and immunohistologically. Thymic involution caused by child abuse might lead to secondary immunodeficiency. PMID:15335522

  6. Gene therapy for primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Hacein-Bey Abina, S; Touzot, F; Cavazzana, M

    2015-12-01

    Gene therapy has effectively entered Medicine via the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Because hematopoietic stem cells are accessible and because it was understood that genetic correction of lymphocyte progenitor cells carrying a genetic defect impairing differentiation, could result in the production of long-lived T lymphocytes, it was reasoned that ex vivo gene transfer in hematopoietic cells could lead to disease phenotype correction. Retroviral vectors were designed to ex vivo transduce such cells. This has indeed been shown to lead to sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiency associated with two forms of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) for now more than ten years. Occurrence in some patients of genotoxicity related to retroviral vectors integration close to and transactivation of oncogenes has led to the development of retroviral vectors devoid of its enhancer element. Results of recent trials performed for several forms of PID indeed suggest that their use is both safe and efficacious. It is thus anticipated that their application to the treatment of many more life threatening PID will be developed over the coming years. PMID:25708106

  7. Evolution of a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Edmonson, Paul; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Martin, Louis N.; Delahunty, Claire; Heeney, Jonathan; Kornfeld, Hardy; Donahue, Peter R.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hood, Leroy; Mullins, James I.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of disease induction by simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV) in macaques was initially hampered by a lack of molecularly defined pathogenic strains. The first molecularly cloned SIV strains inoculated into macaques, SIVmacBK28 and SIVmacBK44 (hereafter designated BK28 and BK44, respectively), were cases in point, since they failed to induce disease within 1 year postinoculation in any inoculated animal. Here we report the natural history of infection with BK28 and BK44 in inoculated rhesus macaques and efforts to increase the pathogenicity of BK28 through genetic manipulation and in vivo passage. BK44 infection resulted in no disease in four animals infected for more than 7 years, whereas BK28 induced disease in less than half of animals monitored for up to 7 years. Elongation of the BK28 transmembrane protein (TM) coding sequence truncated by prior passage in human cells marginally increased pathogenicity, with two of four animals dying in the third year and one dying in the seventh year of infection. Modification of the BK28 long terminal repeat to include four consensus nuclear factor SP1 and two consensus NF-?B binding sites enhanced early virus replication without augmenting pathogenicity. In contrast, in vivo passage of BK28 from the first animal to die from immunodeficiency disease (1.5 years after infection) resulted in a consistently pathogenic strain and a 50% survival time of about 1.3 years, thus corresponding to one of the most pathogenic SIV strains identified to date. To determine whether the diverse viral quasispecies that evolved during in vivo passage was required for pathogenicity or whether a more virulent virus variant had evolved, we generated a molecular clone composed of the 3? half of the viral genome derived from the in vivo-passaged virus (H824) fused with the 5? half of the BK28 genome. Kinetics of disease induction with this cloned virus (BK28/H824) were similar to those with the in vivo-passaged virus, with four of five animals surviving less than 1.7 years. Thus, evolution of variants with enhanced pathogenicity can account for the increased pathogenicity of this SIV strain. The genetic changes responsible for this virulent transformation included at most 59 point mutations and 3 length-change mutations. The critical mutations were likely to have been multiple and dispersed, including elongation of the TM and Nef coding sequences; changes in RNA splice donor and acceptor sites, TATA box sites, and Sp1 sites; multiple changes in the V2 region of SU, including a consensus neutralization epitope; and five new N-linked glycosylation sites in SU. PMID:9420239

  8. Treg depletion in non-human primates using a novel diphtheria toxin-based anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Pratts, Shannon G; Zhang, Huiping; Spencer, Philip J; Yu, Ruichao; Tonsho, Makoto; Shah, Jigesh A; Tanabe, Tatsu; Powell, Harrison R; Huang, Christene A; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Wang, Zhirui

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an important role in modulating the immune response and has attracted increasing attention in diverse fields such as cancer treatment, transplantation and autoimmune diseases. CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) is expressed on the majority of Tregs, especially on effector Tregs. Recently we have developed a diphtheria-toxin based anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin for depleting CCR4(+) cells in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that the anti-human CCR4 immunotoxin bound and depleted monkey CCR4(+) cells in vitro. We also demonstrated that the immunotoxin bound to the CCR4(+)Foxp3(+) monkey Tregs in vitro. In vivo studies performed in two naive cynomolgus monkeys revealed 78-89% CCR4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg depletion in peripheral blood lasting approximately 10 days. In lymph nodes, 89-96% CCR4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs were depleted. No effect was observed in other cell populations including CD8(+) T cells, other CD4(+) T cells, B cells and NK cells. To our knowledge, this is the first agent that effectively depleted non-human primate (NHP) Tregs. This immunotoxin has potential to deplete effector Tregs for combined cancer treatment. PMID:26643572

  9. Cross-reactivity of anti-human, anti-porcine and anti-bovine cytokine antibodies with cetacean tissues.

    PubMed

    Jaber, J R; Prez, J; Zafra, R; Herrez, P; Rodrguez, F; Arbelo, M; de los Monteros, A Espinosa; Fernndez, A

    2010-07-01

    The cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies specific for human, porcine and bovine cytokines was evaluated for three cetacean species: Atlantic spotted dolphins (Stenella frontalis), striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) and fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus). Formalin-fixed and snap-frozen tissue sections of lung, spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph node were evaluated. T and B lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages were detected by use of anti-human CD3, IgG and lysozyme polyclonal antibodies (pAbs), respectively. These reagents were successfully applied to both fixed and frozen tissues. Anti-human interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-8, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and CD25, anti-porcine IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, and anti-bovine IL-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma antibodies produced immunolabelling in cetacean snap-frozen lymph node sections similar to that obtained with tissue from the species of origin, but they did not react with formalin-fixed tissue sections. Anti-porcine IL-12 pAb did not react with snap-frozen cetacean tissue samples. Macrophages and lymphocytes were the most common cells immunolabelled with the anti-cytokine antibodies. This panel of anti-cytokine antibodies may be used to evaluate cytokine expression in snap-frozen tissue samples from the cetacean species tested. PMID:20163803

  10. [Molecular diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    García Rodríguez, M C; López Granados, E; Cambronero Martínez, R; Ferreira Cerdán, A; Fontán Casariego, G

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular defects responsible for some primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) offers undoubted advantages in establishing a reliable diagnosis. Such knowledge would allow us not only to establish a prognosis but also to instigate the most appropriate therapy. After molecular diagnosis, some patients could benefit from gene therapy. However, apart from the diagnosis of the disease, molecular biological techniques also enable more reliable identification of carriers and, when suggested by the family history and when the familial defect is already known, prenatal diagnosis will also be possible, thus establishing the earliest possible treatment. Using the single-stranded conformational polymorphism technique followed by direct sequencing, we found 22 different mutations in 22 patients from unrelated families and with a phenotype compatible with x-linked agammaglobulinemia. Fourteen of these are new, previously undescribed mutations and the remaining eight are already included in the data base (http://www.uta.fi/imt/bioinfo/Btkbase). Analysis of the female carrier was performed in all the mothers and the mutation was de novo in only one patient. Study of the BtK gene enabled differential diagnosis with common variable immunodeficiency disease in some patients who showed absent or very low lymphocyte B counts as well as forms of autosomal recessive agammaglobulinemia. Using the same techniques, we were able to identify mutations in the CD40 ligand gene in three families in which one of the members had clinical and biological phenotype compatible with X-linked hyper-IgM. Molecular diagnosis was very useful in identifying carriers in these families as well as in making the differential diagnosis among patients with common variable immunodeficiency disease. Purely on this were we able to provide appropriate genetic counseling. PMID:11434883

  11. Skin manifestations of immunodeficiencies in children.

    PubMed

    Torchia, D; Connelly, E A

    2010-04-01

    Immunodeficiency is a state in which the immune system's ability to fight infectious diseases is compromised or entirely absent. Most cases of immunodeficiency are acquired (secondary) but some people are born with defects in the immune system, or primary immunodeficiency. More than 140 distinct genes have been identified, which abnormalities account for more than 200 different forms of primary immunodeficiencies. The skin may be one of the organs involved in immunodeficiencies and in a number of primary immunodeficiency syndromes the skin is one of the main clues to the diagnosis and dermatologists may be the first to appreciate an immune defect in their patients. From "A" of well-known ataxia-telangiectasia to "Z" of recently identified zeta-chain (TCR) associated protein kinase 70kDa (ZAP-70) deficiency, this review attempts to provide a complete and up-to-date summary of all known primary immunodeficiencies featuring skin manifestations and presenting in the pediatric population. Given the vastness of the topic etiopathogenesis, extracutaneous manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis were not discussed unless briefly. We hope that this effort will help specialists to facilitate the recognition of primary immunodeficiencies and therefore early diagnosis and management. PMID:20467400

  12. Severe Viral Infections and Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with severe viral infections are often not thoroughly evaluated for immunodeficiencies. In this review, we summarize primary immunodeficiencies that predispose individuals to severe viral infections. Some immunodeficiencies enhance susceptibility to disease with a specific virus or family of viruses, whereas others predispose to diseases with multiple viruses in addition to disease with other microbes. Although the role of cytotoxic T cells in controlling viral infections is well known, a number of immunodeficiencies that predispose to severe viral diseases have recently been ascribed to defects in the Toll-like receptorinterferon signaling pathway. These immunodeficiencies are rare, but it is important to identify them both for prognostic information and for genetic counseling. Undoubtedly, additional mutations in proteins in the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system will be identified in the future, which will reveal the importance of these proteins in controlling infections caused by viruses and other pathogens. PMID:21960712

  13. Pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, J A

    1993-01-01

    The lentivirus human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes AIDS by interacting with a large number of different cells in the body and escaping the host immune response against it. HIV is transmitted primarily through blood and genital fluids and to newborn infants from infected mothers. The steps occurring in infection involve an interaction of HIV not only with the CD4 molecule on cells but also with other cellular receptors recently identified. Virus-cell fusion and HIV entry subsequently take place. Following virus infection, a variety of intracellular mechanisms determine the relative expression of viral regulatory and accessory genes leading to productive or latent infection. With CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV replication can cause syncytium formation and cell death; with other cells, such as macrophages, persistent infection can occur, creating reservoirs for the virus in many cells and tissues. HIV strains are highly heterogeneous, and certain biologic and serologic properties determined by specific genetic sequences can be linked to pathogenic pathways and resistance to the immune response. The host reaction against HIV, through neutralizing antibodies and particularly through strong cellular immune responses, can keep the virus suppressed for many years. Long-term survival appears to involve infection with a relatively low-virulence strain that remains sensitive to the immune response, particularly to control by CD8+ cell antiviral activity. Several therapeutic approaches have been attempted, and others are under investigation. Vaccine development has provided some encouraging results, but the observations indicate the major challenge of preventing infection by HIV. Ongoing research is necessary to find a solution to this devastating worldwide epidemic. Images PMID:8464405

  14. Invasive aspergillosis in primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Almyroudis, N G; Holland, S M; Segal, B H

    2005-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare and usually first manifest during childhood. Invasive aspergillosis is the leading cause of mortality in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), reflecting the key role of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase in host defense against opportunistic fungi. Despite interferon-gamma prophylaxis, invasive filamentous fungal infections are a persistent problem in CGD. Key principles of management of fungal infections involve early recognition and aggressive treatment and appropriate surgical debridement of localized disease. Because CGD is a disorder of phagocyte stem cells in which the gene defects are well defined, it is a model disease to evaluate immune reconstitution through stem cell transplantation and gene therapy. Patients with the hyper-IgE syndrome with recurrent infections (Job syndrome) are prone to colonization of lung cavities (pneumatoceles) by Aspergillus species leading to local invasion and rarely disseminated infection. Other primary phagocytic disorders, T-cell disorders, and mitochondrial disorders are uncommonly associated with invasive aspergillosis. Taken together, these rare primary immunodeficiencies highlight the complex coordination of both innate and acquired pathways mediating host defense against Aspergillus infection. PMID:16110817

  15. Neutral SU(2) and neutral currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudson, M.; Georgi, H.; Yildiz, A.

    1980-11-01

    We examine the neutral current structure of a class of topless gauge theories in which b decay and CP violation are mediated by neutral gauge bosons, N. We find a good fit to all data(better than the fit to the standard model) for sin2θ = 0.205 and MN2/M W2 ~ 10.

  16. TH17 Cells in Autoimmunity and Immunodeficiency: Protective or Pathogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, Ashish K.; Leung, Nicole J.; McMurchy, Alicia N.; Levings, Megan K.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005 a newly discovered T helper cell subset that secreted interleukin (IL)-17 became the center of attention in immunology. Initial studies painted Th17 cells as the culprit for destruction in many different autoimmune and auto-inflammatory diseases. Subsequently, the discovery of patients with primary immunodeficiencies in the IL-17 pathway taught us that Th17 cells have a critical role in defense against certain fungal and bacterial infections. Moreover, the paradoxical exacerbation of Crohn’s disease in the clinical trials of a Secukinumab (AIN457), a fully human neutralizing antibody to IL-17A, has cast into doubt a universal pro-inflammatory and harmful role for Th17 cells. Evidence now suggests that depending on the environment Th17 cells can alter their differentiation program, ultimately giving rise to either protective or pro-inflammatory cells. In this review we will summarize the evidence from patients with immunodeficiencies, autoimmune, or auto-inflammatory diseases that teaches us how the pro-inflammatory versus protective function of Th17 cells varies within the context of different human diseases. PMID:22675324

  17. Crohn's disease as an immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Rahman, Farooq Z; Sewell, Gavin; Smith, Andrew M; Segal, Anthony W

    2010-07-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) has widely been regarded as the consequence of a dysregulated T-cell-mediated response to intestinal microbes, and the majority of the worldwide research effort has focused on characterizing and treating the chronic inflammatory phase of the disease. However, recent molecular biological and clinical investigations indicate that CD is actually a primary immunodeficiency. At first counter-intuitive, the apparent paradox of a pathogenic innate immune defect can be linked mechanistically to the granulomatous chronic inflammation characteristic of the disease. Genome-wide association studies have corroborated the involvement of innate immune dysfunction in the pathogenesis of CD, but less than 20% of the heritable risk is accounted for. By contrast, in vitro and in vivo stimulation of the immune system has highlighted novel areas of interest that may lead to the development of targeted therapeutic and diagnostic tools. PMID:20594132

  18. Pediatric human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, J B

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade, an increase in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has had a substantial impact on childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vertical transmission of HIV from mother to infant accounts for the vast majority of these cases. Identification of HIV-infected pregnant women needs to be impoved so that appropriate therapy can be initiated for both mothers and infants. While recent data demonstrate a dramatic decrease in HIV transmission from a subset of women treated with zidovudine during pregnancy, further efforts at reducing transmission are desperately needed. This review focuses on vertically transmitted HIV infection in children, its epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, natural history, and clinical manifestations including infectious and noninfectious complications. An overview of the complex medical management of these children ensues, including the use of antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infection prophylaxis is reviewed, along with the important role of other supportive therapies. PMID:8894346

  19. Strategies for B-Cell Receptor Repertoire Analysis in Primary Immunodeficiencies: From Severe Combined Immunodeficiency to Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    IJspeert, Hanna; Wentink, Marjolein; van Zessen, David; Driessen, Gertjan J.; Dalm, Virgil A. S. H.; van Hagen, Martin P.; Pico-Knijnenburg, Ingrid; Simons, Erik J.; van Dongen, Jacques J. M.; Stubbs, Andrew P.; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    The antigen receptor repertoires of B- and T-cells form the basis of the adaptive immune response. The repertoires should be sufficiently diverse to recognize all possible pathogens. However, careful selection is needed to prevent responses to self or harmless antigens. Limited antigen receptor repertoire diversity leads to immunodeficiency, whereas unselected or misdirected repertoires can result in autoimmunity. The antigen receptor repertoire harbors information about abnormalities in many immunological disorders. Recent developments in next generation sequencing allow the analysis of the antigen receptor repertoire in much greater detail than ever before. Analyzing the antigen receptor repertoire in patients with mutations in genes responsible for the generation of the antigen receptor repertoire will give new insights into repertoire formation and selection. In this perspective, we describe strategies and considerations for analysis of the naive and antigen-selected B-cell repertoires in primary immunodeficiency patients with a focus on severe combined immunodeficiency and common variable immunodeficiency. PMID:25904919

  20. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.

    1981-08-18

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  1. Warts and All: HPV in Primary Immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Leiding, Jennifer W.; Holland, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) is almost universal and eventually asymptomatic, but pathologic infection with HPV is severe, recurrent, and recalcitrant to therapy. It is also an underappreciated manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Mutations in EVER1, EVER2, GATA2, CXCR4, and DOCK8 are typically associated with extensive HPV infections, whereas several other primary immune defects have severe HPV much less frequently. We review immunodeficiencies with severe HPV infections and the mechanisms underlying them. PMID:23036745

  2. IgG Donor-Specific Anti-Human HLA Antibody Subclasses and Kidney Allograft Antibody-Mediated Injury.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Carmen; Viglietti, Denis; Bentlejewski, Carol; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Vernerey, Dewi; Aubert, Olivier; Verine, Jrme; Jouven, Xavier; Legendre, Christophe; Glotz, Denis; Loupy, Alexandre; Zeevi, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies may have different pathogenicities according to IgG subclass. We investigated the association between IgG subclasses of circulating anti-human HLA antibodies and antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury. Among 635 consecutive kidney transplantations performed between 2008 and 2010, we enrolled 125 patients with donor-specific anti-human HLA antibodies (DSA) detected in the first year post-transplant. We assessed DSA characteristics, including specificity, HLA class specificity, mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), C1q-binding, and IgG subclass, and graft injury phenotype at the time of sera evaluation. Overall, 51 (40.8%) patients had acute antibody-mediated rejection (aABMR), 36 (28.8%) patients had subclinical ABMR (sABMR), and 38 (30.4%) patients were ABMR-free. The MFI of the immunodominant DSA (iDSA, the DSA with the highest MFI level) was 6724464, and 41.6% of patients had iDSA showing C1q positivity. The distribution of iDSA IgG1-4 subclasses among the population was 75.2%, 44.0%, 28.0%, and 26.4%, respectively. An unsupervised principal component analysis integrating iDSA IgG subclasses revealed aABMR was mainly driven by IgG3 iDSA, whereas sABMR was driven by IgG4 iDSA. IgG3 iDSA was associated with a shorter time to rejection (P<0.001), increased microcirculation injury (P=0.002), and C4d capillary deposition (P<0.001). IgG4 iDSA was associated with later allograft injury with increased allograft glomerulopathy and interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy lesions (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Integrating iDSA HLA class specificity, MFI level, C1q-binding status, and IgG subclasses in a Cox survival model revealed IgG3 iDSA and C1q-binding iDSA were strongly and independently associated with allograft failure. These results suggest IgG iDSA subclasses identify distinct phenotypes of kidney allograft antibody-mediated injury. PMID:26293822

  3. Establishment of monoclonal anti-human CD26 antibodies suitable for immunostaining of formalin-fixed tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A T cell costimulatory molecule with dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) activity in its extracellular region, CD26 is a multifunctional molecule associated with various proteins such as adenosine deaminase, caveolin-1, CXCR4, collagen, and fibronectin, while playing an important role in the regulation of inflammatory responses and tumor biology. We have focused on CD26 as a novel therapeutic target for various tumors and immune disorders, and have developed a humanized anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody (mAb), YS110, which is currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical trial for patients with CD26-expressing tumors, including malignant mesothelioma. Since detection of tumor CD26 expression is required for determining potential eligibility for YS110 therapy, the development of anti-human CD26 mAb that can clearly and reliably detect the denatured CD26 molecule in the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues is critical. Methods To develop novel anti-CD26 mAbs capable of binding to the denatured CD26, we immunized mice with CD26 protein denatured in urea buffer. After the fusion of splenocytes and myeloma cells, the mAbs were screened for specific reactivity with human CD26 by flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry. The binding competitiveness of novel anti-CD26 mAbs with the humanized anti-CD26 mAb YS110 was also examined. Results We have succeeded in developing novel anti-human CD26 mAbs suitable for immunohistochemical staining of CD26 in formalin-fixed tissue sections with reliable clarity and intensity. Importantly, some of these mAbs exhibit no cross-reactivity with the humanized anti-CD26 mAb. Conclusions These novel mAbs are potentially useful as companion diagnostic agents to analyze CD26 expression in the clinical setting while advancing future CD26-related research. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/5987140221097729 PMID:24502396

  4. Anti-human protein S antibody induces tissue factor expression through a direct interaction with platelet phosphofructokinase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyi; Liao, Dan; Wang, Jing; Liang, Zhengdong; Yao, Qizhi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Autoantibodies including anti-human protein S antibody (anti-hPS Ab) and anti-human protein C antibody (anti-hPC Ab) can be detected in patients with autoimmune diseases with hypercoagulability. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects and molecular pathways of these autoantibodies on tissue factor (TF) expression in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Materials and Methods HCAECs were treated with anti-hPS Ab or anti-hPC Ab for 3 hours. TF expression was measured by real-time PCR and Western blot. TF-mediated procoagulant activity was determined by a commercial kit. MAPK phosphorylation was analyzed by Bio-Plex luminex immunoassay and Western blot. The potential proteins interacting with anti-hPS Ab were studied by immunoprecipitation, mass spectrometry and in vitro pull-down assay. Results Anti-hPS Ab, but not anti-hPC Ab, specifically induced TF expression and TF-mediated procoagulant activity in HCAECs in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was confirmed in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs). ERK1/2 phosphorylation was induced by anti-hPS Ab treatment, while inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0216 partially blocked anti-hPS Ab-induced TF upregulation (P<0.05). In addition, anti-hPS Ab specifically cross-interacted with platelet phosphofructokinase (PFKP) in HCAECs. Anti-hPS Ab was able to directly inhibit PFKP activities in HCAECs. Furthermore, silencing of PFKP by PFKP shRNA resulted in TF upregulation in HCAECs, while activation of PFKP by fructose-6-phosphate partially blocked the effect of anti-hPS Ab on TF upregulation (P<0.05). Conclusions Anti-hPS Ab induces TF expression through a direct interaction with PFKP and ERK1/2 activation in HCAECs. Anti-hPS Ab may directly contribute to vascular thrombosis in the patient with autoimmune disorders. PMID:24331211

  5. [Lymphocytes B and primary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Lpez-Herrera, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies represent the most frequent genetic diseases of the immune system and the first to be recognized along immunology history. The antibodies were recognized as part of the humoral immune system long ago, and after immunoglobulin discovery, the first antibody immunodeficiency were recognized and named as "agammaglobulinemia", followed by the common variable immunoendeficiency and the hyper-IgM syndrome. The following discoveries in immunology history made possible the understanding of these pathologies, for example: the discoveries of B cells, pre-B cells, the signaling pathway directed by the antigen receptor and many other cellular and molecular mechanisms. Primary antibody deficiencies have been studied for a long time and the discoveries of new syndromes have been helpful in the understanding of immunological mechanisms that take place in our organism. Then, this manuscript pretends to review the relevant findings in the history of immunology, focused on the B cells and the connection with the description of representative clinical entities of primary antibody deficiencies. The aim of this manuscript is to show to the reader that the generation of scientific knowledge has a direct application in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that are affected in these diseases. PMID:26943830

  6. Metabolic defects in immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, A D

    1982-01-01

    There are two ways to find the cause of primary immunodeficiency diseases. One approach is to start with the immune defect and work backwards, using in vitro techniques to define where the primary abnormality lies in the immune response. Immunologists favour this approach for obvious reasons; and it is not without virtue since, for example, it has shown that the defect in most cases of primary hypogammaglobulinaemia is due to a failure of B lymphocyte maturation. The alternative approach is to screen empirically for defects in biochemical pathways in the hope of finding a clue which will eventually lead to the underlying disorder. This is a sensible approach in diseases which are clearly inherited (e.g. X-linked hypogammaglobulinaemia) but is less attractive in a disease such as late onset hypogammaglobulinaemia which is not obviously inherited. In practice, such procedures involve screening the urine for abnormalities in the quality or quantity of excreted compounds. Another way is to screen for abnormalities in organelle integrity by measuring the activity of various enzymes in subcellular fractions. In reality, the clue to the metabolic defect is usually discovered by accident, the prime example in our field being the discovery of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency. PMID:6290113

  7. Radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Christopher C; Cowan, Morton J

    2010-02-01

    Inherited defects in components of the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair mechanism produce a T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) characterized by heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Patients with the radiosensitive form of SCID may also have increased short- and long-term sensitivity to the alkylator-based chemotherapy regimens that are traditionally used for conditioning before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Known causes of radiosensitive SCID include deficiencies of Artemis, DNA ligase IV, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, and Cernunnos-XLF, all of which have been treated with HCT. Because of these patients' sensitivity to certain forms of chemotherapy, the approach to donor selection and the type of conditioning regimen used for a patient with radiosensitive SCID requires careful consideration. Significantly more research needs to be done to determine the long-term outcomes of patients with radiosensitive SCID after HCT and to discover novel nontoxic approaches to HCT that might benefit those patients with intrinsic radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity as well as potentially all patients undergoing an HCT. PMID:20113890

  8. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of zidovudine phosphorylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stretcher, B N; Pesce, A J; Frame, P T; Stein, D S

    1994-01-01

    As part of an effort towards optimization of dosing of zidovudine (ZDV), formation and elimination of total phosphorylated ZDV (ZDVPt) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were examined in 21 asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients during their first 24 weeks of therapy (AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 161). Intracellular concentrations of ZDVPt were measured with a previously described and validated radioimmunoassay technique. Although ZDV phosphorylation occurred readily upon initiation of therapy, it declined with time; the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) at week 4 (mean +/- standard deviation, 3.41 +/- 0.93 pmol.h/10(6) cells) was significantly greater than that at week 24 (2.19 +/- 1.10 pmol.h/10(6) cells). Plasma ZDV AUC did not change with time and did not correlate with ZDVPt AUC. In dose-response experiments (20 to 100 mg orally), phosphorylation did not proportionally increase with increasing plasma ZDV concentrations. Similarly, compared with a single dose, two doses of ZDV over an 8-h period resulted in little ZDVPt increase in cells relative to increase in plasma ZDV concentrations. The half-life of intracellular ZDVPt was twice that of plasma ZDV (4 versus 2 h), suggesting that an every-8-h dosing regimen is justifiable. These findings suggest that metabolism of ZDV to its active intracellular forms may be saturable in some patients, is poorly correlated with plasma concentrations, and diminishes over time. These findings have implications for future development and management of anti-human immunodeficiency virus nucleoside therapy. PMID:7979286

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection despite prior immunization with a recombinant envelope vaccine regimen.

    PubMed Central

    McElrath, M J; Corey, L; Greenberg, P D; Matthews, T J; Montefiori, D C; Rowen, L; Hood, L; Mullins, J I

    1996-01-01

    With efforts underway to develop a preventive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine, it remains unclear which immune responses are sufficient to protect against infection and whether prior HIV-1 immunity can alter the subsequent course of HIV-1 infection. We investigated these issues in the context of a volunteer who received six HIV-1LAI envelope immunizations and 10 weeks thereafter acquired HIV-1 infection through a high-risk sexual exposure. In contrast to nonvaccinated acutely infected individuals, anamnestic HIV-1-specific B- and T-cell responses appeared within 3 weeks in this individual, and neutralizing antibody preceded CD8+ cytotoxic responses. Despite an asymptomatic course and an initial low level of detectable infectious virus, a progressive CD4+ cell decline and dysfunction occurred within 2 years. Although vaccination elicited immunity to HIV-1 envelope, which was recalled upon HIV-1 exposure, it was insufficient to prevent infection and subsequent immunodeficiency. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8633000

  11. 6. Secondary immunodeficiencies, including HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T

    2008-02-01

    The immune system can be adversely affected by a variety of extrinsic factors, including immunosuppressive drugs, exposure to harsh environmental conditions, hereditary disorders other than primary immunodeficiencies, and acquired metabolic disorders such as diabetic mellitus, with all of these resulting in conditions known as secondary immunodeficiencies. Perhaps the most well known secondary immunodeficiency is caused by HIV infection; however, the most prevalent cause of immunodeficiency worldwide is severe malnutrition, which affects as much as 50% of the population in some impoverished communities. The abnormalities of the immune system induced by secondary immunodeficiencies affect both the innate and the adaptive immunity, may be subtle, and are usually heterogeneous in their clinical manifestations. Treatment of the primary condition often results in the improvement of the compromised immune components of the disease complex. This article updates the concepts of some of the major categories of conditions that can potentially suppress the immune response, including HIV disease, to provide a conceptual frame to assess patients with suspected secondary deficiencies of the immune system. PMID:18241688

  12. Alopecia Areata and Vitiligo as Primary Presentations in a Young Male with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Li; Baohua, Yang; Lan, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old Chinese male consulted with the team regarding his alopecia areata and vitiligo for which previous treatment was ineffective. The patient, a homosexual man, denied having a history of drug abuse and of blood transfusion. No member of his family had vitiligo or alopecia. Laboratory studies revealed that the serum for anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody was positive. The patient's CD4 lymphocyte count and CD4/CD8 ratio were both strikingly low (20 cells/mL and 0.04), but no other complaints or opportunistic infections were reported. One month after antiretroviral therapy, the patient's alopecia areata dramatically improved, but no evident improvement in his vitiligo was found. This case is a very rare case of alopecia areata and vitiligo associated with HIV infection that might be attributed to the generation and maintenance of self-reactive CD8+ T-cells due to chronic immune activation with progressive immune exhaustion in HIV infection. PMID:24700956

  13. Purification of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and an adsorptive voltammetric investigation of the interaction of GDH with rabbit anti-human GDH antibody.

    PubMed

    Carty, P; O'Kennedy, R; Lorenzo Abad, E; Fernández Alvarez, J M; Rodriguez Flores, J; Smyth, M R; Tipton, K

    1990-05-01

    A procedure for the isolation of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from human liver, which involves the use of ion-exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose and affinity chromatography on guanosine triphosphate conjugated to Sepharose 4B, is described. The adsorptive voltammetric behaviour of human GDH, bovine GDH and rabbit anti-human GDH antibody was optimised with respect to accumulation potential, accumulation time and scan rate. The lower limits of detection were 0.2 and 1.2 mg l-1 for human and bovine GDH, respectively, and the lower limit of detection for rabbit anti-GDH antibody was 0.04 mg l-1. The interaction of human GDH with rabbit anti-human GDH antibody was also examined using this method. PMID:2396748

  14. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Christian; Madshus, Inger Helene; Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo ; Stang, Espen

    2012-12-10

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  15. Biological nature of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, T; Mikami, T

    1993-08-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was first isolated in 1986 from a cat with an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-like disease. This virus has many characteristics in common with human immunodeficiency virus which is an etiological agent of AIDS in human and is classified as a member of the lentivirus genus of the retrovirus family. Since the discovery of FIV, many researchers have studied the virus extensively from clinical, biological, and genetic aspects. In this review, the biological nature of FIV is summarized in four sections, i.e., morphological and biochemical properties of FIV biological properties of FIV, immunological aspects of FIV infection, and clinical aspects of FIV infection. This review includes some recent, unpublished data from our and other groups. PMID:8399727

  16. Rheumatologic manifestations of primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimitriades, V R; Sorensen, R

    2016-04-01

    In the last 5 years, several hundred articles have been published concerning the link between primary immunodeficiency disease (PID) and rheumatologic diseases. Although rheumatologic complications were originally thought to be at the opposite ends of the spectrum of immunopathologic manifestations, they are now all being considered secondary manifestations of a causative primary "immune derangement." For the rheumatologist, it is important to be able to identify patients who may present with typical rheumatologic findings but who have an underlying PID. In a systematic manner, this overview addresses both the systemic and organ-based rheumatologic diseases which have known associations with primary immunodeficiencies, and explores how immunodeficiency may actually cause these clinical manifestations. PMID:26971790

  17. Adult-onset immunodeficiency in Thailand and Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Sarah K.; Burbelo, Peter D.; Chetchotisakd, Ploenchan; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Shaw, Pamela A.; Kirk, Jennifer L.; Jutivorakool, Kamonwan; Zaman, Rifat; Ding, Li; Hsu, Amy P.; Patel, Smita Y.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Mootsikapun, Piroon; Anunnatsiri, Siriluck; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Sathapatayavongs, Boonmee; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Shieh, Chi-Chang; Brown, Margaret R.; Thongnoppakhun, Wanna; Claypool, Reginald; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Thepthai, Charin; Waywa, Duangdao; Dacombe, Camilla; Reizes, Yona; Zelazny, Adrian M.; Saleeb, Paul; Rosen, Lindsey B.; Mo, Allen; Iadarola, Michael; Holland, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Autoantibodies against interferon-? are associated with severe disseminated opportunistic infection, but their importance and prevalence are unknown. Methods We enrolled 203 persons from sites in Thailand and Taiwan in five groups: 52 patients with disseminated, rapidly or slowly growing, nontuberculous mycobacterial infection (group 1); 45 patients with another opportunistic infection, with or without nontuberculous mycobacterial infection (group 2); 9 patients with disseminated tuberculosis (group 3); 49 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (group 4); and 48 healthy controls (group 5). Clinical histories were recorded, and blood specimens were obtained. Results Patients in groups 1 and 2 had CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts that were similar to those in patients in groups 4 and 5, and they were not infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Washed cells obtained from patients in groups 1 and 2 had intact cytokine production and a response to cytokine stimulation. In contrast, plasma obtained from these patients inhibited the activity of interferon-? in normal cells. High-titer antiinterferon-? autoantibodies were detected in 81% of patients in group 1, 96% of patients in group 2, 11% of patients in group 3, 2% of patients in group 4, and 2% of controls (group 5). Forty other anti-cytokine autoantibodies were assayed. One patient with cryptococcal meningitis had autoantibodies only against granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor. No other anti-cytokine autoantibodies or genetic defects correlated with infections. There was no familial clustering. Conclusions Neutralizing antiinterferon-? autoantibodies were detected in 88% of Asian adults with multiple opportunistic infections and were associated with an adult-onset immunodeficiency akin to that of advanced HIV infection. PMID:22913682

  18. Neutral density revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Carsten; Willebrand, Jürgen

    1999-01-01

    The possibilities of defining and computing an approximately neutral density variable are reexamined in this paper. There are three desirable properties that a neutral density variable should possess. Firstly, the isosurfaces of this variable should coincide with (approximately) neutral surfaces. This would facilitate the analysis of hydrographic data on the most appropriate mixing and spreading surfaces. Secondly, the horizontal gradients of the neutral density should agree with the gradients of the in situ density, and thirdly the vertical gradient of the neutral density variable should be proportional to the static stability of the water column. A density variable that approximates the latter two properties can be used in ocean circulation models based on layer coordinates, and would reduce substantial errors in present isopycnal models due to the use of a potential density variable. No variable can possess all the three properties simultaneously. The variable γn introduced by Jackett and McDougall (1997, J. Phys. Oceanogr. 27, 237-263) satisfies the first of the properties exactly but is not designed for the use in models. Based on climatological data in the North Atlantic, an alternative neutral density variable ν˜(S, Θ) is defined, which is shown to approximate the two gradient criteria much better than any potential density. We suggest that this neutral density variable may be useful in isopycnal ocean models as an alternative to potential density, since it could significantly reduce errors in thermal wind relation and vertical stability.

  19. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joel B.; Mathias, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues. All health-care workers, including physicians and dental personnel, may be instrumental in recognizing risk factors associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Oral signs and symptoms of HIV infection may be the first presentation of the disease or may develop during the course of the disease and require management. Knowledge of the signs, symptoms and associated infections and tumours is needed to assist in recognition, diagnosis, and treatment. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13 PMID:21253078

  20. Equivalent Neutral Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wenqing

    1996-01-01

    The definition of equivalent neutral wind and the rationale for using it as the geophysical product of a spaceborne scatterometer are reviewed. The differences between equivalent neutral wind and actual wind, which are caused by atmospheric density stratification, are demonstrated with measurements at selected locations. A method of computing this parameter from ship and buoy measurements is described and some common fallacies in accounting for the effects of atmospheric stratification on wind shear are discussed. The computer code for the model to derive equivalent neutral wind is provided.

