Science.gov

Sample records for neutrino scattering measurements

  1. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; et al

    2016-06-10

    In muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ~10% due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We also isolated a sample of 135±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux frommore » 9% to 6%. Finally, our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.« less

  2. Measurement of neutrino flux from neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Muon-neutrino elastic scattering on electrons is an observable neutrino process whose cross section is precisely known. Consequently a measurement of this process in an accelerator-based νμ beam can improve the knowledge of the absolute neutrino flux impinging upon the detector; typically this knowledge is limited to ˜10 % due to uncertainties in hadron production and focusing. We have isolated a sample of 135 ±17 neutrino-electron elastic scattering candidates in the segmented scintillator detector of MINERvA, after subtracting backgrounds and correcting for efficiency. We show how this sample can be used to reduce the total uncertainty on the NuMI νμ flux from 9% to 6%. Our measurement provides a flux constraint that is useful to other experiments using the NuMI beam, and this technique is applicable to future neutrino beams operating at multi-GeV energies.

  3. Prospects for measuring coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering at a stopped-pion neutrino source

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2006-02-01

    Rates of coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering at a high-intensity stopped-pion neutrino source in various detector materials (relevant for novel low-threshold detectors) are calculated. Sensitivity of a coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering experiment to new physics is also explored.

  4. Coherent scattering of cosmic neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opher, R.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that cosmic neutrino scattering can be non-negligible when coherence effects previously neglected are taken into account. The coherent neutrino scattering cross section is derived and the neutrino index of refraction evaluated. As an example of coherent neutrino scattering, a detector using critical reflection is described which in principle can detect the low energy cosmic neutrino background allowed by the measured cosmological red shift.

  5. Measurement of Nuclear Dependence in Inclusive Charged Current Neutrino Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, Brian George

    2014-01-01

    Neutrino experiments use heavy nuclei (C, Fe, Pb) to achieve necessary statistics. However, the use of heavy nuclei exposes these experiments to the nuclear dependence of neutrino-nucleus cross sections, which are poorly known and difficult to model. This dissertation presents an analysis of the nuclear dependence of inclusive chargedcurrent neutrino scattering using events in carbon, iron, lead, and scintillator targets of the MINERvA detector. MINERvA (Main INjector ExpeRiment for -A) is a few-GeV neutrinonucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab.

  6. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Bugel, L.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Djurcic, Z.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Monroe, J.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Zeller, G. P.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Tanaka, H. A.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Finley, D. A.

    2008-01-25

    The observation of neutrino oscillations is clear evidence for physics beyond the standard model. To make precise measurements of this phenomenon, neutrino oscillation experiments, including MiniBooNE, require an accurate description of neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) cross sections to predict signal samples. Using a high-statistics sample of {nu}{sub {mu}} CCQE events, MiniBooNE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events observed in a carbon-based detector. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, M{sub A}{sup eff}=1.23{+-}0.20 GeV, that describes the four-momentum dependence of the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon, and a Pauli-suppression parameter, {kappa}=1.019{+-}0.011. Such a modified Fermi gas model may also be used by future accelerator-based experiments measuring neutrino oscillations on nuclear targets.

  7. Two-Phase Emission Detector for Measuring Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, A; Hagmann, C A

    2003-11-26

    Coherent scattering is a flavor-blind, high-rate, as yet undetected neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. We propose to use a compact (kg-scale), two-phase (liquid-gas) argon ionization detector to measure coherent neutrino scattering off nuclei. In our approach, neutrino-induced nuclear recoils in the liquid produce a weak ionization signal, which is transported into a gas under the influence of an electric field, amplified via electroluminescence, and detected by phototubes or avalanche diodes. This paper describes the features of the detector, and estimates signal and background rates for a reactor neutrino source. Relatively compact detectors of this type, capable of detecting coherent scattering, offer a new approach to flavor-blind detection of man-made and astronomical neutrinos, and may allow development of compact neutrino detectors capable of nonintrusive real-time monitoring of fissile material in reactors.

  8. A Proposal for First-Ever Measurement of Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Winant, C D; Bernstein, A; Foxe, M P; Hagmann, C A; Jovanovic, I; Kazkaz, K M; Stoeffl, W S

    2008-02-05

    We propose to build and deploy a 10-kg dual-phase argon ionization detector for the detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, which is described by the reaction; {nu} + (Z,N) {yields} {nu} + (Z,N), where {nu} is the scattering neutrino, and (Z,N) is the target nucleus of atomic number Z and neutron number N. Its detection would validate central tenets of the Standard Model. We have built a gas-phase argon ionization detector to determine the feasibility of measuring the small recoil energies ({approx} 1keV) predicted from coherent neutrino scattering, and to characterize the recoil spectrum of the argon nuclei induced by scattering from medium-energy neutrons. We present calibrations made with 55-Fe, a low-energy X-ray source, and report on measurements to date of the recoil spectra from the 2-MeV LINAC Li-target neutron source at LLNL. A high signal-to-noise measurement of the recoil spectrum will not only serve as an important milestone in achieving the sensitivity necessary for measuring coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, but will break new scientific ground on its own.

  9. Measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon at $$\\langle E_{\

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wolcott, J.

    2016-02-25

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q2 are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q2 for νe with that of similarly selected νμ-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current νe interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, the data are found tomore » be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.« less

  10. Measurement of muon neutrino quasi-elastic scattering on carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; Djurcic, Z.; /Alabama U. /Bucknell U. /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Columbia U. /Embry-Riddle Aeronautical U. /Fermilab /Indiana U. /Los Alamos /Louisiana State U. /Michigan U.

    2007-06-01

    Low energy (200 < E{sub v} < 2000 MeV) neutrino oscillation experiments, including MiniBooNE, require a model of charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino interactions to predict signal samples. Using a high-statistics sample of muon neutrino CCQE events, MiniBooNE finds that a simple Fermi gas model, with appropriate adjustments, accurately characterizes the CCQE events observed in a carbon-based detector. The extracted parameters include an effective axial mass, M{sub A} = 1.23 {+-} 0.20 GeV, used to describe the four-momentum dependence of the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon; and a Pauli-suppression parameter, {kappa} = 1.019 {+-} 0.011.

  11. Cross section measurements for quasi-elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, Mark Edward; /University Coll. London

    2008-04-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment based at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Chicago, Illinois. MINOS measures neutrino interactions in two large iron-scintillator tracking/sampling calorimeters; the Near Detector on-site at FNAL and the Far Detector located in the Soudan mine in northern Minnesota. The Near Detector has recorded a large number of neutrino interactions and this high statistics dataset can be used to make precision measurements of neutrino interaction cross sections. The cross section for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering has been measured by a number of previous experiments and these measurements disagree by up to 30%. A method to select a quasi-elastic enriched sample of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Near Detector is presented and a procedure to fit the kinematic distributions of this sample and extract the quasi-elastic cross section is introduced. The accuracy and robustness of the fitting procedure is studied using mock data and finally results from fits to the MINOS Near Detector data are presented.

  12. Measurement of W-Z interference from neutrino-electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, R.L.; Bowles, T.J.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Doe, P.J.; Frank, J.S.; Potter, M.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. |; Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Lu, X.Q.; Mahler, H.J.; Wang, K.C.; Piasetzky, E.

    1993-04-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering was observed at LAMPF with a 15-ton fine-grained tracking calorimeter exposed to electron-neutrinos from muon decay at rest. The measured {nu}{sub e}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub e}e{sup {minus}} elastic scattering cross section, 10.0 {plus_minus} 1.5(stat) {plus_minus} 0.9(syst) {times} 10{sup {minus}45} cm{sup 2} {times} (E{sub {nu}}(MeV)), gives a model independent measurement of the strength of the destructive interference between the charged and neutral currents, I = {minus}1.07 {plus_minus} 0.21, that agrees well with the standard model (SM) prediction I = {minus}1.08. The agreement between the measured electroweak parameters and SM expectations is used to place limits on neutrino properties, such as neutrino flavor-changing neutral currents and neutrino electromagnetic moments, and on the masses of hypothetical new bosons that would interact with leptons.

  13. Spectral Study of a Broad Energy HPGe Detector for First Measurement of Coherent Neutrino Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surbrook, Jason; Green, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Intense neutrino flux at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the energy domain below Eν = 50 MeV makes SNS a suitable location for measurement of Coherent Neutrino Scattering. Coherent scattering is assumed to occupy vital roles in supernovae (SN) events and measurement offers promising insight into SN mechanics and advancements in SN- ν detection. Furthermore, this interaction is well-calculable and therefore, a strong test of the Standard Model. P-Type Point Contact High-purity germanium detectors are excellent candidates for this measurement due to their sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils. One such, a Canberra Broad Energy HPGe detector, was tested for quality degradation from exposure to fast neutrons in the SNS target building, to assess usefulness in a future coherent scattering experiment. Analysis of the lead-shielded spectra was handled using tools developed for the Majorana Demonstrator neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment. Broad spectrum energy resolution and 68Ge decay rates were calculated. This poster will present findings that will help determine this detector's eligibility and exposure limitations for measurement in a future coherent neutrino scattering experiment at the SNS.

  14. Limit on flavor-changing neutral currents from a measurement of neutrino-electron elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 ); Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Lu, X.; Mahler, H.J.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Doe, P.J.; Frank, J.S.; Potter, M.E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Piasetzky, E. )

    1992-02-01

    From a measurement of the absolute cross section in {nu}{sub {ital e}e}{sup {minus}} elastic scattering we have set a limit on flavor-changing neutral currents in the neutrino sector. We find that an off-diagonal, flavor-changing coupling is limited to 1{minus}{ital f}{sub {ital e}{ital e}}{lt}0.35 (90% C.L.).

  15. Background Neutron Studies for Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering Measurements at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane; Coherent Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The COHERENT collaboration has proposed to measure coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE νNS) cross sections on several nuclear targets using neutrinos produced at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The largest background of concern arises from beam-induced, fast neutrons that can mimic a nuclear recoil signal event in the detector. Multiple technologies of neutron detection have been employed at prospective experiment sites at the SNS. Analysis of these data have produced a consistent picture of the backgrounds expected for a CE νNS measurement. These background studies show that at suitable locations, the fast neutrons of concern arrive mainly in the prompt 1.3 μs window and the neutrons in the delayed window are primarily of lower energies that are relatively easier to shield.

  16. QCD Precision Measurements and Structure Function Extraction at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Batra, P.; Bugel, Leonard G.; Camilleri, Leslie Loris; Conrad, Janet Marie; de Gouvea, A.; Fisher, Peter H.; Formaggio, Joseph Angelo; Jenkins, J.; Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; Kobilarcik, T.R.; /Fermilab /Texas U.

    2009-06-01

    We extend the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering On Glass) to address a variety of issues including precision QCD measurements, extraction of structure functions, and the derived Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain a sample of Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events which is over two orders of magnitude larger than past samples. We outline an innovative method for fitting the structure functions using a parameterized energy shift which yields reduced systematic uncertainties. High statistics measurements, in combination with improved systematics, will enable NuSOnG to perform discerning tests of fundamental Standard Model parameters as we search for deviations which may hint of 'Beyond the Standard Model' physics.

  17. SciNOvA: A Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering in a Narrow-Band Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Paley, J.; Djurcic, Z.; Harris, D.; Tesarek, R.; Feldman, G.; Corwin, L.; Messier, M.D.; Mayer, N.; Musser, J.; Paley, J.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Iowa State U. /Minnesota U. /South Carolina U. /Wichita State U. /William-Mary Coll.

    2010-10-15

    We propose to construct and deploy a fine-grained detector in the Fermilab NOvA 2 GeV narrow-band neutrino beam. In this beam, the detector can make unique contributions to the measurement of quasi-elastic scattering, neutral-current elastic scattering, neutral-current {pi}{sup 0} production, and enhance the NOvA measurements of electron neutrino appearance. To minimize cost and risks, the proposed detector is a copy of the SciBar detector originally built for the K2K long baseline experiment and used recently in the SciBooNE experiment.

  18. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy.more » However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.« less

  19. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerν A Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5-50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x <0.1 . This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice et al. (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  20. Precision measurement of sin2thetaW from semileptonic neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Belusevic, R.; Blondel, A.; Blümer, H.; Böckmann, P.; Brummel, H. D.; Buchholz, P.; Burkhardt, H.; Debu, P.; Duda, J.; Dydak, F.; Falkenburg, B.; Fiedler, M.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Grant, A. L.; Guyot, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Hepp, V.; Hughes, E. W.; Kampschulte, B.; Keilwerth, H.; Kleinknecht, K.; Knobloch, J.; Krasny, M.; Królikowski, J.; Kurz, N.; Lipniacka, A.; Merlo, J.-P.; Müller, E.; Para, A.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Pollman, D.; Ranjard, F.; Renk, B.; Schuller, J.-P.; Taureg, H.; Tittel, K.; Turlay, R.; Vallage, B.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wotschack, J.

    1986-07-01

    The ratio Rν of the neutral- to charged-current cross sections of neutrinos in iron has been measured in an exposure of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay neutrino detector to a 160-GeV/c neutrino narrow-band beam at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. The result is Rν=0.3072+/-0.0025(stat)+/- 0.0020(syst), for hadronic energy greater than 10 GeV. The electroweak mixing parameter is sin2thetaW=0.225+/-0.005(expt )+/-0.003(theor)+0.013(mc-1. 5 GeV/c2), where mc is the charm-quark mass.

  1. Measurement of Neutrino-Nucleon Neutral-Current Elastic Scattering Cross-section at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Hideyuki; /Tokyo Inst. Tech.

    2009-02-01

    In this thesis, results of neutrino-nucleon neutral current (NC) elastic scattering analysis are presented. Neutrinos interact with other particles only with weak force. Measurement of cross-section for neutrino-nucleon reactions at various neutrino energy are important for the study of nucleon structure. It also provides data to be used for beam flux monitor in neutrino oscillation experiments. The cross-section for neutrino-nucleon NC elastic scattering contains the axial vector form factor G{sub A}(Q{sup 2}) as well as electromagnetic form factors unlike electromagnetic interaction. G{sub A} is propotional to strange part of nucleon spin ({Delta}s) in Q{sup 2} {yields} 0 limit. Measurement of NC elastic cross-section with smaller Q{sup 2} enables us to access {Delta}s. NC elastic cross-sections of neutrino-nucleon and antineutrino-nucleon were measured earlier by E734 experiment at Brookheaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1987. In this experiment, cross-sections were measured in Q{sup 2} > 0.4 GeV{sup 2} region. Result from this experiment was the only published data for NC elastic scattering cross-section published before our experiment. SciBooNE is an experiment for the measurement of neutrino-nucleon scattering cross-secitons using Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at FNAL. BNB has energy peak at 0.7 GeV. In this energy region, NC elastic scattering, charged current elastic scattering, charged current pion production, and neutral current pion production are the major reaction branches. SciBar, electromagnetic calorimeter, and Muon Range Detector are the detectors for SciBooNE. The SciBar consists of finely segmented scintillators and 14336 channels of PMTs. It has a capability to reconstruct particle track longer than 8 cm and separate proton from muons and pions using energy deposit information. Signal of NC elastic scattering is a single proton track. In {nu}p {yields} {nu}p process, the recoil proton is detected. On the other hand, most of {nu}n {yields} {nu

  2. Neutrino-Electron Scattering in MINERvA for Constraining the NuMI Neutrino Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jaewon

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is used as a reference process to constrain the neutrino flux at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam observed by the MINERvA experiment. Prediction of the neutrino flux at accelerator experiments from other methods has a large uncertainty, and this uncertainty degrades measurements of neutrino oscillations and neutrino cross-sections. Neutrino-electron elastic scattering is a rare process, but its cross-section is precisely known. With a sample corresponding to $3.5\\times10^{20}$ protons on target in the NuMI low-energy neutrino beam, a sample of $120$ $\

  3. Sterile neutrinos, coherent scattering, and oscillometry measurements with low-temperature bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formaggio, Joseph A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Anderson, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleon scattering offers a unique approach in the search for physics beyond the standard model. When used in conjunction with monoenergetic neutrino sources, the technique can be sensitive to the existence of light sterile neutrinos. The ability to utilize such reactions has been limited in the past due to the extremely low-energy threshold (10-50 eV) needed for detection. In this paper, we discuss an optimization of cryogenic solid-state bolometers that enables reaching extremely low kinetic energy thresholds. We investigate the sensitivity of an array of such detectors to neutrino oscillations to sterile states. A recent analysis of available reactor data appears to favor the existence of such a sterile neutrino with a mass splitting of |Δmsterile|2≥1.5eV2 and mixing strength of sin⁡22θsterile=0.17±0.08 at 95% confidence level. An array of such low-threshold detectors would be able to make a definitive statement as to the validity of the interpretation.

  4. Neutrino scattering and flavor transformation in supernovae.

    PubMed

    Cherry, John F; Carlson, J; Friedland, Alexander; Fuller, George M; Vlasenko, Alexey

    2012-06-29

    We argue that the small fraction of neutrinos that undergo direction-changing scattering outside of the neutrinosphere could have significant influence on neutrino flavor transformation in core-collapse supernova environments. We show that the standard treatment for collective neutrino flavor transformation is adequate at late times but could be inadequate in early epochs of core-collapse supernovae, where the potentials that govern neutrino flavor evolution are affected by the scattered neutrinos. Taking account of this effect, and the way it couples to entropy and composition, will require a new approach in neutrino flavor transformation modeling. PMID:23004955

  5. Measurements of sin/sup 2/ theta/sub w/ from studies of the elastic scattering of neutrinos by protons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    This talk is intended as a brief report on studies of the elastic scattering of neutrinos by protons and electrons. Measurements of the ratios of muon antineutrino and muon neutrino elastic scattering on protons, and the corresponding ratio for elastic scattering on electrons minimize systematic experimental errors, and lead directly to values of the fundamental parameter of the electroweak interaction, the Weinberg Angle, with minimal ambiguity. Accordingly, the principal motivation in carrying out these studies was the desire to obtain and compare precise values of the Weinberg Angle from both the semileptonic and leptonic reactions as still another test of the basic validity of the standard electroweak theory. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Precise measurement of dimuon production cross-sections in muon neutrino iron and anti-muon neutrino iron deep inelastic scattering at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, Maxim T.

    2001-10-01

    This dissertation presents the measurement of the semi- inclusive cross-sections for nm and nm -nucleon deep inelastic scattering interactions with two oppositely charged muons in the final state. These events dominantly arise from production of a charm quark during the scattering process. The measurement is obtained from the analysis of 5102 nm induced and 1458 nm induced events collected with the NuTeV detector exposed to a sign selected beam at the Fermilab Tevatron. A leading-order QCD analysis is used to predict charm production cross-section parameters such as the charm mass mc, strange and anti- strange sea quark probability distribution functions s(x, q2), semi-leptonic charm decay branching ratio Bc, and charm fragmentation function parameter ɛ. The result is presented as a nearly model-independent dimuon production cross-section table. I also extract cross-section measurements from a re-analysis of 5030 nm induced and 1060 nm induced events collected from the exposure of the same detector to a quad-triplet beam by the CCFR experiment. The resulting cross-section tables are the most statistically precise measurements of neutrino- induced dimuon production cross-sections to date. These measurements should be of broad use to phenomenologists interested in the dynamics of charm production, the strangeness content of the nucleon, and the CKM matrix element Vcd.

  7. Neutrino-electron scattering. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    We present here a progress report on an experiment to measure the cross section for nu/sub ..mu../e scattering at the Brookhaven AGS. A wide band focussing horn is used with a neutrino beam energy centered at 1.5 GeV. We have in hand measurements with nu/sub ..mu../ and anti nu/sub ..mu../ beams but we present preliminary data on the nu/sub ..mu../ beam running only. We also measure the reactions: nu/sub ..mu../ + n ..-->.. ..mu../sup -/ + p and nu/sub e/ + n ..-->.. e/sup -/ + p which will be used in normalization and in background estimation.

  8. Measurement of Electron Neutrino Quasielastic and Quasielasticlike Scattering on Hydrocarbon at ⟨E_{ν}⟩=3.6  GeV.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, J; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Salazar, G; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Solano Salinas, C J; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zegarra, A; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2016-02-26

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q^{2} are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q^{2} for ν_{e} with that of similarly selected ν_{μ}-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current ν_{e} interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The data are found to be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE. PMID:26967410

  9. Measurement of Electron Neutrino Quasielastic and Quasielasticlike Scattering on Hydrocarbon at ⟨Eν⟩=3.6 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Salazar, G.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zegarra, A.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q2 are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q2 for νe with that of similarly selected νμ-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current νe interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. The data are found to be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.

  10. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  11. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  12. Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholberg, Kate

    2015-05-01

    I describe physics potential and experimental prospects for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS), a process which has not yet been observed. Germanium- based detectors represent a promising technology for CEvNS experiments. I focus primarily on stopped-pion neutrino sources.

  13. Optical scattering lengths in large liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, M.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Hofmann, M.; Lewke, T.; Meindl, Q.; Moellenberg, R.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Todor, S.; Winter, J.; Lachenmaier, T.; Traunsteiner, C.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodan

    2010-05-15

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents phenylxylylethane, linear alkylbenzene (LAB), and dodecane, which are under discussion for next-generation experiments such as SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory), HanoHano, or LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Results comprise the wavelength range of 415-440 nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  14. Ultrahigh-energy neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Masaaki; Schildknecht, Dieter

    2013-09-01

    We predict the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultrahigh energies relevant in connection with the search for high-energy cosmic neutrinos. Our investigation, employing the color-dipole picture, among other things, allows us to quantitatively determine which fraction of the ultrahigh-energy neutrino-nucleon cross section stems from the saturation vs the color-transparency region. We disagree with various results in the literature that predict a strong suppression of the neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies above E≅109GeV. Suppression in the sense of a diminished increase of the neutrino-nucleon cross section with energy only starts to occur at neutrino energies beyond E≅1014GeV.

  15. Measurement of interference between W and Z exchange in electron-neutrino electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Chen, H.H.; Doe, P.J.; Hausammann, R.; Lee, W.P.; Mahler, H.J.; Potter, M.E.; Lu, X.Q.; Wang, K.C. ); Bowles, T.J.; Burman, R.L.; Carlini, R.D.; Cochran, D.R.F.; Frank, J.S.; Piasetzky, E.; Sandberg, V.D. ); Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L. )

    1990-03-19

    A measurement of the reaction {nu}{sub {ital e}}+{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{nu}{sub {ital e}}+{ital e}{sup {minus}} was performed using a beam-stop source of {nu}{sub {ital e}}. Based upon 234{plus minus}35 events, we obtain a cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {ital ee}})=(9.9{plus minus}1.5(stat){plus minus}1.0(syst)){times}10{sup {minus}42} cm{sup 2} {times}({ital E}{sub {nu}} (GeV)). This reaction is mediated by the exchange of {ital W} and {ital Z} bosons and is thus sensitive to the interference between them. This interference is measured to be {minus}1.07{plus minus}0.17(stat){plus minus}0.11(syst), consistent with the destructive interference ({minus}1.08) predicted by the standard model.

  16. Coherency in neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerman, S.; Sharma, V.; Deniz, M.; Wong, H. T.; Chen, J.-W.; Li, H. B.; Lin, S. T.; Liu, C.-P.; Yue, Q.; Texono Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter (α ) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold, and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of α that can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in α would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to α >0.95 are derived.

  17. Can neutrino-electron scattering tell us whether neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, B.

    1988-04-01

    There has recently been interest in the possibility that neutrino-electron scattering experiments could determine whether neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana particles by providing information on their electromagnetic structure. We try to explain why studies of neutrino electromagnetic structure actually cannot distinguish between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. 9 refs.

  18. Azimuthal asymmetry of recoil electrons in neutrino-electron elastic scattering as signature of neutrino nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobków, W.; Błaut, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the theoretically possible scenario beyond the standard model in order to show how the presence of the exotic scalar, tensor, {V}+{A} weak interactions in addition to the standard vector-axial ({V}-{A}) ones may help to distinguish the Dirac from Majorana neutrinos in the elastic scattering of an (anti)neutrino beam off the unpolarized electrons in the relativistic limit. We assume that the incoming (anti)neutrino beam comes from the polarized muon decay at rest and is the left-right chiral superposition with assigned direction of the transversal spin polarization with respect to the production plane. Our analysis is carried out for the flavour (current) neutrino eigenstates. It means that the transverse neutrino polarization estimates are the same both for the Dirac and Majorana cases. We display that the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of recoil electrons is generated by the interference terms between the standard and exotic couplings, which are proportional to the transversal (anti)neutrino spin polarization and independent of the neutrino mass. This asymmetry for the Majorana neutrinos is larger than for the Dirac ones. We also indicate the possibility of utilizing the azimuthal asymmetry measurements to search for the new CP-violating phases. Our study is based on the assumption that the possible detector (running for 1 year) has the shape of a flat circular ring, while the intense neutrino source is located in the centre of the ring and polarized perpendicularly to the ring. In addition, the large low-threshold, real-time detector is able to measure with a high resolution both the polar angle and the azimuthal angle of outgoing electron momentum. Our analysis is model-independent and consistent with the current upper limits on the non-standard couplings.

  19. Neutrino flux predictions for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hartz, Mark

    2015-05-15

    Experiments that measure neutrino interaction cross sections using accelerator neutrino sources require a prediction of the neutrino flux to extract the interaction cross section from the measured neutrino interaction rate. This article summarizes methods of estimating the neutrino flux using in-situ and ex-situ measurements. The application of these methods by current and recent experiments is discussed.

  20. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Eν˜3.5GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, G. A.; Schmitz, D. W.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Baldin, B.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradford, R.; Brooks, W. K.; Budd, H.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Castromonte, C. M.; Christy, M. E.; Chung, H.; Chvojka, J.; Clark, M.; da Motta, H.; Damiani, D. S.; Danko, I.; Datta, M.; Day, M.; DeMaat, R.; Devan, J.; Draeger, E.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Edmondson, D. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; George, C. A.; Gielata, J. A.; Gingu, C.; Gobbi, B.; Gran, R.; Grossman, N.; Hanson, J.; Harris, D. A.; Heaton, J.; Higuera, A.; Howley, I. J.; Hurtado, K.; Jerkins, M.; Kafka, T.; Kaisen, J.; Kanter, M. O.; Keppel, C. E.; Kilmer, J.; Kordosky, M.; Krajeski, A. H.; Kulagin, S. A.; Le, T.; Lee, H.; Leister, A. G.; Locke, G.; Maggi, G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Ochoa, N.; O'Connor, C. D.; Olsen, J.; Osmanov, B.; Osta, J.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Peña, C.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rude, C.; Sassin, K. E.; Schellman, H.; Schneider, R. M.; Schulte, E. C.; Simon, C.; Snider, F. D.; Snyder, M. C.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tan, W.; Tice, B. G.; Tzanakos, G.; Velásquez, J. P.; Walding, J.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wolthuis, B. A.; Woodward, N.; Zavala, G.; Zeng, H. B.; Zhang, D.; Zhu, L. Y.; Ziemer, B. P.

    2013-07-01

    We report a study of νμ charged-current quasielastic events in the segmented scintillator inner tracker of the MINERvA experiment running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The events were selected by requiring a μ- and low calorimetric recoil energy separated from the interaction vertex. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross section, dσ/dQ2, and study the low energy particle content of the final state. Deviations are found between the measured dσ/dQ2 and the expectations of a model of independent nucleons in a relativistic Fermi gas. We also observe an excess of energy near the vertex consistent with multiple protons in the final state.

  1. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Eν~3.5 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fiorentini, G. A.; Schmitz, D. W.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Baldin, B.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Boyd, S.; et al

    2013-07-11

    We report a study of νμ charged-current quasielastic events in the segmented scintillator inner tracker of the MINERvA experiment running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The events were selected by requiring a μ⁻ and low calorimetric recoil energy separated from the interaction vertex. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross section, dσ/dQ², and study the low energy particle content of the final state. Deviations are found between the measured dσ/dQ² and the expectations of a model of independent nucleons in a relativistic Fermi gas. We also observe an excess of energy near the vertex consistent with multiple protons inmore » the final state.« less

  2. Direct neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thümmler, T.

    2011-07-01

    The determination of the neutrino rest mass plays an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. This topic is currently being addressed by two complementary approaches in laboratory experiments. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments probe whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine an effective neutrino mass value. Single beta decay experiments such as KATRIN and MARE investigate the spectral shape of β-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Owing to neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass parameter appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. Applying an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source and an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type, it allows β-spectroscopy close to the T 2 end-point with unprecedented precision and will reach a sensitivity of 200 meV/ c 2 (90% C.L.) on the neutrino rest mass.

  3. Neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering with nuclei in low and high neutrino energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ha, Eunja; Yang, Ghil-Seok; Kim, K. S.; Kajino, T.

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed present status regarding theoretical approaches for neutrino-induced reactions and neutrino scattering. With a short introduction of relevant data, our recent calculations by distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) for quasielastic region are presented for MiniBooNE data. We also discussed that one step-process estimated by the DWBA is comparable to the two-step process, which has been usually used in the neutrino-nucleosynthesis. For much higher energy neutrino data, such as NOMAD data, elementary process approach was shown to be useful instead of using complicated nuclear models. But, in the low energy region, detailed nuclear structure model, such as QRPA and shell model, turn out to be inescapable to explain the reaction data.

  4. Precise measurement of neutrino and anti-neutrino differential cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanov, M.; Naples, D.; Boyd, S.; McDonald, J.; Radescu, V.; Adams, T.; Alton, A.; Avvakumov, S.; deBarbaro, L.; deBarbaro, P.; Bernstein, R.H.; Bodek, A.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Buchholz, D.; Budd, H.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J.; Drucker, R.B.; Fleming, B.T.; Frey, R.; /Pittsburgh U. /Cincinnati U. /Columbia U. /Fermilab /Kansas State U. /Northwestern U. /Oregon U. /Rochester U.

    2005-09-01

    The NuTeV experiment at Fermilab has obtained a unique high statistics sample of neutrino and anti-neutrino interactions using its high-energy sign-selected beam. We present a measurement of the differential cross section for charged-current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering from iron. Structure functions, F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and xF{sub 3}(x,Q{sup 2}), are determined by fitting the inelasticity, y, dependence of the cross sections. This measurement has significantly improved systematic precision as a consequence of more precise understanding of hadron and muon energy scales.

  5. Elastic scattering of muon neutrinos at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Amako, K.; Aronson, S.H.; Beier, E.W.; Callas, J.L.; Cutts, D.; Diwan, M.; Durkin, L.S.; Gibbard, B.G.

    1987-02-01

    In this paper measurement of the purely leptonic reactions: nu/sub ..mu../e ..-->.. nu/sub ..mu../e and anti nu/sub ..mu../e ..-->.. anti nu/sub ..mu../e, and the semileptonic reactions: nu/sub ..mu../p ..-->.. nu/sub ..mu../p and anti nu/sub ..mu../p ..-->.. anti nu/sub ..mu../p are presented and discussed in terms of the standard model. The data also places limites of interest on the magnitudes of a possible neutrino charge radius and a neutrino magnetic moment.

  6. Theory and phenomenology of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2015-07-15

    We review the theory and phenomenology of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEνNS). After a brief introduction, we summarize the places where CEνNS is already in use and then turn to future physics opportunities from CEνNS. CEνNS has been proposed as a way to limit or discover beyond the standard model physics, measure the nuclear-neutron radius and constrain the Weinberg angle.

  7. Measuring Neutrinos with Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Lloyd

    2016-03-01

    Along with a thermal distribution of photons, we expect a thermal distribution of neutrinos to have been produced in the big bang. Although direct detection of the cosmic neutrino background (CNB) is extremely difficult, if not impossible, there is much we are learning indirectly about the CNB from its gravitational influences. I will review constraints from cosmic microwave background observations on the energy density in the CNB, present a recent detection of supersonic evolution of density perturbations in the CNB, and discuss constraints on neutrino masses from cosmological observables. I will also look toward what we can expect from future cosmological surveys, such as CMB-S4.

  8. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  9. Measuring neutrino-nucleus interactions with MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, P. A.

    2015-07-15

    We present results from the MINERνA experiment for neutrino-nucleus scattering in the few-GeV energy region. These measurements cover a range of processes that must be modeled correctly in neutrino oscillation experiments, and in which recent results from other experiments have suggested deficiencies in the models currently used.

  10. Some radiative corrections to neutrino scattering: Neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James P.; Goldman, T.

    2009-09-01

    With the advent of high precision neutrino scattering experiments comes the need for improved radiative corrections. We present a phenomenological analysis of some contributions to the production of photons in neutrino neutral current scattering that are relevant to experiments subsuming the 1% level of accuracy.

  11. Atmospheric neutrinos in ice and measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Martinez, Enrique; Giordano, Gerardo; Mocioiu, Irina; Mena, Olga

    2010-11-01

    The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show that the very high statistics atmospheric neutrino data can be used to obtain precise measurements of the main oscillation parameters.

  12. Direct measurements of neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent developments in the experimental search for neutrino mass are discussed. New data from Los Alamos on the electron neutrino mass as measured in tritium beta decay give an upper limit of 9.3 eV at the 95% confidence level. This result is not consistent with the long-standing ITEP result of 26(5) eV within a model-independent'' range of 17 to 40 eV. It now appears that the electron neutrino is not sufficiently massive to close the universe by itself. Hime and Jelley report finding new evidence for a 17-keV neutrino in the {Beta} decay of {sup 35}S and {sup 63}Ni. Many other experiments are being reported and the situation is still unresolved. 56 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Precision Solar Neutrino Measurements with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, Noah

    2007-10-26

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is the first experiment to measure the total flux of active, high-energy neutrinos from the sun. Results from SNO have solved the long-standing 'Solar Neutrino Problem' by demonstrating that neutrinos change flavor. SNO measured the total neutrino flux with the neutral-current interaction of solar neutrinos with 1000 tonnes of D{sub 2}O. In the first two phases of the experiment we detected the neutron from that interaction by capture on deuterium and capture on chlorine, respectively. In the third phase an array of {sup 3}He proportional counters was deployed in the detector. This allows a measurement of the neutral-current neutrons that is independent of the Cherenkov light detected by the PMT array. We are currently developing a unique, detailed simulation of the current pulses from the proportional-counter array that will be used to help distinguish signal and background pulses.

  14. A letter of intent for a neutrino scattering experiment on the booster neutrino meanline: FINeSSE

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, B.T.; Tayloe, R.; /Indiana U. /Yale U.

    2005-03-01

    The experiment described in this Letter of Intent provides a decisive measurement of {Delta}s, the spin of the nucleon carried by strange quarks. This is crucial as, after more than thirty years of study, the spin contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon is still not understood. The interpretation of {Delta}s measurements from inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) experiments using charged leptons suffers from two questionable techniques; an assumption of SU(3)-flavor symmetry, and an extrapolation into unmeasured kinematic regions, both of which provide ample room for uncertain theoretical errors in the results. The results of recent semi-inclusive DIS data from HERMES paint a somewhat different picture of the contribution of strange quarks to the nucleon spin than do the inclusive results, but since HERMES does not make use of either of the above-mentioned techniques, then the results are somewhat incomparable. What is required is a measurement directly probing the spin contribution of the strange quarks in the nucleon. Neutrino experiments provide a theoretically clean and robust method of determining {Delta}s by comparing the neutral current interaction, which is isoscalar plus isovector, to the charged current interaction, which is strictly isovector. A past experiment, E734, performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory, has pioneered this effort. Building on what they have learned, we present an experiment which achieves a measurement to {+-} 0.025 using neutrino scattering, and {+-} 0.04 using anti-neutrino scattering, significantly better than past measurements. The combination of the neutrino and anti-neutrino data, when combined with the results of the parity-violating electron-nucleon scattering data, will produce the most significant result for {Delta}s. This experiment can also measure neutrino cross sections in the energy range required for accelerator-based precision oscillation measurements. Accurate measurements of cross sections have been

  15. Model-independent determination of the axial mass parameter in quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Hill, Richard J.; Paz, Gil

    2011-10-01

    Quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering is a basic signal process for neutrino oscillation studies. At accelerator energies, the corresponding cross section is subject to significant uncertainty due to the poorly constrained axial-vector form factor of the nucleon. A model-independent description of the axial-vector form factor is presented. Data from the MiniBooNE experiment for quasielastic neutrino scattering on {sup 12}C are analyzed under the assumption of a definite nuclear model. The value of the axial mass parameter, m{sub A}=0.85{sub -0.07}{sup +0.22}{+-}0.09 GeV, is found to differ significantly from extractions based on traditional form factor models. Implications for future neutrino scattering and pion electroproduction measurements are discussed.

  16. Low-energy neutral-current neutrino scattering on {sup 128,130}Te isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2011-05-15

    Differential, total, and cumulative cross section calculations for neutral current neutrino scattering on {sup 128,130}Te isotopes are performed in the context of the quasiparticle random phase approximation by utilizing realistic two-nucleon forces. These isotopes are the main contents of detectors of ongoing experiments with multiple neutrino physics goals (COBRA and CUORE at Gran Sasso), including potential low-energy astrophysical neutrino (solar, supernova, geoneutrinos) detection. The incoming neutrino energy range adopted in our calculations ({epsilon}{sub {nu}{<=}1}00 MeV) covers the low-energy {beta}-beam neutrinos and the pion-muon stopped neutrino beams existing or planned to be conducted at future neutron spallation sources. The aim of these facilities is to measure neutrino-nucleus cross sections at low and intermediate neutrino energies with the hope of shedding light on open problems in neutrino-induced reactions on nuclei and neutrino astrophysics. Such probes motivate theoretical studies on weak responses of various nuclear systems; thus the evaluated cross sections may be useful in this direction.

  17. The State of the Art of Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.

    2015-06-08

    The study of neutrino interactions has recently experienced a renaissance, motivated by the fact that neutrino oscillation experiments depend critically on an accurate models of neutrino interactions. These models have to predict not only the signal and background populations that oscillation experiments see at near and far detectors, but they must also predict how the neutrino's energy which enters a nucleus gets transferred to energies of the particles that leave the nucleus after the neutrino interacts. Over the past year there have been a number of new results on many different neutrino (and antineutrino) interaction channels using several different target nuclei. These results are often not in agreement with predictions extraolated from charged lepton scattering measurements, or even from predictions anchored to neutrino measurements on deuterium. These new measurements are starting to give the community the handles needed to improve the theoretical description of neutrino interactions, which ultimately pave the way for precision oscillation measurements. This report briefly summarizes recent results and points out where those results differ from the predictions based on current models.

  18. Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering in MINER$\

    SciTech Connect

    Chvojka, Jesse John

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrino oscillation is becoming increasingly understood with results from accelerator-based and reactor-based experiments, but unanswered questions remain. The proper ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates that compose the neutrino avor eigenstates is not completely known. We have yet to detect CP violation in neutrino mixing, which if present could help explain the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter in the universe. We also have not resolved whether sterile neutrinos, which do not interact in any Standard Model interaction, exist. Accelerator-based experiments appear to be the most promising candidates for resolving these questions; however, the ability of present and future experiments to provide answers is likely to be limited by systematic errors. A significant source of this systematic error comes from limitations in our knowledge of neutrino-nucleus interactions. Errors on cross-sections for such interactions are large, existing data is sometimes contradictory, and knowledge of nuclear effects is incomplete. One type of neutrino interaction of particular interest is charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) scattering, which yields a final state consisting of a charged lepton and nucleon. This process, which is the dominant interaction near energies of 1 GeV, is of great utility to neutrino oscillation experiments since the incoming neutrino energy and the square of the momentum transferred to the final state nucleon, Q2, can be reconstructed using the final state lepton kinematics. To address the uncertainty in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, many experiments have begun making dedicated measurements. In particular, the MINER A experiment is studying neutrino-nucleus interactions in the few GeV region. MINERvA is a fine-grained, high precision, high statistics neutrino scattering experiment that will greatly improve our understanding of neutrino cross-sections and nuclear effects that affect the final state particles

  19. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-01

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  20. Scattering of low-energy neutrinos on atomic shells

    SciTech Connect

    Babič, Andrej; Šimkovic, Fedor

    2015-10-28

    We present a derivation of the total cross section for inelastic scattering of low-energy solar neutrinos and reactor antineutrinos on bound electrons, resulting in a transition of the electron to an excited state. The atomic-shell structure of various chemical elements is treated in terms of a nonrelativistic approximation. We estimate the interaction rates for modern neutrino detectors, in particular the Borexino and GEMMA experiments. We establish that in these experiments the effect can be safely neglected, but it could be accessible to future large-volume neutrino detectors with low energy threshold.

  1. Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\

    SciTech Connect

    Backhouse, Christopher James

    2011-01-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters (Δmatm2 and sin2atm). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of vμ interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the vμ-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the vμ-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: Δm2 = 2.32-0.08+0.12 x 10-3 eV2, sin 2 2θ > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly $\\bar{v}$μ beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters Δ$\\bar{m}${sup 2} = (3.36-0.40+0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3eV2, sin2 2$\\bar{θ}$ = 0.86-0.12_0.11

  2. The MINERvA Neutrino Scattering Experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, David W.

    2011-11-23

    The MINER{nu}A experiment at Fermilab is aimed at precision measurements of neutrino interactions in nuclei for energies up to a few GeV. MINER{nu}A makes use of a fine-grained, fully active detector design and a range of nuclear target materials. The experiment began taking data in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab in late 2009 and will collect data in both the neutrino and antineutrino configurations of the beamline.

  3. Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Inclusive Charged Current Cross Section on Iron using the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Loiacono, Laura Jean

    2010-05-01

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) produces an intense muon neutrino beam used by the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS), a neutrino oscillation experiment, and the Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A, (MINERv A), a neutrino interaction experiment. Absolute neutrino cross sections are determined via σv = N vv , where the numerator is the measured number of neutrino interactions in the MINOS Detector and the denominator is the flux of incident neutrinos. Many past neutrino experiments have measured relative cross sections due to a lack of precise measurements of the incident neutrino flux, normalizing to better established reaction processes, such as quasielastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. But recent measurements of neutrino interactions on nuclear targets have brought to light questions about our understanding of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. In this thesis the vμ inclusive charged current cross section on iron is measured using the MINOS Detector. The MINOS detector consists of alternating planes of steel and scintillator. The MINOS detector is optimized to measure muons produced in charged current vμ interactions. Along with muons, these interactions produce hadronic showers. The neutrino energy is measured from the total energy the particles deposit in the detector. The incident neutrino flux is measured using the muons produced alongside the neutrinos in meson decay. Three ionization chamber monitors located in the downstream portion of the NuMI beamline are used to measure the muon flux and thereby infer the neutrino flux by relation to the underlying pion and kaon meson flux. This thesis describes the muon flux instrumentation in the NuMI beam, its operation over the two year duration of this measurement, and the techniques used to derive the neutrino flux.

  4. KATRIN: Measuring the Mass Scale of Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oblath, Noah; Katrin Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Over the past decade, experiments studying neutrinos from atmospheric, solar, and reactor sources have shown conclusively that neutrinos change flavor and, as a consequence, have a small but finite mass. However, the scale of neutrino masses remains an open question that is of great importance for many areas of physics. The most direct method to measure the neutrino mass scale is still via beta decay. The talk will focus primarily on the status of the KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN), currently under construction. KATRIN combines an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source with a high-resolution integrating spectrometer to gain sensitivity to the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. The projected sensitivity of the experiment on the neutrino mass is 0.2 eV at 90% C.L. In this talk I will discuss the status of the KATRIN experiment.

  5. Measuring anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Safdi, Benjamin R.; Tully, Christopher G.

    2014-10-01

    Neutrino capture on tritium has emerged as a promising method for detecting the cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ). We show that relic neutrinos are captured most readily when their spin vectors are antialigned with the polarization axis of the tritium nuclei and when they approach along the direction of polarization. As a result, C ν B observatories may measure anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino velocity and spin distributions by polarizing the tritium targets. A small dipole anisotropy in the C ν B is expected due to the peculiar velocity of the lab frame with respect to the cosmic frame and due to late-time gravitational effects. The PTOLEMY experiment, a tritium observatory currently under construction, should observe a nearly isotropic background. This would serve as a strong test of the cosmological origin of a potential signal. The polarized-target measurements may also constrain nonstandard neutrino interactions that would induce larger anisotropies and help discriminate between Majorana versus Dirac neutrinos.

  6. 7Be Solar Neutrino Measurement with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    The KamLAND Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hanakago, H.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishikawa, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, R.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, D.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Obata, A.; Oki, A.; Oki, Y.; Otani, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yamada, S.; Yamauchi, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D. W.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Murayama, H.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Learned, J. G.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K. E.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Heeger, K.; Decowski, M. P.

    2014-05-26

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate of 862 keV {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos based on a 165.4 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The observed rate is 582{+-}90 (kton day){sup -1}, which corresponds to a 862 keV {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux of (3.26{+-}0.50) x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, assuming a pure electron flavor flux. Comparing this flux with the standard solar model prediction and further assuming three flavor mixing, a e survival probability of 0.66{+-}0.14 is determined from the KamLAND data. Utilizing a global three flavor oscillation analysis, we obtain a total {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux of (5.82{+-}0.98) x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, which is consistent with the standard solar model predictions.

  7. 7Be solar neutrino measurement with KamLAND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hanakago, H.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishikawa, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, R.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, D.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Obata, A.; Oki, A.; Oki, Y.; Otani, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yamada, S.; Yamauchi, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D. W.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Murayama, H.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Learned, J. G.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K. E.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Heeger, K.; Decowski, M. P.; KamLAND Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate of 862 keV 7Be solar neutrinos based on a 165.4 kt d exposure of KamLAND. The observed rate is 582 ±94 (kt d)-1, which corresponds to an 862-keV 7Be solar neutrino flux of (3.26 ±0.52 ) ×109cm-2s-1 , assuming a pure electron-flavor flux. Comparing this flux with the standard solar model prediction and further assuming three-flavor mixing, a νe survival probability of 0.66 ±0.15 is determined from the KamLAND data. Utilizing a global three-flavor oscillation analysis, we obtain a total 7Be solar neutrino flux of (5.82 ±1.02 ) ×109cm-2s-1 , which is consistent with the standard solar model predictions.

  8. Possibility of measuring Adler angles in charged current single pion neutrino-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, F.

    2016-05-01

    Uncertainties in modeling neutrino-nucleus interactions are a major contribution to systematic errors in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Accurate modeling of neutrino interactions requires additional experimental observables such as the Adler angles which carry information about the polarization of the Δ resonance and the interference with nonresonant single pion production. The Adler angles were measured with limited statistics in bubble chamber neutrino experiments as well as in electron-proton scattering experiments. We discuss the viability of measuring these angles in neutrino interactions with nuclei.

  9. Experimental Measurement of Low Energy Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, Kate

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino interactions in the few to few tens of MeV range are of importance for several physics topics, including solar, supernova and reactor neutrinos, as well as future proposed oscillation and Standard Model test experiments. Although interaction cross-sections for some simple targets are well understood, very little experimental data exist for interactions with nuclei. This talk will discuss the motivation for measuring low energy neutrino interactions, the state of knowledge, and possible future strategies.

  10. Evidence for electron neutrino flavor change through measurement of the (8)B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Mark Stephen

    2001-11-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water Cerenkov detector designed to study solar neutrinos. Using 1 kiloton of heavy water as the target and detection medium, SNO is able to separately determine the flux of electron neutrinos (νe) and the flux of all active neutrinos from the Sun by measuring the rate of charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) interactions with deuterons. A comparison of these interaction rates allows for direct observation of solar neutrino oscillations. SNO can also search for oscillations by comparing the rate of CC and neutrino- electron elastic scattering (ES) events, since ES has both charged current and neutral current sensitivity. In this thesis, we present measurement of the 8B solar ν e flux of 1.78+0.13-0.14 (stat+syst) × 106cm-2s -1 (35% BP2000 SSM) through measurement of the CC rate over 169.3 days of livetime. We have also measured the 8B flux from the ES reaction to be 2.56+0.48-0.45 (stat+syst), consistent with measurements by previous water Cerenkov experiments. A flavor analysis comparing the CC measured flux with that determined through ES by SuperKamiokande yields a non- νe active neutrino flux from 8B of 3.62+1.06-1.08 × 106cm-2s-1 , providing evidence for νe --> ν μ,τ oscillations as a solution to the solar neutrino problem. This result excludes pure solar νe --> ν s oscillations at greater than the 99.7% C.I. The total active 8B neutrino flux has been measured to be 5.39+1.07-1.09 × 106cm-2s-1 , consistent with BP2000 SSM predictions. First analyses of the CC (NHit) spectrum and hep flux in SNO are presented. The CC spectrum is found to be a good fit to expectations from an undistorted 8B spectrum, and global best fit vacuum oscillation solutions are disfavored over the other solutions by the data. Through observations near the 8B endpoint with consideration of energy systematics, hep flux limits of 4.1 (90% C.I.) and 6.9 (99% C.I.) times SSM expectations are obtained. A statistical fit for the

  11. Progress in measuring neutrino quasielastic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gran, Richard

    2007-12-21

    This is an exciting time for folks who are looking at neutrino cross sections, and the especially important quasielastic interaction. We are able to inspect several recent results from K2K and MiniBooNE and are looking forward to a couple more high statistics measurements of neutrino and anti-neutrino interactions. There is additional interest because of the need for this cross section information for current and upcoming neutrino oscillation experiments. This paper is a brief review of our current understanding and some puzzles when we compare the recent results with past measurements. I articulate some of the short term challenges facing experimentalists, neutrino event generators, and theoretical work on the quasielastic interaction.

  12. First measurement of the flux of solar neutrinos from the sun at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittich, Peter

    2000-12-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation solar neutrino detector. SNO is the first experiment that is able to measure both the electron neutrino flux and a flavor-blind flux of all active neutrino types, allowing a model-independent determination if the deficit of solar neutrinos known as the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillation. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory started taking production data in November, 1999. A measurement of the charged current rate will be the first indication if SNO too sees a suppression of the solar neutrino signal relative to the theoretical predictions. Such a confirmation is the first step in SNO's ambitious science program. In this thesis, we present evidence that SNO is seeing solar neutrinos and a preliminary ratio of the measured vs predicted rate of electrons as induced by 8B neutrinos in the νe, + d --> p + p + e charged-current (CC) reaction.

  13. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Eν~3.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, G. A.; Schmitz, D. W.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Baldin, B.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradford, R.; Brooks, W. K.; Budd, H.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Castromonte, C. M.; Christy, M. E.; Chung, H.; Chvojka, J.; Clark, M.; da Motta, H.; Damiani, D. S.; Danko, I.; Datta, M.; Day, M.; DeMaat, R.; Devan, J.; Draeger, E.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Edmondson, D. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; George, C. A.; Gielata, J. A.; Gingu, C.; Gobbi, B.; Gran, R.; Grossman, N.; Hanson, J.; Harris, D. A.; Heaton, J.; Higuera, A.; Howley, I. J.; Hurtado, K.; Jerkins, M.; Kafka, T.; Kaisen, J.; Kanter, M. O.; Keppel, C. E.; Kilmer, J.; Kordosky, M.; Krajeski, A. H.; Kulagin, S. A.; Le, T.; Lee, H.; Leister, A. G.; Locke, G.; Maggi, G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Ochoa, N.; O’Connor, C. D.; Olsen, J.; Osmanov, B.; Osta, J.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Peña, C.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rude, C.; Sassin, K. E.; Schellman, H.; Schneider, R. M.; Schulte, E. C.; Simon, C.; Snider, F. D.; Snyder, M. C.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tan, W.; Tice, B. G.; Tzanakos, G.; Velásquez, J. P.; Walding, J.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wolthuis, B. A.; Woodward, N.; Zavala, G.; Zeng, H. B.; Zhang, D.; Zhu, L. Y.; Ziemer, B. P.

    2013-07-11

    We report a study of νμ charged-current quasielastic events in the segmented scintillator inner tracker of the MINERvA experiment running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The events were selected by requiring a μ⁻ and low calorimetric recoil energy separated from the interaction vertex. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross section, dσ/dQ², and study the low energy particle content of the final state. Deviations are found between the measured dσ/dQ² and the expectations of a model of independent nucleons in a relativistic Fermi gas. We also observe an excess of energy near the vertex consistent with multiple protons in the final state.

  14. Sensitivity to Z -prime and nonstandard neutrino interactions from ultralow threshold neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Mahapatra, Rupak; Strigari, Louis E.; Walker, Joel W.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss prospects for probing Z -prime and nonstandard neutrino interactions using neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering with ultralow energy (˜10 eV ) threshold Si and Ge detectors. The analysis is performed in the context of a specific and contemporary reactor-based experimental proposal, developed in cooperation with the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University, and referencing available technology based upon economical and scalable detector arrays. For expected exposures, we show that sensitivity to the Z -prime mass is on the order of several TeV and is complementary to the LHC search with low-mass detectors in the near term. This technology is also shown to provide sensitivity to the neutrino magnetic moment, at a level that surpasses terrestrial limits, and is competitive with more stringent astrophysical bounds. We demonstrate the benefits of combining silicon and germanium detectors for distinguishing between classes of models of new physics and for suppressing correlated systematic uncertainties.

  15. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung from nucleon-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.; Gibson, B. F.

    2015-07-22

    Background: Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes from nucleon-nucleon scattering ΝΝνν¯ (nnvv¯, ppvv¯, and npvv¯) have recently attracted attention in studies of neutrino emission in neutron stars, because of the implications for the neutron star cooling. The calculated ΝΝνν¯ emissivities within the neutron star environment are relatively insensitive to the two-nucleon dynamical model used in the calculations, but differ significantly from those obtained using an OPE model. Purpose: To investigate the free ΝΝνν¯ cross sections using a realistic nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude, comparing the relative sizes of the cross sections for the three processes nnvv¯, ppvv¯, and npvv¯.

  16. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, J.

