Science.gov

Sample records for neutron activation experiments

  1. Neutron field for activation experiments in horizontal channel of training reactor VR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanik, Milan; Katovsky, Karel; Vins, Miroslav; Soltes, Jaroslav; Zavorka, Lukas

    2014-11-01

    The experimental channels of nuclear reactors often serve for nuclear data measurement and validation. The dosimetry-foils activation technique was employed to measure neutron field parameters in the horizontal radial channel of the training reactor VR-1, and to test the possibility of using the reactor for scientific purposes. The reaction rates, energy spectral indexes, and neutron spectrum at several irradiation positions of the experimental channel were determined. The experimental results show the feasibility of the radial channel for irradiating experiments and open new possibilities for data validation by using this nuclear facility.

  2. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments including activation energies and mathematical modeling of methyl halide dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstein, O.; Prager, M.; Grimm, H.; Buchsteiner, A.; Wischnewski, A.

    2007-09-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were carried out using the multichopper time-of-flight spectrometer V3 at the Hahn-Meitner Institut, Germany and the backscattering spectrometer at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. Activation energies for CH3X, X =F, Cl, Br, and I, were obtained. In combination with results from previous inelastic neutron scattering experiments the data were taken to describe the dynamics of the halides in terms of two different models, the single particle model and the coupling model. Coupled motions of methyl groups seem to explain the dynamics of the methyl fluoride and chloride; however, the coupling vanishes with the increase of the mass of the halide atom in CH3Br and CH3I.

  3. High-flux white neutron source based on p(35)-Be reactions for activation experiments at NPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanik, Milan; Bem, Pavel; Gotz, Miloslav; Katovsky, Karel; Majerle, Mitja; Novak, Jan; Simeckova, Eva

    2014-11-01

    The concept of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is based on the d(40)-Li neutron source reaction which produces the white neutron spectrum with mean energy of 14 MeV, energy range with high intensity of neutron beam up to 35 MeV, and weak tail up to 55 MeV. At the Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR in Rez near Prague, the source reaction of p+Be was investigated for proton energy of 35 MeV and beam current intensity of 9.2 μA. The produced white spectrum with neutron flux up to 1011 cm-2 s-1 was determined by the dosimetry foils activation technique at two sample-to-target distances and validated against the Monte Carlo predictions. The neutron field of these high-flux p(35)-Be white neutron source represents the useful tool for experimental simulation of the spectrum of the IFMIF facility, validating the activation cross-section data in the energy range relevant to the IFMIF, studying the radiation hardness of electronics against the high-energy neutron fields, and various activation experiments.

  4. Fusion neutronics experiments and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    UCLA has led the neutronics R D effort in the US for the past several years through the well-established USDOE/JAERI Collaborative Program on Fusion Neutronics. Significant contributions have been made in providing solid bases for advancing the neutronics testing capabilities in fusion reactors. This resulted from the hands-on experience gained from conducting several fusion integral experiments to quantify the prediction uncertainties of key blanket design parameters such as tritium production rate, activation, and nuclear heating, and when possible, to narrow the gap between calculational results and measurements through improving nuclear data base and codes capabilities. The current focus is to conduct the experiments in an annular configuration where the test assembly totally surrounds a simulated line source. The simulated line source is the first-of-a-kind in the scope of fusion integral experiments and presents a significant contribution to the world of fusion neutronics. The experiments proceeded through Phase IIIA to Phase IIIC in these line source simulation experiments started in 1989.

  5. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  6. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  7. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  8. Thermal neutron activation experiments on Ag, In, Cs, Eu, V, Mo, Zn, Sn and Zr in the MINERVE facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leconte, Pierre; Geslot, Benoit; Gruel, Adrien; Pépino, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    The MAESTRO experimental program has been designed to improve nuclear data uncertainty on a large range of materials used for detection, absorption, moderation and structures in LWRs. It consists of pile-oscillation and neutron activation experiments, carried out in the MINERVE low power facility. For this program, the core configuration has been designed to be representative of HZP (Hot Zero Power) conditions of a typical PWR. Samples of high purity elements have been manufactured with severe technological constraints to reach a target accuracy of ±2% (1σ) on the measurement. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of activation experiments, based on TRIPOLI4 Monte-Carlo calculations and various nuclear data libraries.

  9. Calculation of self-shielding factor for neutron activation experiments using GEANT4 and MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Barrientos, Jaime; Molina, F.; Aguilera, Pablo; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-07-01

    The neutron self-shielding factor G as a function of the neutron energy was obtained for 14 pure metallic samples in 1000 isolethargic energy bins from 1.10-5eV to 2.107eV using Monte Carlo simulations in GEANT4 and MCNP6. The comparison of these two Monte Carlo codes shows small differences in the final self-shielding factor mostly due to the different cross section databases that each program uses.

  10. M-ARIANE (Mirror-assisted Active Readout In A Neutron Environment): an x-ray imaging system for implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility at ignition neutron yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Ayers, J.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Cerjan, C.; Emig, J.; Felker, B.; Glenn, S. M.; Hagmann, C.; Holder, J.; Izumi, N.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Moody, J.; Piston, K.; Simanovskaia, N.; Walton, C.

    2013-09-01

    X-ray imaging diagnostics instruments will operate in a harsh ionizing radiation background environment during ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This background consists of mostly neutrons and gamma rays produced by inelastic scattering of neutrons. An imaging system, M-ARIANE (Mirror-assisted Active Readout In A Neutron Environment), based on an x-ray framing camera with film, has been designed to operate in such a harsh neutron-induced background environment. Multilayer x-ray mirrors and a shielding enclosure are the key components of this imaging system which is designed to operate at ignition neutron yields of ~1e18 on NIF. Modeling of the neutronand gamma-induced backgrounds along with the signal and noise of the x-ray imaging system is presented that display the effectiveness of this design.

  11. European Neutron Activation System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  12. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  13. Neutron activation for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.; Nishitani, Takeo

    1996-04-29

    There are three primary goals for the Neutron Activation system for ITER: maintain a robust relative measure of fusion power with stability and high dynamic range (7 orders of magnitude); allow an absolute calibration of fusion power (energy); and provide a flexible and reliable system for materials testing. The nature of the activation technique is such that stability and high dynamic range can be intrinsic properties of the system. It has also been the technique that demonstrated (on JET and TFTR) the highest accuracy neutron measurements in DT operation. Since the gamma-ray detectors are not located on the tokamak and are therefore amenable to accurate characterization, and if material foils are placed very close to the ITER plasma with minimum scattering or attenuation, high overall accuracy in the fusion energy production (7--10%) should be achievable on ITER. In the paper, a conceptual design is presented. A system is shown to be capable of meeting these three goals, also detailed design issues remain to be solved.

  14. Neutron activation analysis in the life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2011-03-01

    Development of methods for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and their applications in the life sciences are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on epithermal activation with reactor neutrons (ENAA), and the advantages of this technique in analysis of environmental objects are shown. The results of applied INAA studies in the field of the life sciences carried out at the world's leading nuclear centers are reported. Experience in employing a radioanalytical complex at the IBR-2 reactor (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna) for such studies is summarized.

  15. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-27

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  16. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Paducha, M.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Karpinski, L.; Pytel, K.

    2014-08-21

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction {sup 9}Be(n, α){sup 6}He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, {sup 6}He, decays with half-life T{sub 1/2} = 0.807 s emitting β{sup −} particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of β–particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known β–source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5–the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of β{sup −} particles emitted from radioactive {sup 6}He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  17. Neutron Unfolding Code System for Calculating Neutron Flux Spectra from Activation Data of Dosimeter Foils.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1982-04-30

    Version 00 As a part of the measurement and analysis plan for the Dosimetry Experiment at the "JOYO" experimental fast reactor, neutron flux spectral analysis is performed using the NEUPAC (Neutron Unfolding Code Package) code system. NEUPAC calculates the neutron flux spectra and other integral quantities from the activation data of the dosimeter foils.

  18. Optimization of Neutron Shielding for the PICASSO Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, S.; Aubin, F.; Auger, M.; Genest, M.-H.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Faust, R.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, L.; Martin, J.-P.; Kumaratunga, S.; Piro, M.-C.; Starinski, N.; Zacek, V.; Behnke, E.; Levine, I.; Shepherd, T.; Beltran, B.; Krauss, C.; MacDonald, R.

    2009-11-09

    The PICASSO experiment searches WIMPs via their spin-dependent interactions with nuclei. At their operating temperatures, PICASSO threshold detectors are not sensitive to {gamma}-rays, while it is necessary to suppress neutron and {alpha}-ray backgrounds. The different types of neutron shielding (water, polyethylene, borated water and polyethylene doped with different compounds of boron and lithium) were studied via the Monte Carlo method using MCNPX code. Efficiencies of these different types of neutron shielding were compared from the point of view of neutron suppression as well as number of newly born y-rays. The neutrons and {gamma}-rays were followed up to the PICASSO detector active material. The most suitable neutron shielding for the PICASSO experiment was determined following these simulations.

  19. Enhanced NIF neutron activation diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yeamans, C. B.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.

    2012-10-15

    The NIF neutron activation diagnostic suite relies on removable activation samples, leading to operational inefficiencies and a fundamental lower limit on the half-life of the activated product that can be observed. A neutron diagnostic system measuring activation of permanently installed samples could remove these limitations and significantly enhance overall neutron diagnostic capabilities. The physics and engineering aspects of two proposed systems are considered: one measuring the {sup 89}Zr/{sup 89m}Zr isomer ratio in the existing Zr activation medium and the other using potassium zirconate as the activation medium. Both proposed systems could improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the current system by at least a factor of 5 and would allow independent measurement of fusion core velocity and fuel areal density.

  20. Neutron and proton activation measurements from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by high-energy protons and secondary neutrons (from nuclear interactions) in various samples returned from different locations in Skylab was measured directly by gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of decay gamma rays from the samples. Incident fluxes were derived from the activation measurements, using known nuclear cross-section. Neutron and proton flux values were found to range from 0.2 to 5 particles/sq cm-sec, depending on the energy range and location in Skylab. The thermal neutron flux was less than 0.07 neutrons/sq cm-sec. The results are useful for data analysis and planning of future high-energy astronomy experiments.

  1. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.

    2009-01-28

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 10 eV and 250 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) events from (n,f) events. The first direct observation of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  2. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 35 eV and 200 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented, where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, the Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) from (n,f) events. The first evidence of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  3. The JET Neutron Activation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, A. L.; Bertalot, L.; Esposito, B.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G.; van Belle, P.

    1997-11-01

    The JET activation system provides the absolute value of the neutron yields as well as a check on the linearity of other neutron detector systems. The total neutron yield is standardized to one irradiation end reentrant in the top of the vessel, while the results from the other seven irradiation ends are normalized to this standard end and provide redundancy as well as information on the plasma position. A pneumatic transfer system is used to transfer up to five capsules containing elemental foils for a single discharge on JET. Eleven different elemental foils have been utilized to determine the yields from both DD and DT plasmas. By placing several different foils with different activation energy thresholds in a single capsule for one DT discharge, neutron spectral information has been obtained by use of the SAND-II unfolding code. A description of the activation system hardware and calibration of the activation detector system will be presented along with the results from the DT neutron calibration campaign.

  4. Active Neutron Shielding R&D for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter; Dmtpc Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Neutrons are a dangerous background to direct dark matter detection searches because they can mimic exactly the signal signature. For this reason, it is desirable to measure the neutron flux directly at underground sites where dark matter experiments are active. We have developed a liquid scintillator-based neutron detector for this purpose, which is currently underground and taking data at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in NM. Before being commissioned underground, the response of this detector to neutrons with kinetic energies from 50 MeV to 800 MeV was determined in a beam test at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in NM. The goal of this R&D is to (i) demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale active and passive neutron shield for dark matter searches and (ii) to measure the neutron energy spectrum underground at WIPP above 50 MeV neutron kinetic energies.

  5. Neutron imaging development for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillaud, Tony; Landoas, Olivier; Thfoin, Isabelle; Philippe, Franck; Casner, Alexis; Bourgade, Jean-Luc; Glebov, Vladimir; Marshall, Frederic J.; Sangster, Craig; Park, Hye Sook; Robey, Harry; Amendt, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Various failure mechanisms may limit fuel compression and ignition during Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments with MegaJoule class lasers (e.g., the Laser M'egaJoule: LMJ and the National Ignition Facility: NIF). A Neutron Imaging System (NIS) may be used to determine the asymmetries in the hot core and the surrounding cold fuel shell. To reveal such asymmetries, a NIS must record both a primary (14 MeV) and a down-scattered (5-10 MeV) neutron image with high SNR and an image plane spatial resolution as low as 5 μm. We report on the continuing development of an NIS diagnostic at the OMEGA laser facility, using coded apertures. A new large neutron camera (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for LMJ/NIF design) has been activated at OMEGA. This camera will allow 5 μm resolution for LMJ neutron source. We have tested a set of three detectors that can be used for various NIS diagnostic experiments on OMEGA from low yield (10^9-10^10 neutrons) low resolution (32 μm) measurements at 4 m from the neutron source to high yield (10^12-10^14 neutrons) high resolution (15 μm) measurements at 13 m. The low yield configuration allowed us to record, the first neutron image on an indirect drive shot with pure deuterium filled capsules.

  6. Fusion neutronics-streaming, shielding, heating, activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.; Richter, D.; Seidel, K.; Unholzer, S.

    2001-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) represents an important step towards a fusion power plant. Controlled fusion will be realized in a d-t-plasma magnetically confined by a Tokamak configuration. The first wall of the plasma chamber, blanket and vacuum vessel of ITER form a compact assembly for converting the kinetic energy of fusion neutrons into heat while simultaneously shielding the superconducting coils efficiently against neutron and accompanying photon radiation. This shielding system can be investigated with neutrons generated by low-energy accelerators. We report on experiments concerning shielding and streaming properties of a mock-up where energy spectra of both neutrons and protons were measured. They are compared with predictions of Monte Carlo calculations (code MCNP-4A) using various data libraries. The agreement justified the use of measured spectra as basis to calculate design parameters such as neutron and photon heating, radiation damage, gas production, and activation. Some of these parameters were also directly measured. The results validate the ITER design.

  7. Neutron activation system for spectral measurements of pulsed ion diode neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Kruse, L.W.

    1980-02-01

    A neutron energy spectrometer has been developed to study intense ion beam-target interactions in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam source. The main component is a neutron threshold activation system employing two multiplexed high efficiency Ge(Li) detectors, an annihilation gamma coincidence system, and a pneumatic sample transport. Additional constraints on the neutron spectrum are provided by total neutron yield and time-of-flight measurements. A practical lower limit on the total neutron yield into 4..pi.. required for a spectral measurement with this system is approx. 10/sup 10/ n where the neutron yield is predominantly below 4 MeV and approx. 10/sup 8/ n when a significant fraction of the yield is above 4 MeV. Applications of this system to pulsed ion diode neutron production experiments on Hermes II are described.