  1. Marketed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, antihypertensives, and human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors: as-yet-unused weapons of the oncologists' arsenal.

    PubMed

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsironi, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that several pharmacological agents that have long been used for the management of various diseases unrelated to cancer exhibit profound in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. This is of major clinical importance, since it would possibly aid in reassessing the therapeutic use of currently used agents for which clinicians already have experience. Further, this would obviate the time-consuming process required for the development and the approval of novel antineoplastic drugs. Herein, both pre-clinical and clinical data concerning the antineoplastic function of distinct commercially available pharmacological agents that are not currently used in the field of oncology, ie, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antihypertensive agents, and anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents inhibiting viral protease, are reviewed. The aim is to provide integrated information regarding not only the molecular basis of the antitumor function of these agents but also the applicability of the reevaluation of their therapeutic range in the clinical setting. PMID:26056460

  2. Combination of CCR5 and CXCR4 Inhibitors in Therapy of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection: In Vitro Studies of Mixed Virus Infections†

    PubMed Central

    Rusconi, Stefano; La Seta Catamancio, Simona; Citterio, Paola; Bulgheroni, Elisabetta; Croce, Francesco; Herrmann, Steven H.; Offord, Robin E.; Galli, Massimo; Hirsch, Martin S.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the combined anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) effects of a derivative of stroma-derived factor 1β (SDF-1β), Met-SDF-1β, and a modified form of RANTES, aminooxypentane (AOP)-RANTES. The antiviral agents were tested singly or in combination at 95 and 99% virus inhibitory concentrations. Clinical R5 and X4 HIV-1 isolates were used. AOP-RANTES inhibited R5 but not X4 viruses, whereas Met-SDF-1β had the opposite effect. Combinations of these compounds inhibited mixed infections with R5 and X4 viruses (95 to 99%), whereas single drugs were less inhibitory (32 to 61%). Combinations of R5 and X4 inhibitors are promising and deserve further evaluation. PMID:10982382

  3. Marketed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, antihypertensives, and human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors: as-yet-unused weapons of the oncologists’ arsenal

    PubMed Central

    Papanagnou, Panagiota; Baltopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsironi, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that several pharmacological agents that have long been used for the management of various diseases unrelated to cancer exhibit profound in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity. This is of major clinical importance, since it would possibly aid in reassessing the therapeutic use of currently used agents for which clinicians already have experience. Further, this would obviate the time-consuming process required for the development and the approval of novel antineoplastic drugs. Herein, both pre-clinical and clinical data concerning the antineoplastic function of distinct commercially available pharmacological agents that are not currently used in the field of oncology, ie, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antihypertensive agents, and anti-human immunodeficiency virus agents inhibiting viral protease, are reviewed. The aim is to provide integrated information regarding not only the molecular basis of the antitumor function of these agents but also the applicability of the reevaluation of their therapeutic range in the clinical setting. PMID:26056460

  4. Is dispersal neutral?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Winsor H; McPeek, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal is difficult to quantify and often treated as purely stochastic and extrinsically controlled. Consequently, there remains uncertainty about how individual traits mediate dispersal and its ecological effects. Addressing this uncertainty is crucial for distinguishing neutral versus non-neutral drivers of community assembly. Neutral theory assumes that dispersal is stochastic and equivalent among species. This assumption can be rejected on principle, but common research approaches tacitly support the 'neutral dispersal' assumption. Theory and empirical evidence that dispersal traits are under selection should be broadly integrated in community-level research, stimulating greater scrutiny of this assumption. A tighter empirical connection between the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape dispersal will enable richer understanding of this fundamental process and its role in community assembly. PMID:24962790

  5. Prevalence of primary immunodeficiency in Korea.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Jung Woo; Kim, Kyung Hyo; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Bong Seong; Kim, Jung Soo; Kim, Chang Hwi; Kim, Hwang Min; Park, Hee Ju; Pai, Ki Soo; Son, Byong Kwan; Shin, Kyung Sue; Oh, Moo Young; Woo, Young Jong; Yoo, Young; Lee, Kun Soo; Lee, Kyung Yil; Lee, Chong Guk; Lee, Joon Sung; Chung, Eun Hee; Choi, Eun Hwa; Hahn, Youn Soo; Park, Hyun Young; Kim, Joong Gon

    2012-07-01

    This study represents the first epidemiological study based on the national registry of primary immunodeficiencies (PID) in Korea. Patient data were collected from 23 major hospitals. A total of 152 patients with PID (under 19 yr of age), who were observed from 2001 to 2005, have been entered in this registry. The period prevalence of PID in Korea in 2005 is 11.25 per million children. The following frequencies were found: antibody deficiencies, 53.3% (n = 81), phagocytic disorders, 28.9% (n = 44); combined immunodeficiencies, 13.2% (n = 20); and T cell deficiencies, 4.6% (n = 7). Congenital agammaglobulinemia (n = 21) and selective IgA deficiency (n = 21) were the most frequently reported antibody deficiency. Other reported deficiencies were common variable immunodeficiencies (n = 16), X-linked agammaglobulinemia (n = 15), IgG subclass deficiency (n = 4). Phagocytic disorder was mostly chronic granulomatous disease. A small number of patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, and severe combined immunodeficiency were also registered. Overall, the most common first manifestation was pneumonia. This study provides data that permit a more accurate estimation PID patients in Korea. PMID:22787376

  6. The Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasner, Peter D.; Kaslow, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews epidemiology and natural history of human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Discusses early and late clinical manifestations, diagnosis of infection, incubation and latency periods, and survival time. Reviews data from published literature on distribution of HIV infection in adult United States population and factors that…

  7. Women at Risk for Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadagno, David; And Others

    This article reports results from a survey among women at risk for contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) as well as transmitting it in a vertical (to offspring) and horizontal (sexual partner or intravenous [IV] drug usage) mode. Little is known about the extent of HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, and IV drug usage for women at risk for…

  8. Laboratory clues to immunodeficiency; missed chances for early diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Bright, P D; Rooney, N; Virgo, P F; Lock, R J; Johnston, S L; Unsworth, D J

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency is seen in an estimated one in 1200 people, and secondary immunodeficiency is increasingly common, particularly with the use of immunosuppresion, cancer therapies and the newer biological therapies such as rituximab. Delays in the diagnosis of immunodeficiency predictably lead to preventable organ damage. Examples of abnormal pathology tests that suggest immunodeficiency from all laboratory specialities are given, where vigilant interpretation of abnormal results may prompt earlier diagnosis. If immunodeficiency is suspected, suggested directed testing could include measuring immunoglobulins, a lymphocyte count and T-cell and B-cell subsets. PMID:25352642

  9. Neutral particle lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Barry Paul

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral particles floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate, such that each feature is printed in parallel, rather than in the serial manner of electron beam lithography. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography (IBL), including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artifacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. In our experiments, a neutral particle beam is formed by passing an ion beam (e.g., 30 keV He+) through a high pressure helium gas cell (e.g., 100 mTorr) to convert the ions to energetic neutrals through charge transfer scattering. The resolution of NPL is generally superior to that of IBL for applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps, and ultra-small features. High accuracy stepped exposures with energetic neutral particles, where magnetic or electrostatic deflection is impossible, have been obtained by clamping the mask to the wafer, setting the proximity gap with a suitable spacer, and mechanically inclining the mask/wafer stack relative to the beam. This approach is remarkably insensitive to vibration and thermal drift; nanometer scale image offsets have been obtained with +/-2 nm placement accuracy for experiments lasting over one hour. Using this nanostepping technique, linewidth versus dose curves were obtained, from which the NPL lithographic blur was determined as 4.4+/-1.4 nm (1sigma), which is 2-3 times smaller than the blur of electron beam lithography. Neutral particle lithography has the potential to form high density, periodic patterns with sub-10 nm resolution.

  10. Neutral beam development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, H S

    1980-08-01

    The national plan is presented for developing advanced injection systems for use on upgrades of existing experiments, and use on future facilities such as ETF, to be built in the late 1980's or early 90's where power production from magnetic fusion will move closer to a reality. Not only must higher power and longer pulse length systems be developed , but they must operate reliably; they must be a tool for the experimenter, not the experiment itself. Neutral beam systems handle large amounts of energy and as such, they often are as complicated as the plasma physics experiment itself. This presents a significant challenge to the neutral beam developer.

  11. Tautomerism in neutral histidine.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2014-10-01

    Histidine is an important natural amino acid, involved in many relevant biological processes, which, because of its physical properties, proved difficult to characterize experimentally in its neutral form. In this work, neutral histidine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples and its N(ε)H tautomeric form unraveled through its rotational spectrum. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, arising from the existing three (14)N nuclei, constituted a site-specifically probe for revealing the tautomeric form as well as the side chain configuration of this proteogenic amino acid. PMID:25146969

  12. Ultracold neutral plasmas.

    PubMed

    Killian, Thomas C

    2007-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas occupy an exotic regime of plasma physics in which electrons form a swarming, neutralizing background for ions that sluggishly move in a correlated manner. Strong interactions between the charged particles give rise to surprising dynamics such as oscillations of the average kinetic energy during equilibration and extremely fast recombination. Such phenomena offer stimulating and challenging problems for computational scientists, and the physics can be applied to other environments, such as the interior of gas giant planets and plasmas created by short-pulse laser irradiation of solid, liquid, and cluster targets. PMID:17478712

  13. The Use of Splenectomy to Manage Platelet Transfusion Refractoriness due to Anti-Human Leukocyte Antibodies in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Margherita; Camoglio, Francesco; Piccoli, Pierluigi; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Balter, Rita; Pegoraro, Anna; Cesaro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    In patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), refractoriness to platelet transfusion has been associated with graft failure, delayed engraftment, early mortality and decreased overall survival. Therapeutic strategies include plasma exchange, immunoglobulins, rituximab, and splenectomy. We describe here three patients with refractoriness to platelet transfusion due to anti-human leukocyte antibodies who were splenectomized before HSCT (two cases) and after HSCT (one case) due to the lack of efficacy of other therapies. Splenectomy was uneventful. All three patients achieved a full donor engraftment. We suggest that splenectomy is feasible and effective in HSCT patients to reduce the risk of graft failure or delayed engraftment. PMID:27114815

  14. Lithium jet neutralizer to improve negative hydrogen neutral beam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.

    2007-10-15

    Hydrogen isotope neutral beam systems for heating and current drive in magnetic fusion energy devices have always used gas cells of the beam isotope to convert a portion of the energetic ions into neutral atoms. In the design of negative-ion based neutral beams for the ITER tokamak [R. Aymar V. A. Chuyanov, M. Huguet et al., Nuclear Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)], or for future fusion reactors, the large gas load from a traditional neutralizer cell causes many problems, including increased heat loads on the accelerator and ion source, reduced beam efficiency due to premature neutralization in the accelerator and reionization after the neutralizer, and the need to stop the beam for regeneration of the cryopanels, reducing the attractiveness of beams for reactors. We explore several approaches to decrease the neutralizer gas throughput, and conclude that a supersonic lithium vapor jet neutralizer is the most appropriate, and also affords a higher neutralization efficiency than does a hydrogen isotope gas cell.

  15. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus by Betadine.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J C; Crawford, D C; Durno, A G; Schooley, R T

    1987-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiological agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), was treated with either Betadine (povidone-iodine) Solution or Betadine Surgical Scrub. HIV inactivation was analyzed using the viral reverse transcriptase assay or by observing the cytopathic effect produced in HIV-infected, H-9, T-cell cultures. The minimum effective Betadine dose was 0.25% for complete inactivation of HIV that was treated for various time intervals (immediate vortex to ten minutes). The titer of HIV stocks used in these experiments (10(5) TCID50 per mL) was greater than amounts generally detected in clinical specimens. Our results provide a rationale for the use of povidone-iodine as a topical antiseptic against HIV in the clinic or laboratory. PMID:3667119

  16. Immunodeficiency in chronic sinusitis: recognition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Peters, Anju T

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is estimated to affect over 35 million people. However, not all patients with the diagnosis respond to standard medical and surgical treatments. Although there are a variety of reasons a patient may be refractory to therapy, one possible etiology is the presence of an underlying immunodeficiency. This review will focus on the description, recognition, and treatment of several antibody deficiencies associated with CRS, including common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), selective IgA deficiency, IgG subclass deficiency, and specific antibody deficiency (SAD). The diagnosis of antibody deficiency in patients with CRS is important because of the large clinical implications it can have on sinus disease management. CVID is treated with immunoglobulin replacement, whereas SAD may be managed symptomatically and sometimes with prophylactic antibiotics and/or immunoglobulin replacement. PMID:25785751

  17. Practical diagnostic testing for human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J B; Balfour, H H

    1988-01-01

    Since the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in 1983, there has been a proliferation of diagnostic tests. These assays can be used to detect the presence of HIV antibody, HIV antigen, HIV ribonucleic and deoxyribonucleic acids, and HIV reverse transcriptase. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot, radioimmunoprecipitation assays, indirect immunofluorescence assays, reverse transcriptase assays, and several molecular hybridization techniques are currently available. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent, Western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence assays for HIV antibody are very sensitive, specific, and adaptable to most laboratories. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for HIV antigen is also readily adaptable to most laboratories and will be commercially available soon. While the other assays are more tedious, they are valuable confirmatory tests and are suitable for reference laboratories. The biohazards of performing HIV testing can be minimized with proper biosafety measures. Images PMID:3060241

  18. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  19. Quantifying the infectivity of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Layne, S P; Spouge, J L; Dembo, M

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a mathematical model that quantifies lymphocyte infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and lymphocyte protection by blocking agents such as soluble CD4. We use this model to suggest standardized parameters for quantifying viral infectivity and to suggest techniques for calculating these parameters from well-mixed infectivity assays. We discuss the implications of the model for our understanding of the infectious process and virulence of HIV in vivo. PMID:2734313

  20. Primary immunodeficiency update and newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Amado, Mercedes C

    2011-01-01

    Most newborns with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) appear normal. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant within the first three months of life increases survival and decreases medical costs. Newborn screening measuring T cell receptor excision circles (TREC), a by product of T cell maturation, offers the opportunity for early diagnosis before infections and failure to thrive occur. The Secretary of Health and Human Services recently recommended addition of TREC to newborn screening, enabling prompt diagnosis and effective management of SCID. PMID:22073493

  1. Familial hepatopulmonary syndrome in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S N; Condliffe, A; Griffiths, W; Baxendale, H; Kumararatne, D S

    2015-04-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) comprises a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies which lead to a range of complications, including infectious, neoplastic and inflammatory disorders. This report describes monozygotic twin brothers with CVID who developed cryptogenic liver disease and subsequently hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS). This is the second report of the association of HPS and CVID. Its occurrence in two identical twins implicates a genetic basis. PMID:25708586

  2. Attentiveness of pediatricians to primary immunodeficiency disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary immunodeficiency (PID) is a cluster of serious disorders that requires special alertness on the part of the medical staff for prompt diagnosis and management of the patient. This study explored PID knowledge and experience among pediatricians of wide educational backgrounds, practicing in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Method A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the competency of pediatricians in their knowledge of PID disorders. This study questionnaire included questions on PID signs and symptoms, syndromes associated with immunodeficiency, screening tests, interpreting laboratory tests and case management. The participants were 263 pediatricians of diverse education working in the 27 governmental hospitals in all regions of UAE. Results The overall performance of the pediatricians did not differ based on their age, gender, origin of certification, rank, or years of experience. Of the 50 questions, 20% of pediatricians answered correctly <60% of the questions, 76% answered correctly 60 to 79% of the questions, and 4% answered correctly ≥80% of the questions. Seventeen of the 19 PID signs and symptoms were identified by 55 to 97%. Four of 5 syndromes associated with immunodeficiency were identified by 50 to 90%. Appropriate screening tests were chosen by 64 to 96%. Attention to the laboratory reference range values as function of patient age was notably limited. Conclusions There was a noteworthy deficiency in PID work-up. Therefore, implementing effective educational strategies is needed to improve the competency of pediatricians to diagnose and manage PID disorders. PMID:22846098

  3. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  4. Allergic diseases in children with primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Celal; Metin, Ayşe; Erkoçoğlu, Mustafa; Kocabaş, Can Naci

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the frequency of atopy and allergic disease in all groups of primary immunodeficiency (PID) patients. The study was done on 318 patients with PID between the ages of 6 months and 18 years. The patients and their parents were questioned regarding their histories of asthma and allergic disease. Within the study group, 82.4% of the patients had antibody deficiency, 10.4% combined immunodeficiency, 6.6% phagocyte number or function defect, and 0.6% complement deficiency. Patients with selective immunoglobulin (Ig)A deficiency had a more significant history of ever wheezing compared to those with IgG subclass deficiency (p=0.022). The frequency of current wheezing was higher in patients with antibody deficiency than in patients with combined immunodeficiency (p=0.049). In conclusion, patients with antibody deficiency, especially those with selective IgA deficiency, should be evaluated regarding asthma and allergic diseases if recurring respiratory symptoms are present. PMID:24827946

  5. Feline immunodeficiency virus in South America.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Bruno M; Hagiwara, Mitika K; Cruz, Juliano C M; Hosie, Margaret J

    2012-03-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  6. Pharmacological Inhibition of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Hakimeh; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a member of the retroviridae family of viruses and causes an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in domestic and non-domestic cats worldwide. Genome organization of FIV and clinical characteristics of the disease caused by the virus are similar to those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Both viruses infect T lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages, and their replication cycle in infected cells is analogous. Due to marked similarity in genomic organization, virus structure, virus replication and disease pathogenesis of FIV and HIV, infection of cats with FIV is a useful tool to study and develop novel drugs and vaccines for HIV. Anti-retroviral drugs studied extensively in HIV infection have targeted different steps of the virus replication cycle: (1) inhibition of virus entry into susceptible cells at the level of attachment to host cell surface receptors and co-receptors; (2) inhibition of fusion of the virus membrane with the cell membrane; (3) blockade of reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA; (4) interruption of nuclear translocation and viral DNA integration into host genomes; (5) prevention of viral transcript processing and nuclear export; and (6) inhibition of virion assembly and maturation. Despite much success of anti-retroviral therapy slowing disease progression in people, similar therapy has not been thoroughly investigated in cats. In this article we review current pharmacological approaches and novel targets for anti-lentiviral therapy, and critically assess potentially suitable applications against FIV infection in cats. PMID:22754645

  7. Neuropathogenesis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome dementia.

    PubMed

    Lipton, S A

    1997-06-01

    During the past year progress has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the dementia associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. As many as one-third of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients eventually develop this condition, and at present it remains only poorly or transiently treated by existing antiretroviral therapies which do not penetrate well into the central nervous system. The past year has witnessed further characterization of microglial/macrophage neurotoxins, increasing evidence for neuronal death by apoptosis, and a more quantitative search for viral products, surrogate markers, or magnetic resonance spectroscopic parameters of brain or cerebrospinal fluid, or both. An increased understanding that the mediation of neuronal injury is not by direct infection of neurons, but rather via a complex network of cytokines, excitotoxins, and free radical mechanisms triggered by human immunodeficiency virus-infected or immune-stimulated brain macrophages and astrocytes has led to the development of therapies that are administered adjunctively with antiretroviral drugs. Some of these potential new treatments have now entered clinical trials. PMID:9229134

  8. Skin manifestations in primary immunodeficient children.

    PubMed

    Al-Herz, Waleed; Nanda, Arti

    2011-01-01

    Skin manifestations are prevalent in primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID). In a large proportion of patients, they manifest as presenting signs and serve as important factors for the early diagnosis of PID. Only a few studies describing the spectrum of skin disorders in PID are available. The objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of skin manifestations in children with PID. Participants were 128 pediatric patients with PID (aged <16 years) registered prospectively over 6 years. Skin manifestations were observed in 61 patients (48%), and those manifestations were the presenting features in 50 (39% of total PID and 82% of those with skin lesions). Skin infections were the most prevalent manifestations, seen in 39 patients (30%), followed by eczemas in 24 (19%). Skin infections were significantly more prevalent in those with congenital defects in phagocyte number, function, or both, as well as in those with well-defined immunodeficiencies. Although widely present in all participants with PID, eczema was a consistent feature (100%) in patients with hyper IgE syndrome and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS). Erythroderma of infancy with diffuse alopecia was seen exclusively in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disorders, telangiectasia in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, and partial albinism with silvery gray hair in those with Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Autoimmune skin manifestations were observed in 6% of reported cases of PID. This study highlights the importance of awareness of skin manifestations of PID to assist in the early diagnosis and management of these disorders. PMID:21453308

  9. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in South America

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Bruno M.; Hagiwara, Mitika K.; Cruz, Juliano C. M.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of AIDS in humans during the period between 1980 and 2000 has led to extensive efforts to understand more fully similar etiologic agents of chronic and progressive acquired immunodeficiency disease in several mammalian species. Lentiviruses that have gene sequence homology with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been found in different species (including sheep, goats, horses, cattle, cats, and several Old World monkey species). Lentiviruses, comprising a genus of the Retroviridae family, cause persistent infection that can lead to varying degrees of morbidity and mortality depending on the virus and the host species involved. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) causes an immune system disease in domestic cats (Felis catus) involving depletion of the CD4+ population of T lymphocytes, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and sometimes death. Viruses related to domestic cat FIV occur also in a variety of nondomestic felids. This is a brief overview of the current state of knowledge of this large and ancient group of viruses (FIVs) in South America. PMID:22590677

  10. Adeno-associated virus 9-mediated airway expression of antibody protects old and immunodeficient mice against influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Adam, Virginie S; Crosariol, Marco; Kumar, Sachin; Ge, Moyar Q; Czack, Sarah E; Roy, Soumitra; Haczku, Angela; Tretiakova, Anna; Wilson, James M; Limberis, Maria P

    2014-11-01

    Influenza causes serious and sometimes fatal disease in individuals at risk due to advanced age or immunodeficiencies. Despite progress in the development of seasonal influenza vaccines, vaccine efficacy in elderly and immunocompromised individuals remains low. We recently developed a passive immunization strategy using an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector to deliver a neutralizing anti-influenza antibody at the site of infection, the nasal airways. Here we show that young, old, and immunodeficient (severe combined immunodeficient [SCID]) mice that were treated intranasally with AAV9 vector expressing a modified version of the broadly neutralizing anti-influenza antibody FI6 were protected and exhibited no signs of disease following an intranasal challenge with the mouse-adapted H1N1 influenza strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934(H1N1) (PR8) (Mt. Sinai strain). Nonvaccinated mice succumbed to the PR8 challenge due to severe weight loss. We propose that airway-directed AAV9 passive immunization against airborne infectious agents may be beneficial in elderly and immunocompromised patients, for whom there still exists an unmet need for effective vaccination against influenza. PMID:25209558

  11. Subpopulations of human T lymphocytes. I. Studies in immunodeficient patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S; Good, R A

    1977-01-01

    T lymphocytes with receptors for IgM(Tmu) and IgG(Tgamma) were examined in thirty patients with primary immunodeficiency and autoimmune disorders. Six out of twenty-seven patients with primary immunodeficiency had a low proportion of Tmu cells when compared with normal controls. Eight out of twenty-seven patients with primary immunodeficiency had an increased proportion of Tgamma cells. Two out of twenty-seven patients had both a low proportion of Tmu cells and a high proportion of Tgamma cells. The patient studied with severe combined immunodeficiency had a low proportion of both Tmu and Tgamma cells. Patients with Bruton-type agammaglobulinaemia, common variable immunodeficiency, thymoma and immunodeficiency syndrome and selective IgA deficiency demonstrated heterogeneity with regard to alterations in T-cell subpopulations. PMID:304782

  12. Anti-human IG and B lymphocytes reconstitute the proliferative response to Con A of T lymphocytes depleted of accessory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuda, T.; Kim, Y.T.; Schwab, R.; Siskind, G.W.; Weksler, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    The requirements for the induction of proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) by low concentrations of Concanavalin A (Con A) were studied using /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation to assay DNA synthesis. Removal of plastic-adherent cells from PBM reduced the proliferative response of lymphocytes to Con A by 80%. Passage of these cells over nylon wool columns totally eliminated their response to Con A. Addition of adherent monocytes or rabbit anti-human IgG conjugated to polyacrylamide beads (anti-IgG beads) to the non-adherent lymphocyte population reconstituted the proliferative response. The lymphoblasts activated in these cultures were more than 90% T11 positive. Anti-IgG beads did not activate lymphocyte proliferation in the absence of Con A. The response of non-adherent lymphocytes to Con A could also be reconstituted by unconjugated rabbit anti-human IgG antiserium. Purified T cells could only be activated by anti-IgG beads and low concentrations of Con A in the presence of irradiated B cells. These results suggest that /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by T cells induced by anti-IgG beads and a low concentration of Con A depends on the interaction of anti-IgG and B cells. The authors suggest that B cell produce growth factors for T cells after interacting with anti-IgG.

  13. Neutralizing antibodies to an immunodominant envelope sequence do not prevent gp120 binding to CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, M A; Langlois, A J; McDanal, C B; McDougal, J S; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1988-01-01

    Animals immunized with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp160 glycoprotein or certain recombinant envelope components develop potent virus-neutralizing activity. This activity is principally due to antibodies directed toward a hypervariable region of gp120 between cysteine residues 302 and 337 and is virus isolate specific. These antisera, as well as two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed against the same hypervariable sequence, do not appreciably block gp120 from binding CD4. In contrast, serum samples from infected humans possess high titers of antibodies that block gp120-CD4 binding; these titers approximately correlate with the serum neutralization titers. Our results suggest that there are at least two targets on the envelope glycoprotein for virus neutralization. The target responsible for the broader neutralizing activity of human serum may be a conserved region of gp120 involved in CD4 binding. The antibodies directed at the hypervariable region of the envelope inhibit a different step in virus infection which is subsequent to receptor binding. The extent to which these two different epitopes of gp120 may be involved in protection against human immunodeficiency virus infection is discussed. PMID:2845130

  14. Neutralizing antibodies to an immunodominant envelope sequence do not prevent gp120 binding to CD4.

    PubMed

    Skinner, M A; Langlois, A J; McDanal, C B; McDougal, J S; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1988-11-01

    Animals immunized with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp160 glycoprotein or certain recombinant envelope components develop potent virus-neutralizing activity. This activity is principally due to antibodies directed toward a hypervariable region of gp120 between cysteine residues 302 and 337 and is virus isolate specific. These antisera, as well as two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed against the same hypervariable sequence, do not appreciably block gp120 from binding CD4. In contrast, serum samples from infected humans possess high titers of antibodies that block gp120-CD4 binding; these titers approximately correlate with the serum neutralization titers. Our results suggest that there are at least two targets on the envelope glycoprotein for virus neutralization. The target responsible for the broader neutralizing activity of human serum may be a conserved region of gp120 involved in CD4 binding. The antibodies directed at the hypervariable region of the envelope inhibit a different step in virus infection which is subsequent to receptor binding. The extent to which these two different epitopes of gp120 may be involved in protection against human immunodeficiency virus infection is discussed. PMID:2845130

  15. [Seasonal changes of secondary immunodeficiency in patients with vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Malysheva, O A; Shirinskiĭ, V S

    1998-01-01

    The examination of 60 patients with vascular dystonia (VD) and immunological disorders shows that secondary immunodeficiency is not a stable condition. It is associated with seasons of the year and VD variants. Secondary immunodeficiency is more pronounced in winter. A correlation exists between mixed vegetative vascular dystonia and combined T-lymphocyte secondary immunodeficiency in winter. The findings may help in planning immunotherapy in "critical seasons" for patients with vegetative disorders. PMID:9644934

  16. Structure and Design of Broadly-Neutralizing Antibodies Against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seong Eon; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery more than 30 years ago of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative agent of the deadly disease, acquired immune deficiency disease (AIDS), there have been no efficient vaccines against the virus. For the infection of the virus, the HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 first recognizes the CD4 receptor on the target helper T-cell, which initiates HIV fusion with the target cell and, if unchecked, leads to destruction of the patient’s immune system. Despite the difficulty of developing appropriate immune responses in HIV-infected individuals, patient sera often contain antibodies that have broad neutralization activity, indicating the possibility of immunological treatment and prevention. Recently, through extensive structural studies of neutralizing antibodies of HIV in complex with gp120, the critical mechanisms of broad neutralization against HIV have been elucidated. Based on these discoveries, the structure-aided designs of antibodies and novel scaffolds were performed to create extremely potent neutralizing antibodies against HIV. These new discoveries and advances shed light on the road to development of efficient immunological therapies against AIDS. PMID:22736269

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genome Research Institute: Learning About Severe Combined Immunodeficiency National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune ... Manual Consumer Version Orphanet: T-B+ severe ...

  18. Carbon neutral hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank S; Keith, David W

    2008-11-13

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector may be the most difficult aspect of climate change mitigation. We suggest that carbon neutral hydrocarbons (CNHCs) offer an alternative pathway for deep emission cuts that complement the use of decarbonized energy carriers. Such fuels are synthesized from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon neutral hydrogen. The result is a liquid fuel compatible with the existing transportation infrastructure and therefore capable of a gradual deployment with minimum supply disruption. Capturing the atmospheric CO2 can be accomplished using biomass or industrial methods referred to as air capture. The viability of biomass fuels is strongly dependent on the environmental impacts of biomass production. Strong constraints on land use may favour the use of air capture. We conclude that CNHCs may be a viable alternative to hydrogen or conventional biofuels and warrant a comparable level of research effort and support. PMID:18757281

  19. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  20. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A diver tests a secondary camera and maneuvering platform in Marshall's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS).The secondary camera will be beneficial for recording repairs and other extra vehicular activities (EVA) the astronuats will perform while making repairs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The maneuvering platform was developed to give the astronauts something to stand on while performing maintenance tasks. These platforms were developed to be mobile so that the astronauts could move them to accommadate different sites.

  1. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  2. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  3. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  4. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  5. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free Exercise and…

  6. 78 FR 29755 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... (78 FR 21613), FDA published a document that announced the disease ] areas for meetings in fiscal... Federal Register document for public comment that was published on September 24, 2012 (77 FR 58849), and a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused...

  7. Intrinsic cellular defenses against human immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2012-09-21

    Viral infections are often detrimental to host survival and reproduction. Consequently, hosts have evolved a variety of mechanisms to defend themselves against viruses. A component of this arsenal is a set of proteins, termed restriction factors, which exhibit direct antiviral activity. Among these are several classes of proteins (APOBEC3, TRIM5, Tetherin, and SAMHD1) that inhibit the replication of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses. Here, we outline the features, mechanisms, and evolution of these defense mechanisms. We also speculate on how restriction factors arose, how they might interact with the conventional innate and adaptive immune systems, and how an understanding of these intrinsic cellular defenses might be usefully exploited. PMID:22999946

  8. Lipid Management in Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Merle

    2016-03-01

    The development and use of antiretroviral medications to treat patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has dramatically changed the course of this disease from one that was fatal to a chronic and more manageable condition. Recommendations and guidelines for the general population are presented in this review with suggestions as to how they may be applied to this patient population. Issues for which there is little or no information available are noted to highlight the many gaps in our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of dyslipidemia for patients living with HIV. PMID:26893003

  9. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia. PMID:2132469

  10. [Human immunodeficiency virus infection - treatment beyond medication].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Carla; Rodrigues, Paula; Cardoso, Cármen; Morais, Angélica; Sequeira, Fátima; Diz, Alcinda; Santos, M Carmo; Marques, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection is presently considered a chronic disorder. Infected people need a thorough medical surveillance and chronic therapy, which affects families and other caregivers. Infected children are also affected by their parents' infection and by the stigma that is still associated with this particular illness. Regular meetings were organized for HIV infected children, their families and the health team with recreational and formative purposes. These meetings were evaluated in a strongly positive manner by all the intervenients. The goal to maintain these activities is proposed as a way of improving the follow-up and the prognosis of these children. PMID:21144321

  11. Pulmonary Manifestations of Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nonas, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary disease, ranging from infectious pneumonia, lung abscess, and empyema to structural lung diseases to malignancy, significantly increase morbidity and mortality in primary immune deficiency. Treatment with supplemental immunoglobulin (intravenous or subcutaneous) and antimicrobials is beneficial in reducing infections but are largely ineffective in preventing noninfectious complications, including interstitial lung disease, malignancy, and autoimmune disease. A low threshold for suspecting pulmonary complications is necessary for the early diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in primary immunodeficiency disorders, before irreversible damage is done, to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26454317

  12. Chimeric Plant Virus Particles as Immunogens for Inducing Murine and Human Immune Responses against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Marusic, Carla; Rizza, Paola; Lattanzi, Laura; Mancini, Camillo; Spada, Massimo; Belardelli, Filippo; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Capone, Imerio

    2001-01-01

    The high-yield expression of a neutralizing epitope from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on the surface of a plant virus and its immunogenicity are presented. The highly conserved ELDKWA epitope from glycoprotein (gp) 41 was expressed as an N-terminal translational fusion with the potato virus X (PVX) coat protein. The resulting chimeric virus particles (CVPs), purified and used to immunize mice intraperitoneally or intranasally, were able to elicit high levels of HIV-1-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies. Furthermore, the human immune response to CVPs was studied with severe combined immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hu-PBL-SCID). hu-PBL-SCID mice immunized with CVP-pulsed autologous dendritic cells were able to mount a specific human primary antibody response against the gp41-derived epitope. Notably, sera from both normal and hu-PBL-SCID mice showed an anti-HIV-1-neutralizing activity. Thus, PVX-based CVPs carrying neutralizing epitopes can offer novel perspectives for the development of effective vaccines against HIV and, more generally, for the design of new vaccination strategies in humans. PMID:11507188

  13. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiencies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-10-14

    Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immunodeficiency; Graft Versus Host Disease; X-Linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; Familial Erythrophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Hyper IgM Syndrome; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Syndrome; Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome

  14. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  15. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  16. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  17. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  18. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b)...

  19. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  20. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orange, Jordan S; Seeborg, Filiz O; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  1. Family Physician Perspectives on Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orange, Jordan S.; Seeborg, Filiz O.; Boyle, Marcia; Scalchunes, Christopher; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) include over 250 diverse disorders. The current study assessed management of PID by family practice physicians. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Primary Immunodeficiency Committee and the Immune Deficiency Foundation conducted an incentivized mail survey of family practice physician members of the American Medical Association and the American Osteopathic Association in direct patient care. Responses were compared with subspecialist immunologist responses from a similar survey. Surveys were returned by 528 (of 4500 surveys mailed) family practice physicians, of whom 44% reported following ≥1 patient with PID. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (21%) and chronic granulomatous disease (11%) were most common and were followed by significantly more subspecialist immunologists (P < 0.05). Use of intravenously administered immunoglobulin and live viral vaccinations across PID was significantly different (P < 0.05). Few family practice physicians were aware of professional guidelines for diagnosis and management of PID (4 vs. 79% of subspecialist immunologists, P < 0.05). Family practice physicians will likely encounter patients with PID diagnoses during their career. Differences in how family practice physicians and subspecialist immunologists manage patients with PID underscore areas where improved educational and training initiatives may benefit patient care. PMID:27066486

  2. Severe combined immunodeficiency--an update.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Emilia; Giardino, Giuliana; Gallo, Vera; D'Assante, Roberta; Grasso, Fiorentino; Romano, Roberta; Di Lillo, Cristina; Galasso, Giovanni; Pignata, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCIDs) are a group of inherited disorders responsible for severe dysfunctions of the immune system. These diseases are life-threatening when the diagnosis is made too late; they are the most severe forms of primary immunodeficiency. SCID patients often die during the first two years of life if appropriate treatments to reconstitute their immune system are not undertaken. Conventionally, SCIDs are classified according either to the main pathway affected by the molecular defect or on the basis of the specific immunologic phenotype that reflects the stage where the blockage occurs during the differentiation process. However, during the last few years many new causative gene alterations have been associated with unusual clinical and immunological phenotypes. Many of these novel forms of SCID also show extra-hematopoietic alterations, leading to complex phenotypes characterized by a functional impairment of several organs, which may lead to a considerable delay in the diagnosis. Here we review the biological and clinical features of SCIDs paying particular attention to the most recently identified forms and to their unusual or extra-immunological clinical features. PMID:26235889

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in developing countries.