    2015-12-31

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter for electron neutrino appearance oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically begin with the muon neutrino cross section and apply theoretical corrections to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section. However, at present no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments exists. We present the cross sections for a CCQE-like process determined using the MINERvA detector, which are the first measurements of any exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^{2}$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^{2}$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between these measurements and the predictions of the GENIE generator. We furthermore report on a photon-like background unpredicted by the generator which we interpret as neutral-coherent diffractive scattering from hydrogen.

  17. Neutrino Scattering Uncertainties and their Role in Long Baseline Oscillation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Harris; G. Blazey; Arie Bodek; D. Boehnlein; S. Boyd; William Brooks; Antje Bruell; Howard S. Budd; R. Burnstein; D. Casper; A. Chakravorty; Michael Christy; Jesse Chvojka; M.A.C. Cummings; P. deBarbaro; D. Drakoulakos; J. Dunmore; Rolf Ent; Hugh Gallagher; David Gaskell; Ronald Gilman; Charles Glashausser; Wendy Hinton; Xiaodong Jiang; T. Kafka; O. Kamaev; Cynthia Keppel; M. Kostin; Sergey Kulagin; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Steven Manly; W.A. Mann; Kevin Mcfarland-porter; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Jorge Morfin; D. Naples; John Nelson; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-ioana Niculescu; W. Oliver; Michael Paolone; Emmanuel Paschos; A. Pla-Dalmau; Ronald Ransome; C. Regis; P. Rubinov; V. Rykalin; Willis Sakumoto; P. Shanahan; N. Solomey; P. Spentzouris; P. Stamoulis; G. Tzanakos; Stephen Wood; F.X. Yumiceva; B. Ziemer; M. Zois

    2004-10-01

    The field of oscillation physics is about to make an enormous leap forward in statistical precision: first through the MINOS experiment in the coming year, and later through the NOvA and T2K experiments. Because of the relatively poor understanding of neutrino interactions in the energy ranges of these experiments, there are systematics that can arise in interpreting far detector data that can be as large as or even larger than the expected statistical uncertainties. We describe how these systematic errors arise, and how specific measurements in a dedicated neutrino scattering experiment like MINERvA can reduce the cross section systematic errors to well below the statistical errors.

  18. Impact of Neutrino Oscillation Measurements on Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2003-11-30

    Neutrino oscillation data had been a big surprise to theorists, and indeed they have ongoing impact on theory. I review what the impact has been, and what measurements will have critical impact on theory in the future.

  19. Measurement of Neutrino and Antineutrino Charged-Current Inclusive Cross Sections with the MINERvA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Devan, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos are a nearly massless, neutral particle in the Standard Model that only interact via the weak interaction. Experimental confirmation of neutrino oscillations, in which a neutrino created as a particular type (electron, muon or tau) can be observed as a different type after propagating some distance, earned the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Neutrino oscillation experiments rely on accurate measurements of neutrino interactions with matter, such as that presented here. Neutrinos also provide a unique probe of the nucleus, complementary to electron scattering experiments. This thesis presents a measurement of the charged-current inclusive cross section for muon neutrinos and antineutrinos in the energy range 2 to 50 GeV with the MINERvA detector. MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab, near Chicago. A cross section measures the probability of an interaction occurring, measured here as a function of neutrino energy. To extract a cross section from data, the observed rate of interactions is corrected for detector efficiency and divided by the number of scattering nucleons in the target and the flux of neutrinos in the beam. The neutrino flux is determined with the low-$\

  20. Influence of the nuclear medium on inclusive electron and neutrino scattering off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, O.; Leitner, T.; Mosel, U.; Alvarez-Ruso, L.

    2007-09-15

    We present a model for inclusive electron and neutrino scattering off nuclei paying special attention to the influence of in-medium effects on the quasielastic scattering and pion-production mechanisms. Our results for electron scattering off {sup 16}O are compared to experimental data at beam energies ranging from 0.7 to 1.5 GeV. The good description of electron scattering serves as a benchmark for neutrino scattering.

  1. Precision Measurement of the Beryllium-7 Solar Neutrino Interaction Rate in Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, Richard Nigel

    Solar neutrinos, since their first detection nearly forty years ago, have revealed valuable information regarding the source of energy production in the Sun, and have demonstrated that neutrino oscillations are well described by the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) oscillation parameters with matter interactions due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. This thesis presents a precision measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino interaction rate within Borexino, an underground liquid scintillator detector that is designed to measure solar neutrino interactions through neutrino-electron elastic scattering. The thesis includes a detailed description of the analysis techniques developed and used for this measurement as well as an evaluation of the relevant systematic uncertainties that affect the precision of the result. The rate of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from 0.862 MeV 7Be neutrinos is determined to be 45.4 +/- 1.6 (stat) +/- 1.5 (sys) counts/day/100 ton. Due to extensive detector calibrations and improved analysis methods, the systematic uncertainty in the interaction rate has been reduced by more than a factor of two from the previous evaluation. In the no-oscillation hypothesis, the interaction rate corresponds to a 0.862 MeV 7Be electron neutrino flux of (2.75 +/- 0.13) x 10 9 cm-2 sec-1. Including the predicted neutrino flux from the Standard Solar Model yields an electron neutrino survival probability of Pee 0.51 +/- 0.07 and rules out the no-oscillation hypothesis at 5.1sigma The LMA-MSW neutrino oscillation model predicts a transition in the solar Pee value between low (< 1 MeV) and high (> 10 MeV) energies which has not yet been experimentally confirmed. This result, in conjunction with the Standard Solar Model, represents the most precise measurement of the electron neutrino survival probability for solar neutrinos at sub-MeV energies.

  2. Measurement of neutrino masses from relative velocities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek; Yu, Yu

    2014-09-26

    We present a new technique to measure neutrino masses using their flow field relative to dark matter. Present day streaming motions of neutrinos relative to dark matter and baryons are several hundred km/s, comparable with their thermal velocity dispersion. This results in a unique dipole anisotropic distortion of the matter-neutrino cross power spectrum, which is observable through the dipole distortion in the cross correlation of different galaxy populations. Such a dipole vanishes if not for this relative velocity and so it is a clean signature for neutrino mass. We estimate the size of this effect and find that current and future galaxy surveys may be sensitive to these signature distortions. PMID:25302878

  3. Effective Spectral Function for Neutrino Quasielastic Scattering Event Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, Brian; Bodek, Arie; Christy, M. Eric

    2014-03-01

    The spectral functions that are used in modeling of quasi elastic scattering in neutrino event generators such as GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE and NUWRO event generators include (Global) Fermi gas, local Fermi gas, Bodek-Ritche Fermi gas with high momentum tail, and the Benhar Fantoni spectral function. We find that these spectral functions do not agree with the prediction of ψ' superscaling functions that are extracted from electron quasi elastic scattering data on nuclear targets. It is known that spectral functions do not fully describe quasi elastic scattering because they only model the initial state. Final state interactions distort the shape of the quasi elastic peak, reduce the cross section at the peak and increase the cross section at the tail of the distribution for large energy transfer to final state nucleons. We show that an ``effective spectral function'' can be constructed to reliably reproduce the kinematic distributions predicted by the ψ' super scaling formalism.

  4. Measurement of light scattering in deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragos, N.; Balasi, K.; Domvoglou, T.; Kiskiras, I.; Lenis, D.; Maniatis, M.; Stavropoulos, G.

    2016-04-01

    The deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea, being prepared by the KM3NET collaboration, will contain thousands of optical sensors to readout. The accurate knowledge of the optical properties of deep-sea water is of great importance for the neutrino event reconstruction process. In this study we describe our progress in designing an experimental setup and studying a method to measure the parameters describing the absorption and scattering characteristics of deep-sea water. Three PMTs will be used to measure in situ the scattered light emitted from six laser diodes in three different wavelengths covering the Cherenkov radiation spectrum. The technique for the evaluation of the parameters is based on Monte Carlo simulations and our results show that we are able to determine these parameters with satisfying precision.

  5. Future atmospheric neutrino measurements with PINGU

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.

    2015-07-15

    Neutrino oscillations, first measured in 1998 via atmospheric neutrinos, have provided the only current direct evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model of Elementary Particles. The full neutrino mixing, described by six parameters, has been measured in the last decade with the exception of the charge-parity phase and the ordering of the mass eigenstates (the neutrino mass hierarchy – NMH). A relatively large mixing-angle between the first and third mass eigenstates has opened the possibility of measuring the mass hierarchy via atmospheric neutrinos using very large volume detectors. A leading proposal to perform this measurement is the future low-energy extension to the IceCube–DeepCore detector, called PINGU (the Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade). By increasing the photocathode density in the DeepCore region, it is possible to lower the energy threshold in the fiducial volume to the region that is affected by the MSW [1, 2], and thus permits extraction of the hierarchy. Here we discuss the design of the PINGU detector, its sensitivity to the mass hierarchy (approximately 3σ in 3.5 years) and measurements of ν{sub μ} disappearance and ν{sub τ} appearance.

  6. Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, J.G.; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

    2003-12-01

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

  7. Hadron production measurements for neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panman, Jaap

    2008-02-21

    One of the limiting factors for the precision of neutrino oscillation experiments is the uncertainty in the composition and spectrum of the neutrino flux. Recently, dedicated hadron production experiments have been taking data and are being planned to supply measurements which can significantly reduce these uncertainties. The HARP experiment has presented results on the measurements of the double-differential production cross-section of charged pions in proton interactions with beryllium, carbon, aluminium, copper, tin, tantalum and lead targets. These results are relevant for a detailed understanding of neutrino flux in accelerator neutrino experiments K2K (p-Al data) and MiniBooNE/SciBooNE (p-Be data), for a better prediction of atmospheric neutrino fluxes (p-C, {pi}{sup +}-C and {pi}{sup -}-C data) as well as for a systematic improvement of hadron production models. The E910 experiment at BNL has recently published their p-Be data. NA49 has measured pion production spectra in p-C interactions and a new experiment, NA61, is starting to take data using essentially the same detector. NA61 plans to measure production spectra for the T2K experiment and for the calculation of extended air showers. MIPP has taken data with a copy of the NuMI target and is progressing in the analysis of these data. An upgrade of the readout of this experiment can greatly increase its potential.

  8. Measuring the Disappearance of Muon Neutrinos with the MINOS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Radovic, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    MINOS is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It measures the flux from the predominately muon neutrino NuMI beam first 1 km from beam start and then again 735 km later using a pair of steel scintillator tracking calorimeters. The comparison of measured neutrino energy spectra at our Far Detector with the prediction based on our Near Detector measurement allows for a measurement of the parameters which define neutrino oscillations. This thesis will describe the most recent measurement of muon neutrino disappearance in the NuMI muon neutrino beam using the MINOS experiment.

  9. First Measurement of the Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Columbia U.

    2010-02-01

    A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub {nu}}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2}) are extracted to facilitate comparison with previous measurements. These quantities may be used to characterize an effective axial-vector form factor of the nucleon and to improve the modeling of low-energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets. The results are relevant for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  10. First measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic double differential cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Tanaka, H. A.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Kasper, P.; Kobilarcik, T.

    2010-05-01

    A high-statistics sample of charged-current muon neutrino scattering events collected with the MiniBooNE experiment is analyzed to extract the first measurement of the double differential cross section ((d{sup 2{sigma}}/dT{sub {mu}d}cos{theta}{sub {mu}})) for charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) scattering on carbon. This result features minimal model dependence and provides the most complete information on this process to date. With the assumption of CCQE scattering, the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub {nu}}]) and the single differential cross section ((d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2})) are extracted to facilitate comparison with previous measurements. These quantities may be used to characterize an effective axial-vector form factor of the nucleon and to improve the modeling of low-energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets. The results are relevant for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  11. KamLAND's precision neutrino oscillation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decowski, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    The KamLAND experiment started operation in the Spring of 2002 and is operational to this day. The experiment observes signals from electron antineutrinos from distant nuclear reactors. The program, spanning more than a decade, allowed the determination of LMA-MSW as the solution to the solar neutrino transformation results (under the assumption of CPT invariance) and the measurement of various neutrino oscillation parameters. In particular, the solar mass-splitting Δ m212 was determined to high precision. Besides the study of neutrino oscillation, KamLAND started the investigation of geologically produced antineutrinos (geo-ν‾e). The collaboration also reported on a variety of other topics related to particle and astroparticle physics.

  12. A proposal for a precision test of the standard model by neutrino-electron scattering (Large /hacek C/erenkov Detector Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Lu, X-Q.; Gollwitzer, K.; Igo, G.J.; Gulmez, E.; Whitten, C.; VanDalen, G.; Layter, J.; Fung, Sun Yui; Shen, B.C.

    1988-04-01

    A precision measurement of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from a beam stop neutrino source at LAMPF is proposed. The total error in sin/sup 2/theta/sub W/ is estimated to be +-0.89/percent/. The experiment also will be sensitive to neutrino oscillations and supernova-neutrino bursts, and should set improved limits on the neutrino-charge radius and magnetic-dipole moment. The detector consists of a 2.5-million-gallon tank of water with approximately 14,000 photomultiplier tubes lining the surfaces of the tank. Neutrino-electron scattering events will be observed from the /hacek C/erenkov radiation emitted by the electrons in the water. 19 refs.

  13. Weak-neutral-current elastic scattering of neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lanou, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    We present progress to date in an experiment (E0734) to measure neutral current phenomena at low neutrino energy (200 less than or equal to E/sub nu/ less than or equal to 3 GeV). The principal goals center upon the elastic reactions: anti nu/sub ..mu../ + p ..-->.. anti nu/sub ..mu../ + p, and anti nu/sub ..mu../ + e ..-->.. anti nu/sub ..mu../ + e.

  14. First Measurement of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic (CCQE) Double Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei; /MIT, LNS

    2009-09-01

    Using a high statistics sample of muon neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) events, we report the first measurement of the double differential cross section (d{sup 2}{sigma}/dT{sub {mu}}d cos {theta}{sub {mu}}) for this process. The result features reduced model dependence and supplies the most complete information on neutrino CCQE scattering to date. Measurements of the absolute cross section as a function of neutrino energy ({sigma}[E{sub v}{sup QE,RFG}]) and the single differential cross section (d{sigma}/dQ{sub QE}{sup 2}) are also provided, largely to facilitate comparison with prior measurements. This data is of particular use for understanding the axial-vector form factor of the nucleon as well as improving the simulation of low energy neutrino interactions on nuclear targets, which is of particular relevance for experiments searching for neutrino oscillations.

  15. CAPTAIN-Minerνa. Neutrino-Argon Scattering in a Medium-Energy Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, Christopher M.

    2015-10-29

    The NuMI facility at Fermilab is currently providing an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the NOνA, MINERνA and MINOS+ experiments. By installing the 5-ton CAPTAIN liquid argon TPC in front of the MINERνA detector in the NuMI beamline and combining the data from the CAPTAIN, MINERνA and MINOS+ detectors, a broad program of few-GeV neutrino cross section measurements on argon can be pursued. These measurements will be extremely helpful for future oscillation experiments. By directly comparing the cross sections on argon to MINERνA’s scintillator (CH) target, a new level of precision can be achieved in the measurements of the effects of the nucleus on neutrino interactions. These effects are of interest to not only the particle physics but also the nuclear physics community. This document describes in detail the physics goals of the CAPTAIN-MINERνA experiment, in addition to a first estimate of the technical resources required to install, commission and operate the CAPTAIN detector in front of the MINERVA detector.

  16. Influence of short-range correlations in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cuyck, T.; Jachowicz, N.; González-Jiménez, R.; Martini, M.; Pandey, V.; Ryckebusch, J.; Van Dessel, N.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Nuclear short-range correlations (SRCs) are corrections to mean-field wave functions connected with the short-distance behavior of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. These SRCs provide corrections to lepton-nucleus cross sections as computed in the impulse approximation (IA). Purpose: We want to investigate the influence of SRCs on the one-nucleon (1 N ) and two-nucleon (2 N ) knockout channels for muon-neutrino induced processes on a 12 target at energies relevant for contemporary measurements. Method: The model adopted in this work corrects the impulse approximation for SRCs by shifting the complexity induced by the SRCs from the wave functions to the operators. Due to the local character of the SRCs, it is argued that the expansion of these operators can be truncated at a low order. Results: The model is compared with electron-scattering data, and two-particle two-hole responses are presented for neutrino scattering. The contributions from the vector and axial-vector parts of the nuclear current as well as the central, tensor, and spin-isospin parts of the SRCs are studied. Conclusions: Nuclear SRCs affect the 1 N knockout channel and give rise to 2 N knockout. The exclusive neutrino-induced 2 N knockout cross section of SRC pairs is shown and the 2 N knockout contribution to the QE signal is calculated. The strength occurs as a broad background which extends into the dip region.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Neutrino Scattering in Heterogeneous High Dense Media

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, O. L.

    2008-03-13

    The dynamics of core-collapse supernovae is sensitive to neutrino scattering. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we calculated ion static structure factors and neutrino mean free paths. We simulated the stellar medium as composed in one case by single ion specie, and in the other by a mixture of ions. For the heterogeneous plasma we used two different models and systematically found the neutrino mean free path is shorter for an ion mixture.

  18. Some Recent Secondary Production Measurements for Neutrino Flux Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Geoffrey B.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements of meson production in proton-nucleus interactions have made possible reliable neutrino flux determinations at modern neutrino experiments. This article discusses preliminary results from the HARP, MIP, and E910 are discussed along with some of their implications for the MINOS, K2K, and MiniBooNE neutrino experiments.

  19. Multiple Scattering Measurements in the MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, T.; Cobb, J.; Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), under construction at RAL, will test a prototype cooling channel for a future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The cooling channel aims to achieve, using liquid hydrogen absorbers, a 10% reduction in transverse emittance. The change in 4D emittance will be determined with an accuracy of 1% by measuring muons individually. Step IV of MICE will make the first precise emittance-reduction measurements of the experiment. Simulation studies using G4MICE, based on GEANT4, find a significant difference in multiple scattering in low Z materials, compared with the standard expression quoted by the Particle Data Group. Direct measurement of multiple scattering using the scintillating-fibre trackers is found to be possible, but requires the measurement resolution to be unfolded from the data.

  20. CNO and pep solar neutrino measurements and perspectives in Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davini, S.; Agostini, M.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    The detection of neutrinos emitted in the CNO reactions in the Sun is one of the ambitious goals of Borexino Phase-II. A measurement of CNO neutrinos would be a milestone in astrophysics, and would allow to solve serious issues in current solar models. A precise measurement of the rate of neutrinos from the pep reaction would allow to investigate neutrino oscillations in the MSW transition region. The pep and CNO solar neutrino physics, the measurement in Borexino Phase-I and the perspectives for the new phase are reviewed in this proceeding.

  1. Elastic neutrino-electron scattering: a progress report on Exp734 at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Amako, K.

    1983-01-01

    I will report preliminary results on elastic neutrino-electron scattering from data taken with the 200 ton segmented liquid scintillator - proportional drift-tube neutrino detector at Brookhaven. Features of the detector (such as the active target and long radiation length) permit a uniquely clean signal. Prospects of results from the completed analysis and further data taking are discussed.

  2. Measuring neutrino masses with weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2006-11-17

    Weak gravitational lensing of distant galaxies by large scale structure (LSS) provides an unbiased way to map the matter distribution in the low redshift universe. This technique, based on the measurement of small distortions in the images of the source galaxies induced by the intervening LSS, is expected to become a key cosmological probe in the future. We discuss how future lensing surveys can probe the sum of the neutrino masses at the 0 05 eV level.

  3. Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA detector in the CNGS neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autiero, Dario

    2012-03-01

    The OPERA neutrino experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory measured the velocity of neutrinos from the CERN CNGS beam over a baseline of about 730 km with much higher accuracy than previous studies conducted with accelerator neutrinos. The measurement was based on high statistics data taken by OPERA in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Dedicated upgrades of the CNGS timing system and of the OPERA detector, as well as a high precision geodesy campaign for the measurement of the neutrino baseline, allowed reaching comparable systematic and statistical accuracies and limiting the overall uncertainty on the neutrinos time of flight measurement to 10 ns. The time of flight was measured by comparing the time distributions of neutrino interactions in OPERA and of protons hitting the CNGS target in 10.5 μs long extractions. The above result, indicating an early arrival time of about 60 ns of CNGS muon neutrinos with respect to the one computed assuming the speed of light in vacuum, was confirmed by a test performed using a beam with a short-bunch time-structure allowing to measure the neutrino time of flight at the single interaction level. The OPERA neutrino velocity measurement will be review as well as the latest developments and perspectives.

  4. Measurement of neutrino velocity with the MINOS detectors and NuMI neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D. J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Beall, E.; Becker, B. R.; Belias, A.; Bergfeld, T.; Bernstein, R. H.; Bhattacharya, D.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, B.; Bock, G. J.; Boehm, J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Border, P. M.; Bower, C.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Cabrera, A.; Chapman, J. D.; Cherdack, D.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Cobb, J. H.; Coleman, S. J.; Culling, A. J.; de Jong, J. K.; de Santo, A.; Dierckxsens, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Dorman, M.; Drakoulakos, D.; Durkin, T.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Harris, E. Falk; Feldman, G. J.; Fields, T. H.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Ford, R.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallagher, H. R.; Giurgiu, G. A.; Godley, A.; Gogos, J.; Goodman, M. C.; Gouffon, P.; Gran, R.; Grashorn, E. W.; Grossman, N.; Grzelak, K.; Habig, A.; Harris, D.; Harris, P. G.; Hartnell, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatcher, R.; Heller, K.; Holin, A.; Howcroft, C.; Hylen, J.; Indurthy, D.; Irwin, G. M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jaffe, D. E.; James, C.; Jenner, L.; Jensen, D.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Kafka, T.; Kang, H. J.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; Kordosky, M.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Kreymer, A.; Kumaratunga, S.; Lang, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, R.; Ling, J.; Liu, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Lucas, P.; Luebke, W.; Mann, W. A.; Marchionni, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marshak, M. L.; Marshall, J. S.; Mayer, N.; McGowan, A. M.; Meier, J. R.; Merzon, G. I.; Messier, M. D.; Michael, D. G.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, J. L.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mislivec, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Moore, C. D.; Morfín, J.; Mualem, L.; Mufson, S.; Murgia, S.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nichol, R. J.; Nicholls, T. C.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oliver, W. P.; Osiecki, T.; Ospanov, R.; Paley, J.; Paolone, V.; Para, A.; Patzak, T.; Pavlović, Ž.; Pearce, G. F.; Peck, C. W.; Perry, C.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Ping, H.; Piteira, R.; Pittam, R.; Plunkett, R. K.; Rahman, D.; Rameika, R. A.; Raufer, T. M.; Rebel, B.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reyna, D. E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Ruddick, K.; Ryabov, V. A.; Saakyan, R.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Saranen, D.; Schneps, J.; Schreiner, P.; Semenov, V. K.; Seun, S.-M.; Shanahan, P.; Smart, W.; Smirnitsky, V.; Smith, C.; Sousa, A.; Speakman, B.; Stamoulis, P.; Symes, P. A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Tetteh-Lartey, E.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Thron, J. L.; Tinti, G.; Trostin, I.; Tsarev, V. A.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Verebryusov, V.; Viren, B.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watabe, M.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; Wehmann, A.; West, N.; White, C.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wright, D. M.; Wu, Q. K.; Yang, T.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Zheng, H.; Zois, M.; Zwaska, R.

    2007-10-01

    The velocity of a ˜3GeV neutrino beam is measured by comparing detection times at the near and far detectors of the MINOS experiment, separated by 734 km. A total of 473 far detector neutrino events was used to measure (v-c)/c=5.1±2.9×10-5 (at 68% C.L.). By correlating the measured energies of 258 charged-current neutrino events to their arrival times at the far detector, a limit is imposed on the neutrino mass of mν<50MeV/c2 (99% C.L.).

  5. Measurement of neutrino velocity with the MINOS detectors and NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-06-01

    The velocity of a {approx}3 GeV neutrino beam is measured by comparing detection times at the Near and Far detectors of the MINOS experiment, separated by 734 km. A total of 473 Far Detector neutrino events was used to measure (v -c)/c = 5.1{+-}2.9x10{sup -5} (at 68% C.L.). By correlating the measured energies of 258 charged-current neutrino events to their arrival times at the Far Detector, a limit is imposed on the neutrino mass of m{sub v} < 50 MeV/c{sup 2} (99% C.L.).

  6. Measurement of the ratio of the numu charged-current single-pion production to quasielastic scattering with a 0.8 GeV neutrino beam on mineral oil.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A A; Anderson, C E; Bazarko, A O; Brice, S J; Brown, B C; Bugel, L; Cao, J; Coney, L; Conrad, J M; Cox, D C; Curioni, A; Djurcic, Z; Finley, D A; Fleming, B T; Ford, R; Garcia, F G; Garvey, G T; Green, C; Green, J A; Hart, T L; Hawker, E; Imlay, R; Johnson, R A; Karagiorgi, G; Kasper, P; Katori, T; Kobilarcik, T; Kourbanis, I; Koutsoliotas, S; Laird, E M; Linden, S K; Link, J M; Liu, Y; Liu, Y; Louis, W C; Mahn, K B M; Marsh, W; McGary, V T; McGregor, G; Metcalf, W; Meyers, P D; Mills, F; Mills, G B; Monroe, J; Moore, C D; Nelson, R H; Nienaber, P; Nowak, J A; Osmanov, B; Ouedraogo, S; Patterson, R B; Perevalov, D; Polly, C C; Prebys, E; Raaf, J L; Ray, H; Roe, B P; Russell, A D; Sandberg, V; Schirato, R; Schmitz, D; Shaevitz, M H; Shoemaker, F C; Smith, D; Soderberg, M; Sorel, M; Spentzouris, P; Spitz, J; Stancu, I; Stefanski, R J; Sung, M; Tanaka, H A; Tayloe, R; Tzanov, M; Van de Water, R; Wascko, M O; White, D H; Wilking, M J; Yang, H J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2009-08-21

    Using high statistics samples of charged-current numu interactions, the MiniBooNE [corrected] Collaboration reports a measurement of the single-charged-pion production to quasielastic cross section ratio on mineral oil (CH2), both with and without corrections for hadron reinteractions in the target nucleus. The result is provided as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeVmeasurements and the prediction from historical neutrino calculations. PMID:19792715

  7. Measurement of the Ratio of the nu{sub m}u Charged-Current Single-Pion Production to Quasielastic Scattering with a 0.8 GeV Neutrino Beam on Mineral Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Bugel, L.; Coney, L.; Djurcic, Z.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Monroe, J.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sorel, M.; Anderson, C. E.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.

    2009-08-21

    Using high statistics samples of charged-current nu{sub m}u interactions, the MiniNooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of the single-charged-pion production to quasielastic cross section ratio on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}), both with and without corrections for hadron reinteractions in the target nucleus. The result is provided as a function of neutrino energy in the range 0.4 GeVmeasurements and the prediction from historical neutrino calculations.

  8. QCD analysis of neutrino charged current structure function F2 in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aleem, F.; Saleem, M.

    1985-01-01

    An analytic expression for the neutrino charged current structure function F sub 2 (x, Q sup 2) in deep inelastic scattering, consistent with quantum chromodynamics, is proposed. The calculated results are in good agreement with experiment.

  9. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle θ23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  10. Precision Measurements of Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation at LBNF

    SciTech Connect

    Worcester, Elizabeth

    2015-08-06

    In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle θ23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.

  11. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Stephen James

    2011-05-01

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting Δm232 = (2.32-0.08+0.12) x 10-3 eV2/c4 and the mixing angle sin2(2θ32) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2σ and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0σ.

  12. Upper bound on neutrino mass based on T2K neutrino timing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment consists of a muon neutrino beam, produced at the J-PARC accelerator, a near detector complex and a large 295-km-distant far detector. The present work utilizes the T2K event timing measurements at the near and far detectors to study neutrino time of flight as a function of derived neutrino energy. Under the assumption of a relativistic relation between energy and time of flight, constraints on the neutrino rest mass can be derived. The sub-GeV neutrino beam in conjunction with timing precision of order tens of ns provide sensitivity to neutrino mass in the few MeV /c2 range. We study the distribution of relative arrival times of muon and electron neutrino candidate events at the T2K far detector as a function of neutrino energy. The 90% C.L. upper limit on the mixture of neutrino mass eigenstates represented in the data sample is found to be mν2<5.6 MeV2/c4 .

  13. Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M.P.

    2011-06-04

    We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from {sup 8}B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.32(syst) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis threshold is driven by {sup 208}Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic {sup 11}Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with standard solar model predictions which include matter-enhanced neutrino oscillation.

  14. Electroweak constraints from atomic parity violation and neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Timothy; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2010-07-01

    Precision electroweak physics can provide fertile ground for uncovering new physics beyond the standard model (SM). One area in which new physics can appear is in so-called 'oblique corrections', i.e., next-to-leading-order expansions of bosonic propagators corresponding to vacuum polarization. One may parametrize their effects in terms of quantities S and T that discriminate between conservation and nonconservation of isospin. This provides a means of comparing the relative contributions of precision electroweak experiments to constraints on new physics. Given the prevalence of strongly T-sensitive experiments, there is an acute need for further constraints on S, such as provided by atomic parity-violating experiments on heavy atoms. We evaluate constraints on S arising from recently improved calculations in the Cs atom. We show that the top quark mass m{sub t} provides stringent constraints on S within the context of the SM. We also consider the potential contributions of next-generation neutrino scattering experiments to improved (S,T) constraints.

  15. The Angra Neutrino Project: precise measurement of θ13 and safeguards applications of neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimiro, E.; Anjos, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    We present an introduction to the Angra Neutrino Project. The goal of the project is to explore the use of neutrino detectors to monitor the reactor activity. The Angra Project, willl employ as neutrino sources the reactors of the nuclear power complex in Brazil, located in Angra dos Reis, some 150 Km south from the city of Rio de Janeiro. The Angra collaboration will develop and operate a low-mass neutrino detector to monitor the nuclear reactor activity, in particular to measure the reactor thermal power and the reactor fuel isotopic composition.

  16. A Measurement of the charged-current interaction cross section of the tau neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, Emily O'Connor; /Minnesota U.

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab experiment E872 (DONUT) was designed to make the first observation of the tau neutrino charged-current interaction. Using a hybrid emulsion-spectrometer detector, the tau lepton was identified by its single-prong or trident decay. Six interactions were observed, of which five were in the deep inelastic scattering region. These five interaction were used to measure the charged-current cross section of the tau neutrino. To minimize uncertainties, the tau neutrino cross section was measured relative to the electron neutrino cross section. The result {sigma}{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}N}{sup const}/{sigma}{sub {nu}{sub e}N}{sup const} = 0.77 {+-} 0.39 is consistent with 1.0, which is predicted by lepton universality. The tau neutrino cross section was also measured for 115 GeV neutrinos, which was the average energy of the interacted tau neutrinos. The result {sigma}{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}N}{sup exp} = 45 {+-} 21 x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} is consistent with the standard model prediction calculated in this thesis, {sigma}{sub {tau}N}{sup SM} = 48 {+-} 5 x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2}.

  17. A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to ~3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved the world

  18. The neutrino mass hierarchy measurement with a neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea: A feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsirigotis, A. G.; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    With the measurement of a non zero value of the θ{sub 13} neutrino mixing parameter, interest in neutrinos as source of the baryon asymmetry of the universe has increased. Among the measurements of a rich and varied program in near future neutrino physics is the determination of the mass hierarchy. We present the status of a study of the feasibility of using a densely instrumented undersea neutrino detector to determine the mass hierarchy, utilizing the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect on atmospheric neutrino oscillations. The detector will use technology developed for KM3NeT. We present the systematic studies of the optimization of a detector in the required 5–10 GeV energy regime. These studies include new tracking and interaction identification algorithms as well as geometrical optimizations of the detector.

  19. Measuring Neutrinos with the ANTARES Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Corey

    2009-12-17

    The ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope has been taking data since construction began in 2006. The telescope, completed in May of 2008, detects the Cerenkov radiation of charged leptons produced by high energy neutrinos interacting in or around the detector. The lepton trajectory is reconstructed with high precision, revealing the direction of the incoming neutrino. The performance of the detector will be discussed and recent data showing muons, electromagnetic showers and atmospheric neutrinos will be presented. Studies have been underway to search for neutrino point sources in the ANTARES data since 2007. Results from these studies will be presented, and the sensitivity of the telescope will be discussed.

  20. Neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; Kuno, Y.; Benedetto, E.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Garoby, R.; Gilardoini, S.; Martini, M.; Wildner, E.; Prior, G.; Blondel, A.; Karadzhow, Y.; Ellis, M.; Kyberd, P.; Bayes, R.; Laing, A.; Soler, F. J. P.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Aslaninejad, M.; Bontoiu, C.; Jenner, L. J.; Kurup, A.; Long, K.; Pasternak, J.; Zarrebini, A.; Poslimski, J.; Blackmore, V.; Cobb, J.; Tunnell, C.; Andreopoulos, C.; Bennett, J. R.J.; Brooks, S.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Edgecock, T. R.; Fitton, M.; Kelliher, D.; Loveridge, P.; McFarland, A.; Machida, S.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rogers, C.; Rooney, M.; Thomason, J.; Wilcox, D.; Booth, C.; Skoro, G.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P.; Berg, J. S.; Fernow, R.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gupta, R.; Kirk, H.; Simos, N.; Stratakis, D.; Souchlas, N.; Witte, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Makhov, N.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Strait, J.; Striganov, S.; Morfín, J. G.; Wands, R.; Snopok, P.; Bagacz, S. A.; Morozov, V.; Roblin, Y.; Cline, D.; Ding, X.; Bromberg, C.; Hart, T.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C. M.; Beard, K. B.; Cummings, M. A.C.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Roberts, T. J.; Yoshikawa, C. Y.; Graves, V. B.; McDonald, K. T.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable of making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.

  1. Neutrino factory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bogomilov, M.; Matev, R.; Tsenov, R.; Dracos, M.; Bonesini, M.; Palladino, V.; Tortora, L.; Mori, Y.; Planche, T.; Lagrange, J. B.; et al

    2014-12-08

    The properties of the neutrino provide a unique window on physics beyond that described by the standard model. The study of subleading effects in neutrino oscillations, and the race to discover CP-invariance violation in the lepton sector, has begun with the recent discovery that theta(13) > 0. The measured value of theta(13) is large, emphasizing the need for a facility at which the systematic uncertainties can be reduced to the percent level. The neutrino factory, in which intense neutrino beams are produced from the decay of muons, has been shown to outperform all realistic alternatives and to be capable ofmore » making measurements of the requisite precision. Its unique discovery potential arises from the fact that only at the neutrino factory is it practical to produce high-energy electron (anti) neutrino beams of the required intensity. This paper presents the conceptual design of the neutrino factory accelerator facility developed by the European Commission Framework Programme 7 EURO nu. Design Study consortium. EURO nu coordinated the European contributions to the International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) collaboration. The EURO nu baseline accelerator facility will provide 10(21) muon decays per year from 12.6 GeV stored muon beams serving a single neutrino detector situated at a source-detector distance of between 1 500 km and 2 500 km. A suite of near detectors will allow definitive neutrino-scattering experiments to be performed.« less

  2. Neutron Background Characterization for a Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering experiment at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering (CNNS) is a theoretical well-grounded, but as-yet unverified process. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) may provide an optimal platform for detection of CNNS, possibly with existing detector technology. A proto-collaboration of groups from several institutions has come together to investigate this option and propose an experiment for the first-time observation of CNNS. Currently, the largest risk to such an experiment comes from an unknown background of beam-induced high-energy neutrons that penetrate the existing SNS concrete shielding. We have deployed a neutron scatter camera at the SNS during beam operation and performed preliminary measurements of the neutron backgrounds at a promising experimental location. In order to measure neutrons as high as 100 MeV, we needed to make modifications to the neutron scatter camera and expand its capabilities beyond its standard operating range of 1-14MeV. We have identified sources of high-energy neutrons and continue to investigate other possible locations that may allow a successful CNNS experiment to go forward. The imaging capabilities of the neutron scatter camera will allow more optimal shielding designs that take into account neutron flux anisotropies at the selected experiment locations.

  3. Measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance with an off-axis beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F D M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Curioni, A; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Frank, E; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Gaudin, A; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Golan, T; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Jung, C K; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kim, S B; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Kogan, G; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Licciardi, C; Lim, I T; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Lopez, G D; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Masliah, P; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Otani, M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Pac, M Y; Palladino, V; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Pearce, G F; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Taylor, I J; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2013-11-22

    The T2K Collaboration reports a precision measurement of muon neutrino disappearance with an off-axis neutrino beam with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV. Near detector measurements are used to constrain the neutrino flux and cross section parameters. The Super-Kamiokande far detector, which is 295 km downstream of the neutrino production target, collected data corresponding to 3.01×10(20) protons on target. In the absence of neutrino oscillations, 205±17 (syst) events are expected to be detected while only 58 muon neutrino event candidates are observed. A fit to the neutrino rate and energy spectrum, assuming three neutrino flavors and normal mass hierarchy yields a best-fit mixing angle sin2(θ23)=0.514±0.082 and mass splitting |Δm(32)(2)|=2.44(-0.15)(+0.17)×10(-3) eV2/c4. Our result corresponds to the maximal oscillation disappearance probability. PMID:24313479

  4. Nucleon-nucleon scattering in a strong external magnetic field and the neutrino emissivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bavarsad, E.; Mohammadi, R.; Haghighat, M.

    2010-11-15

    The nucleon-nucleon scattering in a large magnetic background is considered to find its potential to change the neutrino emissivity of the neutron stars. For this purpose, we consider the one-pion-exchange approximation to find the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross section in a background field as large as 10{sup 15}-10{sup 18} G. We show that the NN cross section in neutron stars with temperatures in the range 0.1-5 MeV can be changed up to the 1 order of magnitude with respect to the one in the absence of the magnetic field. In the limit of the soft neutrino emission, the neutrino emissivity can be written in terms of the NN-scattering amplitude; therefore, the large magnetic fields can dramatically change the neutrino emissivity of the neutron stars as well.

  5. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Han, Junbo; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√{E{(MeV)}} required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.

  6. Ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering and parton distributions at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2006-05-01

    The cross section for ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering is very sensitive to the parton distributions at very small values of Bjorken x (x{<=}10{sup -4}). We numerically investigate the effects of modifying the behavior of the gluon distribution function at very small x in the DGLAP evolution equation. We then use the Color Glass Condensate formalism to calculate the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultrahigh energies and compare the result with those based on modification of DGLAP evolution equation.

  7. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments, which observe the transition from muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos, promise to help answer some of the fundamental questions surrounding physics in the post-Standard-Model era. Because they wish to observe the interactions of electron neutrinos in their detectors, and because the power of current results is typically limited by their systematic uncertainties, these experiments require precise estimates of the cross-section for electron neutrino interactions. Of particular interest is the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) process, which gures signi cantly in the composition of the reactions observed at the far detector. However, no experimental measurements of this crosssection currently exist for electron neutrinos; instead, current experiments typically work from the abundance of muon neutrino CCQE cross-section data and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for electron neutrinos. Veri cation of these predictions is challenging due to the di culty of constructing an electron neutrino beam, but the advent of modern high-intensity muon neutrino beams|together with the percent-level electron neutrino impurity inherent in these beams| nally presents the opportunity to make such a measurement. We report herein the rst-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering, which was made using the MINER A detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE di erential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: nal-state electron angle, nal-state electron energy, and the square of the fourmomentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino , Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE

  8. Neutrino-nucleus scattering of {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Ydrefors, E.; Almosly, W.; Suhonen, J.

    2013-12-30

    Accurate knowledge about the nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos for relevant nuclear targets is important both for neutrino detection and for astrophysical applications. In this paper we discuss the cross sections for the charged-current neutrino-nucleus scatterings off {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd. The microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model is adopted for the odd-even nuclei {sup 95,97}Mo. In the case of {sup 116}Cd we present cross sections both for the Bonn one-boson-exchange potential and self-consistent calculations based on modern Skyrme interactions.

  9. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S. N.; Andersen, T. C.; Anthony, A. E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S. D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M. G.; Burritt, T. H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M. C.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox-Mobrand, G. A.; Currat, C. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P. J.; Dosanjh, R. S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R. J.; Formaggio, J. A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J. TM.; Grant, D. R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R. L.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Harvey, P. J.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hemingway, R. J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M. A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N. A.; Klein, J. R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C. B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C. M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J. C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A. D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M. L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A. J.; Oblath, N. S.; Okada, C. E.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G. D.; Oser, S. M.; Ott, R. A.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Poon, A. W. P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M. H.; Secrest, J. A.; Seibert, S. R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Sonley, T. J.; Steiger, T. D.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R. G.; VanDevender, B. A.; Virtue, C. J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C. E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D. L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-07-10

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  10. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray and Neutrino-Induced Muon Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    SNO collaboration; Aharmim, B.; Ahmed, S.N.; Andersen, T.C.; Anthony, A.E.; Barros, N.; Beier, E.W.; Bellerive, A.; Beltran, B.; Bergevin, M.; Biller, S.D.; Boudjemline, K.; Boulay, M.G.; Burritt, T.H.; Cai, B.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, M.; Chon, M.C.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Deng, H.; Detwiler, J.; Doe, P.J.; Dosanjh, R.S.; Doucas, G.; Drouin, P.-L.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Gagnon, N.; Goon, J.TM.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Habib, S.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Harvey, P.J.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hemingway, R.J.; Henning, R.; Hime, A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Klein, J.R.; Kos, M.; Kruger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A.B.; McGee, S.; Mifflin, C.; Miller, M.L.; Monreal, B.; Monroe, J.; Noble, A.J.; Oblath, N.S.; Okada, C.E.; O?Keeffe, H.M.; Opachich, Y.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Oser, S.M.; Ott, R.A.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rollin, E.; Schwendener, M.H.; Secrest, J.A.; Seibert, S.R.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J.J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M.W.E.; Sonley, T.J.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill, L.C.; Tagg, N.; Tesic, G.; Tolich, N.; Tsui, T.; Van de Water, R.G.; VanDevender, B.A.; Virtue, C.J.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C.E.; Wan Chan Tseung, H.; Wark, D.L.; Watson, P.; Wendland, J.; West, N.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wilson, J.R.; Wouters, J.M.; Wright, A.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, F.; Zuber, K.

    2009-02-16

    Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth's surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and un-oscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muon-like events are measured between -1 {le} cos {theta}{sub zenith} 0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup 2} s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22 {+-} 0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos {theta}{sub zenith} > 0.4 is measured to be (3.31 {+-} 0.01 (stat.) {+-} 0.09 (sys.)) x 10{sup -10} {micro}/s/cm{sup 2}.

  11. Measurement of neutrino induced charged current neutral pion production cross section at SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Catala-Perez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    SciBooNE is a neutrino scattering experiment located in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. It collected data from June 2007 to August 2008 to accurately measure muon neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections on carbon around 1 GeV neutrino energy. In this thesis we present the results on the measurement of the muon neutrino cross section resulting in a μ- plus a single π0 final state (CC- π0 channel). The present work will show the steps taken to achieve this result: from the reconstruction improvements to the background extraction. The flux-averaged CC - π0 production cross section measurement obtained in this thesis < σCC- π0 > Φ = (5.6 ± 1.9fit ± 0.7beam ± 0.5int - 0.7det) × 10-40 cm2/N at an average energy of 0.89 GeV is found to agree well both with the expectation from the Monte Ca

  12. First Search for the EMC Effect and Nuclear Shadowing in Neutrino Nucleus Deep Inelastic Scattering at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research in electron-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS) have provided a clear picture of nuclear physics at high momentum transfer. While these effects have been clearly demonstrated by experiment, the theoretical explanation of their origin in some kinematic regions has been lacking. Particularly, the effects in the intermediate regions of Bjorken-x, anti-shadowing and the EMC effect have no universally accepted quantum mechanical explanation. In addition, these effects have not been measured systematically with neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering, due to experiments lacking multiple heavy targets.

  13. Neutrino-nucleus scattering reexamined: Quasielastic scattering and pion production entanglement and implications for neutrino energy reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, T.; Mosel, U.

    2010-06-15

    We apply the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) model to questions relevant to current and future long-baseline neutrino experiments, and we address in particular the relevance of charged-current reactions for neutrino-disappearance experiments. A correct identification of charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) events--which is the signal channel in oscillation experiments--is relevant for neutrino energy reconstruction and thus for the oscillation result. We show that about 20% of the quasielastic cross section is misidentified in present-day experiments and has to be corrected for by means of event generators. Furthermore, we show that a significant part of 1pi{sup +} (> 40%) events is misidentified as CCQE events, mainly caused by pion absorption in the nucleus. We also discuss the dependence of both of these numbers on experimental detection thresholds. We further investigate the influence of final-state interactions on the neutrino energy reconstruction.

  14. Bolometric detection of neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabrera, B.; Krauss, L. M.; Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic neutrino scattering off electrons in crystalline silicon at 1-10 mK results in measurable temperature changes in macroscopic amounts of material, even for low-energy (less than 0.41-MeV) pp neutrinos from the sun. New detectors for bolometric measurement of low-energy neutrino interactions, including coherent nuclear elastic scattering, are proposed. A new and more sensitive search for oscillations of reactor antineutrinos is practical (about 100 kg of Si), and would lay the groundwork for a more ambitious measurement of the spectrum of pp, Be-7, and B-8 solar neutrinos, and of supernovae anywhere in the Galaxy (about 10 tons of Si).

  15. Coherent Scatter Imaging Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur Rehman, Mahboob

    In conventional radiography, anatomical information of the patients can be obtained, distinguishing different tissue types, e.g. bone and soft tissue. However, it is difficult to obtain appreciable contrast between two different types of soft tissues. Instead, coherent x-ray scattering can be utilized to obtain images which can differentiate between normal and cancerous cells of breast. An x-ray system using a conventional source and simple slot apertures was tested. Materials with scatter signatures that mimic breast cancer were buried in layers of fat of increasing thickness and imaged. The result showed that the contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR) remained high even with added fat layers and short scan times.

  16. Measurement of the total boron-8 solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Vadim Liviu

    This work presents experimental measurements obtained by analyzing the first 254 live days of data from the SNO NaCl run. The electron neutrino flux was measured to be 1.66 +/- 0.10 stat.+0.07 -0.07 (syst.) x 106cm-2s-l and the non-electron neutrino flux was measured to be 3.32 +/- 0.38 stat.+0.26 -0.25 (syst.) x 106cm-2s-1. Using the above results we determined the integrated electron neutrino survival probability to be 0.33 +/- 0.04 stat.+0.02 -0.02 (syst.). This rejects maximum mixing in the solar neutrino sector at more than 3sigma using SNO data only under the assumption that the flavor changing mechanism is due to the MSW effect in the solar interior. The capability of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) to distinguish between the Charged-Current (CC) and Neutral-Current(NC) neutrino interactions made possible the first simultaneous measurements of the electron and non-electron solar neutrino flux, providing a direct test of the hypothesis that neutrinos change flavor as they propagate from the Sun to the Earth. Two tonnes of purified NaCl were added to the one kilotonne of heavy water target of SNO to enhance the neutron capture efficiency and detection of capture gamma-rays. Neutron capture on 35Cl often produces multiple gamma-rays, which permits a statistical separation of neutron capture and electron events based on the event isotropy, the increased statistical separation between event categories, using the degree of event isotropy, made possible a significant improvement on the measured fluxes. Moreover, the flux analysis does not require any assumption regarding the energy dependence of the flavor changing mechanism.

  17. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2015-05-15

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  18. Consistent analysis of neutral- and charged-current (anti)neutrino scattering off carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankowski, Artur M.

    2015-05-01

    Good understanding of the cross sections for (anti)neutrino scattering off nuclear targets in the few-GeV energy region is a prerequisite for the correct interpretation of results of ongoing and planned oscillation experiments. To clarify a possible source of disagreement between recent measurements of the cross sections on carbon, we analyze the available data within an approach based on the realistic spectral function of carbon, treating neutral-current elastic (NCE) and charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) processes on equal footing. We show that the axial mass from the shape analysis of the MiniBooNE data is in good agreement with the results reported by the BNL E734 and NOMAD Collaborations. However, the combined analysis of the NCE and CCQE data does not seem to support the contribution of multinucleon final states being large enough to explain the normalization of the MiniBooNE-reported cross sections.

  19. In-medium effect with muon-neutrino and anti-muon-neutrino quasi-elastic scattering from 12C nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, K. S.; Kim, Hungchong; So, W. Y.; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the in-medium effect by density-dependent axial and weak-vector form factors on muon-neutrino ({{ν }μ }) and anti-muon-neutrino ({{\\bar{ν }}μ }) scattering in the quasi-elastic (QE) region from nucleons (N*) bound in a nucleus or immersed in a nuclear medium via neutral current (NC) and charged current (CC). For the density-dependent form factors, we exploited a quark-meson-coupling (QMC) model. We found that the {{ν }μ }({{\\bar{ν }}μ })-{{N}*} scattering cross sections via NC in the QE region usually decrease with an increased medium density, while those using CC were increased. However, their rate of change was sensitive to the four-momentum transfer given to a bound nucleon through scattering. We compared these results obtained by the elementary process corrected by the in-medium effect to the BNL and MiniBooNE data, which measured {{ν }μ } scattering cross sections per nucleon through {{ν }μ } - 12C scattering in 12C composite targets. The incident energy range was 550 \\lt {{E}ν }\\lt 3000 MeV. We increased the energy up to 100 GeV to compare our results to the NOMAD experimental data. In order to study the density effects on a nucleon embedded in 12C, we exploited the QMC form factors evaluated at ρ =0.5{{ρ }o}, where the normal density {{ρ }o}˜ 0.15 f{{m}-3}. The strangeness contributions in NC scattering are also incorporated into the form factors for comparison with experimental data. Our numerical results show that most of the experimental data can be explained in a satisfactory manner by the density-dependent elementary process, but there are some remaining deviations resulting from the nuclear structure, particularly in the low and high momentum-transfer regions.

  20. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    SciTech Connect

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-15

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming x{sub F} scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments – NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) – are reviewed.

  1. Hadron production measurements to constrain accelerator neutrino beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzenev, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    A precise prediction of expected neutrino fluxes is required for a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment. The flux is used to measure neutrino cross sections at the near detector, while at the far detector it provides an estimate of the expected signal for the study of neutrino oscillations. In the talk several approaches to constrain the ν flux are presented. The first is the traditional one when an interaction chain for the neutrino parent hadrons is stored to be weighted later with real measurements. In this approach differential hadron cross sections are used which, in turn, are measured in ancillary hadron production experiments. The approach is certainly model dependent because it requires an extrapolation to different incident nucleon momenta assuming xF scaling as well as extrapolation between materials having different atomic numbers. In the second approach one uses a hadron production yields off a real target exploited in the neutrino beamline. Yields of neutrino parent hadrons are parametrized at the surface of the target, thus one avoids to trace the particle interaction history inside the target. As in the case of the first approach, a dedicated ancillary experiment is mandatory. Recent results from the hadron production experiments - NA61/SHINE at CERN (measurements for T2K) and MIPP at Fermilab (measurements for NuMI) - are reviewed.

  2. Measuring Neutrino Oscillations with Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2007-10-26

    Since the first direct observations of antineutrino events by Reines and Cowan in the 1950's, nuclear reactors have been an important tool in the study of neutrino properties. More recently, the study of neutrino oscillations has been a very active area of research. The pioneering observation of oscillations by the KamLAND experiment has provided crucial information on the neutrino mixing matrix. New experiments to study the remaining unknown mixing angle are currently under development. These recent studies and potential future developments will be discussed.

  3. Basic oscillation measurables in the neutrino pair beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yoshimura, M.

    2016-09-01

    It was recently shown that the neutrino-pair emission may occur with large rates, their energy being extended to GeV region, if appropriate heavy ions are circulated in a quantum state of mixture. In the present work it is further demonstrated that the vector current contribution of neutrino interaction with electrons in ion, not necessarily suppressed in high atomic number ions, gives rise to the oscillating component, even when a single neutrino is detected alone. On the other hand, the single neutrino detection in Z-boson decay does not show the oscillating component, as known for some time. CP violation measurements in the neutrino pair beam may become a possibility, along with determination of mass hierarchical patterns.

  4. Measuring Active-Sterile Neutrino Oscillations with a Stopped Pion Neutrino Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Richard; Louis, Bill; Mills, Geoff

    2007-04-01

    The question of the existence of light sterile neutrinos is of great interest in many areas of particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Furthermore, should the MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab confirm the LSND oscillation signal, then new measurements are required to identify the mechanism responsible for these oscillations. Possibilities include sterile neutrinos, CP or CPT violation, variable mass neutrinos, and Lorentz violation. Here we consider an experiment at a stopped pion neutrino source (the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL) to determine if active-sterile neutrino oscillations with δm ^2 greater than 0.1 eV^2 can account for the signal. By exploiting stopped +circ decay to produce a monoenergetic νμ source, and measuring the rate of the neutral current reaction νx0.05in ^12C ->νx0.05in ^12C^*(15.11) as a function of distance from the source, we show that a convincing test for active-sterile neutrino oscillations can be performed.

  5. Search for Elastic Coherent Neutrino Scattering off Atomic Nuclei at the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu.; Belov, V. A.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Burenkov, A. A.; Efremenko, Yu. V.; Etenko, A. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Kumpan, A. V.; Melikyan, Yu. A.; Rudik, D. G.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.

    We propose to detect and study neutrino neutral elastic coherent scattering off atomic nuclei with two-phase emission detector with liquid xenon as a target medium. One of the possible experimental site is a Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) situated in the Russian Federation. In this paper we discuss the design of the detector and expected signals and background for this site.