  8. Neutron Scattering Experiment Automation with Python

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierczuk, Piotr A; Riedel, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory currently holds the Guinness World Record as the world most powerful pulsed spallation neutron source. Neutrons scattered off atomic nuclei in a sample yield important information about the position, motions, and magnetic properties of atoms in materials. A neutron scattering experiment usually involves sample environment control (temperature, pressure, etc.), mechanical alignment (slits, sample and detector position), magnetic field controllers, neutron velocity selection (choppers) and neutron detectors. The SNS Data Acquisition System (DAS) consists of real-time sub-system (detector read-out with custom electronics, chopper interface), data preprocessing (soft real-time) and a cluster of control and ancillary PCs. The real-time system runs FPGA firmware and programs running on PCs (C++, LabView) typically perform one task such as motor control and communicate via TCP/IP networks. PyDas is a set of Python modules that are used to integrate various components of the SNS DAS system. It enables customized automation of neutron scattering experiments in a rapid and flexible manner. It provides wxPython GUIs for routine experiments as well as IPython command line scripting. Matplotlib and numpy are used for data presentation and simple analysis. We will present an overview of SNS Data Acquisition System and PyDas architectures and implementation along with the examples of use. We will also discuss plans for future development as well as the challenges that have to be met while maintaining PyDas for 20+ different scientific instruments.

  9. Measurements of fusion neutron yields by neutron activation technique: Uncertainty due to the uncertainty on activation cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankunas, Gediminas; Batistoni, Paola; Sjöstrand, Henrik; Conroy, Sean

    2015-07-01

    The neutron activation technique is routinely used in fusion experiments to measure the neutron yields. This paper investigates the uncertainty on these measurements as due to the uncertainties on dosimetry and activation reactions. For this purpose, activation cross-sections were taken from the International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File (IRDFF-v1.05) in 640 groups ENDF-6 format for several reactions of interest for both 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons. Activation coefficients (reaction rates) have been calculated using the neutron flux spectra at JET vacuum vessel, both for DD and DT plasmas, calculated by MCNP in the required 640-energy group format. The related uncertainties for the JET neutron spectra are evaluated as well using the covariance data available in the library. These uncertainties are in general small, but not negligible when high accuracy is required in the determination of the fusion neutron yields.

  10. Utilization of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, R.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Popek, R.J.; Schulke, A.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) neutron scattering facility (NSF) has been investigated for its applicability to neutron activation analysis. A polyethylene insert has been added to the vertical hole VT3 which enhances the thermal neutron flux by a factor of two. The neutron spectral distribution at this position has been measured by the multiple-foil technique which utilized 28 activation reactions and the STAYSL computer code. The validity of this spectral measurement was tested by two irradiations of National Bureau of Standards SRM-1571 (orchard leaves), SRM-1575 (pine needles), and SRM-1645 (river sediment). The average thermal neutron flux for these irradiations normalized to 10 ..mu..amp proton beam is 4.0 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-s. Concentrations of nine trace elements in each of these SRMs have been determined by gamma-ray spectrometry. Agreement of measured values to certified values is demonstrated to be within experiment error.

  11. Neutron Interference Experiments and Quantum Measurement Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiko, M.; Otake, Y.; Soshi, H.

    1987-03-01

    Physical and epistemological implications of recent experiments on the neutron interference are discussed from the viewpoint of the Machida-Namiki theory of measurement in quantum mechanics, without resort to discussion on the number-phase uncertainty relation. The same idea is also applied to the neutrino oscillation problem.

  12. PLANS FOR A NEUTRON EDM EXPERIMENT AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    ITO, TAKEYASU

    2007-01-31

    The electric dipole moment of the neutron, leptons, and atoms provide a unique window to Physics Beyond the Standard Model. They are currently developing a new neutron EDM experiment (the nEDM Experiment). This experiment, which will be run at the 8.9 {angstrom} Neutron Line at the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FNPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will search for the neutron EDM with a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the present limit. In this paper, the motivation for the experiment, the experimental method, and the present status of the experiment are discussed.

  13. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  14. Neutron Activation Analysis of Water - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, John D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent developments in this field are emphasized. After a brief review of basic principles, topics discussed include sources of neutrons, pre-irradiation physical and chemical treatment of samples, neutron capture and gamma-ray analysis, and selected applications. Applications of neutron activation analysis of water have increased rapidly within the last few years and may be expected to increase in the future.

  15. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  16. Neutron Tracking Simulations for the UCNτ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamek, Evan

    2012-10-01

    The UCNτ experiment aims to measure the neutron beta-decay lifetime to 1 s total uncertainty and beyond by trapping ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a gravito-magnetic trap, in which UCN will undergo no material wall interactions. To study the feasibility in this experimental technique, we have built Monte-Carlo simulations of the full-scale UCNτ experiment. The simulation program consists of two major components: one focuses on simulation of the UCN flux in the guide tubes, and the other on UCN tracking inside the trap. The first simulation studies optimized delivery of UCN into the trap and evaluates the effectiveness of relative flux monitoring to infer the number of trappable UCN for each fill. The second simulation tracks UCN, originating from the trap door, over the entire accessible region. Symplectic integrators are used to integrate the equations of motion of UCN using the full potential. Focus is given to studying the phase-space evolution of marginally trapped UCN. These neutrons have a large tangential velocity component and could be leaking out of the trap slowly (due to non-harmonic components in the trapping potential) and thus skewing the accuracy of the neutron beta-decay lifetime. In this talk, we will discuss many of these subtle effects.

  17. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

  18. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized.

  19. First experiments on neutron detection on the accelerator-based source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Makarov, A. N.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    A pilot accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons, which is intended for wide application in clinics for boron neutron capture therapy, has been constructed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). A stationary proton beam has been obtained and near-threshold neutron generation regime has been realized. Results of the first experiments on neutron generation using the proposed source are described.

  20. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, R. A.; Carothers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates.

  1. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Folden, Charles M., III; Nitsche, Heino; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objective of this project is the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of importance to stewardship science and astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis, while at the same time helping to train the next generation of scientists with expertise relevant to U.S. national nuclear security missions and to stewardship science. A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. Much of the information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. Measurements of these neutron capture cross sections are being conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the unique Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). In our early discussions with the DANCE group, decisions were made on the first cross sections to be measured and how our expertise in target preparation, radiochemical separations chemistry, and data analysis could best be applied. The initial emphasis of the project was on preparing suitable targets of both natural and separated stable europium isotopes in preparation for the ultimate goal of preparing a sufficiently large target of radioactive 155Eu (t1/2 = 4.7 years) and other radioactive and stable species for neutron cross-section measurements at DANCE. Our Annual Report, ''Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei'' by J. M. Schwantes, R. Sudowe, C. M. Folden III, H. Nitsche, and D. C. Hoffman, submitted to NNSA in December 2003, gives details about the initial considerations and scope of the project. During the current reporting period, electroplated targets of natural Eu together with valuable, stable, and isotopically pure 151Eu and 153Eu, and isotopically separated 154Sm were measured for

  2. Planetary Geochemistry Using Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detector (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth, The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asterOIds, comets and the satellites of the outer planets, Gamma-Ray Spectrometers have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially in the case of Mars Odyssey, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars, Neutron detectors have also been placed onboard orbital missions such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and Lunar Prospector to measure the hydrogen content of the surface of the moon, The DAN in situ experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory not only includes neutron detectors, but also has its own neutron generator, However, no one has ever combined the three into one instrument PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine subsurface elemental composition without drilling. We are testing PNG-GRAND at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 m x 1 m granite structure in an empty field, We will present data from the operation of PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a known sample in a geometry that is identical to that which can be achieved on a planetary surface. We will also compare the material composition results inferred from our experiments to both an independent laboratory elemental composition analysis and MCNPX computer modeling results,

  3. Neutron activation analysis of Etruscan pottery

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.; Silverman, A.; Ouellet, C.G.; Clark, D.D.; Hossain, T.Z

    1992-07-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been widely used in archaeology for compositional analysis of pottery samples taken from sites of archaeological importance. Elemental profiles can determine the place of manufacture. At Cornell, samples from an Etruscan site near Siena, Italy, are being studied. The goal of this study is to compile a trace element concentration profile for a large number of samples. These profiles will be matched with an existing data bank in an attempt to understand the place of origin for these samples. The 500 kW TRIGA reactor at the Ward Laboratory is used to collect NAA data for these samples. Experiments were done to set a procedure for the neutron activation analysis with respect to sample preparation, selection of irradiation container, definition of activation and counting parameters and data reduction. Currently, we are able to analyze some 27 elements in samples of mass 500 mg with a single irradiation of 4 hours and two sequences of counting. Our sensitivity for many of the trace elements is better than 1 ppm by weight under the conditions chosen. In this talk, details of our procedure, including quality assurance as measured by NIST standard reference materials, will be discussed. In addition, preliminary results from data treatment using cluster analysis will be presented. (author)

  4. Feasibility studies for high pressure neutron powder diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Von Dreele, R.B. ); Parise, J. )

    1990-01-01

    We recently performed two neutron powder diffraction experiments on very small samples on the High Intensity Powder Diffractometer (HIPD). These were done to determine the feasibility of performing in situ high pressure/high temperature neutron diffraction experiments on HIPD at pressures which would exceed the previous limit of {approximately}50 kbar achievable in a neutron diffraction experiment. The first experiment consisted of examining the product from a high pressure preparation done at Stony Brook. The sample, which had been prepared at 65 kbar and 1000{degree}C, consisted of a small platinum capsule filled with CaGeO{sub 3} perovskite. The weights of the capsule included 225 mg of platinum and 49 mg of the germanate. A diffraction experiment taking {approximately}8.6 hrs at a LANSCE proton beam current of {approximately}53 {mu}A gave peaks of good intensity from both Pt and CaGeO{sub 3}; we could begin to see them after only 20 min of beam time. The second experiment was to test the possibility of diffraction from a high pressure apparatus. We placed in the HIPD sample position the central assembly from a 100 kbar octahedral press. Four tungsten carbide anvils and a copper block previously pressed to 65 kbar were held in an aluminum frame. The sample consisted of a small bit of nickel foil (175 mg) placed in a 3 mm hole in the copper block. The active sample volume is defined by the gap between the anvils and the length of the sample. A small portion of the copper block is also seen in this arrangement. This is viewed at 90{degree} 2{Theta} through a similar gap between the anvils by 4 1/2 in. {times} 12 in. {sup 3}He counter tubes. This arrangement simulates the operating conditions of a high pressure run at 100 kbar and takes advantage of the fixed instrument geometry possible in time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments.

  5. Neutronic aspects of a DHCE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Tsai, H.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    The DHCE (Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment) irradiation experiment was conceived to simulate fusion-relevant helium production in a fission reactor irradiation. The main objective is to maintain the Helium-to-DPA ratio at, roughly, the same level as expected in a fusion environment. The problem in fission reactor irradiation is that Helium production is very low, because the fission neutrons, for basically all structural materials relevant for fusion applications, do not have enough energy to trigger the Helium producing reactions. A DHCE experiment involves the decay of Tritium to Helium-3 to produce the required Helium during irradiation. This paper describes an analysis of the most important aspects of a DHCE experiment and compares different types of fission reactors and their suitability for performing such an experiment. It is concluded that DHCE experiments are feasible in a certain class of mixed-spectrum fission reactors, but a careful and detailed evaluation, for each facility and condition, must be performed to ensure the success of the experiment.

  6. Detector for advanced neutron capture experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, Robert C.; Hunt, L. F.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Strottman, D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4x barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is bcing implemented

  7. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Fowler, M.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    2003-08-26

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4{pi} barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is being implemented.

  8. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  9. Neutron and deuteron activation calculations for IFMIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, R. A.; Loughlin, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    The materials for future fusion devices such as DEMO require testing to high neutron fluence. Such testing is planned to be carried out in IFMIF, an accelerator based facility where the neutrons will have maximum energy of about 55 MeV, but with a broad peak near 14 MeV. In order that activation calculations for IFMIF can be carried out, the nuclear data must contain cross sections covering a similar energy range. A description of the EASY-2005 system is given and it is noted that a new library has been added to EASY to cover another significant source of activation from deuteron-induced reactions. Calculations of the neutron activation of materials in many regions of IFMIF have been carried out. These calculations are reported, and the contribution of neutrons above 20 MeV to the activation is discussed. Preliminary calculations using the deuteron library have been made and the activation from deuterons is discussed.

  10. Calibration of the neutron detectors for the cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Dyer, G.; Rougk, J.; Kim, I.; McCormick, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2012-06-15

    Three types of neutron detectors (plastic scintillation detectors, indium activation detectors, and CR-39 track detectors) were calibrated for the measurement of 2.45 MeV DD fusion neutron yields from the deuterium cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser. A Cf-252 neutron source and 2.45 MeV fusion neutrons generated from laser-cluster interaction were used as neutron sources. The scintillation detectors were calibrated such that they can detect up to 10{sup 8} DD fusion neutrons per shot in current mode under high electromagnetic pulse environments. Indium activation detectors successfully measured neutron yields as low as 10{sup 4} per shot and up to 10{sup 11} neutrons. The use of a Cf-252 neutron source allowed cross calibration of CR-39 and indium activation detectors at high neutron yields ({approx}10{sup 11}). The CR-39 detectors provided consistent measurements of the total neutron yield of Cf-252 when a modified detection efficiency of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} was used. The combined use of all three detectors allowed for a detection range of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 11} neutrons per shot.

  11. NONDESTRUCTIVE MULTIELEMENT INSTRUMENTAL NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A nondestructive instrumental neutron activation analysis procedure permitted accurate and sensitive measurement of most elements with atomic numbers between 11 and 92. The sensitivity of the procedure was dependent on each element's intrinsic characteristics and the sample matri...

  12. Design considerations for neutron activation and neutron source strength monitors for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Jassby, D.L.; LeMunyan, G.; Roquemore, A.L.; Walker, C.

    1997-12-31

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will require highly accurate measurements of fusion power production in time, space, and energy. Spectrometers in the neutron camera could do it all, but experience has taught us that multiple methods with redundancy and complementary uncertainties are needed. Previously, conceptual designs have been presented for time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron source strength monitors, both of which will be important parts of the integrated suite of neutron diagnostics for this purpose. The primary goals of the neutron activation system are: to maintain a robust relative measure of fusion energy production with stability and wide dynamic range; to enable an accurate absolute calibration of fusion power using neutronic techniques as successfully demonstrated on JET and TFTR; and to provide a flexible system for materials testing. The greatest difficulty is that the irradiation locations need to be close to plasma with a wide field of view. The routing of the pneumatic system is difficult because of minimum radius of curvature requirements and because of the careful need for containment of the tritium and activated air. The neutron source strength system needs to provide real-time source strength vs. time with {approximately}1 ms resolution and wide dynamic range in a robust and reliable manner with the capability to be absolutely calibrated by in-situ neutron sources as done on TFTR, JT-60U, and JET. In this paper a more detailed look at the expected neutron flux field around ITER is folded into a more complete design of the fission chamber system.