    PubMed

    French, N; Kaleebu, P; Pisani, E; Whitworth, J A G

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is causing the most destructive epidemic of recent times, having been responsible for the deaths of more than 25 million people since it was first recognised in 1981. This global epidemic remains out of control, with reported figures for 2005 of 40 million people infected with HIV. During 2005 there were 4.9 million new infections, showing that transmission is not being prevented, and there were 3.1 million deaths from the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), reflecting the lack of a definitive cure and the limited access to suppressive antiretroviral treatment in the developing countries that are most severely affected. The current state of the epidemic and the response to date are here reviewed. Present and future opportunities for prevention, treatment and surveillance are discussed, with particular reference to progress towards an HIV vaccine, the expansion of the provision of highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the need to focus control programmes on HIV as an infectious disease, rather than as a development issue. PMID:16899147

  4. Combined Immunodeficiency Associated with DOCK8 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Davis, Jeremiah C.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Jing, Huie; Favreau, Amanda J.; Matthews, Helen F.; Davis, Joie; Turner, Maria L.; Uzel, Gulbu; Holland, Steven M.; Su, Helen C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections with elevated serum levels of IgE are features of some variants of combined immunodeficiency. The genetic causes of these variants are unknown. METHODS We collected longitudinal clinical data on 11 patients from eight families who had recurrent sinopulmonary and cutaneous viral infections. We performed comparative genomic hybridization arrays and targeted gene sequencing. Variants with predicted loss-of-expression mutations were confirmed by means of a quantitative reverse-transcriptase –polymerase-chain-reaction assay and immunoblotting. We evaluated the number and function of lymphocytes with the use of in vitro assays and flow cytometry. RESULTS Patients had recurrent otitis media, sinusitis, and pneumonias; recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin infections with otitis externa; recurrent, severe herpes simplex virus or herpes zoster infections; extensive and persistent infections with molluscum contagiosum; and human papillomavirus infections. Most patients had severe atopy with anaphylaxis; several had squamous-cell carcinomas, and one had T-cell lymphoma –leukemia. Elevated serum IgE levels, hypereosinophilia, low numbers of T cells and B cells, low serum IgM levels, and variable IgG antibody responses were common. Expansion in vitro of activated CD8 T cells was impaired. Novel homozygous or compound heterozygous deletions and point mutations in the gene encoding the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 protein (DOCK8) led to the absence of DOCK8 protein in lymphocytes. CONCLUSIONS Autosomal recessive DOCK8 deficiency is associated with a novel variant of combined immunodeficiency. PMID:19776401

  5. Simian immunodeficiency virus DNA vaccine trial in macaques.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, S; Arthos, J; Montefiori, D C; Yasutomi, Y; Manson, K; Mustafa, F; Johnson, E; Santoro, J C; Wissink, J; Mullins, J I; Haynes, J R; Letvin, N L; Wyand, M; Robinson, H L

    1996-01-01

    An experimental vaccine consisting of five DNA plasmids expressing different combinations and forms of simian immunodeficiency virus-macaque (SIVmac) proteins has been evaluated for the ability to protect against a highly pathogenic uncloned SIVmac251 challenge. One vaccine plasmid encoded nonreplicating SIVmac239 virus particles. The other four plasmids encoded secreted forms of the envelope glycoproteins of two T-cell-tropic relatives (SIVmac239 and SIVmac251) and one monocyte/macrophage-tropic relative (SIVmac316) of the uncloned challenge virus. Rhesus macaques were inoculated with DNA at 1 and 3, 11 and 13, and 21 and 23 weeks. Four macaques were inoculated intravenously, intramuscularly, and by gene gun inoculations. Three received only gene gun inoculations. Two control monkeys were inoculated with control plasmids by all three routes of inoculation. Neutralizing antibody titers of 1:216 to 1:768 were present in all of the vaccinated monkeys after the second cluster of inoculations. These titers were transient, were not boosted by the third cluster of inoculations, and had fallen to 1:24 to 1:72 by the time of challenge. Cytotoxic T-cell activity for Env was also raised in all of the vaccinated animals. The temporal appearance of cytotoxic T cells was similar to that of antibody. However, while antibody responses fell with time, cytotoxic T-cell responses persisted. The SIVmac251 challenge was administered intravenously at 2 weeks following the last immunization. The DNA immunizations did not prevent infection or protect against CD4+ cell loss. Long-term chronic levels of infection were similar in the vaccinated and control animals, with 1 in 10,000 to 1 in 100,000 peripheral blood cells carrying infectious virus. However, viral loads were reduced to the chronic level over a shorter period of time in the vaccinated groups (6 weeks) than in the control group (12 weeks). Thus, the DNA vaccine raised both neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses and provided some attenuation of the acute phase of infection, but it did not prevent the loss of CD4+ cells. PMID:8648735

  6. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing

  7. Health Administrator Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Prevention and Services at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Jones, Sandra; Sutton, Madeline Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Due to the disproportionate impact of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) among African American young adults, the authors explored (1) number of historically black college and university (HBCU) campuses with existing HIV prevention policies and services and (2) perceived barriers for implementing…

  8. Feline immunodeficiency virus: an interesting model for AIDS studies and an important cat pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Bendinelli, M; Pistello, M; Lombardi, S; Poli, A; Garzelli, C; Matteucci, D; Ceccherini-Nelli, L; Malvaldi, G; Tozzini, F

    1995-01-01

    The lentivirus feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a widespread pathogen of the domestic cat that is mainly transmitted through bites, although other means of transmission are also possible. Its prevalence ranges from 1 to 10% in different cat populations throughout the world, thus representing a large reservoir of naturally infected animals. FIV resembles the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in many respects. Similarities include the structural features of the virion, the general organization and great variability of the genome, the life cycle in the infected host, and most importantly, the pathogenic potential. Infection is associated with laboratory signs of immunosuppression as well as with a large variety of superinfections, tumors, and neurological manifestations. Our understanding of FIV is steadily improving and is providing important clues to the pathogenesis of immunodeficiency-inducing lentiviruses. The cellular receptor for FIV is different from the feline equivalent of the human CD4 molecule used by HIV; nevertheless, the major hallmark of infection is a progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes as in HIV infection. The mechanisms by which FIV escapes the host's immune responses are being actively investigated. FIV causes lysis of infected T cells and also appears to predispose these cells to apoptosis. Infection of macrophages and other cell types has also been documented. For reasons yet to be understood, antibody-mediated neutralization of fresh FIV isolates is very inefficient both in vitro and in vivo. Vaccination studies have provided some encouraging results, but the difficulties encountered appear to match those met in HIV vaccine development. FIV susceptibility to antiviral agents is similar to that of HIV, thus providing a valuable system for in vivo preclinical evaluation of therapies. It is concluded that in many respects FIV is an ideal model for AIDS studies. PMID:7704896

  9. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolston, Steven L.

    2008-07-01

    Plasmas are normally thought of as high temperature ionized gases or fluids, such as those in the sun's corona or those found in controlled nuclear fusion experiments. Many interesting plasma phenomena can occur, however, in plasmas at low temperature. With the help of laser trapping and cooling, atoms can be photoionized to form neutral plasmas at extremely low temperatures. These plasmas may exist in the so-called strong coupling regime, where the energy of the Coulomb interactions between particles is larger than their thermal energy. In addition to providing a test bed for studying the strongly coupled plasmas such as those found in Jovian planets and white dwarfs, ultracold plasmas play a critical role in understanding the formation of antihydrogen.

  10. Pinhole neutral atom microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, Philip James

    This work presents a new form of microscopy, the instrument constructed to demonstrate it, the images produced and the image contrast mechanisms seen for the first time. Some of its future scientific potential is described and finally, recent work towards advancing the method is discussed. Many forms of microscopy exist, each with unique advantages. Of several broad categories that they could be grouped into, those that use particle beams have proven very generally useful for micro and nano-scale imaging, including Scanning Electron, Transmission Electron, and Ion Beam microscopes. These have the disadvantage, however, of implanting electric charges into the sample, and usually at very high energy relative to the binding energy of molecules. For most materials this modifies the sample at a small scale and as we work increasingly towards the nano-scale, this is a serious problem. The Neutral Atom Microscope (NAM) uses a beam of thermal energy (under 70 meV) non-charged atoms or molecules to probe an atomic surface. For several decades scientists have been interested in this possibility, using a focused beam. Scattering of neutral atoms provides a uniquely low-energy, surface-sensitive probe, as is known from molecular beam experiments. We have developed a new approach, operating with the sample at a close working distance from an aperture, the need for optics to focus the beam is obviated. The demonstrated, practical performance of this "Pinhole" NAM exceeds all other attempts by great lengths by many measures. The unique images resulting and contrast mechanism discoveries are described. The future potential for nano-scale resolution is shown.

  11. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-García, Concepción; Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Azcona-Gutiérrez, José M; Herraiz, María J; Ibarra, Valvanera; Oteo, José A

    2015-05-01

    Neurological complications in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) are still common, even in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Opportunistic infections, immune reconstitution, the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and neurocognitive disorders have to be considered when establishing the differential diagnosis. Toxoplasmic encephalitis remains the major cause of space-occupying lesions in the brain of patients with HIV/AIDS; however, spinal cord involvement has been reported infrequently. Here, we review spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection and illustrate the condition with a recent case from our hospital. We suggest that most patients with HIV/AIDS and myelitis with enhanced spine lesions, multiple brain lesions and positive serology for Toxoplasma gondii should receive immediate empirical treatment for toxoplasmosis, and a biopsy should be performed in those cases without clinical improvement or with deterioration. PMID:25835092

  12. Live, attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines elicit potent resistance against a challenge with a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 chimeric virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, R; Siemon, C; Czajak, S C; Desrosiers, R C; Martin, M A

    1997-01-01

    Three rhesus macaques, previously immunized with SIVdelta3 or SIVdelta2, each an attenuated derivative of SIVmac239, and two naive monkeys were challenged with 30,000 50% tissue culture infective doses of SHIV, an SIV/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) chimeric virus bearing the dual-tropic envelope of HIV-1DH12. By several criteria, including virus isolation, serological assays, and PCR (both DNA and reverse transcriptase), SHIV levels were reduced to barely detectable levels in the circulating blood of vaccinated animals. The resistant SIV-vaccinated macaques had no preexisting neutralizing antibodies directed against SHIV, nor did they produce neutralizing antibodies at any time over a 14-month observation period following SHIV challenge. Interestingly, SIV sequences, derived from the vaccine, could be amplified from numerous tissue samples collected at the conclusion of the experiment, 60 weeks postchallenge, but SHIV-specific sequences (viz., HIV-1 env) could not. These results demonstrate that live attenuated SIV vaccines provide strong long-term protection even against challenge strains with highly divergent envelope sequences. PMID:9343164

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus infection, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, E M; Chan, N H; Herrick, R A; Amar, J N; Sestak, P M; Willoughby, B C; Whittaker, J S

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A retrospective survey of the medical records of St. Paul's Hospital and its AIDS-care physicians/gastroenterologists searching for patients with both HIV/AIDS and IBD was conducted. Of 1,839 hospitalized patients (4,459 hospital admissions) from 1989 to 1993, two patients with AIDS/HIV and IBD were found. The physician survey revealed four patients for a total of six patients. Four patients developed de novo IBD--two ulcerative colitis (UC), one Crohn's disease (CrD), and one indeterminate colitis (IC)--after HIV infection. Two patients had UC predating HIV seroconversion. The absolute CD4 count of patients with de novo IBD was 210-700 cells/ml at the time of IBD. The patient with IC maintained quiescent IBD from a CD4 count of 190-30 cells/ml. The other had many relapses before HIV seropositivity. With CD4 count depletion, disease activity improved. IBD medications were discontinued at a CD4 count of 130 cells/ml. Diarrhea returned at a CD4 count of 20 cells/ml; however, sigmoidoscopy was unremarkable, and mucosal biopsy revealed cryptosporidiosis without active UC. No patient had an AIDS-related illness during active IBD. Two patients followed to CD4 counts of < 30 cells/ml suffered AIDS-related infections with quiescent IBD. With a progressive decline in CD4 count, IBD disease activity may improve and remit. The CD4 count at which remission occurs may reflect severe immunodeficiency such that risk for AIDS-related infection is high. Active IBD may occur with lesser degrees of immunodeficiency. PMID:8835895

  14. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  15. Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia L; Gootenberg, David B; Zhao, Guoyan; Handley, Scott A; Ghebremichael, Musie S; Lim, Efrem S; Lankowski, Alex; Baldridge, Megan T; Wilen, Craig B; Flagg, Meaghan; Norman, Jason M; Keller, Brian C; Luévano, Jesús Mario; Wang, David; Boum, Yap; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W; Bangsberg, David R; Siedner, Mark J; Kwon, Douglas S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression. PMID:26962942

  16. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F.; Jeggo, Penny A.; Martin, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  17. Structural Basis for Broad and Potent Neutralization of HIV-1 by Antibody VRC01

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tongqing; Georgiev, Ivelin; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dai, Kaifan; Finzi, Andrés; Kwon, Young Do; Scheid, Johannes F.; Shi, Wei; Xu, Ling; Yang, Yongping; Zhu, Jiang; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Sodroski, Joseph; Shapiro, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-08-26

    During HIV-1 infection, antibodies are generated against the region of the viral gp120 envelope glycoprotein that binds CD4, the primary receptor for HIV-1. Among these antibodies, VRC01 achieves broad neutralization of diverse viral strains. We determined the crystal structure of VRC01 in complex with a human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 gp120 core. VRC01 partially mimics CD4 interaction with gp120. A shift from the CD4-defined orientation, however, focuses VRC01 onto the vulnerable site of initial CD4 attachment, allowing it to overcome the glycan and conformational masking that diminishes the neutralization potency of most CD4-binding-site antibodies. To achieve this recognition, VRC01 contacts gp120 mainly through immunoglobulin V-gene regions substantially altered from their genomic precursors. Partial receptor mimicry and extensive affinity maturation thus facilitate neutralization of HIV-1 by natural human antibodies.

  18. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  19. Vaccine Protection against a Heterologous, Non-Syncytium-Inducing, Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Kaur, Harvinder; Patterson, L. Jean; Leno, Michel; Conley, Anthony J.; McKenna, Philip M.; Markham, Phillip D.; Richardson, Ersell; Aldrich, Kristine; Arora, Kamalpreet; Murty, Lalita; Carter, Lucretia; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Sinangil, Faruk

    1998-01-01

    Vaccine-induced protection of chimpanzees against laboratory-adapted and syncytium-inducing, multiply passaged primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates, but not against non-syncytium-inducing, minimally passaged ones, has been demonstrated. Following challenge with such an isolate, HIV-15016, we obtained complete protection in one of three chimpanzees previously protected against low- and high-dose HIV-1SF2 exposures after immunization with an adenovirus-HIV-1MN gp160 priming–HIV-1SF2 gp120 boosting regimen. At challenge, the protected chimpanzee exhibited broad humoral immunity, including neutralizing antibody activity. These results demonstrate the potential of this combination vaccine strategy and suggest that vaccine protection against an HIV isolate relevant to infection of people is feasible. PMID:9811775

  20. Mucosal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Tebit, Denis M; Ndembi, Nicaise; Weinberg, Aaron; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2012-01-01

    Since the beginning of the AIDS pandemic, and following the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the etiological agent of the disease, it was clear that the virus gains access to the human host predominantly through the mucosal tissue after sexual exposure. As a consequence, the female genital tract (vaginal and cervical), as well as the rectal, penile, and oral mucosae have been extensively studied over the last thirty years towards a better understanding of--and to develop strategies to prevent--sexual HIV transmission. This review seeks to describe the biology of the events leading to HIV infection through the human mucosa and introduce some of the approaches attempted to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. PMID:22264040

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Megan; Iser, David; Lewin, Sharon R

    2012-01-01

    Liver disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals encompasses the spectrum from abnormal liver function tests, liver decompensation, with and without evidence of cirrhosis on biopsy, to non-alcoholic liver disease and its more severe form, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular cancer. HIV can infect multiple cells in the liver, leading to enhanced intrahepatic apoptosis, activation and fibrosis. HIV can also alter gastro-intestinal tract permeability, leading to increased levels of circulating lipopolysaccharide that may have an impact on liver function. This review focuses on recent changes in the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of liver disease in HIV-infected patients, in the absence of co-infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, with a specific focus on issues relevant to low and middle income countries. PMID:22489261

  2. INTRINSIC CELLULAR DEFENSES AGAINST HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral infections are often detrimental to host survival and reproduction. Consequently, hosts have evolved a variety of mechanisms to defend themselves against viruses. A component of this arsenal is a set of proteins, termed restriction factors, which exhibit direct antiviral activity. Among these are several classes of proteins (APOBEC3, TRIM5, Tetherin and SAMHD1) that inhibit the replication of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses. Here, we outline the features, mechanisms, and evolution of these defense mechanisms. We also speculate on how restriction factors arose, how they might interact with the conventional innate and adaptive immune systems and how an understanding of these intrinsic cellular defenses might be usefully exploited. PMID:22999946

  3. Use of immunodeficient mice in metastasis research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B S; Schumacher, U

    1997-12-01

    One of the major clinical problems facing the western world is how to stem the tide of deaths from metastasising malignancies. Despite some progress in diagnosis and treatment, the death rate from major clinically important tumours, such as lung, breast and colon cancer, shows no signs of abating. This therapeutic failure is due to tumour metastasis, for which no treatment options are available. Effort has been made to find valid animal models in which the metastatic process can be studied, and in which putative treatments can be evaluated. This review discusses some of the approaches used in creating these models, and focuses on current work using the severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse. PMID:9624739

  4. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Related Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nájera, Rafael; Herrera, M. I.; Andrés, R. de

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and related retroviruses, describing basic characteristics of this new group of viruses such as morphologic and genetic structure, biological and cultural properties, virus growth characteristics, genetic variability and virus replication. The discovery of new human and simian retroviruses has prompted the World Health Organization (WHO) to convene a group of experts to establish criteria for their characterization. This will allow rapid identification of new variants that may arise and allow public health measures to be implemented accordingly. Different approaches are made to nomenclature in view of the evolution of knowledge about these viruses, and a system of nomenclature has been proposed by the WHO working group. This system, inspired by the one developed for the influenza viruses, is practical and descriptive, providing information on the origins of the organism and its type. Images PMID:2829446

  6. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men. PMID:2996396

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus induced oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Warrier, S. Aravind; Sathasivasubramanian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide health problem, which affects in both developing and developed countries. The oral lesions caused due to this disease can drastically change the life of the patient, in terms of quality. We can also know the progression of the disease and also the important immune status of the patient. Lots of information on HIV is known in the developed countries and very less reports are available in the developing countries. The morbidity of HIV disease is due to its association with opportunistic fungal infection and the most common among them is oral candidiasis. Here, we present a case report on an apparently healthy male patient of 39 years, who had oral candidiasis and was one of the indicators for HIV infection. PMID:26538978

  8. Epidemiology of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Australia .

    PubMed

    Whyte, B M; Gold, J; Dobson, A J; Cooper, D A

    1987-01-19

    Since 1982, when the first case of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was diagnosed in Australia, a total of 373 cases has been reported to the NHMRC Special Unit in AIDS Epidemiology and Clinical Research to December 19, 1986. Analysis of the data shows that 70% of cases were diagnosed in NSW and of all cases 88% were found to be in homosexual or bisexual men, with the majority aged between 30 and 39 years. Opportunistic infections were found in nearly three-quarters of cases. A mathematical model which has been developed predicts that 1000 cases will have been diagnosed by mid-1988 and nearly that many again in 1990 alone. The absence of a treatment or vaccine, the likelihood that current Australian resources will be inadequate to deal with the predicted number of cases, and the urgent need to establish measures that are aimed at controlling the extent of the disease are emphasized. PMID:3491950

  9. Infection of Monkeys by Simian-human Immunodeficiency Viruses with Transmitted/ founder Clade C HIV-1 Envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L.; Mach, Linh V.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N.; Lewis, Mark G.; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Letvin, Norman L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Haynes, Barton F.; Santra, Sampa

    2014-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed ten clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques. PMID:25462344

  10. Infection of monkeys by simian-human immunodeficiency viruses with transmitted/founder clade C HIV-1 envelopes.

    PubMed

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L; Mach, Linh V; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N; Lewis, Mark G; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Letvin, Norman L; Burton, Dennis R; Sodroski, Joseph G; Haynes, Barton F; Santra, Sampa

    2015-01-15

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed 10 clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques. PMID:25462344

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus encephalitis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Persidsky, Y.; Limoges, J.; McComb, R.; Bock, P.; Baldwin, T.; Tyor, W.; Patil, A.; Nottet, H. S.; Epstein, L.; Gelbard, H.; Flanagan, E.; Reinhard, J.; Pirruccello, S. J.; Gendelman, H. E.

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is neuroinvasive and commonly causes cognitive and motor deficits during the later stages of viral infection. (referred to as HIV dementia). The mechanism(s) for disease revolves around secretory products produced from immune-activated brain macrophages/microglia. Recently, we developed an animal model system for HIV dementia that contains xenografts of HIV-1-infected cells inoculated into brains of mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). This animal system was used to quantitatively evaluate HIV-induced neuropathology. Xenografts of HIV-1-infected human monocytes (placed into the putamen and cortex of SCID mice) remained viable for 5 weeks. HIV-1 p24 antigen expression in mouse brain was persistent. Progressive inflammatory responses (including astrogliosis and cytokine production), which began at 3 days, peaked at day 12. The range of astrocyte proliferative reactions exceeded the inoculation site by > 1000 microns. Brains with virus-infected monocytes showed a > or = 1.6-fold increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein (staining distribution and intensity) as compared with similarly inoculated brains with uninfected control monocytes. These findings paralleled the accumulation and activation of murine microglia (increased branching of cell processes, formation of microglial nodules, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 expression). An inflammatory reaction of human monocytes (as defined by HLA-DR, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression) and neuronal injury (apoptosis) also developed after virus-infected monocyte xenograft placement into mouse brain tissue. These data, taken together, demonstrate that this SCID mouse model of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis can reproduce key aspects of disease (virus-infected macrophages, astrocytosis, microglial activation, and neuronal damage). This model may serve as an important means for therapeutic development directed toward improving mental function in HIV-infected subjects with cognitive and motor dysfunction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:8780406

  12. Autoimmune cytopenias in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Podjasek, Jenna C; Abraham, Roshini S

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a humoral immunodeficiency whose primary diagnostic features include hypogammaglobulinemia involving two or more immunoglobulin isotypes and impaired functional antibody responses in the majority of patients. While increased susceptibility to respiratory and other infections is a common thread that binds a large cross-section of CVID patients, the presence of autoimmune complications in this immunologically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is recognized in up to two-thirds of patients. Among the autoimmune manifestations reported in CVID (20-50%; Chapel et al., 2008; Cunningham-Rundles, 2008), autoimmune cytopenias are by far the most common occurring variably in 4-20% (Michel et al., 2004; Chapel et al., 2008) of these patients who have some form of autoimmunity. Association of autoimmune cytopenias with granulomatous disease and splenomegaly has been reported. The spectrum of autoimmune cytopenias includes thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia. While it may seem paradoxical "prima facie" that autoimmunity is present in patients with primary immune deficiencies, in reality, it could be considered two sides of the same coin, each reflecting a different but inter-connected facet of immune dysregulation. The expansion of CD21 low B cells in CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune features has also been previously reported. It has been demonstrated that this unique subset of B cells is enriched for autoreactive germline antibodies. Further, a correlation has been observed between various B cell subsets, such as class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, and autoimmunity in CVID. This review attempts to explore the most recent concepts and highlights, along with treatment of autoimmune hematological manifestations of CVID. PMID:22837758

  13. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:26235050

  14. Bioluminescent imaging of vaccinia virus infection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient rats as a model for human smallpox.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Fan, Changfa; Zhou, Shuya; Guo, Yanan; Zuo, Qin; Ma, Jian; Liu, Susu; Wu, Xi; Peng, Zexu; Fan, Tao; Guo, Chaoshe; Shen, Yuelei; Huang, Weijin; Li, Baowen; He, Zhengming; Wang, Youchun

    2015-01-01

    Due to the increasing concern of using smallpox virus as biological weapons for terrorist attack, there is renewed interest in studying the pathogenesis of human smallpox and development of new therapies. Animal models are highly demanded for efficacy and safety examination of new vaccines and therapeutic drugs. Here, we demonstrated that both wild type and immunodeficient rats infected with an engineered vaccinia virus carrying Firefly luciferase reporter gene (rTV-Fluc) could recapitulate infectious and clinical features of human smallpox. Vaccinia viral infection in wild type Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats displayed a diffusible pattern in various organs, including liver, head and limbs. The intensity of bioluminescence generated from rTV-Fluc correlated well with viral loads in tissues. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies had a protective effect against virus reinfection. The recombination activating gene 2 (Rag2) knockout rats generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology were further used to examine the infectivity of the rTV-Fluc in immunodeficient populations. Here we demonstrated that Rag2-/- rats were more susceptible to rTV-Fluc than SD rats with a slower virus clearance rate. Therefore, the rTV-Fluc/SD rats and rTV-Fluc/Rag2-/- rats are suitable visualization models, which recapitulate wild type or immunodeficient populations respectively, for testing human smallpox vaccine and antiviral drugs. PMID:26235050

  15. A Fusion Intermediate gp41 Immunogen Elicits Neutralizing Antibodies to HIV-1*

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Rachel P. J.; Hock, Miriam; Radzimanowski, Jens; Tonks, Paul; Hulsik, David Lutje; Effantin, Gregory; Seilly, David J.; Dreja, Hanna; Kliche, Alexander; Wagner, Ralf; Barnett, Susan W.; Tumba, Nancy; Morris, Lynn; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Seaman, Michael S.; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein subunit gp41 is targeted by potent broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5, 4E10, and 10E8. These antibodies recognize linear epitopes and have been suggested to target the fusion intermediate conformation of gp41 that bridges viral and cellular membranes. Anti-MPER antibodies exert different degrees of membrane interaction, which is considered to be the limiting factor for the generation of such antibodies by immunization. Here we characterize a fusion intermediate conformation of gp41 (gp41int-Cys) and show that it folds into an elongated ∼12-nm-long extended structure based on small angle x-ray scattering data. Gp41int-Cys was covalently linked to liposomes via its C-terminal cysteine and used as immunogen. The gp41int-Cys proteoliposomes were administered alone or in prime-boost regimen with trimeric envelope gp140CA018 in guinea pigs and elicited high anti-gp41 IgG titers. The sera interacted with a peptide spanning the MPER region, demonstrated competition with broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, and exerted modest lipid binding, indicating the presence of MPER-specific antibodies. Although the neutralization potency generated solely by gp140CA018 was higher than that induced by gp41int-Cys, the majority of animals immunized with gp41int-Cys proteoliposomes induced modest breadth and potency in neutralizing tier 1 pseudoviruses and replication-competent simian/human immunodeficiency viruses in the TZM-bl assay as well as responses against tier 2 HIV-1 in the A3R5 neutralization assay. Our data thus demonstrate that liposomal gp41 MPER formulation can induce neutralization activity, and the strategy serves to improve breadth and potency of such antibodies by improved vaccination protocols. PMID:25160627

  16. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in their physics and their technology, or in any case they are considered to be adequately covered by these other authors.

  17. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is established by powering the conversion step by renewable energy and recapturing the CO2 emitted after combustion, ultimately from the surrounding air to cover emissions from distributed source. Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU) coupled to P2G thus creates a CO2-neutral energy system based on synthetic hydrocarbon fuel. It would enable a circular economy where the carbon cycle is closed by recovering the CO2 emitted after reuse of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel. The critical step, technically as well as economically, is the conversion of feedstock CO2/H2O into syngas rather than the capture of CO2 from ambient air.

  18. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is a cutaway illustration of the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC ). The MSFC NBS provided an excellent environment for testing hardware to examine how it would operate in space and for evaluating techniques for space construction and spacecraft servicing. Here, engineers, designers, and astronauts performed various tests to develop basic concepts, preliminary designs, final designs, and crew procedures. The NBS was constructed of welded steel with polyester-resin coating. The water tank was 75-feet (22.9- meters) in diameter, 40-feet (12.2-meters) deep, and held 1.32 million gallons of water. Since it opened for operation in 1968, the NBS had supported a number of successful space missions, such as the Skylab, Solar Maximum Mission Satellite, Marned Maneuvering Unit, Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity/Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (EASE/ACCESS), the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Space Station. The function of the MSFC NBS was moved to the larger simulator at the Johnson Space Center and is no longer operational.

  19. Nonexotic neutral gauge bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, Thomas; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Hopper, Adam R.

    2003-08-01

    We study theoretical and experimental constraints on electroweak theories including a new color-singlet and electrically neutral gauge boson. We first note that the electric charges of the observed fermions imply that any such Z' boson may be described by a gauge theory in which the Abelian gauge groups are the usual hypercharge along with another U(1) component in a kinetic-diagonal basis. Assuming that the observed quarks and leptons have generation-independent U(1) charges, and that no new fermions couple to the standard model gauge bosons, we find that their U(1) charges form a two-parameter family consistent with anomaly cancellation and viable fermion masses, provided there are at least three right-handed neutrinos. We then derive bounds on the Z' mass and couplings imposed by direct production and Z-pole measurements. For generic charge assignments and a gauge coupling of electromagnetic strength, the strongest lower bound on the Z' mass comes from Z-pole measurements, and is of the order of 1 TeV. If the new U(1) charges are proportional to B-L, however, there is no tree-level mixing between the Z and Z', and the best bounds come from the absence of direct production at CERN LEP II and the Fermilab Tevatron. If the U(1) gauge coupling is one or two orders of magnitude below the electromagnetic one, these bounds are satisfied for most values of the Z' mass.

  20. Immunodeficiency and autoimmunity: lessons from systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Alexandros P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that systemic autoimmunity and immunodeficiency are not separate entities, but rather interconnected processes. Immunodeficiency results from distinct defects of the immune response and primarily presents as infections, but also frequently with autoimmune features. Systemic autoimmunity is the combined effect of multiple genetic variations, infectious and immunoregulatory factors that result in dominant autoimmune manifestations in addition to frequent and opportunistic infections. The overlap in disease manifestations and symptoms suggests that immunodeficiency should be considered in the presence of autoimmunity, and vice versa. In this review, we present the shared or similar aspects of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity using systemic lupus erythematosus as a paradigm and discuss the implications for clinical care. PMID:22177735

  1. Neutralization tests on the SERT 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutralization test data obtained on the SERT 2 spacecraft are presented. Tests included ion beam neutralization of a thruster by a close (normal design) neutralizer as well as by a distant (1 meter) neutralizer. Parameters affecting neutralization, such as neutralizer bias voltage, neutralizer anode voltage, local spacecraft plasma density, and solar array voltage configuration were varied and changes in plasma potentials were measured. A plasma model is presented as an approximation of observed results.

  2. Non-Neutral Vegetation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Marani, Marco; Zillio, Tommaso; Belluco, Enrica; Silvestri, Sonia; Maritan, Amos

    2006-01-01

    The neutral theory of biodiversity constitutes a reference null hypothesis for the interpretation of ecosystem dynamics and produces relatively simple analytical descriptions of basic system properties, which can be easily compared to observations. On the contrary, investigations in non-neutral dynamics have in the past been limited by the complexity arising from heterogeneous demographic behaviours and by the relative paucity of detailed observations of the spatial distribution of species diversity (beta-diversity): These circumstances prevented the development and testing of explicit non-neutral mathematical descriptions linking competitive strategies and observable ecosystem properties. Here we introduce an exact non-neutral model of vegetation dynamics, based on cloning and seed dispersal, which yields closed-form characterizations of beta-diversity. The predictions of the non-neutral model are validated using new high-resolution remote-sensing observations of salt-marsh vegetation in the Venice Lagoon (Italy). Model expressions of beta-diversity show a remarkable agreement with observed distributions within the wide observational range of scales explored (5⋅10−1 m÷103 m). We also consider a neutral version of the model and find its predictions to be in agreement with the more limited characterization of beta-diversity typical of the neutral theory (based on the likelihood that two sites be conspecific or heterospecific, irrespective of the species). However, such an agreement proves to be misleading as the recruitment rates by propagules and by seed dispersal assumed by the neutral model do not reflect known species characteristics and correspond to averages of those obtained under the more general non-neutral hypothesis. We conclude that non-neutral beta-diversity characterizations are required to describe ecosystem dynamics in the presence of species-dependent properties and to successfully relate the observed patterns to the underlying processes. PMID:17183710

  3. Magnetic nanocomposite of anti-human IgG/COOH-multiwalled carbon nanotubes/Fe₃O₄ as a platform for electrochemical immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Hajar; Ghourchian, Hedayatollah; Eskandari, Khadijeh; Zeinali, Majid

    2012-02-15

    An electrochemical immunosensing method was developed based on a magnetic nanocomposite. The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were treated with nitric acid to produce carboxyl groups at the open ends. Then, Fe₃O₄ nanoparticles were deposited on COOH-MWCNTs by chemical coprecipitation of Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺ salts in an alkaline solution. Goat anti-human IgG (anti-hIgG) was covalently attached to magnetic nanocomposite through amide bond formation between the carboxylic groups of MWCNTs and the amine groups of anti-hIgG. The prepared bio-nanocomposite was used for electrochemical sensing of human tetanus IgG (hIgG) as a model antigen. The anti-hIgG magnetic nanocomposite was fixed on the surface of a gold plate electrode using a permanent magnet. The hIgG was detected using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-hIgG in a sandwich model. Electrochemical detection of hIgG was carried out in the presence of H₂O₂ and KI as substrates of HRP. Using this method, hIgG was detected in a concentration range from 30 to 1000 ng ml⁻¹ with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 and a detection limit of 25 ng ml⁻¹ (signal/noise=3). The designed immunosensor was stable for 1 month. PMID:22245258

  4. Unexplained fetal death has a biological signature of maternal anti-fetal rejection: chronic chorioamnionitis and alloimmune anti-human leucocyte antigen antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JoonHo; Romero, Roberto; Dong, Zhong; Xu, Yi; Qureshi, Faisal; Jacques, Suzanne; Yoo, Wonsuk; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Mittal, Pooja; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kim, Chong Jai

    2013-01-01

    Aims Chronic chorioamnionitis is a histological manifestation of maternal anti-fetal cellular rejection. Failure of graft survival being the most catastrophic event in organ transplantation, we hypothesized that fetal death could be a consequence of rejection of the mother against the fetus. This study was conducted to assess evidence of cellular and antibody-mediated rejection in fetal death cases. Methods and results Placental histology was reviewed for the presence of chronic chorioamnionitis in unexplained preterm fetal death (n=30) and preterm live birth (n=103) cases. Amniotic fluid CXCL10 concentrations were measured by specific immunoassay. Chronic chorioamnionitis was more frequent in fetal death cases than in live birth cases (60.0% versus 37.9%; P<0.05) and fetal death cases had a higher median amniotic fluid CXCL10 concentration than live birth cases (2.0 ng/ml versus 1.8 ng/ml, P<0.05), after adjusting for gestational age at amniocentesis. Maternal anti-human leucocye antigen (HLA) class II seropositivity determined by flow cytometry was higher in fetal death cases compared to live birth cases (35.7% versus 10.9%; P<0.05). Conclusions Chronic chorioamnionitis is a common pathology of unexplained preterm fetal death. The novel findings herein suggest strongly that cellular and antibody-mediated anti-fetal rejection of the mother is associated with fetal death (graft failure) in human pregnancy. PMID:22092404

  5. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of Xaa-Pro dipeptidyl-peptidase from Streptococcus mutans and its inhibition by anti-human DPP IV drugs.