  6. Neutrino Mass Measurement Using a Directed Mono-Energetic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsifrinovich, Vladimir; Folan, Lorcan

    2015-04-01

    It was shown that a directed mono-energetic neutrino beam can be generated by electron capture beta-decay in a sample with a strong hyperfine field at the radioactive nuclei. We study the conditions required to measure the neutrino rest mass using the recoil force produced by a directed neutrino beam. We consider the displacement of an atomic force microscope cantilever due to such a recoil force. We find the change in the cantilever displacement associated with the non-zero neutrino mass, as a function of nuclear half-life T1 / 2, cantilever spring constant, and temperature. We consider the opportunity to increase the sensitivity of the neutrino mass measurement using averaging of the measurement signal. We show that the optimal time for the signal accumulation is, approximately, 1.8T1 / 2. We compute the optimal signal-to-noise ratio for 119Sb nuclei decaying to 119Sn with a decrease in the nuclear spin from I = 5/2 to I = 3/2, and T1 / 2 = 38.2 hours. Finally, we present the parameters values required for detection of sub-eV neutrino rest mass, and estimate the angular distribution of neutrino radiation as a function of temperature.

  7. Standardization of light scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Sven; von Finck, Alexander; Duparré, Angela

    2015-10-01

    In every advanced optical system, light scattering caused by the imperfections of optical components sooner or later becomes an issue that needs to be addressed. Light scattering can be a critical factor for both the throughput and the imaging quality of optical systems. On a component level, the quantities to describe these effects are the scatter loss or total scattering (TS) and the scattering distribution function or angle-resolved light scattering (ARS). In the last decades, a number of instruments have been developed worldwide for the measurement of TS and ARS. However, numerous pitfalls have to be avoided to obtain objective, reliable, and reproducible measurement results. This is, in particular, true for low scatter levels of high-end optical components. Standard procedures that have to be both concise and easy to implement are thus of crucial importance for the optics community. This paper tries to give an overview on existing standards as well as an outlook on new standards that are still being developed. Special emphasis is put on ISO standards jointly developed, reviewed, and revised by the international experts in the field.

  8. Coherent pion production by neutrino scattering off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kartavtsev, A.; Paschos, E. A.; Gounaris, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    The main part of coherent pion production by neutrinos on nuclei is essentially determined by partial conservation of the axial current (PCAC), provided that the leptonic momentum transferred square Q{sup 2} remains sufficiently small. We give the formulas for the charged and neutral current cross sections, including also the small non-PCAC transverse current contributions and taking into account the effect of the {mu}{sup -}-mass. Our results are compared with the experimental ones and other theoretical treatments.

  9. GiBUU and Neutrino-Nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Leitner, T.; Mosel, U.; Buss, O.

    2011-10-06

    The Giessen BUU transport approach applied to electroweak interactions on nuclei in the few-GeV region is presented. After describing the model ingredients (elementary cross sections, medium effects and final state interactions), the impact of nuclear effects on the observables is discussed. We emphasize the interconnection of quasielastic and pion production processes, which receive a unified treatment, and its relevance for present neutrino experiments.

  10. Constraints on nonstandard neutrino interactions and unparticle physics with {nu}{sub e}-e{sup -} scattering at the Kuo-Sheng nuclear power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Deniz, M.; Bilmis, S.; Yildirim, I. O.; Li, H. B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lin, C. W.; Lin, S. T.; Wong, H. T.; Wu, S. C.; Li, J.; Serin, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Singh, V.; Yue, Q.; Zhou, Z. Y.

    2010-08-01

    Neutrino-electron scatterings are purely leptonic processes with robust standard model (SM) predictions. Their measurements can therefore provide constraints to physics beyond SM. The {nu}{sub e}-e data taken at the Kuo-Sheng Reactor Neutrino Laboratory were used to probe two scenarios: nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) and unparticle physics. New constraints were placed on the NSI parameters ({epsilon}{sub ee}{sup eL},{epsilon}{sub ee}{sup eR}), ({epsilon}{sub e{mu}}{sup eL},{epsilon}{sub e{mu}}{sup eR}), and ({epsilon}{sub e{tau}}{sup eL},{epsilon}{sub e{tau}}{sup eR}) for the nonuniversal and flavor-changing channels, respectively, as well as to the coupling constants for scalar ({lambda}{sub 0}) and vector ({lambda}{sub 1}) unparticles to the neutrinos and electrons.

  11. Superscaling in electron-nucleus scattering and its link to CC and NC QE neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, M. B.; Amaro, J. E.; Caballero, J. A.; González-Jiménez, R.; Donnelly, T. W.; Ivanov, M.; Udías, J. M.

    2015-05-15

    The superscaling approach (SuSA) to neutrino-nucleus scattering, based on the assumed universality of the scaling function for electromagnetic and weak interactions, is reviewed. The predictions of the SuSA model for bot CC and NC differential and total cross sections are presented and compared with the MiniBooNE data. The role of scaling violations, in particular the contribution of meson exchange currents in the two-particle two-hole sector, is explored.

  12. Neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    Besson, Dave; Cowen, Doug; Selen, Mats; Wiebusch, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Neutrinos represent a new “window” to the Universe, spanning a large range of energy. We discuss the science of neutrino astrophysics and focus on two energy regimes. At “lower” energies (≈1 MeV), studies of neutrinos born inside the sun, or produced in interactions of cosmic rays with the atmosphere, have allowed the first incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos have mass. At energies typically one thousand to one million times higher, sources further than the sun (both within the Milky Way and beyond) are expected to produce a flux of particles that can be detected only through neutrinos. PMID:10588680

  13. Measurement of the Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Cross-Section for Electron Neutrinos on a Hydrocarbon Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    We report herein the first-ever measurement of a cross-section for an exclusive state in electron neutrino scattering at the GeV scale, which was made using the MINERnuA detector in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We present the electron neutrino CCQE differential cross-sections, which are averaged over neutrinos of energies 1-10 GeV (with mean energy of about 3 GeV), in terms of various kinematic variables: final-state electron angle, final-state electron energy, and the square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus by the neutrino, Q2. We also provide a total cross-section vs. neutrino energy. While our measurement of this process is found to be in agreement with the predictions of the GENIE event generator, we also report on an unpredicted photon-like process we observe in a similar kinematic regime. The absence of this process from models for neutrino interactions is a potential stumbling block for future on-axis neutrino oscillation experiments. We include kinematic and particle species identification characterizations which can be used in building models to help address this shortcoming.

  14. A phenomenological study of photon production in low energy neutrino nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, James P; Goldman, Terry J

    2009-01-01

    Low energy photon production is an important background to many current and future precision neutrino experiments. We present a phenomenological study of t-channel radiative corrections to neutral current neutrino nucleus scattering. After introducing the relevant processes and phenomenological coupling constants, we will explore the derived energy and angular distributions as well as total cross-section predictions along with their estimated uncertainties. This is supplemented throughout with comments on possible experimental signatures and implications. We conclude with a general discussion of the analysis in the context of complimentary methodologies. This is based on a talk presented at the DPF 2009 meeting in Detroit MI.

  15. Ultra-High Energy Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering and Parton Distributions at Small x

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Ernest M.; Jalilian-Marian, Jamal

    2006-11-17

    The cross section for ultra-high energy neutrino-nucleon scattering is very sensitive to the parton distributions at very small values of Bjorken x (x {<=} 10-4). We numerically investigate the effects of modifying the behavior of the gluon distribution function at very small x in the DGLAP evolution equation. We then use the Color Glass Condensate formalism to calculate the neutrino-nucleon cross section at ultra-high energies and compare the result with those based on modification of DGLAP evolution equation.

  16. Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillations with IceCube.

    PubMed

    Aartsen, M G; Abbasi, R; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker Tjus, J; Becker, K-H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; Benzvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H-P; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Cruz Silva, A H; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haj Ismail, A; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J-H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Palazzo, A; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H-G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2013-08-23

    We present the first statistically significant detection of neutrino oscillations in the high-energy regime (>20 GeV) from an analysis of IceCube Neutrino Observatory data collected in 2010 and 2011. This measurement is made possible by the low-energy threshold of the DeepCore detector (~20 GeV) and benefits from the use of the IceCube detector as a veto against cosmic-ray-induced muon background. The oscillation signal was detected within a low-energy muon neutrino sample (20-100 GeV) extracted from data collected by DeepCore. A high-energy muon neutrino sample (100 GeV-10 TeV) was extracted from IceCube data to constrain systematic uncertainties. The disappearance of low-energy upward-going muon neutrinos was observed, and the nonoscillation hypothesis is rejected with more than 5σ significance. In a two-neutrino flavor formalism, our data are best described by the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters |Δm(32)(2)|=(2.3(-0.5)(+0.6))×10(-3) eV(2) and sin(2)(2θ(23))>0.93, and maximum mixing is favored. PMID:24010427

  17. Measurement of the intrinsic electron neutrino component in the T2K neutrino beam with the ND280 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Floetotto, L.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwai, E.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    The T2K experiment has reported the first observation of the appearance of electron neutrinos in a muon neutrino beam. The main and irreducible background to the appearance signal comes from the presence in the neutrino beam of a small intrinsic component of electron neutrinos originating from muon and kaon decays. In T2K, this component is expected to represent 1.2% of the total neutrino flux. A measurement of this component using the near detector (ND280), located 280 m from the target, is presented. The charged current interactions of electron neutrinos are selected by combining the particle identification capabilities of both the time projection chambers and electromagnetic calorimeters of ND280. The measured ratio between the observed electron neutrino beam component and the prediction is 1.01±0.10 providing a direct confirmation of the neutrino fluxes and neutrino cross section modeling used for T2K neutrino oscillation analyses. Electron neutrinos coming from muons and kaons decay are also separately measured, resulting in a ratio with respect to the prediction of 0.68±0.30 and 1.10±0.14, respectively.

  18. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, Ruth B.

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  19. Neutrinos help reconcile Planck measurements with the local universe.

    PubMed

    Wyman, Mark; Rudd, Douglas H; Vanderveld, R Ali; Hu, Wayne

    2014-02-01

    Current measurements of the low and high redshift Universe are in tension if we restrict ourselves to the standard six-parameter model of flat ΛCDM. This tension has two parts. First, the Planck satellite data suggest a higher normalization of matter perturbations than local measurements of galaxy clusters. Second, the expansion rate of the Universe today, H0, derived from local distance-redshift measurements is significantly higher than that inferred using the acoustic scale in galaxy surveys and the Planck data as a standard ruler. The addition of a sterile neutrino species changes the acoustic scale and brings the two into agreement; meanwhile, adding mass to the active neutrinos or to a sterile neutrino can suppress the growth of structure, bringing the cluster data into better concordance as well. For our fiducial data set combination, with statistical errors for clusters, a model with a massive sterile neutrino shows 3.5σ evidence for a nonzero mass and an even stronger rejection of the minimal model. A model with massive active neutrinos and a massless sterile neutrino is similarly preferred. An eV-scale sterile neutrino mass--of interest for short baseline and reactor anomalies--is well within the allowed range. We caution that (i) unknown astrophysical systematic errors in any of the data sets could weaken this conclusion, but they would need to be several times the known errors to eliminate the tensions entirely; (ii) the results we find are at some variance with analyses that do not include cluster measurements; and (iii) some tension remains among the data sets even when new neutrino physics is included. PMID:24580585

  20. Measurement of electron neutrino appearance with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Joshua Adam Alpern

    2009-05-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline two-detector neutrino oscillation experiment that uses a high intensity muon neutrino beam to investigate the phenomena of neutrino oscillations. By measuring the neutrino interactions in a detector near the neutrino source and again 735 km away from the production site, it is possible to probe the parameters governing neutrino oscillation. The majority of the vμ oscillate to vτ but a small fraction may oscillate instead to ve. This thesis presents a measurement of the ve appearance rate in the MINOS far detector using the first two years of exposure. Methods for constraining the far detector backgrounds using the near detector measurements is discussed and a technique for estimating the uncertainty on the background and signal selection are developed. A 1.6σ excess over the expected background rate is found providing a hint of ve appearance.

  1. Neutrino measurements from the Sun and Earth: Results from Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-07-01

    Important neutrino results came recently from Borexino, a massive, calorimetric liquid scintillator detector installed at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. With its unprecedented radiopurity levels achieved in the core of the detection medium, it is the only experiment in operation able to study in real time solar neutrino interactions in the challenging sub-MeV energy region. The recently achieved breakthrough observation of the fundamental pp flux, the precise measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino flux, and the results concerning the pep, 8B and CNO fluxes, together with their physics implications, are described in this work. Moreover, the detector has also provided a clean detection of terrestrial neutrinos, from which they emerge as a new probe of the interior of the Earth.

  2. Neutrino measurements from the Sun and Earth: Results from Borexino

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, G.; Caccianiga, B.; D’Angelo, D.; Giammarchi, M.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Ranucci, G. Re, A.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Hagner, C.; Meyer, M.; Bonfini, G.; Cavalcante, P.; Gabriele, F.; Gazzana, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Laubenstein, M.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Important neutrino results came recently from Borexino, a massive, calorimetric liquid scintillator detector installed at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. With its unprecedented radiopurity levels achieved in the core of the detection medium, it is the only experiment in operation able to study in real time solar neutrino interactions in the challenging sub-MeV energy region. The recently achieved breakthrough observation of the fundamental pp flux, the precise measurement of the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux, and the results concerning the pep, {sup 8}B and CNO fluxes, together with their physics implications, are described in this work. Moreover, the detector has also provided a clean detection of terrestrial neutrinos, from which they emerge as a new probe of the interior of the Earth.

  3. Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel (Inventor); Danehy, Paul M. (Inventor); Lee, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method and apparatus for performing simultaneous multi-point measurements of multiple velocity components in a gas flow is described. Pulses of laser light are directed to a measurement region of unseeded gas to produce Rayleigh or Mie scattered light in a plurality of directions. The Rayleigh or Mie scattered light is collected from multiple directions and combined in a single collimated light beam. The Rayleigh or Mie scattered light is then mixed together with a reference laser light before it is passed through a single planar Fabry-Perot interferometer for spectral analysis. At the output of the interferometer, a high-sensitivity CCD camera images the interference fringe pattern. This pattern contains the spectral and spatial information from both the Rayleigh scattered light and the reference laser light. Interferogram processing software extracts and analyzes spectral profiles to determine the velocity components of the gas flow at multiple points in the measurement region. The Rayleigh light rejected by the interferometer is recirculated to increase the accuracy and the applicability of the method for measurements at high temperatures without requiring an increase in the laser energy.

  4. RED-100 detector for the first observation of the elastic coherent neutrino scattering off xenon nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, D. Yu; Berdnikova, A. K.; Belov, V. A.; Bolozdynya, A. I.; Burenkov, A. A.; Efremenko, Yu V.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Etenko, A. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Khromov, A. V.; Konovalov, A. M.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Kozlova, E. S.; Kumpan, A. V.; Krakhmalova, T. D.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Naumov, P. P.; Rudik, D. G.; Shafigullin, R. R.; Shakirov, A. V.; Simakov, G. E.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Stekhanov, V. N.; Tobolkin, A. A.; Tolstukhin, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    The RED-100 (Russian Emission Detector) is being constructed for the experiment to search for elastic coherent neutrino scattering off atomic nuclei. This fundamental process was predicted several decades ago by the Standard Model of electroweak interactions but has not been discovered yet. The RED-100 is a two-phase emission xenon detector containing ∼200 kg of the liquid Xe (∼ 100 kg of that is in a fiducial volume). One of the possible sites to carry out the experiment is the SNS (Spallation Neutron Source) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA. SNS is the world's most intense pulsed source of neutrinos and unique place to study neutrino properties. The energy spectrum of neutrinos produced at the SNS extends up to ∼ 50 MeV and satisfies coherence condition. These neutrinos give kinetic energies of Xe recoils up to a few tens of keV where the response of nuclear recoils is well-known from neutron calibrations of dark matter detectors. The detector will be deployed in the basement under the experimental hall at a distance of ∼30 meters from the SNS target. The expected signal and background (neutron and gamma) are estimated for this specific location. The detector details, current status and future plans are provided.

  5. Potential measurements of neutrino-deuterium interactions with the T2K near detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahn, Kendall; T2K Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Uncertainties on neutrino interactions with matter are important for current and future generation neutrino long baseline experiments, which infer neutrino mixing parameters. Measurements of neutrinos on deuterium constrain neutrino-nucleon interaction models, such as axial form factors, and are relatively free of complicating nuclear effects. Existing measurements of neutrino interaction using deuterium bubble chambers suffer from low statistics and significant systematic uncertainty on neutrino flux production. This talk describes the possibility of modern neutrino-deuterium cross section measurements using modifications to the existing T2K experiment near detector complex. A comparison of data taken with deuterated water and normal water would provide a measurement of neutrino-deuteron interactions with high-intensity neutrino beam. T2K is supported by the Department of Energy.

  6. Superscaling Predictions for Neutral Current Quasielastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M. C.; Udias, J. M.; Caballero, J. A.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2008-02-08

    The application of superscaling ideas to predict neutral-current (NC) quasielastic (QE) neutrino cross sections is investigated. The relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) using the same relativistic mean field potential (RMF) for both initial and final nucleons -- a model that reproduces the experimental (e,e{sup '}) scaling function -- is used to illustrate our findings. While NC reactions are apparently not well suited for scaling analyses, to a large extent, the RIA-RMF predictions do exhibit superscaling. Independence of the scaled response on the nuclear species is very well fulfilled. The RIA-RMF NC superscaling function is in good agreement with the experimental (e,e{sup '}) one. The idea that electroweak processes can be described with a universal scaling function, provided that mild restrictions on the kinematics are assumed, is shown to be valid.

  7. Electron- and neutrino-nucleus scattering from the quasielastic to the resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U.; Alvarez-Ruso, L.

    2009-03-15

    We present a model for electron and neutrino scattering off nucleons and nuclei focusing on the quasielastic and resonance region. The lepton-nucleon reaction is described within a relativistic formalism that includes, besides quasielastic scattering, the excitation of 13 N* and {delta} resonances and a nonresonant single-pion background. Recent electron scattering data are used for the state-of-the-art parametrizations of the vector form factors; the axial couplings are determined via partial conservation of the axial current and, in the case of the {delta} resonance, the axial form factor is refitted using neutrino-scattering data. Scattering off nuclei is treated within the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck framework (GiBUU), which takes into account various nuclear effects: the local density approximation for the nuclear ground state, mean-field potentials, and in-medium spectral functions. Results for inclusive scattering off oxygen are presented and, in the case of electron-induced reactions, compared with experimental data and other models.

  8. Model independent extraction of the axial mass parameter in CCQE anti neutrino-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebe, Heather

    2013-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation studies depend on a consistent value for the axial mass. For this reason, a model-independent extraction of this parameter from quasielastic (anti)neutrino-nucleon scattering data is vital. While most studies employ a model-dependent extraction using the dipole model of the axial form factor, we present a model-independent description using the z expansion of the axial form factor. Quasielastic antineutrino scattering data on C-12 from the MiniBooNE experiment are analyzed using this model-independent description. The value found, mA = 0 .85-0 . 06 + 0 . 13 +/- 0 . 13 GeV, differs significantly from the value utilized by the MiniBooNE Collaboration, mA = 1 . 35 GeV. Advisor: Dr. Gil Paz Wayne State Univerity.

  9. Electron Neutrino Charged-Current Quasielastic Scattering in the MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-10-28

    The electron-neutrino charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) cross section on nuclei is an important input parameter to appearance-type neutrino oscillation experiments. Current experiments typically work from the muon neutrino cross section and apply corrections from theoretical arguments to obtain a prediction for the electron neutrino cross section, but to date there has been no experimental verification of the estimates for this channel at an energy scale appropriate to such experiments. We present the first measurement of an exclusive reaction in few-GeV electron neutrino interactions, namely, the cross section for a CCQE-like process, made using the MINERvA detector. The result is given as differential cross-sections vs. the electron energy, electron angle, and square of the four-momentum transferred to the nucleus, $Q^2$. We also compute the ratio to a muon neutrino cross-section in $Q^2$ from MINERvA. We find satisfactory agreement between this measurement and the predictions of the GENIE generator.

  10. Measurement of the Weinberg angle in neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Ubaldo; Ferruccio Loverre, Pier; Ludovici, Lucio

    2016-06-01

    Neutrino physics with high energy neutrino beams has played a crucial role in establishing the Standard Model of the electroweak interaction, in particular with repeated measurements of increasing precision of the fundamental parameter sin2 θW which defines the electroweak mixing. This paper relates the history of these measurements, from the discovery of the neutral current interaction in 1973 until the latest high precision measurements in the years 2000. The review discusses in chronological order the important experiments performed at CERN, Fermilab and Brookhaven during the last thirty years of the 20th century.

  11. Measurement of the Weinberg angle in neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Ubaldo; Loverre, Pier Ferruccio; Ludovici, Lucio

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino physics with high energy neutrino beams has played a crucial role in establishing the Standard Model of the electroweak interaction, in particular with repeated measurements of increasing precision of the fundamental parameter sin2 θ W which defines the electroweak mixing. This paper relates the history of these measurements, from the discovery of the neutral current interaction in 1973 until the latest high precision measurements in the years 2000. The review discusses in chronological order the important experiments performed at CERN, Fermilab and Brookhaven during the last thirty years of the 20th century.

  12. A measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flux and oscillation parameters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonley, Thomas John

    Through-going muon events are analyzed as a function of their direction of travel through the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Based on simulations and previous measurements, muons with a zenith angle of -1 < cos( [straight theta] zenith ) < 0.4 are selected as atmospheric neutrino-induced muons. A two- neutrino analysis of these events agrees with the oscillation parameters observed by the Super Kamiokande and Minos experiments, and places 2-D limits of [Special characters omitted.] at the 68% confidence level, and sin 2 (2 [straight theta] 23 ) > 0.33 at the 90% confidence level. In addition, the flux of atmospheric neutrinos is measured in 1-D with a 68% confidence level to be [Special characters omitted.] times the prediction of the BARTOL group based on SNO data alone, and 1.27± 0.09 times the prediction when the oscillation parameters are constrained by the Super Kamiokande and Minos results. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139- 4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  13. Prospects of measuring the leptonic CP phase with atmospheric neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Abhijit

    2009-10-01

    We have studied the prospects of measuring the CP violating phase with atmospheric neutrinos at a large magnetized iron calorimeter detector considering the muons (directly measurable) of the neutrino events generated by a Monte Carlo event generator Nuance. The effect of {theta}{sub 13} and {delta}{sub CP} appears dominantly neither in atmospheric neutrino oscillation nor in solar neutrino oscillation, but appears as subleading in both cases. These are observable in the range of E{approx}1 GeV for atmospheric neutrino, where solar and atmospheric oscillation couple. In this regime, the quasielastic events dominate and the energy resolution is very good, but the angular resolution is very poor. Unlike beam experiments this poor angular resolution acts against its measurements. However, we find that one can be able to distinguish {delta}{sub CP}{approx_equal}0 deg. and 180 deg. at 90% confidence level. We find no significant sensitivity for {delta}{sub CP}{approx_equal}90 deg. or 270 deg.

  14. Electron-neutrino scattering off nuclei from two different theoretical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Jachowicz, N.; Ericson, M.; Pandey, V.; Van Cuyck, T.; Van Dessel, N.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze charged-current electron-neutrino cross sections on carbon. We consider two different theoretical approaches, on one hand the continuum random phase approximation (CRPA) which allows a description of giant resonances and quasielastic excitations, on the other hand the RPA-based calculations which are able to describe multinucleon emission and coherent and incoherent pion production as well as quasielastic excitations. We compare the two approaches in the genuine quasielastic channel, and find a satisfactory agreement between them at large energies while at low energies the collective giant resonances show up only in the CRPA approach. We also compare electron-neutrino cross sections with the corresponding muon-neutrino ones in order to investigate the impact of the different charged-lepton masses. Finally, restricting to the RPA-based approach, we compare the sum of quasielastic, multinucleon emission, coherent, and incoherent one-pion production cross sections (folded with the electron-neutrino T2K flux) with the charged-current inclusive electron-neutrino differential cross sections on carbon measured by T2K. We find a good agreement with the data. The multinucleon component is needed in order to reproduce the T2K electron-neutrino inclusive cross sections.

  15. Electroweak higher-order effects and theoretical uncertainties in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, K.-P.O.; Dittmaier, S.; Hollik, W.

    2005-11-01

    A previous calculation of electroweak O({alpha}) corrections to deep-inelastic neutrino scattering, as e.g. measured by NuTeV and NOMAD, is supplemented by higher-order effects. In detail, we take into account universal two-loop effects from {delta}{alpha} and {delta}{rho} as well as higher-order final-state photon radiation off muons in the structure function approach. Moreover, we make use of the recently released O({alpha})-improved parton distributions MRST2004QED and identify the relevant QED factorization scheme, which is DIS-like. As a technical by-product, we describe slicing and subtraction techniques for an efficient calculation of a new type of real corrections that are induced by the generated photon distribution. A numerical discussion of the higher-order effects suggests that the remaining theoretical uncertainty from unknown electroweak corrections is dominated by nonuniversal two-loop effects and is of the order 0.0003 when translated into a shift in sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}=1-M{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub Z}{sup 2}. The O({alpha}) corrections implicitly included in the parton distributions lead to a shift of about 0.0004.

  16. Study of scintillation, fluorescence and scattering in mineral oil for the MiniBooNE neutrino detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce C.; Brice, Stephen; Hawker, Eric; Maza, Shannon; Meyer, Hans-Otto; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Tayloe, Rex; Tanaka, Hirohisa A.; Toptygin, Dmitri; /Fermilab /Western Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Princeton U. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2004-11-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino detector at Fermilab (FNAL) is filled with 250,000 gallons of pure mineral oil. The principal signal for MiniBooNE is light observed in a prompt Cherenkov cone. Scattering and fluorescence modify our detection of this light. Scintillation is also created by ionization in the oil. Studies of fluorescence of this oil have been carried out over a wide spectrum of exciting light and time resolved fluorescence with a narrower range of excitation. Polarized scattering measurements have been carried out at longer wavelengths. Time resolved and spectrally resolved scintillation has been studied with a 200 MeV Proton beam at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Results of these studies will be reported.

  17. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže E-mail: PVMcDonald@lbl.gov E-mail: BAReid@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2014-05-01

    We present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant — DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ∼ 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is ∼ 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. We do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors — these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  18. Results on neutrino-electron elastic scattering at AGS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lanou, R.E.

    1984-02-26

    In an experiment designed to study elastic scattering of nu/sub ..mu../ (and anti nu/sub ..mu../) from electrons and protons via the weak neutral current, we have recently completed several extensive data taking runs. Results for the cross section of nu/sub ..mu../ + e/sup -/ ..-->.. nu/sub ..mu../ + e/sup -/ are presented based upon the first third of the available sample. Preliminary analysis of anti nu/sub ..mu../ + e/sup -/ ..-->.. anti nu/sub ..mu../ + e/sup -/ is in progress and evidence for the signal is presented.

  19. Inverse Compton Scattering on Solar Photons, Heliospheric Modulation, and Neutrino Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

    2006-08-01

    We study the inverse Compton scattering of solar photons by Galactic cosmic-ray electrons. We show that the {gamma}-ray emission from this process is significant with the maximum flux in the direction of the Sun; the angular distribution of the emission is broad. This previously neglected foreground should be taken into account in studies of the diffuse Galactic and extragalactic {gamma}-ray emission. Furthermore, observations by GLAST can be used to monitor the heliosphere and determine the electron spectrum as a function of position from distances as large as Saturn's orbit down to close proximity of the Sun, thus enabling studies of solar modulation in the most extreme case. This paves the way for the determination of other Galactic cosmic-ray species, primarily protons, near the solar surface leading to accurate predictions of {gamma}-rays from pp-interactions in the solar atmosphere. These albedo {gamma}-rays will be observable by GLAST, allowing the study of deep atmospheric layers, magnetic field(s), and cosmic-ray cascade development. The latter is necessary to calculate the neutrino flux from pp-interactions at higher energies (>1 TeV). The corresponding neutrino flux from the Sun can be used as a ''standard candle'' for upcoming km{sup 3} neutrino detectors, such as IceCube. Since the solar core is opaque for very high-energy neutrinos, it may be possible to directly study the mass distribution of the Sun.

  20. First neutrino oscillation measurements in NOvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messier, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    The NOvA experiment uses the Fermilab NuMI neutrino beam and a newly constructed 14 kt detector to address several open questions in neutrino oscillations including the neutrino mass hierarchy, the precise value of the angle θ23, and the CP-violating phase δCP. The experiment has been running since 2014 and has recently released its first results from an equivalent exposure of 2.74 ×1020 protons-on-target equal to 8% of the eventual data set. Measurements of νμ →νμ oscillations find Δ m322 = (2.52-0.18+0.20) ×10-3 eV2 and 0.38 neutrino mass hierarchy. The experiment has observed νμ →νe oscillations at 3.3 σ C.L. in this early data and disfavors the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy in the range 0.1 π <δCP < 0.5 π at the 90% C.L.

  1. Solar neutrino measurement with radiochemical gallium detector (GALLEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Ammon, Reinhard

    1994-04-01

    The GALLEX experiment for the detection of solar neutrinos by means of a radiochemical gallium detector is operated by groups from Italy, France, Germany, Israel and the USA in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) near L'Aquila (Italy). It consists of (1) the technical scale tank made of glass fiber reinforced polyester fabric containing 101 metric tons (54 cu m) of a highly concentrated (8 moles per liter) GaCl3 solution; (2) a gas sparging system for desorption of GeCl4 which has been formed by interaction of the neutrinos with gallium according to Ga-71 + nue yields Ge-71 + e(-) and by addition of ca. 1 mg of a stable Ge isotope; (3) the absorption columns for concentration of GeCl4 into a volume of 1 l of water; (4) the laboratory scale apparatus for conversion of GeCl4 to GeH4 and mixing with the counting gas Xe; (5) the counter filling station, and (6) the low level proportional counters. Contributions of possible side reactions which have to be corrected for, e.g. by cosmic muons, fast neutrons and alpha-emitters are discussed, as well as the purification of the target solution from long-lived ( t1/2 = 271 d) cosmogenic Ge-68. A first preliminary result after one year of solar neutrino measurement is presented. This constitutes the first direct measurement of the basic proton-proton fusion reaction in the core of the sun. This result, appreciably below the predictions of the standard solar model (SSM) (132 Solar Neutrino Units (SNU)) can be interpreted, together with the results of the chlori ne and KAMIOKANDE experiments either by astrophysics or by neutrino oscillations (Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect). The solar neutrino measurements are continuing and a calibration experiment with a Cr-51 source is in preparation.

  2. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precision measurements in electron and muon neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, S.J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Recently a new method for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the effective values of the atmospheric {Delta}m{sup 2} measured in the electron neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee), with the one measured in the muon neutrino disappearance channel, {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}), was proposed. If {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) is larger (smaller) than {Delta}m{sup 2} ({mu}{mu}) the hierarchy is of the normal (inverted) type. We re-examine this proposition in the light of two very high precision measurements: {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) that may be accomplished by the phase II of the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment, for example, and {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) that can be envisaged using the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic uncertainties of both measurements, we estimate the parameter region of ({theta}{sub 13}, {delta}) in which the mass hierarchy can be determined. If {theta}{sub 13} is relatively large, sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx}> 0.05, and both of {Delta}m{sup 2}(ee) and {Delta}m{sup 2}({mu}{mu}) can be measured with the precision of {approx} 0.5 % it is possible to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at > 95% CL for 0.3{pi} {approx}< {delta} {approx}< 1.7 {pi} for the current best fit values of all the other oscillation parameters.

  3. Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent NC({pi}{sup 0}) Scattering in the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cherdack, Daniel

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino reactions recorded by the MINOS Near Detector in exposures totalling 2.8x10{sup 20} protons-on-target were searched for single, highly-forward {pi}{sup 0} mesons produced by coherent neutral current interactions {nu}{sub {mu}}+A{yields}{nu}{sub {mu}}+A+{pi}{sup 0}. Events having topologies consistent with single electromagnetic showers were isolated. Contributions from neutrino-induced backgrounds are determined using a data-driven fit of Monte Carlo distributions over sideband regions. The fit is used to project the background levels into signal regions. An excess of events above the best-fit background is observed for shower topologies of few GeV energies and at very forward angles. The partial cross section for NC({pi}{sup 0}) coherent scattering yielding E{sub vis}({pi}{sup 0})>1.0 GeV averaged over incident neutrino energies 2.4{<=}E{sub {nu}{<=}9}.0 GeV is (31.6{+-}10.5)x10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}/nucleus. Total cross sections for coherent scattering from nuclei of average nucleon number A{sub eff} = 48 and for iron (A = 56) nuclei are estimated for } = 4.9 GeV.

  4. The COHERENT collaboration: an effort to observe coherent, elastic, neutral-current neutrino-nucleus scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Grayson; Coherent Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The phenomenon of coherent, neutral-current scattering of neutrinos from nuclei was first proposed by D.Z. Freedman in 1974, who posited that an effort to observe this effect experimentally ``may be an act of hubris'' owing to extreme experimental difficulties. Taking advantage of technologies which have come to maturity and new experience gained in the intervening 40 years, the newly-formed COHERENT collaboration seeks to measure for the first time coherent, elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CE ν NS). Using neutrinos created by stopped pions at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, several detector systems will be deployed to limit systematic uncertainties and unambiguously observe the N2 -dependence on the cross section. The current status of the efforts of the collaboration will be addressed, focusing on detector technologies and calibration of these detectors for low-energy nuclear recoils. We will also discuss the longer-term physics goals of the collaboration, including astrophysical implications of the measurements and the use CE ν NS as a probe to search for non-standard neutrino interactions and as a way to measure the weak mixing angle.

  5. Measuring growth index in a Universe with sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing-Fei; Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Xin

    2014-12-01

    Consistency tests for the general relativity (GR) can be performed by constraining the growth index γ using the measurements of redshift-space distortions (RSD) in conjunction with other observations. In previous studies, deviations from the GR expected value of γ ≈ 0.55 at the 2-3σ level were found. In this work, we reconsider the measurement of γ in a Universe with sterile neutrinos. We constrain the sterile neutrino cosmological model using the RSD measurements combined with the cosmic microwave background data (Planck temperature data plus WMAP 9-yr polarization data), the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the Hubble constant direct measurement, the Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster counts data, and the galaxy shear data. We obtain the constraint result of the growth index, γ =0.584-0.048+0.047, well consistent with the GR expected value (the consistency is at the 0.6σ level). For the parameters of sterile neutrino, we obtain Neff =3.62-0.42+0.26 and mν,sterileeff =0.48-0.14+0.11 eV. We also consider the BICEP2 data and perform an analysis on the model with tensor modes. Similar fit results are obtained, showing that once light sterile neutrino is considered in the Universe, GR will become well consistent with the current observations.

  6. Evidence of coherent $$K^{+}$$ meson production in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Z.

    2016-08-05

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production νμA→μ-K+A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K+ on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K+, μ-, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which ismore » a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. Furthermore, we find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance.« less

  7. Evidence of Coherent K+ Meson Production in Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Marshall, C. M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Simon, C.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production νμA →μ-K+A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K+ on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K+, μ-, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which is a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. We find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3 σ significance.

  8. First evidence of coherent $$K^{+}$$ meson production in neutrino-nucleus scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Z.; et al.

    2016-08-05

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production νμA→μ-K+A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K+ on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K+, μ-, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which ismore » a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. We find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance.« less

  9. Evidence of Coherent K^{+} Meson Production in Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Marshall, C M; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; da Motta, H; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Ghosh, A; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Simon, C; Solano Salinas, C J; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D

    2016-08-01

    Neutrino-induced charged-current coherent kaon production ν_{μ}A→μ^{-}K^{+}A is a rare, inelastic electroweak process that brings a K^{+} on shell and leaves the target nucleus intact in its ground state. This process is significantly lower in rate than the neutrino-induced charged-current coherent pion production because of Cabibbo suppression and a kinematic suppression due to the larger kaon mass. We search for such events in the scintillator tracker of MINERvA by observing the final state K^{+}, μ^{-}, and no other detector activity, and by using the kinematics of the final state particles to reconstruct the small momentum transfer to the nucleus, which is a model-independent characteristic of coherent scattering. We find the first experimental evidence for the process at 3σ significance. PMID:27541459

  10. Neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The field of neutrino physics has expanded greatly in recent years with the discovery that neutrinos change flavor and therefore have mass. Although there are many neutrino physics results since the last DIS workshop, these proceedings concentrate on recent neutrino physics results that either add to or depend on the understanding of Deep Inelastic Scattering. They also describe the short and longer term future of neutrino DIS experiments.

  11. Measuring diffuse neutrino fluxes with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Marek

    2005-05-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of a future kilometre-sized neutrino detector to detect and measure the diffuse flux of high energy neutrinos is evaluated. Event rates in established detection channels, such as muon events from charged current νμ interactions or cascade events from νe and ντ interaction, are calculated using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation. Neutrino fluxes as expected from prompt charm decay in the atmosphere or from astrophysical sources such as Active Galactic Nuclei are modelled assuming power laws. The ability to measure the normalization and slope of these spectra is then analysed. It is found that the cascade channel generally has a high sensitivity for the detection and characterization of the diffuse flux, when compared to what is expected for the upgoing- and downgoing-muon channels. A flux at the level of the Waxman Bahcall upper bound should be detectable in all channels separately while a combination of the information of the different channels will allow detection of a flux more than one order of magnitude lower. Neutrinos from the prompt decay of charmed mesons in the atmosphere should be detectable in future measurements for all but the lowest predictions.

  12. Unparticle physics and neutrino phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Bolanos, A.; Miranda, O. G.; Moura, C. A.; Rashba, T. I.

    2009-04-01

    We have constrained unparticle interactions with neutrinos and electrons using available data on neutrino-electron elastic scattering and the four CERN LEP experiments data on mono photon production. We have found that, for neutrino-electron elastic scattering, the MUNU experiment gives better constraints than previous reported limits in the region d>1.5. The results are compared with the current astrophysical limits, pointing out the cases where these limits may or may not apply. We also discuss the sensitivity of future experiments to unparticle physics. In particular, we show that the measurement of coherent reactor neutrino scattering off nuclei could provide a good sensitivity to the couplings of unparticle interaction with neutrinos and quarks. We also discuss the case of future neutrino-electron experiments as well as the International Linear Collider.

  13. Measuring the 13 Neutrino Mixing Angle and the CP Phase with Neutrino Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Serpico, P.D.; Kachelriess, M.

    2005-06-03

    The observed excess of high-energy cosmic rays from the Galactic plane in the energy range around 10{sup 18} eV may be explained by neutron primaries generated in the photodissociation of heavy nuclei. In this scenario, lower-energy neutrons decay before reaching the Earth and produce a detectable flux in a 1 km{sup 3} neutrino telescope. The initial flavor composition of the neutrino flux, {phi}({nu}{sub e}):{phi}({nu}{sub {mu}}):{phi}({nu}{sub {tau}})=1:0:0, permits a combined {nu}{sub {mu}}/{nu}{sub {tau}} appearance and {nu}{sub e} disappearance experiment. The observable flux ratio {phi}({nu}{sub {mu}})/{phi}({nu}{sub e}+{nu}{sub {tau}}) at Earth depends on the 13 mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and the leptonic CP phase {delta}{sub CP}, thus opening a new way to measure these two quantities.

  14. Limit on the muon neutrino magnetic moment and a measurement of the CCPIP to CCQE cross section ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Ouedraogo, Serge Aristide

    2008-12-01

    A search for the muon neutrino magnetic moment was conducted using the Mini-BooNE low energy neutrino data. The analysis was performed by analyzing the elastic scattering interactions of muon neutrinos on electrons. The analysis looked for an excess of elastic scattering events above the Standard Model prediction from which a limit on the neutrino magnetic could be set. In this thesis, we report an excess of 15.3 ± 6.6(stat)±4.1(syst) vμe events above the expected background. At 90% C.L., we derived a limit on the muon neutrino magnetic moment of 12.7 x 10-10 μB. The other analysis reported in this thesis is a measurement of charged current single pion production (CCπ+) to charged current quasi elastic (CCQE) interactions cross sections ratio. This measurement was performed with two different fitting algorithms and the results from both fitters are consistent with each other.

  15. First result for the neutrino magnetic moment from measurements with the GEMMA spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Beda, A. G.; Brudanin, V. B.; Demidova, E. V.; Vylov, C.; Gavrilov, M. G.; Egorov, V. G.; Starostin, A. S.; Shirchenko, M. V.

    2007-11-15

    The first result obtained in the measurements of the neutrino magnetic moment at the Kalinin nuclear power plant with the GEMMA spectrometer is presented. A high-purity germanium detector of mass 1.5 kg placed at a distance of 13.9 m from the reactor core is used in the spectrometer. The antineutrino flux at the detector position is 2.73 x 10{sup 13{nu}}-bar/(cm{sup 2} s). The differential method is used to select events of electromagnetic antineutrino-electron scattering. The spectra taken in the reactor-on and reactor-off modes over 6200 and 2064 h, respectively, are compared. On the basis of a data analysis, an upper limit of 5.8 x 10{sup -11} {mu}B was set on the neutrino magnetic moment {mu}{sub {nu}}at a 90% C.L.

  16. Measuring neutrino masses with a future galaxy survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2012-11-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a EUCLID-like photometric galaxy and cosmic shear survey will be able to constrain the absolute neutrino mass scale. Adopting conservative assumptions about the survey specifications and assuming complete ignorance of the galaxy bias, we estimate that the minimum mass sum of Σm{sub ν} ≅ 0.06 eV in the normal hierarchy can be detected at 1.5σ to 2.5σ significance, depending on the model complexity, using a combination of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements in conjunction with CMB temperature and polarisation observations from PLANCK. With better knowledge of the galaxy bias, the significance of the detection could potentially reach 5.4σ. Interestingly, neither PLANCK+shear nor PLANCK+galaxy alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined effect of galaxy and cosmic shear power spectrum measurements that breaks the persistent degeneracies between the neutrino mass, the physical matter density, and the Hubble parameter. Notwithstanding this remarkable sensitivity to Σm{sub ν}, EUCLID-like shear and galaxy data will not be sensitive to the exact mass spectrum of the neutrino sector; no significant bias ( < 1σ) in the parameter estimation is induced by fitting inaccurate models of the neutrino mass splittings to the mock data, nor does the goodness-of-fit of these models suffer any significant degradation relative to the true one (Δχ{sub eff}{sup 2} < 1)

  17. Charge Coupled Devices for detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez Moroni, Guillermo; Estrada, Juan; Paolini, Eduardo E.; Cancelo, Gustavo; Tiffenberg, Javier; Molina, Jorge

    2015-04-03

    In this article the feasibility of using charge coupled devices (CCD) to detect low-energy neutrinos through their coherent scattering with nuclei is analyzed. The detection of neutrinos through this standard model process has been elusive because of the small energy deposited in such interaction. Typical particle detectors have thresholds of a few keV, and most of the energy deposition expected from coherent scattering is well below this level. The CCD detectors discussed in this paper can operate at a threshold of approximately 30 eV, making them ideal for observing this signal. On a CCD array of 500 g located next to a power nuclear reactor the number of coherent scattering events expected is about 3000 events/year. Our results shows that a detection with a confidence level of 99% can be reached within 16 days of continuous operation; with the current 52 g detector prototype this time lapse extends to five months.

  18. Neutrino-electron Scattering in 2-D Models of Supernova Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeNisco, K. R.; Swesty, F. D.; Myra, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    We present results from 2-D supernova simulations which include the effects of neutrino-electron scattering. The importance of neutrino-electron scattering in stellar collapse has been known for two decades. Yet it has often been neglected in multidimensional simulations due to the difficulty of implementing it consistently. The inclusion of this process is numerically challenging because of the extremely short scattering timescales involved. The stiffness resulting from this short timescale precludes an explicit numerical treatment of this phenomenon, such as those that have recently been utilized in some 2-D models. We describe our fully-implicit treatment of this process and present our initial results. This work was performed at the State University of New York at Stony Brook as part of the TeraScale Supernova Initiative, and is funded by SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER41185 from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science High-Energy, Nuclear, and Advanced Scientific Computing Research Programs. We gratefully acknowledge support of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) for computational and consulting support.

  19. MINERνA neutrino detector calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA is a neutrino scattering experiment that uses Fermilab’s NuMI beamline. Its goal is to measure cross-sections for neutrino scattering from different nuclei. Precise knowledge of these cross-sections is vital for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. In order to measure these values to a high degree of accuracy, it is essential that the detector be carefully calibrated. Here, we describe in-situ calibration and cross-checks.

  20. Limits on dark matter proton scattering from neutrino telescopes using micrOMEGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Bélanger, G.; Silva, J. Da; Perrillat-Bottonet, T.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-12-17

    Limits on dark matter spin dependent elastic scattering cross section on protons derived from IceCube data are obtained for different dark matter annihilation channels using micrOMEGAs. The uncertainty on the derived limits, estimated by using different neutrino spectra, can reach a factor two. For all dark matter annihilation channels except for quarks, the limits on the spin dependent cross section are more stringent than those obtained in direct detection experiments. The new functions that allow to derive those limits are described.

  1. Computations of the collapse of a stellar iron core allowing for the absorption, emission, and scattering of electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    2012-03-01

    The collapse of the iron core of a star with mass 1.4 M ⊙ is computed. The initial model was chosen to be polytropic, P ∝ ρ 1+1/ n , with n = 3. The equation of state takes into account the equilibrium radiation of photons, a mixture of Fermi gases comprised of free nucleons and ideal gases comprised of nuclei (Fe, He) in equilibrium with respect to nuclear reactions, and electron-positron gas. The transport equation for electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos is also included. The absorption and emission of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos with the participation of free nucleons and nuclei is taken into account, as well as scattering on electrons. The main goal of this study is to develop a numerical method for the joint solution of the gas-dynamical equations formatter and the Boltzmann kinetic equations for the distribution functions of various types of neutrinos in both optically thin and optically thick regions. The spherically symmetrical case is considered, but the dependences of the distribution functions on all the phase-space variables—the mass coordinate, particle energy, cosine of the angle between the radius vector and the particle momentum, and time, ( m, ɛ, µ, t)—are retained in the description of the neutrino transport. When computing reaction rates, the exact quantum-mechanical expressions for the probabilities of processes are used, with integration over the entire momentum phase space. The gas-dynamical variables depend on the mass coordinate and time, ( m, t). The solution yields neutrino light curves, which have narrow maximum with characteristic widths ≈10 ms. This makes it possible to place constraints on the mass of the electron neutrino based on the detection of short bursts of radiation, ≲4 eV. Part of the neutrino energy is absorbed in the envelope of the stellar core (˜1050 erg). This is associated with the higher mean neutrino energies in this model, which is more exact than models with neutrino thermal conductivity. This

  2. Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, K.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Neutrinos are electrically neutral ELEMENTARY PARTICLES which experience only the weak nuclear force and gravity. Their existence was introduced as a hypothesis by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930 to explain the apparent violation of energy conservation in radioactive beta decay. Chadwick had discovered in 1914 that the energy spectrum of electrons emitted in beta decay was not monoenergetic but continuous...

  3. Moving to atomic tritium for neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazkaz, Kareem; Project8 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    For direct measurements of the neutrino mass, the tritium-based experiments Mainz and Troitsk have provided the most sensitive measurements to date, with upper limits near 2200 meV. The KATRIN experiment, beginning its first science run in 2016, also uses tritium as its source and has an anticipated ultimate sensitivity of 200 meV. The largest single systematic effect limiting the mass sensitivity beyond KATRIN is the energy sharing between the emitted beta particle and the resulting T-3He molecule. It therefore behooves all future tritium-based experiments to use atomic, rather than molecular, tritium. In this presentation we will outline experimental considerations of atomic tritium: production, purification, inhibiting recombination, and cooling. We will discuss these considerations within the context of Project8, a tritium-based, cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy neutrino mass measurement with an ultimate target sensitivity of 50 meV. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Low-energy ionization yield in liquid argon for a coherent neutrino-nucleus scatter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxe, Michael P.

    A mode of interaction predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics, but not yet observed, is coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS). CNNS results from the neutrino (or antineutrino) scattering coherently with the entire nucleus rather than a single nucleon. The leading challenge in detecting CNNS is the resulting sub-keV nuclear recoil energies, producing little ionization in the detector medium. In order to detect the CNNS interaction, it is beneficial to first measure the nuclear ionization yield for the chosen detector medium. The ionization yield represents the expected number of electrons produced by a nuclear recoil, and it depends both on the recoil energy and on the detector medium in which the recoil occurs. Additionally, the ionization yield depends on the applied electron drift electric field, and for this reason it should be measured directly in the detector type anticipated for future CNNS measurements. This dissertation is focused on making the prediction and measurement of the ionization yield in LAr using a dual-phase Ar detector. Due to the complexity of measuring the ionization yield at various energies, it is beneficial to also construct a predictive model for the ionization yield. In this dissertation, the prediction of the ionization yield is made on the basis of a simulation of a two-stage process. The number of ionizations generated from Ar recoil of a given energy is simulated using a Monte Carlo atomic collision model, along with the cross sections for ionization and excitation in Ar + Ar collisions. After the electrons are generated, a fraction of them recombine with the initially generated ion cloud. The electron recombination fraction is simulated by assigning the emitted electrons either 1 or 10 eV of initial kinetic energy and transporting the electrons under the influence of Coulomb forces of the ion cloud and an applied external electric field. The simulation predicts the energy dependent ionization yield, with a value of

  5. Neutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic interactions measurement in MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, Denis

    2009-12-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) was designed to search for vμ → ve neutrino oscillations at Δm2 ~ 1 eV2 using an intense neutrino flux with an average energy Ev ~ 700 MeV. From 2002 to 2009 MiniBooNE has accumulated more than 1.0 x 1021 protons on target (POT) in both neutrino and antineutrino modes. MiniBooNE provides a perfect platform for detailed measurements of exclusive and semiinclusive neutrino cross-sections, for which MiniBooNE has the largest samples of events up to date, such as neutral current elastic (NCE), neutral current π0, charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE), charged current π+, and other channels. These measured cross-sections, in turn, allow to improve the knowledge of nucleon structure. This thesis is devoted to the study of NCE interactions. Neutrino-nucleus neutral current elastic scattering (vN → vN) accounts for about 18% of all neutrino interactions in MiniBooNE. Using a high-statistics, high purity sample of NCE interactions in MiniBooNE, the flux-averaged NCE differential cross-section has been measured and is being reported here. Further study of the NCE cross-section allowed for probing the structure of nuclei. The main interest in the NCE cross-section is that it may be sensitive to the strange quark contribution to the nucleon spin, Δs, this however requires a separation of NCE proton (vp → vp) from NCE neutron (vn → vn) events, which in general is a challenging task. MiniBooNE uses a Cherenkov detector, which imposes restrictions on the measured nucleon kinematic variables, mainly due to the impossibility to reconstruct the nucleon direction below the Cherenkov threshold. However, at kinetic energies above this threshold MiniBooNE is able to identify NCE proton events that do not experience final state interactions (FSI). These events were used for the Δs measurement. In this thesis

  6. Axial-vector dominance predictions in quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, J. E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2016-03-01

    The axial form factor plays a crucial role in quasielastic neutrino-nucleus scattering, but the error of the theoretical cross section due to uncertainties of GA remains to be established. Conversely, the extraction of GA from the neutrino nucleus cross section suffers from large systematic errors due to nuclear model dependencies, while the use of single-parameter dipole fits underestimates the errors and prevents an identification of the relevant kinematics for this determination. We propose to use a generalized axial-vector-meson dominance in conjunction with large-Nc and high-energy QCD constraints to model the nucleon axial form factor, as well as the half-width rule as an a priori uncertainty estimate. The minimal hadronic ansatz comprises the sum of two monopoles corresponding to the lightest axial-vector mesons being coupled to the axial current. The parameters of the resulting axial form factor are the masses and widths of the two axial mesons as obtained from the averaged Particle Data Group values. By applying the half-width rule in a Monte Carlo simulation, a distribution of theoretical predictions can then be generated for the neutrino-nucleus quasielastic cross section. We test the model by applying it to the (νμ,μ ) quasielastic cross section from 12 for the kinematics of the MiniBooNE experiment. The resulting predictions have no free parameters. We find that the relativistic Fermi gas model globally reproduces the experimental data, giving χ2/# bins=0.81 . A Q2-dependent error analysis of the neutrino data shows that the uncertainties in the axial form factor GA(Q2) are comparable to the ones induced by the a priori half-width rule. We identify the most sensitive region to be in the range 0.2 ≲Q2≲0.6 GeV2 .

  7. Scattering measurements on natural and model trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James C.; Lee, Sung M.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical back scattering from a simple scale model of a tree has been experimentally measured. The model consisted of a trunk and six limbs, each with 4 branches; no foliage or twigs were included. The data from the anechoic chamber measurements were then mathematically combined to construct the effective back scattering from groups of trees. Also, initial measurements have been conducted out-of-doors on a single tree in an open field in order to characterize its acoustic scattering as a function of azimuth angle. These measurements were performed in the spring, prior to leaf development. The data support a statistical model of forest scattering; the scattered signal spectrum is highly irregular but with a remarkable general resemblance to the incident signal spectrum. Also, the scattered signal's spectra showed little dependence upon scattering angle.

  8. Expression of Interest for Neutrinos Scattering on Glass: NuSOnG

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Fisher, P.H.; Formaggio, J.A.; de Gouvea, A.; Loinaz, W.A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kobilarcik, T.R.; Kopp, S.; Kyle, G.; /New Mexico State U. /Fermilab /MIT /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    We propose a 3500 ton (3000 ton fiducial volume) SiO{sub 2} neutrino detector with sampling calorimetry, charged particle tracking, and muon spectrometers to run in a Tevatron Fixed Target Program. Improvements to the Fermilab accelerator complex should allow substantial increases in the neutrino flux over the previous NuTeV quad triplet beamline. With 4 x 10{sup 19} protons on target/year, a 5 year run would achieve event statistics more than 100 times higher than NuTeV. With 100 times the statistics of previous high energy neutrino experiments, the purely weak processes {nu}{sub {mu}} + e{sup -} {yields} {nu}{sub {mu}} + e{sup -} and {nu}{sub {mu}} + e{sup -} {yields} {nu}{sub e} + {mu}{sup -} (inverse muon decay) can be measured with high accuracy for the first time. The inverse muon decay process is independent of strong interaction effects and can be used to significantly improve the flux normalization for all other processes. The high neutrino and antineutrino fluxes also make new searches for lepton flavor violation and neutral heavy leptons possible. In this document, we give a first look at the physics opportunities, detector and beam design, and calibration procedures.