  13. Neutron coincidence imaging for active and passive neutron assays

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R. J.; Brunson, G. S.; Melton, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron multiplicity assay algorithms for {sup 240}Pu assume a point source of fission neutrons that are detected in a single detector channel. The {sup 240}Pu in real waste, however, is more likely to be distributed throughout the container in some random way. For different reasons, this leads to significant errors when using either multiplicity or simpler coincidence analyses. Reduction of these errors can be achieved using tomographic imaging. In this talk we report on our results from using neutron singles and coincidence data between tagged detector pairs to provide enhanced tomographic imaging capabilities to a crate nondestructive assay system. Only simulated passive coincidence data is examined here, although the higher signal rates from active coincidence counting hold more promise for waste management. The active coincidence approach has significantly better sensitivity than the passive and is not significantly perturbed by (alpha,n) contributions. Our study was based primarily on simulated neutron pulse trains derived from the Los Alamos SIM3D software, which were subjected to analysis using the Los Alamos CTEN-FIT and TGS-FIT software. We found significantly improved imaging capability using the coincidence and singles rate data than could be obtained using the singles rate alone.

  14. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-03-15

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10{sup 13} emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  15. Measurements of DT and DD neutron yields by neutron activation on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Larson, A.R.; LeMunyan, G.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    A variety of elemental foils have been activated by neutron fluence from TFTR under conditions with the DT neutron yield per shot ranging from 10{sup 12} to over 10{sup 18}, and with the DT/(DD+DT) neutron ratio varying from 0.5% (from triton burnup) to unity. Linear response over this large dynamic range is obtained by reducing the mass of the foils and increasing the cooling time, all while accepting greatly improved counting statistics. Effects on background gamma-ray lines from foil-capsule-material contaminants, and the resulting lower limits on activation foil mass, have been determined. DT neutron yields from dosimetry standard reactions on aluminum, chromium, iron, nickel, zirconium, and indium are in agreement within the {+-}9% (one-sigma) accuracy of the measurements; also agreeing are yields from silicon foils using the ACTL library cross-section, while the ENDF/B-V library has too low a cross-section. Preliminary results from a variety of other threshold reactions are presented. Use of the {sup 115}In(n.n{prime}) {sup 115m}In reaction (0.42 times as sensitive to DT neutrons as DD neutrons) in conjunction with pure-DT reactions allows a determination of the DT/(DD+DT) ratio in trace tritium or low-power tritium beam experiments.

  16. Measurements of DT and DD neutron yields by neutron activation on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Larson, A.R.; LeMunyan, G.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1994-05-05

    A variety of elemental foils have been activated by neutron fluence from TFTR under conditions with the DT neutron yield per shot ranging from 10{sup 12} to over 10{sup 18}, and with the DT/(DD+DT) neutron ratio varying from 0.5% (from triton burnup) to unity. Linear response over this large dynamic range is obtained by reducing the mass of the foils and increasing the cooling time, all while accepting greatly improved counting statistics. Effects on background gamma-ray lines from foil-capsule-material contaminants. and the resulting lower limits on activation foil mass, have been determined. DT neutron yields from dosimetry standard reactions on aluminum, chromium, iron, nickel, zirconium, and indium are in agreement within the {plus_minus}9% (one-sigma,) accuracy of the measurements: also agreeing are yields from silicon foils using the ACTL library cross-section. While the ENDF/B-V library has too low a cross-section. Preliminary results from a variety of other threshold reactions are presented. Use of the {sup 115}In(n,n) {sup 115m}In reaction (0.42 times as sensitive to DT neutrons as DD neutrons) in conjunction with pure-DT reactions allows a determination of the DT/(DD+DT) ratio in trace tritium or low-power tritium beam experiments.

  17. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M. Schwantes; Ralf Sudowe; Heino Nitsche; Darleane C. Hoffman

    2003-12-16

    A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. The information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. During this reporting period, the emphasis has been on preparing a radioactive target of {sup 155}Eu (half-life = 4.7 years), and several stable targets, including isotopically separated {sup 154}Sm, {sup 151}Eu, and {sup 153}Eu. Measurements of their neutron capture cross sections will be conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). A suitable backing material (beryllium) for the targets has been selected after careful calculations of its contribution to the background of the measurements. In addition, a high voltage plating procedure has been developed and optimized. Stable targets of {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu and a target of natural Eu ({approx}50% {sup 151}Eu and {approx}50% {sup 153}Eu) have each been plated to a mass thickness of >1 mg/cm{sup 2} and delivered to the DANCE collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Natural Eu targets will be tested first to confirm that the target dimensions and backing are appropriate prior to performing measurements on the extremely valuable targets of separated isotopes. In order to prepare a target of the radioactive {sup 155}Eu, it must first be separated from the {sup 154}Sm target material that was irradiated in a very high neutron flux of 1.5x1015 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/s for 50 days. The reaction is {sup 154}Sm (n,f){sup 155}Sm (half-life = 22 minutes) {sup 155}Eu. Considerable progress has been made in developing a suitable high-yield and high-purity separation method for separating Eu from targets

  18. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. They are using a Schlumberger neutron generator for the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel, in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics for the detection of very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. They have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The results to data are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference.

  19. Relativistic neutrons in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rudak, Bronislaw

    1989-01-01

    The acceleration of protons to relativistic energies in active galactic nuclei leads to the creation of relativistic neutrons which escape from the central engine. The neutrons decay at distances of up to 1-100 pc, depositing their energies and momenta in situ. Energy deposition by decaying neutrons may inhibit spherical accretion and drive a wind, which could be responsible for the velocity fields in emission-line regions and the outflow of broad absorption line systems. Enhanced pressure in the neutron decay region may also help to confine emission line clouds. A fraction of the relativistic proton energy is radiated in gamma-rays with energies which may be as large as about 100,000 GeV.

  20. Miniature Neutron-Alpha Activation Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar; Holloway, James Paul; He, Zhong; Goldsten, John

    2002-10-01

    We are developing a miniature neutron-alpha activation spectrometer for in-situ analysis of chem-bio samples, including rocks, fines, ices, and drill cores, suitable for a lander or Rover platform for Mars or outer-planet missions. In the neutron-activation mode, penetrating analysis will be performed of the whole sample using a γ spectrometer and in the α-activation mode, the sample surface will be analyzed using Rutherford-backscatter and x-ray spectrometers. Novel in our approach is the development of a switchable radioactive neutron source and a small high-resolution γ detector. The detectors and electronics will benefit from remote unattended operation capabilities resulting from our NEAR XGRS heritage and recent development of a Ge γ detector for MESSENGER. Much of the technology used in this instrument can be adapted to portable or unattended terrestrial applications for detection of explosives, chemical toxins, nuclear weapons, and contraband.

  1. Virtual Experiments on the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, V. E.; Cobb, J. W.; Farhi, E.; Miller, S. D.; Taylor, M.

    The TeraGrid's outreach effort to the neutron science community is creating an environment that is encouraging the exploration of advanced cyberinfrastructure being incorporated into facility operations in a way that leverages facility operations to multiply the scientific output of its users, including many NSF supported scientists in many disciplines. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway serves as an exploratory incubator for several TeraGrid projects. Virtual neutron scattering experiments from one exploratory project will be highlighted.

  2. Virtual Experiments on the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Vickie E; Cobb, John W; Farhi, Emmanuel N; Miller, Stephen D; Taylor, M

    2008-01-01

    The TeraGrid's outreach effort to the neutron science community is creating an environment that is encouraging the exploration of advanced cyberinfrastructure being incorporated into facility operations in a way that leverages facility operations to multiply the scientific output of its users, including many NSF supported scientists in many disciplines. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway serves as an exploratory incubator for several TeraGrid projects. Virtual neutron scattering experiments from one exploratory project will be highlighted.

  3. A small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiment using very cold neutrons (VCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuel, M.; Carpenter, J. M.; Micklich, B. J.; Geltenbort, P.; Mishima, K.; Shimizu, H. M.; Iwashita, Y.; Hirota, K.; Hino, M.; Kennedy, S. J.; Lal, J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes the results of SANS measurements of small samples using the very cold neutron (VCN) beam of the PF2 instrument at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL), France. In addition to a classical SANS pinhole collimation, the experiment used a polarizing supermirror as a monochromator and a magnetic sextupole lens to focus the neutron beam in order to gain intensity and avoid any material in the neutron beam besides the sample.

  4. Continued development of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE) for lunar and planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandler, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current progress is reported on the inelastic scattering, capture, and activation gamma ray portions of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE). Experiments are described which have enabled a reduction in weight of the experimental probe to 7.3 kg. Parametric studies are described which enabled the optimization of experimental parameters (e.g., gate time settings, neutron pulse rate, etc.). Estimated detection sensitivities using this light weight probe and the optimized experimental parameters are discussed.

  5. Neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, J.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gu, W. Q.; Li, G. S.; McKeown, R. D.; Qian, X.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wu, F. F.; Zhang, C.

    2015-07-09

    We describe the design and construction of the low rate neutron calibration sources used in the Daya Bay Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiment. Such sources are free of correlated gamma-neutron emission, which is essential in minimizing induced background in the anti-neutrino detector. Thus, the design characteristics have been validated in the Daya Bay anti-neutrino detector.

  6. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. K. Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  7. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydov, V. K.; Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  8. Enhancing the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  9. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N; Ullmann, J. L.; et al

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  10. A Freon-Filled Bubble Chamber for Neutron Detection in Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilea, M.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.

    2011-03-24

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron–Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 1013 emitted from deuterium–tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  11. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Meg Hornidge, David; Annand, John; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-31

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  12. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Meg; Annand, John; Hornidge, David; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  13. Results from neutron imaging of ICF experiments at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 a neutron imaging diagnostic was commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system has been used to collect neutron images to measure the size and shape of the burning DT plasma and the surrounding fuel assembly. The imaging technique uses a pinhole neutron aperture placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two-dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic collects two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically one image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons, and the other image measures the distribution of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core. Images have been collected for the majority of the experiments performed as part of the ignition campaign. Results from this data have been used to estimate a burn-averaged fuel assembly as well as providing performance metrics to gauge progress towards ignition. This data set and our interpretation are presented.

  14. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  15. Simulations towards optimization of a neutron/anti-neutron oscillation experiment at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Matthew; Kamyshkov, Yuri; Castellanos, Luis; Klinkby, Esben; US NNbar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The observation of Neutron/Anti-neutron oscillation would prove the existence of Baryon Number Violation (BNV), and thus an explanation for the dominance of matter over anti-matter in the universe. The latest experiments have shown the oscillation time to be greater than 8.6 x 107 seconds, whereas current theoretical predictions suggest times on the order of 108 to 109 seconds. A neutron oscillation experiment proposed at the European Spallation Source (ESS) would provide sensitivity of more than 1000 times previous experiments performed, thus providing a result well-suited to confirm or deny current theory. A conceptual design of the proposed experiment will be presented, as well as the optimization of key experiment components using Monte-Carlo simulation methods, including the McStas neutron ray-trace simulation package. This work is supported by the Organized Research Units Program funded by The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Office of Research and Engagement.

  16. Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Denison, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

  17. Effects of geochemical composition on neutron die-away measurements: Implications for Mars Science Laboratory's Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C.; Moersch, J.; Drake, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment, part of the scientific payload of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission, will have the ability to assess both the abundance and the burial depth of subsurface hydrogen as the rover traverses the Martian surface. DAN will employ a method of measuring neutron fluxes called “neutron die-away” that has not been used in previous planetary exploration missions. This method requires the use of a pulsed neutron generator that supplements neutrons produced via spallation in the subsurface by the cosmic ray background. It is well established in neutron remote sensing that low-energy (thermal) neutrons are sensitive not only to hydrogen content, but also to the macroscopic absorption cross-section of near-surface materials. To better understand the results that will be forthcoming from DAN, we model the effects of varying abundances of high absorption cross-section elements that are likely to be found on the Martian surface (Cl, Fe) on neutron die-away measurements made from a rover platform. Previously, the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spirit and Opportunity found that elevated abundances of these two elements are commonly associated with locales that have experienced some form of aqueous activity in the past, even though hydrogen-rich materials are not necessarily still present. By modeling a suite of H and Cl compositions, we demonstrate that (for abundance ranges reasonable for Mars) both the elements will significantly affect DAN thermal neutron count rates. Additionally, we show that the timing of thermal neutron arrivals at the detector can be used together with the thermal neutron count rates to independently determine the abundances of hydrogen and high neutron absorption cross-section elements (the most important being Cl). Epithermal neutron die-away curves may also be used to separate these two components. We model neutron scattering in actual Martian compositions that were determined by the MER Alpha

  18. Neutron Yield Measurements via Aluminum Activation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-08

    Neutron activation of aluminum may occur by several neutron capture reactions. Four such reactions are described here: {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(n, 2n){sup 26}Al and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg. The radioactive nuclei {sup 28}Al, {sup 24}Na, and {sup 27}Mg, which are produced via the {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg neutron reactions, beta decay to excited states of {sup 28}Si, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 27}Al respectively. These excited states then emit gamma rays as the nuclei de-excite to their respective ground states.

  19. Neutronics experiments for DEMO blanket at JAERI/FNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Ochiai, K.; Hori, J.; Verzilov, Y.; Klix, A.; Wada, M.; Terada, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Morimoto, Y.; Nishitani, T.

    2003-07-01

    In order to verify the accuracy of the tritium production rate (TPR), neutron irradiation experiments have been performed with a mockup relevant to the fusion DEMO blanket consisting of F82H blocks, Li2TiO3 blocks with a 6Li enrichment of 40% and 95%, and beryllium blocks. Sample pellets of Li2TiO3 were irradiated and the TPR was measured by a liquid scintillation counter. The TPR was also calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B with the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 and ENDF-B/VI. The results agreed with experimental values within the statistical error (10%) of the experiment. Accordingly, it was clarified that the TPR could be evaluated within 10% uncertainty by the calculation code and the nuclear data. In order to estimate the induced activity caused by sequential reactions in cooling water pipes in the DEMO blanket, neutron irradiation experiments have been performed using test specimens simulating the pipes. Sample metals of Fe, W, Ti, Pb, Cu, V and reduced activation ferritic steel F82H were irradiated as typical fusion materials. The effective cross-sections needed to calculate the formation of the radioactive nuclei (56Co, 184Re, 48V, 206Bi, 65Zn and 51Cr) due to sequential reactions were measured. From the experimental results, it was found that the effective cross-sections increased remarkably while coming closer to polyethylene board, which was a substitute for water. As a result of this present study, it has become clear that the sequential reaction rates are important factors in the accurate evaluation of induced activity in fusion reactor design.

  20. Neutron Emission Characteristics of Two Mixed-Oxide Fuels: Simulations and Initial Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury; E. M. Gantz

    2009-07-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate the neutron emission characteristics of two mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and it's Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) campaign. This analysis used the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and energy spectra of the different neutron source terms within these fuels, and then used this data to simulate the detection and measurement of these emissions using an array of liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers. These calculations accounted for neutrons generated from the spontaneous fission of the actinides in the MOX fuel as well as neutrons created via (alpha,n) reactions with oxygen in the MOX fuel. The analysis was carried out to allow for characterization of both neutron energy as well as neutron coincidences between multiple detectors. Coincidences between prompt gamma rays and neutrons were also analyzed. Experiments were performed at INL with the same materials used in the simulations to benchmark and begin validation tests of the simulations. Data was collected in these experiments using an array of four liquid scintillators and a high-speed waveform digitizer. Advanced digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithms were developed and used to collect this data. Results of the simulation and modeling studies are presented together with preliminary results from the experimental campaign.