    PubMed

    De, Arpan; Lupidi, Giulio; Petrelli, Dezemona; Vitali, Luca A

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans harbours an intracellular, human DPP IV-analogous enzyme Xaa-Pro dipeptidyl-peptidase (EC 3.4.14.11). According to previous reports, an extracellular isozyme in S. gordonii and S. suis has been associated with virulence. Speculating that even an intracellular form may aid in virulence of S. mutans, we have tried to purify, characterize and evaluate enzyme inhibition by specific inhibitors. The native enzyme was partially purified by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Owing to low yield, the enzyme was overexpressed in Lactococcus lactis and purified by affinity chromatography. The recombinant enzyme (rSm-XPDAP) had a specific activity of 1070 U mg(-1), while the Vmax and Km were 7 μM min(-1) and 89 ± 7 μM (n = 3), respectively. The serine protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride and a DPP IV-specific inhibitor diprotin A proved to be active against rSm-XPDAP. As a novel approach, the evaluation of the effect of anti-human DPP IV (AHD) drugs on rSm-XPDAP activity found saxagliptin to be effective to some extent (Ki = 129 ± 16 μM), which may lead to the synthesis and development of a new class of antimicrobial agents. PMID:27010012

  6. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  7. [Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Mitsuru

    2013-03-01

    The Ibaraki Medical Association established the Committee for Alternative Dispute Resolution called the Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee in 2006. Among 64 claims presented to the committee, 29 were settled through mediation or consultation. Patients were generally satisfied that their claims were considered fairly by the committee and that they were able to talk directly with healthcare professionals. However, some did not consider the committee to be completely neutral. The healthcare professionals involved rated the committee highly because they felt that the processes were neutral and no emotional aspects were involved. PMID:23617190

  8. Neutral current interactions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Alexandre; /Oxford U.

    2007-07-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) long-baseline experiment has been actively collecting beam data since 2005, having already accumulated 3 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT). The several million neutrinos per year observed at the Near detector may improve the existing body of knowledge of neutrino cross-sections and the Near-Far comparison of the observed energy spectrum neutral current events constrains oscillations into sterile neutrinos. MINOS capabilities of observing neutral current neutrino events are described and the employed methodology for event selection is discussed, along with preliminary results obtained. An outlook on the expected neutral current related contributions from MINOS is also presented.

  9. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, G S; Stahl, R E; el-Sadr, W; Cassai, N D; Forrester, E M; Zolla-Pazner, S

    1985-04-01

    Blood and a variety of tissues from 97 patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 25 with the AIDS prodrome were studied ultrastructurally. Tubuloreticular structures (TRS) were found in 85 per cent of the patients with AIDS and in 92 per cent of those with the prodrome. Test tube and ring-shaped forms (TRF), found in 41 per cent of the patients with AIDS and in 8 per cent of those with the prodrome, increased with disease progression. Among the patients with AIDS, as the number of sites examined per case increased, the incidence of TRS and TRF tended to approach 100 per cent, suggesting that they are present in all patients with AIDS. Other changes seen frequently were immunologic capping of blood lymphocytes, intramitochondrial iron in blood reticulocytes and marrow normoblasts, megakaryocytic immaturity and platelet phagocytosis, collections of membranous rings in hepatocytic cytoplasm, suggestive of non-A, non-B hepatitis, and proliferations and engorgement of hepatic Ito cells with lipid. The data suggest that TRS and TRF can be used as diagnostic and prognostic markers. PMID:3872253

  10. Bacterial Respiratory Infections Complicating Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Opportunistic bacterial and fungal infections of the lower respiratory tract, most commonly those caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Pneumocystis jirovecii, remain the major causes of mortality in those infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial respiratory pathogens most prevalent in those infected with HIV, other than M. tuberculosis, represent the primary focus of the current review with particular emphasis on the pneumococcus, the leading cause of mortality due to HIV infection in the developed world. Additional themes include (1) risk factors; (2) the predisposing effects of HIV-mediated suppression on pulmonary host defenses, possibly intensified by smoking; (3) clinical and laboratory diagnosis, encompassing assessment of disease severity and outcome; and (4) antibiotic therapy. The final section addresses current recommendations with respect to pneumococcal immunization in the context of HIV infection, including an overview of the rationale underpinning the current "prime-boost" immunization strategy based on sequential administration of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13 and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23. PMID:26974299

  11. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Vance D.; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to abnormalities in systemic immune function, patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the pre-AIDS syndromes have significant abnormalities in the distribution of T-cell subsets in the intestinal tract. Such immune deficits predispose such patients to opportunistic infections and tumors, many of which involve the gastrointestinal tract. For example, Candida albicans often causes stomatitis and esophagitis. Intestinal infections with parasites (Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia) or bacteria (Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare) are associated with severe diarrhea and malabsorption, whereas viruses like cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus cause mucosal ulcerations. Clinically debilitating chronic diarrhea develops in many AIDS patients for which no clear cause can be identified. Enteric pathogens like Salmonella and Campylobacter can be associated with bacteremias. Kaposi's sarcoma and lymphoma involving the intestinal tract are now well-recognized complications of AIDS. Although AIDS is not associated with a pathognomonic liver lesion, opportunistic infections and Kaposi's sarcoma or lymphoma may involve the liver. ImagesFigure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:3825111

  12. Immunodeficiency and laser magnetic therapy in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maati, Moufagued; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Avdoshin, V. P.

    1996-11-01

    The importance of immunodeficiency problem has increased last time not only due to AIDS appearance, but also to a great extent as a result of the development and active practical use of the methods of immunology parameters investigations. Al great pharmaceutical firms are organizing the process of creating the drugs, influencing on the different phases of immunity, but unfortunately, the problem of their adverse effect and connected complications is till today a milestone. A great number of investigations, proving a good effect of laser-magnetic therapy concerning immune system have been done today. There is, in particular, changing of blood counts and immunologic tests after intravenous laser irradiation of blood. Intravenous laser irradiation of blood results in increasing of lymphocytes, T-immuno stimulation, stabilization of t-lymphocyte subpopulation, increasing of t-lymphocyte helper activity and decreasing of suppressor one.Under this laser action number of circulating immune complexes is decreased, and blood serum bactericide activity and lisozyme number are increased.

  13. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: cerebral computed tomographic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Whelan, M A; Kricheff, I I; Handler, M; Ho, V; Crystal, K; Gopinathan, G; Laubenstein, L

    1983-11-01

    CT examination of the central nervous system was performed in 19 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Eighteen patients were homosexuals, and five drug abusers. Parenchymal and meningeal inflammations were seen in patients with intracranial manifestations of the disease. The most common demonstrable lesion in the parenchyma was toxoplasmosis, which produced ring enhancement, solid enhancement, and nonenhancing focal edema. The most common meningeal inflammation was cryptococcosis, which was diagnosed by examination of the cerebrospinal fluid and did not show specific CT changes. It is concluded that toxoplasmosis and cryptococcosis should be the first diagnostic consideration in patients with neurologic findings who have a history of homosexuality and/or intravenous drug abuse and previous unusual infections or anergy. A delayed contrast scan, single or double dose, appears to be the most accurate method of outlining the total extent of disease thereby helping to locate the best biopsy site for pretreatment diagnosis. Empirical institution of toxoplasmosis therapy is recommended in those cases in which CT findings are consistent with toxoplasmosis and the biopsy shows only nonspecific encephalitis. A biopsy of every parenchymal lesion is not considered necessary. PMID:6622692

  14. Common Variable Immunodeficiency: Etiological and Treatment Issues

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Sean; Selmi, Carlo; Naguwa, Stanley M.; Teuber, Suzanne S.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2009-01-01

    One of the great advances in clinical medicine was the recognition of the pleomorphism of the immune response and the multiple afferent and efferent limbs of antigen processing and responsiveness. A significant contribution to this understanding was derived from studies of human immunodeficiency states, including both inherited and acquired syndromes. Amongst these syndromes, one of the most common, and least understood, is common variable immune deficiency (CVID). CVID is a syndrome that leads to a reduction in serum immunoglobulins and complications including recurrent infections. Management includes immunoglobulin replacement therapy; however, patients with CVID are at risk for complications of exogenous immunoglobulin administration as well as CVID-associated diseases such as autoimmune processes and malignancies. To assess the current state of knowledge in the field, we performed a literature review of a total of 753 publications covering the period of 1968 until 2008. From this list, 189 publications were selected for discussion. In this review, we demonstrate that while the molecular basis of CVID in many cases remains incompletely understood, significant strides have been made and it is now clear that there is involvement of several pathways of immune activation, with contributions from both T and B cells. Furthermore, despite the current gaps in our knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of the syndrome, there have been dramatic advances in management that have led to improved survival and significantly reduced morbidity in affected patients. PMID:19571563

  15. Antiviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E

    1995-01-01

    Depending on the stage of their intervention with the viral replicative cycle, human immunodeficiency virus inhibitors could be divided into the following groups: (i) adsorption inhibitors (i.e., CD4 constructs, polysulfates, polysulfonates, polycarboxylates, and polyoxometalates), (ii) fusion inhibitors (i.e., plant lectins, succinylated or aconitylated albumins, and betulinic acid derivatives), (iii) uncoating inhibitors (i.e., bicyclams), (iv) reverse transcription inhibitors acting either competitively with the substrate binding site (i.e., dideoxynucleoside analogs and acyclic nucleoside phosphonates) or allosterically with a nonsubstrate binding site (i.e., non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (v) integration inhibitors, (vi) DNA replication inhibitors, (vii) transcription inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and Tat antagonists), (viii) translation inhibitors (i.e., antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and ribozymes), (ix) maturation inhibitors (i.e., protease inhibitors, myristoylation inhibitors, and glycosylation inhibitors), and finally, (x) budding (assembly/release) inhibitors. Current knowledge, including the therapeutic potential, of these various inhibitors is discussed. In view of their potential clinical the utility, the problem of virus-drug resistance and possible strategies to circumvent this problem are also addressed. PMID:7542558

  16. Infections and immunodeficiency in Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ram, G; Chinen, J

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic disease and presents with cognitive impairment, cardiac and gastrointestinal abnormalities, in addition to other miscellaneous clinical conditions. DS individuals may have a high frequency of infections, usually of the upper respiratory tract, characterized by increased severity and prolonged course of disease, which are partially attributed to defects of the immune system. The abnormalities of the immune system associated with DS include: mild to moderate T and B cell lymphopenia, with marked decrease of naive lymphocytes, impaired mitogen-induced T cell proliferation, reduced specific antibody responses to immunizations and defects of neutrophil chemotaxis. Limited evidence of genetic abnormalities secondary to trisomy of chromosome 21 and affecting the immune system is available, such as the potential consequences of gene over-expression, most significantly SOD1 and RCAN1. Secondary immunodeficiency due to metabolic or nutritional factors in DS, particularly zinc deficiency, has been postulated. Non-immunological factors, including abnormal anatomical structures (e.g. small ear canal, tracheomalacia) and gastro-oesophageal reflux, may play a role in the increased frequency of respiratory tract infections. The molecular mechanisms leading to the immune defects observed in DS individuals and the contribution of these immunological abnormalities to the increased risk of infections require further investigation. Addressing immunological and non-immunological factors involved in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases may reduce the susceptibility to infections in DS subjects. PMID:21352207

  17. [Neonatal screening of severe combined immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, C; Mirallié, S; Pierres, C; Dert, C; Clément, M-C; Mahlaoui, N; Durand-Zaleski, I; Fischer, A; Audrain, M

    2015-06-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) are a group of inherited diseases of the immune system characterized by profound abnormalities of T-cell development. Infants with SCID require prompt clinical intervention to prevent life-threatening infection and studies show significantly improved survival in babies diagnosed at birth based on previous family history. SCID follows the criteria for population-based newborn screening because it is asymptomatic at birth and fatal within the 1st year of life if there is no intervention, the confirmation of the disease is easy, there is a curative treatment, and it is known that early hematopoietic stem cell transplantation significantly improves survival, the quality of immune reconstitution, and quality of life. Quantification of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) in DNA extracted from Guthrie samples is a sensitive and specific screening test for SCID. We conducted a nationwide prospective study of neonatal screening of SCID in a population of 200,000 French newborns over a period of 2 years. The objective was to study the clinical utility and the cost-effectiveness ratio, and to demonstrate that universal SCID screening could result in a substantial benefit to detect individuals, making screening relatively cost-effective in spite of the low incidence of the disease. PMID:25896629

  18. Failure of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immune globulin to protect chimpanzees against experimental challenge with HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, A M; Horowitz, B; Baker, L; Shulman, R W; Ralph, H; Valinsky, J; Cundell, A; Brotman, B; Boehle, W; Rey, F

    1988-01-01

    To assess the possible efficacy of passive immunization against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) an immune globulin was prepared from plasma of HIV-seropositive donors selected to be among those having the top 12.5% of virus-neutralizing antibody titers. The immune globulin was treated with pepsin to render it intravenously tolerable. The preparation, which we termed HIVIG, neutralized 100 tissue culture 50% infective doses (TCID50) of HIV at an average dilution of 1:1000 in neutralization tests in vitro. During preparation HIVIG was subjected to virus inactivation and removal procedures that in theory resulted in a reduction in HIV infectivity by a factor of 10(25). At a dose of 9-10 ml/kg of body weight both the virus-inactivated source plasma and the final immunoglobulin preparation were noninfective and without adverse effect in two chimpanzees. Two chimpanzees inoculated intravenously with HIVIG at 1 ml/kg and two inoculated with 10 ml/kg were challenged intravenously 1 day later with 400 TCID50 of the same strain of HIV (HTLV-IIIb) used in neutralization assays in vitro. All animals became infected. Incubation periods to virus isolation (by cocultivation with human mononuclear cells) in HIVIG recipients did not differ significantly from the incubation period seen in a control animal that received a normal anti-HIV-free immunoglobulin. These findings may have implications for understanding the failure of experimental vaccines to protect against HIV challenge in chimpanzee experiments. Images PMID:3413127

  19. HSV Neutralization by the Microbicidal Candidate C5A

    PubMed Central

    Chatterji, Udayan; van Loenen, Freek B.; Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Gallay, Philippe A.

    2011-01-01

    Genital herpes is a major risk factor in acquiring human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and is caused by both Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. The amphipathic peptide C5A, derived from the non-structural hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein 5A, was shown to prevent HIV-1 infection but neither influenza nor vesicular stomatitis virus infections. Here we investigated the antiviral function of C5A on HSV infections. C5A efficiently inhibited both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infection in epithelial cells in vitro as well as in an ex vivo epidermal infection model. C5A destabilized the integrity of the viral HSV membrane. Furthermore, drug resistant HSV strains were inhibited by this peptide. Notably, C5A-mediated neutralization of HSV-1 prevented HIV-1 transmission. An in vitro HIV-1 transmigration assay was developed using primary genital epithelial cells and HSV infection increased HIV-1 transmigration. Treatment with C5A abolished HIV-1 transmigration by preventing HSV infection and by preserving the integrity of the genital epithelium that was severely compromised by HSV infection. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that C5A represents a multipurpose microbicide candidate, which neutralizes both HIV-1 and HSV, and which may interfere with HIV-1 transmission through the genital epithelium. PMID:21573158

  20. Neutral-surface potential vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougall, Trevor J.

    The use of potential density in ocean models does not overcome all the annoying problems caused by the compressible nature of seawater. For example, the reduced gravity for layered ocean models is not proportional to the difference of potential density across an interface. The appropriate reduced gravity is derived and it is shown to be relatively easy to incorporate in future layered models. Potential-density surfaces are commonly inclined with respect to neutral surfaces and so lateral motion along neutral surfaces gives rise to unwanted diapycnal velocities that are unrelated to vertical mixing processes. This unphysical part of the diapycnal motion is quantified, emphasizing the need for performing ocean-circulation studies in the neutral-surface framework. If there were no variations of θ and S along neutral surfaces in the ocean, then lateral mixing would occur along potential-density surfaces. A perfectly respectable potential vorticity variable would then be isopycnal potential vorticity, IPV, defined by -gf[∂ρ θ/∂z]/ρ θ. However, there is mixing in the ocean, and neutral surfaces do not coincide with potential density surfaces. Since the efficient lateral mixing processes occur along neutral trajectories, and vertical velocities through neutral surfaces occur only in response to mixing processes of a vertical nature (including the two dianeutral advection processes, thermobaricity and cabbeling), it is logical to seek a potential vorticity variable that is proportional to f/h, where h is the vertical distance between adjacent neutral surfaces. This form of potential vorticity is here referred to as “neutral-surface potential vorticity”, NSPV. Its epineutral variations can be significantly different to those of the two other commonly used potential vorticity variables, IPV, and fN 2. The difference between NSPV and fN 2 is shown to result from the path-dependence inherent in integrating N 2 in the vertical plane between two neutral trajectories. The β-spiral equations are derived for a fully non-linear equation of state, and neutral surfaces emerge as the dynamically relevant surfaces for these studies. It is also shown that IPV is not conserved on potential-density surfaces because of the non-linear nature of the equation of state; this problem does not arise in the neutral tangent plane. Mixing processes cause scalar properties to change at different rates on a potential-density surface than in a neutral tangent plane. In particular, potential density itself is mixed and advected by epineutral processes, thereby complicating the interpretation of inversemodels that use potential density surfaces. The dynamical equations governing the ocean circulation take simple and exact forms with respect to the neutral tangent plane at eaach point, but when an interface or surface must be formed over an extended geographical region, the ambiguity associated with defining a neutral surface raises its ugly head. Here it is shown that the approximately neutral surfaces of McDougall and Jackett (1988) are the most appropriate surfaces for this purpose.

  1. Role of a Putative gp41 Dimerization Domain in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Membrane Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Deng, Y; Li, Q; Dey, A; Moore, J; Lu, M

    2010-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into a target cell entails a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein that mediates the fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. A trimer-of-hairpins structure formed by the association of two heptad repeat (HR) regions of the gp41 ectodomain has been implicated in a late step of the fusion pathway. Earlier native and intermediate states of the protein are postulated to mediate the antiviral activity of the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NAbs), but the details of these structures remain unknown. Here, we report the identification and crystal structure of a dimerization domain in the C-terminal ectodomain of gp41 (residues 630 to 683, or C54). Two C54 monomers associate to form an asymmetric, antiparallel coiled coil with two distinct C-terminal {alpha}-helical overhangs. This dimer structure is conferred largely by interactions within a central core that corresponds to the sequence of enfuvirtide. The mutagenic alteration of the dimer interface severely impairs the infectivity of Env-pseudotyped viruses. Moreover, the C54 structure binds tightly to both the 2F5 and 4E10 NAbs and likely represents a potential intermediate conformation of gp41. These results should enhance our understanding of the molecular basis of the gp41 fusogenic structural transitions and thereby guide rational, structure-based efforts to design new fusion inhibitors and vaccine candidates intended to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  2. Prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Daniel R.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2005-01-01

    Strategies for confronting the epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) have included a range of different approaches that focus on prevention and treatment. However, debate persists over what levels of emphasis are appropriate for the different components of the global response. This paper presents an overview of this debate and briefly summarizes the evidence on a range of interventions designed to prevent the spread of HIV infection, paying particular attention to voluntary counselling and testing, treatment for sexually transmitted infections and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We also review the experience with antiretroviral therapy to date in terms of response rates and survival rates, adherence, drug resistance, behavioural change and epidemiological impact. Although various studies have identified strategies with proven effectiveness in reducing the risks of HIV infection and AIDS mortality, considerable uncertainties remain. Successful integration of treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS will require a balanced approach and rigorous monitoring of the impact of programmes in terms of both individual and population outcomes. PMID:15744406

  3. Isolation of human immunodeficiency virus-related simian immunodeficiency viruses from African green monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, G; Werner, A; Baier, M; Binniger, D; Ferdinand, F J; Norley, S; Kurth, R

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated lentivirus strains that are related to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops; AGM). Although immunologically related, these SIVagm are clearly distinct from other simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) isolates, including isolates from Macaca mulatta (SIVmac) or even from other AGM. The SIVagm strains described in this communication grow well in a limited number of human T-lymphoma lines. Virus density, morphology, and reverse transcriptase activity are characteristic of the lentivirus group. SIVagm exhibits the following pattern of major virus proteins: p18, p28, gp45, p64, gp140. They appear to bind to the target cell via the CD4 or its primate analogue. Four virus isolates have already been molecularly cloned for detailed genomic analysis and within this SIV agm group they exhibit the genomic variability that is typical of lentiviruses. AGMs infected with this virus apparently remain healthy and therefore SIVagm not only provides a virus model for vaccine studies but also allows investigation of the defense mechanisms (immunological and others) that keep the AGMs healthy. Furthermore, precise genomic analysis of these and other SIV strains will lead to a better understanding of the evolution and pathogenicity of human lentiviruses like HIV. Images PMID:2468160

  4. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Results Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the patients with posterior versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. The most common ocular manifestation was retinal microvasculopathy (15.0%), followed by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (14.2%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (9.4%), cytomegalovirus retinitis (3.1%), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (2.4%), and blepharitis (1.6%). Retinal microvasculopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis were common in patients with CD4+ counts <200 cells/µL, while keratoconjunctivitis sicca and conjunctival microvasculopathy were common in patients with CD4+ counts of 200 to 499 cells/µL. There was a significant (p < 0.05) association between ocular manifestation and CD4+ count or age. Conclusions The introduction of HAART has changed the landscape of ocular presentations in patients with AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. We found that CD4+ count and age >35 years were independent risk factors for developing ocular manifestations. PMID:26240508

  5. Antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lortholary, O; Dupont, B

    1997-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with almost all types of immunodeficiencies. These infections may be nosocomial (aspergillosis) or community acquired (cryptococcosis), or both (candidiasis). Endemic mycoses such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and penicilliosis may infect many immunocompromised hosts in some geographic areas and thereby create major public health problems. With the wide availability of oral azoles, antifungal prophylactic strategies have been extensively developed. However, only a few well-designed studies involving strict criteria have been performed, mostly in patients with hematological malignancies or AIDS. In these situations, the best dose and duration of administration of the antifungal drug often remain to be determined. In high-risk neutropenic or bone marrow transplant patients, fluconazole is effective for the prevention of superficial and/or systemic candidal infections but is not always able to prolong overall survival and potentially selects less susceptible or resistant Candida spp. Primary prophylaxis against aspergillosis remains investigative. At present, no standard general recommendation for primary antifungal prophylaxis can be proposed for AIDS patients or transplant recipients. However, for persistently immunocompromised patients who previously experienced a noncandidal systemic fungal infection, prolonged suppressive antifungal therapy is often indicated to prevent a relapse. Better strategies for controlling immune deficiencies should also help to avoid some potentially life-threatening deep mycoses. When prescribing antifungal prophylaxis, physicians should be aware of the potential emergence of resistant strains, drug-drug interactions, and the cost. Well-designed, randomized, multicenter clinical trials in high-risk immunocompromised hosts are urgently needed to better define how to prevent severe invasive mycoses. PMID:9227863

  6. Medical management of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic has pervasive effects on culture, economics, policy, and human development. All organs can be affected by complications of HIV/AIDS, including the eye. When sufficient resources are available and widespread antiretroviral resistance does not exist, the four available classes of antiretroviral agents - nucleoside/ nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors - can be combined to provide highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). For many (not all) patients, HAART converts an inexorably fatal disease into a chronic disease with a fairly good prognosis. Use of HAART often induces partial immune recovery, which has predominantly beneficial effects on ocular complications of AIDS. However, HAART-induced immune recovery sometimes results in immune recovery inflammatory syndromes, such as immune recovery uveitis. Use of HAART is the single most useful intervention for most patients with ocular complications of AIDS. However, specific ocular therapy is also critical to avoid blindness in the early months before immune recovery can occur, or if HAART is unavailable. Increasing availability of HAART worldwide shows great promise to alleviate one of the world′s greatest plagues. However, predictable secular trends in the AIDS epidemic make it likely that the number of cases of ocular complications of AIDS will increase substantially before they decrease. Ophthalmologists worldwide should be familiar with the diagnosis and management of cytomegalovirus retinitis - the most common ocular complication of AIDS - and should establish partnerships with physicians who are able to provide HAART. Research is needed to determine the optimal approach for managing cytomegalovirus retinitis in resource- constrained settings. PMID:18711266

  7. Human papillomavirus, human immunodeficiency virus and immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Denny, Lynette A; Franceschi, Silvia; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Heard, Isabelle; Moscicki, Anna Barbara; Palefsky, Joel

    2012-11-20

    The vast majority of women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) will be co-infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). The interaction between the two sexually transmitted infections appears to be related to the alteration in cell-mediated immunity in HIV infected persons, increased susceptibility, and possibly reactivation of latent HPV infection. Linkage studies of HIV/AIDs and Cancer registries have indicated a 2- to 22-fold increase in cervical cancer in HIV-positive women compared to HIV-negative women. Data on the prevalence of HPV types in invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) suggest that the proportion of infection with types HPV16/18 (responsible for over 70% of all cervical cancers) is similar in HIV-negative and HIV-positive women. The biological interaction between HIV and HPV needs further elucidation, although there is some evidence that the presence of HPV infection may be associated with increased HIV transmission. Adolescents perinatally infected by HIV are known to have higher rates of HPV infection and also have been shown to seroconvert in response to HPV vaccination with the quadrivalent vaccine, albeit to lower titers than HIV-negative individuals. Anal cancer incidence is greatly increased in HIV-positive individuals, particularly in HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Screening for anal cancer precursors is feasible and effective; however, the impact on reduction of anal cancer remains to be demonstrated. There are ongoing studies on the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of current HPV vaccines in HIV-positive individuals and mature data are awaited. Male circumcision may be another approach to prevention of HPV transmission, which also requires further study. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:23199960

  8. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis. PMID:26676359

  9. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import via Vpr-Importin {alpha} interactions as a novel HIV-1 therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nonaka, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Yoshie; Matsuda, Go; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsuyama, Megumi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Kato, Shingo; Aida, Yoko

    2009-03-20

    The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. One such target is the interaction between Vpr, one of the accessory gene products of HIV-1 and Importin {alpha}, which is crucial, not only for the nuclear import of Vpr, but also for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. We have identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner. Analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that hematoxylin specifically inhibited nuclear import step of pre-integration complex. Thus, hematoxylin is a new anti-HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the interaction between viral protein and the cellular factor may provide a new strategy for HIV-1 therapy.

  10. Efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus replication using novel modified microRNA-30a targeting 3′-untranslated region transcripts

    PubMed Central

    NEJATI, AHMAD; SHAHMAHMOODI, SHOHREH; AREFIAN, EHSAN; SHOJA, ZABIHOLLAH; MARASHI, SAYED-MAHDI; TABATABAIE, HAMIDEH; MOLLAEI-KANDELOUS, YAGHOUB; SOLEIMANI, MASOUD; NATEGH, RAKHSHANDEH

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-based gene therapy is currently considered to be a combinatorial anti-human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) therapy. Although artificial polycistronic microRNAs (miRs) can reduce HIV-1 escape mutant variants, this approach may increase the risk of side effects. The present study aimed to optimize the efficiency of anti-HIV RNAi gene therapy in order to reduce the cell toxicity induced by multi-short hairpin RNA expression. An artificial miR-30a-3′-untranslated region (miR-3-UTR) obtained from a single RNA polymerase II was used to simultaneously target all viral transcripts. The results of the present study demonstrated that HIV-1 replication was significantly inhibited in the cells with the miR-3-UTR construct, suggesting that miR-3′-UTR may serve as a promising tool for RNAi-based gene therapy in the treatment of HIV-1. PMID:27168813

  11. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  12. Neurosyphilis in a Man with Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghani, Khosro; Kallini, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe a 33-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus who developed erythematous macules on the palms and soles with subsequent headaches, papilledema, and iritis. They review the salient characteristics of neurosyphilis with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals. The incidence of syphilis has increased since the year 2000 in African Americans, Hispanics, and men who have sex with men. Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of this disease—a fastidious, slowly growing, microaerophilic spirochete. Sexual contact is the most common mode of transmission. The rapid plasma reagin, Venereal Disease Research Laboratory assay, and fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption assay are commonly used to diagnose syphilis. The mainstay treatment is penicillin. Special considerations exist in the natural history and management of syphilis in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:25161759

  13. Immunodeficiency and Autoimmune Enterocolopathy Linked to NFAT5 Haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Brigid S.; Widjaja, Christella E.; Banno, Asoka; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Stephanie H.; Stoven, Samantha; Peterson, Michael R.; Jones, Marilyn C.; Su, H. Irene; Crowe, Sheila E.; Bui, Jack D.; Ho, Samuel B.; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Goel, Ajay; Marietta, Eric V.; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Jepsen, Kristen L.; Aramburu, Jose; Lopez-Rodriguez, Cristina; Sandborn, William J.; Murray, Joseph A.; Harismendy, Olivier; Chang, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The link between autoimmune diseases and primary immunodeficiency syndromes has been increasingly appreciated. Immunologic evaluation of a young man with autoimmune enterocolopathy and unexplained infections revealed evidence of immunodeficiency, including IgG subclass deficiency, impaired antigen-induced lymphocyte proliferation, reduced cytokine production by CD8+ T lymphocytes, and decreased numbers of natural killer (NK) cells. Genetic evaluation identified haploinsufficiency of NFAT5, a transcription factor regulating immune cell function and cellular adaptation to hyperosmotic stress, as a possible cause of this syndrome. Inhibition or deletion of NFAT5 in normal human and murine cells recapitulated several of the immune deficits identified in the patient. These results provide evidence of a primary immunodeficiency disorder associated with organ-specific autoimmunity linked to NFAT5 deficiency. PMID:25667416

  14. Recent advances in treatment of severe primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Gennery, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare, inborn errors that result in impaired, disordered or uncontrolled immune responses. Whilst symptomatic and prophylactic treatment is available, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an option for many diseases, leading to cure of the immunodeficiency and establishing normal physical and psychological health. Newborn screening for some diseases, whilst improving outcomes, is focusing research on safer and less toxic treatment strategies, which result in durable and sustainable immune function without adverse effects. New conditioning regimens have reduced the risk of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and new methods of manipulating stem cell sources should guarantee a donor for almost all patients. Whilst incremental enhancements in transplantation technique have gradually improved survival outcomes over time, some of these new applications are likely to radically alter our approach to treating primary immunodeficiencies. PMID:26918153

  15. Noninfectious Granulomas: A Sign of an Underlying Immunodeficiency?

    PubMed

    Shoimer, Ilya; Wright, Nicola; Haber, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders, such as ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), may rarely be associated with cutaneous granulomas without an identifiable infection. The authors report a case of a 3-year-old boy with A-T who presented with two persistent ulcerated erythematous nodules. Histopathology was consistent with a granulomatous process secondary to A-T, without an infectious origin. Partial improvement was noted with clobetasol propionate 0.05% cream applied twice daily under occlusion. Of note, the presence of multiple noninfectious granulomas in a child may be the initial sign of an immune deficiency and should alert the astute clinician to investigate for an underlying primary immunodeficiency. Herein, the authors discuss the associations of noninfectious granulomas and primary immunodeficiency disorders and present management options for these difficult-to-treat lesions. PMID:26728658

  16. Absence of cytotoxic antibody to human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in humans and its induction in animals after infection or immunization with purified envelope glycoprotein gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, P.L.; Robey, W.G.; Gonda, M.A.; Carter, S.G.; Fischinger, P.J.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) was assessed in humans and chimpanzees, which are capable of infection with human immunodeficiency virus isolate HTLV-IIIb, and examined in the goat after immunization with the major viral glycoprotein (gp120) of HTLV-IIIb. In infected humans no antibody mediating ACC was observed regardless of the status of disease. Even healthy individuals with high-titer, broadly reactive, neutralizing antibodies has no ACC. In contrast, chimpanzees infected with HTLV-IIIb, from whom virus could be isolated, not only had neutralizing antibody but also antibodies broadly reactive in ACC, even against distantly related human immunodeficiency virus isolates, as well as against their own reisolated virus. In the goat, the gp120 of HTLV-IIIb induced a highly type-specific response as measured by both ACC and flow cytofluorometry of live infected H9 cells. Normal human cells were not subject to ACC by animal anti-HTLV-III gp120-specific sera. Induction of ACC and neutralizing antibody were closely correlated in the animal experimental models but not in humans. The presence of ACC in gp120-inoculated goats and HTLV-III-infected chimpanzees represent a qualitative difference that may be important in the quest for the elicitation of a protective immunity in humans.

  17. Antibodies neutralizing feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) in cats immunized with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E.

    PubMed

    Langhammer, Stefan; Hbner, Janine; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2006-02-01

    The feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) vaccines that are currently in wide use are generally poor inducers of virus-neutralizing antibodies, although such antibodies appear after recovering from challenge. However, the presence of neutralizing antibodies in cats recovering from natural FeLV infection clearly correlates with resistance to subsequent infection and passive transfer of antibodies can protect other animals. After demonstrating the induction of neutralizing antibodies in rats and goats immunized with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E of FeLV, cats were immunized with the same antigen. High titres of neutralizing antibodies specific for FeLV were induced and epitope mapping revealed a pattern of recognition similar to that seen following immunization of rats and goats. These epitopes are highly related to epitopes recognized after immunization with porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) p15E and to epitopes recognized by neutralizing antibodies in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The ability of p15E to induce neutralizing antibodies in cats suggests that it should be included in the next generation of vaccines. In contrast, sera from FeLV-infected animals usually fail to recognize the neutralization-relevant epitopes in p15E. Since homologous epitope sequences are present in feline endogenous retroviruses, it appears that tolerance against these sequences is not induced. PMID:16423059

  18. Antibodies neutralizing feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) in cats immunized with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E

    PubMed Central

    Langhammer, Stefan; Hbner, Janine; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) vaccines that are currently in wide use are generally poor inducers of virus-neutralizing antibodies, although such antibodies appear after recovering from challenge. However, the presence of neutralizing antibodies in cats recovering from natural FeLV infection clearly correlates with resistance to subsequent infection and passive transfer of antibodies can protect other animals. After demonstrating the induction of neutralizing antibodies in rats and goats immunized with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E of FeLV, cats were immunized with the same antigen. High titres of neutralizing antibodies specific for FeLV were induced and epitope mapping revealed a pattern of recognition similar to that seen following immunization of rats and goats. These epitopes are highly related to epitopes recognized after immunization with porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) p15E and to epitopes recognized by neutralizing antibodies in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The ability of p15E to induce neutralizing antibodies in cats suggests that it should be included in the next generation of vaccines. In contrast, sera from FeLV-infected animals usually fail to recognize the neutralization-relevant epitopes in p15E. Since homologous epitope sequences are present in feline endogenous retroviruses, it appears that tolerance against these sequences is not induced. PMID:16423059

  19. Specificity of antibodies produced against native or desialylated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 recombinant gp160.