  9. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Q.R.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen, T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Barton,J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler,M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Buhler, G.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Clifford, E.T.H.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky,M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon, N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime, A.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac,M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar, R.J.; Kouzes, R.; Kutter,T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Manor, J.; Marino, A.D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,D.S.; McDonald, A.B.; McFarlane, K.; McGregor, G.; Meijer, R.; Mifflin,C.; Miller, G.G.; Milton, G.; Moffat, B.A.; Moorhead, M.; Nally, C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; Newcomer, F.M.; Ng, H.S.; Noble, A.J.; Norman, E.B.; Novikov, V.M.; O'Neill, M.; Okada, C.E.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Omori, M.; Orrell, J.L.; Oser, S.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Radcliffe, T.J.; Roberge, A.; Robertson, B.C.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Rosendahl, S.S.E.; Rowley, J.K.; Rusu, V.L.; Saettler, E.; Schaffer, K.K.; Schwendener,M.H.; Schulke, A.; Seifert, H.; Shatkay, M.; Simpson, J.J.; Sims, C.J.; et al.

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  10. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Q. R. Ahmad, R. C. Allen, T. C. Andersen, J. D. Anglin, G. Bühler, J. C. Barton, E. W. Beier, M. Bercovitch, J. Bigu, S. Biller, R. A. Black, I. Blevis, R. J. Boardman, J. Boger, E. Bonvin, M. G. Boulay, M. G. Bowler, T. J. Bowles, S. J. Brice, M. C. Browne, T. V. Bullard, T. H. Burritt, K. Cameron, J. Cameron, Y. D. Chan, M. Chen, H. H. Chen, X. Chen, M. C. Chon, B. T. Cleveland, E. T. H. Clifford, J. H. M. Cowan, D. F. Cowen, G. A. Cox, Y. Dai, X. Dai, F. Dalnoki-Veress, W. F. Davidson, P. J. Doe, G. Doucas, M. R. Dragowsky, C. A. Duba, F. A. Duncan, J. Dunmore, E. D. Earle, S. R. Elliott, H. C. Evans, G. T. Ewan, J. Farine, H. Fergani, A. P. Ferraris, R. J. Ford, M. M. Fowler, K. Frame, E. D. Frank, W. Frati, J. V. Germani, S. Gil, A. Goldschmidt, D. R. Grant, R. L. Hahn, A. L. Hallin, E. D. Hallman, A. Hamer, A. A. Hamian, R. U. Haq, C. K. Hargrove, P. J. Harvey, R. Hazama, R. Heaton, K. M. Heeger, W. J. Heintzelman, J. Heise, R. L. Helmer, J. D. Hepburn, H. Heron, J. Hewett, A. Hime, M. Howe, J. G. Hykawy, M. C. P. Isaac, P. Jagam, N. A. Jelley, C. Jillings, G. Jonkmans, J. Karn, P. T. Keener, K. Kirch, J. R. Klein, A. B. Knox, R. J. Komar, R. Kouzes, T. Kutter, C. C. M. Kyba, J. Law, I. T. Lawson, M. Lay, H. W. Lee, K. T. Lesko, J. R. Leslie, I. Levine, W. Locke, M. M. Lowry, S. Luoma, J. Lyon, S. Majerus, H. B. Mak, A. D. Marino, N. McCauley, A. B. McDonald, D. S. McDonald, K. McFarlane, G. McGregor, W. McLatchie, R. Meijer Drees, H. Mes, C. Mifflin, G. G. Miller, G. Milton, B. A. Moffat, M. Moorhead, C. W. Nally, M. S. Neubauer, F. M. Newcomer, H. S. Ng, A. J. Noble, E. B. Norman, V. M. Novikov, M. O'Neill, C. E. Okada, R. W. Ollerhead, M. Omori, J. L. Orrell, S. M. Oser, A. W. P. Poon, T. J. Radcliffe, A. Roberge, B. C. Robertson, R. G. H. Robertson, J. K. Rowley, V. L. Rusu, E. Saettler, K. K. Schaffer, A. Schuelke, M. H. Schwendener, H. Seifert, M. Shatkay, J. J. Simpson, D. Sinclair, P. Skensved, A. R. Smith, M. W. E. Smith, N. Starinsky, T. D. Steiger, R. G. Stokstad, R. S. Storey, B. Sur, R. Tafirout, N. Tagg, N. W. Tanner, R. K. Taplin, M. Thorman, P. Thornewell, P. T. Trent, Y. I. Tserkovnyak, R. Van Berg, R. G. Van de Water, C. J. Virtue, C. E. Waltham, J.-X. Wang, D. L. Wark, N. West, J. B. Wilhelmy, J. F. Wilkerson, J. Wilson, P. Wittich, J. M. Wouters, and M. Yeh

    2001-09-24

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D{sub 2}O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar {nu}{sub e} flux and the total flux of all active neutrino species. Solar neutrinos from the decay of {sup 8}B have been detected at SNO by the charged-current (CC) interaction on the deuteron and by the elastic scattering (ES) of electrons. While the CC reaction is sensitive exclusively to {nu}{sub e}, the ES reaction also has a small sensitivity to {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}}. In this paper, recent solar neutrino results from the SNO experiment are presented. It is demonstrated that the solar flux from {sup 8}B decay as measured from the ES reaction rate under the no-oscillation assumption is consistent with the high precision ES measurement by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. The {nu}{sub e} flux deduced from the CC reaction rate in SNO differs from the Super-Kamiokande ES results by 3.3{sigma}. This is evidence for an active neutrino component, in additional to {nu}{sub e}, in the solar neutrino flux. These results also allow the first experimental determination of the total active {sup 8}B neutrino flux from the Sun, and is found to be in good agreement with solar model predictions.

  11. Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Coherent Pion Production and the Diffractive Background in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Alicia; Minerva Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Neutrino-induced coherent charged pion production is a unique neutrino-nucleus scattering process in which a muon and pion are produced while the nucleus is left in its ground state. The MINERvA experiment has made a model-independent differential cross section measurement of this process on carbon by selecting events with a muon and a pion, no evidence of nuclear break-up, and small momentum transfer to the nucleus | t | . A similar process which is a background to the measurement on carbon is diffractive pion production off the free protons in MINERvA's scintillator. This process is not modeled in the neutrino event generator GENIE. At low | t | these events have a similar final state to the aforementioned process. A study to quantify this diffractive event contribution to the background is done by emulating these diffractive events by reweighting all other GENIE-generated background events to the predicted | t | distribution of diffractive events, and then scaling to the diffractive cross section.

  12. Measurement of Ratios of νμ Charged-Current Cross Sections on C, Fe, and Pb to CH at Neutrino Energies 2-20 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, B. G.; Datta, M.; Mousseau, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Barrios Sazo, M. G.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Brooks, W. K.; Budd, H.; Bustamante, M. J.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Castromonte, C. M.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Jerkins, M.; Kafka, T.; Kordosky, M.; Kulagin, S. A.; Le, T.; Maggi, G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martin Mari, C.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Savage, D. G.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Simon, C.; Snider, F. D.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Valencia, E.; Velásquez, J. P.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B. P.; Minerva Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of νμ charged-current cross section ratios on carbon, iron, and lead relative to a scintillator (CH) using the fine-grained MINERvA detector exposed to the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The measurements utilize events of energies 2scattering angle less than 17° to extract ratios of inclusive total cross sections as a function of neutrino energy Eν and flux-integrated differential cross sections with respect to the Bjorken scaling variable x. These results provide the first high-statistics direct measurements of nuclear effects in neutrino scattering using different targets in the same neutrino beam. Measured cross section ratios exhibit a relative depletion at low x and enhancement at large x. Both become more pronounced as the nucleon number of the target nucleus increases. The data are not reproduced by GENIE, a conventional neutrino-nucleus scattering simulation, or by the alternative models for the nuclear dependence of inelastic scattering that are considered.

  13. Ultra-low Q values for neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Joachim; Merle, Alexander; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2009-11-01

    We investigate weak nuclear decays with extremely small kinetic energy release (Q value) and thus extremely good sensitivity to the absolute neutrino mass scale. In particular, we consider decays into excited daughter states, and we show that partial ionization of the parent atom can help to tune Q values to << 1 keV. We discuss several candidate isotopes undergoing {beta}{sup {+-}}, bound state {beta}, or electron capture decay, and come to the conclusion that a neutrino mass measurement using low-Q decays might only be feasible if no ionization is required, and if future improvements in isotope production technology, nuclear mass spectroscopy, and atomic structure calculations are possible. Experiments using ions, however, are extremely challenging due to the large number of ions that must be stored. New precision data on nuclear excitation levels could help to identify further isotopes with low-Q decay modes and possibly less challenging requirements.

  14. Measuring Neutrino Mass with Radioactive Ions in a Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-03-30

    A method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay is proposed. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. By counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for m{sub n}u<0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than deltap/p<10{sup -5}, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least O(10{sup 18}) decays.

  15. Measuring the neutrino mass from future wide galaxy cluster catalogues

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Moscardini, Lauro; Cimatti, Andrea; Fedeli, Cosimo E-mail: cosimo.fedeli@astro.ufl.edu E-mail: a.cimatti@unibo.it

    2012-03-01

    We present forecast errors on a wide range of cosmological parameters obtained from a photometric cluster catalogue of a future wide-field Euclid-like survey. We focus in particular on the total neutrino mass as constrained by a combination of the galaxy cluster number counts and correlation function. For the latter we consider only the shape information and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), while marginalising over the spectral amplitude and the redshift space distortions. In addition to the cosmological parameters of the standard ΛCDM+ν model we also consider a non-vanishing curvature, and two parameters describing a redshift evolution for the dark energy equation of state. For completeness, we also marginalise over a set of ''nuisance'' parameters, representing the uncertainties on the cluster mass determination. We find that combining cluster counts with power spectrum information greatly improves the constraining power of each probe taken individually, with errors on cosmological parameters being reduced by up to an order of magnitude. In particular, the best improvements are for the parameters defining the dynamical evolution of dark energy, where cluster counts break degeneracies. Moreover, the resulting error on neutrino mass is at the level of σ(M{sub ν}) ∼ 0.9 eV, comparable with that derived from present Lyα forest measurements and Cosmic Microwave background (CMB) data in the framework of a non-flat Universe. Further adopting Planck priors and reducing the number of free parameters to a ΛCDM+ν cosmology allows to place constraints on the total neutrino mass of σ(M{sub ν}) ∼ 0.08 eV, close to the lower bound enforced by neutrino oscillation experiments. Finally, in the optimistic case where uncertainties in the calibration of the mass-observable relation were so small to be neglected, the combination of Planck priors with cluster counts and power spectrum would constrain the total neutrino mass down to σ(M{sub ν}) ∼ 0.034 eV, i

  16. Twist-four effects in deep inelastic neutrino scattering and sinStheta/sub w/

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, S.; Oakes, R.J.

    1985-07-01

    In addition to the standard perturbative QCD corrections to deep inelastic scattering, there are nonperturbative twist-four corrections which behave like 1/QS relative to the lnQS leading log corrections. We have calculated the twist-four, spin-one and spin-two corrections to sigma/sub NC/, sigma/sub CC/, R/sub nu/ and R/sub anti nu/ using the following procedure: The bilocal product of the weak currents is expanded into local operators using the Wilson operator product expansion. The coefficient functions obey the renormalization group equations and, neglecting the anomalous dimensions of the operators, were calculated using perturbative techniques. The nucleon matrix elements of the local operators can then be evaluated assuming some quark confinement model. We found that twist-four, spin-two corrections to the neutral current neutrino scattering decreases sinStheta/sub w/ by about 1%. Taking into account the twist-four, spin-two corrections for the charged current cross section, we found that they give a dominant contribution to the ratio R/sub nu/ and increased sinStheta/sub w/ by about 0.5%. We also have studied the model dependence of our results, and we have found that the twist-four, spin-two corrections to sinStheta/sub w/ are quite model dependent. The twist-four, spin-one corrections to the neutrino scattering were also calculated. These corrections come from two-quark, one-gluon operators and even at low QS their contribution was found to be considerably smaller than the twist-four, spin-two corrections.

  17. Experiment to measure the electron neutrino mass using frozen tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Fackler, O.; Sticker, H.; Mugge, M.; White, R.M.; Woerner, R.

    1985-01-01

    We are performing an experiment to determine the electron neutrino mass with the precision of a few eV by measuring the tritium beta decay energy distribution near the endpoint. To make this measurement, we have built a spectrometer with a resolution of 2 eV. Our source is frozen tritium since tritium and the HeT/sup +/ daughter ion have electronic wavefunctions that can be calculated with high accuracy. We describe the experiment and discuss the excited final molecular state calculations.

  18. Determination of sin/sup 2/theta/sub w/ by muon neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Amako, K.; Aronson, S.H.; Beier, E.W.; Callas, J.L.; Connolly, P.L.; Cutts, D.; Diwan, M.V.; Doughty, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Total and differential cross sections for ..nu../sub ..mu../ and /bar /nu///sub ..mu../ elastic scattering by electrons were measured. The best value of sin/sup 2/theta/sub w/, obtained by fits to the differential distributions, was found to be sin/sup 2/theta/sub w/ = 0.195 +- 0.018 +- 0.013. 11 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yongquan

    2015-04-01

    The most basic Quantum are the particles who mutual rotation, quantum is composed of basic quantum.Quantum convergence or divergence is conditional, the faster the particle rotates, the smaller the orbiting radius will be, the greater quality is, the more density will be. The orbiting radius of less than 10-15 meters in the order of convergence, convergence of neutron, proton, and then they are in the formation of the nucleus, and the convergence of quantum can make extra nuclear electron and the formation of atomic; if rotation radius is more than 10-15 meters of magnitude, the internal quantum atoms diverge to outer space in the form of electromagnetic waves. The quality of magnetic wave particle is composed of the rotation speed of the particle which is internal of the electromagnetic, it doesn't matter about the electromagnetic wave propagation velocity of particles. Neutrinos are orbiting particles, the orbiting radius is about 10-15 meters, is a special kind of radiation. Neutrino is between the virtual particles (according to modern science, the electromagnetic wave doesn't have quality) and modern scientific (the particle who has quality) special particles

  20. a Search for Neutrino-Electron Elastic Scattering at the LAMPF Beam Stop.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, George Alfred

    Neutrino-electron elastic scattering reactions play an important role in tests of weak interaction theory. The four reactions which may be considered are:. (nu)(,e) + e('-) (--->) (nu)(,e) + e('-). (nu)(,e)(' )+ e('-) (--->) (nu)(,e) + e('-). (nu)(,(mu)) + e('-) (--->) (nu)(,(mu)) + e('-). (nu)(,(mu))(' )+ e('-) (--->) (nu)(,(mu)) + e(' -). The experimental study of these purely leptonic interactions severely tests basic theoretical ideas, and the reaction with (nu)(,e) has not yet been observed. The characteristics of Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. (LAMPF) are such that (nu)(,e) is rarely produced, whereas (nu)(,e),(nu)(,(mu)), and(' ). (nu)(,(mu)) are present in equal numbers. Thus, data on all three processes(' ). will be collected simultaneously, but the (nu)(,e) reaction is expected to dominate. However, such studies are exceedingly difficult. The main problem arises from the nature of the event signature (an undetected particle enters the detector producing a single recoil electron) coupled with the miniscule cross sections expected (and therefore low event rates) amid numerous sources of background events. To learn how to reduce the rates of such backgrounds, the UCI Neutrino Group installed in the Neutrino Facility in 1974 a small scale detector system consisting of a sandwich of optical spark chambers and plastic scintillator slabs (0.38 metric tons) which was shielded by 2 1/2" of Pb and enclosed by tanks of liquid scintillator used as an anticoincidence. Electronics and instrumentation, including a CAMAC system interfaced with a PDP-11/05 computer, were housed in a nearby trailer. The 1974 study was carried out with the LAMPF Neutrino Facility shielded against cosmic rays by Fe walls 3' thick and a 4' Fe roof. Nevertheless, stopping cosmic ray muons appeared to give rise to the substantial number of background electron events observed. Several techniques were invoked to reduce the potential background for neutrino -electron elastic scattering to (1

  1. a Cylindrical Mirror Analyser for Neutrino Mass Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Simon Shaughan

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The design of an electrostatic Cylindrical Mirror Analyser (CMA) for neutrino mass measurement is given. The resolution is 15 eV FWHM, being achieved with second order focusing and tight collimation. The field-matching grids are unique, being sets of accurately positioned vertical wires producing negligible resolution effects. Luminosity is maximised with an extended source and by utilisation of the full 2pi of the CMA. Background is minimised as the deflecting voltage is half the analysing energy so that field--emission can be discriminated against. Cosmic -ray secondaries are largely removed by high resolution silicon surface barrier detectors. The construction of the CMA to an accuracy of ~10 eV in base resolution, and of the magnetic shielding and vacuum systems is outlined. The power supplies and monitoring systems, signal processing electronics and data acquisition software are also described. Ytterbium conversion electron measurements confirm the calculated CMA optical resolution function to better than 10% in half-width. These measurements demonstrate that the CMA calibration and dispersion are at their theoretical values and also identify a small mis-alignment in the CMA, consistent with construction accuracy. Correcting fields are subsequently designed. The end-point spectrum of tritium is measured using a Langmuir-Blodgett mono-layer source, yielding a neutrino mass limit of <64 eV (90% CL), including total resolution systematic error and being limited principally by statistical errors. Tritium measurements also verify the luminosity of the CMA as ~ 9 times 10^ {-4} cm^2 and demonstrate the extremely low background of 2 times 10^{-3} s^{-1} . Monte-Carlo simulations indicate that with this optical resolution, knowledge of molecular final states and energy loss, a lower limit of 10 eV (95% CL) should be measured for a neutrino mass of 30 eV with a suitable source. For a zero

  2. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters m2 21, θ12 and constraints on θ13 based on a study of reactor antineutrinos at a baseline of ~ 180 km with the KamLAND detector. The data presented here was collected between April 2002 and November 2009, and amounts to a total exposure of 2.64 ± 0.07 × 1032 proton-years. For this exposure we expect 2140 ± 74(syst) antineutrino candidates from reactors, assuming standard model neutrino behavior, and 350±88(syst) candidates from background. The number observed is 1614. The ratio of background-subtracted candidates observed to expected is (NObs - NBkg)/ (NExp) = 0.59 ± 0.02(stat) ± 0.045(syst) which confirms reactor neutrino disappearance at greater than 5σ significance. Interpreting this deficit as being due to neutrino oscillation, the best-fit oscillation parameters from a three-flavor analysis are m2 21= 7.60+0.20 -0.19×10-5eV2, θ12 = 32.5 ± 2.9 degrees and sin2 θ13 = 0.025+0.035 -0.035, the 95% confidence-level upper limit on sin2 θ13 is sin2 θ13 < 0.083. Assuming CPT invariance, a combined analysis of KamLAND and solar neutrino data yields best-fit values: m2 21 = 7.60+0.20 -0.20 × 10-5eV2, θ12 = 33.5+1.0 -1.1 degrees, and sin2 θ13 = 0.013 ± 0.028 or sin2 θ13 < 0.06 at the 95% confidence level.

  3. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precise measurements of two delta m**2 in electron-neutrino and muon-neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Minakata, H.; Nunokawa, H.; Parke, Stephen J.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-09-01

    In this talk, the authors discuss the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the two effective atmospheric neutrino mass squared differences measured, respectively, in electron, and in muon neutrino disappearance oscillation experiments. if the former, is larger (smaller) than the latter, the mass hierarchy is of normal (inverted) type. They consider two very high precision (a few per mil) measurements of such mass squared differences by the phase II of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) experiment and by the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic errors of both measurements, they determine the region of sensitivities where the mass hierarchy can be distinguished. Due to the tight space limitation, they present only the general idea and show a few most important plots.

  4. Potential of geo-neutrino measurements at JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ran; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhan, Liang; McDonough, William, F.; Cao, Jun; Ludhova, Livia

    2016-03-01

    The flux of geoneutrinos at any point on the Earth is a function of the abundance and distribution of radioactive elements within our planet. This flux has been successfully detected by the 1-kt KamLAND and 0.3-kt Borexino detectors, with these measurements being limited by their low statistics. The planned 20-kt JUNO detector will provide an exciting opportunity to obtain a high statistics measurement, which will provide data to address several questions of geological importance. This paper presents the JUNO detector design concept, the expected geo-neutrino signal and corresponding backgrounds. The precision level of geo-neutrino measurements at JUNO is obtained with the standard least-squares method. The potential of the Th/U ratio and mantle measurements is also discussed. Supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405056, 11305193, 11205176, 21504063), National Science Foundation of U.S. (EAR 1067983/1068097), Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant No. XDA10010100 and CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  5. An autonomous underwater telescope for measuring the scattering of light in the deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasi, K. G.; Domvoglou, T.; Kiskiras, I.; Lenis, D.; Maniatis, M.; Maragos, N.; Stavropoulos, G.

    2016-05-01

    The KM3NeT research infrastructure will be a deep sea multidisciplinary observatory in the Mediterranean Sea housing a neutrino telescope. Accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the sea water is important for the performance evaluation of the telescope. In this work we describe the deployment of the equipment that we had previously examined by Monte Carlo (MC) simulationsl, in the context of the scattering experiment in order to evaluate the parameters describing the scattering characteristics of the sea water. Four photomultipliers (PMTs) were used to measure in situ the scattered light emitted by six laser diodes in three different wavelengths covering the Cherenkov radiation spectrum.

  6. Precision measurement of the speed of propagation of neutrinos using the MINOS detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamson, P.

    2015-09-17

    We report a two-detector measurement of the propagation speed of neutrinos over a baseline of 734 km. The measurement was made with the NuMI beam at Fermilab between the near and far MINOS detectors. Furthermore, the fractional difference between the neutrino speed and the speed of light is determined to be (v/c-1)=(1.0±1.1)×10-6, consistent with relativistic neutrinos.

  7. Precision measurement of the speed of propagation of neutrinos using the MINOS detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.

    2015-09-17

    We report a two-detector measurement of the propagation speed of neutrinos over a baseline of 734 km. The measurement was made with the NuMI beam at Fermilab between the near and far MINOS detectors. Furthermore, the fractional difference between the neutrino speed and the speed of light is determined to be (v/c-1)=(1.0±1.1)×10-6, consistent with relativistic neutrinos.

  8. Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with theSudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set

    SciTech Connect

    Aharmim, B.; Ahmad, Q.R.; Ahmed, S.N.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen,T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Buehler, G.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch,M.; Bergevin, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Deng, H.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon,N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Henning, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime,A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar,R.J.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Kouzes, R.; Krueger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss,C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,A.B.; McDonald, D.S.; McFarlane, K.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; MeijerDrees, R.; Mes, H.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Milton,G.; Moffat, B.A.; Monreal, B.; Moorhead, M.; Morrissette, B.; Nally,C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; et al.

    2007-02-01

    This article provides the complete description of resultsfrom the Phase I data set of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ThePhase I data set is based on a 0.65 kt-year exposure of heavy water tothe solar 8B neutrino flux. Included here are details of the SNO physicsand detector model, evaluations of systematic uncertainties, andestimates of backgrounds. Also discussed are SNO's approach tostatistical extraction of the signals from the three neutrino reactions(charged current, neutral current, and elastic scattering) and theresults of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the ?e flux. Under theassumption that the 8B spectrum is undistorted, the measurements fromthis phase yield a solar ?e flux of ?(?e) =1.76+0.05?0.05(stat.)+0.09?0.09 (syst.) x 106 cm?2 s?1, and a non-?ecomponent ?(? mu) = 3.41+0.45?0.45(stat.)+0.48?0.45 (syst.) x 106 cm?2s?1. The sum of these components provides a total flux in excellentagreement with the predictions of Standard Solar Models. The day-nightasymmetry in the ?e flux is found to be Ae = 7.0 +- 4.9 (stat.)+1.3?1.2percent (sys.), when the asymmetry in the total flux is constrained to bezero.

  9. Improvement in Rayleigh Scattering Measurement Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous velocity, density, and temperature measurements. The Fabry-Perot interferometer or etalon is a commonly employed instrument for resolving the spectrum of molecular Rayleigh scattered light for the purpose of evaluating these flow properties. This paper investigates the use of an acousto-optic frequency shifting device to improve measurement accuracy in Rayleigh scattering experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The frequency shifting device is used as a means of shifting the incident or reference laser frequency by 1100 MHz to avoid overlap of the Rayleigh and reference signal peaks in the interference pattern used to obtain the velocity, density, and temperature measurements, and also to calibrate the free spectral range of the Fabry-Perot etalon. The measurement accuracy improvement is evaluated by comparison of Rayleigh scattering measurements acquired with and without shifting of the reference signal frequency in a 10 mm diameter subsonic nozzle flow.

  10. Measurement of the Neutrino Neutral-Current Elastic Differential Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.A.; Anderson, C.E.; Bazarko, A.O.; Brice, S.J.; Brown, B.C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J.M.; Cox, D.C.; Curioni, A.; /Yale U. /Argonne

    2010-07-01

    We report a measurement of the flux-averaged neutral-current elastic differential cross section for neutrinos scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}) as a function of four-momentum transferred squared, Q{sup 2}. It is obtained by measuring the kinematics of recoiling nucleons with kinetic energy greater than 50 MeV which are readily detected in MiniBooNE. This differential cross-section distribution is fit with fixed nucleon form factors apart from an axial mass, M{sub A}, that provides a best fit for M{sub A} = 1.39 {+-} 0.11 GeV. Using the data from the charged-current neutrino interaction sample, a ratio of neutral-current to charged-current quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of Q{sup 2} has been measured. Additionally, single protons with kinetic energies above 350 MeV can be distinguished from neutrons and multiple nucleon events. Using this marker, the strange quark contribution to the neutral-current axial vector form factor at Q{sup 2} = 0, {Delta}s, is found to be {Delta}s = 0.08{+-} 0.26.

  11. Measurement of the Total Active 8B Solar Neutrino Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with Enhanced Neutral Current Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S. N.; Anthony, A. E.; Beier, E. W.; Bellerive, A.; Biller, S. D.; Boger, J.; Boulay, M. G.; Bowler, M. G.; Bowles, T. J.; Brice, S. J.; Bullard, T. V.; Chan, Y. D.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B. T.; Cox, G. A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Doe, P. J.; Dosanjh, R. S.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duba, C. A.; Duncan, F. A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J. A.; Earle, E. D.; Elliott, S. R.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Fleurot, F.; Formaggio, J. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Frame, K.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gagnon, N.; Graham, K.; Grant, D. R.; Hahn, R. L.; Hall, J. C.; Hallin, A. L.; Hallman, E. D.; Hamer, A. S.; Handler, W. B.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harvey, P. J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K. M.; Heintzelman, W. J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R. L.; Hemingway, R. J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M. A.; Jagam, P.; Jelley, N. A.; Klein, J. R.; Kos, M. S.; Krumins, A. V.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C. C.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I. T.; Lesko, K. T.; Leslie, J. R.; Levine, I.; Luoma, S.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H. B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A. D.; McCauley, N.; McDonald, A. B.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K. K.; Miller, G. G.; Moffat, B. A.; Nally, C. W.; Nickel, B. G.; Noble, A. J.; Norman, E. B.; Oblath, N. S.; Okada, C. E.; Ollerhead, R. W.; Orrell, J. L.; Oser, S. M.; Ouellet, C.; Peeters, S. J.; Poon, A. W.; Robertson, B. C.; Robertson, R. G.; Rollin, E.; Rosendahl, S. S.; Rusu, V. L.; Schwendener, M. H.; Simard, O.; Simpson, J. J.; Sims, C. J.; Sinclair, D.; Skensved, P.; Smith, M. W.; Starinsky, N.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stonehill, L. C.; Tafirout, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tešić, G.; Thomson, M.; Thorman, M.; van Berg, R.; van de Water, R. G.; Virtue, C. J.; Wall, B. L.; Waller, D.; Waltham, C. E.; Tseung, H. Wan; Wark, D. L.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wilson, J. R.; Wouters, J. M.; Yeh, M.; Zuber, K.

    2004-05-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has precisely determined the total active (νx) 8B solar neutrino flux without assumptions about the energy dependence of the νe survival probability. The measurements were made with dissolved NaCl in heavy water to enhance the sensitivity and signature for neutral-current interactions. The flux is found to be 5.21±0.27(stat)±0.38(syst)×106 cm-2 s-1, in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of these and other solar and reactor neutrino results yields Δm2=7.1+1.2-0.6×10-5 eV2 and θ=32.5+2.4-2.3 degrees. Maximal mixing is rejected at the equivalent of 5.4 standard deviations.

  12. MINERvA: A Dedicated neutrino scattering experiment at NuMI

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Kevin S.; /Rochester U.

    2006-05-01

    MINERvA is a dedicated neutrino cross-section experiment planned for the near detector hall of the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. I summarize the detector design and physics capabilities of the experiment.

  13. Testing molecular effects for tritium-based neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parno, Diana; Bodine, Laura; Robertson, R. G. Hamish

    2015-10-01

    The upcoming KATRIN experiment will use the kinematics of tritium beta decay to probe the neutrino mass. The tritium source is molecular, however, and one of KATRIN's largest expected systematic uncertainties arises from the population of molecular final states following beta decay. To study this uncertainty, the Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer will measure the dissociation probability of the daughter molecule following beta decay, addressing a discrepancy between modern, high-precision theoretical calculations and two mass spectrometry measurements from the 1950s. We will describe the novel measurement technique and the commissioning of the experiment. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  14. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  15. Precise Measurement of the Neutrino Mixing Parameter θ23 from Muon Neutrino Disappearance in an Off-Axis Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Bentham, S. W.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bertram, I.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dufour, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Floetotto, L.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Ives, S. J.; Iwai, E.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koseki, K.; Koshio, Y.; Kreslo, I.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kumaratunga, S.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Laihem, K.; Lamont, I.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lee, K. P.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Macaire, M.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Maruyama, T.; Marzec, J.; Mathie, E. L.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Monfregola, L.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nagasaki, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakai, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Naples, D.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Retiere, F.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Szeglowski, T.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Ueno, K.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    New data from the T2K neutrino oscillation experiment produce the most precise measurement of the neutrino mixing parameter θ23. Using an off-axis neutrino beam with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV and a data set corresponding to 6.57×1020 protons on target, T2K has fit the energy-dependent νμ oscillation probability to determine oscillation parameters. The 68% confidence limit on sin2(θ23) is 0.514-0.056+0.055 (0.511±0.055), assuming normal (inverted) mass hierarchy. The best-fit mass-squared splitting for normal hierarchy is Δm322=(2.51±0.10)×10-3 eV2/c4 (inverted hierarchy: Δm132=(2.48±0.10)×10-3 eV2/c4). Adding a model of multinucleon interactions that affect neutrino energy reconstruction is found to produce only small biases in neutrino oscillation parameter extraction at current levels of statistical uncertainty.

  16. Precise measurement of the neutrino mixing parameter θ23 from muon neutrino disappearance in an off-axis beam.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Bentham, S W; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bertram, I; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dufour, F; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Floetotto, L; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Ives, S J; Iwai, E; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kreslo, I; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kumaratunga, S; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lee, K P; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Macaire, M; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Maruyama, T; Marzec, J; Mathie, E L; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Monfregola, L; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nagasaki, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakai, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Naples, D; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Retiere, F; Robert, A; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smith, R J; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Szeglowski, T; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Ueno, K; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2014-05-01

    New data from the T2K neutrino oscillation experiment produce the most precise measurement of the neutrino mixing parameter θ23. Using an off-axis neutrino beam with a peak energy of 0.6 GeV and a data set corresponding to 6.57×10(20) protons on target, T2K has fit the energy-dependent νμ oscillation probability to determine oscillation parameters. The 68% confidence limit on sin(2)(θ23) is 0.514(-0.056)(+0.055) (0.511±0.055), assuming normal (inverted) mass hierarchy. The best-fit mass-squared splitting for normal hierarchy is Δm32(2)=(2.51±0.10)×10(-3)  eV(2)/c(4) (inverted hierarchy: Δm13(2)=(2.48±0.10)×10(-3)  eV(2)/c(4)). Adding a model of multinucleon interactions that affect neutrino energy reconstruction is found to produce only small biases in neutrino oscillation parameter extraction at current levels of statistical uncertainty. PMID:24856687

  17. Introduction to direct neutrino mass measurements and KATRIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thümmler, T.; Katrin Collaboration

    2012-08-01

    The properties of neutrinos and especially their rest mass play an important role at the intersections of cosmology, particle physics and astroparticle physics. At present there are two complementary approaches to address this topic in laboratory experiments. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay probes whether neutrinos are Majorana particles and determines an effective neutrino mass value. On the other hand experiments such as MARE, KATRIN and the recently proposed Project 8 will investigate the spectral shape of β-decay electrons close to their kinematic endpoint in order to determine the neutrino rest mass with a model-independent method. Here, because of neutrino flavour mixing, the neutrino mass appears as an average of all neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) is currently the experiment in the most advanced status of commissioning. It combines an ultra-luminous molecular windowless gaseous tritium source with an integrating high-resolution spectrometer of MAC-E filter type. It will investigate the neutrino rest mass with 0.2 eV/c (90% C.L.) sensitivity and allow β spectroscopy close to the T endpoint at 18.6 keV with unprecedented precision.

  18. Crustal heat production measurements near the Sudbury geo-neutrino observatory: Implications for calculating the crustal geo-neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Phaneuf, C.; Mareschal, J.

    2010-12-01

    We compare estimates of crustal heat production in the Sudbury region from airborne radiometric surveys and from measurements on core samples from mining exploration drill holes. Airborne surveys have a high spatial resolution (250m) but are only sensitive to the very shallow part of the crust. They give a mean heat production of 0.8 μW m^-3 +/- 0.6 (σ) for more than 20,000 values. Measurements on surface rock samples collected on a 15 km transect starting at the margin of the structure yield an average heat production of 2.9 μW m^-3 +/- 2.4 (σ) yield and core samples from drill holes yield 2.5 μW m^-3 +/- 0.8 (σ). The high heat production measured on samples is consistent with surface heat flux measurements in the Sudbury area that are higher than the average Canadian Shield. Crustal heat production must be estimated as precisely as possible for the future geo-neutrino experiment planned at the Sudbury neutrino observatory. Our study shows that airborne aeromagnetic surveys are not likely to provide the reliable estimates needed to calculate the crustal geo-neutrino flux, and that crustal heat production and the geo-neutrino flux must be calculated from heat flux and heat production measurements on rock and core samples.

  19. The Measurement of the Number of Light Neutrino Species at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Within weeks of the start of the data taking at the LEP accelerator, the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments were able to confirm the existence of just three light neutrino species. This measurement relies on the Standard Model relation between the `invisible' width of the Z-boson and the cross-sections for Z-boson production and subsequent decay into hadrons. The full data sample collected by the experiments at and around the Z-boson resonance allows a high-precision measurement of the number of light neutrino species as 2.9840 ± 0.0082. The uncertainty is mostly due to the understanding of the low-angle Bhabha scattering process used to determine the experimental luminosity. This result is independently confirmed by the elegant direct observation of the e^-e^+ to ν bar{ν}γ process, through the detection of an initial-state-radiation photon in otherwise empty detectors. This result confirms expectations from the existence of three charged leptons species, and contributes to the fields of astrophysics and cosmology. Alongside other LEP achievements, the precision of this result is a testament to the global cooperation underpinning CERN's fourth decade. LEP saw the onset of large-scale collaboration across experiments totaling over 2000 scientists, together with a strong partnership within the wider high-energy physics community: from accelerator operations to the understanding of theoretical processes.

  20. Measurement of Charged Pions from Neutrino-produced Nuclear Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Clifford N.

    2014-01-01

    A method for identifying stopped pions in a high-resolution scintillator bar detector is presented. I apply my technique to measure the axial mass MΔAfor production of the Δ(1232) resonance by neutrino, with the result MΔA = 1.16±0.20 GeV (68% CL) (limited by statistics). The result is produced from the measured spectrum of reconstructed momentum-transfer Q2. I proceed by varying the value of MΔA in a Rein-Sehgal-based Monte Carlo to produce the best agreement, using shape only (not normalization). The consistency of this result with recent reanalyses of previous bubble-chamber experiments is discussed.

  1. Measurement of the solar B8 neutrino rate with a liquid scintillator target and 3 MeV energy threshold in the Borexino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bonetti, S.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; de Kerret, H.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Joyce, M.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Leung, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Risso, P.; Romani, A.; Rountree, D.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Xu, J.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.; Borexino Collaboration

    2010-08-01

    We report the measurement of ν-e elastic scattering from B8 solar neutrinos with 3 MeV energy threshold by the Borexino detector in Gran Sasso (Italy). The rate of solar neutrino-induced electron scattering events above this energy in Borexino is 0.22±0.04(stat)±0.01(syst)cpd/100t, which corresponds to ΦB8ES=2.4±0.4±0.1×106cm-2s-1, in good agreement with measurements from SNO and SuperKamiokaNDE. Assuming the B8 neutrino flux predicted by the high metallicity standard solar model, the average B8 νe survival probability above 3 MeV is measured to be 0.29±0.10. The survival probabilities for Be7 and B8 neutrinos as measured by Borexino differ by 1.9σ. These results are consistent with the prediction of the MSW-LMA solution of a transition in the solar νe survival probability Pee between the low-energy vacuum-driven and the high-energy matter-enhanced solar neutrino oscillation regimes.

  2. First measurement of pp neutrinos in real time in the Borexino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosteiro, Pablo

    2014-09-01

    The Sun is fueled by a series of nuclear reactions that produce the energy that makes it shine. Neutrinos (nu) produced by these nuclear reactions exit the Sun and reach Earth within minutes, providing us with key information about what goes on at the core of our star. For over twenty years since the first detection of solar neutrinos in the late 1960's, an apparent deficit in their detection rate was known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Today, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect is the accepted mechanism by which neutrinos oscillate inside the Sun, arriving at Earth as a mixture of nue, numu and nutau, the latter two of which were invisible to early detectors. Several experiments have now confirmed the observation of neutrino oscillations. These experiments, when their results are combined together, have demonstrated that neutrino oscillations are well described by the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) solution of the MSW effect. This thesis presents the first measurement of pp neutrinos in the Borexino detector, which is another validation of the LMA-MSW model of neutrino oscillations. In addition, it is one more step towards the completion of the spectroscopy of pp chain neutrinos in Borexino, leaving only the extremely faint hep neutrinos undetected. This advance validates the experiment itself and its previous results. This is, furthermore, the first direct real-time measurement of pp neutrinos. We find a pp neutrino detection rate of 143+/-16 (stat)+/-10 (syst) cpd/100 t in the Borexino experiment, which translates, according to the LMA-MSW model, to (6.42+/-0.85)x1010 cm -2 s-1. We also report on a measurement of neutrons in a dedicated system within the Borexino detector, which resulted in an improved understanding of neutron rates in liquid scintillator detectors at Gran Sasso depths. This result is crucial to the development of novel direct dark matter detection experiments.

  3. An effective potential for electron-nucleus scattering in neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung in neutron star crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofengeim, D. D.; Kaminker, A. D.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    We derive an analytic approximation for the emissivity of neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung (NPB) due to scattering of electrons by atomic nuclei in a neutron star (NS) crust of any realistic composition. The emissivity is expressed through generalized Coulomb logarithm by introducing an effective potential of electron-nucleus scattering. In addition, we study the conditions at which NPB in the crust is affected by strong magnetic fields and outline the main effects of the fields on neutrino emission in NSs. The results can be used for modelling of many phenomena in NSs, such as cooling of young isolated NSs, thermal relaxation of accreting NSs with overheated crust in soft X-ray transients and evolution of magnetars.

  4. First Measurement of $\

    SciTech Connect

    Palomino Gallo, Jose Luis

    2012-12-01

    Understanding of the $\\pi^0$ production via anti-neutrino-nucleus charged current interaction in the neutrino energy region of 1-10 GeV is essential for neutrino oscillation experiments. In this thesis, we present a measurement of charged current $\\pi^0$ production from anti-muon neutrinos scattering on a polystyrene scintillator (CH) target in the MINER$\

  5. Measuring Muon-Neutrino Charged-Current Differential Cross Sections with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    More than 80 years after its proposed existence, the neutrino remains largely mysterious and elusive. Precision measurements of the neutrino's properties are just now beginning to take place. Such measurements are required in order to determine the mass of the neutrino, how many neutrinos there are, if neutrinos are different than anti-neutrinos, and more. Muon-neutrino charged-current differential cross sections on an argon target in terms of the outgoing muon momentum and angle are presented. The measurements have been taken with the ArgoNeuT Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment. ArgoNeuT is the first LArTPC to ever take data in a low energy neutrino beam, having collected thousands of neutrino and anti-neutrino events in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The results are relevant for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments searching for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$, CP-violation in the lepton sector, and the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy, among other things. Furthermore, the differential cross sections are important for understanding the nature of the neutrino-nucleus interaction in general. These measurements represent a significant step forward for LArTPC technology as they are among the first neutrino physics results with such a device.

  6. Prospects for the measurement of pep and CNO solar neutrino rates with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavarria, Alvaro

    2011-04-01

    Borexino is the only detector currently able to perform neutrino spectroscopy below 2 MeV. The Borexino Collaboration has already published the first and only real-time measurement of the ^7Be neutrino flux from the Sun. Of great interest are also the measurements of the CNO and pep neutrino rates. Knowledge of the CNO neutrino rate is key to answer the Solar Metallicity Problem, while the pep neutrinos are an excellent probe for the vacuum-matter transition region of the LMA-MSW solution to the Solar Neutrino Problem. The main challenge for these measurements is the characterization and removal of cosmogenic and radiogenic background in the scintillator. I will present data analysis techniques that can significantly reduce the cosmogenic ^11C background in Borexino's energy spectrum, which should allow for the measurement of the pep neutrino rate. Additionally, I will discuss the status of the detector in terms of radiogenic background and the possibility for the eventual measurement of the CNO neutrino rate with Borexino.

  7. Preliminary Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters By NuMI/MINOS and Calibration Studies for Improving this Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Symes, Philip Andrew

    2005-11-01

    This thesis explains the origins of neutrinos and their interactions, and the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations. Experiments for measuring neutrino oscillations are mentioned and the experiment investigated in this thesis, the ''Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search'', and its neutrino beam, the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's ''Neutrinos At The Main Injector'', are described. MINOS is a long baseline (735 km) neutrino oscillation experiment with a near and a far detector, intended to make precision measurements of the atmospheric sector neutrino oscillation parameters. A measurement is made of the ''atmospheric'' neutrino oscillation parameters, {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin {sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}), using neutrinos from the NuMI beam. The results of this analysis are compared to measurements at MINOS using neutrinos from the atmosphere and with other experiments. A more detailed method of beam neutrino analysis is discussed, and the extra calibrations needed to perform that analysis properly are described, with special attention paid to two aspects of the calibration, which comprise the bulk of work for this thesis. The light injection calibration system uses LEDs to illuminate the detector readout and provides a normalization of the stability of the detector over time. The hardware and different modi operandi of the system are described. There is a description of installation and commissioning of the system at one of the MINOS detectors. The response normalization of each detector with cosmic ray muons is described. Special attention is paid to the explanation of necessary corrections that must be made to the muon sample in order for the sample to be used to calibrate each detector to the specified accuracy. The performance of the calibration is shown.

  8. Measurement of Neutral Current Neutral Pion Production on Carbon in a Few-GeV Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kurimoto, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of the π0 production via neutrino-nucleus neutral current interaction in the neutrino energy region of a few GeV is essential for the neutrino oscillation experiments. In this thesis, we present a study of neutral current π0 production from muon neutrinos scattering on a polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE experiment. All neutrino beam data corresponding to 0.99 × 1020 protons on target have been analyzed. We have measured the cross section ratio of the neutral current π0 production to the total charge current interaction and the π0 kinematic distribution such as momentum and direction. We obtain [7.7 ± 0.5(stat.) ± 0.5(sys.)] × 10-2 as the ratio of the neutral current neutral pion production to total charged current cross section; the mean energy of neutrinos producing detected neutral pions is 1.1 GeV. The result agrees with the Rein- Sehgal model, which is generally used for the Monte Carlo simulation by many neutrino oscillation experiments. We achieve less than 10 % uncertainty which is required for the next generation search for νµ → νe oscillation. The spectrum shape of the π0 momentum and the distribution of the π0 emitted angle agree with the prediction, which means that not only the Rein-Sehgal model but also the intra-nuclear interaction models describe our data well. We also measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent pion production to total charged current cross section to be (1.17 ± 0.23 ) × 10-2 based on the Rein and Sehgal model. The result gives the evidence for non-zero coherent pion production via neutral current interaction at the mean neutrino energy of 1.0 GeV.

  9. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  10. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon. PMID:27284650

  11. Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-21

    In this paper we discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  12. Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, Ion

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the recently-completed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  13. Low-Energy Neutrino Cross-Section Measurements at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancu, Ion

    2006-05-01

    We discuss the proposal to build a neutrino facility at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) presently under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This facility can host an extensive, long-term program to study neutrino-nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  14. A Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production (CCπ0) off a nuclear target. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) and Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) are discussed in detail. MiniBooNE is a high-statistics (~ 1, 000, 000 interactions) low-energy (Evϵ 2 0.5 - 2.0 GeV) neutrino experiment located at Fermilab. The method for selecting and reconstructing CCπ0 events is presented. The π0 and μ- are fully reconstructed in the final state allowing for the measurement of, among other things, the neutrino energy. The total observable CCπ0 cross-section is presented as a function of neutrino energy, along with five differential cross-sections in terms of the final state kinematics and Q2. The results are combined to yield a flux-averaged total cross-section of <σ>Φ = (9.2 ± 0.3stat. ± 1.5syst.) × 10-39 cm2/CH2 at energy 965 MeV. These measurements will aid future neutrino experiments with the prediction of their neutrino interaction rates.

  15. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  16. Precision measurement of solar neutrino oscillation parameters by a long-baseline reactor neutrino experiment in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petcov, S. T.; Schwetz, T.

    2006-11-01

    We consider the determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters Δm212 and θ12 by studying oscillations of reactor anti-neutrinos emitted by nuclear power plants (located mainly in France) with a detector installed in the Frejus underground laboratory. The performances of a water Čerenkov detector of 147 kt fiducial mass doped with 0.1% of gadolinium (MEMPHYS-Gd) and of a 50 kt scale liquid scintillator detector (LENA) are compared. In both cases 3σ uncertainties below 3% on Δm212 and of about 20% on sin2θ12 can be obtained after one year of data taking. The gadolinium doped Super-Kamiokande detector (SK-Gd) in Japan can reach a similar precision if the SK/MEMPHYS fiducial mass ratio of 1 to 7 is compensated by a longer SK-Gd data taking time. Several years of reactor neutrino data collected by MEMPHYS-Gd or LENA would allow a determination of Δm212 and sin2θ12 with uncertainties of approximately 1% and 10% at 3σ, respectively. These accuracies are comparable to those that can be reached in the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters Δm312 and sin2θ23 in long-baseline superbeam experiments.

  17. Project 8: Exploring a novel technique for the measurement of neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    Project 8 is a neutrino mass measurement experiment. It uses radio frequency techniques to observe the cyclotron radiation from beta-decay electrons trapped in a magnetic bottle. From the electrons' cyclotron frequencies, the beta-decay energy spectrum, and thus the mass of the electron neutrino may be observed. This nondestructive energy measurement technique may provide improved sensitivity to the neutrino mass over previous experiments. Currently, Project 8 is seeking to demonstrate an energy measurement made on single electrons. Recent progress and prototype status will be discussed.

  18. Rayleigh scattering measurements of several fluorocarbon gases.

    PubMed

    Zadoo, Serena; Thompson, Jonathan E

    2011-11-01

    Integrating nephelometers are commonly used to monitor airborne particulate matter. However, they must be calibrated prior to use. The Rayleigh scattering coefficients (b(RS), Mm(-1)), scattering cross sections (σ(RS), cm(2)), and Rayleigh multipliers for tetrafluoromethane (R-14), sulfur hexafluoride, pentafluoroethane (HFC-125), hexafluoropropene (HFC-216), 1,1,1,2,3,3,3,-heptafluoropropane (HFC-227ea), and octafluorocyclobutane (C-318) are reported from measurements made using a Radiance Research M903 integrating nephelometer operating at λ = 530 nm and calibration with gases of known scattering constants. Rayleigh multipliers (±90% conf. int.) were found to be 2.6 ± 0.5, 6.60 ± 0.07, 7.5 ± 1, 14.8 ± 0.9, 15.6 ± 0.5, and 22.3 ± 0.8 times that of air, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported values for R-14, HFC-216, HFC-125, and C-318. Experimental accuracy is supported through measurements of values for SF(6) and HFC-227ea which agree to within 3% of previous literature reports. In addition to documenting fundamental Rayleigh scattering data for the first time, the information presented within will find use for calibration of optical scattering sensors such as integrating nephelometers. PMID:22027960

  19. On the Measurement of the Electron-Neutrino Correlation in Neutron Beta Decay

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J. David

    2005-01-01

    I present a new approach to the measurement of a, the electron-neutrino correlation, in neutron beta decay. A precise measurement of a can lead to a precise determination of ratio of the axial vector and vector coupling constants, Ga/Gv. Coincidences between electrons and protons are detected in a field-expansion spectrometer. The field-expansion spectrometer is designed to make 1/TOF ≈ | pp|. TOF and pp are the proton time of flight and momentum. Two segmented Si detectors view both electrons and protons in 4π geometry. The time of flight between the electron and proton are accurately measured in a long, ≈ 1 m, drift distance. The electron energy is accurately measured in the Si detectors. The proton momentum and electron energy determine the electron-neutrino opening angle. I have shown that by sorting the data on proton time of flight and electron energy, a can be determined with a statistical relative standard uncertainty of ≈2.4/n, where n is the number of decays observed. The approach has a number of advantages. The acceptance of the spectrometer is 4π for both particles. Thin-dead-layer segmented Si detectors as well as all other components in the apparatus, are commercially available. There are no material apertures to determine the acceptance of the apparatus. The charged particles interact only with electric and magnetic fields before striking the detectors. Coincident detection of electrons and protons reduces backgrounds, and allows the in situ determination of backgrounds. In the analysis, it is not necessary to sort on the relative electron and proton direction and hence electron back scattering does not cause systematic uncertainties. A time of flight spectrum is obtained for each electron energy. Different parts of the spectra have different sensitivities to a. The medium time of flight parts of the spectra that are insensitive to a can be used to verify the accuracy of the electric and magnetic field determinations. PMID:27308158

  20. Measurement of low energy neutrino cross sections with the PEANUT experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.

    2011-11-23

    The PEANUT experiment was designed to study neutrino interactions in the few GeV range using the NuMi beam at Fermilab. The detector uses a hybrid technique, being made of nuclear emulsions and scintillator trackers. Emulsion films act as a tracking device and they are interleaved with lead plates used as neutrino target. The detector is designed to reconstruct the topology of neutrino interactions at the single particle level. We present here the full reconstruction and analysis of a sample of 147 neutrino interactions occurred in the PEANUT detector and the measurement of the quasi-elastic, resonance and deep-inelastic contributions to the total charged current cross-section. This technique could be applied for the beam monitoring for future neutrino facilities.

  1. Measurement of the neutrino mass splitting and flavor mixing by MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, G.J.; Boehnlein, D.J.; /Fermilab /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of neutrino oscillations using the disappearance of muon neutrinos from the Fermilab NuMI neutrino beam as observed by the two MINOS detectors are reported. New analysis methods have been applied to an enlarged data sample from an exposure of 7.25 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. A fit to neutrino oscillations yields values of |{Delta}m{sup 2}| = (2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} for the atmospheric mass splitting and sin 2(2{Theta}) > 0.90 (90% C.L.) for the mixing angle. Pure neutrino decay and quantum decoherence hypotheses are excluded at 7 and 9 standard deviations, respectively.

  2. Measurement of the neutrino mass splitting and flavor mixing by MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Andreopoulos, C; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Cavanaugh, S; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Coelho, J A B; Coleman, S J; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grant, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Ilic, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Lefeuvre, G; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Petyt, D A; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Ratchford, J; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Toner, R; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Yang, T; Zwaska, R

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of neutrino oscillations using the disappearance of muon neutrinos from the Fermilab NuMI neutrino beam as observed by the two MINOS detectors are reported. New analysis methods have been applied to an enlarged data sample from an exposure of 7.25×10(20) protons on target. A fit to neutrino oscillations yields values of |Δm(2)|=(2.32(-0.08)(+0.12))×10(-3) eV(2) for the atmospheric mass splitting and sin(2)(2θ)>0.90 (90% C.L.) for the mixing angle. Pure neutrino decay and quantum decoherence hypotheses are excluded at 7 and 9 standard deviations, respectively. PMID:21635083

  3. Measurement of the activity of an artificial neutrino source based on {sup 37}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, D. N.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Gavrin, V. N.; Gorbachev, V. V.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Mirmov, I. N. Shikhin, A. A.; Yants, V. E.; Barsanov, V. I.; Dzhanelidze, A. A.; Zlokazov, S. B.; Markov, S. Yu.; Shakirov, Z. N.; Cleveland, B. T.