  1. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  2. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  3. Benchmark experiments on neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall penetrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Lilley, S.; Naish, J.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Stamatelatos, I.; Syme, B.; Vasilopoulou, T.; contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    Neutronics experiments are performed at JET for validating in a real fusion environment the neutronics codes and nuclear data applied in ITER nuclear analyses. In particular, the neutron fluence through the penetrations of the JET torus hall is measured and compared with calculations to assess the capability of state-of-art numerical tools to correctly predict the radiation streaming in the ITER biological shield penetrations up to large distances from the neutron source, in large and complex geometries. Neutron streaming experiments started in 2012 when several hundreds of very sensitive thermo-luminescence detectors (TLDs), enriched to different levels in 6LiF/7LiF, were used to measure the neutron and gamma dose separately. Lessons learnt from this first experiment led to significant improvements in the experimental arrangements to reduce the effects due to directional neutron source and self-shielding of TLDs. Here we report the results of measurements performed during the 2013-2014 JET campaign. Data from new positions, at further locations in the South West labyrinth and down to the Torus Hall basement through the air duct chimney, were obtained up to about a 40 m distance from the plasma neutron source. In order to avoid interference between TLDs due to self-shielding effects, only TLDs containing natural Lithium and 99.97% 7Li were used. All TLDs were located in the centre of large polyethylene (PE) moderators, with natLi and 7Li crystals evenly arranged within two PE containers, one in horizontal and the other in vertical orientation, to investigate the shadowing effect in the directional neutron field. All TLDs were calibrated in the quantities of air kerma and neutron fluence. This improved experimental arrangement led to reduced statistical spread in the experimental data. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to calculate the air kerma due to neutrons and the neutron fluence at detector positions, using a JET model validated up to the

  4. Design of a laboratory for experiments with a pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Memoli, G; Trusler, J P M; Ziver, A K

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of a neutron shielding design and optimisation study performed to reduce the exposure to radiological doses arising from a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator (PNG) having a maximum emission strength of 2.0 x 10(8) neutrons s(-1). The source was intended to be used in a new irradiation facility for the realisation of an experiment on acoustical cavitation in liquids. This paper describes in detail how the facility was designed to reduce both neutron and gamma-ray dose rates to acceptable levels, taking into account the ALARP principle in following the steps of optimisation. In particular, this work compares two different methods of optimisation to assess neutron dose rates: the use of analytical methods and the use of Monte Carlo simulations (MCNPX 2.4). The activation of the surrounding materials during operation was estimated using the neutron spectra as input to the FISPACT 3.0 code. The limitations of a first-order analytical model to determine the neutron activation levels are highlighted. The impact that activation has on the choice of the materials to be used inside the laboratory and on the waiting time before anyone can safely enter the room after the neutron source is switched off is also discussed. PMID:19454793

  5. Development of the methods for simulating the neutron spectrometers and neutron-scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoshin, S. A.; Belushkin, A. V.; Ioffe, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Reviewed are the results of simulating the neutron scattering instruments with the program package VITESS upgraded by the routines for treating the polarized neutrons, as developed by the authors. The reported investigations have been carried out at the Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics at JINR in collaboration with the Juelich research center (Germany). The performance of the resonance and gradient adiabatic spin flippers, the Drabkin resonator, the classical and resonance spin-echo spectrometers, the spin-echo diffractometer for the small-angle neutron scattering, and the spin-echo spectrometer with rotating magnetic fields is successfully modeled. The methods for using the 3D map of the magnetic field from the input file, either mapped experimentally or computed using the finite-elements technique, in the VITESS computer code, are considered in detail. The results of neutron-polarimetry experiments are adequately reproduced by our simulations.

  6. D-T Neutron Skyshine Experiments at JAERI/FNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Ochiai, Kentaro; Yoshida, Shigeo; Tanaka, Ryohei; Wakisaka, Masashi; Nakao, Makoto; Sato, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Michinori; Hori, Jun-Ichi; Takahashi, Akito; Kaneko, Jun-Ichi; Sawamura, Teruko

    The D-T neutron skyshine experiments have been carried out at the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) of JAERI with the neutron yield of ˜1.7×1011n/s. The concrete thickness of the roof and the wall of a FNS target room are 1.15 and 2 m, respectively. The FNS skyshine port with a size of 0.9 × 0.9 m2 was open during the experimental period.The radiation dose rate outside the target room was measured as far as about 550 m away from the D-T target point with a spherical rem-counter. The highest neutron dose was about 0.5 μSv/hr at a distance of 30 m from the D-T target point and the dose rate was attenuated to 0.002 μSv/hr at a distance of 550 m. The measured neutron dose distribution was analyzed with Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B and a simple line source model. The MCNP calculation overestimates the neutron dose in the distance range larger than 250 m. The neutron spectra were evaluated with a 3He detector with different thickness of polyethylene neutron moderators. Secondary gamma-rays were measured with high purity Ge detectors and NaI scintillation detectors.

  7. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  8. Physical basis for prompt-neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The technique called prompt ..gamma..-ray neutron activation analysis has been applied to rapid materials analysis. The radiation following the neutron radiation capture is prompt in the sense that the nuclear decay time is on the order of 10/sup -15/ second, and thus the technique is not strictly activation, but should be called radiation neutron capture spectroscopy or neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy. This paper reviews the following: sources and detectors, theory of radiative capture, nonstatistical capture, giant dipole resonance, fast neutron capture, and thermal neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectra. 14 figures.

  9. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  10. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: design, analysis, and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, K D; Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Fehl, D L; Chandler, G A; Knapp, P F; Leeper, R J; Nelson, A J; Smelser, R M; Torres, J A

    2014-04-01

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r(2) decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm(2) and is ∼ 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects. PMID:24784607

  11. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K. D. Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Leeper, R. J.

    2014-04-15

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r{sup 2} decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm{sup 2} and is ∼ 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  12. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Cooper, G. W.; Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Leeper, R. J.; Nelson, A. J.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r2 decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm2 and is ˜ 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  13. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  14. Active Seismic Imaging Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Patricia A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Evans, John R.

    In September 1985 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will conduct an active seismic experiment in the Medicine Lake area of northern California. The work is supported by the Geothermal Research Program of USGS and by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U.S. Department of Energy. We invite interested organizations or individuals to record our explosions from Medicine Lake volcano and surrounding areas not covered by the USGS-LLNL array.

  15. Analysis of epithermal neutron beam experiments at the HIFAR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, B.V.; Constantine, G.

    1995-01-01

    A calculated model of the entire core of the DIDO class reactor HIFAR has been used to analyze epithermal neutron beam experiments. In the experiments, an off-center fuel element was replaced by a dummy fuel element voided by a dry liner in which an aluminium spectrum shifter was suspended at core center to extract the beam. Various combinations of the filter materials aluminum, iron, sulfur, titanium, and cadmium were inserted near the top of the dry liner, and liquid argon was placed in a cryostat above the dummy element. Reaction rates were measured in a fission chamber, sandwiched between various thicknesses of polyethylene, in order to assess the accuracy of the calculational model for different regions of the neutron energy spectrum of the beam. The neutron source distribution of the HIFAR core was obtained from a three-dimensional diffusion calculation, with burnup-dependent fuel compositions and fission products included, using the AUS modular code scheme. Argon cross sections were generated from ENDL-84 data and resonance parameters taken from Neutron Cross Sections (1984). A whole-core MCNP source calculation was used to analyze the experiments giving good agreement between measured and calculated reaction rates. This whole-core model of HIFAR may be applied with confidence to predict the performance of filtered beams for boron neutron capture therapy and also to other HIFAR calculations.

  16. Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-10-01

    The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as “ship effect” neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

  17. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  18. ACTIV87: Fast Neutron Activation Cross Section File

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-08-01

    4. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND AND INFORMATION ACTIV87 is a compilation of fast neutron induced activation reaction cross-sections. The compilation covers energies from threshold to 20 MeV and is based on evaluated data taken from other evaluated data libraries and individual evaluations. The majority of these evaluations were performed by using available experimental data. The aforementioned available experimental data were used in the selection of needed parameters for theoretical computations and for normalizing the results of suchmore » computations. Theoretical calculations were also used for interpolation and extrapolation of experimental cross-section data. All of the evaluated data curves were compared with experimental data that had been reported over the four year period preceding 1987. Only those cross-sections not in contradiction with experimental data that was current in 1987 were retained in the activation file, ACTIV87. In cases of several conflicting evaluations, that evaluation was chosen which best corresponded to the experimental data. A few evaluated curves were renormalized in accordance with the results of the latest precision measurements. 5. APPLICATION OF THE DATA 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA The following libraries and individual files of evaluated neutron cross-section data were used for the selection of the activation cross-sections: the BOSPOR Library, the Activation File of the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library, the Evaluated Neutron Data File (ENDF/B-V) Activation File, the International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-82), and individual evaluations carried out under various IAEA research contracts. The file of selected reactions contains 206 evaluated cross-section curves of the (n,2n), (n,p) and (n,a) reactions which lead to radioactive products and may be used in many practical applications of neutron activation analysis. Some competing activation reactions, usually with low cross-section values, are given for completeness.« less

  19. Generalized diffusion equation and analytical expressions to neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2014-12-01

    An integro-differential diffusion equation with linear force, based on the continuous time random walk model, is considered. The equation generalizes the ordinary and fractional diffusion equations. Analytical expressions related to neutron scattering experiments are presented and analyzed, which can be used to describe, for instance, biological systems.

  20. Comparison of fission neutron and pulsed spallation neutron sources for radiation effects experiments on Cu/sub 3/Au

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, M.A.

    1983-10-01

    Through our recent experimental work on the neutron irradiation effects in Cu/sub 3/Au, we will compare fission and pulsed spallation neutron sources. Neutron characteristics of irradiation facilities at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) and the CP-5 reactor (now closed down), are briefly described. Defect cascade size distributions from irradiations of Cu/sub 3/Au at both neutron sources illustrated by transmission electron micrographs of disordered zones. Radiation-enhanced diffusion experiments in Cu/sub 3/Au are discussed along with the effect of pulsed neutron irradiations.

  1. Magnetic Field R&D for the neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammei, Russell R.

    2014-09-01

    The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. Supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Canada Research Chairs program.

  2. Neutron activation analysis in archaeological chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a convenient way of performing the chemical analysis of archaeologically-excavated artifacts and materials. It is fast and does not require tedious laboratory operations. It is multielement, sensitive, and can be made nondestructive. Neutron activation analysis in its instrumental form, i.e., involving no chemical separation, is ideally suited to automation and conveniently takes the first step in data flow patterns that are appropriate for many taxonomic and statistical operations. The future will doubtless see improvements in the practice of NAA in general, but in connection with archaeological science the greatest change will be the filling, interchange and widespread use of data banks based on compilations of analytical data. Since provenience-oriented data banks deal with materials (obsidian, ceramics, metals, semiprecious stones, building materials and sculptural media) that participated in trade networks, the analytical data is certain to be of interest to a rather broad group of archaeologists. It is to meet the needs of the whole archaeological community that archaeological chemistry must now turn.

  3. Proposed Experiment for Testing Quantum Contextuality with Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cabello, Adan; Filipp, Stefan; Rauch, Helmut; Hasegawa, Yuji

    2008-04-04

    We show that an experimental demonstration of quantum contextuality using 2 degrees of freedom of single neutrons based on a violation of an inequality derived from the Peres-Mermin proof of the Kochen-Specker theorem would be more conclusive than those obtained from previous experiments involving pairs of ions [M. A. Rowe et al., Nature (London) 409, 791 (2001)] and single neutrons [Y. Hasegawa et al., Nature (London) 425, 45 (2003)] based on violations of Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt-like inequalities.

  4. Large Searching for Higher Dimensional Gravity with Neutron Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Alejandro

    2007-10-26

    N-dimensional gravity is analized in the context of recent work on 'large' supplementary dimensions. A simple derivation of the compactification radii for additional dimensions in the universe is made, as a function of the Planck and the electro-weak scales. It is argued that the modified gravitational force would give rise to effects that might be within the detection range of dedicated neutron experiments. An analysis suggests that neutron scattering off atomic nuclei with null spin may provide an experimental test for these ideas.

  5. Coincidence Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. gandner; C.W. Mayo; W.A. Metwally; W. Zhang; W. Guo; A. Shehata

    2002-11-10

    The normal prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis for either bulk or small beam samples inherently has a small signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio due primarily to the neutron source being present while the sample signal is being obtained. Coincidence counting offers the possibility of greatly reducing or eliminating the noise generated by the neutron source. The present report presents our results to date on implementing the coincidence counting PGNAA approach. We conclude that coincidence PGNAA yields: (1) a larger signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, (2) more information (and therefore better accuracy) from essentially the same experiment when sophisticated coincidence electronics are used that can yield singles and coincidences simultaneously, and (3) a reduced (one or two orders of magnitude) signal from essentially the same experiment. In future work we will concentrate on: (1) modifying the existing CEARPGS Monte Carlo code to incorporate coincidence counting, (2) obtaining coincidence schemes for 18 or 20 of the common elements in coal and cement, and (3) optimizing the design of a PGNAA coincidence system for the bulk analysis of coal.

  6. A militarily fielded thermal neutron activation sensor for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, E. T. H.; McFee, J. E.; Ing, H.; Andrews, H. R.; Tennant, D.; Harper, E.; Faust, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence has developed a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor system to detect anti-tank landmines on roads and tracks in peacekeeping operations. A key part of the system is a thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor which is placed above a suspect location to within a 30 cm radius and confirms the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.835 MeV gamma ray associated with thermal neutron capture on 14N. The TNA uses a 100 μg252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm×7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. The system, consisting of the TNA sensor head, including source, detectors and shielding, the high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics and the data processing methodology are described. Results of experiments to characterize detection performance are also described. The experiments have shown that anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less can be detected in roughly a minute or less, but deeper mines and mines significantly displaced horizontally take considerably longer time. Mines as deep as 30 cm can be detected for long count times (1000 s). Four TNA detectors are now in service with the Canadian Forces as part of the four multi-sensor systems, making it the first militarily fielded TNA sensor and the first militarily fielded confirmation sensor for landmines. The ability to function well in adverse climatic conditions has been demonstrated, both in trials and operations.

  7. Neutron Activation of NIF Final Optics Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaraman, S; Dauffy, L; Khater, H; Brereton, S

    2009-09-29

    Analyses were performed to characterize the radiation field in the vicinity of the Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) due to neutron activation following Deuterium-Deuterium (DD), Tritium-Hydrogen-Deuterium (THD), and Deuterium-Tritium (DT) shots associated with different phases of the NIF operations. The activation of the structural components of the FOAs produces one of the larger sources of gamma radiation and is a key factor in determining the stay out time between shots to ensure worker protection. This study provides estimates of effective dose rates in the vicinity of a single FOA and concludes that the DD and THD targets produce acceptable dose rates within 10 minutes following a shot while about 6-days of stay out time is suggested following DT shots. Studies are ongoing to determine the combined effects of multiple FOAs and other components present in the Target Bay on stay-out time and worker dose.