    PubMed Central

    Benjouad, A; Gluckman, J C; Montagnier, L; Bahraoui, E

    1993-01-01

    In a previous report we have shown that, in contrast to antibodies produced against native or fully deglycosylated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 in rabbits, antibodies raised against desialylated HIV-1 gp160 also recognize gp140 from HIV-2 at high titers. Here, we characterize the fine specificity of these cross-reactive antibodies. Inhibition assays with a panel of synthetic peptides as competitors showed that cross-reactivity to gp140 was due to antibodies that were specific for the region encompassing HIV-1 gp41 immunodominant epitope, mimicked by peptide P39 (residues 583 to 609), the latter being able to totally inhibit the formation of complexes between radiolabeled HIV-2 gp140 and antibodies elicited by desialylated HIV-1 gp160. In addition, anti-desialylated gp160 antibodies retained on a P39 affinity column still bound HIV-2 gp140. Fine mapping has enabled us to localize the cross-reactive epitope within the N-terminal extremity of the gp41 immunodominant region. Interestingly, this cross-reactive antibody population did not recognize glycosylated or totally deglycosylated simian immunodeficiency virus gp140 despite an amino acid homology with HIV-1 within this region that is comparable to that of HIV-2. This cross-reactivity between HIV-1 and HIV-2 did not correlate with cross-neutralization. These results illustrate the influence of carbohydrate moieties on the specificity of the antibodies produced and clearly indicate that such procedures may be an efficient way to raise specific immune responses that are not type specific. Moreover, this cross-reactivity might explain the double-positive reactivity observed, in some human sera, against both HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope antigens. PMID:7679751

  20. DC-SIGN Interactions with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and 2 and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pöhlmann, Stefan; Baribaud, Frédéric; Lee, Benhur; Leslie, George J.; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Hiebenthal-Millow, Kirsten; Münch, Jan; Kirchhoff, Frank; Doms, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) efficiently bind and transmit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to cocultured T cells and so may play an important role in HIV transmission. DC-SIGN, a novel C-type lectin that is expressed in DCs, has recently been shown to bind R5 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) strains and a laboratory-adapted X4 strain. To characterize the interaction of DC-SIGN with primate lentiviruses, we investigated the structural determinants of DC-SIGN required for virus binding and transmission to permissive cells. We constructed a panel of DC-SIGN mutants and established conditions which allowed comparable cell surface expression of all mutants. We found that R5, X4, and R5X4 HIV-1 isolates as well as simian immunodeficiency and HIV-2 strains bound to DC-SIGN and could be transmitted to CD4/coreceptor-positive cell types. DC-SIGN contains a single N-linked carbohydrate chain that is important for efficient cell surface expression but is not required for DC-SIGN-mediated virus binding and transmission. In contrast, C-terminal deletions removing either the lectin binding domain or the repeat region abrogated DC-SIGN function. Trypsin-EDTA treatment inhibited DC-SIGN mediated infection, indicating that virus was maintained at the surface of the DC-SIGN-expressing cells used in this study. Finally, quantitative fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of AU1-tagged DC-SIGN revealed that the efficiency of virus transmission was strongly affected by variations in DC-SIGN expression levels. Thus, variations in DC-SIGN expression levels on DCs could greatly affect the susceptibility of human individuals to HIV infection. PMID:11312337

  1. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  2. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these

  3. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  4. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Anthony A.; Rosenthal, David G.; Bender Ignacio, Rachel; Chu, Helen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in immunocompromised hosts is a fulminant syndrome of immune activation with high rates of mortality that may be triggered by infections or immunodeficiency. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder is necessary to prevent progression to multiorgan failure and death. We report a case of HLH in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus, disseminated histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. We discuss management of acutely ill patients with HLH and treatment of the underlying infection versus initiation of HLH-specific chemotherapy. PMID:26566535

  5. [The correction of secondary radiation-induced immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, G M; Smirnov, V S; Khavinson, V Kh; Morozov, V G

    1991-01-01

    The influence of the ionizing radiation upon the human organism is accompanied by the formation of the secondary radiative immunodeficiencies, which can be treated with the help of immunomodulating preparations of microbiotic, animal and plant origin, as well as compounds obtained by chemical synthesis. The comparative analysis of the various immunomodulators has shown that the peptide preparations of thymos and bone marrow, referred to the cytomedinum class (thymalinum, thymogenum, haemalinum) were most perspective for the correction of the secondary radiative immunodeficiencies. The scheme of thymalinum application in the treatment of radioactive affections of immune system is enclosed. PMID:2014661

  6. Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Secondary to Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Anthony A; Rosenthal, David G; Bender Ignacio, Rachel; Chu, Helen Y

    2015-12-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in immunocompromised hosts is a fulminant syndrome of immune activation with high rates of mortality that may be triggered by infections or immunodeficiency. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disorder is necessary to prevent progression to multiorgan failure and death. We report a case of HLH in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus, disseminated histoplasmosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Escherichia coli bacteremia. We discuss management of acutely ill patients with HLH and treatment of the underlying infection versus initiation of HLH-specific chemotherapy. PMID:26566535

  7. Replication of respiratory syncytial virus in lungs of immunodeficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wyde, P.R.; Sun, C.S.; Knight, V.

    1983-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus was frequently isolated during a 10-day test period from the lungs of 4- to 6-week-old immunodeficient nude (nu/nu) mice and from gamma-irradiated C3H mice inoculated intranasally with this virus, but not from similar aged and comparably inoculated normal littermates of these mice. Virus isolation rates and levels of virus in lungs in both groups of immunodeficient mice were similar. No extrapulmonary dissemination of virus was observed in any test group of mice.

  8. RE: Pedagogy--After Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I'Anson, John

    2010-01-01

    Within the UK and in many parts of the world, official accounts of what it is to make sense of religion are framed within a rhetorics of neutrality in which such study is premised upon the possibility of dispassionate engagement and analysis. This paper, which is largely theoretical in scope, explores both the affordances and the costs of such an…

  9. LBL neutralized beam focusing experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, G.A.; Kim, C.H.; Smith, L.

    1985-05-01

    An intense neutralized Cs/sup +1/ beam has been focused by an electrostatic polarization field induced by a solenoidal magnetic field of 10-25 gauss. This report describes the experiment and compares the results with the predictions of an analytic linearized fluid model and a particle-in-cell simulation which treats the motion of the warm electrons in detail.

  10. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  11. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  12. Neutralization kinetics for polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, K.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1988-06-01

    In a well-defined experimental system the neutralization of polonium-218 ions was investigated as a function of the physical and chemical properties of the controlled composition atmosphere. The diffusion coefficient of polonium-218 under various concentrations of trace gas NO/sub 2/ in nitrogen was measured. The mobilities of Po/sup +/ and PoO/sub 2//sup +/ are determined by combining experimental results with a computer model of the system. Three neutralization mechanisms were individually studied. The small-ion recombination rate has been found to be proportional to the square root of radon concentration. The electron-scavenging mechanism is responsible for the neutralization of Po/sup +/ in NO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O in nitrogen. When PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is formed, the electron-transfer mechanism dominates the neutralization process. The electron is transferred to PoO/sub 2//sup +/ from molecules with lower ionization potentials. The ionization molecules with lower ionization potentials. The ionization potential of PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is also determined to be 10.44 +/- 0.05 eV.

  13. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  14. Aquagenic urticaria and human immunodeficiency virus infection: treatment with stanozolol.

    PubMed

    Fearfield, L A; Gazzard, B; Bunker, C B

    1997-10-01

    We report the first case of aquagenic urticaria in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This is a rare physical urticaria not previously described in this context. The disorder proved unamenable to conventional treatment with antihistamines, but did respond dramatically to stanozolol, suggesting a novel indication for this anabolic steroid. PMID:9390343

  15. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  16. The Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Epidemic, Washington, DC.

    This document presents findings of the Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) epidemic. The executive summary lists 20 major findings and recommendations which together comprise a comprehensive national strategy for managing the HIV epidemic. The commission recommends: (1) replacement of the obsolete term "AIDS"…

  17. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. PMID:26011426

  18. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Low, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  19. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future. PMID:25577549

  20. Uveomeningoencephalitis in a human immunodeficiency virus type 2-seropositive patient.

    PubMed

    Hormigo, A; Bravo-Marques, J M; Souza-Ramalho, P; Pimentel, J; Teixeira, C; Martins, R

    1988-03-01

    A 35-year-old woman developed longstanding uveitis and later a uveomeningoencephalitis of unknown origin and died of toxoplasmal brain abscesses. The presence of immunological impairment, human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) seropositivity, and multinucleated cells in the brain led us to suspect neurotropic properties for HIV-2 similar to those of HIV-1. PMID:3163906

  1. Resistance of previously infected chimpanzees to successive challenges with a heterologous intraclade B strain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, R; Siemon, C; Cho, M W; Arthur, L O; Nigida, S M; Matthews, T; Sawyer, L A; Schultz, A; Murthy, K K; Israel, Z; Javadian, A; Frost, P; Kennedy, R C; Lane, H C; Martin, M A

    1996-01-01

    To test whether the protective effects of attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccines in macaques were applicable to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-chimpanzee system, two groups of animals, previously infected with HIV-1(IIIB) or HIV-1(SF2) were each challenged with a heterologous clade B virus, HIV-1(DH12). Following challenge, the parameters measured included virus isolation (from plasma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and lymph node tissue); quantitative DNA PCR using primers capable of distinguishing HIV-1(IIIB), HIV-1(SF2), and HIV-1(DH12) from one another; and serologic assays to monitor changes in binding and neutralizing antibodies. In contrast to an HIV-1-naive chimpanzee that rapidly became infected following the inoculation of HIV-1(DH12), the two chimpanzees previously infected with HIV-1(IIIB) resisted repeated and escalating inoculations of HIV-1(DH12), as monitored by virus isolation and PCR. The two animals previously infected with HIV-1(SF2) became infected with HIV-1(DH12) but in contrast to the case with the HIV-1-naive chimpanzee, no cell-free viral RNA was detected in the plasma by the branched DNA procedure and levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cell-associated viral DNA were reduced 35- to 50-fold. PMID:8676459

  2. How can epidemiology assist in guiding interventions for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome/human immunodeficiency virus?

    PubMed

    Vermund, S H; Hoth, D F

    1990-12-01

    In a single decade, the pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become an international health, social, and economic emergency. Early and effective intervention is urgently needed for both prevention of HIV infection and for the amelioration of clinical disease. Results of therapeutic trials have suggested expanding the population for which chemotherapy is indicated. In this paper, we first review the findings from selected recent drug trials, using zidovudine and pentamidine as examples. We then discuss six issues that we believe to be crucial for future epidemiologic research in the service of vaccine and drug development: 1. To identify which complications of HIV infection most urgently require development of new therapies, we must characterize the frequency and severity of specific medical events (outcomes) in persons taking a variety of treatments. 2. Currently, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) therapeutic trials gauge the effectiveness of new therapies by their impact on such clinical parameters as the time to development of AIDS or death. These approaches take too long to provide information. We urgently need to identify surrogate markers of clinical outcome that will be useful in the early assessment of treatment efficacy. 3. Progress in vaccine development is being retarded because we do not have enough data from natural history studies on host immunologic responses to suggest that a given response is protective. We therefore need to identify natural correlates of immunity, which can help set priorities in vaccine development. 4. Discovery that a therapy works in the setting of a clinical trial is only a first step in intervention. We must also assess the impact of new therapies on the health of the public, evaluating access to health care, compliance, and other barriers to treatment. 5. Clinical trials are usually associated with the effort to prevent disease in infected persons. However, other trials are needed to assess efforts to interrupt viral transmission through use of condoms, use of virucides, and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, and by effecting specific behavioral changes. 6. Traditional methods of conducting clinical therapeutic research may not be adequate to address urgent questions in the AIDS/HIV epidemic. We must develop innovative clinical research methods, including better use of data from observational studies, to infer what we can about the effect of treatment on the clinical course. PMID:1669495

  3. Frequent transmission of immunodeficiency viruses among bobcats and pumas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Boyce, W.M.; Riley, S.P.D.; Roelke, M.E.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which emerged in humans after cross-species transmissions of simian immunodeficiency viruses from nonhuman primates, immunodeficiency viruses of the family Lentiviridae represent species-specific viruses that rarely cross species barriers to infect new hosts. Among the Felidae, numerous immunodeficiency-like lentiviruses have been documented, but only a few cross-species transmissions have been recorded, and these have not been perpetuated in the recipient species. Lentivirus seroprevalence was determined for 79 bobcats (Lynx rufus) and 31 pumas (Puma concolor) from well-defined populations in Southern California. Partial genomic sequences were subsequently obtained from 18 and 12 seropositive bobcats and pumas, respectively. Genotypes were analyzed for phylogenic relatedness and genotypic composition among the study set and archived feline lentivirus sequences. This investigation of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in bobcats and pumas of Southern California provides evidence that cross-species infection has occurred frequently among these animals. The data suggest that transmission has occurred in multiple locations and are most consistent with the spread of the virus from bobcats to pumas. Although the ultimate causes remain unknown, these transmission events may occur as a result of puma predation on bobcats, a situation similar to that which fostered transmission of HIV to humans, and likely represent the emergence of a lentivirus with relaxed barriers to cross-species transmission. This unusual observation provides a valuable opportunity to evaluate the ecological, behavioral, and molecular conditions that favor repeated transmissions and persistence of lentivirus between species. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Perinatally infected adolescents living with human immunodeficiency virus (perinatally human immunodeficiency virus)

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria Leticia S; Cardoso, Claudete A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of highly potent antiretroviral treatment during the last decades has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic disease. Children that were diagnosed during the first months or years of life and received treatment, are living longer and better and are presently reaching adolescence and adulthood. Perinatally HIV-infected adolescents (PHIV) and young adults may present specific clinical, behavior and social characteristics and demands. We have performed a literature review about different aspects that have to be considered in the care and follow-up of PHIV. The search included papers in the MEDLINE database via PubMed, located using the keywords “perinatally HIV-infected” AND “adolescents”. Only articles published in English or Portuguese from 2003 to 2014 were selected. The types of articles included original research, systematic reviews, and quantitative or qualitative studies; case reports and case series were excluded. Results are presented in the following topics: “Puberal development and sexual maturation”, “Growth in weight and height”, “Bone metabolism during adolescence”, “Metabolic complications”, “Brain development, cognition and mental health”, “Reproductive health”, “Viral drug resistance” and “Transition to adult outpatient care”. We hope that this review will support the work of pediatricians, clinicians and infectious diseases specialists that are receiving these subjects to continue treatment. PMID:26279988

  5. Systemic lymphadenopathic histology in human immunodeficiency virus-1-seropositive drug addicts without apparent acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Burke, A P; Anderson, D; Mannan, P; Ribas, J L; Liang, Y H; Smialek, J; Virmani, R

    1994-03-01

    We examined lymph nodes from multiple sites in 50 individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) who died accidentally of drug overdoses and in whom there was no evidence of opportunistic infection. The size, histologic pattern, presence of Warthin-Finkeldey-type giant cells, and estimation of CD4 cell count of these lymph nodes were compared with those of 13 seronegative drug addicts (controls). Lymph nodes from seropositive individuals were slightly but significantly larger than those of controls. Lymph nodes from seropositive cases were much more likely to contain secondary follicles (90%) than were those from controls (20%). Unlike follicles in control nodes, most secondary follicles in the seropositive cases were in various stages of fragmentation and involution. As follicular changes progressed, there was a decrease in CD4 cells and an increase in intrafollicular and paracortical plasma cells. Plasmacytosis was much more prevalent in lymph nodes from seropositive individuals than in controls. Warthin-Finkeldey-type giant cells were present in at least one node in 29 of 50 seropositive cases, were most numerous in those showing follicular hyperplasia with fragmentation (45% of cases), and were especially numerous in Peyer's patches (61% of cases). There was generally good concordance of HIV-1-associated follicular morphology among diverse lymph node groups. There is prolonged generalized, mild hyperplastic lymphadenopathy with frequent syncytial cells in intravenous drug addicts with asymptomatic HIV-1 infection. PMID:8150456

  6. Improbability of Effective Vaccination Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Because of Its Intracellular Transmission and Rectal Portal of Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, Albert B.

    1992-09-01

    The worldwide effort to produce a vaccine against AIDS continues to disregard the fact that even human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immunity are ineffective against virus within cells without viral antigens on the cell membrane-and that much of HIV infection is transmitted in this manner. According to a recent report, a simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine that protected monkeys against an intravenous challenge with cell-free virus was, as predicted, ineffective against an intravenous challenge with the same amount of virus in infected cells. Moreover, antibody and HIV have been found to coexist in cell-free plasma from asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Excluding direct introduction of HIV into the bloodstream, the most common and efficient form of transmission of HIV infection is by receptive anal intercourse, and semen contains large numbers of infected cells per milliliter. Recent reports showing that colorectal cells can be persistently infected by HIV and that HIV RNA and cDNA are present in the cells of the colon of dead AIDS patients indicate that either cell-free or intracellular HIV has the capacity to multiply at the portal of entry in the colorectal area without interference from neutralizing antibodies. The available data provide no basis for testing any HIV vaccine in human beings either before or after infection. The main challenge is to find a way to kill cells with chromosomally integrated HIV cDNA without harming normal cells, perhaps by identifying repressor proteins that might be produced by the cells with integrated HIV cDNA and thus could become specific targets for cell-killing drugs.

  7. The Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 nef Gene Can to a Large Extent Replace Simian Immunodeficiency Virus nef In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, Frank; Münch, Jan; Carl, Silke; Stolte, Nicole; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Fuchs, Dietmar; Ten Haaft, Peter; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Swigut, Tomek; Skowronski, Jacek; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane

    1999-01-01

    The nef gene of the pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) 239 clone was replaced with primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nef alleles to investigate whether HIV-1 Nef can substitute for SIV Nef in vivo. Initially, two rhesus macaques were infected with the chimeric viruses (Nef-SHIVs). Most of the nef alleles obtained from both animals predicted intact open reading frames. Furthermore, forms containing upstream nucleotide substitutions that enhanced expression of the inserted gene became predominant. One animal maintained high viral loads and slowly progressed to immunodeficiency. nef long terminal repeat sequences amplified from this animal were used to generate a second generation of Nef-SHIVs. Two macaques, which were subsequently infected with a mixture of cloned chimeric viruses, showed high viral loads and progressed to fatal immunodeficiency. Five macaques received a single molecular clone, named SHIV-40K6. The SHIV-40K6 nef allele was active in CD4 and class I major histocompatibility complex downregulation and enhanced viral infectivity and replication. Notably, all of the macaques inoculated with SHIV-40K6 showed high levels of viral replication early in infection. During later stages, however, the course of infection was variable. Three animals maintained high viral loads and developed immunodeficiency. Of the remaining two macaques, which showed decreasing viral loads after the acute phase of infection, only one efficiently controlled viral replication and remained asymptomatic during 1.5 years of follow-up. The other animal showed an increasing viral load and developed signs of progressive infection during later stages. Our data demonstrate that HIV-1 nef can, to a large extent, functionally replace SIVmac nef in vivo. PMID:10482588

  8. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  9. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  10. Systemic Delivery of Neutralizing Antibody Targeting CCL2 for Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinmei; Fujita, Mitsugu; Snyder, Linda A.; Okada, Hideho

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) inhibit anti-tumor immune responses and facilitate tumor growth. Precursors for these immune cell populations migrate to the tumor site in response to tumor secretion of chemokines, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), which was originally purified and identified from human gliomas. In syngeneic mouse GL261 glioma and human U87 glioma xenograft models, we evaluated the efficacy of systemic CCL2 blockade by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting mouse and/or human CCL2. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of anti-mouse CCL2 mAb as monotherapy (2 mg/kg/dose, twice a week) significantly, albeit modestly, prolonged the survival of C57BL/6 mice bearing intracranial GL261 glioma (p=0.0033), which was concomitant with a decrease in TAMs and MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment. Similarly, survival was modestly prolonged in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing intracranial human U87 glioma xenografts treated with both anti-human CCL2 mAb and anti-mouse CCL2 antibodies (2 mg/kg/dose for each, twice a week) compared to mice treated with control IgG (p=0.0159). Furthermore, i.p. administration of anti-mouse CCL2 antibody in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly prolonged the survival of C57BL/6 mice bearing GL261 glioma with 8 of 10 treated mice surviving longer than 70 days, while only 3 of 10 mice treated with TMZ and isotype IgG survived longer than 70 days (p=0.0359). These observations provide support for development of mAb-based CCL2 blockade strategies in combination with the current standard TMZ-based chemotherapy for treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:21116835

  11. Influence of carbohydrate moieties on the immunogenicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 recombinant gp160.

    PubMed Central

    Benjouad, A; Gluckman, J C; Rochat, H; Montagnier, L; Bahraoui, E

    1992-01-01

    The role of carbohydrates in the immunogenicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) glycoproteins (gp160 and gp120) remains poorly understood. We have analyzed the specificity and neutralizing capacity of antibodies raised against native gp160 or against gp160 deglycosylated by either endo F-N glycanase, neuraminidase, or alpha-mannosidase. Rabbits immunized with these immunogens produced antibodies that recognized recombinant gp160 (rgp160) from HIV-1 in a radioimmunoassay and in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies elicited by the different forms of deglycosylated gp160 were analyzed for their reactivity against a panel of synthetic peptides. Compared with anti-native gp160 antisera, serum reactivity to most peptides remained unchanged, or it could increase (peptide P41) or decrease. Only antibodies raised against mannosidase-treated gp160 failed to react with a synthetic peptide (peptide P29) within the V3 loop of gp120. Rabbits immunized with desialylated rgp160 generated antibodies which recognized not only rgp160 from HIV-1 but also rgp140 from HIV-2 at high titers. Although all antisera produced against glycosylated or deglycosylated rgp160 could prevent HIV-1 binding to CD4-positive cells in vitro, only antibodies raised against native or desialylated gp160 neutralized HIV-1 infectivity and inhibited syncytium formation between HIV-1-infected cells and noninfected CD4-positive cells, whereas antibodies raised against alpha-mannosidase-treated gp160 inhibited neither virus replication nor syncytium formation. These findings indicate that the carbohydrate moieties of gp160 can modulate the specificity and the protective efficiency of the antibody response to the molecule. Images PMID:1347797

  12. Neutral-current x-distributions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Friedman, J. I.; Kendall, H. W.; Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.; Fisk, R.; Fuess, S.; Bofill, J.; Busza, W.; Eldridge, T.; Abolins, M.; Brock, R.; et al.

    1984-06-01

    The role of the semi leptonic neutral current interaction as a probe of nucleon structure is examined. Previous measurements of neutral current x-distributions are reviewed, and new results from the Fermilab - MIT - MSU collaboration are presented.

  13. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sliepen, Kwinten; Sanders, Rogier W

    2016-03-01

    The long pursuit for a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has recently been boosted by a number of exciting developments. An HIV-1 subunit vaccine ideally should elicit potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), but raising bNAbs by vaccination has proved extremely difficult because of the characteristics of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). However, the isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected patients demonstrates that the human humoral immune system is capable of making such antibodies. Therefore, a focus of HIV-1 vaccinology is the elicitation of bNAbs by engineered immunogens and by using vaccination strategies aimed at mimicking the bNAb maturation pathways in HIV-infected patients. Important clues can also be taken from the successful subunit vaccines against hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus. Here, we review the different types of HIV-1 immunogens and vaccination strategies that are being explored in the search for an HIV-1 vaccine that induces bNAbs. PMID:26654478

  14. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  15. Electron tomography analysis of envelope glycoprotein trimers on HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus virions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ping; Chertova, Elena; Bess, Julian; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Arthur, Larry O.; Liu, Jun; Taylor, Kenneth A.; Roux, Kenneth H.

    2003-01-01

    We used electron tomography to directly visualize trilobed presumptive envelope (env) glycoprotein structures on the surface of negatively stained HIV type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) virions. Wild–type HIV-1 and SIV virions had an average of 8–10 trimers per virion, consistent with predictions based on biochemical evidence. Mutant SIVs, biochemically demonstrated to contain high levels of the viral env proteins, averaged 70–79 trimers per virion in tomograms. These correlations strongly indicate that the visualized trimers represent env spikes. The env trimers were without obvious geometric distribution pattern or preferred rotational orientation. Combined with biochemical analysis of gag/env ratios in virions, these trimer counts allow calculation of the number of gag molecules per virion, yielding an average value of ≈1,400. Virion and env dimensions were also determined. Image-averaging analysis of SIV env trimers revealed a distinct chirality and strong concordance with recent molecular models. The results directly demonstrate the presence of env trimers on the surface of AIDS virus virions, albeit at numbers much lower than generally appreciated, and have important implications for understanding virion formation, virus interactions with host cells, and virus neutralization. PMID:14668432

  16. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  17. Chemokine-adjuvanted electroporated DNA vaccine induces substantial protection from simian immunodeficiency virus vaginal challenge.

    PubMed

    Kutzler, M A; Wise, M C; Hutnick, N A; Moldoveanu, Z; Hunter, M; Reuter, M A; Yuan, S; Yan, J; Ginsberg, A A; Sylvester, A; Pahar, B; Carnathan, D G; Kathuria, N; Khan, A S; Montefiori, D; Sardesai, N Y; Betts, M R; Mestecky, J; Marx, P A; Weiner, D B

    2016-01-01

    There have been encouraging results for the development of an effective HIV vaccine. However, many questions remain regarding the quality of immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies. We addressed some of these issues by using a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine adjuvanted with plasmid-expressed mucosal chemokines combined with an intravaginal SIV challenge in rhesus macaque (RhM) model. We previously reported on the ability of CCR9 and CCR10 ligand (L) adjuvants to enhance mucosal and systemic IgA and IgG responses in small animals. In this study, RhMs were intramuscularly immunized five times with either DNA or DNA plus chemokine adjuvant delivered by electroporation followed by challenge with SIVsmE660. Sixty-eight percent of all vaccinated animals (P<0.01) remained either uninfected or had aborted infection compared with only 14% in the vaccine naïve group. The highest protection was observed in the CCR10L chemokines group, where six of nine animals had aborted infection and two remained uninfected, leading to 89% protection (P<0.001). The induction of mucosal SIV-specific antibodies and neutralization titers correlated with trends in protection. These results indicate the need to further investigate the contribution of chemokine adjuvants to modulate immune responses and the role of mucosal antibodies in SIV/HIV protection. PMID:25943275

  18. Influence of random genetic drift on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 env evolution during chronic infection.

    PubMed Central

    Shriner, Daniel; Shankarappa, Raj; Jensen, Mark A; Nickle, David C; Mittler, John E; Margolick, Joseph B; Mullins, James I

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has high replication and mutation rates that generate large census populations and high levels of genetic variation. We examined the roles of natural selection, population growth, random genetic drift, and recombination in shaping the variation in 1509 C2-V5 env sequences derived from nine men with chronic HIV-1 infection. These sequences were obtained from clinical visits that reflect the first 6-13.7 years of infection. Pairwise comparisons of nonsynonymous and synonymous distances, Tajima's D test, Fu and Li's D* test, and a test of recurrent mutation revealed evidence for episodes of nonneutral evolution in a total of 22 out of 145 blood samples, representing six of the nine individuals. Using three coalescent-based maximum-likelihood estimators, we found viral effective population sizes in all nine individuals to be approximately 10(3). We also show that a previous estimate of the effective population size of approximately 10(5) based on rare haplotype frequencies decreases to approximately 10(3) upon correcting a biased sampling procedure. We conclude that the genetic variation in these data sets can be explained by a predominance of random genetic drift of neutral mutations with brief episodes of natural selection that were frequently masked by recombination. PMID:15082537

  19. B- and T-lymphocyte responses to an immunodominant epitope of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schrier, R D; Gnann, J W; Langlois, A J; Shriver, K; Nelson, J A; Oldstone, M B

    1988-01-01

    Using synthetic peptides, we characterized the B-lymphocyte (antibody) and T-lymphocyte (proliferation) responses to an immunodominant epitope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) located near the amino-terminal end of the transmembrane glycoprotein (env amino acids 598 to 609). Both immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies against this epitope appeared early after primary infection with HIV-1. In an animal model, the IgG response to a synthetic peptide derived from this sequence was T-helper-cell dependent, whereas the IgM response was T-cell independent. In addition, antibody generated by immunization with this peptide had HIV-1-neutralizing activity. Greater than 99% (201 of 203) of patients infected with HIV-1 generated antibody to this peptide in vivo; however, only 24% (7 of 29) had T cells that proliferated in response to this peptide in vitro. These observations suggest that different HIV-1 gp41 epitopes elicit B-cell and T-cell immune responses. PMID:3260630

  20. The Net Neutrality Debate: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Rich

    2006-01-01

    Rich Greenfield examines the basics of today's net neutrality debate that is likely to be an ongoing issue for society. Greenfield states the problems inherent in the definition of "net neutrality" used by Common Cause: "Network neutrality is the principle that Internet users should be able to access any web content they choose and use any…

  1. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  2. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  3. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee of the Federal Government or any other individual who is acceptable to the parties to a dispute... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  4. Inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine failed to protect rhesus macaques from intravenous or genital mucosal infection but delayed disease in intravenously exposed animals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutjipto, S.; Pedersen, N.C.; Miller, C.J.; Gardner, M.B.; Hanson, C.V.; Gettie, A.; Jennings, M.; Higgins, J.; Marx, P.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Eight rhesus macaques were immunized four times over a period of 8 months with a psoralen-UV-light-inactivated whole simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine adjuvanted with threonyl muramyl dipeptide. Eight unvaccinated control animals received adjuvant alone. Only the vaccinated animals made antibodies before challenge exposure to the viral core and envelope as determined by Western blotting (immunoblotting) and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Ten days after the final immunization, one-half of the vaccinated and nonvaccinated monkeys were challenged exposed intravenously (i.v.) and one-half were challenge exposed via the genital mucosa with virulent simian immunodeficiency virus. All of the nonvaccinated control monkeys became persistently infected. In spite of preexisting neutralizing antibodies and an anamnestic antibody response, all of the immunized monkeys also became persistently infected. However, there was evidence that the clinical course in immunized i.v. infected animals was delayed. All four mock-vaccinated i.v. challenge-exposed animals died with disease from 3 to 9 months postchallenge. In contrast, only one of four vaccinated i.v. challenge-exposed monkeys had died by 11 months postchallenge.

  5. Inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine failed to protect rhesus macaques from intravenous or genital mucosal infection but delayed disease in intravenously exposed animals.

    PubMed Central

    Sutjipto, S; Pedersen, N C; Miller, C J; Gardner, M B; Hanson, C V; Gettie, A; Jennings, M; Higgins, J; Marx, P A

    1990-01-01

    Eight rhesus macaques were immunized four times over a period of 8 months with a psoralen-UV-light-inactivated whole simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine adjuvanted with threonyl muramyl dipeptide. Eight unvaccinated control animals received adjuvant alone. Only the vaccinated animals made antibodies before challenge exposure to the viral core and envelope as determined by Western blotting (immunoblotting) and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Ten days after the final immunization, one-half of the vaccinated and nonvaccinated monkeys were challenged exposed intravenously (i.v.) and one-half were challenge exposed via the genital mucosa with virulent simian immunodeficiency virus. All of the nonvaccinated control monkeys became persistently infected. In spite of preexisting neutralizing antibodies and an anamnestic antibody response, all of the immunized monkeys also became persistently infected. However, there was evidence that the clinical course in immunized i.v. infected animals was delayed. All four mock-vaccinated i.v. challenge-exposed animals died with disease from 3 to 9 months postchallenge. In contrast, only one of four vaccinated i.v. challenge-exposed monkeys had died by 11 months postchallenge. Images PMID:2157886

  6. Thirty years of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Younai, Fariba S

    2013-01-01

    After more than 30 years of battling a global epidemic, the prospect of eliminating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the most challenging infectious disease of the modern era is within our reach. Major scientific discoveries about the virus responsible for this immunodeficiency disease state, including its pathogenesis, transmission patterns and clinical course, have led to the development of potent antiretroviral drugs that offer great hopes in HIV treatment and prevention. Although these agents and many others still in development and testing are capable of effectively suppressing viral replication and survival, the medical management of HIV infection at the individual and the population levels remains challenging. Timely initiation of antiretroviral drugs, adherence to the appropriate therapeutic regimens, effective use of these agents in the pre and post-exposure prophylaxis contexts, treatment of comorbid conditions and addressing social and psychological factors involved in the care of individuals continue to be important considerations. PMID:24136672

  7. Early neuropsychological dysfunction caused by human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Marotta, R; Perry, S

    1989-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiological agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), directly affects the central nervous system (CNS) and often causes cognitive, motor, and behavioral changes and eventually a dementia prior to death. Suggestive evidence for the early onset of HIV-induced mental changes is derived from numerous case reports, the nature of subcortical CNS postmortem findings, and early abnormalities seen in cerebrospinal fluid, on brain computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography, and on neuropsychological tests administered to patients with AIDS and AIDS-related complex. However, whether clinically significant cerebral impairment can precede symptoms of immunosuppression is unclear. A few studies have shown poorer performance on neuropsychological tests by asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects compared with uninfected controls, but several studies have not found this difference. To address this controversy, the current literature is reviewed, methodological problems are discussed, and recommendations are made for evaluation and treatment when early HIV-induced mental changes are suspected. PMID:2521066

  8. Application of Flow Cytometry in the Evaluation of Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fleisher, Thomas A; Madkaikar, Manisha; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2016-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of the immune system. Currently more than 250 different PIDDs with a known genetic defect have been recognized. The diagnosis of many of these disorders is supported strongly by a wide variety of flow cytometry applications. Flow cytometry offers a rapid and sensitive tool for diagnosis and classification of PIDDs. It is applicable in the initial workup and subsequent management of several primary immunodeficiency diseases. As our understanding of the pathogenesis and management of these diseases increases, the majority of these tests can be easily established in the diagnostic laboratory. Thus, the focus of this article is on the application of flow cytometry in the diagnosis and/or evaluation of PIDDs. PMID:26865168

  9. Trends in human immunodeficiency virus infection: epidemiology in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chew, S K

    1993-03-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and recognised a decade ago, has reached pandemic proportions worldwide. By early 1992, the World Health Organisation estimates that at least 10 to 12 million people are infected with HIV globally. The majority of these infections are the result of heterosexual transmission. In South and South-east Asia, the AIDS pandemic is growing rapidly due to intravenous drug use and heterosexual transmission. Since 1985, the major route of HIV transmission in Singapore has been sexual. The transmission pattern, however, has changed from one that was predominantly homosexual or bisexual to one that is increasingly heterosexual from mid-1990. In addition, HIV infections among intravenous drug users, children and organ recipients who received transplantation overseas have also surfaced since 1990. It is estimated that there will be 400 cases of HIV infection in Singapore by the mid-1990s. PMID:8363325

  10. [Pulmonary complications in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Brockmann V, Pablo; Viviani S, Támara; Peña D, Anamaría

    2007-08-01

    Pulmonary complications in children infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common and may be the first manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The aim of our study was to review pulmonary diseases and complications in pediatric patients with HIV infection in a large tertiary hospital in Santiago, Chile. We performed a retrospective, descriptive analysis of 17 patients with HIV infection controlled at the Hospital Dr. Sótero del Rio. Respiratory complications/diseases were: overall pneumonia (n: 14), recurrent pneumonia (n: 10), citomegalovirus associated pneumonia (n: 4), Pneumocystis jiroveci associated pneumonia (n: 1) pulmonary tuberculosis (n: 1), lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (n: 3) and chronic pulmonary disease (n: 7). Microorganisms isolated were mostly atypical and frequently associated with severe and chronic pulmonary damage. A high degree of suspicion is required to detect atypical microorganisms promptly, in order to rapidly implement pathogen targeted therapy that could potentially decrease the possibility of sequelae. PMID:17728918

  11. Clinical aspects of feline immunodeficiency and feline leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with a global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of developing opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia) and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less important as a deadly infectious agent as in the last 20 years prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. PMID:21807418

  12. Molecular and genetic basis of X-linked immunodeficiency disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, J.M. )

    1994-03-01

    Within a short time interval the specific gene defects causing three X-linked human immunodeficiencies, agammaglobulinemia (XLA), hyper-IgM syndrome (HIGM), and severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), have been identified. These represent the first human disease phenotypes associated with each of three gene families already recognized to be important in lymphocyte development and signaling: XLA is caused by mutations of a B cell-specific intracellular tyrosine kinase; HIGM, by mutations in the TNF-related CD40 ligand, through which T cells deliver helper signals by direct contact with B cell CD40; and XSCID, by mutations in the [gamma] chain of the lymphocyte receptor for IL-2. Each patient mutation analyzed to date has been unique, representing both a challenge for genetic diagnosis and management and an important resource for dissecting molecular domains and understanding the physiologic function of the gene products.

  13. Molecular and biological aspects of the bovine immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Andrea G; St-Louis, Marie-Claude; Archambault, Denis

    2010-01-01

    The bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) was isolated in 1969 from a cow, R-29, with a wasting syndrome suggesting bovine leucosis. The virus, first designated bovine visna-like virus, remained unstudied until HIV was discovered in 1983. Then, it was demonstrated in 1987 that the bovine R-29 isolate was a lentivirus with striking similarity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Moreover, BIV has the most complex genomic structure among all identified lentiviruses shown by several regulatory/accessory genes encoding proteins, some of which are involved in the regulation of virus gene expression. This manuscript aims to review biological and molecular aspects of BIV, with emphasis on regulatory/accessory viral genes/proteins which are involved in virus expression. PMID:20210777

  14. A novel X-linked combined immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, E G; Schmalstieg, F C; Wirt, D P; Rosenblatt, H M; Adkins, L T; Lookingbill, D P; Rudloff, H E; Rakusan, T A; Goldman, A S

    1990-01-01

    A novel X-linked combined immunodeficiency disease was found in five living males in an extended family in the United States. The age of the affected males ranged from 2.5 to 34 yr. The most prominent clinical abnormalities were a paucity of lymphoid tissue; recurrent sinusitis, otitis media, bronchitis, and pneumonia; severe varicella; and chronic papillomavirus infections. The principal immunologic features of the disorder were normal concentrations of serum immunoglobulins but restricted formation of IgG antibodies to immunogens; normal numbers of B cells and NK cells but decreased numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, particularly the CD45RA+ subpopulations; diminished proliferative responses of blood T cells to allogeneic cells, mitogens and antigens; and decreased production of IL-2 by mitogen stimulated blood lymphocytes. Thus, affected males in this family carry an abnormal gene on their X chromosome that results in a combined immunodeficiency that is distinct from previously reported disorders. Images PMID:2243135

  15. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  16. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  17. Autoimmune and Lymphoproliferative Complications of Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is frequently complicated by the development of autoimmune and lymphoproliferative diseases. With widespread use of immunoglobulin replacement therapy, autoimmune and lymphoproliferative complications have replaced infection as the major cause of morbidity and mortality in CVID patients. Certain CVID complications, such as bronchiectasis, are likely to be the result of immunodeficiency and are associated with infection susceptibility. However, other complications may result from immune dysregulation rather than immunocompromise. CVID patients develop autoimmunity, lymphoproliferation, and granulomas in association with distinct immunological abnormalities. Mutations in transmembrane activator and CAML interactor, reduction of isotype-switched memory B cells, expansion of CD21 low B cells, heightened interferon signature expression, and retained B cell function are all associated with both autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation in CVID. Further research aimed to better understand that the pathological mechanisms of these shared forms of immune dysregulation may inspire therapies beneficial for multiple CVID complications. PMID:26857017

  18. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Wyand, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.