    2007-02-15

    The activity of an artificial neutrino source based on {sup 37}Ar was measured by a specially developed method of directly counting {sup 37}Ar decays in a proportional counter. This source was used to irradiate the target of the SAGE radiochemical gallium-germanium neutrino telescope at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow), whereupon the measurements were performed at the Institute of Reactor Materials (Zarechny, Sverdlovsk oblast, Russia). The method used to prepare gaseous samples for measurements in proportional counters and the counting procedure are described. The measured activity of the {sup 37}Ar neutrino source is 405.1 {+-} 3.7 kCi (corrected for decays that occurred within the period between the instant of activity measurement and the commencement of the irradiation of Ga target at 04:00 Moscow time, 30.04.2004)

  4. Measurement of Solar pp-neutrino flux with Borexino: results and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, O. Yu; Agostini, M.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, O.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    Measurement of the Solar pp-neutrino flux completed the measurement of Solar neutrino fluxes from the pp-chain of reactions in Borexino experiment. The result is in agreement with the prediction of the Standard Solar Model and the MSW/LMA oscillation scenario. A comparison of the total neutrino flux from the Sun with Solar luminosity in photons provides a test of the stability of the Sun on the 105 years time scale, and sets a strong limit on the power production by the unknown energy sources in the Sun.

  5. Photo- and neutrino-induced reactions for SNe nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Tatsushi

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino-induced nuclear reactions are considered to play important roles in the dynamics of supernova explosions and in supernova nucleosynthesis. For example, neutrino-inelastic scattering off light nuclei are supposed to assist the explosion by supplying the kinetic energy to the outgoing matters. The neutrino-nucleus reactions via the neutral and charged current of the weak interaction are the key reactions in the r-process nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven wind. To quantitatively understand those phenomena, precise data of the neutrino-nucleus reaction rates are indispensable. Recently developed secondary particle beams provide good experimental opportunities for determining the neutrino-nucleus reaction rates. A quasi-monochromatic laser Compton-scattered (LCS) photon beam is useful for studying the photonuclear reactions which are the direct analogue of the neutrino inelastic scatterings caused by the weak neutral current. On the other hand, real neutrino beams are ideal tools to directly measure the absolute neutrino-nucleus reaction rates. Another interesting probe will be the nuclear muon-capture reaction, because it can be applied for measurement of the targets with very small quantities thanks to its large capture probability. In this talk recent progress in ongoing experiments with LCS gamma-rays and muon beams will be presented. A new plan for direct measurement of the neutrino-nucleus reactions with an accelerator-driven neutrino beam will be also discussed.

  6. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Capozza, Luigi [Irfu Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2012-10-23

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  7. Prospects for a Low Threshold Neutrino Experiment at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane

    2008-10-01

    A low-threshold neutrino scattering experiment at a high-intensity stopped-pion neutrino source has the potential to measure coherent neutral current neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering. Coherent scattering is a vital process for driving stellar explosion mechanisms which are as yet poorly understood in supernova evolution, and may provide a means to detect neutrino bursts from nearby supernova. The coherent scattering interaction rate can be very precisely calculated in the Standard Model, therefore comparison to measurements provides for another means to test the Standard Model and an opportunity to search for non-standard neutrino interactions. A promising prospect for the measurement of this process is a proposed noble-liquid-based experiment, dubbed CLEAR (Coherent Low-Energy A(Nuclear) Recoils), at the Spallation Neutron Source located at ORNL in Tennessee. This talk will describe the CLEAR proposal and its physics reach.

  8. Measurement of spin coherence using Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Delteil, A.; Faelt, S.; Imamoǧlu, A.

    2016-06-01

    Ramsey interferometry provides a natural way to determine the coherence time of most qubit systems. Recent experiments on quantum dots, however, demonstrated that dynamical nuclear spin polarization can strongly influence the measurement process, making it difficult to extract the T2* coherence time using standard optical Ramsey pulses. Here, we demonstrate an alternative method for spin coherence measurement that is based on first-order coherence of photons generated in spin-flip Raman scattering. We show that if a quantum emitter is driven by a weak monochromatic laser, Raman coherence is determined exclusively by spin coherence, allowing for a direct determination of spin T2* time. When combined with coherence measurements on Rayleigh scattered photons, our technique enables us to identify coherent and incoherent contributions to resonance fluorescence, and to minimize the latter. We verify the validity of our technique by comparing our results to those determined from Ramsey interferometry for electron and heavy-hole spins.

  9. Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, E.I.; Furman, W.I.; Lychagin, W.I.; Muzichka, G.V.; Nekhaev, G.V.; Safronov, Yu.V.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Strelkov, A.V.; Bowman, C.D.; Crawford, B.E.; Stephenson, S.L.; Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W.; Levakov, B.G.; Litvin, V.I.; Lyzhin, A.E.; Magda, E.P.; Mitchell, G.E.

    2003-08-26

    In order to resolve long-standing discrepancies in indirect measurements of the neutron-neutron scattering length ann and contribute to solving the problem of the charge symmetry of the nuclear force, the collaboration DIANNA (Direct Investigation of ann Association) plans to measure the neutron-neutron scattering cross section {sigma}nn. The key issue of our approach is the use of the through-channel in the Russia reactor YAGUAR with a peak neutron flux of 10{sup 18} /cm2/s. The proposed experimental setup is described. Results of calculations are presented to connect {sigma}nn with the nn-collision detector count rate and the neutron flux density in the reactor channel. Measurements of the thermal neutron fields inside polyethylene converters show excellent prospects for the realization of the direct nn-experiment.

  10. Measurement system for laser bistatic lidar scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chin-Yuan

    2001-11-01

    We construct a bistatic polarimetric scattering system and improve the experimental techniques to contribute to the research of a mathematical model that describes the electromagnetic waves scattering characteristics from random rough surfaces, and to serve as a tool used to better describe wave interaction with random media. To accomplish the measurement both a horn antenna operating in the far field and a parabolic-dish antenna operating in the near-field focus mode are utilized. The transmitter for the active system is a linearly polarized, helium-neon laser operating in the red light region. The receiver measures both like- and cross-polarized returns, which helps assess the scattered radiation pattern. A flat metal plate is developed to calibrate the measuring facility. The system is automated and consists of a spherical frame over which the transmitter and receiver travel. The transmitter and receiver design, system automation, and system architecture are discussed. Experimental measurements for a target are presented to evaluate the accuracy, repeatability, and utility of the helium-neon laser measurement system.

  11. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  12. Measuring scattering lengths of gaseous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, M. G.; Black, T. C.; Haun, R.; Pushin, D. A.; Shahi, C. B.; Weitfeldt, F. E.

    2016-03-01

    Neutron interferometry represents one of the most precise techniques for measuring the coherent scattering lengths (bc) of particular nuclear isotopes. Currently bc for helium-4 is known only to 1% relative uncertainty; a factor of ten higher than precision measurements of other light isotopes. Scattering lengths are measured using a neutron interferometer and by comparing the phase shift a neutron acquires as it passes through a gaseous sample relative to that of a neutron passing through vacuum. The density of the gas is determined by continuous monitoring of the sample's temperature and pressure. Challenges for these types of experiments include achieving the necessary long-term phase stability and accurate determination of the phase shift caused by the aluminum cell used to hold the gas; a phase shift many times greater than that of the sample. The present status on the effort to measure the n-4He scattering length at the NIST center for Neutron Research will be given. Financial support provided by the NSERC `Create' and `Discovery' programs, CERC, NIST and NSF Grant PHY-1205342.

  13. KM3NeT - ORCA: measuring the neutrino mass ordering in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchner, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    ORCA (Oscillations Research with Cosmics in the Abyss) is the low-energy branch of KM3NeT, the underwater Cherenkov neutrino detector in the Mediterranean. Its primary goal is to resolve the long-standing unsolved question of the neutrino mass ordering by measuring matter oscillation effects in atmospheric neutrinos. To be deployed at the French KM3NeT site, ORCA’s multi-PMT optical modules will exploit the excellent optical properties of deep seawater to reconstruct cascade and track events with a few GeV of energy. This contribution reviews the methods and technology, and discusses the current expected performances.

  14. Measurement of coherent production of π± in neutrino and antineutrino beams on carbon from Eν of 1.5 to 20 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Higuera, A.

    2014-12-23

    Neutrino-induced coherent charged pion production on nuclei ν(–)μA → μ±π∓A is a rare, inelastic interaction in which a small squared four-momentum |t| is transferred to the recoil nucleus, leaving it intact in the reaction. In the scintillator tracker of MINERvA, we remove events with evidence of particles from nuclear breakup and reconstruct |t| from the final-state pion and muon. In addition, we select low |t| events to isolate a sample rich in coherent candidates. By selecting low |t| events, we produce a model-independent measurement of the differential cross section for coherent scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on carbon. We findmore » poor agreement with the predicted kinematics in neutrino generators used by current oscillation experiments.« less

  15. Measurement of coherent production of π(±) in neutrino and antineutrino beams on carbon from Eν of 1.5 to 20 GeV.

    PubMed

    Higuera, A; Mislivec, A; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Brooks, W K; Budd, H; Butkevich, A; Carneiro, M F; Castromonte, C M; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Fiorentini, G A; Gallagher, H; Gomez, A; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Hurtado, K; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Snider, F D; Solano Salinas, C J; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2014-12-31

    Neutrino-induced coherent charged pion production on nuclei νμA→μ(±)π(∓)A is a rare, inelastic interaction in which a small squared four-momentum |t| is transferred to the recoil nucleus, leaving it intact in the reaction. In the scintillator tracker of MINERvA, we remove events with evidence of particles from nuclear breakup and reconstruct |t| from the final-state pion and muon. We select low |t| events to isolate a sample rich in coherent candidates. By selecting low |t| events, we produce a model-independent measurement of the differential cross section for coherent scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on carbon. We find poor agreement with the predicted kinematics in neutrino generators used by current oscillation experiments. PMID:25615308

  16. Measurement of Geo-neutrinos with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Satoru

    2011-11-23

    Radioactive isotopes inside the Earth produce geo-neutrinos through beta decays. Geo-neutrinos could be direct probes to investigate the interior of the Earth as a supplement to the current geophysical survey that mainly relies on an indirect seismic approach. After the Kamioka liquid scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) reported the first indication of geo-neutrinos in 2005, we have accumulated data for a total of 2,135 days of live-time and achieved a lower background level by purifying liquid scintillator. The number of obtained geo-neutrino events is 106{sub -28}{sup +29} corresponding to an electron antineutrino flux of 4.3{sub -1.1}{sup +1.2}x10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} from {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series at the Earth's surface. The null hypothesis for the existence of geo-neutrinos is excluded at the 99.997% confidence level. We combined this precise result with that of the Borexino experiment to obtain 20.0{sub -8.6}{sup +8.8} TW as a contribution of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th to the Earth heat flow.

  17. Transparent material thickness measurements by Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Pershin, Sergey M; Lednev, Vasily N; Yulmetov, Renat N; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2015-07-01

    An efficient and simple and convenient technique for transparent samples thickness measurements by Raman spectroscopy is suggested. The elastic scattering can be effectively used for sample border indication if the refractive index changes more than 3%, while it fails to detect an ice-to-water border of floating ice. The alternative is to use Raman spectroscopy to detect the interface between different layers of transparent materials. The difference between the Raman spectra of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and water, and between ice and liquid water were employed to locate the PMMA-water and ice-water interfaces, while elastic scattering was used for air-solid surface detection. This approach yields an error of 2%-5% indicating that it is promising to express a remote and noninvasive thickness measurement technique in field experiments. PMID:26193136

  18. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Prather, William S.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  19. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  20. Light scattering measurement of sodium polyacrylate products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lama, Nisha; Norwood, David; Boone, Steven; Massie-Boyer, Valerie

    2015-03-01

    In the presentation, we will describe the use of a multi-detector HPLC incorporating the DAWN EOS multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) detector to measure the properties such as molecular weight, RMS radius, contour and persistence length and polydispersity of sodium polyacrylate products. The samples of sodium polyacrylate are used in various industries as thickening agents, coating dispersants, artificial snow, laundry detergent and disposable diapers. Data and results obtained from the experiment will be presented.

  1. Measurements of cross-section of charge current inclusive of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using carbon, iron, lead and scintillator at MINER$\

    SciTech Connect

    Rakotondravohitra, Laza

    2015-08-18

    Neutrino physics is one of the most active fields in the domaine of high energy physics during the last century. The need of precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus interactions required by the neutrino oscillation experiments is a an exiting step. These measurements of cross-section are more than essential for neutrino oscillation experiment. Over the year, many measurements from varieties of experiments have been presented. MINERνA is one of the world leaders in measuring cross-section of neutrino and antineutrino -nucleus interactions. MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment installed in the few-GeV NuMI beam line at Fermilab. In order to study nuclear dependence, MINERνA is endowed with different types of solid nuclear targets as well are liquid targets such as helium and water. This thesis presents measurements of cross-section of antineutrino scattering off nucleons using a variety of solid nuclear targets, carbon, iron, lead and also polystyrene scintillator (CH). The data set of antineutrino used for this analysis was taken between March and July 2010 with a total of 1.60X1020 protons on target. Charged current inclusive interactions were selected by requiring a positive muon and kinematics limitation of acceptance of the muon spectrometer are applied. The analysis requires neutrino energy between 2GeV et 20GeV and the angle of muon θmu < 17degree . The absolute cross-section # as function of neutrino energy and the differential cross-section dσ/ dxbj measured and shown the corresponding systematics for each nuclear targets. Data results are compared with prediction of the models implemented in the neutrino events generators GENIE 2.6.2 used by the experiment.

  2. Measurement of the response of a Ga solar neutrino experiment to neutrinos from a {sup 37}Ar source

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Gavrin, V.N.; Girin, S.V.

    2006-04-15

    An intense source of {sup 37}Ar was produced by the (n,{alpha}) reaction on {sup 40}Ca by irradiating 330 kg of calcium oxide in the fast neutron breeder reactor at Zarechny, Russia. The {sup 37}Ar was released from the solid target by dissolution in acid, collected from this solution, purified, sealed into a small source, and brought to the Baksan Neutrino Observatory where it was used to irradiate 13 tonnes of gallium metal in the Russian-American gallium solar neutrino experiment SAGE. Ten exposures of the gallium to the source, whose initial strength was 409{+-}2kCi, were carried out during the period April to September 2004. The {sup 71}Ge produced by the reaction {sup 71}Ga({nu}{sub e},e{sup -}){sup 71}Ge was extracted, purified, and counted. The measured production rate was 11.0{sub -0.9}{sup +1.0} (stat){+-}0.6 (syst) atoms of {sup 71}Ge/d, which is 0.79{sub -0.10}{sup +0.09} of the theoretically calculated production rate. When all neutrino source experiments with gallium are considered together, there is an indication the theoretical cross section has been overestimated.

  3. Leptonic CP Violation measurement at the neutrino factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguet Castell, J.; Mena, O.

    2003-05-01

    In this talk, based on the work [J. Burguet Castell, et al., Nucl. Phys. B 608 (2001) 301], we refine our previous analysis [A. Cervera, et al., Nucl. Phys. B 579 (2000) 17] of the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and θ13 at a neutrino factory in the LMA-MSW scenario, by exploring the full range of these two parameters. We have discovered that there exist, at fixed neutrino energy, Eν, and baseline, L, degenerate solutions. Although the spectral analysis helps in disentangling fake from true solutions, a leftover product of this degeneracy remains for a realistic detector, which we analyse. Furthermore, we take into account the expected uncertainties on the solar and atmospheric oscillation parameters and in the average Earth matter density along the neutrino path. An intermediate baseline of O(3000) km is still the best option to tackle CP violation, although a combination of two baselines turns out to be very important in resolving degeneracies.

  4. Determination of electroweak parameters from the elastic scattering of muon neutrinos and antineutrinos on electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, L.A.; Aronson, S.H.; Connolly, P.L.; Gibbard, B.G.; Murtagh, M.J.; Murtagh, S.J.; Terada, S.; White, D.H. ); Callas, J.L.; Cutts, D.; Diwan, M.V.; Hoftun, J.S.; Hughlock, B.W.; Lanou, R.E.; Shinkawa, T. ); Kurihara, Y. ); Amako, K.; Kabe, S. , Ibaraki-Ken 305 ); Nagashima, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tatsumi, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. ); Abe, K.; Beier, E.W.; Doughty, D.C.; Durkin, L.S.; Heagy, S.M.; Hurley, M.; Mann, A.K.; Newcomer, F.M.; Williams, H.H.; York, T. ); Hedin, D.; Marx, M.D.; Stern, E. )

    1990-06-01

    Total and differential cross sections for {nu}{sub {mu}}{ital e}{r arrow}{nu}{sub {mu}}{ital e} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{ital e}{r arrow}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{ital e} are measured. Values for the model-independent neutral-current couplings of the electron are found to be {ital g}{sub {ital V}}={minus}0.107{plus minus}0.035(stat){plus minus}0.028(syst) and {ital g}{sub {ital A}}={minus}0.514{plus minus}0.023(stat){plus minus}0.028(syst). The electroweak mixing parameter sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub {ital W}} is determined to be 0.195{plus minus}0.018(stat){plus minus}0.013(syst). Limits are set for the charge radius and magnetic moment of the neutrino as ({l angle}{ital r}{sup 2}{r angle}){lt}0.24{times}10{sup {minus}32} cm{sup 2} and {ital f}{sub {mu}}{lt}0.85{times}10{sup {minus}9} Bohr magnetons, respectively.

  5. High precision 7Be solar neutrinos measurement and day night effect obtained with Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testera, G.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonetti, S.; Bonfini, G.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Chavarria, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Korablev, D.; Kobychev, V.; Korga, G.; Koshio, Y.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Leung, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, P.; Lombardi, F.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pena-Garay, C.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Romani, A.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-11-01

    We report the direct measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino signal rate performed with the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and the search for a day-night asymmetry of this interaction rate. The interaction rate of the 0.862 MeV 7Be neutrinos is 46±1.6(stat)-1.6+1.5(syst) counts/(day · 100 ton). The hypothesis of no oscillation for this solar neutrinos is inconsistent with our measurement at the 5.8σ C.L. Our result is the first direct measurement of solar neutrinos with an accuracy better than 5%. We report the survival probability for solar νe in the transition region between matter-enhanced and vacuum-driven oscillations. The measured day night asymmetry is Adn=0.001±0.012 (stat)±0.007 (syst), in agreement with the predicition of MSW-LMA neutrino [13] oscillations. This result discourages MSW oscillations with mixing parameters in the LOW region at more than 8.5σ, meaning that this region is, for the first time, strongly rejected without the assumption of CPT symmetry. The result can also be used to constrain some neutrino oscillation scenarios involving new physics.

  6. Neutrino-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, H.; Garvey, G.; Zeller, G.P.; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The study of neutrino oscillations has necessitated a new generation of neutrino experiments that are exploring neutrino-nuclear scattering processes. We focus in particular on charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, a particularly important channel that has been extensively investigated both in the bubble-chamber era and by current experiments. Recent results have led to theoretical reexamination of this process. We review the standard picture of quasi-elastic scattering as developed in electron scattering, review and discuss experimental results, and discuss additional nuclear effects such as exchange currents and short-range correlations that may play a significant role in neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  7. The NuMI Beam at FNAL and its Use for Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Sacha E.

    2007-12-21

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab began operations in late 2004. NuMI will deliver an intense {nu}{sub {mu}} beam of variable energy (2-20 GeV). Several aspects of the design and results from runs of the MINOS experiment are reviewed. I also discuss technique to measure directly the neutrino flux using a muon flux system at the end of the NuMI line.

  8. Measurement of muon neutrino and antineutrino induced single neutral pion production cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Colin E.

    2011-05-01

    Elucidating the nature of neutrino oscillation continues to be a goal in the vanguard of the efforts of physics experiment. As neutrino oscillation searches seek an increasingly elusive signal, a thorough understanding of the possible backgrounds becomes ever more important. Measurements of neutrino-nucleus interaction cross sections are key to this understanding. Searches for νμ → νe oscillation - a channel that may yield insight into the vanishingly small mixing parameter θ13, CP violation, and the neutrino mass hierarchy - are particularly susceptible to contamination from neutral current single π0 (NC 1π0) production. Unfortunately, the available data concerning NC 1π0 production are limited in scope and statistics. Without satisfactory constraints, theoretical models of NC 1π0 production yield substantially differing predictions in the critical Eν ~ 1 GeV regime. Additional investigation of this interaction can ameliorate the current deficiencies. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation search operating at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). While the oscillation search is the principal charge of the MiniBooNE collaboration, the extensive data (~ 106 neutrino events) offer a rich resource with which to conduct neutrino cross section measurements. This work concerns the measurement of both neutrino and antineutrino NC 1π0 production cross sections at MiniBooNE. The size of the event samples used in the analysis exceeds that of all other similar experiments combined by an order of magnitude. We present the first measurements of the absolute NC 1π0 cross section as well as the first differential cross sections in both neutrino and antineutrino mode. Specifically, we measure single differential cross sections with respect to pion momentum and pion angle. We find the

  9. Solar neutrinos and neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltoni, Michele; Smirnov, Alexei Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Solar neutrino studies triggered and largely motivated the major developments in neutrino physics in the last 50 years. The theory of neutrino propagation in different media with matter and fields has been elaborated. It includes oscillations in vacuum and matter, resonance flavor conversion and resonance oscillations, spin and spin-flavor precession, etc. LMA MSW has been established as the true solution of the solar neutrino problem. Parameters θ_{12} and Δ m 2 21 have been measured; θ_{13} extracted from the solar data is in agreement with results from reactor experiments. Solar neutrino studies provide a sensitive way to test theory of neutrino oscillations and conversion. Characterized by long baseline, huge fluxes and low energies they are a powerful set-up to search for new physics beyond the standard 3 ν paradigm: new neutrino states, sterile neutrinos, non-standard neutrino interactions, effects of violation of fundamental symmetries, new dynamics of neutrino propagation, probes of space and time. These searches allow us to get stringent, and in some cases unique bounds on new physics. We summarize the results on physics of propagation, neutrino properties and physics beyond the standard model obtained from studies of solar neutrinos.

  10. Using Neutrino Nucleus Interactions as a Probe of the Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, Jorge G.

    2011-11-23

    Neutrino scattering experiments have been studying QCD for over 30 years. From the Gargamelle experiments in the early 70's, through the subsequent bubble chamber and electronic detector experiments in the 80's and 90's, neutrino scattering experiments have steadily accumulated increasing statistics and minimized their systematic errors. An example of the more recent studies of QCD with neutrinos is from the TeVatron neutrino beam--the NuTeV {nu}-Fe experiment. The problem the community faces in trying to study QCD with modern neutrino data is that there is no experimentally verified way to scale neutrino-nucleus (for example, Fe) results to the equivalent neutrino-nucleon values making it difficult to combine neutrino nucleus scattering data with charged-lepton nucleus and nucleon scattering data in QCD global fits to extract parton distribution functions. This is particularly crucial since there is now indications that nuclear effects in neutrino nucleus interactions are different than those measured in charged-lepton nucleus scattering. To better understand this situation, the MINER{nu}A neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment at Fermilab, a collaboration of elementary-particle and nuclear physicists, is systematically studying neutrino nuclear effects off of He, C, Fe and Pb for a more thorough A-dependent study of nuclear PDFs and these correction factors.

  11. Solar neutrino physics with low-threshold dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billard, J.; Strigari, L. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.

    2015-05-01

    Dark matter detectors will soon be sensitive to Solar neutrinos via two distinct channels: coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron elastic scatterings. We establish an analysis method for extracting Solar model properties and neutrino properties from these measurements, including the possible effects of sterile neutrinos which have been hinted at by some reactor experiments and cosmological measurements. Even including sterile neutrinos, through the coherent scattering channel, a 1 ton-year exposure with a low-threshold background free Germanium detector could improve on the current measurement of the normalization of the B 8 Solar neutrino flux down to 3% or less. Combining with the neutrino-electron elastic scattering data will provide constraints on both the high- and low-energy survival probability and will improve on the uncertainty on the active-to-sterile mixing angle by a factor of 2. This sensitivity to active-to-sterile transitions is competitive and complementary to forthcoming dedicated short baseline sterile neutrino searches with nuclear decays. Finally, we show that such solar neutrino physics potentials can be reached as long as the signal-to-noise ratio is better than 0.1.

  12. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared to Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.

  13. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, G.

    2011-07-28

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2σ/dpdΩ = (5.34 ±0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomore » Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 ± 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.« less

  14. Future Long-Baseline Neutrino Oscillations: View from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE), that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  15. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2015-07-15

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  16. Future long-baseline neutrino oscillations: View from North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2015-07-01

    In late 2012 the US Department of Energy gave approval for the first phase of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) that will conduct a broad scientific program including neutrino oscillations, neutrino scattering physics, search for baryon violation, supernova burst neutrinos and other related astrophysical phenomena. The project is now being reformulated as an international facility hosted by the United States. The facility will consist of an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), a highly capable set of neutrino detectors on the Fermilab campus, and a large underground liquid argon time projection chamber at Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in South Dakota 1300 km from Fermilab. With an intense beam and massive far detector, the experimental program at the facility will make detailed studies of neutrino oscillations, including measurements of the neutrino mass hierarchy and Charge-Parity symmetry violation, by measuring neutrino and anti-neutrino mixing separately. At the near site, the high-statistics neutrino scattering data will allow for many cross section measurements and precision tests of the Standard Model. This presentation will describe the configuration developed by the LBNE collaboration, the broad physics program, and the status of the formation of the international facility.

  17. The Fermilab main injector neutrino program

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, Jorge G.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The NuMI Facility at Fermilab provides an extremely intense beam of neutrinos making it an ideal place for the study of neutrino oscillations as well as high statistics (anti)neutrino-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiments. The MINOS neutrino oscillation {nu}{mu} disappearance experiment is currently taking data and has published first results. The NO{nu}A {nu}e appearance experiment is planning to begin taking data at the start of the next decade. For the study of neutrino scattering, the MINER{nu}A experiment at Fermilab is a collaboration of elementary-particle and nuclear physicists planning to use a fully active fine-grained solid scintillator detector. The overall goals of the experiment are to measure absolute exclusive cross-sections, nuclear effects in {nu} - A interactions, a systematic study of the resonance-DIS transition region and the high-xBj - low Q2 DIS region.

  18. Measurement, entanglement, and collapse, in atom-photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeri, Roee; Glickman, Yinnon; Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan

    2013-05-01

    Photon scattering is a common tool in atomic physics experiments. We show how, entanglement, measurement and decoherence are intertwined in the process of photon scattering by a single trapped ion. We preform quantum process tomography on the spin of a single trapped 88Sr+ ion, undergoing resonant photon scattering. We observe that, following the scattering and detection of a single photon, a spin measurement basis emerges. The measurement basis is aligned with the scattered photon direction and its state are invariant under photon scattering. We also find that, while the measurement basis states themselves are classically correlated with the scattered photon polarization, superpositions of these basis state become entangled with the scattered photon. Quantum feedback, based on photon polarization measurement, can be used to reverse photon scattering decoherence.

  19. Measurement of the muon beam direction and muon flux for the T2K neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Bay, F.; Bronner, C.; Ereditato, A.; Friend, M.; Hartz, M.; Hiraki, T.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Juget, F.; Kikawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Maruyama, T.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Otani, M.; Oyama, Y.; Patel, N.; Pistillo, C.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Tada, S.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yokoyama, M.

    2015-05-01

    The Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) neutrino experiment measures neutrino oscillations by using an almost pure muon neutrino beam produced at the J-PARC accelerator facility. The T2K muon monitor was installed to measure the direction and stability of the muon beam which is produced in conjunction with the muon neutrino beam. The systematic error in the muon beam direction measurement was estimated, using data and MC simulation, to be 0.28 mrad. During beam operation, the proton beam has been controlled using measurements from the muon monitor and the direction of the neutrino beam has been tuned to within 0.3 mrad with respect to the designed beam-axis. In order to understand the muon beam properties, measurement of the absolute muon yield at the muon monitor was conducted with an emulsion detector. The number of muon tracks was measured to be (4.06± 0.05± 0.10)× 10^4cm^{-2} normalized with 4× 10^{11} protons on target with 250 kA horn operation. The result is in agreement with the prediction, which is corrected based on hadron production data.

  20. First Measurement of the Muon Anti-Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic Double-Differential Cross-Section

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation presents the first measurement of the muon antineutrino charged current quasi-elastic double-differential cross section. These data significantly extend the knowledge of neutrino and antineutrino interactions in the GeV range, a region that has recently come under scrutiny due to a number of conflicting experimental results. To maximize the precision of this measurement, three novel techniques were employed to measure the neutrino background component of the data set. Representing the first measurements of the neutrino contribution to an accelerator-based antineutrino beam in the absence of a magnetic field, the successful execution of these techniques carry implications for current and future neutrino experiments.

  1. Attachment to spextrophotometers for measuring scattering patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Fsel'son, M.P.; Krikum, A.Z.; Sivyakov, Y.A.; Spivak, R.Y.

    1986-02-01

    The authors have developed a simple attachment to the Shimadsu MPS 50L spectrophotometer for measuring scattering patterns. The attachment is mounted directly at the cuvette section of the spectrophotometer. The radiation detector of the attachment is formed by an FR1-4 photoresistor disposed on the vertical section of a gamma-shaped bar adapted to be inclined by plus or minus 90 degrees with respect to the direction of the radiation beam. When the attachment is used, its radiation detector is connected into the measuring circuit of the spectrophotometer in place of the spectrophotometer's detector. When the spectrophotometer alone is used the detector of the attachment is moved out of the beam and the detector of the spectrophotometer proper is inserted into the measuring circuit.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime measurements in heterogeneous scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Goro; Awasthi, Kamlesh; Furukawa, Daisuke

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence lifetime in heterogeneous multiple light scattering systems is analyzed by an algorithm without solving the diffusion or radiative transfer equations. The algorithm assumes that the optical properties of medium are constant in the excitation and emission wavelength regions. If the assumption is correct and the fluorophore is a single species, the fluorescence lifetime can be determined by a set of measurements of temporal point-spread function of the excitation light and fluorescence at two different concentrations of the fluorophore. This method is not dependent on the heterogeneity of the optical properties of the medium as well as the geometry of the excitation-detection on an arbitrary shape of the sample. The algorithm was validated by an indocyanine green fluorescence in phantom measurements and demonstrated by an in vivo measurement.

  3. Flavor oscillations with sterile neutrinos and in dense neutrino environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollander, David

    Many experiments have provided evidence for neutrino flavor oscillations, and consequently that neutrinos are in fact massive which is not predicted by the Standard Model. Many experiments have been built to constrain the parameters which determine flavor oscillations, and for only three flavors of neutrinos the mixing parameters are well known, aside from the CP violating phase for two mass hierarchies. Most experimental data can be well explained by mixing between three flavors of neutrinos, however oscillation anomalies from several experiments, most notably from LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) have suggested that there may be additional flavors of neutrinos beyond those in the Standard Model. One of the focuses of this dissertation is the possibility of adding new flavors of right-handed neutrinos to the Standard Model to account for oscillation anomalies, and exploring the consequences of sterile neutrinos for other experiments. Sensitivities to a particular model of sterile neutrinos at the future Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment will be determined, in which CP effects introduced by the sterile neutrinos play an important role. It will be demonstrated how, by combining data from the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment along with data from Daya Bay and T2K, it is possible to provide evidence for or rule out this model of sterile neutrinos. A chi-squared analysis is used to determine the significance of measuring the effects of sterile neutrinos in IceCube; it will be shown that it may be possible to extract evidence for sterile neutrinos from high energy atmospheric neutrinos in IceCube. Furthermore it will be demonstrated how measuring neutrino flavor ratios from astrophysical sources in IceCube can help to distinguish between the three flavor scenario and a beyond the Standard Model (BSM) scenario involving sterile neutrinos. Measuring astrophysical as well as atmospheric neutrinos can evince the existence of sterile neutrinos. Despite the fact

  4. Direct extraction of nuclear effects in quasielastic scattering on carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Callum; McFarland, Kevin S.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear effects on neutrino reactions are expected to be a significant complication in current and future neutrino oscillation experiments seeking precision measurements of neutrino flavor transitions. Calculations of these nuclear effects are hampered by a lack of experimental data comparing neutrino reactions on free nucleons to neutrino reactions on nuclei. We present results from a novel technique that compares neutrino and antineutrino charged current quasielastic scattering on hydrocarbons to extract a cross section ratio of antineutrino charged current elastic reactions on free protons to charged current quasielastic reactions on the protons bound in a carbon nucleus. This measurement of nuclear effects is compared to models.

  5. Measurement of Neutrino Mixing Angle thetas13 Using Neutron Captured on Hydrogen in Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianyi

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment aims to measure the last unknown neutrino mixing angle theta13, by measuring the disappearance of electron anti-neutrinos produced by the six nuclear reactors of the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant. In total eight functionally identical anti-neutrino detectors are deployed underground, with two detectors distributed at each of the two near sites close to the reactor cores and four detectors placed at a far site ˜2 km away from the reactor cores. The number of observed electron anti-neutrinos are measured via inverse-beta decay reaction, v¯e+ p+ → e+ + n. The positrons deposit energy in the liquid scintillator and annihilate with electrons, emitting gammas, which is the prompt signals for detection. The neutrons are captured on either gadolinium or hydrogen atoms and emit gammas with total energy ˜8 MeV or ˜2 MeV, respectively, producing the delayed signals. The ratio between the numbers of anti-neutrinos from far site and near site detectors is used to measure the oscillation parameters. With 55 calendar days of data, the Daya Bay experiment first published its result using neutron-captured-on-gadolinium signals in March 2012, with best-fit sin2 2theta13 = 0.092+/-0.016( stat.)0.005(syst.), excluding the zero-theta 13 hypothesis at 5.2sigma confidence level. Subsequently results with higher statistics and improved systematic uncertainty have further constrained sin2 2theta13 = 0.085 +/- 0.006. In this thesis, an independent oscillation analysis using the neutron-captured-on- hydrogen signals is presented, which could cross-check the neutron-captured-on-gadolinium analysis result with independent anti-neutrino samples and different systematic uncertainty. With 190 live days of data and 6 detectors, the rate-only analysis gives best-fit sin2 2theta13 = 0.078 +/- 0.02.

  6. Assessment of molecular effects on neutrino mass measurements from tritium β decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, L. I.; Parno, D. Â. S.; Robertson, R. Â. G. Â. H.

    2015-03-01

    The β decay of molecular tritium currently provides the highest sensitivity in laboratory-based neutrino mass measurements. The upcoming Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment will improve the sensitivity to 0.2 eV, making a percent-level quantitative understanding of molecular effects essential. The modern theoretical calculations available for neutrino mass experiments agree with spectroscopic data. Moreover, when neutrino mass experiments performed in the 1980s with gaseous tritium are reevaluated using these modern calculations, the extracted neutrino mass squared values are consistent with zero instead of being significantly negative. However, the calculated molecular final-state branching ratios are in conflict with dissociation experiments performed in the 1950s. We reexamine the theory of the final-state spectrum of molecular-tritium decay and its effect on the determination of the neutrino mass, with an emphasis on the role of the vibrational- and rotational-state distribution in the ground electronic state. General features can be reproduced quantitatively from considerations of kinematics and zero-point motion. We summarize the status of validation efforts and suggest means for resolving the apparent discrepancy in dissociation rates.

  7. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  8. Measurement of inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Y.; jima, Y.Naka; Alcaraz-Aunion, J.L.; Brice, S.J.; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Cheng, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D.A.; /Kyoto U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Fermilab /MIT /Valencia U. /Columbia U. /MIT /Columbia U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Fermilab /Columbia U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U.

    2010-11-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of inclusive charged current interactions of muon neutrinos on carbon with an average energy of 0.8 GeV using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. We compare our measurement with two neutrino interaction simulations: NEUT and NUANCE. The charged current interaction rates (product of flux and cross section) are extracted by fitting the muon kinematics, with a precision of 6-15% for the energy dependent and 3% for the energy integrated analyses. We also extract CC inclusive interaction cross sections from the observed rates, with a precision of 10-30% for the energy dependent and 8% for the energy integrated analyses. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. These results can be used to convert previous SciBooNE cross section ratio measurements to absolute cross section values.

  9. Determination of particle size using measurement of scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A literature search was conducted to determine the state of the art particle size measurement by the light scatter technique. This technique may involve diffraction pattern analysis, location of minima and maxima in angular dependence of scattered light, magnitude of intensity verses angle, forward lobe scattered intensity ratio using two small angles, forward scatter in a small cone, and total scatter. Some of the more modern recordings and detection systems are video, holographic, and systems using optical processing.

  10. Measurement of the Velocity of Neutrinos from the CNGS Beam with the Large Volume Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N. Yu.; Aglietta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Ashikhmin, V. V.; Bari, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bressan, E.; Bruno, G.; Dadykin, V. L.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Ghia, P. L.; Giusti, P.; Kemp, E.; Mal'gin, A. S.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Persiani, R.; Pless, I. A.; Ryasny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Saavedra, O.; Sartorelli, G.; Shakyrianova, I. R.; Selvi, M.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vigorito, C.; Yakushev, V. F.; Zichichi, A.; Razeto, A.

    2012-08-01

    We report the measurement of the time of flight of ˜17GeV νμ on the CNGS baseline (732 km) with the Large Volume Detector (LVD) at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. The CERN-SPS accelerator has been operated from May 10th to May 24th 2012, with a tightly bunched-beam structure to allow the velocity of neutrinos to be accurately measured on an event-by-event basis. LVD has detected 48 neutrino events, associated with the beam, with a high absolute time accuracy. These events allow us to establish the following limit on the difference between the neutrino speed and the light velocity: -3.8×10-6<(vν-c)/c<3.1×10-6 (at 99% C.L.). This value is an order of magnitude lower than previous direct measurements.

  11. Measurement of the velocity of neutrinos from the CNGS beam with the large volume detector.

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N Yu; Aglietta, M; Antonioli, P; Ashikhmin, V V; Bari, G; Bertoni, R; Bressan, E; Bruno, G; Dadykin, V L; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Garbini, M; Ghia, P L; Giusti, P; Kemp, E; Mal'gin, A S; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Persiani, R; Pless, I A; Ryasny, V G; Ryazhskaya, O G; Saavedra, O; Sartorelli, G; Shakyrianova, I R; Selvi, M; Trinchero, G C; Vigorito, C; Yakushev, V F; Zichichi, A; Razeto, A

    2012-08-17

    We report the measurement of the time of flight of ∼17 GeV ν(μ) on the CNGS baseline (732 km) with the Large Volume Detector (LVD) at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. The CERN-SPS accelerator has been operated from May 10th to May 24th 2012, with a tightly bunched-beam structure to allow the velocity of neutrinos to be accurately measured on an event-by-event basis. LVD has detected 48 neutrino events, associated with the beam, with a high absolute time accuracy. These events allow us to establish the following limit on the difference between the neutrino speed and the light velocity: -3.8 × 10(-6) < (v(ν)-c)/c < 3.1 × 10(-6) (at 99% C.L.). This value is an order of magnitude lower than previous direct measurements. PMID:23006352

  12. A Study of the Nuclear-Medium Influence on Transverse Momentum of Hadrons Produced in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Agababyan, N.M.; Ammosov, V.V.; Ivanilov, A.A.; Korotkov, V.A.; Atayan, M.; Grigoryan, N.; Gulkanyan, H.; Karamyan, Zh.

    2005-07-01

    The influence of nuclear effects on the transverse momentum (p{sub T}) of neutrino-produced hadrons is investigated using the data obtained with the SKAT propane-freon bubble chamber irradiated in the neutrino beam (with E{sub {nu}} = 3-30 GeV) at the Serpukhov accelerator. It has been observed that the nuclear effects cause an enhancement of of hadrons produced in the target fragmentation region at low invariant mass of the hadronic system (2 < W < 4 GeV) and at low energies transferred to the hadrons (2 < {nu} < 9 GeV). At higher W and {nu}, no influence of nuclear effects on is observed. Measurement results are compared with predictions of a simple model, incorporating secondary intranuclear interactions of hadrons, which qualitatively reproduces the main features of the data.

  13. Measuring the mass of a sterile neutrino with a very short baseline reactor experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, D. C.; Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    An analysis of the world's neutrino oscillation data, including sterile neutrinos, [M. Sorel, C. M. Conrad, and M. H. Shaevitz, Phys. Rev. D 70, 073004 (2004)] found a peak in the allowed region at a mass-squared difference Δm2≅0.9eV2. We trace its origin to harmonic oscillations in the electron survival probability Pee as a function of L/E, the ratio of baseline to neutrino energy, as measured in the near detector of the Bugey experiment. We find a second occurrence for Δm2≅1.9eV2. We point out that the phenomenon of harmonic oscillations of Pee as a function of L/E, as seen in the Bugey experiment, can be used to measure the mass-squared difference associated with a sterile neutrino in the range from a fraction of an eV2 to several eV2 (compatible with that indicated by the LSND experiment), as well as measure the amount of electron-sterile neutrino mixing. We observe that the experiment is independent, to lowest order, of the size of the reactor and suggest the possibility of a small reactor with a detector sitting at a very short baseline.

  14. Measuring the mass of a sterile neutrino with a very short baseline reactor experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, D. C.; Escamilla, J.; Ernst, D. J.

    2007-04-15

    An analysis of the world's neutrino oscillation data, including sterile neutrinos, [M. Sorel, C. M. Conrad, and M. H. Shaevitz, Phys. Rev. D 70, 073004 (2004)] found a peak in the allowed region at a mass-squared difference {delta}m{sup 2} congruent with 0.9 eV{sup 2}. We trace its origin to harmonic oscillations in the electron survival probability P{sub ee} as a function of L/E, the ratio of baseline to neutrino energy, as measured in the near detector of the Bugey experiment. We find a second occurrence for {delta}m{sup 2} congruent with 1.9 eV{sup 2}. We point out that the phenomenon of harmonic oscillations of P{sub ee} as a function of L/E, as seen in the Bugey experiment, can be used to measure the mass-squared difference associated with a sterile neutrino in the range from a fraction of an eV{sup 2} to several eV{sup 2} (compatible with that indicated by the LSND experiment), as well as measure the amount of electron-sterile neutrino mixing. We observe that the experiment is independent, to lowest order, of the size of the reactor and suggest the possibility of a small reactor with a detector sitting at a very short baseline.

  15. Charged current quasi-elastic neutrino analysis at MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, G. A.

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA (Main INjector Experiment for ν-A) is a neutrino scattering experiment in the NuMI high-intensity neutrino beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. MINERvA was designed to make precision measurements of low energy neutrino and antineutrino cross sections on a variety of different materials (plastic scintillator, C, Fe, Pb, He and H2O). We present the current status of the charged current quasi-elastic scattering in plastic scintillator.

  16. Neutrino interactions on nuclei at MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, M. F.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Here we present analysis results from the MINERvA experiment for scattering of neutrinos on nucleus in an energy region of few GeV. These results cover a plethora of processes important for high precision neutrino oscillation measurements in which recent results have suggested that the currently used models are insufficient.

  17. Measurement of the inclusive electron neutrino charged current cross section on carbon with the T2K near detector.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Adam, J; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Metelko, C; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2014-12-12

    The T2K off-axis near detector ND280 is used to make the first differential cross-section measurements of electron neutrino charged current interactions at energies ∼1  GeV as a function of electron momentum, electron scattering angle, and four-momentum transfer of the interaction. The total flux-averaged ν(e) charged current cross section on carbon is measured to be ⟨σ⟩(ϕ)=1.11±0.10(stat)±0.18(syst)×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon. The differential and total cross-section measurements agree with the predictions of two leading neutrino interaction generators, NEUT and GENIE. The NEUT prediction is 1.23×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon and the GENIE prediction is 1.08×10⁻³⁸ cm²/nucleon. The total ν(e) charged current cross-section result is also in agreement with data from the Gargamelle experiment. PMID:25541766

  18. Measurement of the Inclusive Electron Neutrino Charged Current Cross Section on Carbon with the T2K Near Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Finch, A. J.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Johnson, R. A.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Metelko, C.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    The T2K off-axis near detector ND280 is used to make the first differential cross-section measurements of electron neutrino charged current interactions at energies ˜1 GeV as a function of electron momentum, electron scattering angle, and four-momentum transfer of the interaction. The total flux-averaged νe charged current cross section on carbon is measured to be ⟨σ ⟩ϕ =1.11 ±0.10 (stat)±0.18 (syst)×1 0-38 cm2/nucleon . The differential and total cross-section measurements agree with the predictions of two leading neutrino interaction generators, NEUT and GENIE. The NEUT prediction is 1.23 ×1 0-38 cm2/nucleon and the GENIE prediction is 1.08 ×1 0-38 cm2/nucleon . The total νe charged current cross-section result is also in agreement with data from the Gargamelle experiment.

  19. Aspects of neutrino interactions (scatterings at the low Q{sup 2}-region)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoinka, T.; Paschos, E. A.; Thomas, L.

    2015-10-15

    The article begins with a description of chiral symmetry and its application to neutrino induced reactions. For small Q{sup 2} (forward direction) the process is dominated by the amplitute with helicity zero where the pion pole disappears when multiplied with the polarization vector. The remaining part of the amplitude is determined by PCAC. For E{sub ν} > 2 GeV the computed cross sections are in good agreement with data. In coherent pion production we expect equal yields for neutrinos and antineutrinos a relation which for E{sub ν} > 2 GeV is fulfilled. We discuss specific features of the data and suggest methods for improving them by presenting new estimates for the incoherent background.

  20. Thomson Scattering Measurements of Plasma Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, A; Redmer, R; Tschentscher, T; Toleikis, S; Forster, E; Cao, L; Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P

    2006-03-29

    The authors propose to investigate the dynamics of plasmas in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime on ultra-short time scales. Accessible plasma conditions are in the density range of n = 10{sup 20} - 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} and at moderate temperatures of T = 1 - 20 eV. These plasmas are of importance for laboratory astrophysics, high energy density science and inertial confinement fusion. They are characterized by a coupling parameter of {Lambda} {approx}> 1, where electromagnetic interactions are of the same order as the kinetic energy. The high density of the plasma makes it opaque to radiation in the visible range and, as a consequence, UV up to x-ray radiation can be used to probe such systems. Therefore a wide range in the temperature-density plane of WDM is presently unexplored and only the VUV-FEL opens for the first time the opportunity for its detailed investigation. In equilibrium, the macroscopic state of the plasma is completely characterized by its density and temperature. In pump-probe experiments however, the plasma is initially in a nonequilibrium state and relaxes towards equilibrium within the relaxation time {tau}{sub R}. For t > {tau}{sub R}, the plasma is in an equilibrium state and expands hydrodynamically on a time scale {tau}{sub H}. The proposed experiment measures the time-resolved Thomson scattering signal with the VUV-FEL radiation characterizing the plasma in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states. Both regimes are extremely interesting and will provide new insight into the following phenomena: (1) details of nonequilibrium correlations, (2) relaxation phenomena, (3) hydrodynamic expansion, (4) recombination kinetics. The time-resolved Thomson scattering signal is obtained in a pump-probe experiment by varying the delay between pump and probe. The final stage of the relaxation process (t {approx} {tau}{sub R}) is of special interest since the plasma components (electrons and ion species) can be assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium. This

  1. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurement with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Debdatta; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-03-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of energy dependence of the neutrino-nucleon inclusive charged current cross section on an isoscalar target in the range 3-50 GeV for neutrinos and 5-50 GeV energy range for antineutrinos. The data set was collected with the MINOS Near Detector using the wide band NuMI beam at Fermilab. The size of the charged current sample is 1.94 x 10{sup 6} neutrino events and 1.60 x 10{sup 5} antineutrino events. The flux has been extracted using a low hadronic energy sub-sample of the charged current events. The energy dependence of the cross section is obtained by dividing the charged current sample with the extracted flux. The neutrino and antineutrino cross section exhibits a linear dependence on energy at high energy but shows deviations from linear behavior at low energy. We also present a measurement of the ratio of antineutrino to neutrino inclusive cross section.

  2. NEUTRINO FACTORIES - PHYSICS POTENTIALS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-02-16

    The recent results from Super-Kamiokande atmospheric and solar neutrino observations opens a new era in neutrino physics and has sparked a considerable interest in the physics possibilities with a Neutrino Factory based on the muon storage ring. We present physics opportunities at a Neutrino Factory, and prospects of Neutrino oscillation experiments. Using the precisely known flavor composition of the beam, one could envision an extensive program to measure the neutrino oscillation mixing matrix, including possible CP violating effects. These and Neutrino Interaction Rates for examples of a Neutrino Factory at BNL (and FNAL) with detectors at Gran Sasso, SLAC and Sudan are also presented.

  3. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal, part III

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2008-01-01

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keY of 65.4{sup +3.1}{sub 3.0} (stat) {sup +2.6}{sub -2.8} (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neUlrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1 {+-} 3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced {sup 37}Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior {sup 51}Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.88 {+-} 0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in {sup 71}Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63--67 SNU with an uncertainly of about 5%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the pp neutrino flux produced in the Sun to be {phi}{sup {circle_dot}}{sub pp} = (6.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 10}/(cm{sup 2} s), which agrees well with the flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  4. Neutrino Oscillations and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, David

    2001-04-01

    When the existence of the neutrino was almost apologetically first proposed by Wolfgang Pauli it was intended to explain the mysterious apparent absence of energy and momentum in beta decay. 70 years later the neutrino has indeed solved that mystery, but it has generated still more of its own. Are neutrinos massive? Is it possible to create a neutrino with its spin in the same direction as its momentum? What fraction of the mass of the Universe is made up of neutrinos? Are the flavour labels which we put on neutrinos, like electron and muon, really fixed or can they change? Why does no experiment see the predicted flux of neutrinos from the Sun? Why do there appear to be roughly equal numbers of muon and electron neutrinos created in our atmosphere, rather than the 2:1 ratio we would expect? Many of these questions were coupled when Bruno Pontecorvo first suggested that the shortfall in solar neutrino measurements were caused by neutrino oscillations - neutrinos spontaneously changing flavour as they travel from the Sun. 30 years later we still await definitive proof of that conjecture, and providing that proof is the reason for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The talk will discuss the current state of neutrino oscillations studies, and show how the unique capabilities of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory can provide definitive proof of whether neutrino oscillations are the long-sought answer to the solar neutrino problem.

  5. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-01

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ13 can be determined from abundance ratio of 7Li/11B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on 40Ar and 208Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-40Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-208Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  6. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ{sub 13} can be determined from abundance ratio of {sup 7}Li/{sup 11}B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on {sup 40}Ar and {sup 208}Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 40}Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 208}Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  7. An atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance measurement with the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gogos, Jeremy Peter

    2007-12-01

    It is now widely accepted that the Standard Model assumption of massless neutrinos is wrong, due primarily to the observation of solar and atmospheric neutrino flavor oscillations by a small number of convincing experiments. The MINOS Far Detector, capable of observing both the outgoing lepton and associated showering products of a neutrino interaction, provides an excellent opportunity to independently search for an oscillation signature in atmospheric neutrinos. To this end, a MINOS data set from an 883 live day, 13.1 kt-yr exposure collected between July, 2003 and April, 2007 has been analyzed. 105 candidate charged current muon neutrino interactions were observed, with 120.5 ± 1.3 (statistical error only) expected in the absence of oscillation. A maximum likelihood analysis of the observed log(L/E) spectrum shows that the null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at over 96% confidence and that the best fit oscillation parameters are sin223 = 0.95 -0.32 and Δm$2\\atop{23}$ = 0.93$+3.94\\atop{ -0.44}$ x 10-3 eV2. This measurement of oscillation parameters is consistent with the best fit values from the Super-Kamiokande experiment at 68% confidence.

  8. Beta Decay in the Field of an Electromagnetic Wave and Experiments on Measuring the Neutrino Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Dorofeev, O.F.; Lobanov, A.E.

    2005-06-01

    Investigations of the effect of an electromagnetic wave field on the beta-decay process are used to analyze the tritium-decay experimental data on the neutrino mass. It is shown that the electromagnetic wave can distort the beta spectrum, shifting the end point to the higher energy region. This phenomenon is purely classical and it is associated with the electron acceleration in the radiation field. Since strong magnetic fields exist in setups for precise measurement of the neutrino mass, the indicated field can appear owing to the synchrotron radiation mechanism. The phenomenon under consideration can explain the experimentally observed anomalies in the spectrum of the decay electrons; in particular, the effect of the 'negative square of the neutrino mass'.

  9. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136. Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and Searching for Majoron-Emitting Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Herrin, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Observations of neutrino flavor oscillations have demonstrated that neutrinos have mass. Since the discovery of these oscillations, much progress has been made at mea- suring the neutrino mass-squared differences and lepton mixing angles that character- ize them. However, the origin and absolute scale of neutrino masses remain unknown. Unique among fermions, neutrinos can be Majorana particles, which could provide an explanation for neutrino masses. Discovery of a hypothetical process known as neutrinoless double beta decay would show that neutrinos are Majorana particles and determine the mass scale for neutrinos. The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) is a series of experiments searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The first experiment, EXO-200, began operation in 2011 and makes use of 200 kg of xenon enriched to 80.6% in 136Xe. The analysis presented here makes use of data from EXO-200 to obtain a more precise measurement of the half-life for the two-neutrino-emitting mode of double beta decay than previously reported. The analysis also sets limits on the half-lives for exotic, Majoron-emitting modes of neutrinoless double beta decay. Data from EXO-200 is also used to produce a measurement of the cosmic muon flux at the WIPP under- ground site where EXO-200 is located.

  10. Measured microwave scattering cross sections of three meteorite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    Three meteorite specimens were used in a microwave scattering experiment to determine the scattering cross sections of stony meteorites and iron meteorites in the frequency range from 10 to 14 GHz. The results indicate that the stony meteorites have a microwave scattering cross section that is 30 to 50 percent of their projected optical cross section. Measurements of the iron meteorite scattering were inconclusive because of specimen surface irregularities.