  8. Maximizing Macromolecule Crystal Size for Neutron Diffraction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. A.; Kephart, R.; Leardi, R.; Myles, D. A.; Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A challenge in neutron diffraction experiments is growing large (greater than 1 cu mm) macromolecule crystals. In taking up this challenge we have used statistical experiment design techniques to quickly identify crystallization conditions under which the largest crystals grow. These techniques provide the maximum information for minimal experimental effort, allowing optimal screening of crystallization variables in a simple experimental matrix, using the minimum amount of sample. Analysis of the results quickly tells the investigator what conditions are the most important for the crystallization. These can then be used to maximize the crystallization results in terms of reducing crystal numbers and providing large crystals of suitable habit. We have used these techniques to grow large crystals of Glucose isomerase. Glucose isomerase is an industrial enzyme used extensively in the food industry for the conversion of glucose to fructose. The aim of this study is the elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism at the molecular level. The accurate determination of hydrogen positions, which is critical for this, is a requirement that neutron diffraction is uniquely suited for. Preliminary neutron diffraction experiments with these crystals conducted at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) reveal diffraction to beyond 2.5 angstrom. Macromolecular crystal growth is a process involving many parameters, and statistical experimental design is naturally suited to this field. These techniques are sample independent and provide an experimental strategy to maximize crystal volume and habit for neutron diffraction studies.

  9. Nondestructive testing: Neutron radiography and neutron activation. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of neutron radiography and neutron activation for nondestructive testing of materials. The development and evaluation of neutron activation analysis and neutron diffraction examination of liquids and solids are presented. Citations also discuss nondestructive assay, verification, evaluation, and multielement analysis of biomedical, environmental, industrial, and geological materials. Nondestructive identification of chemical agents, explosives, weapons, and drugs in sealed containers are explored. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Characterization of segmented Silicon detectors for neutron beta decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Americo; McGaughey, Patrick

    2012-03-01

    The ``Nab'', and ``UCNB'' collaborations will measure the correlation parameters ``a'', ``b'', and ``B'' that are found in the triple differential rate equation from neutron β-decay ( n ->p + e + νe). These parameters that offer an atractive platform for searches of signals of new physics beyond standard model will be measured using unpolarized cold neutrons (Nab) at SNS, ORNL,and polarized ultracold neutrons (UCNB) at LANL. Following a neutron β-decay the electron and proton, will be accelerated in a 4π-field spectrometer, and detected by a novel detector design consisting of two opposite large area and thick silicon detectors segmented in 127 pixels per detector, and operated at ˜ 100 Kelvin. We have successfully completed the first phase of detector characterization, operating 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm thick Silicon detectors of 11 cm in diameter for neutron β-decay experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and detected ˜ 300 Hz protons from 15 to 35 keV at NCSU with a FWHM resolution of ˜ 3.2 keV with a potential of another factor of two improvement. Custom amplifiers based on FETs mounted directly on the detector reduced the noise and made possible the proton detection.

  11. Fast-neutron activation of long-lived nuclides in natural Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Fields, N. E.; Hixon, D.

    2015-04-01

    We measured the production of the long-lived nuclides 207 Bi, 202 Pb, and 194 Hg in a sample of natural Pb due to high-energy neutron interactions using a neutron beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The activated sample was counted by a HPGe detector to measure the amount of radioactive nuclides present. These nuclides are critical in understanding potential backgrounds in low background experiments utilizing large amounts of Pb shielding due to cosmogenic neutron interactions in the Pb while residing on the Earth's surface. By scaling the LANSCE neutron flux to a cosmic neutron flux, we measure the sea level cosmic ray production rates of 8.0 ± 1.3 atoms/kg/day of 194 Hg, 120 ± 25 atoms/kg/day 202 Pb, and <0.17 ± 0.04 atoms/kg/day 207 Bi.

  12. Search for reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Gary; Rundberg, Robert; Tonchev, Anton; Fowler, Malcolm; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Archuleta, Tom; Bionta, Richard; Boswell, Mitzi; Gostic, Julie; Griego, Jeff; Knittel, Kenn; Klein, Andi; Moody, Ken; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Wilde, Carl; Yeamans, Charles

    2013-10-01

    We report on measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons at the National Ignition Facility. RIF neutrons are produced in cryogenically layered implision by up-scattered deuterium, or tritium ions that undergo subsequent fusion reactions. The rate of RIF neutron production is proportional to the fuel areal density (| | R) and ion-stopping length in the dense fuel assembly. Thus, RIF neutrons provide information on charge particle stopping in a strongly coupled plasma, where perturbative modeling breaks down. To measure RIF neutrons, a set of thulium activation foils was placed 50 cm from layered cryogenic implosions at the NIF. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a neutron kinetic energy threshold of 14.96 MeV. We will present results from initial experiments performed during the spring of 2013. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA, LA-UR-13-22085.

  13. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  14. A prospective pulsed source of ultracold neutrons for experiments in fundamental neutron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Th.; Zechlau, Th.

    2013-08-01

    Since their discovery, ultracold neutrons (UCNs) have been a unique tool for the investigation of fundamental properties of the free neutron and its interactions. The succesfull installation of a new pulsed superthermal source for ultracold neutrons based on solid deuterium at the TRIGA Mainz reactor is described. In a combination of solid hydrogen acting as pre-moderator and a solid deuterium converter of around 160 cm3, this new UCN source should provide at the experimental area ≥ 370000 UCN to the storage volume with the reactor operated in the pulse mode. In a storage experiment, a UCN density of 18 ± 2 UCN/cm3 was measured applying 1.5 pulses with a nominal power of 7 MJ. Assuming a linear behaviour of the UCN output as a function of reactor power this corresponds to a UCN density of 25 ± 3 UCN/cm3 for 2 (10 MJ) pulses.

  15. Fusion neutronics experiments and analysis. Progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    UCLA has led the neutronics R&D effort in the US for the past several years through the well-established USDOE/JAERI Collaborative Program on Fusion Neutronics. Significant contributions have been made in providing solid bases for advancing the neutronics testing capabilities in fusion reactors. This resulted from the hands-on experience gained from conducting several fusion integral experiments to quantify the prediction uncertainties of key blanket design parameters such as tritium production rate, activation, and nuclear heating, and when possible, to narrow the gap between calculational results and measurements through improving nuclear data base and codes capabilities. The current focus is to conduct the experiments in an annular configuration where the test assembly totally surrounds a simulated line source. The simulated line source is the first-of-a-kind in the scope of fusion integral experiments and presents a significant contribution to the world of fusion neutronics. The experiments proceeded through Phase IIIA to Phase IIIC in these line source simulation experiments started in 1989.

  16. Precision Neutron Decay Studies with the Nab and UCNB Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprow, Aaron; Nab Collaboration; UCNB Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Precision neutron decay correlation experiments are a sensitive means to study the standard model and probe for beyond the standard model physics. Nab and UCNB are two such experiments that will measure the neutrino-electron correlation term, a, and the neutrino asymmetry, B, respectively. Thick, highly-segmented silicon detectors will be used to directly measure the proton and electron from each decay event in coincidence, leading to the extraction of these angular correlations. Preliminary work to understand the systematic uncertainties associated with these experiments, as well as the early analysis of data taken from the 2015-2016 beam time at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be presented.

  17. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, J.; Casoli, P.; Chappert, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  18. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  19. Experimental neutronics tests for a neutron activation system for the European ITER TBM

    SciTech Connect

    Klix, A.; Fischer, U.; Gehre, D.; Kleizer, G.; Raj, P.; Rovni, I.; Ruecker, Tom

    2014-08-21

    We are investigating methods for neutron flux measurement in the ITER TBM. In particular we have tested sets of activation materials leading to induced gamma activities with short half-lives of the order of tens of seconds up to minutes and standard activation materials. Packages of activation foils have been irradiated with the intense neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden in a pure DT neutron field as well as in a neutronics mock-up of the European ITER HCLL TBM. An important aim was to check whether the gamma activity induced in the activation foils in these packages could be measured simultaneously. It was indeed possible to identify gamma lines of interest in gamma-ray measurements immediately after extraction from the irradiation.

  20. Modeling of Neutron Spectra Based on Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovancevic, N.; Fridman, M.; Daraban, L.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Hult, M.; Lutter, G.; Marissens, G.; Stroh, H.

    Safe and economical use of nuclear energy and particularly the development of GEN-IV reactors impose a better understanding of prompt neutron emission in fission, as well as of the fission process as such. Therefore, accurate measurements of the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) are very important. In this work, we are testing the possibility to determine the PFNS by an activation method called DONA (DOsimetry and Spectroscopy using Neuron Activation) recently developed at IRMM (Wieslander et al., 2010, Lövestam et al., 2009). This type of modeling of the neutron spectra, based on the activation analysis, can provide new information about an old problem which still exists today, i.e. the discrepancy between measured integral and differential data (Capote et al., 2012). The problem is that the calculated average cross section for a certain neutron reaction, by using the differential experimental PFNS, in many cases cannot reproduce satisfactorily the integral measured cross section values. The modeling of the neutron spectra by the DONA technique was tested with the standard neutron spectrum of the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. We analyzed the sensitivity of the unfolding procedure to the initial neutron energy spectrum, the influence of the neutron scattering, the possibility of using different activation reactions and we also made an estimation of the lowest measurable neutron fluence rate.

  1. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of sectioned hair strands for arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is a valuable and proven method for the quantitative analysis of sectioned human head hair specimens for arsenic - and, if arsenic is found to be present at high concentrations, the approximate times when it was ingested. Reactor-flux thermal-neutron activation of the hair samples produces 26.3-h {sup 76}As, which is then detected by germanium gamma-ray spectrometry, measuring the 559.1-keV gamma-ray peak of {sup 76}As. Even normal levels of arsenic in hair, in the range of <1 ppm up to a few parts per million of arsenic can be measured - and the far higher levels associated with large internal doses of arsenic, levels approaching or exceeding 100 ppm arsenic, are readily and accurately measurable. However, all phases of forensic investigations of possible chronic (or in some cases, acute) arsenic poisoning are important, i.e., not just the analysis phase. All of these phases are discussed in this paper, based on the author`s experience and the experience of others, in criminal cases. Cases of chronic arsenic poisoning often reveal a series of two to four doses, perhaps a few months apart, with increasing doses.

  2. Neutron activation diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited).

    PubMed

    Bleuel, D L; Yeamans, C B; Bernstein, L A; Bionta, R M; Caggiano, J A; Casey, D T; Cooper, G W; Drury, O B; Frenje, J A; Hagmann, C A; Hatarik, R; Knauer, J P; Johnson, M Gatu; Knittel, K M; Leeper, R J; McNaney, J M; Moran, M; Ruiz, C L; Schneider, D H G

    2012-10-01

    Neutron yields are measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by an extensive suite of neutron activation diagnostics. Neutrons interact with materials whose reaction cross sections threshold just below the fusion neutron production energy, providing an accurate measure of primary unscattered neutrons without contribution from lower-energy scattered neutrons. Indium samples are mounted on diagnostic instrument manipulators in the NIF target chamber, 25-50 cm from the source, to measure 2.45 MeV deuterium-deuterium fusion neutrons through the (115)In(n,n')(115 m) In reaction. Outside the chamber, zirconium and copper are used to measure 14 MeV deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons via (90)Zr(n,2n), (63)Cu(n,2n), and (65)Cu(n,2n) reactions. An array of 16 zirconium samples are located on port covers around the chamber to measure relative yield anisotropies, providing a global map of fuel areal density variation. Neutron yields are routinely measured with activation to an accuracy of 7% and are in excellent agreement both with each other and with neutron time-of-flight and magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements. Relative areal density anisotropies can be measured to a precision of less than 3%. These measurements reveal apparent bulk fuel velocities as high as 200 km/s in addition to large areal density variations between the pole and equator of the compressed fuel. PMID:23126840

  3. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  4. Neutron activation analysis of some building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salagean, M. N.; Pantelica, A. I.; Georgescu, I. I.; Muntean, M. I.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U. Yb, W and Zn in seven Romanian building materials were determined by the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) method using the VVR-S Reactor of NIPNE- Bucharest. Raw matarials used in cement obtaining ≈ 75% of limestone and ≈ 25% of clay, cement samples from three different factories, furnace slag, phosphogypsum, and a type of brick have been analyzed. The brick was compacted from furnace slay, fly coal ash, phosphogypsum, lime and cement. The U, Th and K concentrations determined in the brick are in agreement with the natural radioactivity measurements of226Ra,232Th and40K. These specific activities were found about twice and 1.5 higher than the accepted levels in the case of226Ra and232Th, as well as40K, respectively. By consequence, the investigated brick is considered a radioactive waste. The rather high content of Co, Cr, K, Th, and Zh in the brick is especially due to the slag and fly ash, the main componets. The presence of U, Th and K in slag is mainly correlated with the limestone and dolomite as fluxes in matallurgy.

  5. Active neutron sensing of the Martian surface with the DAN experiment onboard the NASA "Curiosity" Mars rover: Two types of soil with different water content in the gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Lisov, D. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Golovin, D. V.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Nikiforov, S. Yu.; Sanin, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the water and chlorine content estimates on the bottom of the Martian crater Gale obtained by processing the data of active neutron sensing with the DAN experiment onboard theNASA "Curiosity"Mars rover at 412 spots along the 11-kilometer track. For 78% of the examined spots the water distribution in depth is found to be homogeneous with a mean content of 2.1±0.5% by mass (here and elsewhere variations correspond to the mean square deviations). For 22% of the examined spots the data require a two-layer model of water distribution down to the sensitivity limit of about 60 cm. The mean water content in upper layer of these spots is about 2-3% by mass, which is close to the content for spots with the homogeneous water distribution. In 8% of the examined spots the water content in the bottom layer at a depth of 27 ± 18 cm increases to 5.6 ± 2.7%. In 14% of the examined spots the water content in the bottom layer at a depth of 14 ± 7 cm decreases to 1.2 ± 0.5%. For interpretation of these results we conclude that the Gale crater has areas both with high and low water content, which correspond to distinct sedimentary layers from different past epochs, when sedimentation process took place underwater and in air correspondingly.

  6. Space Time Reversal Experiment by Use of Pulsed Neutron Ramsey Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Y.; Jeong, S. C.; Watanabe, Y.; Skoy, V.; Ino, T.

    2007-06-13

    We have developed a pulsed neutron Ramsey resonance for a T-violation experiment on polarized neutron transmission through a polarized nuclear target. Two separated oscillatory fields were placed in a pulsed neutron beam line, which were synchronized with a neutron pulse for precision neutron spin manipulation. We observed neutron Larmor precession between the two oscillatory fields as a function of a neutron time of flight (TOF). We modulated the phase of the second oscillatory field with respect to the first oscillatory field. The effect of the phase modulation was found in a neutron intensity modulation as a function of the TOF. From the neutron intensity modulation, the neutron spin direction as well as the neutron velocity between the two oscillatory fields was precisely obtained.