  19. Inhibitory effects of polyethers on human immunodeficiency virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, M; Kunimoto, S; Takahashi, Y; Naganawa, H; Sakaue, M; Inoue, S; Ohno, T; Takeuchi, T

    1992-01-01

    We examined the inhibitory activities of 10 polyether antibiotics on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. These compounds caused concentration-dependent inhibition of HIV replication in primary infected cultures of human T-lymphoblastoid H9 cells. The ratio of 50% effective concentrations for cellular cytotoxicity (MTT assay) to antiviral activity (reverse transcriptase assay) was over 5. Anti-HIV activity was also observed in cultures of monocytic lineage U937 cells chronically infected with HIV. PMID:1605620

  20. The Value of Family History in Diagnosing Primary Immunodeficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Alhammadi, Ahmad; Al-Yafei, Fawzia

    2014-01-01

    Eliciting proper family medical history is critical in decreasing morbidity and mortality in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs). Communities with a common practice of consanguinity have a high rate of PIDs. We are presenting 2 cases where digging deeply into the family medical history resulted in the diagnosis of Omenn syndrome, a possibly fatal entity if not managed in a reasonable period. PMID:25161792

  1. Antiretroviral therapy reduces neurodegeneration in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Alex K.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Umlauf, Anya; Gouaux, Ben; Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Letendre, Scott L.; Achim, Cristian L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Grant, Igor; Moore, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of virally-suppressive antiretroviral therapy on cortical neurodegeneration and associated neurocognitive impairment. Design Retrospective, postmortem observational study. Methods Clinical neuropsychological and postmortem neuropathology data were analyzed in 90 human immunodeficiency virus-infected volunteers from the general community who had never undergone antiretroviral therapy (n=7, “naïve”) or who had undergone antiretroviral therapy and whose plasma viral load was detectable (n = 64 “unsuppressed”) or undetectable (n = 19, “suppressed”) at the last clinical visit prior to death. Subjects were predominately male (74/90, 82%) with a mean age of 44.7 years (SD 9.8). Cortical neurodegeneration was quantified by measuring microtubule-associated protein (MAP2) and synaptophysin (SYP) density in midfrontal cortex tissue sections. Results The suppressed group had higher SYP density than the naïve group (p = 0.007) and higher MAP2 density than the unsuppressed group (p = 0.04). The suppressed group had lower odds of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders than naïve (OR 0.07, p = 0.03). Higher SYP was associated with lower likelihood of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorders in univariable (OR 0.8, p=0.03) and multivariable models after controlling for antiretroviral treatment and brain human immunodeficiency virus p24 protein levels (OR 0.72, p=0.01). Conclusions We conclude that virally suppressive antiretroviral treatment protects against cortical neurodegeneration. Further, we find evidence supporting the causal chain from treatment-mediated peripheral and central nervous system viral load suppression to reduced neurodegeneration and improved neurocognitive outcomes. PMID:25686681

  2. [Lopinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women].

    PubMed

    Téllez, María Jesús

    2014-11-01

    There are clear sex-related biological differences between men and women. Diseases that affect the two sexes differently are studied separately. However, some diseases affect both men and women, but their incidence or outcome are clearly different. In human immunodeficiency virus infection, the potential differences in the effects of antiretroviral therapy are poorly characterized and few studies have been designed to elucidate these differences. Moreover, women are usually poorly represented in clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:25542872

  3. Sequential injection immunoassay for human bone morphogenic protein-7 using an immunoreactor immobilized with anti-human bone morphogenic protein-7 antibody--CdSe/ZnS quantum dot conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chun-Kwang; Duong, Hong Dinh; Rhee, Jong Il

    2013-07-01

    The detection of human bone morphogenic protein-7 (BMP-7) was achieved using a sequential injection immunoassay (SIIA) system. The SIIA system is based on the binding between BMP-7 and anti-human BMP-7 (AbBMP7)-CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) conjugates immobilized onto a glass disk or an optical fiber, using fluorescence detection at excitation and emission wavelengths of 470 nm and 580 nm, respectively. The AbBMP7-QD conjugates were prepared by conjugating anti-human BMP-7 antibody (AbBMP7) to hydrophilic CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs). The SIIA system was fully automated using software written in the LabVIEW™ development environment. The analytical performance of the SIIA system was characterized with a number of variables such as carrier flow rate and elution buffer. Under partially optimized operating conditions, the SIIA system had a linear calibration graph at up to 10.0 ng mL(-1) BMP-7 (R(2)≥0.975) and a sample frequency of two samples per hour. The SIIA system with an optical fiber immunosensor was used to detect and quantify BMP-7 in spiked real samples obtained from a biological process with recoveries in the range of 95-102%. PMID:23790295

  4. Nonlinear neutral inclusions: assemblages of coated ellipsoids

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños, Silvia Jiménez; Vernescu, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    The problem of determining nonlinear neutral inclusions in (electrical or thermal) conductivity is considered. Neutral inclusions, inserted in a matrix containing a uniform applied electric field, do not disturb the field outside the inclusions. The well-known Hashin-coated sphere construction is an example of a neutral inclusion. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing neutral inclusions from nonlinear materials. In particular, we discuss assemblages of coated ellipsoids. The proposed construction is neutral for a given applied field. PMID:26064633

  5. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  6. Ralstonia pickettii-Induced Ataxia in Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Marion; Medaille, Christine; Simon, Meredith; Serre, Stphanie; Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2009-01-01

    We report here the characterization of an asymmetric ataxia syndrome (head tilt and circling, with death in the most severe cases) demonstrated by profoundly immunodeficient mice housed at the Institut Curie SPF facility. The immune system of the affected mice had been genetically modified so that they were deficient in both B and T cells. Extensive bacteriologic, parasitic, serologic, and histopathologic analysis of the affected animals and their healthy controls led us to identify Ralstonia pickettii as the causative agent of the ataxic syndrome. The outbreak was managed through a test-and-cull process. Even though they also carried Ralstonia pickettii, immunocompetent mice that were kept in the same facility, did not show any of the signs that were expressed by their immunodeficient counterparts. This case highlights the difficulty of maintaining immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice in the same microbiologic unit and the importance of enlarging the spectrum of health monitoring to opportunistic agents when investigating clinical cases in populations of immunocompromised rodents. PMID:19389312

  7. A nonsense mutation in IKBKB causes combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mousallem, Talal; Yang, Jialong; Urban, Thomas J.; Wang, Hongxia; Adeli, Mehdi; Parrott, Roberta E.; Roberts, Joseph L.; Goldstein, David B.; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the molecular etiologies of primary immunodeficiencies has led to important insights into the development and function of the immune system. We report here the cause of combined immunodeficiency in 4 patients from 2 different consanguineous Qatari families with similar clinical and immunologic phenotypes. The patients presented at an early age with fungal, viral, and bacterial infections and hypogammaglobulinemia. Although their B- and T-cell numbers were normal, they had low regulatory T-cell and NK-cell numbers. Moreover, patients’ T cells were mostly CD45RA+-naive cells and were defective in activation after T-cell receptor stimulation. All patients contained the same homozygous nonsense mutation in IKBKB (R286X), revealed by whole-exome sequencing with undetectable IKKβ and severely decreased NEMO proteins. Mutant IKKβ(R286X) was unable to complex with IKKα/NEMO. Immortalized patient B cells displayed impaired IκBα phosphorylation and NFκB nuclear translocation. These data indicate that mutated IKBKB is the likely cause of immunodeficiency in these 4 patients. PMID:25139357

  8. Primary immunodeficiency diseases: dissectors of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Rebecca H

    2002-07-01

    The past 50 years have seen enormous progress in this field. An unknown concept until 1952, there are now more than 100 different primary immunodeficiency syndromes in the world's literature. Each novel syndrome has shed new insight into the workings of the immune system, dissecting its multiple parts into unique functioning components. This has been especially true over the past decade, as the molecular bases of approximately 40 of these diseases have been identified in rapid succession. Advances in the treatment of these diseases have also been impressive. Antibody replacement has been improved greatly by the development of human immunoglobulin preparations that can be safely administered by the intravenous route, and cytokine and humanized anticytokine therapies are now possible through recombinant technologies. The ability to achieve life-saving immune reconstitution of patients with lethal severe combined immunodeficiency by administering rigorously T-cell-depleted allogeneic related haploidentical bone marrow stem cells has extended this option to virtually all such infants, if diagnosed before untreatable infections develop. Finally, the past 3 years have witnessed the first truly successful gene therapy. The impressive results in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency offer hope that this approach can be extended to many more diseases in the future. PMID:12190932

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease: is it a primary immunodeficiency?

    PubMed

    Glocker, Erik; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are chronic and relapsing conditions, characterized by abdominal pain, diarrhea, bleeding and malabsorption. IBD has been considered a hyperinflammatory state due to disturbed interactions between the immune system and the commensal bacterial flora of the gut. However, there is evidence that Crohn's disease might be the consequence of a reduced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an impaired acute inflammatory response, thereby suggesting that IBD might be an immunodeficiency rather than an excessive inflammatory reaction. This theory has been supported by observations in patients with primary immunodeficiencies such as the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and IPEX (immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome). In contrary, defects in the anti-inflammatory down-regulation of the immune response as they are seen in patients with Mendelian defects in the IL10 signaling pathway support the hyper-inflammatory theory. In this review, we describe and discuss primary immunodeficiencies associated with IBD and show that the bowel is a highly sensitive indicator of dysregulations, making IBD a model disease to study and identify key regulators required to balance the human mucosal immune system. PMID:21997382

  10. Neutral gas dynamics in fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-06-01

    Fireballs are local discharge phenomena on positively biased electrodes in partially ionized plasmas. Electrons, energized at a double layer, heat neutral gas which expands. The gas pressure exceeds the plasma pressure, hence becomes important to the stability and transport in fireballs. The flow of gas moves the electrode and sensors similar to a mica pendulum. Flow speed and directions are measured. A fireball gun has been developed to partially collimate the flow of hot gas and heat objects in its path. New applications of fireballs are suggested.

  11. Combined immunodeficiency develops with age in Immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome 2 (ICF2).

    PubMed

    von Bernuth, Horst; Ravindran, Ethiraj; Du, Hang; Frhler, Sebastian; Strehl, Karoline; Krmer, Nadine; Issa-Jahns, Lina; Amulic, Borko; Ninnemann, Olaf; Xiao, Mei-Sheng; Eirich, Katharina; Klsch, Uwe; Hauptmann, Kathrin; John, Rainer; Schindler, Detlev; Wahn, Volker; Chen, Wei; Kaindl, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    The autosomal recessive immunodeficiency-centromeric instability-facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is characterized by immunodeficiency, developmental delay, and facial anomalies. ICF2, caused by biallelic ZBTB24 gene mutations, is acknowledged primarily as an isolated B-cell defect. Here, we extend the phenotype spectrum by describing, in particular, for the first time the development of a combined immune defect throughout the disease course as well as putative autoimmune phenomena such as granulomatous hepatitis and nephritis. We also demonstrate impaired cell-proliferation and increased cell death of immune and non-immune cells as well as data suggesting a chromosome separation defect in addition to the known chromosome condensation defect. PMID:25330735

  12. Neutral endopeptidase modulates neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nadel, J A

    1991-06-01

    A noncholinergic, nonadrenergic nervous system has been described, involving the sensory nerves in the airways. Chemicals, dusts and other irritants stimulate these sensory nerves to release substance P and related neuropeptides. These neuropeptides have the remarkable ability to affect multiple cells in the airways and to provoke many responses including cough, mucus secretion, smooth muscle contraction, plasma extravasation and neutrophil adhesion. This series of effects is termed "neurogenic inflammation." An enzyme exists on the surfaces of all lung cells that contain receptors for these neuropeptides. This enzyme, neutral endopeptidase (NEP), by cleaving and thus inactivating the neuropeptides, limits the concentration of the neuropeptide that reaches the receptor on the cell surface. Thus, neurogenic inflammatory responses are normally mild and presumably protective in nature. However, when NEP is inhibited pharmacologically (with NEP inhibitors) or by cigarette smoke, respiratory viral infection, or by inhalation of the industrial pollutant toluene diisocyanate, neurogenic inflammatory responses are exaggerated. Delivery of exogenous human recombinant NEP inhibits neurogenic inflammation. Finally, evidence is provided that corticosteroids suppress neurogenic plasma extravasation and that this drug can upregulate NEP in human airway tissue. Neutral endopeptidase cleaves multiple peptides. Thus, its selectivity resides, at least in part, on its fixed location on the surfaces of specific cells where it can modulate effects of peptides exposed to the cells' surfaces. PMID:1889501

  13. Detailed Atomic Structure of Neutral and Near-Neutral Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Paul; Hibbert, Alan

    2011-05-11

    This paper highlights the issues which need to be addressed in undertaking accurate calculations of multi-electron atoms and ions, particularly at or near the neutral end of an isoelectronic sequence. We illustrate the processes through two calculations--of transitions in Cl I and Sn II--and discuss the convergence of our results as well as updating previous work. In particular, in the case of Cl I, we propose new identifications of the levels involved in certain transitions which are important in determining the abundance of chlorine in the inter-stellar medium (ISM), while in singly ionised tin, our calculations suggest a re-evaluation of the the abundance of tin in the ISM. We also confirm recent identification of Sn II lines seen in tokamak plasmas.

  14. Rapid selection for an N-linked oligosaccharide by monoclonal antibodies directed against the V3 loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Schnning, K; Jansson, B; Olofsson, S; Hansen, J E

    1996-04-01

    The V3 loop of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) surface protein, gp 120, constitutes a principal neutralizing determinant. HIV strains lacking a naturally conserved N-linked oligosaccharide (at position 306) within the V3 loop are highly sensitive to neutralization. We subjected molecular clones of HIV(LAI) lacking this 306N-glycan to in vitro immune selection with MAbs directed against the V3 loop. In all, ten clones were characterized, and all proved resistant to V3-directed neutralization. Sequencing of the V3 loop revealed that six of the clones had become resistant at least partly by reacquisition of the 306N-glycan. Only two of the clones possessed mutations within the binding site of the antibody itself, while the two remaining clones did not display changes within the V3 loop itself. Thus, HIV strains lacking the 306N-glycan primarily develop resistance to V3-directed neutralization through acquisition of the specific oligosaccharide. This demonstrates that protein glycosylation can be a primary modifier of virus antigenicity of possible importance for the interaction of HIV with the host immune response. PMID:8627264

  15. Protein Microarrays: A New Tool for the Study of Autoantibodies in Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jacob M.; Utz, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is highly coincident with immunodeficiency. In a small but growing number of primary immunodeficiencies, autoantibodies are diagnostic of a given disease and implicated in disease pathogenesis. In order to improve our understanding of the role of autoantibodies in immunodeficiencies and to discover novel autoantibodies, new proteomic tools are needed. Protein microarrays have the ability to screen for reactivity to hundreds to many thousands of unique autoantigens simultaneously on a single chip using minimal serum input. Here, we review different types of protein microarrays and how they can be useful in framing the study of primary and secondary immunodeficiencies. PMID:25904912

  16. Roles of glycans in interactions between gp120 and HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Im, Wonpil

    2016-03-01

    Many novel broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been identified during the past decade, providing promising templates for the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Structural studies reveal that the epitopes of some of these antibodies involve one or more crucial glycans, without which the binding is completely abolished. In this study, we have investigated the critical roles of glycans in interactions between HIV-1 gp120 and two broadly neutralizing antibodies PG9 (targeting V1/V2) and PGT128 (targeting V3) that are able to neutralize more than 70% of HIV-1 isolates. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a number of systems including antibody-gp120 complex with and without glycans, antibody, gp120 with and without glycans, and glycan-only systems. The simulation results show that the complex structures are stabilized by the glycans, and the multivalent interactions between the antibody and gp120 promote cooperativities to further enhance the binding. In the free gp120, the glycans increase the flexibility of the V1/V2 and V3 loops, which likely increases the entropy cost of the antibody recognition. However, the antibodies are able to bind the flexible interface by recognizing the preexisting glycan conformation, and penetrating the glycan shield with flexible complementarity determining region loops that sample the bound conformations occasionally. PMID:26537503

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation but not causation.

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1989-01-01

    AIDS is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defined by a severe depletion of T cells and over 20 conventional degenerative and neoplastic diseases. In the U.S. and Europe, AIDS correlates to 95% with risk factors, such as about 8 years of promiscuous male homosexuality, intravenous drug use, or hemophilia. Since AIDS also correlates with antibody to a retrovirus, confirmed in about 40% of American cases, it has been hypothesized that this virus causes AIDS by killing T cells. Consequently, the virus was termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and antibody to HIV became part of the definition of AIDS. The hypothesis that HIV causes AIDS is examined in terms of Koch's postulates and epidemiological, biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary conditions of viral pathology. HIV does not fulfill Koch's postulates: (i) free virus is not detectable in most cases of AIDS; (ii) virus can only be isolated by reactivating virus in vitro from a few latently infected lymphocytes among millions of uninfected ones; (iii) pure HIV does not cause AIDS upon experimental infection of chimpanzees or accidental infection of healthy humans. Further, HIV violates classical conditions of viral pathology. (i) Epidemiological surveys indicate that the annual incidence of AIDS among antibody-positive persons varies from nearly 0 to over 10%, depending critically on nonviral risk factors. (ii) HIV is expressed in less than or equal to 1 of every 10(4) T cells it supposedly kills in AIDS, whereas about 5% of all T cells are regenerated during the 2 days it takes the virus to infect a cell. (iii) If HIV were the cause of AIDS, it would be the first virus to cause a disease only after the onset of antiviral immunity, as detected by a positive "AIDS test." (iv) AIDS follows the onset of antiviral immunity only after long and unpredictable asymptomatic intervals averaging 8 years, although HIV replicates within 1 to 2 days and induces immunity within 1 to 2 months. (v) HIV supposedly causes AIDS by killing T cells, although retroviruses can only replicate in viable cells. In fact, infected T cells grown in culture continue to divide. (vi) HIV is isogenic with all other retroviruses and does not express a late, AIDS-specific gene. (vii) If HIV were to cause AIDS, it would have a paradoxical, country-specific pathology, causing over 90% Pneumocystis pneumonia and Kaposi sarcoma in the U.S. but over 90% slim disease, fever, and diarrhea in Africa.(viii) It is highly improbable that within the last few years two viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) that are only 40% sequence-related would have evolved that could both cause the newly defined syndrome AIDS. Also, viruses are improbable that kill their only natural host with efficiencies of 50-100%, as is claimed for HIVs. It is concluded that HIV is not sufficient for AIDS and that it may not even be necessary for AIDS because its activity is just as low in symptomatic carriers as in asymptomatic carriers. The correlation between antibody to HIV and AIDS does not prove causation, because otherwise indistinguishable diseases are now set apart only on the basis of this antibody. I propose that AIDS is not a contagious syndrome caused by one conventional virus or microbe. No such virus or microbe would require almost a decade to cause primary disease, nor could it cause the diverse collection of AIDS diseases. Neither would its host range be as selective as that of AIDS, nor could it survive if it were as inefficiently transmitted as AIDS. Since AIDS is defined by new combinations of conventional diseases, it may be caused by new combinations of conventional pathogens, including acute viral or microbial infections and chronic drug use and malnutrition. The long and unpredictable intervals between infection with HIV and AIDS would then reflect the thresholds for these pathogenic factors to cause AIDS diseases, instead of an unlikely mechanism of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:2644642

  18. Safety assessment, in vitro and in vivo, and pharmacokinetics of emivirine, a potent and selective nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Szczech, G M; Furman, P; Painter, G R; Barry, D W; Borroto-Esoda, K; Grizzle, T B; Blum, M R; Sommadossi, J; Endoh, R; Niwa, T; Yamamoto, M; Moxham, C

    2000-01-01

    Emivirine (EMV), formerly known as MKC-442, is 6-benzyl-1-(ethoxymethyl)-5-isopropyl-uracil, a novel nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor that displays potent and selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity in vivo. EMV showed little or no toxicity towards human mitochondria or human bone marrow progenitor cells. Pharmacokinetics were linear for both rats and monkeys, and oral absorption was 68% in rats. Whole-body autoradiography showed widespread distribution in tissue 30 min after rats were given an oral dose of [(14)C]EMV at 10 mg/kg of body weight. In rats given an oral dose of 250 mg/kg, there were equal levels of EMV in the plasma and the brain. In vitro experiments using liver microsomes demonstrated that the metabolism of EMV by human microsomes is approximately a third of that encountered with rat and monkey microsomes. In 1-month, 3-month, and chronic toxicology experiments (6 months with rats and 1 year with cynomolgus monkeys), toxicity was limited to readily reversible effects on the kidney consisting of vacuolation of kidney tubular epithelial cells and mild increases in blood urea nitrogen. Liver weights increased at the higher doses in rats and monkeys and were attributed to the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes. EMV tested negative for genotoxic activity, and except for decreased feed consumption at the high dose (160 mg/kg/day), with resultant decreases in maternal and fetal body weights, EMV produced no adverse effects in a complete range of reproductive toxicology experiments performed on rats and rabbits. These results support the clinical development of EMV as a treatment for HIV-1 infection in adult and pediatric patient populations. PMID:10602732

  19. Ergonomically neutral arm support system

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J; Chung, Jeffrey Y; Dellinges, Steven; Lafever, Robin E

    2005-08-02

    An ergonomic arm support system maintains a neutral position for the forearm. A mechanical support structure attached to a chair or other mounting structure supports the arms of a sitting or standing person. The system includes moving elements and tensioning elements to provide a dynamic balancing force against the forearms. The support structure is not fixed or locked in a rigid position, but is an active dynamic system that is maintained in equipoise by the continuous operation of the opposing forces. The support structure includes an armrest connected to a flexible linkage or articulated or pivoting assembly, which includes a tensioning element such as a spring. The pivoting assembly moves up and down, with the tensioning element providing the upward force that balances the downward force of the arm.

  20. Anti-human cytomegalovirus activity of cytokines produced by CD4+ T-cell clones specifically activated by IE1 peptides in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davignon, J L; Castani, P; Yorke, J A; Gautier, N; Clment, D; Davrinche, C

    1996-01-01

    The control of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections by the immune system is poorly understood. We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells specific for the human CMV major regulatory protein IE1 are frequent in latently infected healthy blood donors. In order to learn about the possible role of these cells, we have developed IE1-specific CD4+ T-cell clones and, in this study, analyzed their epitope specificity and function in vitro. We measured their cytokine production when stimulated with specific IE1 peptides or whole recombinant IE1 protein. Their cytokine profiles, as deduced from gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-6 production, were of the Th0- and Th1-like phenotypes. Supernatants from IE1-specific clones producing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were shown to inhibit CMV replication in U373 MG cells. This effect was due, as found by using cytokine-specific neutralizing antibodies, mostly to IFN-gamma, which was secreted at higher levels than TNF-alpha. To better assess the anti-CMV activity of cytokines, recombinant IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were used and shown to have a synergistic effect on the inhibition of CMV replication and protein expression. Thus, IE1-specific CD4+ T cells display in vitro anti-CMV activity through cytokine secretion and may play a role in the control of in vivo latent infections. PMID:8642638

  1. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  2. Global Structure of HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody IgG1 b12 is Asymmetric

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish, F.; Solanki, A; Boone, C; Krueger, J

    2010-01-01

    Human antibody IgG1 b12 is one of the four antibodies known to neutralize a broad range of human immunodeficiency virus-1. The crystal structure of this antibody displayed an asymmetric disposition of the Fab arms relative to its Fc portion. Comparison of structures solved for other IgG1 antibodies led to a notion that crystal packing forces entrapped a 'snap-shot' of different conformations accessible to this antibody. To elucidate global structure of this unique antibody, we acquired small-angle X-ray scattering data from its dilute solution. Data analysis indicated that b12 adopts a bilobal globular structure in solution with a radius of gyration and a maximum linear dimension of {approx}54 and {approx}180 {angstrom}, respectively. Extreme similarity between its solution and crystal structure concludes that non-flexible, asymmetric shape is an inherent property of this rare antibody.

  3. Neutrality and curiosity: elements of technique.

    PubMed

    Nersessian, Edward; Silvan, Matthew

    2007-07-01

    In the past three decades, neutrality has come under increasing criticism. The idea that a psychoanalyst can leave himself out of the therapeutic exchange has come to be seen as either an impossible dream or a myth. We propose that examining neutrality through the lens of curiosity allows for a new appreciation of the ongoing and vital importance of this psychoanalytic attitude. Our hypothesis is that curiosity and neutrality are linked, and that to maintain a neutral stance, the analyst must be able to direct a relatively conflict-free curiosity toward the workings of the analysand's mind as well as his own. PMID:17695334

  4. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  5. Neutral Vlasov kinetic theory of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tronci, Cesare; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-02-15

    The low-frequency limit of Maxwell equations is considered in the Maxwell-Vlasov system. This limit produces a neutral Vlasov system that captures essential features of plasma dynamics, while neglecting radiation effects. Euler-Poincaré reduction theory is used to show that the neutral Vlasov kinetic theory possesses a variational formulation in both Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates. By construction, the new model recovers all collisionless neutral models employed in plasma simulations. Then, comparisons between the neutral Vlasov system and hybrid kinetic-fluid models are presented in the linear regime.

  6. Alkaline solution neutralization capacity of soil.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2010-10-01

    Alkaline eluate from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration residue deposited in landfill alkalizes waste and soil layers. From the viewpoint of accelerating stability and preventing heavy metal elution, pH of the landfill layer (waste and daily cover soil) should be controlled. On the other hand, pH of leachate from existing MSW landfill sites is usually approximately neutral. One of the reasons is that daily cover soil can neutralize alkaline solution containing Ca(2+) as cation. However, in landfill layer where various types of wastes and reactions should be taken into consideration, the ability to neutralize alkaline solutions other than Ca(OH)(2) by soil should be evaluated. In this study, the neutralization capacities of various types of soils were measured using Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH solutions. Each soil used in this study showed approximately the same capacity to neutralize both alkaline solutions of Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH. The cation exchange capacity was less than 30% of the maximum alkali neutralization capacity obtained by the titration test. The mechanism of neutralization by the pH-dependent charge can explain the same neutralization capacities of the soils. Although further investigation on the neutralization capacity of the soils for alkaline substances other than NaOH is required, daily cover soil could serve as a buffer zone for alkaline leachates containing Ca(OH)(2) or other alkaline substances. PMID:20395123

  7. Influenza virus antigenicity and broadly neutralizing epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Air, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    A vaccine formulation that would be effective against all strains of influenza virus has long been a goal of vaccine developers, but antibodies after infection or vaccination were seen to be strain specific and there was little evidence of cross-reactive antibodies that neutralized across subtypes. Recently a number of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies have been characterized. This review describes the different classes of broadly neutralizing antibodies and discusses the potential of their therapeutic use or for design of immunogens that induce a high proportion of broadly neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25846699

  8. Effect of cacao husk extract on human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Unten, S; Ushijima, H; Shimizu, H; Tsuchie, H; Kitamura, T; Moritome, N; Sakagami, H

    1991-12-01

    A sodium hydroxide extract from cacao husk inhibited the cytopathic effect of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) against HTLV-1-transformed T-cell lines MT-2 and MT-4. It also inhibited syncytium formation between HIV-infected and uninfected lymphoblastoid T-cell line, MOLT-4. The anti-HIV activity was concentrated by membrane filter fractionation to a fraction with molecular weight of 100-300 KDa. Anti-HIV activity of the extract was attributable to interference with the virus adsorption, rather than to inhibition of the virus replication after adsorption. PMID:1367748

  9. Passive antibody protection of cats against feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hohdatsu, T; Pu, R; Torres, B A; Trujillo, S; Gardner, M B; Yamamoto, J K

    1993-01-01

    All six cats passively immunized with sera from either feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-vaccinated cats or cats infected with FIV (Petaluma strain) were protected from homologous FIV infection at a challenge dose that infected all six control cats. Passive immunization with sera from cats vaccinated with uninfected allogeneic T cells used to grow the vaccine virus did not protect either of two cats against the same FIV challenge. These results suggest that antiviral humoral immunity, perhaps in synergy with anticellular antibodies, may be responsible for previously reported vaccine protection. PMID:8383246

  10. Towards detecting the human immunodeficiency virus using microcantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alodhayb, Abdullah; Brown, Nicole; Saydur Rahman, S. M.; Harrigan, Richard; Beaulieu, L. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Detecting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is difficult because the virus is prone to mutations and is in low concentrations in the body. Inside the HIV virion are two well characterized single stranded (ss) RNA molecules (viral genome) that feature both variable regions and regions that are conserved under virus mutation. In this work, microcantilever sensors have been employed as potential HIV detectors by targeting a conserved sequence of the viral genome by attempting to detect target ssDNA and ssRNA molecules that are significantly longer than the ssDNA molecules functionalized on the cantilever.

  11. Multifactorial Nature of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease: Implications for Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1993-11-01

    The immunopathogenic mechanisms underlying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease are extremely complex; the disease process is multifactorial with multiple overlapping phases. Viral burden is substantial and viral replication occurs throughout the entire course of HIV infection. Inappropriate immune activation and elevated secretion of certain cytokines compound the pathogenic process. Profound immunosuppression ultimately occurs together with a disruption of the microenvironment of the immune system, which is probably unable to regenerate spontaneously. Thus, therapeutic strategies in HIV disease must not be unidimensional, but rather must be linked to the complex pathogenic components of the disease and must address where feasible each of the recognized pathoclenic processes for the possibility of therapeutic intervention.

  12. Relapsing and remitting human immunodeficiency virus-associated leukoencephalomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Berger, J R; Tornatore, C; Major, E O; Bruce, J; Shapshak, P; Yoshioka, M; Houff, S; Sheremata, W; Horton, G F; Landy, H

    1992-01-01

    We describe a 33-year-old homosexual man with a steroid-responsive, remitting and relapsing leukoencephalopathy associated with recent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seroconversion. Biopsy of a parieto-occipital lesion revealed demyelination and astrogliosis with focal necrosis. Detailed investigations demonstrated no pathogens in the brain other than HIV-1. This patient illustrates that a neurological disorder clinically indistinguishable from multiple sclerosis may be the presenting manifestation of HIV-1 infection and may occur in the absence of clinically significant immunosuppression. PMID:1311910

  13. Emerging drugs for the treatment of Human Immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Bhopale, Girish M

    2012-04-01

    Rapid emergence of drug resistant Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) variants and severe side effects of anti-HIV drugs limit the efficacy of existing anti-HIV therapies. Efforts are being made to develop newer anti-HIV agents. Few newer anti-HIV agents reached the different clinical phases of development and appear promising for future therapy. The present article highlights the current status of available anti-HIV drugs, emerging anti-HIV drug agents and recent anti-HIV drugs patents information. PMID:22353003

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection-Related Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thuy Van; Torres, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral medications are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease. In the pre-antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, HIV-infected patients had increased morbidity and mortality from opportunistic infections; in the post-ART era, these patients are at increased risk of chronic diseases such as acute coronary syndrome, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy. They may present with vague symptoms such as weakness, dyspnea, or fatigue as the initial presentation of their cardiovascular disease. An overview of the clinical presentation, workup, management, and treatment of different cardiovascular disease is provided in this article. PMID:26226869

  15. Alteration in pancreatic islet function in human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Haugaard, Steen B

    2014-09-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind the defects in insulin production and secretion associated with antihuman immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) therapy and the development of HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) are discussed in this article. Data suggesting insulin resistance on the beta cell and defects in first-phase insulin release of HALS patients are presented. Hepatic extraction of insulin, nonglucose insulin secretagogues and insulin-like growth factor release may exert influence on the demand of circulating insulin and on insulin secretion in HIV-infected patients. Finally, the paucity in understanding the incretin effects in HIV and HIV therapy in relation to insulin secretion is highlighted. PMID:25169562

  16. Morphology and Immunohistochemical Phenotype of the Thymus in Secondary Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Struchko, G Yu; Merkulova, L M; Moskvichev, E V; Kostrova, O Yu; Mikhailova, M N; Drandrova, E G

    2015-10-01

    The thymus of outbred male rats 5 months after splenectomy (experimental secondary immunodeficiency) was studied by common histological and immunohistochemical methods using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to CD3, CD30, CD68, synaptophysin, to S100, p53, bcl-2, and Ki-67 proteins. Removal of the spleen led to acute involution of the thymic parenchyma, which was replaced by the adipose tissue and was associated with restructuring of the thymopoietic and nonthymopoietic components of the gland, changes in cellular composition and antigenic phenotype of the lobular cortical and medullary matter, and by reduction of cell proliferation. PMID:26519276

  17. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a) Identification. The in vitro HIV drug resistance genotype assay is a device that consists of nucleic acid...

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    1990-01-01

    Provides update on what is currently known about neurobehavioral correlates of infection with human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1), causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Discusses methodological and theoretical issues complicating interpretation of existing data and suggests strategies for future research in this area. (NB)

  20. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) through Solid Organ Transplantation (Draft Guideline). The Draft Guideline can...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  2. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  3. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46 Section 610.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are...

  4. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46 Section 610.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  6. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46 Section 610.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are...

  7. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus... Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). ACTION: Notice. Notice of Intent to increase... Announcement CDC-RFA-PS10-10138, ``Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for...

  8. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46 Section 610.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are...

  9. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ requirements. 610.46 Section 610.46 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  11. Merkel cell carcinoma in a patient with GATA2 deficiency: a novel association with primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Crall, C; Morley, K W; Rabinowits, G; Schmidt, B; Broyles, A Dioun; Huang, J T

    2016-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with GATA2 deficiency and neurofibromatosis 1 was diagnosed with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). This polyomavirus-associated cutaneous malignancy has previously been associated with immunosuppression and acquired immunodeficiencies such as HIV/AIDS. However, MCC has not been previously reported in the setting of underlying primary or inherited immunodeficiency. PMID:26252413

  12. Neutral Models of Microbiome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinglong; Sukumaran, Jeet; Wu, Steven; Rodrigo, Allen

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research on host-associated microbial communities (i.e.,microbiomes). Much of this research has focused on surveys of microbial diversities across a variety of host species, including humans, with a view to understanding how these microbiomes are distributed across space and time, and how they correlate with host health, disease, phenotype, physiology and ecology. Fewer studies have focused on how these microbiomes may have evolved. In this paper, we develop an agent-based framework to study the dynamics of microbiome evolution. Our framework incorporates neutral models of how hosts acquire their microbiomes, and how the environmental microbial community that is available to the hosts is assembled. Most importantly, our framework also incorporates a Wright-Fisher genealogical model of hosts, so that the dynamics of microbiome evolution is studied on an evolutionary timescale. Our results indicate that the extent of parental contribution to microbial availability from one generation to the next significantly impacts the diversity of microbiomes: the greater the parental contribution, the less diverse the microbiomes. In contrast, even when there is only a very small contribution from a constant environmental pool, microbial communities can remain highly diverse. Finally, we show that our models may be used to construct hypotheses about the types of processes that operate to assemble microbiomes over evolutionary time. PMID:26200800

  13. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Skylab's success proved that scientific experimentation in a low gravity environment was essential to scientific progress. A more permanent structure was needed to provide this space laboratory. President Ronald Reagan, on January 25, 1984, during his State of the Union address, claimed that the United States should exploit the new frontier of space, and directed NASA to build a permanent marned space station within a decade. The idea was that the space station would not only be used as a laboratory for the advancement of science and medicine, but would also provide a staging area for building a lunar base and manned expeditions to Mars and elsewhere in the solar system. President Reagan invited the international community to join with the United States in this endeavour. NASA and several countries moved forward with this concept. By December 1985, the first phase of the space station was well underway with the design concept for the crew compartments and laboratories. Pictured are two NASA astronauts, at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS), practicing construction techniques they later used to construct the space station after it was deployed.