  11. A theoretical perspective on neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A survey of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}, {rho}, CKM matrix, and axial-isoscalar neutral current measurements via neutrino scattering is presented. Loop effects due to heavy top or a fourth generation are described. Neutrino oscillations are discussed in a three generation mixing framework and some motivation for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation searches is given. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Neutrino-driven Explosion of a 20 Solar-mass Star in Three Dimensions Enabled by Strange-quark Contributions to Neutrino–Nucleon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melson, Tobias; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Bollig, Robert; Hanke, Florian; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Interactions with neutrons and protons play a crucial role for the neutrino opacity of matter in the supernova core. Their current implementation in many simulation codes, however, is rather schematic and ignores not only modifications for the correlated nuclear medium of the nascent neutron star, but also free-space corrections from nucleon recoil, weak magnetism, or strange quarks, which can easily add up to changes of several 10% for neutrino energies in the spectral peak. In the Garching supernova simulations with the Prometheus-Vertex code, such sophistications have been included for a long time except for the strange-quark contributions to the nucleon spin, which affect neutral-current neutrino scattering. We demonstrate on the basis of a 20 {M}ȯ progenitor star that a moderate strangeness-dependent contribution of {g}{{a}}{{s}}=-0.2 to the axial-vector coupling constant {g}{{a}}≈ 1.26 can turn an unsuccessful three-dimensional (3D) model into a successful explosion. Such a modification is in the direction of current experimental results and reduces the neutral-current scattering opacity of neutrons, which dominate in the medium around and above the neutrinosphere. This leads to increased luminosities and mean energies of all neutrino species and strengthens the neutrino-energy deposition in the heating layer. Higher nonradial kinetic energy in the gain layer signals enhanced buoyancy activity that enables the onset of the explosion at ∼300 ms after bounce, in contrast to the model with vanishing strangeness contributions to neutrino–nucleon scattering. Our results demonstrate the close proximity to explosion of the previously published, unsuccessful 3D models of the Garching group.

  13. Single photon production induced by (anti)neutrino neutral current scattering on nucleons and nuclear targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Nieves, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-10-01

    We review our theoretical approach to neutral current photon emission on nucleons and nuclei in the few-GeV energy region, relevant for neutrino oscillation experiments. These reactions are dominated by the weak excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance but there are also important non-resonant contributions. We have also included terms mediated by nucleon excitations from the second resonance region. On nuclei, Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the in-medium Δ resonance broadening have been taken into account for both incoherent and coherent reaction channels. With this model, the number and distributions of photon events at the MiniBooNE and T2K experiments have been obtained. We have also compared to the NOMAD upper limit at higher energies. The implications of our findings and future perspectives are discussed.

  14. Single photon production induced by (anti)neutrino neutral current scattering on nucleons and nuclear targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Nieves, J.; Wang, E.

    2015-10-15

    We review our theoretical approach to neutral current photon emission on nucleons and nuclei in the few-GeV energy region, relevant for neutrino oscillation experiments. These reactions are dominated by the weak excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance but there are also important non-resonant contributions. We have also included terms mediated by nucleon excitations from the second resonance region. On nuclei, Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and the in-medium Δ resonance broadening have been taken into account for both incoherent and coherent reaction channels. With this model, the number and distributions of photon events at the MiniBooNE and T2K experiments have been obtained. We have also compared to the NOMAD upper limit at higher energies. The implications of our findings and future perspectives are discussed.

  15. Measurement of the neutrino component of an antineutrino beam observed by a nonmagnetized detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Spitz, J.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Kobilarcik, T.; Marsh, W.; Moore, C. D.; Polly, C. C.; Russell, A. D.; Stefanski, R. J.; Zeller, G. P.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Karagiorgi, G.; Nguyen, V.

    2011-10-01

    Two methods are employed to measure the neutrino flux of the antineutrino-mode beam observed by the MiniBooNE detector. The first method compares data to simulated event rates in a high-purity {nu}{sub {mu}}-induced charged-current single {pi}{sup +} (CC1{pi}{sup +}) sample while the second exploits the difference between the angular distributions of muons created in {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {mu}} charged-current quasielastic (CCQE) interactions. The results from both analyses indicate the prediction of the neutrino flux component of the predominately antineutrino beam is overestimated--the CC1{pi}{sup +} analysis indicates the predicted {nu}{sub {mu}} flux should be scaled by 0.76{+-}0.11, while the CCQE angular fit yields 0.65{+-}0.23. The energy spectrum of the flux prediction is checked by repeating the analyses in bins of reconstructed neutrino energy, and the results show that the spectral shape is well-modeled. These analyses are a demonstration of techniques for measuring the neutrino contamination of antineutrino beams observed by future nonmagnetized detectors.

  16. A Measurement of the Neutrino Neutral Current Pi0 Cross Section at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Raaf, Jennifer Lynne

    2005-05-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino beam and detector at Fermilab are used to study the production of neutral current {pi}{sup 0} events. The cross sections for neutrino interactions with mineral oil (CH{sub 2}) are reported for resonantly produced and coherently produced single {pi}{sup 0} events. We measure a resonant single {pi}{sup 0} cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {mu}} N {pi}{sup 0}) = (0.0129 {+-} 0.0011(stat.) {+-} 0.0043(syst.)) x 10{sup -36} cm{sup 2}/CH{sub 2} at a mean neutrino energy of 1.26 GeV. We measure a coherent single {pi}{sup 0} cross section of {sigma}({nu}{sub {mu}} A {yields} {nu}{sub {mu}} A {pi}{sup 0}) = (0.00077 {+-} 0.00016 (stat.) {+-} 0.00036 (syst.)) x 10{sup -36} cm{sup 2}/CH{sub 2} at mean neutrino energy 1.12 GeV.

  17. Deep Water Cherenkov Light Scatter Meter

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, L; Petta, C.; Russo, G.V.

    2000-12-31

    The relevant parameters for the site choice of an underwater neutrino's telescope are discussed. The in situ measurement of the scattering distribution of the cherenkov light requires a suitable experimental setup. Its main features are described here.

  18. Measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum with IceCube in the 79- and 86-String configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhe, T.; Scheriau, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2016-04-01

    IceCube is a neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of one cubic kilometer. A total of 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) is deployed on 86 strings forming a three dimensional detector array. Although primarily designed for the detection of neutrinos from astrophysical sources, the detector can be used for spectral measurements of atmospheric neutrinos. These spectral measurements are hindered by a dominant background of atmospheric muons. State-of-the-art techniques from Machine Learning and Data Mining are required to select a high-purity sample of atmospheric neutrino candidates. The energy spectrum of muon neutrinos is obtained from energy-dependent input variables by utilizing regularized unfolding. The results obtained using IceCube in the 79- and 86-string configuration are presented in this paper.

  19. Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters Using Anti-fiducial Charged Current Events in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, Matthew Levy

    2010-09-01

    Abstract The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) obse rves the disappearance of muon neutrinos as they propagate in the long baseline Neutri nos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beam. MINOS consists of two detectors. The near detector sam ples the initial composition of the beam. The far detector, 735 km away, looks for an energy-d ependent deficit in the neutrino spectrum. This energy-dependent deficit is interpreted as q uantum mechanical oscillations be- tween neutrino flavors. A measurement is made of the effective two-neutrino mixing parameters ∆ m 2 ≈ ∆ m 2 23 and sin 2 2 θ ≈ sin 2 2 θ 23 . The primary MINOS analysis uses charged current events in the fiducial volume of the far detector. This analysis uses the roughly equal-sized sample of events that fails the fiducial cut, consisting of interact ions outside the fiducial region of the detector and in the surrounding rock. These events provide a n independent and complementary measurement, albeit weaker due to incomplete reconstructi on of the events. This analysis reports on an exposure of 7 . 25 × 10 20 protons-on-target. Due to poor energy resolution, the meas urement of sin 2 2 θ is much weaker than established results, but the measuremen t of sin 2 2 θ > 0 . 56 at 90% confidence is consistent with the accepted value. The measur ement of ∆ m 2 is much stronger. Assuming sin 2 2 θ = 1 , ∆ m 2 = (2 . 20 ± 0 . 18[stat] ± 0 . 14[syst]) × 10 − 3 eV 2 .

  20. Neutrino and antineutrino inclusive charged-current cross section measurements with the MINOS near detector

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Childress, S.; Harris, D.; Hatcher, R.; Hylen, J.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Koizumi, G.; Kreymer, A.; Lucas, P.; Moore, C. D.; Morfin, J.; Plunkett, R. K.; Rameika, R. A.; Rebel, B.; Saoulidou, N.; Shanahan, P.

    2010-04-01

    The energy dependence of the neutrino-iron and antineutrino-iron inclusive charged-current cross sections and their ratio have been measured using a high-statistics sample with the MINOS near detector exposed to the NuMI beam from the main injector at Fermilab. Neutrino and antineutrino fluxes were determined using a low hadronic energy subsample of charged-current events. We report measurements of {nu}-Fe ({nu}-Fe) cross section in the energy range 3-50 GeV (5-50 GeV) with precision of 2%-8% (3%-9%) and their ratio which is measured with precision 2%-8%. The data set spans the region from low energy, where accurate measurements are sparse, up to the high-energy scaling region where the cross section is well understood.

  1. Neutrino astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    Current knowledge and proposed experiments in the field of neutrino astronomy are reviewed, with particular emphasis on expected sources and existing and proposed detectors for intermediate-energy (10 to 50 MeV) and ultrahigh energy (greater than 10 GeV) neutrinos. Following a brief discussion of the counting rate obtained in the solar neutrino experiment of Davis (1978) and possible statistical sources for the discrepancy between the expected and observed rates, consideration is given to the physics of neutrino ejection in stellar gravitational collapse and sources of high-energy proton collisions giving rise to ultrahigh energy neutrinos. The capabilities of operating Cerenkov detectors at the Homestake Gold Mine, the Mt. Blanc Tunnel and in the Soviet Caucasus are considered in relation to the detection of gravitational collapse in the center of the galaxy, and it is pointed out that neutrino detectors offer a more reliable means of detecting collapses in the Galaxy than do gravitational wave detectors. The possibility of using Cerenkov detectors for ultrahigh energy neutrino detection is also indicated, and applications of large neutrino detectors such as the proposed DUMAND array to measure the lifetime of the proton are discussed.

  2. Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Bob

    2015-06-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

  3. Solar neutrino detection in a large volume double-phase liquid argon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, D.; Giganti, C.; Agnes, P.; Agostino, L.; Bottino, B.; Canci, N.; Davini, S.; De Cecco, S.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A. M.; Hungerford, E. V.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jollet, C.; Marini, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meregaglia, A.; Pagani, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Pantic, E.; Pocar, A.; Razeti, M.; Renshaw, A. L.; Rossi, B.; Rossi, N.; Suvorov, Y.; Testera, G.; Tonazzo, A.; Wang, H.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2016-08-01

    Precision measurements of solar neutrinos emitted by specific nuclear reaction chains in the Sun are of great interest for developing an improved understanding of star formation and evolution. Given the expected neutrino fluxes and known detection reactions, such measurements require detectors capable of collecting neutrino-electron scattering data in exposures on the order of 1 ktonne-yr, with good energy resolution and extremely low background. Two-phase liquid argon time projection chambers (LAr TPCs) are under development for direct Dark Matter WIMP searches, which possess very large sensitive mass, high scintillation light yield, good energy resolution, and good spatial resolution in all three cartesian directions. While enabling Dark Matter searches with sensitivity extending to the ``neutrino floor'' (given by the rate of nuclear recoil events from solar neutrino coherent scattering), such detectors could also enable precision measurements of solar neutrino fluxes using the neutrino-electron elastic scattering events. Modeling results are presented for the cosmogenic and radiogenic backgrounds affecting solar neutrino detection in a 300 tonne (100 tonne fiducial) LAr TPC operating at LNGS depth (3,800 meters of water equivalent). The results show that such a detector could measure the CNO neutrino rate with ~15% precision, and significantly improve the precision of the 7Be and pep neutrino rates compared to the currently available results from the Borexino organic liquid scintillator detector.

  4. Rayleigh Scattering for Measuring Flow in a Nozzle Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Carlos R.; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-engine-component test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust. A molecular Rayleigh-scattering-based air-density measurement system was built in a large nozzle-and-enginecomponent test facility for surveying supersonic plumes from jet-engine exhaust

  5. Neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2015-07-15

    The Neutrino Factory is a facility that produces neutrino beams with a well-defined flavour content and energy spectrum from the decay of intense, high-energy, stored muon beams to establish CP violation in the neutrino sector. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) is providing a Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility. The present design is optimised for the recent measurements of θ{sub 13}. The accelerator facility will deliver 10{sup 21} muon decays per year from 10 GeV stored muon beams. The straight sections of the storage ring point to a 100 kton Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) at a distance of 2000-2500 km from the source. The accuracy in the value of δ{sub CP} that a Neutrino Factory can achieve and the δ{sub CP} coverage is unrivalled by other future facilities. Staging scenarios for the Neutrino Factory deliver facilities that can carry out physics at each stage. In the context of Fermilab, such a scenario would imply in the first stage the construction of a small storage ring, nuSTORM, to carry out neutrino cross-section and sterile neutrino measurements and to perform a programme of 6D muon cooling R&D. The second stage is the construction of a 5 GeV Neutrino Factory (nuMAX) pointing to the Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake and the final stage would use many of the components of this facility to construct a Muon Collider, initially as a 126 GeV CM Higgs Factory, which may be upgraded to a multi-TeV Muon Collider if required.

  6. Neutrino factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2015-07-01

    The Neutrino Factory is a facility that produces neutrino beams with a well-defined flavour content and energy spectrum from the decay of intense, high-energy, stored muon beams to establish CP violation in the neutrino sector. The International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (the IDS-NF) is providing a Reference Design Report (RDR) for the facility. The present design is optimised for the recent measurements of θ13. The accelerator facility will deliver 1021 muon decays per year from 10 GeV stored muon beams. The straight sections of the storage ring point to a 100 kton Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) at a distance of 2000-2500 km from the source. The accuracy in the value of δCP that a Neutrino Factory can achieve and the δCP coverage is unrivalled by other future facilities. Staging scenarios for the Neutrino Factory deliver facilities that can carry out physics at each stage. In the context of Fermilab, such a scenario would imply in the first stage the construction of a small storage ring, nuSTORM, to carry out neutrino cross-section and sterile neutrino measurements and to perform a programme of 6D muon cooling R&D. The second stage is the construction of a 5 GeV Neutrino Factory (nuMAX) pointing to the Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake and the final stage would use many of the components of this facility to construct a Muon Collider, initially as a 126 GeV CM Higgs Factory, which may be upgraded to a multi-TeV Muon Collider if required.

  7. Solar Neutrinos: Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.; Hamish Robertson, R. G.; Serenelli, Aldo M.

    2013-08-01

    We describe the current status of solar neutrino measurements and of the theory—both neutrino physics and solar astrophysics—employed in interpreting measurements. Important recent developments include Super-Kamiokande's determination of the ν-e elastic scattering rate for 8B neutrinos to 3%; the latest Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) global analysis in which the inclusion of low-energy data from SNO I and II significantly narrowed the range of allowed values for the neutrino mixing angle θ12; Borexino results for both the 7Be and proton-electron-proton (pep) neutrino fluxes, the first direct measurements constraining the rate of proton-proton (pp) I and pp II burning in the Sun; global reanalyses of solar neutrino data that take into account new reactor results on θ13; a new decadal evaluation of the nuclear physics of the pp chain and CNO cycle defining best values and uncertainties in the nuclear microphysics input to solar models; recognition of an emerging discrepancy between two tests of solar metallicity, helioseismological mappings of the sound speed in the solar interior, and analyses of the metal photoabsorption lines based on our best current description of the Sun's photosphere; a new round of standard solar model calculations optimized to agree either with helioseismology or with the new photospheric analysis; and, motivated by the solar abundance problem, the development of nonstandard, accreting solar models, in order to investigate possible consequences of the metal segregation that occurred in the proto-solar disk. We review this progress and describe how new experiments such as SNO+ could help us further exploit neutrinos as a unique probe of stellar interiors.

  8. Supernovae and neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Beacom

    2002-09-19

    A long-standing problem in supernova physics is how to measure the total energy and temperature of {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}, {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, and {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. While of the highest importance, this is very difficult because these flavors only have neutral-current detector interactions. We propose that neutrino-proton elastic scattering, {nu} + p {yields} {nu} + p, can be used for the detection of supernova neutrinos in scintillator detectors. It should be emphasized immediately that the dominant signal is on free protons. Though the proton recoil kinetic energy spectrum is soft, with T{sub p} {approx_equal} 2E{sub {nu}}{sup 2}/M{sub p}, and the scintillation light output from slow, heavily ionizing protons is quenched, the yield above a realistic threshold is nearly as large as that from {bar {nu}}{sub e} + p {yields} e{sup +} + n. In addition, the measured proton spectrum is related to the incident neutrino spectrum. The ability to detect this signal would give detectors like KamLAND and Borexino a crucial and unique role in the quest to detect supernova neutrinos.

  9. Sterile neutrinos and indirect dark matter searches in IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Argüelles, Carlos A.; Kopp, Joachim E-mail: jkopp@fnal.gov

    2012-07-01

    If light sterile neutrinos exist and mix with the active neutrino flavors, this mixing will affect the propagation of high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun. In particular, new Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonances can occur, leading to almost complete conversion of some active neutrino flavors into sterile states. We demonstrate how this can weaken IceCube limits on neutrino capture and annihilation in the Sun and how potential future conflicts between IceCube constraints and direct detection or collider data might be resolved by invoking sterile neutrinos. We also point out that, if the dark matter-nucleon scattering cross section and the allowed annihilation channels are precisely measured in direct detection and collider experiments in the future, IceCube can be used to constrain sterile neutrino models using neutrinos from the dark matter annihilation.

  10. Measurement of thermal radiation scattering characteristics of submicron refractory particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, W. R.; Williams, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The differential scattering parameter has been measured for 0.04-micron tungsten particles in hydrogen and nitrogen at temperatures to 1080 K. The differential scattering parameter has also been measured for 0.1 micron tungsten, three types of carbon particles, and fly ash in nitrogen at temperatures to 1000 K. The 0.04 micron tungsten shows a temperature dependent total scattering parameter varying from around 4000 sq cm per g at room temperature to 7000 sq cm per g at 1088 K. The temperatures over which data were obtained are not high enough to confirm the temperature dependence of the total scattering parameter of tungsten.

  11. Neutrino and Anti-neutrino Cross Sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan

    2011-10-06

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  12. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    SciTech Connect

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; Asaadi, J.; Baller, B.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Church, E.; Edmunds, D.; Ereditato, A.; Farooq, S.; Fleming, B.; Greenlee, H.; Hatcher, R.; Horton-Smith, G.; James, C.; Klein, E.; Lang, K.; Laurens, P.; Mehdiyev, R.; Page, B.; Palamara, O.; Partyka, K.; Rameika, G.; Rebel, B.; Santos, E.; Schukraft, A.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Szelc, A.  M.; Weber, M.; Yang, T.; Zeller, G. P.

    2014-12-23

    We report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) × 10⁻³⁸cm² / Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) × 10⁻³⁹ cm² / Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  13. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; Asaadi, J.; Baller, B.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Church, E.; Edmunds, D.; Ereditato, A.; et al

    2014-12-23

    We report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) × 10⁻³⁸cm² / Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) × 10⁻³⁹ cm² / Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  14. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon.

    PubMed

    Acciarri, R; Adams, C; Asaadi, J; Baller, B; Bolton, T; Bromberg, C; Cavanna, F; Church, E; Edmunds, D; Ereditato, A; Farooq, S; Fleming, B; Greenlee, H; Hatcher, R; Horton-Smith, G; James, C; Klein, E; Lang, K; Laurens, P; Mehdiyev, R; Page, B; Palamara, O; Partyka, K; Rameika, G; Rebel, B; Santos, E; Schukraft, A; Soderberg, M; Spitz, J; Szelc, A M; Weber, M; Yang, T; Zeller, G P

    2014-12-31

    We report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6(-1.0)(+1.2)(stat)(-0.4)(+0.3)(syst)×10(-38)  cm(2)/Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5(-2.1)(+2.6)(stat)(-0.7)(+0.6)(syst)×10(-39)  cm(2)/Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV. PMID:25615307

  15. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acciarri, R.

    2015-01-20

    In this study, we report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) x 10-38 cm2/Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) x 10-39 cm2/Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  16. Proposed Measurement of the Beta-Neutrino Correlation in Neutron Decay

    PubMed Central

    Collett, B.; Anderman, R.; Balashov, S.; Bateman, F. B.; Byrne, J.; Dewey, M. S.; Fisher, B. M.; Goldin, L.; Jones, G.; Komives, A.; Konopka, T.; Leuschner, M.; Mostovoy, Yu.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Trull, C.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Wilson, R.; Yerozolimsky, B. G.

    2005-01-01

    Currently, the beta-neutrino asymmetry has the largest uncertainty (4 %) of the neutron decay angular correlations. Without requiring polarimetry this decay parameter can be used to measure λ (ga/gv), test Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity limit scalar and tensor currents, and search for Charged Vector Current (CVC) violation. We propose to measure the beta-neutrino asymmetry coeffcient, a, using time-of-flight for the recoil protons. We hope to achieve a systematic uncertainty of σa / a ≈ 1.0 %. After tests at Indiana University’s Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS), the apparatus will be moved to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where the measurement can achieve a statistical uncertainty of 1 % to 2 % in about 200 beam days. PMID:27308157

  17. Hybrid method to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy by supernova (anti)neutrino induced reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vale, D.; Rauscher, T.; Paar, N.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a hybrid method to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy by simultaneous measurements of responses of at least two detectors to antineutrino and neutrino fluxes from accretion and cooling phases of core-collapse supernovae. The (anti)neutrino-nucleus cross sections for 56Fe and 208Pb are calculated in the framework of the relativistic nuclear energy density functional and weak interaction Hamiltonian, while the cross sections for inelastic scattering on free protons p(bar nue,e+)n are obtained using heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. The modelling of (anti)neutrino fluxes emitted from a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova include collective and Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects inside the exploding star. The particle emission rates from the elementary decay modes of the daughter nuclei are calculated for normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. It is shown that simultaneous use of (anti)neutrino detectors with different target material allows to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy from the ratios of νe- and bar nue-induced particle emissions. This hybrid method favors neutrinos from the supernova cooling phase and the implementation of detectors with heavier target nuclei (208Pb) for the neutrino sector, while for antineutrinos the use of free protons in mineral oil or water is the appropriate choice.

  18. Measurement of the neutrino asymmetry in the β decay of laser-cooled, polarized 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melconian, D.; Behr, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Aviv, O.; Bricault, P. G.; Dombsky, M.; Fostner, S.; Gorelov, A.; Gu, S.; Hanemaayer, V.; Jackson, K. P.; Pearson, M. R.; Vollrath, I.

    2007-06-01

    A measurement of the neutrino asymmetry is presented which represents the first search for new physics using polarized radioactive atoms initially cooled and confined in a magneto-optical trap. Optical pumping and photoionization techniques are used to generate and measure, in situ, a highly spin-polarized (96.5 (0.8) %) sample of the short-lived β+-emitter 37K. The angular distribution of neutrinos from this polarized decay, inferred from the daughter recoil asymmetry, is used to search for a hypothetical V + A current in the weak interaction. We find the ν asymmetry parameter to be Bν = - 0.755 ± 0.020 (stat) ± 0.013 (syst), in agreement with the standard model's purely V- A interaction.

  19. ( sup 6 Li, sup 6 He) measurements as an alternative calibration for solar neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, E.; Dennert, H.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Moosburger, M.; Wirth, H. ); Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Zagromski, S. )

    1991-12-01

    The ({sup 6}Li,{sup 6}He) reaction was studied on the nuclei {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga at {ital E}{sub 6Li}=156 MeV at extreme forward angles including zero degree. Gamow-Teller strength and the corresponding {ital B}(GT) values were extracted. It is shown that these measurements provide an alternative method to calibrate solar neutrino detectors.

  20. Polyphase-coded incoherent scatter measurements at Millstone Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Ilkka I.; Lind, Frank D.; Roininen, Lassi; Erickson, Philip J.; Rideout, William C.; Orispää, Mikko; Vierinen, Juha; Lehtinen, Markku S.

    2013-09-01

    We report first results of polyphase-coded incoherent scatter measurements at Millstone Hill. To our knowledge, these are the first incoherent scatter measurements with polyphase alternating codes of Markkanen et al. (2008) and optimal quadriphase sequences of Damtie et al. (2008). The results demonstrate that an arbitrary waveform generator recently installed at the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar, part of the National Science Foundation Geospace Facility operated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Haystack Observatory, is capable of reproducing the polyphase waveforms with an accuracy sufficient for incoherent scatter measurements. Polyphase codes will allow incoherent scatter radar experiments to be better optimized, because they provide a larger variety of code and code cycle lengths than the traditional binary codes.

  1. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Hix, William Raphael; Bruenn, S. W.

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of including, and improving, the calculation of neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations by removing, or replacing, each opacity individually, or removing opacities in groups. We find that during core collapse improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei based on the hybrid model, relative to the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for a mean nucleus, plays the most important role of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse leading to larger deleptonization of the collapsing core, without the energy downscattering via non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons required for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from NIS on electrons. For the accretion phase NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by $e^+e^-$-annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear electron capture, $e^+e^-$-annihilation pair emission, and non-isoenergetic scattering on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  2. Interplay of Neutrino Opacities in Core-collapse Supernova Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Hix, W. Raphael; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e + e - annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e + e --annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  3. INTERPLAY OF NEUTRINO OPACITIES IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Bruenn, Stephen W.

    2012-11-20

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics with the code Agile-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of modern neutrino opacities on the development of supernova simulations. We test the effects of opacities by removing opacities or by undoing opacity improvements for individual opacities and groups of opacities. We find that improvements to electron capture (EC) on nuclei, namely EC on an ensemble of nuclei using modern nuclear structure models rather than the simpler independent-particle approximation (IPA) for EC on a mean nucleus, plays the most important role during core collapse of all tested neutrino opacities. Low-energy neutrinos emitted by modern nuclear EC preferentially escape during collapse without the energy downscattering on electrons required to enhance neutrino escape and deleptonization for the models with IPA nuclear EC. During shock breakout the primary influence on the emergent neutrinos arises from non-isoenergetic scattering (NIS) on electrons. For the accretion phase, NIS on free nucleons and pair emission by e {sup +} e {sup -} annihilation have the largest impact on the neutrino emission and shock evolution. Other opacities evaluated, including nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung and especially neutrino-positron scattering, have little measurable impact on neutrino emission or shock dynamics. Modern treatments of nuclear EC, e {sup +} e {sup -}-annihilation pair emission, and NIS on electrons and free nucleons are critical elements of core-collapse simulations of all dimensionality.

  4. Solar {sup 8}B and hep Neutrino Measurements from 1258 Days of Super-Kamiokande Data

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Itow, Y.; Kajita, T.; Kameda, J.; Kaneyuki, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y.; Miura, M.

    2001-06-18

    Solar neutrino measurements from 1258days of data from the Super-Kamiokande detector are presented. The measurements are based on recoil electrons in the energy range 5.0{endash}20.0MeV. The measured solar neutrino flux is 2.32{+-}0.03(stat){sup +0.08}{sub {minus}0.07}(syst){times}10{sup 6} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} , which is 45.1{+-}0.5(stat ){sup +1.6}{sub {minus}1.4}(syst) % of that predicted by the BP2000 SSM. The day vs night flux asymmetry ({Phi}{sub n}{minus}{Phi}{sub d})/ {Phi}{sub average} is 0.033{+-}0.022(stat){sup +0.013}{sub {minus}0.012}(syst) . The recoil electron energy spectrum is consistent with no spectral distortion. For the hep neutrino flux, we set a 90% C.L.upper limit of 40{times}10{sup 3} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} , which is 4.3times the BP2000 SSM prediction.

  5. Atomic ionization by sterile-to-active neutrino conversion and constraints on dark matter sterile neutrinos with germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Chi, Hsin-Chang; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, C.-P.; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T.; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2016-05-01

    The transition magnetic moment of a sterile neutrino can give rise to its conversion to an active neutrino through radiative decay or nonstandard interaction (NSI) with matter. For sterile neutrinos of keV-mass as dark matter candidates, their decay signals are actively searched for in cosmic x-ray spectra. In this work, we consider the NSI that leads to atomic ionization, which can be detected by direct dark matter experiments. It is found that this inelastic scattering process for a nonrelativistic sterile neutrino has a pronounced enhancement in the differential cross section at energy transfer about half of its mass, manifesting experimentally as peaks in the measurable energy spectra. The enhancement effects gradually smear out as the sterile neutrino becomes relativistic. Using data taken with low-threshold low-background germanium detectors, constraints on sterile neutrino mass and its transition magnetic moment are derived and compared with those from astrophysical observations.

  6. Measurements of scattering and absorption in mammalian cell suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Freyer, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    During the past several years a range of spectroscopies, including fluorescence and elastic-scatter spectroscopy, have been investigated for optically based detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. Both elastic-scatter and fluorescence signals depend, in part, on scattering and absorption properties of the cells in the tissue. Therefore an understanding of the scattering and absorption properties of cells is a necessary prerequisite for understanding and developing these techniques. Cell suspensions provide a simple model with which to begin studying the absorption and scattering properties of cells. In this study we have made preliminary measurements of the scattering and absorption properties of suspensions of mouse mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) over a broad wavelength range (380 nm to 800 nm).

  7. Measurement of Scattering Nonlinearities from a Single Plasmonic Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsuan; Li, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Yen-Ta; Shen, Po-Ting; Deka, Gitanjal; Oketani, Ryosuke; Yonemaru, Yasuo; Yamanaka, Masahito; Fujita, Katsumasa; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonics, which are based on the collective oscillation of electrons due to light excitation, involve strongly enhanced local electric fields and thus have potential applications in nonlinear optics, which requires extraordinary optical intensity. One of the most studied nonlinearities in plasmonics is nonlinear absorption, including saturation and reverse saturation behaviors. Although scattering and absorption in nanoparticles are closely correlated by the Mie theory, there has been no report of nonlinearities in plasmonic scattering until very recently. Last year, not only saturation, but also reverse saturation of scattering in an isolated plasmonic particle was demonstrated for the first time. The results showed that saturable scattering exhibits clear wavelength dependence, which seems to be directly linked to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). Combined with the intensity-dependent measurements, the results suggest the possibility of a common mechanism underlying the nonlinear behaviors of scattering and absorption. These nonlinearities of scattering from a single gold nanosphere (GNS) are widely applicable, including in super-resolution microscopy and optical switches. In this paper, it is described in detail how to measure nonlinearity of scattering in a single GNP and how to employ the super-resolution technique to enhance the optical imaging resolution based on saturable scattering. This discovery features the first super-resolution microscopy based on nonlinear scattering, which is a novel non-bleaching contrast method that can achieve a resolution as low as l/8 and will potentially be useful in biomedicine and material studies. PMID:26780248

  8. Unified theory of near-field analysis and measurement - Scattering and inverse scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacker, P. F.

    1981-03-01

    The scanning procedures of unified theory of near-field analysis and measurement are adapted to the determination of scattering patterns of electromagnetic and scalar systems from measurements made in the near, intermediate, or far field, with emphasis on high accuracy and efficient data processing. The scanning procedures include spherical, improved plane polar, and many types of plane rectangular, plane radial, and circular cylindrical scanning. Application of group representation to inverse scattering analysis is discussed.

  9. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  10. Use of optical scatter sensors for measurement of visibility.

    PubMed

    Tjugum, S A; Vaagen, J S; Jakobsen, T; Hamre, B

    2005-06-01

    A study on the measurement of visibility by the use of light scattering has been carried out. The basis for the research was the optical forward-scatter sensor, Mira visibility sensor, developed and produced by Aanderaa Instruments. The focus of the study was on how to measure correct visibility at different weather situations (e.g. fog, rain, haze and snow) and how a sensor can provide information on the type of particles/drops which are causing reduced visibility. Optical scatter measurement of airborne dust was also investigated. The work includes theoretical calculations and experimental work. The correlations between scatter measurements and both visibility and the concentration of airborne dust are studied. A short introduction to the subject of visibility measurement is also included. PMID:15931423

  11. Measurements and interpretations of light scattering from intact biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeremy D.

    Visible light interacts with biological cells primarily through elastic scattering. The details of how cells scatter light depend on their morphology and their substructures. In this thesis we first present a series of experiments and models to discern the specific contributions of certain sub-cellular constituents to whole-cell scattering. Exploiting the findings of those studies, we report on experiments within model systems of cell death that demonstrate the potential of light scattering measurements as a tool in modern biology. Instrumentation capable of exploiting the findings of this thesis from a biology-relevant microscopy platform is designed and developed. A Mie theory based interpretation of light scattering signals originating from a collection of particles with a broad size distribution is developed. Upon applying this model to scattering data from intact cells, we find that it robustly extracts the size scale of dominant light scattering particles, suggests that scattering measurements are sensitive primarily to mitochondrial and lysosomal morphology, and unites conflicting results in the literature. Using this model as a basis, we present a collection of studies in which we use various strategies of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as a biophysical tool to perturb mitochondria and lysosomes, and observe the effects of these perturbations on whole-cell scattering. Through these experiments, we are able to discern the individual contributions of mitochondria and lysosomes to whole-cell light scattering, and demonstrate that mitochondria are responsible for roughly 80% of the scattering signal. Results of experiments aimed at demonstrating the potential role that light scattering measurements have to play in future studies of cell death biology are presented. We first show that mitochondrial-PDT-induced morphology changes measured with light scattering map into the cell killing efficacy of the therapy. We next demonstrate that mitochondrial

  12. Measurement of coherent production of π± in neutrino and antineutrino beams on carbon from Eν of 1.5 to 20 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Higuera, A.

    2014-12-23

    Neutrino-induced coherent charged pion production on nuclei ν(–)μA → μ±πA is a rare, inelastic interaction in which a small squared four-momentum |t| is transferred to the recoil nucleus, leaving it intact in the reaction. In the scintillator tracker of MINERvA, we remove events with evidence of particles from nuclear breakup and reconstruct |t| from the final-state pion and muon. In addition, we select low |t| events to isolate a sample rich in coherent candidates. By selecting low |t| events, we produce a model-independent measurement of the differential cross section for coherent scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on carbon. We find poor agreement with the predicted kinematics in neutrino generators used by current oscillation experiments.

  13. A method to measure the distance among scatters and the scatters' diameter in artificial composite materials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Ji, Aiming; Hu, Jialing; Zhu, Canyan; Zhang, Lijun; Yang, Jianfeng; Liu, Yongsong; Mao, Ling-Feng

    2016-04-01

    A new method to measure the distance among scatters, the density of scatters, and the scatters' diameter in artificial composite materials has been proposed. This method is based on detecting the reflection amplitude change (amp) of the echo signal reflected from scatters. Simulation results show that such a method is valid for the distance less than four times of the acoustic wavelength, because the coupling between the scatters can be neglected for the distance larger than four times of the acoustic wavelength. Therefore, this new measure method can be always valid by choosing appropriate frequency according to the scaling rule discussed in this paper. At the same time, it is found that the diameter of scatters is the half of the wavelength where the curve peak of the amp vs frequency occurs. It implies that such a new method can also be used to measure the diameter of scatters in solids and liquids, and even in PM2.5 pollution particles in air. PMID:26799127

  14. Effect of multiple scattering on depolarization measurements with spaceborne lidars.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Susanne; Reichardt, Jens

    2003-06-20

    An analytical model based on the integration of the scattering-angle and light-path manifold has been developed to quantify the effect of multiple scattering on cirrus measurements obtained with elastic polarization lidars from space. Light scattering by molecules and by a horizontally homogeneous cloud is taken into account. Lidar parameter, including laser beam divergence, can be freely chosen. Up to 3 orders of scattering are calculated. Furthermore, an inversion technique for the retrieval of cloud extinction profiles from measurements with elastic-backscatter lidars is proposed that explicitly takes multiple scattering into account. It is found that for typical lidar system parameters such as those of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) instrument multiple scattering does not significantly affect depolarization-ratio measurements in cirrus clouds with small to moderate optical depths. For all simulated clouds, the absolute value of the difference between measured and single-scattering volume depolarization ratio is < 0.006. The particle depolarization ratio can be calculated from the measured volume depolarization ratio and the retrieved backscatter ratio without degradation of accuracy; thus characterization of the various cirrus categories in terms of the particle depolarization ratio and retrieval of cloud microphysical properties is feasible from space. The results of this study apply to polar stratospheric clouds as well. PMID:12833968

  15. Nondestructive Method For Measuring The Scattering Coefficient Of Bulk Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenhuis, R. A. J.; ten Bosch, J. J.

    1981-05-01

    During demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel its structure changes resulting in a change of the absorption and scattering coefficients of the enamel. By measuring these coefficients during demineralization and remineralization these processes can be monitored in a non-destructive way. For this purpose an experimental arrangement was made: a fibre illuminates a spot on the sample with monochromatic light with a wave-length between 400 nm and 700 nm; a photomultiplier measures the luminance of the light back-scattered by the sample as a function of the distance from the measuring snot to the spot of illumination. In a Monte Carlo-model this luminance is simulated using the same geometry given the scattering and absorption coefficients in a sample. Then the scattering and absorption coefficients in the sample are determined by selecting the theoretical curve fitting the experimental one. Scattering coefficients below 10 mm-1 and absorption coefficients obtained with this method on calibration samples correspond well with those obtained with another method. Scattering coefficients above 10 mm-1 (paper samples) were measured ton low. This perhaps is caused by the anisotropic structure of paper sheets. The method is very suitable to measure the scattering and absorption coefficients of bulk materials.

  16. Accelerator Measurments of the Askaryan Effect in Rock Salt: A Roadmap Toward Teraton Underground Neutrino Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.

    2004-12-15

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of cubic km of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over two orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt-dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

  17. Accelerator measurements of the Askaryan effect in rock salt: A roadmap toward teraton underground neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Guillian, E.; Milincic, R.; Miocinovic, P.; Saltzberg, D.; Williams, D.; Field, R.C.; Walz, D.

    2005-07-15

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large-scale ultra-high-energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of km{sup 3} of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over 2 orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed a detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

  18. The impact of sterile neutrinos on CP measurements at long baselines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gandhi, Raj; Kayser, Boris; Masud, Mehedi; Prakash, Suprabh

    2015-09-01

    With the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as an example, we show that the presence of even one sterile neutrino of mass ~1 eV can significantly impact the measurements of CP violation in long baseline experiments. Using a probability level analysis and neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry calculations, we discuss the large magnitude of these effects, and show how they translate into significant event rate deviations at DUNE. These results demonstrate that measurements which, when interpreted in the context of the standard three family paradigm, indicate CP conservation at long baselines, may, in fact hide large CP violation if there is a sterilemore » state. Similarly, any data indicating the violation of CP cannot be properly interpreted within the standard paradigm unless the presence of sterile states of mass O(1 eV) can be conclusively ruled out. Our work underscores the need for a parallel and linked short baseline oscillation program and a highly capable near detector for DUNE, but in order that its highly anticipated results on CP violation in the lepton sector may be correctly interpreted.« less

  19. The impact of sterile neutrinos on CP measurements at long baselines

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Kayser, Boris; Masud, Mehedi; Prakash, Suprabh

    2015-09-01

    With the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) as an example, we show that the presence of even one sterile neutrino of mass ~1 eV can significantly impact the measurements of CP violation in long baseline experiments. Using a probability level analysis and neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry calculations, we discuss the large magnitude of these effects, and show how they translate into significant event rate deviations at DUNE. These results demonstrate that measurements which, when interpreted in the context of the standard three family paradigm, indicate CP conservation at long baselines, may, in fact hide large CP violation if there is a sterile state. Similarly, any data indicating the violation of CP cannot be properly interpreted within the standard paradigm unless the presence of sterile states of mass O(1 eV) can be conclusively ruled out. Our work underscores the need for a parallel and linked short baseline oscillation program and a highly capable near detector for DUNE, but in order that its highly anticipated results on CP violation in the lepton sector may be correctly interpreted.

  20. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations for Earth tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Modern proposed atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments, such as PINGU in the Antarctic ice or ORCA in Mediterranean sea water, aim for precision measurements of the oscillation parameters including the ordering of the neutrino masses. They can, however, go far beyond that: Since neutrino oscillations are affected by the coherent forward scattering with matter, neutrinos can provide a new view on the interior of the earth. We show that the proposed atmospheric oscillation experiments can measure the lower mantle density of the earth with a precision at the level of a few percent, including the uncertainties of the oscillation parameters and correlations among different density layers. While the earth's core is, in principle, accessible by the angular resolution, new technology would be required to extract degeneracy-free information.

  1. Calculating Neutrino Oscillations with Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linehan, Bryan

    2014-09-01

    In particle physics, it is currently known that three types of neutrinos exist that interact via the weak force. Referred to as ``flavors,'' they are distinguishable and named for the lepton they produce through charged current interactions: electron, muon, and tau. In a process called neutrino oscillation, one flavor of neutrino can change into another flavor as it propagates through space. At the moment, mild discrepancies between expected and measured neutrino oscillations suggest that more types of neutrinos that do not interact via the weak force exist: sterile neutrinos. The goal of this project was to calculate non-sterile flavor oscillation probabilities when 1, 2 or 3 sterile neutrinos were assumed to exist. An application has been written in Mathematica that calculates these probabilities with the neutrino masses, linear relationships between mass and flavor states, values of CP symmetry violating constants, and constant densities of media in which the neutrinos propagate set as parameters. The application was published online for researchers to use as a tool when considering the existence of sterile neutrinos. In the immediate future, the insights this application gives into neutrino oscillations will be studied and reported. In particle physics, it is currently known that three types of neutrinos exist that interact via the weak force. Referred to as ``flavors,'' they are distinguishable and named for the lepton they produce through charged current interactions: electron, muon, and tau. In a process called neutrino oscillation, one flavor of neutrino can change into another flavor as it propagates through space. At the moment, mild discrepancies between expected and measured neutrino oscillations suggest that more types of neutrinos that do not interact via the weak force exist: sterile neutrinos. The goal of this project was to calculate non-sterile flavor oscillation probabilities when 1, 2 or 3 sterile neutrinos were assumed to exist. An application

  2. SOLAR NEUTRINO PHYSICS: SENSITIVITY TO LIGHT DARK MATTER PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilidio; Silk, Joseph E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt

    2012-06-20

    Neutrinos are produced in several neutrino nuclear reactions of the proton-proton chain and carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle that take place at different radii of the Sun's core. Hence, measurements of solar neutrino fluxes provide a precise determination of the local temperature. The accumulation of non-annihilating light dark matter particles (with masses between 5 GeV and 16 GeV) in the Sun produces a change in the local solar structure, namely, a decrease in the central temperature of a few percent. This variation depends on the properties of the dark matter particles, such as the mass of the particle and its spin-independent scattering cross-section on baryon-nuclei, specifically, the scattering with helium, oxygen, and nitrogen among other heavy elements. This temperature effect can be measured in almost all solar neutrino fluxes. In particular, by comparing the neutrino fluxes generated by stellar models with current observations, namely {sup 8}B neutrino fluxes, we find that non-annihilating dark matter particles with a mass smaller than 10 GeV and a spin-independent scattering cross-section with heavy baryon-nuclei larger than 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -37} cm{sup -2} produce a variation in the {sup 8}B neutrino fluxes that would be in conflict with current measurements.

  3. Di-lepton Top Quark Mass Measurement with the Neutrino Weighting Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Simon

    2005-04-01

    We report a measurement of the Top Quark Mass using approximately 340 pb-1 of data from pp collisions at √s = 1.96 GeV at CDF Run II. We select tt candidates that are consistent with two W bosons decaying leptonically. Only one of the two charged leptons is required to be identified as an electron or a muon candidate, while the other is simply a well measured track. Using the Neutrino Weighting Algorithm to reconstruct a top quark mass in each event and comparing the resulting distribution to Monte Carlo templates, we measure the top quark mass.

  4. Recent developments in neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    I shall attempt to summarize recent developments in the experimental situation in neutrino physics. The paper will deal with recent results, drawing on either published work or research that has been presented in preprint form, as there is an adequate supply of interesting and controversial data restricting oneself to these generally more reliable sources. The discussion of the theoretical implication of these experimental results will be presented in the following paper by Boris Kayser. The topics to be covered in this presentation are: direct measurements of {bar {nu}}{sub e} mass via beta endpoint studies; status of solar neutrino observations; status of 17-keV neutrino'' reports; and the use of {nu}p elastic scattering to determine the strange quark'' content of the proton. 2 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Probing BSM neutrino physics with flavor and spectral distortions: Prospects for future high-energy neutrino telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Ian M.; Murase, Kohta

    2016-04-01

    The flavor of cosmic neutrinos may help unveil their sources and could reveal the presence of new physics in the neutrino sector. We consider impacts of next-generation neutrino detectors, including the planned upgrade to neutrino detector, IceCube-Gen2, which is well positioned to make dramatic improvements in both flavor and spectral measurements. We show that various models in neutrino physics beyond the Standard Model, such as neutrino decay, pseudo-Dirac states, and neutrino self-scattering, may be found or strongly constrained at IceCube-Gen2 and Cubic Kilometre Neutrino Telescope. We find that the additional flavor discriminants given by Glashow resonance events and so-called "double-bang" topologies improve the ability to access the flavor of the cosmic high-energy neutrinos and probe the beyond the Standard Model physics. In addition, although details depend on source properties, Glashow resonance events have the additional feature of being able to inform us of the relative strengths of neutrino and antineutrino emission, which may help us discriminate astrophysical scenarios.

  6. Polar nephelometer for light-scattering measurements of ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Barkey, B; Liou, K N

    2001-02-15

    We report on a small, lightweight polar nephelometer for the measurement of the light-scattering properties of cloud particles, specifically designed for use on a balloonborne platform in cirrus cloud conditions. The instrument consists of 33 fiber-optic light guides positioned in a two-dimensional plane from 5 degrees to 175 degrees that direct the scattered light to photodiode detectors-amplifier units. The system uses an onboard computer and data acquisition card to collect and store the measured signals. The instrument's calibration is tested by measurement of light scattered into a two-dimensional plane from small water droplets generated by an ultrasonic humidifier. Excellent comparisons between the measured water-droplet scattering properties and expectations generated by Mie calculation are shown. The measured scattering properties of ice crystals generated in a cold chamber also compare reasonably well with the theoretical results based on calculations from a unified theory of light scattering by ice crystals that use the particle size distribution measured in the chamber. PMID:18033557

  7. Measurement of the ratio of total and differential cross sections on neutrons and protons for charged-current neutrino events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armenise, N.; Calicchio, M.; Erriquez, O.; Fogli-Muciaccia, M. T.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Romano, F.; Belusevic, R.; Colley, D. C.; Jones, G. T.; O'Neale, S.; Sewell, S. J.; Votruba, M. F.; Bertrand, D.; Moreels, J.; Sacton, J.; Vander Velde-Wilquet, C.; Van Doninck, W.; Wilquet, G.; Brisson, V.; Francois, T.; Petiau, P.; Cooper, A. M.; Guy, J. G.; Michette, A. G.; Tyndel, M.; Venus, W.; Alitti, J.; Baton, J. P.; Gerbier, G.; Iori, M.; Kochowski, C.; Neveu, M.; Azemoon, T.; Bartley, J. H.; Bullock, F. W.; Davis, D. H.; Jones, T. W.; Parker, M. A.; BEBC TST Neutrino Collaboration

    1981-06-01

    Charged-current neutrino interactions have been analysed in a sample of pictures from BEBC equipped with a TST. Using a method independent of both the neutrino flux and nuclear interaction corrections, the ratio R= σn/ σp has been measured. The result is R=1.98±0.19 for the ratio of total cross sections. Bjorken x distributions for proton and neutron targets and for u and d quarks are compared.

  8. Neutrino Physics at Fermilab

    ScienceCinema

    Saoulidou, Niki

    2010-01-08

    Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

  9. Super-PINGU for measurement of the leptonic CP-phase with atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaque, Soebur; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    We explore a possibility to measure the CP-violating phase δ using multimegaton scale ice or water Cherenkov detectors with low, (0.2-1) GeV, energy threshold assuming that the neutrino mass hierarchy is identified. We elaborate the relevant theoretical and phenomenological aspects of this possibility. The distributions of the ν μ (track) and ν e (cascade) events in the neutrino energy and zenith angle ( E ν - θ z ) plane have been computed for different values of δ. We study properties and distinguishability of the distributions before and after smearing over the neutrino energy and zenith angle. The CP-violation effects are not washed out by smearing, and furthermore, the sensitivity to δ increases with decrease of the energy threshold. The ν e events contribute to the CP-sensitivity as much as the ν μ events. While sensitivity of PINGU to δ is low, we find that future possible upgrade, Super-PINGU, with few megaton effective volume at (0 .5-1) GeV and e.g. after 4 years of exposure will be able to disentangle values of δ = π/2 , π, 3 π/2 from δ = 0 with "distinguishability" (˜ significance in σ's) S {/σ tot} = (3 - 8), (6 - 14), (3 - 8) correspondingly. Here the intervals of S σot are due to various uncertainties of detection of the low energy events, especially the flavor identification, systematics, etc. Super-PINGU can be used simultaneously for the proton decay searches.

  10. Measurement of the beta-neutrino correlation in laser trapped {sup 21}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Scielzo, Nicholas David

    2003-06-01

    Trapped radioactive atoms are an appealing source for precise measurements of the beta-neutrino correlation coefficient, a, since the momentum of the neutrino can be inferred from the detection of the unperturbed low-energy recoil daughter nucleus. Sodium-21 is produced on-line at the 88'' cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and 8e5 atoms have been maintained in a magneto-optical trap. A static electric field draws daughter Neon-21 ions to a microchannel plate detector and betas are detected in coincidence with a plastic scintillator beta detector. The Neon-21 time-of-flight distribution determines the beta neutrino correlation coefficient, a. The resulting charge-state distribution is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation which suggests a small but important contribution from nuclear recoil-induced ionization. A larger than expected fraction of the daughters are detected in positive charge-states, but no dependence on either the beta or recoil nucleus energy was observed. We find a = 0.5243 plus or minus 0.0092, which is in 3.6 sigma disagreement with the Standard Model prediction of a = 0.559 plus or minus 0.003. Aside from a deviation from the Standard Model, a possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the branching ratio to the first excited state is in error.

  11. Measurement of the Antineutrino Double-Differential Charged-Current Quasi-Elastic Scattering Cross Section at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments, such as DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, hope to measure charge-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector. In order to do this, they must dramatically reduce their current levels of uncertainty, particularly those due to neutrino-nucleus interaction models. As CP violation is a measure of the difference between the oscillation properties of neutrinos and antineutrinos, data about how the less-studied antineutrinos interact is especially valuable. We present the MINERvA experiment's first double-differential scattering cross sections for antineutrinos on scintillator, in the few-GeV range relevant to experiments such as DUNE and NOvA. We also present total antineutrino-scintillator quasi-elastic cross sections as a function of energy, which we compare to measurements from previous experiments. As well as being useful to help reduce oscillation experiments' uncertainty, our data can also be used to study the prevalence of various cor relation and final-state interaction effects within the nucleus. We compare to models produced by different model generators, and are able to draw first conclusions about the predictions of these models.

  12. Ocean Raman Scattering in Satellite Backscatter UV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Joiner, Joanna; Gleason, James; Bhartia, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ocean Raman scattering significantly contributes to the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines measured by satellite backscatter ultraviolet (buy) instruments in the cloudless atmosphere over clear ocean waters. A model accounting for this effect in buy measurements is developed and compared with observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GONE). The model extends existing models for ocean Raman scattering to the UV spectral range. Ocean Raman scattering radiance is propagated through the atmosphere using a concept of the Lambert equivalent reflectively and an accurate radiative transfer model for Rayleigh scattering. The model and observations can be used to evaluate laboratory measurements of pure water absorption in the UV. The good agreement between model and observations suggests that buy instruments may be useful for estimating chlorophyll content.

  13. Measurement and simulation of scattering properties of dysprosium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yijun; Burdick, Nathaniel; Lev, Benjamin; Sykesy, Andrew; Bohn, John

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold collisions can often be characterized by a single parameter, the s-wave scattering length a, but despite the simplicity of this model, the scattering length a often must be determined experimentally, even for alkali atoms. For highly magnetic lanthanide atoms such as dysprosium (Dy, 10 μB), the dipolar interaction may strongly affect the scattering properties and must also be taken into account. We have characterized the elastic cross-section for scattering between ultracold Dy atoms by measuring the rethermalization rate in a Dy clouds driven out of equilibrium. The experimental data agree well with numerical simulations based on Boltzmann equations that include the dipolar interaction contribution. Our recent work on observations of inelastic dipolar scattering will also be briefly discussed.

  14. From eV to EeV: Neutrino cross sections across energy scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formaggio, J. A.; Zeller, G. P.

    2012-07-01

    Since its original postulation by Wolfgang Pauli in 1930, the neutrino has played a prominent role in our understanding of nuclear and particle physics. In the intervening 80 years, scientists have detected and measured neutrinos from a variety of sources, both man made and natural. Underlying all of these observations, and any inferences we may have made from them, is an understanding of how neutrinos interact with matter. Knowledge of neutrino interaction cross sections is an important and necessary ingredient in any neutrino measurement. With the advent of new precision experiments, the demands on our understanding of neutrino interactions is becoming even greater. The purpose of this article is to survey our current knowledge of neutrino cross sections across all known energy scales: from the very lowest energies to the highest that we hope to observe. The article covers a wide range of neutrino interactions including coherent scattering, neutrino capture, inverse beta decay, low-energy nuclear interactions, quasielastic scattering, resonant pion production, kaon production, deep inelastic scattering, and ultrahigh energy interactions. Strong emphasis is placed on experimental data whenever such measurements are available.