  7. Quantum contextual phenomena observed in single-neutron interferometer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yuji; Rauch, Helmut

    2006-01-04

    Neutron optical experiments are presented, which exhibit quantum contextual phenomena. Entanglement is achieved not between particles, but between degrees of freedom, in this case, for a single-particle. Appropriate combinations of the direction of spin analysis and the position of the phase shifter allow an experimental verification of the violation of a Bell-like inequality. Our experiments manifest the fact that manipulation of the wavefunction in one Hilbert space influences the result of the measurement in the other Hilbert space: manipulation without touch{exclamation_point} Next, we report another experiment which exhibits other peculiarity of quantum contextuality, e.g., originally intended to show a Kochen-Specker-like phenomenon. We have introduced inequalities for quantitative analysis of the experiments. The value obtained in the experiments clearly showed violations of prediction by non-contextual theory. Finally, we have accomplished a tomographic determination of entangled quantum state in single-neutrons. There, characteristics of the Bell-sate are confirmed: four poles for the real part of the density matrix are clearly seen.

  8. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide {sup 252}Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world`s largest inventory of compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of {le} 10{sup 11} neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} at the sample. Total flux of {ge}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the {sup 252}Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis.

  9. The Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellacasa, G.; Cortese, P.; Cicaló, C.; de Falco, A.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Usai, G.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; de Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Scomparin, E.; Travaglia, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2005-02-01

    The neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZN) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator neutrons in heavy ion collisions. The ZN is a spaghetti calorimeter, that exploits the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a W-alloy absorber. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and positron beams of different momenta ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/c. The main features of the detector are presented: the linearity and energy resolution as a function of energy, the shower's transverse profile, the position resolution. Moreover the response of the calorimeter to a 158A GeV/c Indium beam has been investigated; in particular the energy resolution and the linearity as a function of the number of incident nucleons were measured.

  10. The Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicalò, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Travaglia, G.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, we present the performance of the Neutron Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZN) for the ALICE experiment. The ZN is a quartz-fiber spaghetti calorimeter, which will measure the energy of the spectator neutrons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Its principle of operation is based on the detection of the Cherenkov light produced by the charged particles of the shower in silica optical fibers, embedded in a W-alloy absorber. The detector was tested at CERN SPS using positive hadron and positron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter, the energy resolution, the localizing capability, the signal uniformity and the transverse profile of the detectable hadronic shower are presented.

  11. Active Neutron Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-05-01

    Portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) may be used to interrogate suspicious items to detect, characterize, and quantify the presence fissionable material based upon the measurement of prompt and/or delayed emissions of neutrons and/or photons resulting from fission. The small size (<0.2 m3), light weight (<12 kg), and low power consumption (<50 W) of modern ENGs makes them ideally suited for use in field situations, incorporated into systems carried by 2-3 individuals under rugged conditions. At Idaho National Laboratory we are investigating techniques and portable equipment for performing active neutron interrogation of moderate sized objects less than ~2-4 m3 to detect shielded fissionable material. Our research in this area relies upon the use of pulsed deuterium-tritium ENGs and the measurement of die-away prompt fission neutrons and other neutron signatures in-between neutron pulses from the ENG and after the ENG is turned off.

  12. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    MJ Trbovich; DP Barry; RE Slovacck; Y Danon; RC Block; JA Burke; NJ Drindak; G Leinweber; RV Ballad

    2004-10-13

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically-enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY [1] and INTER [2] codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  13. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, Michael J.; Barry, Devin P.; Burke, John A.; Drindak, Noel J.; Leinweber, Greg; Ballad, Robert V.; Slovacek, Rudy E.; Danon, Yaron; Block, Robert C.

    2005-05-24

    The focus of this work is to determine resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005-200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping 176Hf and 178Hf resonances near 8 eV. The large neutron cross section of hafnium, combined with its corrosion resistance and excellent mechanical properties, make it a useful material for controlling nuclear reactions.Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission were performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) using the time of flight method. 6Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m. Capture experiments were done using a sixteen-section NaI(Tl) multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized various thicknesses of metallic and isotopically enriched liquid samples. The liquid samples were designed to provide information on the 176Hf and 178Hf contributions to the 8-eV doublet without saturation.Data analysis was done using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY version M6 beta. SAMMY is able to account for experimental resolution effects for each of the experimental setups at the RPI LINAC, and also can correct for multiple scattering effects in neutron capture yield data. The combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005-200 eV. Resonance integrals were calculated along with errors for each hafnium isotope using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previously published values; however the calculated elemental hafnium resonance integral changed very little.

  14. A portable active interrogation system using a switchable AmBe neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew; Hertz, Kristin; Kunz, Christopher; Mascarenhas, Nicholas

    2005-09-01

    Active neutron interrogation is an effective technique used to locate fissionable material. This paper discusses a portable system that utilizes a AmBe neutron source. The AmBe source consists of an americium alpha source and a beryllium target that can be switched into alignment to turn the source on and out of alignment to turn the source off. This offers a battery operated backpack portable source. The detector system that has been fabricated for use with this source is a fifteen tube 3He neutron detector. The results of initial experiments with the detector and MCNP calculations are discussed.

  15. Neutron interactions in the CUORE neutrinoless double beta decay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinski, Michelle Jean

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0nuDBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0nuDBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0nuDBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0nuDBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0nuDBD of 130Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO2 bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0nuDBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10-6. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0nuDBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, winch can be produced underground both by (alpha,n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE data to set an upper

  16. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinski, Michelle Jean

    2008-10-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vDBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0vDBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0vDBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0vDBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0vDBD of 130Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO2 bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0vDBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10-6. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0vDBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, which can be produced underground both by (α,n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE

  17. The synchronous active neutron detection system for spent fuel assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-10-01

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit the unique operating features of a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. This generator and a novel detection system will be applied to the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed {open_quotes}lock-in{close_quotes} amplifiers. The authors have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. This approach is possible because the Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. The results to date are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be nonthermal and penetrating. Although a significant amount of work remains to fully explore the relevant physics and optimize the instrument design, the underlying concept appears sound.

  18. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  19. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population. PMID:26509624

  20. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at KAMINI shielding experiment location.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sujoy; Bagchi, Subhrojit; Prasad, R R; Venkatasubramanian, D; Mohanakrishnan, P; Keshavamurty, R S; Haridas, Adish; Arul, A John; Puthiyavinayagam, P

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spectrum at KAMINI reactor south beam tube end has been determined using multifoil activation method. This beam tube is being used for characterizing neutron attenuation of novel shield materials. Starting from a computed guess spectrum, the spectrum adjustment/unfolding procedure makes use of minimization of a modified constraint function representing (a) least squared deviations between the measured and calculated reaction rates, (b) a measure of sharp fluctuations in the adjusted spectrum and (c) the square of the deviation of adjusted spectrum from the guess spectrum. The adjusted/unfolded spectrum predicts the reaction rates accurately. The results of this new procedure are compared with those of widely used SAND-II code. PMID:27389881

  1. A new active thermal neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Bedogni, R; Bortot, D; Pola, A; Introini, M V; Gentile, A; Esposito, A; Gómez-Ros, J M; Palomba, M; Grossi, A

    2014-10-01

    This communication presents the main results about the design and in-house fabrication of a new solid-state neutron detector, which produces a DC output signal proportional to the thermal neutron fluence rate. The detector has been developed within the framework of the 3-y project NESCOFI@BTF of INFN (CSN V). Due to its sensitivity, photon rejection, low cost and minimum size, this device is suited to be used in moderator-based spectrometers. PMID:24345462

  2. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  3. Spallation Neutron Source Operating Experience and Outlook for Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Stuart

    2010-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a MW-class accelerator-driven pulsed neutron source. The SNS began formal operations in October 2006. Since then, the beam power has been increased to 1 MW, the number of operating hours per year has increased to nearly 5000, the availability has increased to 85%, and the number of operating neutron scattering instruments has increased to 13. Plans are in place to increase the beam power and availability to their design values of 1.4 MW and 90% over the next two years, and to continue the build-out of instruments to 16 by 2012. Two upgrade projects are in the planning stages. In the first, the beam power of the SNS is increased to at least 2 MW by raising the beam energy from 1.0 to 1.3 GeV and the beam current by 60%. In the second, a Second Target Station is constructed, and is powered by sharing beam pulses with the first target station. The operating experience will be described, as will the challenges that have been met along the path toward 1 MW beam power. The strategy for upgrades will also be presented.

  4. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  5. Neutron lifetime experiment using UCN storage in an 'accordion-like' trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Ashish M.

    The precise determination of the neutron lifetime has an impact on particle physics and cosmology. We report progress towards a measurement of the neutron lifetime using an accordion-like storage trap. Ultracold neutrons are filled in the accordion-like storage volume, and the neutron lifetime is measured by counting surviving neutrons as a function of time. Preliminary results of the storage lifetimes, obtained during the experiment done at I.L.L in 2010, are presented. Several tests and attempts to improve the storage lifetime are discussed. The analysis of the experiment done in 2011, along with the measured values of the neutron lifetime at room temperature, and measured values of the neutron lifetime at low temperatures are presented. The measured value of the neutron lifetime at low temperatures is τn =894 ± 46 s, which is consistent with the current world average value of the neutron lifetime.

  6. Thermal Neutron Imaging in an Active Interrogation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, Peter E.; Forman, Leon; Norman, Daren R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of excitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutron-emitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  7. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis at the IBR-2 reactor of the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2008-10-01

    Experience of the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Department in employing epithermal activation in life sciences and materials science is summarized. The potential of a combination of epithermal activation and the suppression of Compton scattering and contributions from cascade-photon-emitting elements for raising NAA-based analytical studies up to a new level are discussed.

  8. High pressure gas spheres for neutron and photon experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, G.; Petrich, D.; Käppeler, F.; Kaltenbaek, J.; Leugers, B.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-09-01

    High pressure gas spheres have been designed and successfully used in several nuclear physics experiments on noble gases. The pros and cons of this solution are the simple design and the high reliability versus the fact that the density is limited to 40-60% of liquid or solid gas samples. Originally produced for neutron capture studies at keV energies, the comparably small mass of the gas spheres were an important advantage, which turned out to be of relevance for other applications as well. The construction, performance, and operation of the spheres are described and examples for their use are presented.

  9. Neutron-activation analysis applied to copper ores and artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, N. F.

    1970-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is used for quantitative identification of trace metals in copper. Establishing a unique fingerprint of impurities in Michigan copper would enable identification of artifacts made from this copper.

  10. Neutron activation studies and the effect of exercise on osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is described to measure calcium content by in vivo neutron activation analysis of the trunk and upper thighs. In postmenopausal women, estrogen and calcium or fluoride reversed osteoporosis.

  11. Simulation of a Novel Active Target for Neutron-Unbound State Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Nathan; MoNA Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Measurement of nuclei at extreme ratios of protons to neutrons is challenging due to the low production rate. New facilities will increase the production of neutron-rich isotopes, but still not reach the neutron dripline for heavier nuclei. We simulated a carbon-based active target system that could be constructed to both increase statistics while preserving the experimental resolution. This simulation is an adaptation of the in-house MoNA Collaboration C + + based simulation tool to extract the decay energy of neutron-unbound states. A number of experiments of this type have been carried out at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). In most experiments, we produce neutron-unbound nuclei by bombarding a Beryllium target with a radioactive beam. The nucleus of interest immediately decays into a charged particle and one or more neutrons. In this simulation, we have constructed a carbon-based active target that provides a measurement of energy loss, which is used to calculate the nuclear interaction point within the target. This additional information is used to improve the resolution or preserve the resolution of a thinner target while increasing statistics. This presentation will cover some aspects of the simulation process as well as show a resolution improvement of up to about 4 with a ~700 mg/cm2 active target compared to a Be-target. The simulation utilized experimental settings from published work. Work supported by National Science Foundation Grant #0969173.

  12. Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2008-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at Idaho National Laboratory to study methodology and instrumentation for performing neutron active interrogation die-away analyses for the purpose of detecting shielded fissionable material. Here we report initial work using a portable DT electronic neutron generator with a He-3 fast neutron detector to detect shielded fissionable material including >2 kg quantities of enriched uranium and plutonium. Measurements have been taken of bare material as well as of material hidden within a large plywood cube. Results from this work have demonstrated the efficacy of the die-away neutron measurement technique for quickly detecting the presence of special nuclear material hidden within plywood shields by analyzing the time dependent neutron signals in-between neutron generator pulses. Using a DT electronic neutron generator operating at 300 Hz with a yield of approximately 0.36 x 10**8 neutrons per second, 2.2 kg of enriched uranium hidden within a 0.60 m x 0.60 m x 0.70 m volume of plywood was positively detected with a measurement signal 2-sigma above the passive background within 1 second. Similarly, for a 500 second measurement period a lower detection limit of approaching the gram level could be expected with the same simple set-up.

  13. Thermal neutron imaging in an active interrogation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L., and Norman, D.R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of xcitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutronemitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  14. Spin-path entanglement in single-neutron interferometer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yuji; Erdoesi, Daniel

    2011-09-23

    There are two powerful arguments against the possibility of extending quantum mechanics (QM) into a more fundamental theory yielding a deterministic description of nature. One is the experimental violation of Bell inequalities, which discards local hidden-variable theories as a possible extension to QM. The other is the Kochen-Specker (KS) theorem, which stresses the incompatibility of QM with a larger class of hidden-variable theories, known as noncontextual hidden-variable theories. We performed experiments with neutron interferometer, which exploits spin-path entanglements in single neutrons. A Bell-like state is generated to demonstrate a violation of the Bell-like inequality and phenomena in accordance with KS theorem: both experiments study quantum contextuality and show clear evidence of the incompatibility of noncontextual hidden variable theories with QM. The value S = 2.202{+-}0.007 Neither-Less-Than-Nor-Equal-To 2 is obtained in the new measurement of the Bell-like inequality, which shows a larger violation than the previous measurement. For the study of KS theorem, the obtained violation 2.291{+-}0.008 Neither-Less-Than-Nor-Equal-To 1 clearly shows that quantum mechanical predictions cannot be reproduced by noncontextual hidden variable theories.

  15. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  16. Treatment experience: locally advanced sarcomas with 15 MeV fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ornitz, R.; Herskovic, A.; Schell, M.; Fender, F.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-06-01

    Experience with ten evaluable osseous sarcomas and ten evaluable advanced soft tissue sarcomas treated with neutrons of a mean neutron energy of 15 MeV are described. Neutron irradiation with or without conventional megavoltage radiotherapy is an effective modality in the treatment of these patients. No correlation between response rate and grade or whether fast neutrons alone or combined with megavoltage radiotherapy was noted. Those patients receiving a neutron dose of 2195 neutron plus gamma rads or greater all had a complete response.