  14. Neutral Buoyancy Test: Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory. It was the first and flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the1970s and 1980s, the HST was finally designed and built becoming operational in the 1990s. The HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. Pictured is MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator that served as the test center for shuttle astronauts training for Hubble related missions. Shown is an astronaut training on a mock-up of a modular section of the HST in the removal and replacement of scientific instruments.

  15. Primary immunodeficiency diseases: an update on the classification from the international union of immunological societies expert committee for primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Herz, Waleed; Bousfiha, Aziz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chatila, Talal; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Franco, Jose Luis; Gaspar, H Bobby; Holland, Steven M; Klein, Christoph; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D; Oksenhendler, Erik; Picard, Capucine; Puck, Jennifer M; Sullivan, Kate; Tang, Mimi L K

    2014-01-01

    We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) compiled by the Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. In comparison to the previous version, more than 30 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. In addition, we have added a table of acquired defects that are phenocopies of PIDs. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This classification is the most up-to-date catalog of all known PIDs and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases. PMID:24795713

  16. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: An Update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Al-Herz, Waleed; Bousfiha, Aziz; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chatila, Talal; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Franco, Jose Luis; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Holland, Steven M.; Klein, Christoph; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D.; Oksenhendler, Erik; Picard, Capucine; Puck, Jennifer M.; Sullivan, Kate; Tang, Mimi L. K.

    2014-01-01

    We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) compiled by the Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. In comparison to the previous version, more than 30 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. In addition, we have added a table of acquired defects that are phenocopies of PIDs. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This classification is the most up-to-date catalog of all known PIDs and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases. PMID:24795713

  17. Cytokine Polymorphisms are Associated with Poor Sleep Maintenance in Adults Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kathryn A.; Gay, Caryl; Pullinger, Clive R.; Hennessy, Mary Dawn; Zak, Rochelle S.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Cytokine activity and polymorphisms have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether circulating plasma cytokines and cytokine polymorphisms are associated with the poor sleep maintenance commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting: HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay area. Participants: A convenience sample of 289 adults (193 men, 73 women, and 23 transgender) living with HIV/AIDS. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 h to estimate the percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO%) and total sleep time (TST), plasma cytokines were analyzed, and genotyping was conducted for 15 candidate genes involved in cytokine signaling: interferon-gamma (IFNG), IFNG receptor 1 (IFNGR1), interleukins (IL1B, IL1R2, IL1R2, IL2, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL13, IL17A), nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (NFKB1 and NFKB2), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFA). Controlling for demographic variables such as race and sex, and clinical variables such as CD4+ count and medications, higher WASO% was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IL1R2 rs11674595 and TNFA rs1041981 and less WASO% was associated with IL2 rs2069776. IL1R2 rs11674595 and TNFA rs1041981 were also associated with short sleep duration. Conclusions: This study strengthens the evidence for an association between inflammation and sleep maintenance problems. In this chronic illness population, cytokine polymorphisms associated with wake after sleep onset provide direction for intervention research aimed at comparing anti-inflammatory mechanisms with hypnotic agents for improving sleep maintenance and total sleep time. Citation: Lee KA; Gay C; Pullinger CR; Hennessy MD; Zak RS; Aouizerat BE. Cytokine polymorphisms are associated with poor sleep maintenance in adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. SLEEP 2014;37(3):453-463. PMID:24587567

  18. A Simple Mouse Model for the Study of Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Chang; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Kyung-Chang; Park, Ki Hoon; Lee, Hee Jung; Cho, Young Keol; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Sung Soon; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2016-02-01

    Humanized mouse models derived from immune-deficient mice have been the primary tool for studies of human infectious viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). However, the current protocol for constructing humanized mice requires elaborate procedures and complicated techniques, limiting the supply of such mice for viral studies. Here, we report a convenient method for constructing a simple HIV-1 mouse model. Without prior irradiation, NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ-null (NSG) mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 × 10(7) adult human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hu-PBMCs). Four weeks after PBMC inoculation, human CD45(+) cells, and CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells were detected in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, and liver, whereas human CD19(+) cells were observed in lymph nodes and spleen. To examine the usefulness of hu-PBMC-inoculated NSG (hu-PBMC-NSG) mice as an HIV-1 infection model, we intravenously injected these mice with dual-tropic HIV-1DH12 and X4-tropic HIV-1NL4-3 strains. HIV-1-infected hu-PBMC-NSG mice showed significantly lower human CD4(+) T cell counts and high HIV viral loads in the peripheral blood compared with noninfected hu-PBMC-NSG mice. Following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and neutralizing antibody treatment, HIV-1 replication was significantly suppressed in HIV-1-infected hu-PBMC-NSG mice without detectable viremia or CD4(+) T cell depletion. Moreover, the numbers of human T cells were maintained in hu-PBMC-NSG mice for at least 10 weeks. Taken together, our results suggest that hu-PBMC-NSG mice may serve as a relevant HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis model that could facilitate in vivo studies of HIV-1 infection and candidate HIV-1 protective drugs. PMID:26564392

  19. Adaptation of Subtype A Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope to Pig-Tailed Macaque Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Humes, Daryl; Overbaugh, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection of macaques to HIV-1 infection in humans depends on how closely SHIVs mimic HIV-1 transmission, pathogenesis, and diversity. Circulating HIV-1 strains are predominantly subtypes C and A and overwhelmingly require CCR5 for entry, yet most SHIVs incorporate CXCR4-using subtype B envelopes (Envs). While pathogenic subtype C-based SHIVs have been constructed, the subtype A-based SHIVs (SHIV-As) constructed to date have been unable to replicate in macaque cells. To understand the barriers to SHIV-A replication in macaque cells, HIVAQ23/SIVvif was constructed by engineering a CCR5-tropic subtype A provirus to express SIV vif, which counters the macaque APOBEC3G restriction. HIVAQ23/SIVvif replicated poorly in pig-tailed macaque (Ptm) lymphocytes, but viruses were adapted to Ptm lymphocytes. Two independent mutations in gp120, G312V (V3 loop) and A204E (C2 region), were identified that increased peak virus levels by >100-fold. Introduction of G312V and A204E to multiple subtype A Envs and substitution of G312 and A204 with other residues increased entry into Ptm cells by 10- to 100-fold. G312V and A204E Env variants continued to require CCR5 for entry but were up to 50- and 200-fold more sensitive to neutralization by IgG1b12 and soluble CD4 and had a 5- to 50-fold increase in their ability to utilize Ptm CD4 compared to their wild-type counterparts. These findings identify the inefficient use of Ptm CD4 as an unappreciated restriction to subtype A HIV-1 replication in Ptm cells and reveal amino acid changes to gp120 that can overcome this barrier. PMID:21325401

  20. A New Age of Constructivism: "Mode Neutral"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Peter; Smith, Brian; Sherratt, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents work in progress exploring social constructivism within Mode Neutral, and how various conditions impact upon the student experience. Mode Neutral's three dimensions--curriculum design, the role of the tutor and communication for learning--are affected by the conditions that can vary in any given context. The authors realise

  1. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  2. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  3. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  4. The Dubious Value of Value Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Hard science is properly value neutral. But when that ideological neutrality extends to the whole university, the traditional foundation crumbles. Steve Balch laments the moral vacuum that now substitutes for fundamental principles, because it is impossible to frame a program of education--especially in the humanities and social sciences--without

  5. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  6. Implications of tritium in neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Stewart, L D

    1980-01-01

    Neutral injectors for heating plasmas of D-T burning fusion reactors are subject to tritium contamination. This paper discusses relevant questions and problem areas pertinent to tritium environment, including calculations of tritium contaminations in different neutral injectors, gas handling and pumping systems, and implications on beam line components.

  7. A simplified approach for recording neutral zone.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Swatantra; Gangadhar, Praveen; Ahmad, Nafis; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2010-06-01

    Neutral zone technique is long being used for the management of severely resorbed mandibular ridges. Various materials are used in recording neutral zone, which have their own advantages and disadvantages. This article discusses the use of Polyether impression material which is simpler and more practical. PMID:21629452

  8. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically

  9. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically…

  10. The Dubious Value of Value Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Hard science is properly value neutral. But when that ideological neutrality extends to the whole university, the traditional foundation crumbles. Steve Balch laments the moral vacuum that now substitutes for fundamental principles, because it is impossible to frame a program of education--especially in the humanities and social sciences--without…

  11. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  12. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  13. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  14. Efficient laser production of energetic neutral beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, F.; Antonelli, L.; Flacco, A.; Braenzel, J.; Vauzour, B.; Folpini, G.; Birindelli, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Batani, D.; Malka, V.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration by intense, ultra-short, laser pulse has received increasing attention in recent years, and the availability of much compact and versatile ions sources motivates the study of laser-driven sources of energetic neutral atoms. We demonstrate the production of a neutral and directional beam of hydrogen and carbon atoms up to 200 keV per nucleon, with a peak flow of 2.7× {{10}13} atom s-1. Laser accelerated ions are neutralized in a pulsed, supersonic argon jet with tunable density between 1.5× {{10}17} cm-3and 6× {{10}18} cm-3. The neutralization efficiency has been measured by a time-of-flight detector for different argon densities. An optimum is found, for which complete neutralization occurs. The neutralization rate can be explained only at high areal densities (>1× {{10}17} cm-2) by single electron charge transfer processes. These results suggest a new perspective for the study of neutral production by laser and open discussion of neutralization at a lower density.

  15. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  16. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  17. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  18. A New Age of Constructivism: "Mode Neutral"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Peter; Smith, Brian; Sherratt, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents work in progress exploring social constructivism within Mode Neutral, and how various conditions impact upon the student experience. Mode Neutral's three dimensions--curriculum design, the role of the tutor and communication for learning--are affected by the conditions that can vary in any given context. The authors realise…

  19. Adrenal adenomatoid tumor in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Phitayakorn, Roy; MacLennan, Gregory; Sadow, Peter; Wilhelm, Scott

    2011-01-01

    We present the clinical course of a patient with human immunodeficiency virus and an adrenal adenomatoid tumor (AAT). We describe the clinical course and laboratory, radiographic, and microscopic findings of a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and an adenomatoid tumor of the right adrenal gland. A review of the literature was also done via electronic searches through PubMed for articles from 1965 to 2008 that contained the following search terms, adenomatoid tumor limited to the English language only. A 22 year-old African-American male with HIV was incidentally found to have a hypermetabolic right adrenal mass. The patient underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy and the mass had morphological and immunohistochemical features that were consistent with an AAT. A review of the medical literature reveals that almost all cases of AAT were in male patients (96%) with a mean age of 4111 years (range=2264) with no significant difference in laterality (right side=46%, left side=50%, unknown=4%). AAT have an average size of 4.23.5 cm (range=0.514.3 cm). Pre-operative imaging studies do not appear to be able to reliably distinguish AAT from other types of adrenocortical tumors. For reasons that require further research, AAT typically occur in male patients and may be associated with immunosuppression. AAT can be safely removed laparoscopically with no evidence of long-term recurrence even with tumor extension beyond the adrenal capsule. PMID:21769320

  20. Simian immunodeficiency virus interactions with macaque dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Teleshova, Natalia; Derby, Nina; Martinelli, Elena; Pugach, Pavel; Calenda, Giulia; Robbiani, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes advances in the following areas: (1) dendritic cell (DC)-mediated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission, (2) role of DCs in innate and adaptive immunity against SIV, and (3) approaches to harness DC function to induce anti-SIV responses. The nonhuman primate (NHP) model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in rhesus macaques and other Asian NHP species is highly relevant to advance the understanding of virus-host interactions critical for transmission and disease pathogenesis. HIV infection is associated with changes in frequency, phenotype, and function of the two principal subsets of DCs, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. DC biology during pathogenic SIV infection is strikingly similar to that observed in HIV-infected patients. The NHP models provide an opportunity to dissect the requirements for DC-driven SIV infection and to understand how SIV distorts the DC system to its advantage. Furthermore, the SIV model of mucosal transmission enables the study of the earliest events of infection at the portal of entry that cannot be studied in humans, and, importantly, the involvement of DCs. Nonpathogenic infection in African NHP hosts allows investigations into the role of DCs in disease control. Understanding how DCs are altered during SIV infection is critical to the design of therapeutic and preventative strategies against HIV. PMID:22975875

  1. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  2. Colonization of congenitally immunodeficient mice with probiotic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R D; Warner, T; Roberts, L; Farmer, J; Balish, E

    1997-08-01

    We assessed the capacity of four probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus casei GG, and Bifidobacterium animalis) to colonize, infect, stimulate immune responses in, and affect the growth and survival of congenitally immunodeficient gnotobiotic beige-athymic (bg/bg-nu/nu) and beige-euthymic (bg/bg-nu/+) mice. The bacteria colonized and persisted, in pure culture, in the alimentary tracts of both mouse strains for the entire study period (12 weeks). Although all adult and neonatal beige-euthymic mice survived probiotic colonization, some infant mortality occurred in beige-athymic pups born to mothers colonized with pure cultures of L. reuteri or L. casei GG. The probiotic bacteria manifested different capacities to adhere to epithelial surfaces, disseminate to internal organs, affect the body weight of adult mice and the growth of neonatal mice, and stimulate immune responses. Although the probiotic species were innocuous for adults, these results suggest that caution and further studies to assess the safety of probiotic bacteria for immunodeficient hosts, especially neonates, are required. PMID:9234796

  3. Inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying tuberculosis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stphanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; El-Baghdadi, Jamila; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Parvaneh, Nima; El Azbaoui, Safaa; Agader, Aomar; Hassani, Amal; El Hafidi, Naima; Mrani, Nidal Alaoui; Jouhadi, Zineb; Ailal, Fatima; Najib, Jilali; Reisli, Ismail; Zamani, Adil; Yosunkaya, Sebnem; Gulle-Girit, Saniye; Yildiran, Alisan; Cipe, Funda Erol; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Metin, Ayse; Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Dogu, Figen; Karaca, Neslihan; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil; Keser-Emiroglu, Melike; Somer, Ayper; Tanir, Gonul; Aytekin, Caner; Adimi, Parisa; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Mamishi, Setareh; Bousfiha, Aziz; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and a few related mycobacteria, is a devastating disease, killing more than a million individuals per year worldwide. However, its pathogenesis remains largely elusive, as only a small proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease either during primary infection or during reactivation from latency or secondary infection. Subacute, hematogenous, and extrapulmonary disease tends to be more frequent in infants, children, and teenagers than in adults. Life-threatening primary TB of childhood can result from known acquired or inherited immunodeficiencies, although the vast majority of cases remain unexplained. We review here the conditions conferring a predisposition to childhood clinical diseases caused by mycobacteria, including not only M.tb but also weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. Infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria are much rarer than TB, but the inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying these infections are much better known. Their study has also provided genetic and immunological insights into childhood TB, as illustrated by the discovery of single-gene inborn errors of IFN-? immunity underlying severe cases of TB. Novel findings are expected from ongoing and future human genetic studies of childhood TB in countries that combine a high proportion of consanguineous marriages, a high incidence of TB, and an excellent clinical care, such as Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. PMID:25703555

  4. Inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying tuberculosis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; El-Baghdadi, Jamila; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Parvaneh, Nima; Azbaoui, Safaa El; Agader, Aomar; Hassani, Amal; Hafidi, Naima El; Mrani, Nidal Alaoui; Jouhadi, Zineb; Ailal, Fatima; Najib, Jilali; Reisli, Ismail; Zamani, Adil; Yosunkaya, Sebnem; Gulle-Girit, Saniye; Yildiran, Alisan; Cipe, Funda Erol; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Metin, Ayse; Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Dogu, Figen; Karaca, Neslihan; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil; Keser-Emiroglu, Melike; Somer, Ayper; Tanir, Gonul; Aytekin, Caner; Adimi, Parisa; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Mamishi, Setareh; Bousfiha, Aziz; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and a few related mycobacteria, is a devastating disease, killing more than a million individuals per year worldwide. However, its pathogenesis remains largely elusive, as only a small proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease either during primary infection or during reactivation from latency or secondary infection. Subacute, hematogenous, and extrapulmonary disease tends to be more frequent in infants, children, and teenagers than in adults. Life-threatening primary TB of childhood can result from known acquired or inherited immunodeficiencies, although the vast majority of cases remain unexplained. We review here the conditions conferring a predisposition to childhood clinical diseases caused by mycobacteria, including not only M.tb but also weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. Infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria are much rarer than TB, but the inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying these infections are much better known. Their study has also provided genetic and immunological insights into childhood TB, as illustrated by the discovery of single-gene inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlying severe cases of TB. Novel findings are expected from ongoing and future human genetic studies of childhood TB in countries that combine a high proportion of consanguineous marriages, a high incidence of TB, and an excellent clinical care, such as Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. PMID:25703555

  5. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVagm Dynamics in African Green Monkeys▿

    PubMed Central

    Pandrea, Ivona; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Gautam, Rajeev; Gaufin, Thaidra; Pattison, Melissa; Barnes, Mary; Monjure, Christopher; Stoulig, Crystal; Dufour, Jason; Cyprian, Wayne; Silvestri, Guido; Miller, Michael D.; Perelson, Alan S.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the lack of disease progression in natural simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) hosts are still poorly understood. To test the hypothesis that SIV-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) avoid AIDS due to virus replication occurring in long-lived infected cells, we infected six animals with SIVagm and treated them with potent antiretroviral therapy [ART; 9-R-(2-phosphonomethoxypropyl) adenine (tenofovir) and beta-2,3-dideoxy-3-thia-5-fluorocytidine (emtricitabine)]. All AGMs showed a rapid decay of plasma viremia that became undetectable 36 h after ART initiation. A significant decrease of viral load was observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestine. Mathematical modeling of viremia decay post-ART indicates a half-life of productively infected cells ranging from 4 to 9.5 h, i.e., faster than previously reported for human immunodeficiency virus and SIV. ART induced a slight but significant increase in peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts but no significant changes in CD4+ T-cell levels in lymph nodes and intestine. Similarly, ART did not significantly change the levels of cell proliferation, activation, and apoptosis, already low in AGMs chronically infected with SIVagm. Collectively, these results indicate that, in SIVagm-infected AGMs, the bulk of virus replication is sustained by short-lived cells; therefore, differences in disease outcome between SIVmac infection of macaques and SIVagm infection of AGMs are unlikely due to intrinsic differences in the in vivo cytopathicities between the two viruses. PMID:18216122

  6. Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Marc; Masur, Henry; Kovacs, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    The presentation of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in previously healthy men having sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco and New York City in 1981 heralded the beginning of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic. Despite a decreasing incidence of PCP among patients with HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) since the advent of combination antiretroviral therapy in the mid-1990s, PCP remains one of the most common AIDS-defining opportunistic infections in the United States and Western Europe. Newer molecular diagnostic tests in conjunction with standard immunofluorescent or colorimetric tests have allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis. Although several effective oral and intravenous therapies exist to treat PCP, mortality rates in HIV-infected individuals remain unacceptably high, especially in those with advanced AIDS. The identification of specific mutations in Pneumocystis genes targeted by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has raised concerns about the development of resistance to the drug of choice and may ultimately lead to greater utilization of alternative therapies to treat PCP in the future. PMID:26974301

  7. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Coogan, Maeve M.; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  8. When less is more: primary immunodeficiency with an autoinflammatory kick

    PubMed Central

    Giannelou, Angeliki; Zhou, Qing; Kastner, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Next-generation sequencing is revolutionizing the molecular taxonomy of human disease. Recent studies of patients with unexplained autoinflammatory disorders reveal germline genetic mutations that target important regulators of innate immunity. Recent findings Whole-exome analyses of previously undiagnosed patients have catalyzed the recognition of two new disease genes. First, a phenotypic spectrum, including livedo racemosa, fever with early-onset stroke, polyarteritis nodosa, and Sneddon syndrome, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in cat eye syndrome chromosome region, candidate 1 (CECR1), encoding adenosine deaminase 2. Adenosine deaminase 2 is a secreted protein expressed primarily in myeloid cells, and a regulator of macrophage differentiation and endothelial development. Disease-associated mutations impair anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage differentiation. Second, patients presenting with cold-induced urticaria, granulomatous rash, autoantibodies, and common variable immunodeficiency, or with blistering skin lesions, bronchiolitis, enterocolitis, ocular inflammation, and mild immunodeficiency harbor distinct mutations in phospholipase C?2, encoding a signaling molecule expressed in natural killer cells, mast cells, and B lymphocytes. These mutations inhibit the function of a phospholipase C?2 autoinhibitory domain, causing increased or constitutive signaling. Summary These findings underscore the power of next-generation sequencing, demonstrating how the primary deficiency of key molecular regulators or even regulatory motifs may lead to autoinflammation, and suggesting a possible role for cat eye syndrome chromosome region, candidate 1 and phospholipase C?2 in common diseases. PMID:25337682

  9. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: manifestations in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Urízar, José Manuel; Echebarría-Goicouría, María Angeles; Eguía-del-Valle, Asier

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a pandemic disease characterised by impairment of the immune system; the main parameter is a progressive decline in the number of CD4 lymphocytes. This circumstance paves the way for opportunistic infections and the development of neoplastic processes that can lead the patient to a state known as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and ultimately, results in death. The incorporation of treatment based on a cocktail of different active drugs (highly active antiretroviral therapy) has made it possible to drastically change the panorama of the disease in developed nations; improving quality of life for the patient and delaying the progression of the disease. The oral manifestations of HIV infection have been and continue to be an important component of the disease from the very first descriptions and are indicative of progression. At some point in the course of the disease, nine out of every ten patients will present oral manifestations and, on occasion, these symptoms will be the first sign of the syndrome. It is essential that oral healthcare professionals recognize the hallmarks of the illness. In developed countries, the emergence of new therapies has made it possible to significantly reduce immune deficiency-related oral manifestations, both in terms of frequency, as well as severity. This review analyses the most important oral lesions associated with HIV infection and the current state of affairs in this regard. PMID:15580133

  10. Oral lesions: A true clinical indicator in human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Saini, Rajiv

    2011-07-01

    From the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic over 20 years ago (since the appearance of the first cases of contamination by the HIV virus in the 1980s), more than 60 million people have become infected and more than 20 million people have died. An estimated 15,000 new infections occur each day, with more than 95% of these in developing countries. The distinctive characteristic in the pathogenesis of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is that the primary target cell for HIV is immune cells bearing the CD4 marker at their surface, and the CD4 cell count and viral load have been used lately as the most important laboratory parameters to evaluate the evolution of the disease. Oral lesions are common (30-80%) in patients infected by the HIV virus and may indicate an impairment in the patient's general health status and, consequently, a poor prognosis. Oral manifestations can suggest decreased cluster-differentiated (CD4+) T cell count and increased viral load, which might also aid in diagnosis, progression, and prognosis of the disease. At the tertiary level of oral care, a dentist should be available to make definitive diagnoses of oral lesions and provide professional oral services such as prophylaxis, restorations, biopsies, and the prescription of appropriate medication. PMID:22346226

  11. Oral lesions in infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Coogan, Maeve M; Greenspan, John; Challacombe, Stephen J

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the importance of oral lesions as indicators of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and as predictors of progression of HIV disease to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Oral manifestations are among the earliest and most important indicators of infection with HIV. Seven cardinal lesions, oral candidiasis, hairy leukoplakia, Kaposi sarcoma, linear gingival erythema, necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are strongly associated with HIV infection, have been identified and internationally calibrated, and are seen in both developed and developing countries. They may provide a strong indication of HIV infection and be present in the majority of HIV-infected people. Antiretroviral therapy may affect the prevalence of HIV-related lesions. The presence of oral lesions can have a significant impact on health-related quality of life. Oral health is strongly associated with physical and mental health and there are significant increases in oral health needs in people with HIV infection, especially in children, and in adults particularly in relation to periodontal diseases. International collaboration is needed to ensure that oral aspects of HIV disease are taken into account in medical programmes and to integrate oral health care with the general care of the patient. It is important that all health care workers receive education and training on the relevance of oral health needs and the use of oral lesions as surrogate markers in HIV infection. PMID:16211162

  12. Gastrointestinal opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    PubMed

    Al Anazi, Awadh R

    2009-04-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) opportunistic infections (OIs) are commonly encountered at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. In view of the suppressive nature of the virus and the direct contact with the environment, the GI tract is readily accessible and is a common site for clinical expression of HIV. The subject is presented based on information obtained by electronic searches of peer-reviewed articles in medical journals, Cochrane reviews and PubMed sources. The spectrum of GI OIs ranges from oral lesions of Candidiasis, various lesions of viral infections, hepatobiliary lesions, pancreatitis and anorectal lesions. The manifestations of the disease depend on the level of immunosuppression, as determined by the CD4 counts. The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has altered the pattern of presentation, resorting mainly to features of antimicrobial-associated colitis and side effects of antiretroviral drugs. The diagnosis of GI OIs in HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients is usually straightforward. However, subtle presentations require that the physicians should have a high index of suspicion when given the setting of HIV infection. PMID:19568572

  13. Cernunnos/XLF Deficiency: A Syndromic Primary Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Cipe, Funda Erol; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Babayigit Hocaoglu, Arzu; Kilic, Merve; Kaya, Gul Demet; Yilmaz Gulec, Elif

    2014-01-01

    Artemis, DNA ligase IV, DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit, and Cernunnos/XLF genes in nonhomologous end joining pathways of DNA repair mechanisms have been identified as responsible for radiosensitive SCID. Here, we present a 3-year-old girl patient with severe growth retardation, bird-like face, recurrent perianal abscess, pancytopenia, and polydactyly. Firstly, she was thought as Fanconi anemia and spontaneous DNA breaks were seen on chromosomal analysis. After that DEB test was found to be normal and Fanconi anemia was excluded. Because of that she had low IgG and IgA levels, normal IgM level, and absence of B cells in peripheral blood; she was considered as primary immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome. A mutation in NBS1 gene was not found; then Cernunnos/XLF deficiency was investigated due to clinical similarities with previously reported cases. Homozygous mutation in Cernunnos/XLF gene (NHEJ1) was identified. She is now on regular IVIG prophylaxis and has no new infection. Fully matched donor screening is in progress for bone marrow transplantation which is curative treatment of the disease. In conclusion, the patients with microcephaly, bird-like face, and severe growth retardation should be evaluated for hypogammaglobulinemia and primary immunodeficiency diseases. PMID:24511403

  14. Cernunnos/XLF Deficiency: A Syndromic Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Çipe, Funda Erol; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Babayigit Hocaoglu, Arzu; Kilic, Merve; Kaya, Gul Demet; Yilmaz Gulec, Elif

    2014-01-01

    Artemis, DNA ligase IV, DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit, and Cernunnos/XLF genes in nonhomologous end joining pathways of DNA repair mechanisms have been identified as responsible for radiosensitive SCID. Here, we present a 3-year-old girl patient with severe growth retardation, bird-like face, recurrent perianal abscess, pancytopenia, and polydactyly. Firstly, she was thought as Fanconi anemia and spontaneous DNA breaks were seen on chromosomal analysis. After that DEB test was found to be normal and Fanconi anemia was excluded. Because of that she had low IgG and IgA levels, normal IgM level, and absence of B cells in peripheral blood; she was considered as primary immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome. A mutation in NBS1 gene was not found; then Cernunnos/XLF deficiency was investigated due to clinical similarities with previously reported cases. Homozygous mutation in Cernunnos/XLF gene (NHEJ1) was identified. She is now on regular IVIG prophylaxis and has no new infection. Fully matched donor screening is in progress for bone marrow transplantation which is curative treatment of the disease. In conclusion, the patients with microcephaly, bird-like face, and severe growth retardation should be evaluated for hypogammaglobulinemia and primary immunodeficiency diseases. PMID:24511403

  15. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-05-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  16. Sarcoidosis and common variable immunodeficiency: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Verbsky, James W; Routes, John M

    2014-06-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency that is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and poor/absent specific antibody production. Granulomatous and lymphocytic interstitial lung disease (GLILD) is an increasingly recognized complication of CVID, occurring in 10 to 20% of patients. GLILD is characterized by non-necrotizing granuloma, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis and follicular bronchiolitis-histological patterns that are typically present in the same biopsy. GLILD is a multisystem disease and is frequently accompanied by diffuse adenopathy, splenomegaly, and extrapulmonary granulomatous disease most commonly in the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and gastrointestinal tract. The presence of noncaseating granuloma in the lung along with some of the extrapulmonary features of GLILD may lead to an incorrect diagnosis of sarcoidosis. However, GLILD differs from sarcoidosis in several important ways including mode of presentation, extrapulmonary manifestations, radiographic abnormalities on high-resolution computed tomography scan of the chest, and laboratory features (serum immunoglobulins, bronchoalveolar lavage, and histopathology). The misdiagnosis of sarcoidosis in a patient with CVID and GLILD can lead to inappropriate treatment and increase the morbidity and mortality of the disorder. PMID:25007085

  17. Clinical and Immunological Features of Common Variable Immunodeficiency in China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lian-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chuan; Liu, Xin-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background: Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is one of the most common symptomatic primary immunodeficiency syndromes. The purpose of this article was to broaden our knowledge about CVID for better diagnosis and treatment. Methods: Clinical and immunological features of 40 Chinese patients with CVID were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The median age at onset was 11-year-old (range 4–51 years). The median age at diagnosis was 14.5-year-old (range 5–66 years). The average time of delay in diagnosis was 5.3 years (range 1–41 years). The most common main complaint was fever due to infections (35 cases, 87.5%). Pneumonia (28 cases, 70%) was the most common type of infections. Bronchiectasis was present in 6 patients (15%). Autoimmune disease was detected in 6 cases of CVID, and malignancy in 2 cases. The median total serum levels of IgG, IgA, and IgM at diagnosis were 1.07 g/L, 0.07 g/L, and 0.28 g/L, respectively. The percentages of CD3−/CD10+ B-cells were 1%–3.14%. Conclusions: Infection is the most frequent presentation of CVID. Patients with unexplainable infections should receive further examination including serum immunoglobulin (Ig) and lymphocyte subset analysis. Regular and sufficient substitution with Ig is recommended. PMID:25635425

  18. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pakfetrat, Atessa; Falaki, Farnaz; Delavarian, Zahra; Dalirsani, Zohreh; Sanatkhani, Majid; Zabihi Marani, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral lesions are among the earliest clinical manifestations of human immunodeficiency (HIV) infection and are important in early diagnosis and for monitoring the progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral lesions and their relationship with a number of factors in HIV/AIDS patients attending an HIV center. Materials and Methods: A total of 110 HIV-positive patients were examined to investigate the prevalence of oral lesions according to the criteria established by the European Community Clearing House on Oral Problems Related to HIV Infection. An independent T-test was used for correlation of oral lesions with CD4+ count and a χ2 test was used for analysis of the relationship of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), sexual contact, route of transmission, history of drug abuse, and history of incarceration. Results: Most of the cases were male patients (82.7%). The mean age across all participants was 36.2±8.1 years. Rampant carries, severe periodontitis and oral candidiasis were the most notable oral lesions. Oral lesions were more prevalent in patients between 26–35 years of age. There was a significant difference between patients with and without pseudomembranous candidiasis and angular cheilitis according to mean level of CD4+. Conclusion: The most common oral presentations were severe periodontitis, pseudomembranous candidiasis and xerostomia. PMID:25745611

  19. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  20. Snake venom hemorrhagins: neutralization by commercial antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Mebs, D; Pohlmann, S; Von Tenspolde, W

    1988-01-01

    One monovalent (habu-antivenom) and five polyvalent antivenoms (Crotalidae; Orient, North, Central and South Africa) were tested for their ability to neutralize the hemorrhagic activity of 12 snake venoms (Agkistrodon, Bothrops, Crotalus, Sistrurus, Trimeresurus, Bitis, Echis spp.) when mixed prior to injection into the hind leg of mice. Considerable cross-neutralization was observed: antivenoms prepared against African snake venoms were equally or more potent in neutralizing the hemorrhagic activity of Crotalidae venoms. The same applies to Crotalidae antivenom which neutralized the activity of African snake venoms. Anti-hemorrhagic antibodies were isolated from a polyvalent antivenom by affinity chromatography using purified hemorrhagins from Bitis arietans and Crotalus adamanteus venom as ligands. These antibodies neutralized the activity of both hemorrhagins indicating common antigenic determinants in these molecules. PMID:2460973

  1. Toward Effective HIV Vaccination INDUCTION OF BINARY EPITOPE REACTIVE ANTIBODIES WITH BROAD HIV NEUTRALIZING ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; Nitti, Giovanni; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Jin, Lei; Symersky, Jindrich; Boivin, Stephane; Sienczyk, Marcin; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl V.; Paul, Sudhir

    2009-11-23

    We describe murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised by immunization with an electrophilic gp120 analog (E-gp120) expressing the rare ability to neutralize genetically heterologous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains. Unlike gp120, E-gp120 formed covalent oligomers. The reactivity of gp120 and E-gp120 with mAbs to reference neutralizing epitopes was markedly different, indicating their divergent structures. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides and electrophilic peptide analogs indicated binary recognition of two distinct gp120 regions by anti-E-gp120 mAbs, the 421-433 and 288-306 peptide regions. Univalent Fab and single chain Fv fragments expressed the ability to recognize both peptides. X-ray crystallography of an anti-E-gp120 Fab fragment revealed two neighboring cavities, the typical antigen-binding cavity formed by the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and another cavity dominated by antibody heavy chain variable (VH) domain framework (FR) residues. Substitution of the FR cavity VH Lys-19 residue by an Ala residue resulted in attenuated binding of the 421-433 region peptide probe. The CDRs and VH FR replacement/silent mutation ratios exceeded the ratio for a random mutation process, suggesting adaptive development of both putative binding sites. All mAbs studied were derived from VH1 family genes, suggesting biased recruitment of the V gene germ line repertoire by E-gp120. The conserved 421-433 region of gp120 is essential for HIV binding to host CD4 receptors. This region is recognized weakly by the FR of antibodies produced without exposure to HIV, but it usually fails to induce adaptive synthesis of neutralizing antibodies. We present models accounting for improved CD4-binding site recognition and broad HIV neutralizing activity of the mAbs, long sought goals in HIV vaccine development.

  2. In vitro infection and type-restricted antibody-mediated neutralization of authentic human papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed

    White, W I; Wilson, S D; Bonnez, W; Rose, R C; Koenig, S; Suzich, J A

    1998-02-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is strongly associated with the development of cervical cancer. Studies of model systems with animal papillomaviruses have demonstrated the importance of neutralizing antibodies in preventing papillomavirus-associated disease. The assessment of neutralizing antibody responses against HPV-16, previously hampered by the lack of a viral source, was enabled by the recent propagation of an HPV-16 stock in xenografted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. HPV-16 infection of an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line was demonstrated by detection of an HPV-16-specific spliced mRNA amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR. Infection was blocked by preincubation of the virus with antiserum generated against HPV-16 virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of the major capsid protein, L1. To examine potential cross-neutralizing activity among the different genital HPV types, rabbit antisera to L1 VLPs corresponding to HPV-6, -11, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, and -45 were assayed for the ability to block the HPV-16 infection of cultured cells. Antiserum raised against HPV-33 L1 VLPs was the only heterologous antiserum which inhibited HPV-16 infection. Thus, a neutralization assay for HPV-16 may help to characterize the components required to compose a broadly efficacious genital HPV vaccine. PMID:9444988

  3. Ultracold Neutral Plasma Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killian, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas, which are created by photoionizing laser cooled atoms near the ionization threshold, have been extensively studied in order to probe strong Coulomb coupling effects, low-energy atomic processes, equilibration, and collective phenomena [1]. The experimental study of collective modes, however, has previously been limited to phenomena involving electrons. By spatially modulating the intensity pattern of the photoionizing laser, we are now able to create controlled density perturbations on the plasma, which enables study of ion collective behavior. Periodic modulation excites ion acoustic waves [2]. We have also created two distinct plasmas that stream into each other. In the hydrodynamic regime, the central gap between the two plasmas splits into two density ``holes'' that propagate away from the plasma center at the ion acoustic velocity. At lower densities and higher particle velocities, plasmas are less collisional, and we observe kinetic effects such as plasma streams penetrating each other, with a penetration depth that reflects the ion stopping power. This general technique for sculpting the density opens many new possibilities, such as investigation of non-linear phenomena, instabilities, and shock waves in the ultracold regime, and determination of the effects of strong coupling on dispersion relations. The low temperature, small size, plasma expansion, and strongly coupled nature of ultracold plasmas make these studies fundamentally interesting. They may also shed light on similar phenomena in high energy density, laser-produced plasmas that can be near the strongly coupled regime. [4pt] [1] T. C. Killian, T. Pattard, Thomas Pohl, and J. M. Rost, Phys. Rep., 449, 77 (2007).[0pt] [2] J. Castro, P. McQuillen, and T. C. Killian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 065004 (2010).