  15. Precision Measurement of Delbrück Scattering via Laser Compton Scattered γ-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, J. K.; Hayakawa, T.

    2016-03-01

    Precision measurements such as the muon anomalous magnetic moment have indicated deviations from the standard model and have in turn prompted higher precision theoretical calculations. Delbrück scattering is the scattering of photons off the Coulomb field of nuclei via virtual electron-positron pairs and has been measured using γ-rays from radioactivities and following neutron capture reactions. However, because low flux γ-rays from nuclear transitions have been used in the low photon energy regime fairly large uncertainty exists in the data. In addition, due to the complexity and time consuming nature of the theoretical calculation the scattering cross sections are obtained from tables with interpolation between the tabular values. In recent years high flux γ-ray sources via laser Compton scattering (LCS) using energy-recovery linacs have been proposed. These sources allow measuring the Delbrück scattering with high precision. We will present our own independent calculations for the scattering cross section and show what precision can be obtained using the new LCS γ-ray sources in the low photon energy regime.

  16. The Retrieval of Ozone Profiles from Limb Scatter Measurements: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flittner, D. E.; Herman, B. M.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R. D.; Hilsenrath, E.

    1999-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for retrieving vertical profiles of O3 concentration using measurements of UV and visible light scattered from the limb of the atmosphere. The UV measurements provide information about the O3 profile in the upper and middle stratosphere, while only visible wavelengths are capable of probing the lower stratospheric O3 profile. Sensitivity to the underlying scene reflectance is greatly reduced by normalizing measurements at a tangent height high in the atmosphere (approximately 55 km), and relating measurements taken at lower altitudes to this normalization point. To decrease the effect of scattering by thin aerosols/clouds that may be present in the field of view, these normalized measurements are then combined by pairing wavelengths with strong and weak O3 absorption. We conclude that limb scatter can be used to measure O3 between 15 km and 50 km with 2-3 km vertical resolution and better than 10% accuracy.

  17. Emergence of a measurement basis in atom-photon scattering.

    PubMed

    Glickman, Yinnon; Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-03-01

    After measurement, a wave-function is postulated to collapse on a predetermined set of states--the measurement basis. Using quantum process tomography, we show how a measurement basis emerges in the evolution of the electronic spin of a single trapped atomic ion after spontaneous photon scattering and detection. This basis is determined by the excitation laser polarization and the direction along which the photon was detected. Quantum tomography of the combined spin-photon state reveals that although photon scattering entangles all superpositions of the measurement-basis states with the scattered photon polarization, the measurement-basis states themselves remain classically correlated with it. Our findings shed light on the process of quantum measurement in atom-photon interactions. PMID:23471403

  18. An Experimental Program in Neutrinos, Nucleon Decay and Astroparticle Physics Enabled by the Fermilab Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwan, Milind; Elbnf Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A Letter of Intent has been submitted by a new International Team to pursue an accelerator-based long-baseline neutrino experiment, as well as neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay, with an approximately 40-kt (fiducial) modular liquid argon TPC (LAr-TPC) detector located deep underground and a high-resolution near detector. Several independent worldwide efforts, developed through years of detailed studies, are converging around the opportunity provided by the megawatt neutrino beam facility planned at Fermilab and by the new significant expansion with improved access at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, 1,300 km from Fermilab. The principle goals of this experiment are: a comprehensive investigation of neutrino oscillations to test CP violation in the lepton sector, determine the ordering of the neutrino masses, and test the three-neutrino paradigm; to perform a broad set of neutrino scattering measurements with the near detector; and to exploit the large, high-resolution, underground far detector for non-accelerator physics topics including atmospheric neutrino measurements, searches for nucleon decay, and measurement of astrophysical neutrinos especially those from a core-collapse supernova.

  19. On the measurement of in situ antenna radiation parameters from scattering measurements using a general scattering parametric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Enrique Alberto

    The new concept of antenna radiation center (ARC) is introduced and an empirical method to measure it from complex scattering data is presented. This concept is different from the well-known antenna phase center utilized in reflector antenna applications. A novel and efficient procedure based on a General Parametric Scattering Model (GSPM) is utilized to extract in-situ antenna radiation properties from complex antenna scattering data. This model based measurement approach has the advantage that it only requires two swept frequency scattering measurements in order to obtain antenna RCS, antenna gain and antenna radiation center in its integrated operational environment. The GSPM structure required to accurately extract arbitrary target scattering data is developed based on basic electromagnetic principles. The mathematical model structure consists of an early time response based on a point scattering model and on a late time response based on the Singularity Expansion Method (SEM). Both of these methods are implemented to take into account the target dispersion in a general fashion. Robust signal processing algorithms are utilized to extract the model parameters by exploiting the model symmetry properties in the time and frequency domains. In particular, super-resolution algorithms such as ESPRIT and MUSIC are utilized to extract scattering center location and resonance frequency information, while Least Squares techniques are used to estimate the different model amplitude coefficients as a function of time or frequency in an optimal (i.e. mean square sense) fashion. Theoretical derivations are provided to demonstrate that the GSPM can be utilized to extract antenna gain and radiation center information from scattering data. Synthetic and measured antenna scattering data are utilized to demonstrate the GSPM superior gain and radiation center results over traditional Fourier techniques. Gain transfer measurements results are also compared to the GSPM derived gain

  20. First Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in NOvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Ader, C.; Andrews, M.; Anfimov, N.; Anghel, I.; Arms, K.; Arrieta-Diaz, E.; Aurisano, A.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Baird, M.; Bambah, B. A.; Bays, K.; Bernstein, R.; Betancourt, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bian, J.; Biery, K.; Blackburn, T.; Bocean, V.; Bogert, D.; Bolshakova, A.; Bowden, M.; Bower, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bromberg, C.; Brunetti, G.; Bu, X.; Butkevich, A.; Capista, D.; Catano-Mur, E.; Chase, T. R.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Chowdhury, B.; Coan, T. E.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Colo, M.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Cunningham, A.; Davies, G. S.; Davies, J. P.; Del Tutto, M.; Derwent, P. F.; Deepthi, K. N.; Demuth, D.; Desai, S.; Deuerling, G.; Devan, A.; Dey, J.; Dharmapalan, R.; Ding, P.; Dixon, S.; Djurcic, Z.; Dukes, E. C.; Duyang, H.; Ehrlich, R.; Feldman, G. J.; Felt, N.; Fenyves, E. J.; Flumerfelt, E.; Foulkes, S.; Frank, M. J.; Freeman, W.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Gebhard, M.; Ghosh, T.; Gilbert, W.; Giri, A.; Goadhouse, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodenough, L.; Goodman, M. C.; Grichine, V.; Grossman, N.; Group, R.; Grudzinski, J.; Guarino, V.; Guo, B.; Habig, A.; Handler, T.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Heller, K.; Howcroft, C.; Huang, J.; Huang, X.; Hylen, J.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jediny, F.; Jensen, C.; Jensen, D.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kafka, G. K.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kasetti, S.; Kephart, K.; Koizumi, G.; Kotelnikov, S.; Kourbanis, I.; Krahn, Z.; Kravtsov, V.; Kreymer, A.; Kulenberg, Ch.; Kumar, A.; Kutnink, T.; Kwarciancy, R.; Kwong, J.; Lang, K.; Lee, A.; Lee, W. M.; Lee, K.; Lein, S.; Liu, J.; Lokajicek, M.; Lozier, J.; Lu, Q.; Lucas, P.; Luchuk, S.; Lukens, P.; Lukhanin, G.; Magill, S.; Maan, K.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Martens, M.; Martincik, J.; Mason, P.; Matera, K.; Mathis, M.; Matveev, V.; Mayer, N.; McCluskey, E.; Mehdiyev, R.; Merritt, H.; Messier, M. D.; Meyer, H.; Miao, T.; Michael, D.; Mikheyev, S. P.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mohanta, R.; Moren, A.; Mualem, L.; Muether, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Newman, H. B.; Nelson, J. K.; Niner, E.; Norman, A.; Nowak, J.; Oksuzian, Y.; Olshevskiy, A.; Oliver, J.; Olson, T.; Paley, J.; Pandey, P.; Para, A.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Pearson, N.; Perevalov, D.; Pershey, D.; Peterson, E.; Petti, R.; Phan-Budd, S.; Piccoli, L.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poling, R.; Potukuchi, B.; Psihas, F.; Pushka, D.; Qiu, X.; Raddatz, N.; Radovic, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Ray, R.; Rebel, B.; Rechenmacher, R.; Reed, B.; Reilly, R.; Rocco, D.; Rodkin, D.; Ruddick, K.; Rusack, R.; Ryabov, V.; Sachdev, K.; Sahijpal, S.; Sahoo, H.; Samoylov, O.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Schlabach, P.; Schneps, J.; Schroeter, R.; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J.; Shanahan, P.; Sherwood, B.; Sheshukov, A.; Singh, J.; Singh, V.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Smolik, J.; Solomey, N.; Sotnikov, A.; Sousa, A.; Soustruznik, K.; Stenkin, Y.; Strait, M.; Suter, L.; Talaga, R. L.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tariq, S.; Tas, P.; Tesarek, R. J.; Thayyullathil, R. B.; Thomsen, K.; Tian, X.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Trevor, J.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Valerio, L.; Vinton, L.; Vrba, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Wang, B.; Wang, Z.; Weber, A.; Wehmann, A.; Whittington, D.; Wilcer, N.; Wildberger, R.; Wildman, D.; Williams, K.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wood, K.; Xiao, M.; Xin, T.; Yadav, N.; Yang, S.; Zadorozhnyy, S.; Zalesak, J.; Zamorano, B.; Zhao, A.; Zirnstein, J.; Zwaska, R.; NOvA Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We report results from the first search for νμ→νe transitions by the NOvA experiment. In an exposure equivalent to 2.74 ×1020 protons on target in the upgraded NuMI beam at Fermilab, we observe 6 events in the Far Detector, compared to a background expectation of 0.99 ±0.11 (syst) events based on the Near Detector measurement. A secondary analysis observes 11 events with a background of 1.07 ±0.14 (syst) . The 3.3 σ excess of events observed in the primary analysis disfavors 0.1 π <δC P<0.5 π in the inverted mass hierarchy at the 90% C.L.

  1. First Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in NOvA.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Ader, C; Andrews, M; Anfimov, N; Anghel, I; Arms, K; Arrieta-Diaz, E; Aurisano, A; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Baird, M; Bambah, B A; Bays, K; Bernstein, R; Betancourt, M; Bhatnagar, V; Bhuyan, B; Bian, J; Biery, K; Blackburn, T; Bocean, V; Bogert, D; Bolshakova, A; Bowden, M; Bower, C; Broemmelsiek, D; Bromberg, C; Brunetti, G; Bu, X; Butkevich, A; Capista, D; Catano-Mur, E; Chase, T R; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Chowdhury, B; Coan, T E; Coelho, J A B; Colo, M; Cooper, J; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cunningham, A; Davies, G S; Davies, J P; Del Tutto, M; Derwent, P F; Deepthi, K N; Demuth, D; Desai, S; Deuerling, G; Devan, A; Dey, J; Dharmapalan, R; Ding, P; Dixon, S; Djurcic, Z; Dukes, E C; Duyang, H; Ehrlich, R; Feldman, G J; Felt, N; Fenyves, E J; Flumerfelt, E; Foulkes, S; Frank, M J; Freeman, W; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Gebhard, M; Ghosh, T; Gilbert, W; Giri, A; Goadhouse, S; Gomes, R A; Goodenough, L; Goodman, M C; Grichine, V; Grossman, N; Group, R; Grudzinski, J; Guarino, V; Guo, B; Habig, A; Handler, T; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Hatzikoutelis, A; Heller, K; Howcroft, C; Huang, J; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Ishitsuka, M; Jediny, F; Jensen, C; Jensen, D; Johnson, C; Jostlein, H; Kafka, G K; Kamyshkov, Y; Kasahara, S M S; Kasetti, S; Kephart, K; Koizumi, G; Kotelnikov, S; Kourbanis, I; Krahn, Z; Kravtsov, V; Kreymer, A; Kulenberg, Ch; Kumar, A; Kutnink, T; Kwarciancy, R; Kwong, J; Lang, K; Lee, A; Lee, W M; Lee, K; Lein, S; Liu, J; Lokajicek, M; Lozier, J; Lu, Q; Lucas, P; Luchuk, S; Lukens, P; Lukhanin, G; Magill, S; Maan, K; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Martens, M; Martincik, J; Mason, P; Matera, K; Mathis, M; Matveev, V; Mayer, N; McCluskey, E; Mehdiyev, R; Merritt, H; Messier, M D; Meyer, H; Miao, T; Michael, D; Mikheyev, S P; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mohanta, R; Moren, A; Mualem, L; Muether, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Newman, H B; Nelson, J K; Niner, E; Norman, A; Nowak, J; Oksuzian, Y; Olshevskiy, A; Oliver, J; Olson, T; Paley, J; Pandey, P; Para, A; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pearson, N; Perevalov, D; Pershey, D; Peterson, E; Petti, R; Phan-Budd, S; Piccoli, L; Pla-Dalmau, A; Plunkett, R K; Poling, R; Potukuchi, B; Psihas, F; Pushka, D; Qiu, X; Raddatz, N; Radovic, A; Rameika, R A; Ray, R; Rebel, B; Rechenmacher, R; Reed, B; Reilly, R; Rocco, D; Rodkin, D; Ruddick, K; Rusack, R; Ryabov, V; Sachdev, K; Sahijpal, S; Sahoo, H; Samoylov, O; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schlabach, P; Schneps, J; Schroeter, R; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J; Shanahan, P; Sherwood, B; Sheshukov, A; Singh, J; Singh, V; Smith, A; Smith, D; Smolik, J; Solomey, N; Sotnikov, A; Sousa, A; Soustruznik, K; Stenkin, Y; Strait, M; Suter, L; Talaga, R L; Tamsett, M C; Tariq, S; Tas, P; Tesarek, R J; Thayyullathil, R B; Thomsen, K; Tian, X; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Trevor, J; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Valerio, L; Vinton, L; Vrba, T; Waldron, A V; Wang, B; Wang, Z; Weber, A; Wehmann, A; Whittington, D; Wilcer, N; Wildberger, R; Wildman, D; Williams, K; Wojcicki, S G; Wood, K; Xiao, M; Xin, T; Yadav, N; Yang, S; Zadorozhnyy, S; Zalesak, J; Zamorano, B; Zhao, A; Zirnstein, J; Zwaska, R

    2016-04-15

    We report results from the first search for ν_{μ}→ν_{e} transitions by the NOvA experiment. In an exposure equivalent to 2.74×10^{20} protons on target in the upgraded NuMI beam at Fermilab, we observe 6 events in the Far Detector, compared to a background expectation of 0.99±0.11(syst) events based on the Near Detector measurement. A secondary analysis observes 11 events with a background of 1.07±0.14(syst). The 3.3σ excess of events observed in the primary analysis disfavors 0.1π<δ_{CP}<0.5π in the inverted mass hierarchy at the 90% C.L. PMID:27127961

  2. Scattering Anisotropy Measurements in Dental Tissues and Biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Perez, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the behaviour of light propagation in biological materials is essential for biomedical engineering and applications, and even more so when dealing with incoming biomaterials. Many methods for determining optical parameters from biological media assume that scattered light is isotropically distributed over all angles. However, an angular dependence of light scattering may exist and affect the optical behaviour of biological media. The present work seeks to experimentally analyze the scattering anisotropy in different dental tissues (enamel and dentine) and their potential substitute biomaterials (hybrid dental-resin, nano-filled composite, and zirconia ceramic) and comparatively study them. Goniometric measurements were made for four wavelengths in the visible range, allowing a spectral characterization of the materials studied. Previously, for each material, measurements were made with two different sample thicknesses at the same wavelength, checking the behaviour of the angular scattering profile. The asymmetry of experimental phase functions was considered in the recovery of the scattering anisotropy factor. The results demonstrate that the thicker sample yielded a less forward-directed scattering profile than did the thinner sample. The biomaterials analysed show angular scattering comparable to those of the tissues that they may replace. Comparisons can be made by virtue of the low uncertainties found.

  3. A Lead Astronomical Neutrino Detector: LAND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, C. K.; Batkin, I.; Sundaresan, M. K.; Dubeau, J.

    1996-08-01

    The development of a sensitive detector for neutrinos of astronomical origin (simply called astronomical neutrinos hereafter) would make possible detailed investigation of supernovae (SN) and open the way for the discovery of new astronomical phenomena. The neutrino weak interaction cross section at energies less than 100 MeV increases with Z due to correlated nucleon effects and the nuclear Coulomb factor (Fermi function). Therefore neutrino detection based on high Z materials will give the largest possible cross sections and best possible neutrino detection efficiency. This physics argument motivated us to study lead as a detector of SN. The neutrino cross section for neutron production on lead through the reaction Pb(νe,μ,τ, ln)X is ≈ 10-40 cm2, for energies up to 50 MeV, where X refers to Pb, Bi or Tl, the product nuclei of the reactions, l refers to the scattered lepton, and n refers to neutrons. Neutron production will occur for all types of neutrinos and the neutrons can be detected easily and efficiently. The detector is uniquely sensitive to all neutrinos but #x003BD;e. We show that a SN at the centre of the galaxy produces about 1000 neutrons in a 1 kiloton detector. This large number will make it possible to measure the mass of νμ and ντ neutrinos between 10 and 100 eV with a precision of 10 eV. Further, we describe a possible detector in which one also detects the associated electromagnetic energy in coincidence with the neutrons. The coincidence makes this detector essentially background free. It is possible to expand such a detector to a size which will reach SN well beyond our galaxy. We calculate the ν-Pb cross section, discuss the design, neutrino mass resolution, neutron detection efficiency and signal to noise ratio aspects of these detectors.

  4. The new experiment WAGASCI for water to hydrocarbon neutrino cross section measurement using the J-PARC beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsiannikova, T.; Antonova, M.; Bronner, C.; Blondel, A.; Bonnemaison, A.; Cornat, R.; Cadoux, F.; Chikuma, N.; Cao, S.; Drapier, O.; Izmaylov, A.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ferreira, O.; Favre, Y.; Gastaldi, F.; Gonin, M.; Hayashino, T.; Hosomi, F.; Hayato, Y.; Koga, T.; Kondo, K.; Kin, K.; Kudenko, Y.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Minamino, A.; Mueller, Th A.; Mefodiev, A.; Mineev, O.; Nakamura, K.; Nakaya, T.; Noah, E.; Patel, N.; Quilain, B.; Rayner, M.; Seiya, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Yershov, N.; Yamamoto, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Yokoyama, M.

    2016-02-01

    The T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to study various parameters that rule neutrino oscillations, with an intense beam of muon neutrinos. A near detector complex (ND280) is used to constrain non-oscillated flux and hence to predict the expected number of events in the far detector (Super-Kamiokande). The difference in the target material between the far (water) and near (scintillator, hydrocarbon) detectors leads to the main non-canceling systematic uncertainty for the oscillation analysis. In order to reduce this uncertainty a new water grid and scintillator detector, WAGASCI, has been proposed. The detector will be operated at the J-PARC neutrino beam line with the main physics goal to measure the charged current neutrino cross section ratio between water and hydrocarbon with a few percent accuracy. Further physics program may include high-precision measurements of different charged current neutrino interaction channels. The concept of the new detector will be covered together with the actual construction plan.

  5. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-04-11

    In this study, a time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  6. Method for measuring multiple scattering corrections between liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, J. M.; Glenn, A. M.; Keefer, G. J.; Wurtz, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    A time-of-flight method is proposed to experimentally quantify the fractions of neutrons scattering between scintillators. An array of scintillators is characterized in terms of crosstalk with this method by measuring a californium source, for different neutron energy thresholds. The spectral information recorded by the scintillators can be used to estimate the fractions of neutrons multiple scattering. With the help of a correction to Feynman's point model theory to account for multiple scattering, these fractions can in turn improve the mass reconstruction of fissile materials under investigation.

  7. Rotational Raman scattering (Ring effect) in satellite backscatter ultraviolet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; Joiner, Joanna; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; McPeters, Richard D.; Park, Hongwoo

    1995-07-01

    A detailed radiative transfer calculation has been carried out to estimate the effects of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) on satellite measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation. Raman-scattered light is shifted in frequency from the incident light, which causes filling in of solar Fraunhofer lines in the observed backscattered spectrum (also known as the Ring effect). The magnitude of the rotational Raman scattering filling in is a function of wavelength, solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, surface pressure, and instrument spectral resolution. The filling in predicted by our model is found to be in agreement with observations from the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer and the Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer.

  8. Neutrinos help reconcile Planck measurements with both the early and local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorkin, Cora; Wyman, Mark; Rudd, Douglas H.; Hu, Wayne

    2014-10-01

    In light of the recent BICEP2 B-mode polarization detection, which implies a large inflationary tensor-to-scalar ratio r0.05=0.2-0.05+0.07, we re-examine the evidence for an extra sterile massive neutrino, originally invoked to account for the tension between the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature power spectrum and local measurements of the expansion rate H0 and cosmological structure. With only the standard active neutrinos and power-law scalar spectra, this detection is in tension with the upper limit of r<0.11 (95% confidence) from the lack of a corresponding low multipole excess in the temperature anisotropy from gravitational waves. An extra sterile species with the same energy density as is needed to reconcile the CMB data with H0 measurements can also alleviate this new tension. By combining data from the Planck and ACT/SPT temperature spectra, WMAP9 polarization, H0, baryon acoustic oscillation and local cluster abundance measurements with BICEP2 data, we find the joint evidence for a sterile massive neutrino increases to ΔNeff=0.98±0.26 for the effective number and ms=0.52±0.13 eV for the effective mass, or 3.8σ and 4σ evidence, respectively. We caution the reader that these results correspond to a joint statistical evidence and, in addition, astrophysical systematic errors in the clusters and H0 measurements, and small-scale CMB data could weaken our conclusions.

  9. Multiple-Point Mass Flux Measurement System Using Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-point Rayleigh scattering diagnostic is being developed to provide mass flux measurements in gas flows. Spectroscopic Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic that has the ability to provide simultaneous density, temperature, and velocity measurements. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 18 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is directly imaged through a solid Fabry-Perot etalon onto a CCD detector which permits spectral analysis of the light. The spatial resolution of the measurements is governed by the locations of interference fringes, which can be changed by altering the etalon characteristics. A prototype system has been used to acquire data in a Mach 0.56 flow to demonstrate feasibility of using this system to provide mass flux measurements. Estimates of measurement uncertainty and recommendations for system improvements are presented

  10. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Measurement of Velocity and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for measuring dynamic gas velocity and temperature is described. The technique is based on molecular Rayleigh scattering of laser light, so no seeding of the flow is necessary. The Rayleigh scattered light is filtered with a fixed cavity, planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. A minimum number of photodetectors were used in order to allow the high data acquisition rate needed for dynamic measurements. One photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used to measure the total Rayleigh scattering, which is proportional to the gas density. Two additional PMTs were used to detect light that passes through two apertures in a mask located in the interferometer fringe plane. An uncertainty analysis was used to select the optimum aperture parameters and to predict the measurement uncertainty due to photon shot-noise. Results of an experiment to measure the velocity of a subsonic free jet are presented.

  11. Direct Neutrino Mass Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanDevender, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Neutrino flavor oscillation experiments have demonstrated that the three Standard Model neutrino flavor eigenstates are mixed with three mass eigenstates whose mass eigenvalues are nondegenerate. The oscillation experiments measure the differences between the squares of the mass eigenvalues but tell us nothing about their absolute values. The unknown absolute neutrino mass scale has important implications in particle physics and cosmology. Beta decay endpoint measurements are presented as a model-independent method to measure the absolute neutrino mass. The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino Experiment (KATRIN) is explored in detail.

  12. Measuring and quantifying scatter from non-isotropic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, John C.

    2015-08-01

    The usual definition for BRDF assumes that the illuminated surface is isotropic. This is why when the primary source of scatter is a surface pit or particle the differential scattering cross-section is used to quantify scatter. In these cases the DSC is independent of changes in illumination spot size and thus is a more meaningful characterization than the measured BRDF. The same thing is true for other situations. These include scatter from isolated scratches, non-isotropic roughness (such as a rolled surface) and scatter from the edge or corner of a surface. In these situations the measurements may be done differently and the quantified scatter often has different units - such as area/sr or 1/deg instead of the common 1/sr associated with BRDF. If the data is being taken for use in one of the stray radiation codes this can cause problems because those codes require BRDF as an input. This paper reviews these situations for both measurement and analysis issues.

  13. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  14. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  15. Paper area density measurement from forward transmitted scattered light

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.

    2001-01-01

    A method whereby the average paper fiber area density (weight per unit area) can be directly calculated from the intensity of transmitted, scattered light at two different wavelengths, one being a non-absorpted wavelength. Also, the method makes it possible to derive the water percentage per fiber area density from a two-wavelength measurement. In the optical measuring technique optical transmitted intensity, for example, at 2.1 microns cellulose absorption line is measured and compared with another scattered, optical transmitted intensity reference in the nearby spectrum region, such as 1.68 microns, where there is no absorption. From the ratio of these two intensities, one can calculate the scattering absorption coefficient at 2.1 microns. This absorption coefficient at this wavelength is, then, experimentally correlated to the paper fiber area density. The water percentage per fiber area density can be derived from this two-wavelength measurement approach.

  16. Using neutrinos as a probe of the strong interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Neutrino scattering experiments have been studying QCD for over 30 years. From the Gargamelle experiments in the early 70's, through the subsequent bubble chamber and electronic detector experiments in the 80's and 90's, neutrino scattering experiments have steadily accumulated increasing statistics and minimized their systematic errors. While the most recent study of QCD with neutrinos is from the TeVatron neutrino beam (the NuTeV experiment with results presented by Martin Tzanov at this Workshop), near-future studies will shift to the Main Injector based NuMI facility also at Fermilab. The NuMI Facility at Fermilab provides an extremely intense beam of neutrinos making it an ideal place for high statistics (anti)neutrino-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiments. The MINERvA experiment at Fermilab is a collaboration of elementary-particle and nuclear physicists planning to use a fully active fine-grained solid scintillator detector to measure absolute exclusive cross-sections and nuclear effects in v - A interactions as well as a systematic study of the resonance-DIS transition region and DIS with an emphasis on the extraction of high-xBj parton distribution functions. Further in the future an intense proton source, the Fermilab Proton Driver, will increase neutrino interaction rates by a further factor of 5-20.

  17. Determination of |Vub| from measurements of the electron and neutrino momenta in inclusive semileptonic B decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-09-01

    We present a determination of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| based on the analysis of semileptonic B decays from a sample of 88 x 10(6) Gamma(4S) decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Charmless semileptonic B decays are selected using measurements of the electron energy and the invariant mass squared of the electron-neutrino pair. We obtain |Vub| =(3.95 +/- 0.26(+0.58)(-0.42) +/- 0.25) x 10(-3), where the errors represent experimental uncertainties, heavy quark parameter uncertainties, and theoretical uncertainties, respectively. PMID:16196998

  18. Neutrino and Antineutrino Cross sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; /Alabama U.

    2011-10-01

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH2). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  19. Scattering volume in the collective Thomson scattering measurement using high power gyrotron in the LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, S.; Nishiura, M.; Tanaka, K.; Moseev, D.; Ogasawara, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Makino, R.

    2016-06-01

    High-power gyrotrons prepared for the electron cyclotron heating at 77 GHz has been used for a collective Thomson scattering (CTS) study in LHD. Due to the difficulty in removing fundamental and/or second harmonic resonance in the viewing line of sight, the subtraction of the background ECE from measured signal was performed by modulating the probe beam power from a gyrotron. The separation of the scattering component from the background has been performed successfully taking into account the response time difference between both high-energy and bulk components. The other separation was attempted by fast scanning the viewing beam across the probing beam. It is found that the intensity of the scattered spectrum corresponding to the bulk and high energy components were almost proportional to the calculated scattering volume in the relatively low density region, while appreciable background scattered component remains even in the off volume in some high density cases. The ray-trace code TRAVIS is used to estimate the change in the scattering volume due to probing and receiving beam deflection effect.

  20. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the T2K Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongjirad, Taritree Michael

    We describe the measurement of muon neutrino disappearance due to neutrino oscillation using the Tokai-2-Kamiokande (T2K) experiment's Run 1--4 (6.57 x 1020 POT) data set. We analyze the data using the conventional Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata (PMNS) mixing matrix for the three Standard Model neutrinos. The output of the analysis is a measurement of the parameters sin2theta23, Delta m232 for the normal hierarchy and sin2theta23, Deltam 213 for the inverted hierarchy. The best-fit oscillation parameters for the normal hierarchy are found to be. (sin2theta23, Deltam 232) = (0.514, 2.51 x 10-3 eV 2/c4). The 90% 1D confidence interval---determined for both parameters using the Feldman-Cousins procedure---is for the normal hierarchy. 0.428 < sin2theta23 < 0.598 and. 2.34 x 10-3 eV2/c4 < Deltam232 < 2.68 x 10-3 eV2/c4. For the inverted hierarchy, the best-fit oscillation parameters are. (sin2theta23, Deltam 213) = (0.511, 2.48 x 10-3 eV2/c4. The 90% 1D Feldman-Cousins confidence intervals for the inverted hierarchy are. 2.31 x 10-3 eV2/c4 < Deltam213 < 2.64 x 10-3 eV2/c4.

  1. Concentration of hydrogen in titanium measured by neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen-Mayer, H.H.; Mildner, D.F.R.; Lamaze, G.P.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Paul, R.L.; Kvardakov, V.V.; Richards, W.J.

    1998-12-31

    Mass fractions of hydrogen in titanium matrices have been measured using neutron incoherent scattering (NIS) and compared with results from prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA). Qualitatively, NIS is a more efficient technique than PGAA which involves neutron absorption, and the former may be suitable for on-line analysis. However, for NIS the scattering contribution comes from both the hydrogen and the matrix, whereas prompt gamma emission has minimal matrix effect. To isolate the signal due to hydrogen scattering, a set of polypropylene films is used to simulate the increasing amount of hydrogen, and the scattered intensity is monitored. From this response, an unknown amount of the hydrogen can be deduced empirically. The authors have further attempted a first principle calculation of the intensity of the scattered signal from the experimental systems, and have obtained good agreement between calculation and the measurements. The study can be used as a reference for future applications of the scattering method to other hydrogen-in-metal systems.

  2. Scattering photoacoustic method in measurement of weakly absorbing turbid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zuomin; Törmänen, Matti; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-08-01

    Conventional photoacoustic techniques in composition determination and biomedical diagnose and imaging are based on the optical absorption in target substance or objects from which the photons to be scattered are not concerned. It is obvious that the intensities of scattered lights closely relate to the property of the interrogated substance, therefore measuring the signals produced by them can give rise to more information of the substance. Based on this idea, a novel method entitled scattering photoacoustic (SPA) method is put forward to study weak absorption suspensions with highly scattering. In this method, a near infrared pulse laser irradiates the studied object which contacts with external absorbers, resulting the generation of a few photoacoustic signals; one is produced in the studied object as conventional case, others are in external absorbers which are produced by the scattered photons. All these signals are successively received by a piezoelectric detector with short damping period. Analyzing these signals is capable of determining reduced scattered coefficient and absorption coefficient, as well as acoustic attenuation of studied suspensions. Some measurement results in intralipid and fibre (paper pulp) suspensions are given rise to in the end.

  3. Measurement of neutrino and antineutrino oscillations using beam and atmospheric data in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Anghel, I; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mathis, M; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moed Sher, S; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; O'Connor, J; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2013-06-21

    We report measurements of oscillation parameters from ν(μ) and ν(μ) disappearance using beam and atmospheric data from MINOS. The data comprise exposures of 10.71×10(20) protons on target in the ν(μ)-dominated beam, 3.36×10(20) protons on target in the ν(μ)-enhanced beam, and 37.88 kton yr of atmospheric neutrinos. Assuming identical ν and ν oscillation parameters, we measure |Δm2| = (2.41(-0.10)(+0.09))×10(-3)  eV2 and sin2(2θ) = 0.950(-0.036)(+0.035). Allowing independent ν and ν oscillations, we measure antineutrino parameters of |Δm2| = (2.50(-0.25)(+0.23))×10(-3)  eV2 and sin2(2θ) = 0.97(-0.08)(+0.03), with minimal change to the neutrino parameters. PMID:23829728

  4. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Eisch, J.; Gladstone, L.; Grullon, S.; Halzen, F.; Hill, G. C.; Hoshina, K.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18 000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject misreconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain a sample of up-going muon neutrino events. Background contamination in the final event sample is less than 1%. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos up to 400 TeV, and is fundamental to understanding the impact of this neutrino background on astrophysical neutrino observations with IceCube. The measured spectrum is consistent with predictions for the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}+{nu}{mu}} flux.

  5. Measurements of Scattering and Absorption Changes in Muscle and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    1997-06-01

    Non-invasive techniques for the study of human brain function based on changes of the haemoglobin content or on changes of haemoglobin saturation have recently been proposed. Among the new methods, near-infrared transmission and reflection measurements may have significant advantages and complement well-established methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Near-infrared measurements can be very fast, comparable in speed to electrophysiological measurements, but are better localized. We will present the demonstration of measurements of millisecond signals due to brain activity in humans following stimulation of the visual cortex. However, major unresolved questions remain about the origin of the signals observed. Optical measurements on exposed cortex in animals show that both the absorption and the scattering coefficient are affected by neural activity. Model calculations show that the signals we detected may originate from rapid changes of the scattering coefficient in a region about 1 to 2 cm below the scalp. We discuss our measurement protocol, which is based on a frequency-domain instrument, and the algorithm to separate the absorption from the scattering contribution in the overall optical response. Our method produces excellent separation between scattering and absorption in relatively homogeneous masses such as large muscles. The extrapolation of our measurement protocol to a complex structure such as the human head is critically evaluated.

  6. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 about equals 1-eV2 region

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, David W.

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the Δm2 ~ 1 eV2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  7. Correlation measurements in Z→ τ+τ- and the τ neutrino helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Zimmermann, A.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; St. Denis, R.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kimfn, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Sau Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    Using data collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP correlations between the decay products of the τ + and τ - produced in the decay of the Z have been measured. The measurements performed in the decays τ→ πν and τ→ ϱν place limits on deviations from the Standard Model. These are given by the parameter ζ with ζ = -1 for the Standard Model. The measured values are ζπ = -0.95 ± 0.11 ± 0.05 and ζϱ = -1.03 ± 0.11 ± 0.05. For models which predict ζπ = ζϱ = ζ - interpreted as the average τ neutrino helicity - the measurement is ζ = -0.99 ± 0.07 ± 0.04.

  8. Transverse Beam Halo Measurements at High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) using Vibrating Wire Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Hanna, B.; Scarpine, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Steimel, J.; Artinian, S.; Arutunian, S.

    2015-02-26

    The measurement and control of beam halos will be critical for the applications of future high-intensity hadron linacs. In particular, beam profile monitors require a very high dynamic range when used for the transverse beam halo measurements. In this study, the Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM) with aperture 60 mm was installed at the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) front-end to measure the transverse beam halo. A vibrating wire is excited at its resonance frequency with the help of a magnetic feedback loop, and the vibrating and sensitive wires are connected through a balanced arm. The sensitive wire is moved into the beam halo region by a stepper motor controlled translational stage. We study the feasibility of the vibrating wire for the transverse beam halo measurements in the low-energy front-end of the proton linac.

  9. Determination of particle size using measurement of scatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Scatter from glass beads placed on a mirror was measured using a quartz lamp and laser. Data were obtained in the plane containing the normal to the surface and the incident beam. For the quartz lamp the best correlation can be obtained for data measured at a zenith of 55 deg and 180 deg from the incident beam. The best correlation when the laser is used is obtained at about the same position. However, the correlation variables are angular spacing of the minimums of the data versus the size. Whereas, with the quartz lamp the correlation variables are the amount of scattered energy versus size.

  10. Control of experimental uncertainties in filtered Rayleigh scattering measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forkey, Joseph N.; Finkelstein, N. D.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1995-01-01

    Filtered Rayleigh Scattering is a technique which allows for measurement of velocity, temperature, and pressure in unseeded flows, spatially resolved in 2-dimensions. We present an overview of the major components of a Filtered Rayleigh Scattering system. In particular, we develop and discuss a detailed theoretical model along with associated model parameters and related uncertainties. Based on this model, we then present experimental results for ambient room air and for a Mach 2 free jet, including spatially resolved measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure.

  11. A PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRINO MIXING ANGLE THETA (SUB 13) USING REACTOR ANTINEUTRINOS AT DAYA BAY.

    SciTech Connect

    KETTELL, S.; ET AL.

    2006-10-16

    This document describes the design of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. Recent discoveries in neutrino physics have shown that the Standard Model of particle physics is incomplete. The observation of neutrino oscillations has unequivocally demonstrated that the masses of neutrinos are nonzero. The smallness of the neutrino masses (<2 eV) and the two surprisingly large mixing angles measured have thus far provided important clues and constraints to extensions of the Standard Model. The third mixing angle, {delta}{sub 13}, is small and has not yet been determined; the current experimental bound is sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.17 at 90% confidence level (from Chooz) for {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. It is important to measure this angle to provide further insight on how to extend the Standard Model. A precision measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} using nuclear reactors has been recommended by the 2004 APS Multi-divisional Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics as well as a recent Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NUSAG) report. We propose to perform a precision measurement of this mixing angle by searching for the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from the nuclear reactor complex in Daya Bay, China. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will be vital in resolving the neutrino-mass hierarchy and future measurements of CP violation in the lepton sector because this technique cleanly separates {theta}{sub 13} from CP violation and effects of neutrino propagation in the earth. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will provide important, complementary information to that from long-baseline, accelerator-based experiments. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 0.01 or better in sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} at 90% confidence level.

  12. Measuring and quantifying scatter from a variety of sample types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, John C.

    2015-09-01

    When using the BRDF to learn about surface statistics or to estimate hemispherical scatter from in-plane measurements the assumption is usually made that the surface is isotropic. Unfortunately, this is often not the case; for example a diamond turned mirror is not isotropic. Other common examples are rolled surfaces and situations where scatter is mostly caused by small discrete surface features such as scratches, pits or particles. Another example is scatter from an extended edge that is much longer than the illuminated spot. In these situations the measurements may be made differently and quantified in different units (such as area/sr or 1/deg instead of the common 1/sr associated with BRDF) in order to have a result that can reliably characterize the scatter source. The situation is further complicated by the fact that the popular stray radiation codes accept scatter data only in the standardized BRDF format with units of 1/sr. This paper reviews these situations for both measurement and analysis issues.

  13. Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Eν˜3.5GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, L.; Chvojka, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Baldin, B.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradford, R.; Brooks, W. K.; Budd, H.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Castromonte, C. M.; Christy, M. E.; Chung, H.; Clark, M.; da Motta, H.; Damiani, D. S.; Danko, I.; Datta, M.; Day, M.; DeMaat, R.; Devan, J.; Draeger, E.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Edmondson, D. A.; Felix, J.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Gago, A. M.; Gallagher, H.; George, C. A.; Gielata, J. A.; Gingu, C.; Gobbi, B.; Gran, R.; Grossman, N.; Hanson, J.; Harris, D. A.; Heaton, J.; Higuera, A.; Howley, I. J.; Hurtado, K.; Jerkins, M.; Kafka, T.; Kaisen, J.; Kanter, M. O.; Keppel, C. E.; Kilmer, J.; Kordosky, M.; Krajeski, A. H.; Kulagin, S. A.; Le, T.; Lee, H.; Leister, A. G.; Locke, G.; Maggi, G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Ochoa, N.; O'Connor, C. D.; Olsen, J.; Osmanov, B.; Osta, J.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Peña, C.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rude, C.; Sassin, K. E.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Schneider, R. M.; Schulte, E. C.; Simon, C.; Snider, F. D.; Snyder, M. C.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tan, W.; Tice, B. G.; Tzanakos, G.; Velásquez, J. P.; Walding, J.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Wolthuis, B. A.; Woodward, N.; Zavala, G.; Zeng, H. B.; Zhang, D.; Zhu, L. Y.; Ziemer, B. P.

    2013-07-01

    We have isolated ν¯μ charged-current quasielastic (QE) interactions occurring in the segmented scintillator tracking region of the MINERvA detector running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross section, dσ/dQ2, and compare to several theoretical models of QE scattering. Good agreement is obtained with a model where the nucleon axial mass, MA, is set to 0.99GeV/c2 but the nucleon vector form factors are modified to account for the observed enhancement, relative to the free nucleon case, of the cross section for the exchange of transversely polarized photons in electron-nucleus scattering. Our data at higher Q2 favor this interpretation over an alternative in which the axial mass is increased.

  14. Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Quasielastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Eν~3.5 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fields, L.; Chvojka, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Baldin, B.; Baumbaugh, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradford, R.; et al

    2013-07-11

    We have isolated ν¯μ charged-current quasielastic (QE) interactions occurring in the segmented scintillator tracking region of the MINERvA detector running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross section, dσ/dQ², and compare to several theoretical models of QE scattering. Good agreement is obtained with a model where the nucleon axial mass, MA, is set to 0.99 GeV/c² but the nucleon vector form factors are modified to account for the observed enhancement, relative to the free nucleon case, of the cross section for the exchange of transversely polarized photons in electron-nucleus scattering. Our data at highermore » Q² favor this interpretation over an alternative in which the axial mass is increased.« less

  15. Earth Radioactivity Measurements with a Deep Ocean Anti-neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S. T.; Guillian, E.; Learned, J. G.; Maricic, J.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Varner, G.; Wilcox, M.

    2006-12-01

    We consider the detector size, location, depth, background, and radio-purity required of a mid-Pacific deep-ocean instrument to accomplish the twin goals of making a definitive measurement of the electron anti-neutrino flux due to uranium and thorium decays from Earth’s mantle and core, and of testing the hypothesis for a natural nuclear reactor at the core of Earth. We take the experience with the KamLAND detector in Japan as our baseline for sensitivity and background estimates. We conclude that an instrument adequate to accomplish these tasks should have an exposure of at least 10 kilotonne-years (kT-y), should be placed at least at 4 km depth, may be located close to the Hawaiian Islands (no significant background from them), and should aim for KamLAND radio-purity levels, except for radon where it should be improved by a factor of at least 100. With an exposure of 10 kT-y we should achieve a 25% measurement of the flux of U/Th neutrinos from the mantle plus core. Exposure at multiple ocean locations for testing lateral heterogeneity is possible.

  16. Measurement of the neutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section on mineral oil at E{sub {nu}{approx}1} GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Cao, J.; Anderson, C. E.; Curioni, A.; Fleming, B. T.; Linden, S. K.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Bazarko, A. O.; Laird, E. M.; Meyers, P. D.; Patterson, R. B.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Tanaka, H. A.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Kasper, P.

    2010-11-01

    We report a measurement of the flux-averaged neutral-current elastic differential cross section for neutrinos scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}) as a function of four-momentum transferred squared, Q{sup 2}. It is obtained by measuring the kinematics of recoiling nucleons with kinetic energy greater than 50 MeV which are readily detected in MiniBooNE. This differential cross-section distribution is fit with fixed nucleon form factors apart from an axial mass M{sub A} that provides a best fit for M{sub A}=1.39{+-}0.11 GeV. Using the data from the charged-current neutrino interaction sample, a ratio of neutral-current to charged-current quasielastic cross sections as a function of Q{sup 2} has been measured. Additionally, single protons with kinetic energies above 350 MeV can be distinguished from neutrons and multiple nucleon events. Using this marker, the strange quark contribution to the neutral-current axial vector form factor at Q{sup 2}=0, {Delta}s, is found to be {Delta}s=0.08{+-}0.26.

  17. Measurement of the neutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section on mineral oil at Eν˜1GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Anderson, C. E.; Bazarko, A. O.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cao, J.; Coney, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Cox, D. C.; Curioni, A.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D. A.; Fleming, B. T.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Garvey, G. T.; Grange, J.; Green, C.; Green, J. A.; Hart, T. L.; Hawker, E.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R. A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kasper, P.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kourbanis, I.; Koutsoliotas, S.; Laird, E. M.; Linden, S. K.; Link, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.; Louis, W. C.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Marsh, W.; Mauger, C.; McGary, V. T.; McGregor, G.; Metcalf, W.; Meyers, P. D.; Mills, F.; Mills, G. B.; Monroe, J.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Nelson, R. H.; Nienaber, P.; Nowak, J. A.; Osmanov, B.; Ouedraogo, S.; Patterson, R. B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C. C.; Prebys, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Ray, H.; Roe, B. P.; Russell, A. D.; Sandberg, V.; Schirato, R.; Schmitz, D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shoemaker, F. C.; Smith, D.; Soderberg, M.; Sorel, M.; Spentzouris, P.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R. J.; Sung, M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tayloe, R.; Tzanov, M.; van de Water, R. G.; Wascko, M. O.; White, D. H.; Wilking, M. J.; Yang, H. J.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    We report a measurement of the flux-averaged neutral-current elastic differential cross section for neutrinos scattering on mineral oil (CH2) as a function of four-momentum transferred squared, Q2. It is obtained by measuring the kinematics of recoiling nucleons with kinetic energy greater than 50 MeV which are readily detected in MiniBooNE. This differential cross-section distribution is fit with fixed nucleon form factors apart from an axial mass MA that provides a best fit for MA=1.39±0.11GeV. Using the data from the charged-current neutrino interaction sample, a ratio of neutral-current to charged-current quasielastic cross sections as a function of Q2 has been measured. Additionally, single protons with kinetic energies above 350 MeV can be distinguished from neutrons and multiple nucleon events. Using this marker, the strange quark contribution to the neutral-current axial vector form factor at Q2=0, Δs, is found to be Δs=0.08±0.26.

  18. 650 GHz bistatic scattering measurements on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Richard A.; Mujica-Schwahn, Natalie; Grossman, Erich N.

    2014-06-01

    Many groups are developing submillimeter cameras that will be used to screen human subjects for improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and other threat items hidden beneath their clothing. To interpret submillimeter camera images the scattering properties, specifically the bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF) must be known. This problem is not trivial because surfaces of man-made objects and human skin have topographic features comparable to the wavelength of submillimeter radiation—thus simple, theoretical scattering approximations do not apply. To address this problem we built a goniometer instrument to measure the BSDF from skin surfaces of live human subjects illuminated with a beam from a 650 GHz synthesized source. To obtain some multi-spectral information, the instrument was reconfigured with a 160 GHz source. Skin areas sampled are from the hand, interior of the forearm, abdomen, and back. The 650 GHz beam has an approximately Gaussian profile with a FWHM of approximately 1 cm. Instrument characteristics: angular resolution 2.9⍛; noise floor -45 dB/sr; dynamic range ˃ 70 dB; either s or p-polarization; 25⍛ bidirectional-scattering-angle ≤ 180⍛ ; The human scattering target skin area was placed exactly on the goniometer center of rotation with normal angle of incidence to the source beam. Scattering power increased at the higher frequency. This new work enables radiometrically correct models of humans.

  19. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-05-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2 θ W to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to quantify errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. Our analysis shows that the combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the 8B flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on both the pp and boron-8 neutrino fluxes to below 1%. Finally, we use current results from LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite to set bounds on new interactions between neutrinos and electrons or nuclei, and show that future direct detection experiments can be used to set complementary constraints on the parameter space associated with light mediators.

  20. Collective Thomson scattering measurements with high frequency resolution at TEXTORa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stejner, M.; Nielsen, S. K.; Korsholm, S. B.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Bürger, A.; Kantor, M.; de Baar, M.

    2010-10-01

    We discuss the development and first results of a receiver system for the collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic at TEXTOR with frequency resolution in the megahertz range or better. The improved frequency resolution expands the diagnostic range and utility of CTS measurements in general and is a prerequisite for measurements of ion Bernstein wave signatures in CTS spectra. The first results from the new acquisition system are shown to be consistent with theory and with simultaneous measurements by the standard receiver system.

  1. Rayleigh scattering for density measurements in premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouldin, F. C.; Halthore, R. N.

    1986-09-01

    Rayleigh scattering measurements for molecular number density in turbulent, premixed CH4-air flames are discussed, and data for both flamelet passage time distributions and power spectral density functions are reported and compared to the recent predictions of Bray, Libby and Moss (1984). Measurement problems associated with variations in mixture-averaged Rayleigh scattering cross section, index of refraction fluctuations, finite spatial and temporal resolution and with scattering from particles are discussed. It is concluded that these effects are relatively minor in the reported experiments. Correction procedures are suggested for the effects of cross section variation and of finite resolution. Passage time and spectral data support the Bray, Libby and Moss hypothesis for the passage time distribution function. Furthermore, model predictions for the variation across the flame brush of mean passage times for both reactant and product eddies are in reasonable agreement with experiment. Finally, the data suggest that these mean times scale in part with Ū and λ in the reactant flow.

  2. Measurement of the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B neutron decay using ultracold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, Wesley S

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to measuring the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B in neutron decay. The approach combines the technology of large-area ion-implanted silicon detectors being developed for the abBA experiment, with an ultracold neutron source to provide more precise neutron polarimetry. The technique detects both proton and electron from the neutron decay in coincidence. B is determined from an electron-energy-dependent measurement of the proton spin asymmetry. This approach will provide a statistical precision of 1 x 10-4 . The systematic precision is still being evaluated, but is expected to be below 1 x 10-3 , and could approach 1 x 10-4 . A measurement of B with this precision would place constraints on supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model.

  3. Gamma-ray scattering for fat fraction measurement.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, J; Morgan, H M; Lillicrap, S C

    1997-07-01

    The work reported examines the potential of using gamma-ray photon backscatter information to measure in vivo the percentage of fat in specific tissue volumes. 241Am gamma rays are used as the source and the backscatter detected with a hyperpure germanium detector, with ethanol (approximately 80% fat, 20% muscle) and water (muscle) being used as tissue substitutes. Two measurement techniques are examined; the measurement of the ratio of coherent scatter to Compton scatter and the measurement of the Compton scatter profile. Both are shown to be sensitive to the composition difference between ethanol and water. For the coherent-Compton scatter ratio, the measured difference between water and ethanol is 1.85:1, close to the value calculated (about 2:1). A similar difference in the coherent-Compton ratios between muscle and fat is calculated (2.2:1). The FWHM of the Compton profile has also been shown to vary with tissue composition with a difference of 0.10 keV (5%) between the ethanol and water profile widths. PMID:9253048

  4. Gamma-ray scattering for fat fraction measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeshaft, J.; Morgan, H. M.; Lillicrap, S. C.

    1997-07-01

    The work reported examines the potential of using gamma-ray photon backscatter information to measure in vivo the percentage of fat in specific tissue volumes. gamma rays are used as the source and the backscatter detected with a hyperpure germanium detector, with ethanol (approximately 80% fat, 20% muscle) and water (muscle) being used as tissue substitutes. Two measurement techniques are examined; the measurement of the ratio of coherent scatter to Compton scatter and the measurement of the Compton scatter profile. Both are shown to be sensitive to the composition difference between ethanol and water. For the coherent - Compton scatter ratio, the measured difference between water and ethanol is 1.85:1, close to the value calculated (about 2:1). A similar difference in the coherent - Compton ratios between muscle and fat is calculated (2.2:1). The FWHM of the Compton profile has also been shown to vary with tissue composition with a difference of 0.10 keV (5%) between the ethanol and water profile widths.

  5. Measurements of the nonlinear refractive index in scattering media using the Scattered Light Imaging Method--SLIM.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Kelly C; García, Hans A; Amaral, Anderson M; Reyna, Albert S; Menezes, Leonardo de S; de Araújo, Cid B

    2015-07-27

    The Scattered Light Imaging Method (SLIM) was applied to measure the nonlinear refractive index of scattering media. The measurements are based on the analysis of the side-view images of the laser beam propagating inside highly scattering liquid suspensions. Proof-of-principle experiments were performed with colloids containing silica nanoparticles that behave as light scatterers. The technique allows measurements with lasers operating with arbitrary repetition rate as well as in the single-shot regime. The new method shows advantages and complementarity with respect to the Z-scan technique which is not appropriate to characterize scattering media. PMID:26367609

  6. Measurements of scattering anisotropy in dental tissue and zirconia ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Pecho, Oscar E.; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María M.

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of biological structures is useful for clinical applications, especially when dealing with incoming biomaterials engineered to improve the benefits for the patient. One ceramic material currently used in restorative dentistry is yttrium cation-doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP) because of its good mechanical properties. However, its optical properties have not been thoroughly studied. Many methods for the determination of optical parameters from biological media make the assumption that scattered light is isotropically distributed over all angles. Nevertheless, real biological materials may have an angular dependence on light scattering, which may affect the optical behaviour of the materials. Therefore, the recovery of the degree of anisotropy in the scattering angular distribution is important. The phase function that represents the scattering angular distribution is usually characterized by the anisotropy coefficient g, which equals the average cosine of the scattering angle. In this work, we measured angularscattering distributions for two zirconia ceramic samples, pre-sintered and sintered, with similar thicknesses (0.48 mm and 0.50 mm, respectively) and also for a human dentine sample (0.41 mm in thickness). The samples were irradiated with a He-Ne laser beam (λ = 632.8 nm) and the angular-scattering distributions were measured using a rotating goniometer. The g values yielded were: -0.7970 +/- 0.0016 for pre-sintered zirconia, -0.2074 +/- 0.0024 for sintered zirconia and 0.0620 +/- 0.0010 for dentine. The results show that zirconia sintering results in optical behaviour more similar to those of dentine tissue, in terms of scattering anisotropy.