  17. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Landoas, Olivier; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range. PMID:21806179

  18. Neutron activation analysis of wheat samples.

    PubMed

    Galinha, C; Anawar, H M; Freitas, M C; Pacheco, A M G; Almeida-Silva, M; Coutinho, J; Maçãs, B; Almeida, A S

    2011-11-01

    The deficiency of essential micronutrients and excess of toxic metals in cereals, an important food items for human nutrition, can cause public health risk. Therefore, before their consumption and adoption of soil supplementation, concentrations of essential micronutrients and metals in cereals should be monitored. This study collected soil and two varieties of wheat samples-Triticum aestivum L. (Jordão/bread wheat), and Triticum durum L. (Marialva/durum wheat) from Elvas area, Portugal and analyzed concentrations of As, Cr, Co, Fe, K, Na, Rb and Zn using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) to focus on the risk of adverse public health issues. The low variability and moderate concentrations of metals in soils indicated a lower significant effect of environmental input on metal concentrations in agricultural soils. The Cr and Fe concentrations in soils that ranged from 93-117 and 26,400-31,300mg/kg, respectively, were relatively high, but Zn concentration was very low (below detection limit <22mg/kg) indicating that soils should be supplemented with Zn during cultivation. The concentrations of metals in roots and straw of both varieties of wheat decreased in the order of K>Fe>Na>Zn>Cr>Rb>As>Co. Concentrations of As, Co and Cr in root, straw and spike of both varieties were higher than the permissible limits with exception of a few samples. The concentrations of Zn in root, straw and spike were relatively low (4-30mg/kg) indicating the deficiency of an essential micronutrient Zn in wheat cultivated in Portugal. The elemental transfer from soil to plant decreases with increasing growth of the plant. The concentrations of various metals in different parts of wheat followed the order: Root>Straw>Spike. A few root, straw and spike samples showed enrichment of metals, but the majority of the samples showed no enrichment. Potassium is enriched in all samples of root, straw and spike for both varieties of wheat. Relatively to the seed used for cultivation, Jord

  19. Proposed experiment to measure {gamma}-rays from the thermal neutron capture of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takatomi; Ou, I.; Izumi, T.; Yamaguchi, R.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.

    2012-11-12

    Gadolinium-157 ({sup 157}Gd) has the largest thermal neutron capture cross section among any stable nuclei. The thermal neutron capture yields {gamma}-ray cascade with total energy of about 8 MeV. Because of these characteristics, Gd is applied for the recent neutrino detectors. Here, we propose an experiment to measure the multiplicity and the angular correlation of {gamma}-rays from the Gd neutron capture. With these information, we expect the improved identification of the Gd neutron capture.

  20. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  1. Addressing Different Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures from Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-10-01

    In a continuing effort to examine portable methods for implementing active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded fissionable material research is underway to investigate the utility of analyzing multiple time-correlated signatures. Time correlation refers here to the existence of unique characteristics of the fission interrogation signature related to the start and end of an irradiation, as well as signatures present in between individual pulses of an irradiating source. Traditional measurement approaches in this area have typically worked to detect die-away neutrons after the end of each pulse, neutrons in between pulses related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products, or neutrons or gamma rays related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products after the end of an irradiation exposure. In this paper we discus the potential weaknesses of assessing only one signature versus multiple signatures and make the assertion that multiple complimentary and orthogonal measurements should be used to bolster the performance of active interrogation systems, helping to minimize susceptibility to the weaknesses of individual signatures on their own. Recognizing that the problem of detection is a problem of low count rates, we are exploring methods to integrate commonly used signatures with rarely used signatures to improve detection capabilities for these measurements. In this paper we will discuss initial activity in this area with this approach together with observations of some of the strengths and weaknesses of using these different signatures.

  2. Benchmarking of activation reaction distribution in an intermediate energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Morev, Mikhail N; Hirota, Masahiro; Abe, Takuya; Koike, Yuya; Iwai, Satoshi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction rate depth profiles inside concrete shield irradiated by intermediate energy neutron were calculated using a Monte-Carlo code and compared with an experiment. An irradiation field of intermediate neutron produced in the forward direction from a thick (stopping length) target bombarded by 400 MeV nucleon(-1) carbon ions was arranged at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. Ordinary concrete shield of 90 cm thickness was installed 50 cm downstream the iron target. Activation detectors of aluminum, gold and gold covered with cadmium were inserted at various depths. Irradiated samples were extracted after exposure and gamma-ray spectrometry was performed for each sample. Comparison of experimental and calculated shows good agreement for both low- and high-energy neutron-induced reaction except for (27)Al(n,X)(24)Na reaction at the surface. PMID:21515619

  3. Delayed Choice in Feynman's Neutron Scattering Off a Crystal Experiment: The Effect of Information on the Neutron Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Douglas

    2014-03-01

    Feynman (Lect. on Phys., v. 3, 1965, ps. 3-7 to 3-9) maintained in his neutron scattering off a crystal experiment that which-way info can exist even if one does not perform a measurement. This interaction involves a spin flip for both the neutron and nucleus that the neutron scatters off. With the flip, the spin of the nucleus that the neutron scattered off becomes different than the spin direction of all the other nuclei in the crystal that the neutron could have scattered off. The spins of all the other nuclei are the same. It may be possible to eliminate the ww info as long as particle detections have not been made. Through spin-lattice relaxation after the neutron-nucleus interaction occurs, the spin flip of the nucleus would reverse before any detection is made. It would no longer be possible to determine which nucleus the neutron scattered off. The result is only interference in the distribution of the neutrons. This change from ww info to interference would be affected by a change in info regarding the nuclei in the crystal since there is no physical process whereby the change in the nuclei can affect the distribution of the neutrons. Altering relaxation duration relative to neutron detection time could provide a delayed choice. Another possibility would be to shut off the uniform, strong, external magnetic field B, that initially aligns all of the spins of the nuclei along the same axis, after the spin flip and before the neutron is detected. Ww info would be eliminated since the spin directions of all the nuclei would quickly become essentially random. Maintaining or turning off B could be a delayed choice.

  4. The stainless steel bulk shielding benchmark experiment at the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batistoni, P.; Angelone, M.; Martone, M.; Petrizzi, L.; Pillon, M.; Rado, V.; Santamarina, A.; Abidi, I.; Gastaldi, G.; Joyer, P.; Marquette, J. P.; Martini, M.

    1994-09-01

    In the framework of the European Technology Program for NET/ITER, ENEA (Ente Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente), Frascati and CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique), Cadarache, are collaborating on a bulk shielding benchmark experiment using the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). The aim of the experiment is to obtain accurate experimental data for improving the nuclear database and methods used in the shielding designs, through a rigorous analysis of the results. The experiment consists of the irradiation of a stainless steel block by 14 MeV neutrons. The neutron flux and spectra at different depths, up to 65 cm inside the block, are measured by fission chambers and activation foils characterized by different energy response ranges. The γ-ray dose measurements are performed with ionization chambers and thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD). The first results are presented, as well as the comparison with calculations using the cross section library EFF (European Fusion File).

  5. Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  6. The role of neutron activation analysis in nutritional biomonitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, V.

    1988-01-01

    Nutritional biomonitoring is a multidisciplinary task and an integral part of a more general bioenvironmental surveillance. In its comprehensive form, it is a combination of biological, environmental, and nutrient monitoring activities. Nutrient monitoring evaluates the input of essential nutrients required to maintain vital bodily functions; this includes vigilance over extreme fluctuations of nutrient intake in relation to the recommended dietary allowances and estimated safe and adequate daily dietary intakes and adherence to the goals of provisional tolerance limits. Environmental monitoring assesses the external human exposure via ambient pathways, namely, air, water, soil, food, etc. Biological monitoring quantifies a toxic agent and its metabolites in representative biologic specimens of an exposed organ to identify health effects. In practice, coordinating all three components of a nutritional biomonitoring program is complex, expensive, and tedious. Experience gained from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys demonstrates the problems involved. By far the most critical challenge faced here is the question of analytical quality control, particularly when trace element determinations are involved. Yet, measures to ensure reliability of analytical data are mandatory, and there are no short-cuts to this requirement. The purpose of this presentation is to elucidate the potential of neutron activation analysis (NAA) in nutritional biomonitoring activities.

  7. NaI detector neutron activation spectra for PGNAA applications

    PubMed

    Gardner; El; Zheng; Hayden; Mayo

    2000-10-01

    When NaI detectors are used in prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis devices, they are activated by neutrons that penetrate the detector. While thermal neutron filters like boron or lithium can be used to reduce this activation, it can never be completely eliminated by this approach since high energy neutrons can penetrate the detector and thermalize inside it. This activation results in the emission of prompt gamma rays from both the I and Na and the production of the radioisotopes 128I and 24Na that subsequently decay and emit their characteristic beta particles and gamma rays. The resulting three spectra represent a background for this measurement. An experimental method for obtaining these three spectra is described and results are reported for 2" x 2", 5" x 5", 6" x 6", and 1" x 6" NaI detectors using the thermal neutron beam of the NCSU PULSTAR nuclear reactor. In addition, Monte Carlo simulation programs have been developed and used for simulating these spectra. Good results have been obtained by the Monte Carlo method for the two radioisotope spectra, and it is anticipated that good results will also be obtained for the prompt gamma-ray spectrum when the I and Na coincidence schemes are known. PMID:11003483

  8. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  9. Measuring fast neutrons with large liquid scintillation detector for ultra-low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Mei, D.-M.; Davis, P.; Woltman, B.; Gray, F.

    2013-11-01

    We developed a 12-liter volume neutron detector filled with the liquid scintillator EJ301 that measures neutrons in an underground laboratory where dark matter and neutrino experiments are located. The detector target is a cylindrical volume coated on the inside with reflective paint (95% reflectivity) that significantly increases the detector's light collection. We demonstrate several calibration techniques using point sources and cosmic-ray muons for energies up to 20 MeV for this large liquid scintillation detector. Neutron-gamma separation using pulse shape discrimination with a few MeV neutrons to hundreds of MeV neutrons is shown for the first time using a large liquid scintillator.

  10. Calibration of the delayed-gamma neutron activation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Zhao, X.; Rarback, H.M.; Yasumura, S.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Moore, R.I.; Lo Monte, A.F.; Vodopia, K.A.; Liu, H.B.; Economos, C.D.; Nelson, M.E.; Aloia, J.F.; Vaswani, A.N.; Weber, D.A.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.; Joel, D.D.

    1996-02-01

    The delayed-gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory was originally calibrated using an anthropomorphic hollow phantom filled with solutions containing predetermined amounts of Ca. However, 99{percent} of the total Ca in the human body is not homogeneously distributed but contained within the skeleton. Recently, an artificial skeleton was designed, constructed, and placed in a bottle phantom to better represent the Ca distribution in the human body. Neutron activation measurements of an anthropomorphic and a bottle (with no skeleton) phantom demonstrate that the difference in size and shape between the two phantoms changes the total body calcium results by less than 1{percent}. To test the artificial skeleton, two small polyethylene jerry-can phantoms were made, one with a femur from a cadaver and one with an artificial bone in exactly the same geometry. The femur was ashed following the neutron activation measurements for chemical analysis of Ca. Results indicate that the artificial bone closely simulates the real bone in neutron activation analysis and provides accurate calibration for Ca measurements. Therefore, the calibration of the delayed-gamma neutron activation system is now based on the new bottle phantom containing an artificial skeleton. This change has improved the accuracy of measurement for total body calcium. Also, the simple geometry of this phantom and the artificial skeleton allows us to simulate the neutron activation process using a Monte Carlo code, which enables us to calibrate the system for human subjects larger and smaller than the phantoms used as standards. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.}

  11. Improved thermal neutron activation sensor for detection of bulk explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Faust, Anthony A.; Andrews, H. Robert; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Mosquera, Cristian M.

    2012-06-01

    Defence R&D Canada - Suffield and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives since 1994. First generation sensors, employing an isotopic source and NaI(Tl) gamma ray detectors, were deployed by Canadian Forces in 2002 as confirmation sensors on the ILDS teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor anti-tank landmine detection systems. The first generation TNA could detect anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less in no more than a minute, but deeper mines and those significantly displaced horizontally required considerably longer times. Mines as deep as 30 cm could be detected with long counting times (1000 s). The second generation TNA detector is being developed with a number of improvements aimed at increasing sensitivity and facilitating ease of operation. Among these are an electronic neutron generator to increase sensitivity for deeper and horizontally displaced explosives; LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, to improve time response and energy resolution; improved thermal and electronic stability; improved sensor head geometry to minimize spatial response nonuniformity; and more robust data processing. This improved sensitivity can translate to either decreased counting times, decreased minimum detectable explosive quantities, increased maximum sensor-to-target displacement, or a trade off among all three. Experiments to characterize the performance of the latest generation TNA in detecting buried landmines and IEDs hidden in culverts were conducted during 2011. This paper describes the second generation system. The experimental setup and methodology are detailed and preliminary comparisons between the performance of first and second generation systems are presented.

  12. Neutron activation analysis for antimetabolites. [in food samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Determination of metal ion contaminants in food samples is studied. A weighed quantity of each sample was digested in a concentrated mixture of nitric, hydrochloric and perchloric acids to affect complete solution of the food products. The samples were diluted with water and the pH adjusted according to the specific analysis performed. The samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis, polarography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The solid food samples were also analyzed by neutron activation analysis for increased sensitivity and lower levels of detectability. The results are presented in tabular form.

  13. Feasibility of culvert IED detection using thermal neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.; McFee, John E.; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Andrews, Hugh Robert; Mosquera, Cristian; Roberts, William C.

    2012-06-01

    Bulk explosives hidden in culverts pose a serious threat to the Canadian and allied armies. Culverts provide an opportunity to conceal insurgent activity, avoid the need for detectable surface disturbances, and limit the applicability of conventional sub-surface sensing techniques. Further, in spite of the large masses of explosives that can be employed, the large sensor{target separation makes detection of the bulk explosive content challeng- ing. Defence R&D Canada { Sueld and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives for over 15 years. The next generation TNA sensor, known as TNA2, incorporates a number of improvements that allow for increased sensor-to-target dis- tances, making it potentially feasible to detect large improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in culverts using TNA. Experiments to determine the ability of TNA2 to detect improvised explosive devices in culverts are described, and the resulting signal levels observed for relevant quantities of explosives are presented. Observations conrm that bulk explosives detection using TNA against a culvert-IED is possible, with large charges posing a detection challenge at least as dicult as that of a deeply buried anti-tank landmine. Because of the prototype nature of the TNA sensor used, it is not yet possible to make denitive statements about the absolute sensitivity or detection time. Further investigation is warranted.

  14. BOREHOLE NEUTRON ACTIVATION: THE RARE EARTHS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron-induced borehole gamma-ray spectroscopy has been widely used as a geophysical exploration technique by the petroleum industry, but its use for mineral exploration is not as common. Nuclear methods can be applied to mineral exploration, for determining stratigraphy and bed correlations, for mapping ore deposits, and for studying mineral concentration gradients. High-resolution detectors are essential for mineral exploration, and by using them an analysis of the major element concentrations in a borehole can usually be made. A number of economically important elements can be detected at typical ore-grade concentrations using this method. Because of the application of the rare-earth elements to high-temperature superconductors, these elements are examined in detail as an example of how nuclear techniques can be applied to mineral exploration.