  4. Polysaccharide antibody responses are impaired post bone marrow transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency, but not other primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Slatter, M A; Bhattacharya, A; Flood, T J; Spickett, G P; Cant, A J; Abinun, M; Gennery, A R

    2003-07-01

    Established treatment of severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) and other primary immunodeficiencies (PID) is bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Normal lymphocyte numbers and protein antigen responses are present within 2 years of BMT, polysaccharide antibody responses appear last. Streptococcus pneumoniae infection causes significant morbidity and mortality post-BMT. Previous studies have shown good protein antigen responses post-BMT for SCID and PID, but had not examined the polysaccharide responses. We retrospectively analysed pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS) responses in our patient series. In total, 22 SCID and 12 non-SCID PID were evaluated, all >2 years post BMT: 17 SCID, 12 PID received chemotherapy conditioning; 17 SCID, three PID had T-cell depleted (TCD) BMT, others had nonconditioned whole marrow BMT. All had normal Haemophilus influenza B and tetanus antibody responses. Of 22 SCID, 13 vs 11/12 PID responded to PPS vaccine (P=0.05). There was no association with donor age, GvHD, B-cell chimerism, or IgG2 level. Fewer TCD marrow recipients responded to PPS (P=0.04). Analysis of the SCID group showed no association of PPS response with type of marrow received. This is the first study to specifically examine PPS antibody responses following SCID and PID BMT. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine antibody responses should be examined in these children. PMID:12838289

  5. South Asian Consensus Guidelines for the rational management of diabetes in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Raza, Syed Abbas; Bantwal, Ganpathy; Baruah, Manash P.; Latt, Tint Swe; Shrestha, Dina; John, Mathew; Katulanda, Prasad; Somasundaram, Noel; Sahay, Rakesh; Pathan, Faruque

    2011-01-01

    As newer methods of management are made available, and accessible, survival rates with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are increasing. This means that chronic, metabolic complications of HIV are becoming more frequent in clinical practice, as acute morbidity is controlled. Management of HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is gradually expanding to include these chronic and metabolic complications of the disease, and the adverse effects associated with its treatments, including diabetes. Unfortunately, no guidelines are available to help the medical practitioners choose appropriate therapy for patients with these conditions. The aim of the South Asian Consensus Guidelines is to provide evidence-based recommendations to assist healthcare providers in the rational management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with HIV. The development of these guidelines used systematic reviews of available evidence to form its key recommendations. These guidelines and associated review of literature represent a compilation of available knowledge regarding rational management of diabetes in HIV. Patients of diabetes with concomitant HIV infection are managed optimally with insulin therapy and judicious use of highly active antiretroviral therapy with suitable alternatives is also recommended. These guidelines should prove helpful to physicians, not only in South Asia, but also across the globe, while managing patients with coexistent HIV and diabetes. PMID:22028994

  6. Rapid Tests and the Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Jnior, Walter Lins; Ramos de Arajo, Paulo Srgio; Dias de Andrade, Luiz; Aguiar Dos Santos, Ana Maria; Lopes da Silva, Maria Almerice; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Medeiros, Zulma

    2015-11-01

    After the emergence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the number of visceral leishmaniasis (VL)-HIV/AIDS coinfections has increased worldwide. Herein, we assessed the usefulness of an rK39-based immunochromatographic test (rK39 ICT) (DiaMed-IT LEISH(); DiaMed AG, Cressier-sur-Morat, Switzerland) and a latex agglutination test (KAtex; Kalon Biological, Guildford, United Kingdom) for urinary antigen detection to diagnose VL in 15 HIV/AIDS patients from northeastern Brazil. VL diagnosis was based on clinical findings, cytology, serology, parasite DNA, and/or urinary antigen detection. VL was confirmed in seven out of 15 HIV/AIDS patients. Only three patients were positive in bone marrow cytology, three patients were conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive, while six were real-time PCR positive. All patients were direct agglutination test (DAT) (Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) positive; of these, four were positive by rK39 ICT and five by KAtex. Large-scale studies are needed to validate the use of the KAtex in the national public health laboratory network in Brazil, aiming at improving the diagnosis of VL in HIV/AIDS patients in this country. PMID:26416105

  7. Gas Flow in the Neutralization Region of EAST Neutral Beam Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jiang-Long; Hu, Chun-Dong; Liang, Li-Zhen; Xie, Yuan-Lai

    2013-04-01

    The gas flow in the neutralization region affects the neutralization efficiency as well as the beam transition efficiency of whole neutral beam injector, which will be applied as a high power auxiliary heating and non-inductive current driver system for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The neutralization region of EAST neutral beam injector includes not only the gas cell neutralizer in traditional sense, but also part of the ion source downstream the electrode grid, the gate valve, and the transitional piping and fitting. The gas flow in this neutralization region has been modeled and researched using an adjusted Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code to understand the formation mechanism of gas target thickness, which determines the neutralization efficiency. This paper presents the steady-state, viscous and transition region flowfields, the gas density distribution and the various centerline profiles including Knudsen number, temperature, pressure and axial velocity by injected the deuterium gas from the arc chamber and neutralizer, respectively. The target thickness in the neutralization region as a function of gas inlet quantity is also given in the absence of beam for future operation of EAST neutral beam injector.

  8. Expression and characterization of genetically engineered human immunodeficiency virus-like particles containing modified envelope glycoproteins: implications for development of a cross-protective AIDS vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Rovinski, B; Haynes, J R; Cao, S X; James, O; Sia, C; Zolla-Pazner, S; Matthews, T J; Klein, M H

    1992-01-01

    Noninfectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viruslike particles containing chimeric envelope glycoproteins were expressed in mammalian cells by using inducible promoters. We engineered four expression vectors in which a synthetic oligomer encoding gp120 residues 306 to 328 (amino acids YNKRKRIHIGP GRAFYTTKNIIG) from the V3 loop of the MN viral isolate was inserted at various positions within the endogenous HIV-1LAI env gene. Expression studies revealed that insertion of the heterologous V3(MN) loop segment at two different locations within the conserved region 2 (C2) of gp120, either 173 or 242 residues away from the N terminus of the mature subunit, resulted in the secretion of fully assembled HIV-like particles containing chimeric LAI/MN envelope glycoproteins. Both V3 loop epitopes were recognized by loop-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, insertion of the V3(MN) loop segment into other regions of gp120 led to the production of envelope-deficient viruslike particles. Immunization with HIV-like particles containing chimeric envelope proteins induced specific antibody responses against both the autologous and heterologous V3 loop epitopes, including cross-neutralizing antibodies against the HIV-1LAI and HIV-1MN isolates. This study, therefore, demonstrates the feasibility of genetically engineering optimized HIV-like particles capable of eliciting cross-neutralizing antibodies. Images PMID:1602531

  9. Breakthrough of SIV strain smE660 challenge in SIV strain mac239-vaccinated rhesus macaques despite potent autologous neutralizing antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Samantha L.; Kilgore, Katie M.; Smith, S. Abigail; Reddy, Sharmila; Hunter, Eric; Robinson, Harriet L.; Silvestri, Guido; Amara, Rama R.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the correlates of immunological protection from human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus infection remain incompletely understood, it is generally believed that medium to high titers of serum neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against the challenge virus will prevent infection. This paradigm is based on a series of studies in which passive transfer of HIV-specific nAbs protected rhesus macaques (RMs) from subsequent mucosal challenge with a chimeric human/simian immunodeficiency virus. However, it is unknown whether nAb titers define protection in the setting of active immunization. Here we determined serum nAb titers against breakthrough transmitted/founder (T/F) SIVsmE660-derived envelope glycoprotein (Env) variants from 14 RMs immunized with SIVmac239-based DNA-prime/modified vaccinia virus Ankara-boost vaccine regimens that included GM-CSF or CD40L adjuvants and conferred significant but incomplete protection against repeated low-dose intrarectal challenge. A single Env variant established infection in all RMs except one, with no identifiable genetic signature associated with vaccination breakthrough compared with T/F Envs from four unvaccinated monkeys. Breakthrough T/F Env pseudoviruses were potently neutralized in vitro by heterologous pooled serum from chronically SIVsmE660-infected monkeys at IC50 titers exceeding 1:1,000,000. Remarkably, the T/F Env pseudoviruses from 13 of 14 monkeys were also susceptible to neutralization by autologous prechallenge serum at in vitro IC50 titers ranging from 1:742–1:10,832. These titers were similar to those observed in vaccinated RMs that remained uninfected. These data suggest that the relationship between serum nAb titers and protection from mucosal SIV challenge in the setting of active immunization is more complex than previously recognized, warranting further studies into the balance between immune activation, target cell availability, and protective antibody responses. PMID:26261312

  10. Neutral particle beams for space defense

    SciTech Connect

    Botwin, R.; Favale, A.

    1987-01-01

    Neutral particle beam (NPB) weapons direct highly focused high energy streams of electrically neutral atomic particles traveling at nearly the speed of light, escaping deflection from the earth's magnetic field and acting on the subatomic structure of a target, destroying it from within. The beam's brief contact with a reentry vehicle produces a nuclear reaction in the latter that yields particle emissions; by detecting and identifying those particles, it becomes possible to effectively distinguish warheads from decoys. Attention is given to the NPB program roles to be played by the Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket and Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment projects.

  11. Fast Neutral Pressure Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; T. Provost; R. Gernhardt; T.R. Jarboe; M.G. Bell

    2002-08-06

    Several fast neutral pressure gauges have been installed on NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] to measure the vessel and divertor pressure during inductive and coaxial helicity injected (CHI) plasma operations. Modified, PDX [Poloidal Divertor Experiment]-type Penning gauges have been installed on the upper and lower divertors. Neutral pressure measurements during plasma operations from these and from two shielded fast Micro ion gauges at different toroidal locations on the vessel mid-plane are described. A new unshielded ion gauge, referred to as the In-vessel Neutral Pressure (INP) gauge is under development.

  12. Viral genetic determinants of T-cell killing and immunodeficiency disease induction by the feline leukemia virus FeLV-FAIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, P R; Quackenbush, S L; Gallo, M V; deNoronha, C M; Overbaugh, J; Hoover, E A; Mullins, J I

    1991-01-01

    Within the fatal immunodeficiency disease-inducing strain of feline leukemia virus, FeLV-FAIDS, are viruses which range in pathogenicity from minimally (clone 61E is the prototype) to acutely pathogenic, most of the latter of which are also replication defective (clone 61C is the prototype). Mixtures of 61E and 61C virus and chimeras generated between them, but not 61E alone, killed feline T cells. T-cell killing depended on changes within a 7-amino-acid region near the C terminus of the gp70 env gene or was achieved independently by changes within a 109-amino-acid region encompassing the N terminus of gp70. The carboxy-terminal change was also sufficient for induction of fatal immunodeficiency disease in cats. Other changes within the 61C gp70 gene enhanced T-cell killing, as did changes in the long terminal repeat, the latter of which also enhanced virus replication. T-cell killing correlated with high levels of intracellular unintegrated and proviral DNA, all of which were blocked by treatment of infected cells with sera from 61C-immune cats or with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. These findings indicate that T-cell killing is a consequence of superinfection and that the mutations in env critical to pathogenicity of the immunosuppressive variant result in a failure to establish superinfection interference in infected cells. Images PMID:1649341

  13. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Stephen Luke; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-09-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL and is comparable to the result from CDF in the same channel which uses approximately twice the integrated luminosity.

  14. Novel assay to detect increased level of neutralizing anti-interferon gamma autoantibodies in non-tuberculous mycobacterial patients.

    PubMed

    Shima, Kenjiro; Sakagami, Takuro; Tanabe, Yoshinari; Aoki, Nobumasa; Moro, Hiroshi; Koya, Toshiyuki; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Takashi; Suzuki, Ei-ichi; Narita, Ichiei

    2014-01-01

    Subjects exposed to non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) species do not always develop an active disease, which likely reflects underlying host susceptibility factors. Recent reports have shown that anti interferon gamma (IFN-γ) neutralizing autoantibodies (IFN-γ Ab) are associated with the development of disseminated NTM in patients without known evidence of immunodeficiency. The purpose of this study is to establish the screening method if subjects have IFN-γ Ab. Whole blood was obtained from patients with disseminated NTM, those with pulmonary NTM, and healthy controls. The neutralizing capacity to IFN-γ activity was assessed as an inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activation of Transcription 1 (STAT-1) phosphorylation in leukocyte after stimulation with exogenous IFN-γ by flow cytometer. The strength of phosphorylation was described as STAT1 phosphorylation index. Antigen capture assay was performed to measure the relative titer of Immunoglobulin-G fraction of IFN-γ Ab. STAT1 phosphorylation by IFN-γ was significantly inhibited in the leukocytes from patients with disseminated NTM compared to that in healthy subjects, while this inhibition was not observed in patients with pulmonary NTM. All subjects with inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation had high titer of Immunoglobulin-G that reacted with IFN-γ in the antigen capture assay. The measurement of STAT1 phosphorylation index in whole blood leukocytes and antigen capture assay are simple and useful method for detection of anti-IFN-γ neutralizing autoantibodies, and is valuable in the pathophysiological diagnosis of disseminated NTM patients without obvious immunodeficiency. PMID:24462426

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Patients With Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    AGARWAL, SHRADHA; MAYER, LLOYD

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders such as chronic or acute diarrhea, malabsorption, abdominal pain, and inflammatory bowel diseases can indicate immune deficiency. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest lymphoid organ in the body, so it is not surprising that intestinal diseases are common among immunodeficient patients. Gastroenterologists therefore must be able to diagnose and treat patients with primary immunodeficiency. Immune-related gastrointestinal diseases can be classified as those that develop primarily via autoimmunity, infection, an inflammatory response, or malignancy. Immunodeficient and immunocompetent patients with gastrointestinal diseases present with similar symptoms. However, intestinal biopsy specimens from immunodeficient patients often have distinct histologic features, and these patients often fail to respond to conventional therapies. Therefore, early recognition of symptoms and referral to an immunologist for a basic immune evaluation is required to select appropriate treatments. Therapies for primary immunodeficiency comprise immunoglobulin replacement, antibiotics, and, in severe cases, bone marrow transplantation. Treatment of immunodeficient patients with concomitant gastrointestinal disease can be challenging, and therapy with immunomodulators often is required for severe disease. This review aims to guide gastroenterologists in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with primary immunodeficiency. PMID:23501398

  16. HIV-specific humoral and cellular immunity in rabbits vaccinated with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus-like gag-env particles

    SciTech Connect

    Haffar, O.K.; Smithgall, M.D.; Moran, P.A.; Travis, B.M.; Zarling, J.M.; Hu, S.L. )

    1991-08-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-like gag-env particles produced in mammalian cells were inoculated into two New Zealand white rabbits. In parallel, two control rabbits were inoculated with the homologous HIV-1 virions inactivated by ultraviolet light (uv) and psoralen treatments. The humoral and cellular immune responses to HIV-1 were evaluated for both groups of animals. Recombinant particles elicited humoral immunity that was specific for all the viral structural proteins. The antibodies recognized both denatured and nondenatured proteins. Moreover, the sera neutralized the in vitro infectivity of the homologous virus in CEM cells. Importantly, the recombinant particles also generated a T helper response by priming with the HIV proteins. Similar results were observed with inactivated virus immunization. Therefore, the authors results suggest that the recombinant HIV-like particles elicit functional humoral immunity as well as cellular immunity and represent a novel vaccine candidate for AIDS.

  17. Implication of the Lymphocyte-Specific Nuclear Body Protein Sp140 in an Innate Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Navid; Millette, Robert; Platt, Emily J.; Marin, Mariana; Kozak, Susan L.; Bloch, Donald B.; Kabat, David

    2002-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizes an unidentified antiviral pathway that occurs only in nonpermissive (NP) cells. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human lymphocyte cDNA library, we identified several potential Vif partners. One, the nuclear body protein Sp140, was found specifically in all NP cells (n = 12 cell lines tested; P ≤ 0.001), and HIV-1 infection induced its partial dispersal from nuclear bodies into cytosolic colocalization with Vif. Our results implicate Sp140 in a response to HIV-1 that may be related to or coordinated with the pathway that inactivates HIV-1 lacking vif. PMID:12368356

  18. Il2rg gene-targeted severe combined immunodeficiency pigs.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Iwamoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoriko; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Misae; Mikawa, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Aoki, Yuki; Najima, Yuho; Takagi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Nahoko; Suzuki, Emi; Kubo, Masanori; Mimuro, Jun; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Madoiwa, Seiji; Sakata, Yoichi; Perry, Anthony C F; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Onishi, Akira

    2012-06-14

    A porcine model of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) promises to facilitate human cancer studies, the humanization of tissue for xenotransplantation, and the evaluation of stem cells for clinical therapy, but SCID pigs have not been described. We report here the generation and preliminary evaluation of a porcine SCID model. Fibroblasts containing a targeted disruption of the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene, Il2rg, were used as donors to generate cloned pigs by serial nuclear transfer. Germline transmission of the Il2rg deletion produced healthy Il2rg(+/-) females, while Il2rg(-/Y) males were athymic and exhibited markedly impaired immunoglobulin and T and NK cell production, robustly recapitulating human SCID. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, donor cells stably integrated in Il2rg(-/Y) heterozygotes and reconstituted the Il2rg(-/Y) lymphoid lineage. The SCID pigs described here represent a step toward the comprehensive evaluation of preclinical cellular regenerative strategies. PMID:22704516

  19. Practice parameter for the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Francisco A; Khan, David A; Ballas, Zuhair K; Chinen, Javier; Frank, Michael M; Hsu, Joyce T; Keller, Michael; Kobrynski, Lisa J; Komarow, Hirsh D; Mazer, Bruce; Nelson, Robert P; Orange, Jordan S; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Sorensen, Ricardo U; Verbsky, James W; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Lang, David; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Randolph, Christopher R; Schuller, Diane; Spector, Sheldon L; Tilles, Stephen; Wallace, Dana

    2015-11-01

    The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing the "Practice parameter for the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion. PMID:26371839

  20. FELINE IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (FIV) IN WILD PALLAS CATS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Meredith A.; Munkhtsog, Bariushaa; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Ross, Steve; Sellers, Rani; Fine, Amanda E.; Swanson, William F.; Roelke, Melody E.; OBrien1, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a feline lentivirus related to HIV, causes immune dysfunction in domestic and wild cats. The Pallas cat is the only species from Asia known to harbor a species-specific strain of FIV designated FIVOma in natural populations. Here, a 25% seroprevalence of FIV is reported from 28 wild Mongolian Pallas cats sampled from 2000-2008. Phylogenetic analysis of proviral RT-Pol from eight FIVOma isolates from Mongolia, Russia, China and Kazakhstan reveals a unique monophyletic lineage of the virus within the Pallas cat population, most closely related to the African cheetah and leopard FIV strains. Histopathological examination of lymph node and spleen from infected and uninfected Pallas cats suggests that FIVOma causes immune depletion in its native host. PMID:19926144

  1. Partial central diabetes insipidus in patient with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Megías, Marta Cano; Matei, Ana Maria; Gonzalez Albarran, Olga; Perez Lopez, Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have any autoimmune disease, as concurrent as prior to diagnosis, even during follow-up. In recent years, cases of CVID associated to endocrine autoimmune diseases have been reported. To our knowledge, no cases of CVID with diabetes insipidus has been reported previously. The authors present the case of a 37-year-old male, diagnosed of CVID, who had thirst, polyuria and nocturia for several years. After a water deprivation test and a complete resolution of patient's symptoms with vasopressin (DDAVP) treatment, diagnosis of partial central diabetes insipidus was finally made. Patients diagnosed of CVID could develop water misbalance due to posterior hypophysis autoimmune disorder. A high index of clinical suspicion, an early diagnosis and treatment of these disease could avoid future complications and improve the quality of life of these patients. PMID:22761233

  2. [Oral manifestations in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Delgado Azañero, W; Mosqueda Taylor, A; Gotuzzo Herencia, E; Sánchez, J

    1989-10-01

    This study describes the stomatological findings reported on 20 Peruvian patients infected by the human AIDS virus. Lesions occurring most frequently were: xerostoma (80%), pseudomembranous candidiasis (70%), commissural cheilitis (55%), atrophy of filiform papillae (40%), ulcerative lesions (30%), vellous leucoplasia (25%) and erithematose or atrophic candidiasis (25%). Prevalence of the diverse lesions detected was correlated with the clinical stage of the disease in order to identify those manifestations that could be considered as early signs or precursors of the Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The present article includes a review of the literature related to those clinical, epidemiological and preventive aspects that the dental surgeon must understand if he is to perform diagnosis and treatment on this type of patients. PMID:2701241

  3. Head and neck presentations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, R A; Schneider, K L; Cohen, N L

    1984-05-01

    Since December 1980, over 2,000 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been reported. The charts of 72 patients admitted to the New York University Medical Center with a diagnosis of AIDS were reviewed with particular emphasis on presenting signs, symptoms and laboratory values. Symptoms tended to be non-specific and most often resembled an upper respiratory infection. Over 95% of the patients presented with either diffuse adenopathy, oral or facial lesions consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma, white oral lesions, or anergy. Laboratory findings included leukopenia, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, thrombocytopenia and anemia. The in-hospital mortality rate was 26%. The current status of our knowledge concerning AIDS is reviewed and discussed. The frequency and types of presenting signs and symptoms in the head and neck are reported in order to alert the otolaryngologic community to this entity. PMID:6717222

  4. Head and neck presentations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, R A; Schneider, K L; Cohen, N L

    1985-12-01

    Since December 1980, over 3000 cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been reported. The charts of 102 patients admitted to the New York University Medical Center with a diagnosis of AIDS were reviewed with particular emphasis on presenting signs, symptoms, and laboratory values. Symptoms tended to be nonspecific and most often resembled those of an upper respiratory infection. Over 71% of the patients presented with at least two of the following four signs: diffuse adenopathy, oral and facial lesions consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma, white oral lesions, and anergy. Laboratory findings included leukopenia, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. The in-hospital mortality rate was 26%. The current status of our knowledge concerning AIDS is reviewed and discussed. The frequency and types of presenting signs and symptoms in the head and neck are reported to alert the otolaryngologic community to this entity. PMID:3937090

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection. PMID:8067276

  6. Primary immunodeficiency in the neonate: Early diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Walkovich, Kelly; Connelly, James A

    2016-02-01

    Many primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) manifest in the neonatal period but can be challenging to diagnose and manage optimally. In part, the difficulty stems from the natural immaturity of the neonatal immune system that may mask immune deficits and/or complicate interpretation of clinical findings and laboratory assays. The great diversity of PIDs - from innate immune system defects to those that impact the humoral and/or cellular components of the adaptive immune system - and the rapid rate at which new PIDs are being discovered makes it challenging for practioners to stay current. Moreover, recent appreciation for immune deficiencies that lead to autoinflammation and autoimmunity have broadened the spectrum of neonatal PID, adding additional complexity to an already intricate field. This article serves to highlight the deficiencies in the neonatal immune system, while providing a review of the more common PIDs that present in the neonate and guidelines for diagnosis and supportive care. PMID:26776073

  7. Primary Immunodeficiencies and Inflammatory Disease: A Growing Genetic Intersection.

    PubMed

    Fodil, Nassima; Langlais, David; Gros, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in genome analysis have provided important insights into the genetic architecture of infectious and inflammatory diseases. The combined analysis of loci detected by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 22 inflammatory diseases has revealed a shared genetic core and associated biochemical pathways that play a central role in pathological inflammation. Parallel whole-exome sequencing studies have identified 265 genes mutated in primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Here, we examine the overlap between these two data sets, and find that it consists of genes essential for protection against infections and in which persistent activation causes pathological inflammation. Based on this intersection, we propose that, although strong or inactivating mutations (rare variants) in these genes may cause severe disease (PIDs), their more subtle modulation potentially by common regulatory/coding variants may contribute to chronic inflammation. PMID:26791050

  8. Oral findings in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Phelan, J A; Saltzman, B R; Friedland, G H; Klein, R S

    1987-07-01

    Oral examinations of 103 consecutive patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were performed. Of these patients, 74 (72%) were heterosexuals and 29 (28%) were homosexual or bisexual men. Lesions that were identified on subsequent examination were recorded separately. Oral candidiasis was the most common finding, occurring in 94 patients. Other findings were herpes simplex ulceration (ten patients), exfoliative cheilitis (nine patients), xerostomia (ten patients), "hairy" leukoplakia (seven patients), and Kaposi's sarcoma (four patients). A patchy, depapillated tongue was seen in six patients, and ulcers with uncertain cause were seen in three patients. Gingival bleeding, perioral molluscum contagiosum, and brown hairy tongue each occurred in one patient. In this study, "hairy" leukoplakia and Kaposi's sarcoma occurred exclusively in homosexual and bisexual men with AIDS, and occurred significantly more frequently in this group than in heterosexual patients with AIDS. There was no significant difference between these groups in the frequency of occurrence of other findings. PMID:3475658

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus and female prostitutes, Sydney 1985.

    PubMed

    Philpot, C R; Harcourt, C; Edwards, J; Grealis, A

    1988-06-01

    One hundred and thirty two female prostitutes and 55 non-prostitutes who were tested for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were surveyed by questionnaire at this centre. The two groups were well matched for age and were very similar in other except for numbers of their sexual partners. Questions were asked about drug taking, sexual practices, general health, and episodes of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). None of the women in the survey was found to be seropositive, but both groups were found to be seriously at risk of HIV infection through using intravenous (IV) drugs, having unprotected sexual intercourse with men who used IV drugs, having unprotected sexual intercourse with bisexual men, or exposure to several STDs. PMID:3410467

  10. Drug Use Patterns: Implications for the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lawrence S.; Evans, Ruppert; Murphy, Debra; Primm, Beny J.

    1986-01-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) represents a major public health concern for society. Intravenous drug users continue to be the second largest risk group. While needle sharing has been demonstrated to play a prominent role in the higher risk experienced by illicit drug users, serious evaluations of the inherent immunologic aberrancies attendant to drug abuse have been limited. Partly responsible are the small study sample sizes and inadequate examinations of the role of particular patterns of drug abuse in the development of immunologic dysfunction. The present study represents the preliminary findings of an ongoing investigation to assess the contribution of an array of behaviors on various indicators of immunologic status. The results in 97 patients investigated demonstrate that route of administration and duration of drug use were the factors most significantly associated with a greater prevalence of immunologic abnormalities. There was also a suggestion that abnormal liver function may contribute to altered immune status. PMID:3806689

  11. The 2015 IUIS Phenotypic Classification for Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Bousfiha, Aziz; Jeddane, Leïla; Al-Herz, Waleed; Ailal, Fatima; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chatila, Talal; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Franco, Jose Luis; Gaspar, H Bobby; Holland, Steven M; Klein, Christoph; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D; Oksenhendler, Eric; Picard, Capucine; Puck, Jennifer M; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Tang, Mimi L K

    2015-11-01

    There are now nearly 300 single-gene inborn errors of immunity underlying phenotypes as diverse as infection, malignancy, allergy, auto-immunity, and auto-inflammation. For each of these five categories, a growing variety of phenotypes are ascribed to Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases (PID), making PIDs a rapidly expanding field of medicine. The International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) PID expert committee (EC) has published every other year a classification of these disorders into tables, defined by shared pathogenesis and/or clinical consequences. In 2013, the IUIS committee also proposed a more user-friendly, phenotypic classification, based on the selection of key phenotypes at the bedside. We herein propose the revised figures, based on the accompanying 2015 IUIS PID EC classification. PMID:26445875

  12. Mucocutaneous manifestations in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mendiratta, Vibhu; Mittal, Saurabh; Jain, Arpita; Chander, Ram

    2010-01-01

    Skin is one of the most frequently involved organs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and mucocutaneous manifestations may be one of the earliest markers of AIDS. The prevalence of cutaneous abnormalities in HIV approaches nearly 90%. Mucocutaneous manifestations may also act as a prognostic marker of HIV infection. Children are increasingly being affected by HIV infection and it is important to realize the presence of the infection early in the disease process as their immune status is not mature enough to handle the stress of various infections. Skin manifestations can serve as early markers and prognostic indicators of HIV infection. This review highlights the epidemiology, transmission, pathogenesis, and the mucocutaneous manifestations of HIV infection in children. PMID:20826983

  13. Opportunistic Neurologic Infections in Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Albarillo, Fritzie; O'Keefe, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remain a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality despite the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) especially in the resource-limited regions of the world. Diagnosis of these infections may be challenging because findings on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and brain imaging are nonspecific. While brain biopsy provides a definitive diagnosis, it is an invasive procedure associated with a relatively low mortality rate, thus less invasive modalities have been studied in recent years. Diagnosis, therefore, can be established based on a combination of a compatible clinical syndrome, radiologic and CSF findings, and understanding of the role of HIV in these infections. The most common CNS opportunistic infections are AIDS-defining conditions; thus, treatment of these infections in combination with HAART has greatly improved survival. PMID:26747443

  14. Glanzmann thrombasthenia associated with human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Natarajan, Kannan; Patil, Rajendra; Prathi, Venkata Sarath; Beeraka, Swapna Sridevi; Kolaparthi, Venkata Suneel Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is an autosomal recessive inherited platelet function defect characterized by normal platelet count, prolonged bleeding time and abnormal clot retraction. This disease typically presents in infancy or early childhood and has proven to have very good prognosis. In this case study, a 22-year-old GT patient who also developed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection after sometime is reported. The patient showed oral manifestations of gingival hyperplasia and petechial lesions. Unfortunately the detection of both thrombasthenia and HIV were done at considerably late stages which contributed to a poor prognosis. The patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to HIV, thrombasthenia and thrombocytopenia. The importance of early detection, supportive care and communication between the general and oral physician in management of the GT is also discussed. PMID:24829739

  15. Renal transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive children.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Mignon I; Kala, Udai K

    2015-04-01

    Renal transplantation is being performed in adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and increasingly in paediatric patients as well. A multidisciplinary team involving an infectious disease professional is required to assist with HIV viral-load monitoring and in choosing the most appropriate highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Drug interactions complicate immunosuppressant therapy and require careful management. The acute rejection rates appear to be similar in adults to those in noninfective transplant recipients. Induction with basiliximab and calcineurin-based immunosuppression appears to be safe and effective in these recipients. Prophylaxis is advised for a variety of infections and may need life-long administration, especially in children. Organ shortage remains a significant problem, and kidneys from deceased HIV-positive donors have been used successfully in a small study population. Overall, with careful planning and close follow-up, successful renal transplantation for paediatric HIV-infected recipients is possible. PMID:24691821

  16. In vitro assembly of the feline immunodeficiency virus Gag polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Affranchino, José L; González, Silvia A

    2010-06-01

    The retroviral Gag protein is the only viral product that is necessary for the assembly of virions in mammalian cells. We have established an in vitro assembly system to study the assembly properties of purified feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Gag protein expressed in bacteria. Under fully defined conditions, the FIV Gag protein assembles into spherical particles of 33 nm in diameter which are morphologically similar to authentic immature particles, albeit smaller than virions. The in vitro assembly of FIV Gag into particles was found to be resistant to the addition of Triton X-100 and required the presence of RNA. Notably, we found that an amino acid substitution in the nucleocapsid domain of Gag that impairs RNA binding and blocks virion production in vivo, also abrogates Gag assembly in vitro. The development of an in vitro assembly system for FIV Gag protein will facilitate the study of the mechanisms by which this protein assembles into immature particles. PMID:20347892

  17. Systemic Spironucleosis In Two Immunodeficient Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, C; Kramer, J; Mejia, A; MacKey, J; Mansfield, KG; Miller, AD

    2011-01-01

    Spironucleus spp. are parasites of fish and terrestrial vertebrates including mice and turkeys that rarely cause extraintestinal disease. Two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were experimentally inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus mac251 (SIVmac251). Both progressed to simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) within one year of inoculation and, in addition to common opportunistic infections including rhesus cytomegalovirus, rhesus lymphocryptovirus, and rhesus adenovirus, developed systemic protozoal infections. In the first case, the protozoa were associated with colitis, multifocal abdominal abscessation, and lymphadenitis. In the second case they one of a number of organisms associated with extensive pyogranulomatous pneumonia and colitis. Ultrastructural, molecular, and phylogenetic analysis revealed the causative organism to be a species of Spironucleus closely related to Spironucleus meleagridis of turkeys. This is the first report of extraintestinal infection with Spironucleus sp. in higher mammals and further expands the list of opportunistic infections found in immunocompromised rhesus macaques. PMID:20351359

  18. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in wild Pallas' cats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Meredith A; Munkhtsog, Bariushaa; Troyer, Jennifer L; Ross, Steve; Sellers, Rani; Fine, Amanda E; Swanson, William F; Roelke, Melody E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-03-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a feline lentivirus related to HIV, causes immune dysfunction in domestic and wild cats. The Pallas' cat is the only species from Asia known to harbor a species-specific strain of FIV designated FIV(Oma) in natural populations. Here, a 25% seroprevalence of FIV is reported from 28 wild Mongolian Pallas' cats sampled from 2000 to 2008. Phylogenetic analysis of proviral RT-Pol from eight FIV(Oma) isolates from Mongolia, Russia, China and Kazakhstan reveals a unique monophyletic lineage of the virus within the Pallas' cat population, most closely related to the African cheetah and leopard FIV strains. Histopathological examination of lymph node and spleen from infected and uninfected Pallas' cats suggests that FIV(Oma) causes immune depletion in its' native host. PMID:19926144

  19. Fungal, Viral, and Parasitic Pneumonias Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Joseph H; Limper, Andrew H

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory illness is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The spectrum of pulmonary disease that can affect patients with HIV is wide and includes opportunistic infection with many fungal, viral, and parasitic organisms. This article reviews the clinical presentation; approach to diagnosis; and management of fungal, viral, and parasitic pneumonias that can develop in patients with HIV including respiratory disease caused by Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, Histoplasma, Coccidioides, Cytomegalovirus, Toxoplasma, and Strongyloides. Because clinical symptoms and radiographic patterns are often insensitive at distinguishing these pulmonary infections, this review particularly focuses on specific host risk factors and diagnostic testing to consider when approaching HIV patients with respiratory illness. PMID:26974302

  20. Glanzmann Thrombasthenia Associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Natarajan, Kannan; Patil, Rajendra; Prathi, Venkata Sarath; Beeraka, Swapna Sridevi; Kolaparthi, Venkata Suneel Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) is an autosomal recessive inherited platelet function defect characterized by normal platelet count, prolonged bleeding time and abnormal clot retraction. This disease typically presents in infancy or early childhood and has proven to have very good prognosis. In this case study, a 22-year-old GT patient who also developed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection after sometime is reported. The patient showed oral manifestations of gingival hyperplasia and petechial lesions. Unfortunately the detection of both thrombasthenia and HIV were done at considerably late stages which contributed to a poor prognosis. The patient died of cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to HIV, thrombasthenia and thrombocytopenia. The importance of early detection, supportive care and communication between the general and oral physician in management of the GT is also discussed. PMID:24829739