  7. Astroparticle physics with solar neutrinos

    PubMed Central

    NAKAHATA, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Solar neutrino experiments observed fluxes smaller than the expectations from the standard solar model. This discrepancy is known as the “solar neutrino problem”. Flux measurements by Super-Kamiokande and SNO have demonstrated that the solar neutrino problem is due to neutrino oscillations. Combining the results of all solar neutrino experiments, parameters for solar neutrino oscillations are obtained. Correcting for the effect of neutrino oscillations, the observed neutrino fluxes are consistent with the prediction from the standard solar model. In this article, results of solar neutrino experiments are reviewed with detailed descriptions of what Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande have contributed to the history of astroparticle physics with solar neutrino measurements. PMID:21558758

  8. Using Quasi-Elastic Events to Measure Neutrino Oscillations with MINOS Detectors in the NuMI Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Watabe, Masaki

    2010-05-01

    MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has been designed to search for a change in the avor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as they travel between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Far Detector in the Soudan mine in Minnesota, 735 km from the target. The MINOS oscillation analysis is mainly performed with the charged current (CC) events and sensitive to constrain high- Δm2 values. However, the quasi-elastic (QEL) charged current interaction is dominant in the energy region important to access low- m2 values. For further improvement, the QEL oscillation analysis is performed in this dissertation. A data sample based on a total of 2.50 x 1020 POT is used for this analysis. In summary, 55 QEL-like events are observed at the Far detector while 87.06 ± 13.17 (syst:) events are expected with null oscillation hypothesis. These data are consistent with disappearance via oscillation with m2 = 2:10 0.37 (stat:) ± 0.24 (syst:) eV2 and the maximal mixing angle.

  9. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel using the neutrino weighting algorithm at CDF II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabik, Simon

    We measure the top quark mass using approximately 359 pb-1 of data from pp¯ collisions at s = 1.96 GeV at CDF Run II. We select tt¯ candidates that are consistent with two W bosons decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino following tt¯ → W+W-bb¯ → l+l- nn¯ bb¯. Only one of the two charged leptons is required to be identified as an electron or a muon candidate, while the other is simply a well measured track. We use a neutrino weighting algorithm which weighs each possibility of neutrino direction to reconstruct a top quark mass in each event. We compare the resulting distribution to Monte Carlo templates to obtain a top quark mass of 170.8+6.9-6.5 (stat) +/- 4.6 (syst) GeV/c 2.

  10. Measurement of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Kopytin, M.

    2005-10-06

    The measurement of azimuthal cross section asymmetries from deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton and deuteron at HERMES is discussed. In particular results on the longitudinal target spin asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle and the Mandelstam t are given. The t-dependence of the asymmetry is compared with calculations based on generalized parton distribution models.

  11. Recent Results in Solar Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Solar neutrinos are an invaluable tool for studying neutrino oscillations in matter as well as probing the nuclear reactions that fuel the Sun. In this talk I will give an overview of solar neutrinos and discuss the latest results in the field. I will highlight the recent precision measurement of the ^7Be solar neutrino interaction rate with the Borexino solar neutrino detector and present the status of the analysis of pep and CNO neutrinos. I will also briefly describe future experiments and their potential to detect low energy solar neutrinos.

  12. Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, R. D.

    2010-08-04

    Recent studies of neutrino oscillations have established the existence of finite neutrino masses and mixing between generations of neutrinos. The combined results from studies of atmospheric neutrinos, solar neutrinos, reactor antineutrinos and neutrinos produced at accelerators paint an intriguing picture that clearly requires modification of the standard model of particle physics. These results also provide clear motivation for future neutrino oscillation experiments as well as searches for direct neutrino mass and nuclear double-beta decay. I will discuss the program of new neutrino oscillation experiments aimed at completing our knowledge of the neutrino mixing matrix.

  13. Nuclear resonance scattering measurement of human iron stores

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ancona, R.C.; Mossey, R.T.; Vaswani, A.N.; Cohn, S.H.

    1985-07-01

    Hepatic iron stores were measured noninvasively in 31 patients (thalassemia, hemodialysis, hemosiderosis, refractory anemia) with suspected iron overload, employing a nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) technique. The thalassemia patients were undergoing desferrioxamine chelation therapy during the NRS measurements. The hemodialysis patients were measured before chelation therapy. Iron levels measured by NRS were in general agreement with those determined in liver biopsies by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In addition, NRS measurements from the thorax of some of these patients suggest that this method may also prove useful for clinical assessment of cardiac iron.

  14. Neutrino mass from cosmology: impact of high-accuracy measurement of the Hubble constant

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Takahashi, Tomo; Greenhill, Lincoln E-mail: kazuhide@me.kyoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: greenhill@cfa.harvard.edu

    2010-03-01

    Non-zero neutrino mass would affect the evolution of the Universe in observable ways, and a strong constraint on the mass can be achieved using combinations of cosmological data sets. We focus on the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, the Hubble constant H{sub 0}, and the length scale for baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) to investigate the constraint on the neutrino mass, m{sub ν}. We analyze data from multiple existing CMB studies (WMAP5, ACBAR, CBI, BOOMERANG, and QUAD), recent measurement of H{sub 0} (SHOES), with about two times lower uncertainty (5 %) than previous estimates, and recent treatments of BAO from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We obtained an upper limit of m{sub ν} < 0.2eV (95 % C.L.), for a flat ΛCDM model. This is a 40 % reduction in the limit derived from previous H{sub 0} estimates and one-third lower than can be achieved with extant CMB and BAO data. We also analyze the impact of smaller uncertainty on measurements of H{sub 0} as may be anticipated in the near term, in combination with CMB data from the Planck mission, and BAO data from the SDSS/BOSS program. We demonstrate the possibility of a 5σ detection for a fiducial neutrino mass of 0.1 eV or a 95 % upper limit of 0.04 eV for a fiducial of m{sub ν} = 0 eV. These constraints are about 50 % better than those achieved without external constraint. We further investigate the impact on modeling where the dark-energy equation of state is constant but not necessarily -1, or where a non-flat universe is allowed. In these cases, the next-generation accuracies of Planck, BOSS, and 1 % measurement of H{sub 0} would all be required to obtain the limit m{sub ν} < 0.05−0.06 eV (95 % C.L.) for the fiducial of m{sub ν} = 0 eV. The independence of systematics argues for pursuit of both BAO and H{sub 0} measurements.

  15. First measurement of muon-neutrino disappearance in NOvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, P.; Ader, C.; Andrews, M.; Anfimov, N.; Anghel, I.; Arms, K.; Arrieta-Diaz, E.; Aurisano, A.; Ayres, D. S.; Backhouse, C.; Baird, M.; Bambah, B. A.; Bays, K.; Bernstein, R.; Betancourt, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bian, J.; Biery, K.; Blackburn, T.; Bocean, V.; Bogert, D.; Bolshakova, A.; Bowden, M.; Bower, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bromberg, C.; Brunetti, G.; Bu, X.; Butkevich, A.; Capista, D.; Catano-Mur, E.; Chase, T. R.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Chowdhury, B.; Coan, T. E.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Colo, M.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Cunningham, A.; Davies, G. S.; Davies, J. P.; Del Tutto, M.; Derwent, P. F.; Deepthi, K. N.; Demuth, D.; Desai, S.; Deuerling, G.; Devan, A.; Dey, J.; Dharmapalan, R.; Ding, P.; Dixon, S.; Djurcic, Z.; Dukes, E. C.; Duyang, H.; Ehrlich, R.; Feldman, G. J.; Felt, N.; Fenyves, E. J.; Flumerfelt, E.; Foulkes, S.; Frank, M. J.; Freeman, W.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Gebhard, M.; Ghosh, T.; Gilbert, W.; Giri, A.; Goadhouse, S.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodenough, L.; Goodman, M. C.; Grichine, V.; Grossman, N.; Group, R.; Grudzinski, J.; Guarino, V.; Guo, B.; Habig, A.; Handler, T.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Heller, K.; Howcroft, C.; Huang, J.; Huang, X.; Hylen, J.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jediny, F.; Jensen, C.; Jensen, D.; Johnson, C.; Jostlein, H.; Kafka, G. K.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kasetti, S.; Kephart, K.; Koizumi, G.; Kotelnikov, S.; Kourbanis, I.; Krahn, Z.; Kravtsov, V.; Kreymer, A.; Kulenberg, Ch.; Kumar, A.; Kutnink, T.; Kwarciancy, R.; Kwong, J.; Lang, K.; Lee, A.; Lee, W. M.; Lee, K.; Lein, S.; Liu, J.; Lokajicek, M.; Lozier, J.; Lu, Q.; Lucas, P.; Luchuk, S.; Lukens, P.; Lukhanin, G.; Magill, S.; Maan, K.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Martens, M.; Martincik, J.; Mason, P.; Matera, K.; Mathis, M.; Matveev, V.; Mayer, N.; McCluskey, E.; Mehdiyev, R.; Merritt, H.; Messier, M. D.; Meyer, H.; Miao, T.; Michael, D.; Mikheyev, S. P.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mohanta, R.; Moren, A.; Mualem, L.; Muether, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Newman, H. B.; Nelson, J. K.; Niner, E.; Norman, A.; Nowak, J.; Oksuzian, Y.; Olshevskiy, A.; Oliver, J.; Olson, T.; Paley, J.; Pandey, P.; Para, A.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Pearson, N.; Perevalov, D.; Pershey, D.; Peterson, E.; Petti, R.; Phan-Budd, S.; Piccoli, L.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poling, R.; Potukuchi, B.; Psihas, F.; Pushka, D.; Qiu, X.; Raddatz, N.; Radovic, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Ray, R.; Rebel, B.; Rechenmacher, R.; Reed, B.; Reilly, R.; Rocco, D.; Rodkin, D.; Ruddick, K.; Rusack, R.; Ryabov, V.; Sachdev, K.; Sahijpal, S.; Sahoo, H.; Samoylov, O.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Schlabach, P.; Schneps, J.; Schroeter, R.; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J.; Shanahan, P.; Sherwood, B.; Sheshukov, A.; Singh, J.; Singh, V.; Smith, A.; Smith, D.; Smolik, J.; Solomey, N.; Sotnikov, A.; Sousa, A.; Soustruznik, K.; Stenkin, Y.; Strait, M.; Suter, L.; Talaga, R. L.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tariq, S.; Tas, P.; Tesarek, R. J.; Thayyullathil, R. B.; Thomsen, K.; Tian, X.; Tognini, S. C.; Toner, R.; Trevor, J.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Valerio, L.; Vinton, L.; Vrba, T.; Waldron, A. V.; Wang, B.; Wang, Z.; Weber, A.; Wehmann, A.; Whittington, D.; Wilcer, N.; Wildberger, R.; Wildman, D.; Williams, K.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wood, K.; Xiao, M.; Xin, T.; Yadav, N.; Yang, S.; Zadorozhnyy, S.; Zalesak, J.; Zamorano, B.; Zhao, A.; Zirnstein, J.; Zwaska, R.; NOvA Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the first measurement using the NOvA detectors of νμ disappearance in a νμ beam. The analysis uses a 14 kton-equivalent exposure of 2.74 ×1020 protons-on-target from the Fermilab NuMI beam. Assuming the normal neutrino mass hierarchy, we measure Δ m322=(2.52-0.18+0.20)×10-3 eV2 and sin2θ23 in the range 0.38-0.65, both at the 68% confidence level, with two statistically degenerate best-fit points at sin2θ23=0.43 and 0.60. Results for the inverted mass hierarchy are also presented.

  16. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  17. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  18. Measurement of the τ Neutrino Helicity and Michel Parameters in Polarized e+e- Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N. J.; Ash, W. W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K. G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H. R.; Barakat, M. B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T. L.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Bazarko, A. O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bilei, G. M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J. R.; Bolen, B.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G. R.; Brau, J. E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W. M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Burrows, P. N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Chou, A.; Church, E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coller, J. A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R. F.; Coyne, D. G.; Crawford, G.; D'Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C. J.; Daoudi, M.; de Sangro, R.; dell'Orso, R.; Dervan, P. J.; Dima, M.; Dong, D. N.; Du, P. Y.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Fahey, S.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fernandez, J. P.; Fero, M. J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hart, E. L.; Harton, J. L.; Hasan, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasuko, K.; Hedges, S. J.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M. E.; Hughes, E. W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J. A.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Johnson, R. A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H. J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H. W.; Kim, Y. D.; King, M. E.; King, R.; Kofler, R. R.; Krishna, N. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Labs, J. F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J. A.; Leith, D. W.; Lia, V.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H. L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T. W.; Maruyama, T.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A. K.; Meadows, B. T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P. M.; Moffeit, K. C.; Moore, T. B.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L. S.; Panvini, R. S.; Park, C. H.; Park, H.; Pavel, T. J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K. T.; Plano, R. J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C. Y.; Punkar, G. D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reeves, T. W.; Reidy, J.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Rensing, P. E.; Rochester, L. S.; Rowson, P. C.; Russell, J. J.; Saxton, O. H.; Schalk, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schumm, B. A.; Sen, S.; Serbo, V. V.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, G.; Sherden, D. J.; Shmakov, K. D.; Simopoulos, C.; Sinev, N. B.; Smith, S. R.; Smy, M. B.; Snyder, J. A.; Stamer, P.; Steiner, H.; Steiner, R.; Strauss, M. G.; Su, D.; Suekane, F.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Swartz, M.; Szumilo, A.; Takahashi, T.; Taylor, F. E.; Torrence, E.; Trandafir, A. I.; Turk, J. D.; Usher, T.; Va'Vra, J.; Vannini, C.; Vella, E.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdier, R.; Verdini, P. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Wagner, S. R.; Waite, A. P.; Watts, S. J.; Weidemann, A. W.; Weiss, E. R.; Whitaker, J. S.; White, S. L.; Wickens, F. J.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, D. C.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Woods, M.; Word, G. B.; Wyss, J.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Yamartino, J. M.; Yang, X.; Yashima, J.; Yellin, S. J.; Young, C. C.; Yuta, H.; Zapalac, G.; Zdarko, R. W.; Zhou, J.

    1997-06-01

    We present a new measurement of the τ neutrino helicity hντ and the τ Michel parameters ρ, η, ξ, and the product δξ. The analysis exploits the highly polarized SLC electron beam to extract these quantities directly from a measurement of the τ decay spectra, using the 1993-1995 SLD data sample of 4328 e+e--->Z0-->τ+τ- events. From the decays τ-->πντ and τ-->ρντ we obtain a combined value hντ = -0.93+/-0.10+/-0.04. The leptonic decay channels yield combined values of ρ = 0.72+/-0.09+/-0.03, ξ = 1.05+/-0.35+/-0.04, and δξ = 0.88+/-0.27+/-0.04.

  19. A Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment After Four Years of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanaugh, Steven

    2010-05-01

    This work attempts to measure or set a limit on sin2(2θ13), the parameter which describes vμ → ve oscillations. The MINOS detectors at Fermilab are used to perform a search for the oscillations utilizing a beam of vμ neutrinos created in the NuMI beamline by the collisions of 120 GeV protons with a carbon target. These collisions create π± and K± which are focused with magnetic horns, are allowed to decay, and result in a beam of vμ in the energy range of 1 to 30 GeV. Two functionally identical steel-scintillator calorimetric detectors are utilized to measure the interactions of the generated neutrinos. A detector close to the NuMI beam, located 104 m underground and 1040 m from the target, is used to measure the properties of the neutrino beam, including the flux, composition, and energy spectrum. This information is used in part to generate a predicted spectrum of neutrinos in absence of vμ → ve oscillations in the detector located far from the target, at a distance of 705 m underground and 735.5 km from the target. An excess of predicted ve charged current events in this far detector will be interpreted as vμ → ve oscillations, and a measurement of sin2(2θ13) will be made using a Feldman-Cousins analysis. The measurement of vμ → ve requires the separation of ve candidates from background events. New reconstruction software was developed with a focus on identifying ve candidate events in order to reduce systematic errors. The event parameters measured by this software were used as an input to an artificial neutral network event discriminator. The details of this reconstruction software and the other steps of the analysis necessary to making the measurement will be discussed. This work builds on a previous measurement made with this

  20. Spatially resolved scatter measurement of diffractive micromirror arrays.

    PubMed

    Sicker, Cornelius; Heber, Jörg; Berndt, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLMs) support flexible system concepts in modern optics and especially phase-only SLMs such as micromirror arrays (MMAs) appear attractive for many applications. In order to achieve a precise phase modulation, which is crucial for optical performance, careful characterization and calibration of SLM devices is required. We examine an intensity-based measurement concept, which promises distinct advantages by means of a spatially resolved scatter measurement that is combined with the MMA's diffractive principle. Measurements yield quantitative results, which are consistent with measurements of micromirror roughness components, by white-light interferometry. They reveal relative scatter as low as 10-4, which corresponds to contrast ratios up to 10,000. The potential of the technique to resolve phase changes in the subnanometer range is experimentally demonstrated. PMID:27411205

  1. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Amendt, P.; Divol, L.; Kugland, N. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2012-10-15

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  2. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

    2012-05-01

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  3. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in Dilepton Final States with the Neutrino Weighting Method

    SciTech Connect

    Ilchenko, Yuriy

    2012-12-15

    The top quark is the heaviest fundamental particle observed to date. The mass of the top quark is a free parameter in the Standard Model (SM). A precise measurement of its mass is particularly important as it sets an indirect constraint on the mass of the Higgs boson. It is also a useful constraint on contributions from physics beyond the SM and may play a fundamental role in the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. I present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel using the Neutrino Weighting Method. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the DØ detector. Kinematically under-constrained dilepton events are analyzed by integrating over neutrino rapidity. Weight distributions of t$\\bar{t}$ signal and background are produced as a function of the top quark mass for different top quark mass hypotheses. The measurement is performed by constructing templates from the moments of the weight distributions and input top quark mass, followed by a subsequent likelihood t to data. The dominant systematic uncertainties from jet energy calibration is reduced by using a correction from `+jets channel. To replicate the quark avor dependence of the jet response in data, jets in the simulated events are additionally corrected. The result is combined with our preceding measurement on 1 fb-1 and yields mt = 174.0± 2.4 (stat.) ±1.4 (syst.) GeV.

  4. Laser scattering measurement for laser removal of graffiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tearasongsawat, Watcharawee; Kittiboonanan, Phumipat; Luengviriya, Chaiya; Ratanavis, Amarin

    2015-07-01

    In this contribution, a technical development of the laser scattering measurement for laser removal of graffiti is reported. This study concentrates on the removal of graffiti from metal surfaces. Four colored graffiti paints were applied to stainless steel samples. Cleaning efficiency was evaluated by the laser scattering system. In this study, an angular laser removal of graffiti was attempted to examine the removal process under practical conditions. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.06 microns with the repetition rate of 1 Hz was used to remove graffiti from stainless steel samples. The laser fluence was investigated from 0.1 J/cm2 to 7 J/cm2. The laser parameters to achieve the removal effectiveness were determined by using the laser scattering system. This study strongly leads to further development of the potential online surface inspection for the removal of graffiti.

  5. Molecular origin of background light in Thomson scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.

    1986-06-01

    The plasma background light in Thomson scattering measurements is often far higher than expected for a pure hydrogen plasma. The spectral distribution of light from three plasmas (duration: 1 ms to steady state; electron density: below 10/sup 12/ to over 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/; temperature: below 20 to over 1000 eV) and signal-to-noise and intensity data from the Thomson scattering systems used on them are compared with analytic estimates to show that in two of these plasmas molecular light dominates the spectrum, while in the other, molecular light is present, but bremsstrahlung is usually more intense. Knowledge of the mechanism for background light can aid in designing detection systems for Thomson scattering and provide information on the neutral species composition and effective charge of the plasma.

  6. Broadband acoustic scattering measurements of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO).

    PubMed

    Bucaro, J A; Houston, B H; Saniga, M; Dragonette, L R; Yoder, T; Dey, S; Kraus, L; Carin, L

    2008-02-01

    In order to evaluate the potential for detection and identification of underwater unexploded ordnance (UXO) by exploiting their structural acoustic response, we carried out broadband monostatic scattering measurements over a full 360 degrees on UXO's (two mortar rounds, an artillery shell, and a rocket warhead) and false targets (a cinder block and a large rock). The measurement band, 1-140 kHz, includes a low frequency structural acoustics region in which the wavelengths are comparable to or larger than the target characteristic dimensions. In general, there are aspects that provide relatively high target strength levels ( approximately -10 to -15 dB), and from our experience the targets should be detectable in this structural acoustics band in most acoustic environments. The rigid body scattering was also calculated for one UXO in order to highlight the measured scattering features involving elastic responses. The broadband scattering data should be able to support feature-based separation of UXO versus false targets and identification of various classes of UXO as well. PMID:18247878

  7. Measurement of Compton scattering in phantoms by germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zasadny, K.R.; Koral, K.F. . Medical Center); Floyd, C.E. Jr.; Jaszczak, R.J. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-04-01

    Quantitative Anger-camera tomography requires correction for Compton scattering. The Anger camera spectral-fitting technique can measure scatter fractions at designated positions in an image allowing for correction. To permit verification of those measurements for {sup 131}I, the authors have determined scatter fractions with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and various phantom configurations. The scatter fraction values for {sup 99m}Tc were also measured and are compared to results from Monte Carlo simulation. The phantom consisted of a 22.2 cm diameter {times} 18.6 cm high cylinder filled with water and a 6 cm diameter water-filled sphere placed at various locations inside the cylinder. Radioisotope is added to either the sphere or the cylinder. The source is collimated by an Anger camera collimator and the active area of the HPGe detector is defined by a 0.6 cm diameter hole in a lead shielding mask. Corrections include accounting for the HPGe detector efficiency as a function of gamma-ray energy, the finite energy resolution of detector and the HPGe detector energy resolution compared to that for a NaI(Tl) Anger camera.

  8. Observation of deficit in NuMI neutrino-induced rock and non-fiducial muons in MINOS Far Detector and measurement of neutrino oscillation parameters

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, Aaron Michael

    2007-08-01

    The MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) experiment has observed muon neutrino disappearance consistent with the oscillation hypothesis tested by Super-Kamiokande and K2K. The survival probability for vμ is given approximately by 1 - sin22θ23sin2(1.27Δm$2\\atop{32}$L/E), whereθ23 and Δm$2\\atop{32}$ are the mixing angle and difference in mass squared in eV2/c4 between the mass eigenstates v3 and v2, L is the distance traveled in km, and E is the neutrino energy in GeV. In the Near Detector at Fermilab, a measurement of the energy spectrum of the NuMI neutrino beam is made 1 km from the beam target. The neutrinos travel to the Far Detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, where another measurement of the energy spectrum is made 735 km from the target. MINOS measures |Δm$2\\atop{32}$| and sin223 by comparing the ND and FD neutrino energy spectra. In this dissertation, a n alternate method is presented that utilizes rock muons, a class of events that occur when a vμ interaction takes place in the rock surrounding the FD. Many muons that result from these interactions penetrate the rock and reach the detector. Muon events from vμ interactions in the non-fiducial volume of the FD are also used in this analysis. The distribution of reconstructed muon momentum and direction relative to the beam is predicted by Monte Carlo simulation, normalized by the measured vμ energy spectrum at the ND. In the first year of NuMI running (an exposure of 1.27x1020 protons on target) 117 selected events are observed below 3.0 GeV/c, where 150.2±16.1 events are expected. When a fit is performed to events below 10.0 GeV/c, the null (no disappearance) hypothesis is ruled out at significance level α = 4.2 x 10-3. The data are consistent with the oscillation hypothesis given parameter

  9. MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search

    SciTech Connect

    Koskinen, David Jason

    2009-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the v μ→ Vτ transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling ~2.5 x 1020 protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

  10. Sensitivity of low energy neutrino experiments to physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Miranda, O. G.; Rashba, T. I.

    2007-10-01

    We study the sensitivity of future low energy neutrino experiments to extra neutral gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and R-parity breaking interactions. We focus on future proposals to measure coherent neutrino-nuclei scattering and neutrino-electron elastic scattering. We introduce a new comparative analysis between these experiments and show that in different types of new physics it is possible to obtain competitive bounds to those of present and future collider experiments. For the cases of leptoquarks and R-parity breaking interactions we found that the expected sensitivity for most of the future low energy experimental setups is better than the current constraints.

  11. An Experimentalist's Overview of Solar Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oser, Scott M.

    2012-02-01

    Four decades of solar neutrino research have demonstrated that solar models do a remarkable job of predicting the neutrino fluxes from the Sun, to the extent that solar neutrinos can now serve as a calibrated neutrino source for experiments to understand neutrino oscillations and mixing. In this review article I will highlight the most significant experimental results, with emphasis on the latest model-independent measurements from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The solar neutrino fluxes are seen to be generally well-determined experimentally, with no indications of time variability, while future experiments will elucidate the lower energy part of the neutrino spectrum, especially pep and CNO neutrinos.

  12. Remote measurements of the atmosphere using Raman scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Raman optical radar measurements of the atmosphere demonstrate that the technique may be used to obtain quantitative measurements of the spatial distribution of individual atmospheric molecular trace constituents (in particular water vapor) and of the major constituents. It is shown that monitoring Raman signals from atmospheric nitrogen aids in interpreting elastic scattering measurements by eliminating attenuation effects. In general, the experimental results show good agreement with independent meteorological measurements. Finally, experimental data are utilized to estimate the Raman backscatter cross section for water vapor excited at 3471.5 A.

  13. The beam stop array method to measure object scatter in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haeng-hwa; Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Jae-Gu; Choi, Young-Wook

    2014-03-01

    Scattered radiation is inevitably generated in the object. The distribution of the scattered radiation is influenced by object thickness, filed size, object-to-detector distance, and primary energy. One of the investigations to measure scatter intensities involves measuring the signal detected under the shadow of the lead discs of a beam-stop array (BSA). The measured scatter by BSA includes not only the scattered radiation within the object (object scatter), but also the external scatter source. The components of external scatter source include the X-ray tube, detector, collimator, x-ray filter, and BSA. Excluding background scattered radiation can be applied to different scanner geometry by simple parameter adjustments without prior knowledge of the scanned object. In this study, a method using BSA to differentiate scatter in phantom (object scatter) from external background was used. Furthermore, this method was applied to BSA algorithm to correct the object scatter. In order to confirm background scattered radiation, we obtained the scatter profiles and scatter fraction (SF) profiles in the directions perpendicular to the chest wall edge (CWE) with and without scattering material. The scatter profiles with and without the scattering material were similar in the region between 127 mm and 228 mm from chest wall. This result indicated that the measured scatter by BSA included background scatter. Moreover, the BSA algorithm with the proposed method could correct the object scatter because the total radiation profiles of object scatter correction corresponded to original image in the region between 127 mm and 228 mm from chest wall. As a result, the BSA method to measure object scatter could be used to remove background scatter. This method could apply for different scanner geometry after background scatter correction. In conclusion, the BSA algorithm with the proposed method is effective to correct object scatter.

  14. Time-Resolved Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2008-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded gas flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultipler tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. Mean and rms velocity and temperature fluctuation measurements in both an electrically-heated jet facility with a 10-mm diameter nozzle and also in a hydrogen-combustor heated jet facility with a 50.8-mm diameter nozzle at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented.

  15. High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Multiple Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, E. W.; Piironen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) provides unambiguous measurements of backscatter cross section, backscatter phase function, depolarization, and optical depth. This is accomplished by dividing the lidar return into separate particulate and molecular contributions. The molecular return is then used as a calibration target. We have modified the HSRL to use an I2 molecular absorption filter to separate aerosol and molecular signals. This allows measurement in dense clouds. Useful profiles extend above the cloud base until the two way optical depth reaches values between 5 and 6; beyond this, photon counting errors become large. In order to observe multiple scattering, the HSRL includes a channel which records the combined aerosol and molecular lidar return simultaneously with the spectrometer channel measurements of optical properties. This paper describes HSRL multiple scattering measurements from both water and ice clouds. These include signal strengths and depolarizations as a function of receiver field of view. All observations include profiles of extinction and backscatter cross sections. Measurements are also compared to predictions of a multiple scattering model based on small angle approximations.

  16. Charged current inclusive measurements in MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Kenyi

    2015-05-15

    MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment stationed in the high intensity NuMI beam line at Fermilab, designed to measure neutrino cross sections, final states and nuclear effects on a variety of targets in the few-GeV region to reduce systematic uncertainties in oscillation experiments and provide new understanding of the nucleus. Here we present the current MINERvA results for inclusive charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering in the active region of the detector and different neutrino cross section ratios with different nuclear targets.

  17. An experiment to measure the electron neutrino mass using a cryogenic tritium source

    SciTech Connect

    Fackler, O.; Jeziorski, B.; Kolos, W.; Monkhorst, H.; Mugge, M.; Sticker, H.; Szalewicz, K.; White, R.M.; Woerner, R.

    1985-06-25

    An experiment has been performed to determine the electron neutrino mass with the precision of a few eV by measuring the tritium beta decay energy distribution near the endpoint. Key features of the experiment are a 2 eV resolution electrostatic spectrometer and a high-activity frozen tritium source. It is important that the source have electronic wavefunctions which can be accurately calculated. These calculations have been made for tritium and the HeT/sup +/ daughter ion and allow determination of branching fractions to 0.1% and energy of the excited states to 0.1 eV. The excited final molecular state calculations and the experimental apparatus are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Thomson Scattering Measurements on HIT-SI3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, C. J.; Morgan, K. D.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2015-11-01

    A multi-point Thomson Scattering diagnostic has been implemented on HIT-SI3 (Helicity Injected Torus - Steady Inductive 3) to measure electron temperature. The HIT-SI3 experiment is a modification of the original HIT-SI apparatus that uses three injectors instead of two. This modification alters the configuration of magnetic fields and thus the plasma behavior in the device. The scientific aim of HIT-SI3 is to develop a deeper understanding of how injector behavior and interactions influence current drive and plasma performance in the spheromak. The Thomson Scattering system includes a 20 J (1 GW pulse) Ruby laser that provides the incident beam, and collection optics that are installed such that measurements can be taken at four spatial locations in HIT-SI3 plasmas. For each measurement point, a 3-channel polychromator is used to detect the relative level of scattering. These measurements allow for the presence of temperature gradients in the spheromak to be investigated. Preliminary HIT-SI3 temperature data are presented and can be compared to predictions from computational models. Work supported by the D.O.E.

  19. Method for Measuring the Volume-Scattering Function of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Yogesh C.

    2009-01-01

    The volume scattering function (VSF) of seawater affects visibility, remote sensing properties, in-water light propagation, lidar performance, and the like. Currently, it s possible to measure only small forward angles of VSF, or to use cumbersome, large, and non-autonomous systems. This innovation is a method of measuring the full range of VSF using a portable instrument. A single rapid-sensing photosensor is used to scan a green laser beam, which delivers the desired measurement. By using a single sensor, inter-calibration is avoided. A compact design is achieved by using drift-free detector electronics, fiber optics, and a new type of photomultiplier. This provides a high angular resolution of 1 or better, as well as the ability to focus in on a VSF region of particular interest. Currently, the total scattering of light is measured as a difference from the other two parts of the light budget equation. This innovation will allow the direct calculation of the total scattering of light by taking an integral of the VSF over all angles. This directly provides one of the three components of the light budget equation, allowing greater versatility in its calculation.

  20. Neutrinos and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, Alejandro

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos could be key particles to unravel the nature of the dark matter of the Universe. On the one hand, sterile neutrinos in minimal extensions of the Standard Model are excellent dark matter candidates, producing potentially observable signals in the form of a line in the X-ray sky. On the other hand, the annihilation or the decay of dark matter particles produces, in many plausible dark matter scenarios, a neutrino flux that could be detected at neutrino telescopes, thus providing non-gravitational evidence for dark matter. More conservatively, the non-observation of a significant excess in the neutrino fluxes with respect to the expected astrophysical backgrounds can be used to constrain dark matter properties, such as the self-annihilation cross section, the scattering cross section with nucleons and the lifetime.

  1. Meson-exchange currents and quasielastic predictions for charged-current neutrino-12C scattering in the superscaling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megias, G. D.; Donnelly, T. W.; Moreno, O.; Williamson, C. F.; Caballero, J. A.; González-Jiménez, R.; De Pace, A.; Barbaro, M. B.; Alberico, W. M.; Nardi, M.; Amaro, J. E.

    2015-04-01

    We evaluate and discuss the impact of meson-exchange currents (MECs) on charged-current quasielastic neutrino cross sections. We consider the nuclear transverse response arising from two-particle two-hole states excited by the action of electromagnetic, purely isovector meson-exchange currents in a fully relativistic framework based on the work by the Torino Collaboration [A. D. Pace, M. Nardi, W. M. Alberico, T. W. Donnelly, and A. Molinari, Nucl. Phys. A726, 303 (2003)]. An accurate parametrization of this MEC response as a function of the momentum and energy transfers involved is presented. Results of neutrino-nucleus cross sections using this MEC parametrization together with a recent scaling approach for the one-particle one-hole contributions (named SuSAv2) are compared with experimental data.

  2. Quantifying the information measured by neutron scattering instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.W.

    1997-09-01

    The concept of the information content of a scientific measurement is introduced, and a theory is presented which enables the information that may be obtained by a neutron scattering instrument to be calculated. When combined with the time taken to perform the measurement the bandwidth of the instrument is obtained. This bandwidth is effectively a figure of merit which is of use in three respects: in the design of neutron instrumentation, the optimisation of measurements, and in the comparison of one instrument with another.

  3. Multiple Point Dynamic Gas Density Measurements Using Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard; Panda, Jayanta

    1999-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique for measuring dynamic gas density properties is described. Molecular Rayleigh scattering is used to measure the time-history of gas density simultaneously at eight spatial locations at a 50 kHz sampling rate. The data are analyzed using the Welch method of modified periodograms to reduce measurement uncertainty. Cross-correlations, power spectral density functions, cross-spectral density functions, and coherence functions may be obtained from the data. The technique is demonstrated using low speed co-flowing jets with a heated inner jet.

  4. 12C(p,p‧) scattering measurement at forward angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Itoh, M.; Matsubara, H.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Fujita, Y.; Sakaguchi, H.; Zenihiro, J.; Kawabata, T.; Sasamoto, Y.; Dozono, M.; Carter, J.; Fujita, H.; Rubio, B.; Perez, A.

    Experimental method of measuring inelastic proton scattering with high-resolution at forward angles including zero degrees has been developed. An energy resolution of 20 keV and a scattering angle resolution of 0.5 degrees have been achieved as well as low background condition and a reliable background subtraction method. The experimental technique was applied to the 12C(p,p‧) reaction for studying the property of the second 0+ state at 7.7 MeV and a broad bump around Ex~10 MeV, where the presence of a 2+ state was reported from the 12C(α,α‧) measurement. Preliminary spectra and angular distributions are shown.

  5. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model. PMID:662693

  6. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitweg, J.; Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Abbiendi, G.; Anselmo, F.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Paul, E.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Barret, O.; Brook, N. H.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; McFall, J. D.; Piccioni, D.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Burgard, C.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hasell, D.; Hebbel, K.; Johnson, K. F.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Monteiro, T.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Pelucchi, F.; Petrucci, M. C.; Rohde, M.; Saull, P. R. B.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Sievers, M.; Stonjek, S.; Tassi, E.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Straub, P. B.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Lee, S. W.; Macdonald, N.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Waugh, R.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Poelz, G.; Zetsche, F.; Goncalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Mallik, U.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Park, I. H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; Glasman, C.; Gonzalez, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Barbi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Riveline, M.; Stairs, D. G.; Wing, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Y.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; van Sighem, A.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Vossebeld, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiński, J. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Wichmann, R.; Williams, D. C.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Simmons, D.; Butterworth, J. M.; Catterall, C. D.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Z˙arnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Gadaj, T.; Deppe, O.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Foudas, C.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wildschek, T.; Wodarczyk, M.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C.; Cole, J. E.; Frisken, W. R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2000-05-01

    The distribution of the azimuthal angle for the charged hadrons has been studied in the hadronic centre-of-mass system for neutral current deep inelastic positron-proton scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Measurements of the dependence of the moments of this distribution on the transverse momenta of the charged hadrons are presented. Asymmetries that can be unambiguously attributed to perturbative QCD processes have been observed for the first time.

  7. Neutrino physics with JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fengpeng; An, Guangpeng; An, Qi; Antonelli, Vito; Baussan, Eric; Beacom, John; Bezrukov, Leonid; Blyth, Simon; Brugnera, Riccardo; Buizza Avanzini, Margherita; Busto, Jose; Cabrera, Anatael; Cai, Hao; Cai, Xiao; Cammi, Antonio; Cao, Guofu; Cao, Jun; Chang, Yun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Yixue; Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Clerbaux, Barbara; Conrad, Janet; D'Angelo, Davide; De Kerret, Hervé; Deng, Zhi; Deng, Ziyan; Ding, Yayun; Djurcic, Zelimir; Dornic, Damien; Dracos, Marcos; Drapier, Olivier; Dusini, Stefano; Dye, Stephen; Enqvist, Timo; Fan, Donghua; Fang, Jian; Favart, Laurent; Ford, Richard; Göger-Neff, Marianne; Gan, Haonan; Garfagnini, Alberto; Giammarchi, Marco; Gonchar, Maxim; Gong, Guanghua; Gong, Hui; Gonin, Michel; Grassi, Marco; Grewing, Christian; Guan, Mengyun; Guarino, Vic; Guo, Gang; Guo, Wanlei; Guo, Xin-Heng; Hagner, Caren; Han, Ran; He, Miao; Heng, Yuekun; Hsiung, Yee; Hu, Jun; Hu, Shouyang; Hu, Tao; Huang, Hanxiong; Huang, Xingtao; Huo, Lei; Ioannisian, Ara; Jeitler, Manfred; Ji, Xiangdong; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Jollet, Cécile; Kang, Li; Karagounis, Michael; Kazarian, Narine; Krumshteyn, Zinovy; Kruth, Andre; Kuusiniemi, Pasi; Lachenmaier, Tobias; Leitner, Rupert; Li, Chao; Li, Jiaxing; Li, Weidong; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xiaonan; Li, Yi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Zhi-Bing; Liang, Hao; Lin, Guey-Lin; Lin, Tao; Lin, Yen-Hsun; Ling, Jiajie; Lippi, Ivano; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Hongbang; Liu, Hu; Liu, Jianglai; Liu, Jianli; Liu, Jinchang; Liu, Qian; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Shulin; Lombardi, Paolo; Long, Yongbing; Lu, Haoqi; Lu, Jiashu; Lu, Jingbin; Lu, Junguang; Lubsandorzhiev, Bayarto; Ludhova, Livia; Luo, Shu; Lyashuk, Vladimir; Möllenberg, Randolph; Ma, Xubo; Mantovani, Fabio; Mao, Yajun; Mari, Stefano M.; McDonough, William F.; Meng, Guang; Meregaglia, Anselmo; Meroni, Emanuela; Mezzetto, Mauro; Miramonti, Lino; Mueller, Thomas; Naumov, Dmitry; Oberauer, Lothar; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Ortica, Fausto; Paoloni, Alessandro; Peng, Haiping; Peng, Jen-Chieh; Previtali, Ezio; Qi, Ming; Qian, Sen; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yongzhong; Qin, Zhonghua; Raffelt, Georg; Ranucci, Gioacchino; Ricci, Barbara; Robens, Markus; Romani, Aldo; Ruan, Xiangdong; Ruan, Xichao; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Shaevitz, Mike; Sinev, Valery; Sirignano, Chiara; Sisti, Monica; Smirnov, Oleg; Soiron, Michael; Stahl, Achim; Stanco, Luca; Steinmann, Jochen; Sun, Xilei; Sun, Yongjie; Taichenachev, Dmitriy; Tang, Jian; Tkachev, Igor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw; van Waasen, Stefan; Volpe, Cristina; Vorobel, Vit; Votano, Lucia; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Wang, Guoli; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Wang, Ruiguang; Wang, Siguang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yifang; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Zhigang; Wang, Zhimin; Wei, Wei; Wen, Liangjian; Wiebusch, Christopher; Wonsak, Björn; Wu, Qun; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Wurm, Michael; Xi, Yufei; Xia, Dongmei; Xie, Yuguang; Xing, Zhi-zhong; Xu, Jilei; Yan, Baojun; Yang, Changgen; Yang, Chaowen; Yang, Guang; Yang, Lei; Yang, Yifan; Yao, Yu; Yegin, Ugur; Yermia, Frédéric; You, Zhengyun; Yu, Boxiang; Yu, Chunxu; Yu, Zeyuan; Zavatarelli, Sandra; Zhan, Liang; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Hong-Hao; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jingbo; Zhang, Qingmin; Zhang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhenghua; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhong, Weili; Zhou, Guorong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Rong; Zhou, Shun; Zhou, Wenxiong; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yeling; Zhou, Yufeng; Zou, Jiaheng

    2016-03-01

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO), a 20 kton multi-purpose underground liquid scintillator detector, was proposed with the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy (MH) as a primary physics goal. The excellent energy resolution and the large fiducial volume anticipated for the JUNO detector offer exciting opportunities for addressing many important topics in neutrino and astro-particle physics. In this document, we present the physics motivations and the anticipated performance of the JUNO detector for various proposed measurements. Following an introduction summarizing the current status and open issues in neutrino physics, we discuss how the detection of antineutrinos generated by a cluster of nuclear power plants allows the determination of the neutrino MH at a 3-4σ significance with six years of running of JUNO. The measurement of antineutrino spectrum with excellent energy resolution will also lead to the precise determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters {{sin}}2{θ }12, {{Δ }}{m}212, and | {{Δ }}{m}{ee}2| to an accuracy of better than 1%, which will play a crucial role in the future unitarity test of the MNSP matrix. The JUNO detector is capable of observing not only antineutrinos from the power plants, but also neutrinos/antineutrinos from terrestrial and extra-terrestrial sources, including supernova burst neutrinos, diffuse supernova neutrino background, geoneutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, and solar neutrinos. As a result of JUNO's large size, excellent energy resolution, and vertex reconstruction capability, interesting new data on these topics can be collected. For example, a neutrino burst from a typical core-collapse supernova at a distance of 10 kpc would lead to ˜5000 inverse-beta-decay events and ˜2000 all-flavor neutrino-proton ES events in JUNO, which are of crucial importance for understanding the mechanism of supernova explosion and for exploring novel phenomena such as collective neutrino oscillations

  8. A facility for neutrino-nucleus cross-section measurements at the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremenko, Yu.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of building a neutrino facility at the Spallation Neutron Source presently under construction at ORNL. At such a facility an extensive long-term program can be established to study neutrino nucleus cross-sections in the range of interest for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear theory.

  9. Fiber optic light-scattering measurement system for evaluation of embryo viability: light-scattering characteristics from live mouse embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1997-06-01

    We measured angular distribution of the light scattering from live mouse embryo with 632.8nm in wavelength to evaluate the embryo viability. We aim to measure the mitochondrial density in human embryo which have relation to the embryo viability. We have constructed the light scattering measurement system to detect the mitochondrial density non-invasively. We have employed two optical fibers for the illumination and sensing to change the angle between these fibers. There were two dips on the scattering angular distribution from the embryo. These dips existed on 30 and 85 deg. We calculated the scattering angular pattern by Mie theory to fit the measured scattering estimated scattering size and density. The best fitting was obtained when the particle size and density were 0.9 micrometers and 1010 particles per ml, respectively. These values coincided with the approximated values of mitochondrial in the embryo. The measured light scattering may mainly originated from mitochondria in spite of the existence of the various scattering particles in the embryo. Since our simple scattering measurement may offer the mitochondrial density in the embryo, it might become the practical method of human embryo on in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer.

  10. Thomson scattering measurements in the RFX reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Bassan, M.; Bilato, R.; Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sardella, A.

    1997-01-01

    The first systematic measurements of the electron temperature (T{sub e}) spatial profile have been obtained in the reversed field pinch experiment RFX with a single pulse Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic. Scattered light from a ruby laser pulse (E{le}15 J, {Delta}t=30 ns) is collected through three objectives from 10 positions along a diameter in the plasma equatorial plane, with a spatial resolution of 2.5 cm. Plasma discharges with current in the range 700{endash}900 kA have been investigated finding evidence of a quite flat T{sub e} profile. Data dispersion significantly greater than experimental uncertainties provides an indication of remarkable plasma fluctuations. Results are in good agreement with T{sub e} measurements from other single chord spectroscopic diagnostics (SiLi detector and SXR double filter), showing a reliable operation down to an electron density n{sub e}=3{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}. Integration of this apparatus with a ND:YLF laser system for multipulse Thomson scattering measurements, sharing the same input optics, is under way. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Probing f (R) cosmology with sterile neutrinos via measurements of scale-dependent growth rate of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we constrain the dimensionless Compton wavelength parameter B0 of f (R) gravity as well as the mass of sterile neutrino by using the cosmic microwave background observations, the baryon acoustic oscillation surveys, and the linear growth rate measurements. Since both the f (R) model and the sterile neutrino generally predict scale-dependent growth rates, we utilize the growth rate data measured in different wavenumber bins with the theoretical growth rate approximatively scale-independent in each bin. The employed growth rate data come from the peculiar velocity measurements at z = 0 in five wavenumber bins, and the redshift space distortions measurements at z = 0.25 and z = 0.37 in one wavenumber bin. By constraining the f (R) model alone, we get a tight 95% upper limit of log10 ⁡B0 < - 4.1. This result is slightly weakened to log10 ⁡B0 < - 3.8 (at 2σ level) once we simultaneously constrain the f (R) model and the sterile neutrino mass, due to the degeneracy between the parameters of the two. For the massive sterile neutrino parameters, we get the effective sterile neutrino mass m,SUB>ν,sterileeff < 0.62 eV (2σ) and the effective number of relativistic species Neff < 3.90 (2σ) in the f (R) model. As a comparison, we also obtain mν,sterileeff < 0.56 eV (2σ) and Neff < 3.92 (2σ) in the standard ΛCDM model.

  12. Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, E. W.

    1992-03-01

    This document is a technical progress report on work performed at the University of Pennsylvania during the current year on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. The motivation for the experiment is the measurement of neutrinos emitted by the sun. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a second generation dedicated solar neutrino experiment which will extend the results of our work with the Kamiokande II detector by measuring three reactions of neutrinos rather than the single reaction measured by the Kamiokande experiment. The collaborative project includes physicists from Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Full funding for the construction of this facility was obtained in Jan. 1990, and its construction is estimated to take five years. The motivation for the SNO experiment is to study the fundamental properties of neutrinos, in particular the mass and mixing parameters, which remain undetermined after decades of experiments in neutrino physics utilizing accelerators and reactors as sources of neutrinos. To continue the study of neutrino properties it is necessary to use the sun as a neutrino source. The long distance to the sun makes the search for neutrino mass sensitive to much smaller mass than can be studied with terrestrial sources. Furthermore, the matter density in the sun is sufficiently large to enhance the effects of small mixing between electron neutrinos and mu or tau neutrinos. This experiment, when combined with the results of the radiochemical Cl-37 and Ga-71 experiments and the Kamiokande II experiment, should extend our knowledge of these fundamental particles, and as a byproduct, improve our understanding of energy generation in the sun.

  13. Measurable neutrino mass scale in A{sub 4}xSU(5)

    SciTech Connect

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.; King, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a supersymmetric A{sub 4}xSU(5) model of quasidegenerate neutrinos which predicts the effective neutrino mass m{sub ee} relevant for neutrinoless double beta decay to be proportional to the neutrino mass scale, thereby allowing its determination approximately independently of unknown Majorana phases. Such a natural quasidegeneracy is achieved by using A{sub 4} family symmetry (as an example of a non-Abelian family symmetry with real triplet representations) to enforce a contribution to the neutrino mass matrix proportional to the identity. Tribimaximal neutrino mixing as well as quark CP violation with {alpha}{approx_equal}90 deg. d a leptonic CP phase {delta}{sub MNS{approx_equal}}90 deg. arise from the breaking of the A{sub 4} family symmetry by the vacuum expectation values of four 'flavon' fields pointing in specific postulated directions in flavor space.

  14. Measurement of neutrino oscillations with the MINOS detectors in the NuMI beam.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Andreopoulos, C; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Baller, B; Barnes, P D; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehm, J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Cavanaugh, S; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Coleman, S J; Culling, A J; de Jong, J K; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Dytman, S A; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Harris, E Falk; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Godley, A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, J J; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Ma, J; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Merzon, G I; Messier, M D; Metelko, C J; Michael, D G; Miller, J L; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlović, Z; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Peterson, E A; Petyt, D A; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahaman, A; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ruddick, K; Ryabov, V A; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Seun, S-M; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Symes, P; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tavera, M A; Thomas, J; Thompson, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Yang, T; Zois, M; Zhang, K; Zwaska, R

    2008-09-26

    This Letter reports new results from the MINOS experiment based on a two-year exposure to muon neutrinos from the Fermilab NuMI beam. Our data are consistent with quantum-mechanical oscillations of neutrino flavor with mass splitting |Deltam2| = (2.43+/-0.13) x 10(-3) eV2 (68% C.L.) and mixing angle sin2(2theta) > 0.90 (90% C.L.). Our data disfavor two alternative explanations for the disappearance of neutrinos in flight: namely, neutrino decays into lighter particles and quantum decoherence of neutrinos, at the 3.7 and 5.7 standard-deviation levels, respectively. PMID:18851439

  15. Measurement of Neutrino Oscillations with the MINOS Detectors in the NuMI Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Baller, B.; Bernstein, R. H.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Grossman, N.; Harris, D.; Hatcher, R.; Hylen, J.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Koizumi, G.; Kreymer, A.; Lucas, P.; Marchionni, A.; Moore, C. D.

    2008-09-26

    This Letter reports new results from the MINOS experiment based on a two-year exposure to muon neutrinos from the Fermilab NuMI beam. Our data are consistent with quantum-mechanical oscillations of neutrino flavor with mass splitting |{delta}m{sup 2}|=(2.43{+-}0.13)x10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} (68% C.L.) and mixing angle sin{sup 2}(2{theta})>0.90 (90% C.L.). Our data disfavor two alternative explanations for the disappearance of neutrinos in flight: namely, neutrino decays into lighter particles and quantum decoherence of neutrinos, at the 3.7 and 5.7 standard-deviation levels, respectively.

  16. Neutrino Interactions with Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U.; Alvarez-Ruso, L.

    2007-12-21

    We investigate neutrino-nucleus collisions at intermediate energies incorporating quasielastic scattering and the excitation of 13 resonances as elementary processes, taking into account medium effects such as Fermi motion, Pauli blocking, mean-field potentials and in-medium spectral functions. A coupled-channel treatment of final state interactions is achieved with the GiBUU transport model. Results for inclusive reactions, neutrino- and electron-induced, as well as for pion production and nucleon knockout are presented.

  17. Characterization of scatter in digital mammography from physical measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Stephanie M. Wagner, Louis K.; Brateman, Libby F.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: That scattered radiation negatively impacts the quality of medical radiographic imaging is well known. In mammography, even slight amounts of scatter reduce the high contrast required for subtle soft-tissue imaging. In current clinical mammography, image contrast is partially improved by use of an antiscatter grid. This form of scatter rejection comes with a sizeable dose penalty related to the concomitant elimination of valuable primary radiation. Digital mammography allows the use of image processing as a method of scatter correction that might avoid effects that negatively impact primary radiation, while potentially providing more contrast improvement than is currently possible with a grid. For this approach to be feasible, a detailed characterization of the scatter is needed. Previous research has modeled scatter as a constant background that serves as a DC bias across the imaging surface. The goal of this study was to provide a more substantive data set for characterizing the spatially-variant features of scatter radiation at the image detector of modern mammography units. Methods: This data set was acquired from a model of the radiation beam as a matrix of very narrow rays or pencil beams. As each pencil beam penetrates tissue, the pencil widens in a predictable manner due to the production of scatter. The resultant spreading of the pencil beam at the detector surface can be characterized by two parameters: mean radial extent (MRE) and scatter fraction (SF). The SF and MRE were calculated from measurements obtained using the beam stop method. Two digital mammography units were utilized, and the SF and MRE were found as functions of target, filter, tube potential, phantom thickness, and presence or absence of a grid. These values were then used to generate general equations allowing the SF and MRE to be calculated for any combination of the above parameters. Results: With a grid, the SF ranged from a minimum of about 0.05 to a maximum of about 0

  18. A measurement of the neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic cross section at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, David Christopher

    2008-02-01

    The neutral current neutrino-nucleon elastic interaction v N → v N is a fundamental process of the weak interaction ideally suited for characterizing the structure of the nucleon neutral weak current. This process comprises ~18% of neutrino events in the neutrino oscillation experiment, MiniBooNE, ranking it as the experiment's third largest process. Using ~10% of MiniBooNE's available neutrino data, a sample of these events were identified and analyzed to determine the differential cross section as a function of the momentum transfer of the interaction, Q2. This is the first measurement of a differential cross section with MiniBooNE data. From this analysis, a value for the nucleon axial mass MA was extracted to be 1.34 ± 0.25 GeV consistent with previous measurements. The integrated cross section for the Q2 range 0.189 → 1.13 GeV2 was calculated to be (8.8 ± 0.6(stat) ± 0.2(syst)) x 10-40 cm2.

  19. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  20. Measurements of radio propagation in rock salt for the detection of high-energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Amy; Goodhue, Abigail; Miki, Christian; Nichol, Ryan; Saltzberg, David

    2009-02-01

    We present measurements of the transmission of radio/microwave pulses through salt in the Cote Blanche salt mine operated by the North American Salt Company in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. These results are from data taken in the southwestern region of the 1500 ft (457 m) deep level of the mine on our third and most recent visit to the mine. We transmitted and received a fast, high-power, broadband pulse from within three vertical boreholes that were drilled to depths of 100 ft (30 m) and 200 ft below the 1500 ft level using three different pairs of dipole antennas whose bandwidths span 125-900 MHz. By measuring the relative strength of the received pulses between boreholes with separations of 50 and 169 m, we deduce the attenuation of the signal attributed to the salt medium. We fit the frequency dependence of the attenuation to a power law and find the best fit field attenuation lengths to be 93±7m at 150 MHz, 63±3m at 300 MHz, and 36±2m at 800 MHz. This is the most precise measurement of radio attenuation in a natural salt formation to date. We assess the implications of this measurement for a future neutrino detector in salt.