  15. Neutron Fluences and Radiation Damage Parameters for the HFIR-MFE-RB-17J Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Glasgow, David C.; Baldwin, Charles A.

    2010-08-23

    The HFIR-MFE-RB-17J experiment was conducted in the removable beryllium (RB) position of HFIR with a Eu2O2 shield. The irradiation was conducted from April 27, 2004, to May 18, 2005. The total exposure was for 353.6 FPD (full power days). Reactor dosimetry capsules were analyzed and the activation data were used to provide the best estimates of the neutron fluences and radiation damage parameters as a function of height relative to midplane of the reactor.

  16. Prompt Fission Neutron Experiments on 235U(n,f) and 252Cf(SF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.

    For nuclear modeling and improved evaluation of nuclear data knowledge about fluctuations of the prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of incident neutron energy is requested for the major actinides 235U and 239Pu. Experimental investigations of the prompt fission neutron emission in resonance neutron induced fission on 235U are taking place at the GELINA facility of the IRMM. The experiment employs an array of neutron scintillation-detectors (SCINTIA) in conjunction with a newly designed 3D position sensitive twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber. A preparatory experiment on prompt fission neutron emission in 252Cf(SF) was undertaken to verify analysis procedures relevant for the implementation of the SCINTIA neutron detector array. The available literature data on the TKE dependence of the multiplicity show strong deviations. Therefore, effort was focused on investigating experimental factors in low efficiency neutron counting experiments that may lead to faulty determination of this dependence. Taking these factors into account a result that agree well with data from high efficiency neutron counting experiments is obtained.

  17. Neutron Background Characterization for a Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering experiment at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering (CNNS) is a theoretical well-grounded, but as-yet unverified process. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) may provide an optimal platform for detection of CNNS, possibly with existing detector technology. A proto-collaboration of groups from several institutions has come together to investigate this option and propose an experiment for the first-time observation of CNNS. Currently, the largest risk to such an experiment comes from an unknown background of beam-induced high-energy neutrons that penetrate the existing SNS concrete shielding. We have deployed a neutron scatter camera at the SNS during beam operation and performed preliminary measurements of the neutron backgrounds at a promising experimental location. In order to measure neutrons as high as 100 MeV, we needed to make modifications to the neutron scatter camera and expand its capabilities beyond its standard operating range of 1-14MeV. We have identified sources of high-energy neutrons and continue to investigate other possible locations that may allow a successful CNNS experiment to go forward. The imaging capabilities of the neutron scatter camera will allow more optimal shielding designs that take into account neutron flux anisotropies at the selected experiment locations.

  18. Neutron dosimetry qualification experiments for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Lithium Blanket Module program

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, F.Y.; Harker, Y.D.; Anderi, R.A.; Nigg, D.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Lithium Blanket module (LBM) program is a first-of-kind neutronics experiment involving a toroidal fusion neutron source. Qualification experiments have been conducted to develop primary measurement techniques and verify dosimetry materials that will be used to characterize the neutron environment inside and on the surfaces of the LBM. The deuterium-tritium simulation experiments utilizing a 14-MeV neutron generator and a fusion blanket mockup facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Results and discussions are presented that identify the quality and limitations of the measured integral reaction data, including the minimum fluence requirement for the TFTR experiment and the use of such data in neutron spectrum adjustment and in predicting integral performance parameters, e.g., tritium production.

  19. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy.

  20. Determination of fission neutron transmission through waste matrix material using neutron signal correlation from active assay of {sup 239}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Hollas, C.L.; Arnone, G.; Brunson, G.; Coop, K.

    1996-09-01

    The accuracy of TRU (transuranic) waste assay using the differential die-away technique depends upon significant corrections to compensate for the effects of the matrix material in which the TRU waste is located. The authors have used a new instrument, the Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) instrument for the assay of TRU waste, to develop methods to improve the accuracy of these corrections. Neutrons from a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator are moderated in the walls of the CTEN cavity and induce fission in the TRU material. The prompt neutrons from these fission events are detected in cadmium-wrapped {sup 3}He neutron detectors. They report new methods of data acquisition and analysis to extract correlation in the neutron signals resulting form fission during active interrogation. They use the correlation information in conjunction with the total number of neutrons to determine the fraction of fission neutrons transmitted through the matrix material into the {sup 3}He detectors. This determination allows them to cleanly separate the matrix effects into two processes: matrix modification upon the neutron interrogating flux and matrix modification upon the fraction of fission neutrons transmitted to the neutron detectors. This transmission information is also directly applied in a neutron multiplicity analysis in the passive assay of {sup 240}Pu.

  1. Superthermal source of ultracold neutrons for fundamental physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Oliver; Piegsa, Florian M; Ivanov, Sergey N

    2011-09-23

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) play an important role for precise measurements of the properties of the neutron and its interactions. During the past 25 years, a neutron turbine coupled to a liquid deuterium cold neutron source at a high-flux reactor has defined the state of the art for UCN production, despite a long history of efforts towards a new generation of UCN sources. This Letter reports a world-best UCN density available for users, achieved with a new source based on conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium. A conversion volume of 5 liters provides at least 274,000 UCN in a single accumulation run. Cyclically repeated operation of the source has been demonstrated, as well. PMID:22026860

  2. Superthermal Source of Ultracold Neutrons for Fundamental Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Oliver; Piegsa, Florian M.; Ivanov, Sergey N.

    2011-09-23

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) play an important role for precise measurements of the properties of the neutron and its interactions. During the past 25 years, a neutron turbine coupled to a liquid deuterium cold neutron source at a high-flux reactor has defined the state of the art for UCN production, despite a long history of efforts towards a new generation of UCN sources. This Letter reports a world-best UCN density available for users, achieved with a new source based on conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium. A conversion volume of 5 liters provides at least 274 000 UCN in a single accumulation run. Cyclically repeated operation of the source has been demonstrated, as well.

  3. Neutron Correlations in Special Nuclear Materials, Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J; Dougan, A; Nakae, L; Sale, K; Snyderman, N

    2007-06-05

    Fissile materials emit neutrons with an unmistakable signature that can reveal characteristics of the material. We describe here measurements, simulations, and predicted signals expected and prospects for application of neutron correlation measurement methods to detection of special nuclear materials (SNM). The occurrence of fission chains in SNM can give rise to this distinctive, measurable time correlation signal. The neutron signals can be analyzed to detect the presence and to infer attributes of the SNM and surrounding materials. For instance, it is possible to infer attributes of an assembly containing a few kilograms of uranium, purely passively, using detectors of modest size in a reasonable time. Neutron signals of three radioactive sources are shown to illustrate the neutron correlation and analysis method. Measurements are compared with Monte Carlo calculations of the authenticated sources.

  4. Versatile module for experiments with focussing neutron guides

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.; Brandl, G.; Chacon, A.; Wagner, J. N.; Rahn, M.; Mühlbauer, S.; Georgii, R.

    2014-09-22

    We report the development of a versatile module that permits fast and reliable use of focussing neutron guides under varying scattering angles. A simple procedure for setting up the module and neutron guides is illustrated by typical intensity patterns to highlight operational aspects as well as typical parasitic artefacts. Combining a high-precision alignment table with separate housings for the neutron guides on kinematic mounts, the change-over between neutron guides with different focussing characteristics requires no readjustments of the experimental setup. Exploiting substantial gain factors, we demonstrate the performance of this versatile neutron scattering module in a study of the effects of uniaxial stress on the domain populations in the transverse spin density wave phase of single crystal Cr.

  5. Active neutron multiplicity analysis and Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, M. S.; Ensslin, N.; Langner, D. G.; Miller, M. C.; Siebelist, R.; Stewart, J. E.; Ceo, R. N.; May, P. K.; Collins, L. L., Jr.

    Active neutron multiplicity measurements of high-enrichment uranium metal and oxide samples have been made at Los Alamos and Y-12. The data from the measurements of standards at Los Alamos were analyzed to obtain values for neutron multiplication and source-sample coupling. These results are compared to equivalent results obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. An approximate relationship between coupling and multiplication is derived and used to correct doubles rates for multiplication and coupling. The utility of singles counting for uranium samples is also examined.

  6. Current Status of the Experiment on Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering Length at the Reactor YAGUAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, W. I.; Muzichka, A. Yu.; Crawford, B. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kandiev, Ya.; Levakov, B. G.; Litvin, V. I.; Lychagin, E. V.; Lyzhin, A. E.; Mitchell, G. E.; Nekhaev, G. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Stephenson, S. L.; Strelkov, A. V.; Tchernukhin, Yu. I.; Tornow, W.

    2009-03-01

    A new experiment was proposed in 2002 to perform the first direct measurement of neutron-neutron scattering on the powerful pulsed reactor YAGUAR located at Snezhinsk, Ural region, Russia. Extensive efforts were made to model the background conditions and to optimize the set-up design. To make the experiment feasible it was necessary to suppress the background from various origins by more than 16 orders of magnitude for thermal neutrons and 14 orders of magnitude for fast neutrons. In 2003 a channel was drilled under the reactor and equipped for time-of-flight measurements. During the next two years at this channel there were carried out a series of test experiments aimed at verifying the accuracy of the background modeling. Good agreement of the measured results with the calculated values enabled us to make the final design of the full scale set-up. During 2005-2006 the experimental system was manufactured. After vacuum tests at JINR the set-up was mounted at the YAGUAR reactor hall. In 2006-2007 calibration measurements with noble gases were performed. The results confirmed the validity of the modeling of the full scale experiment and verified the calibration. The first preliminary experiments for nn-scattering were performed in April 2008. These recent results are discussed.

  7. Current Status of the Experiment on Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering Length at the Reactor YAGUAR

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, W. I.; Muzichka, A. Yu.; Lychagin, E. V.; Nekhaev, G. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Strelkov, A. V.; Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W.; Kandiev, Ya.; Levakov, B. G.; Litvin, V. I.; Lyzhin, A. E.; Tchernukhin, Yu. I.; Mitchell, G. E.

    2009-03-31

    A new experiment was proposed in 2002 to perform the first direct measurement of neutron-neutron scattering on the powerful pulsed reactor YAGUAR located at Snezhinsk, Ural region, Russia. Extensive efforts were made to model the background conditions and to optimize the set-up design. To make the experiment feasible it was necessary to suppress the background from various origins by more than 16 orders of magnitude for thermal neutrons and 14 orders of magnitude for fast neutrons. In 2003 a channel was drilled under the reactor and equipped for time-of-flight measurements. During the next two years at this channel there were carried out a series of test experiments aimed at verifying the accuracy of the background modeling. Good agreement of the measured results with the calculated values enabled us to make the final design of the full scale set-up. During 2005-2006 the experimental system was manufactured. After vacuum tests at JINR the set-up was mounted at the YAGUAR reactor hall. In 2006-2007 calibration measurements with noble gases were performed. The results confirmed the validity of the modeling of the full scale experiment and verified the calibration. The first preliminary experiments for nn-scattering were performed in April 2008. These recent results are discussed.

  8. Neutron spectrum measurements in DT discharges using activation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, B.; Bertalot, L.; Loughlin, M.; Roquemore, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    The JET activation system has eight irradiation ends where samples may be irradiated in the neutron flux from the plasma. There is one end, re-entrant into the top of the vessel, for which there is little intervening material between it and the plasma; the other ends, including two beneath the divertor coils, have increasingly larger amounts of intervening structure. The local neutron spectrum at each irradiation end was measured by simultaneously activating several elemental foils (Al, Au, Co, Fe, In, Mg, Nb, Ni, Ti, Zr). There were 15 activation reactions in the energy range of 0.5-16 MeV which were used as input to the SNL-SAND-II code to determine the neutron energy spectrum. The results are compared with neutron transport calculations both from the MCNP and FURNACE codes: the average standard deviation between measured to SNL-SAND-II calculated activity ratios was as low as 5%. The results demonstrate the reliability of the neutronics calculations and have implications for the design of diagnostics and blankets for the next generation of large tokamaks such as ITER. The 377.9 keV line of the 54Fe(n,2n)53Fe reaction (threshold ˜13.9 MeV, not a dosimetric standard) has also been measured in different plasma conditions. The ratio of the saturated activity from this reaction to that from the 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reaction (threshold ˜4.5 MeV) provides information on the broadening of the 14 MeV fusion peak.

  9. Neutron activation analysis; A sensitive test for trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z. . Ward Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron activation analysis (NAA), an extremely sensitive technique for determining the elemental constituents of an unknown specimen. Currently, there are some twenty-five moderate-power TRIGA reactors scattered across the United States (fourteen of them at universities), and one of their principal uses is for NAA. NAA is procedurally simple. A small amount of the material to be tested (typically between one and one hundred milligrams) is irradiated for a period that varies from a few minutes to several hours in a neutron flux of around 10{sup 12} neutrons per square centimeter per second. A tiny fraction of the nuclei present (about 10{sup {minus}8}) is transmuted by nuclear reactions into radioactive forms. Subsequently, the nuclei decay, and the energy and intensity of the gamma rays that they emit can be measured in a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  10. Polymer gel dosimetry for neutron beam in the Neutron Exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sato, H.; Hamano, T.; Suda, M.; Yoshii, H.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether gel dosimetry could be used to measure neutron beams. We irradiated a BANG3-type polymer gel dosimeter using neutron beams in the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. First, the polymer gels were irradiated from 0 to 7.0 Gy to investigate the dose-R2 responses. Irradiated gels were evaluated using 1.5-T magnetic resonance R2 images. Second, the polymer gels were irradiated to 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 Gy to acquire a depth-R2 response curve. The dose-R2 response curve was linear up to approximately 7 Gy, with a slope of 1.25 Gy-1·s-1. Additionally, compared with the photon- irradiated gels, the neutron-irradiated gels had lower R2 values. The acquired depth-R2 curves of the central axis from the 3.0- and 5.0-Gy neutron dose-irradiated gels exhibited an initial build-up. Although, a detailed investigation is needed, polymer gel dosimetry is effective for measuring the dose-related R2 linearity and depth-R2 relationships of neutron beams.

  11. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  12. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  13. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  14. Neutron activation system using water flow for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani, T.; Ebisawa, K.; Kasai, S.; Walker, C.

    2003-03-01

    A neutron activation system with flowing water using the 16O(n,p)16N reaction has been designed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reaction (ITER) neutron yield monitor with temporal resolution, based on the experimental results carried out at the fusion neutronics source (FNS) facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. On ITER, irradiation ends will be installed in the filler shielding module between the blanket modules at the equatorial ports. The gamma-ray counting stations will be installed on the upstairs of the pit outside the biological shield. BGO (Bi4Ge3O12) scintillation detectors will be employed to measure 6.13 MeV gamma rays emitted from 16N. The distance between the irradiation end and the counting station is ˜20 m. The performance of the neutron activation system has been evaluated by using the neutron Monte Carlo code MCNP-4b with the JENDL 3.2 library. The reaction rate of 16O(n,p)16N was calculated not only at the irradiation end but also along the transfer line, which showed that the temporal resolution would be less than the ITER requirement of 100 ms including turbulent diffusion effects for the flow velocity of 10 m/s. With a flow velocity of 10 m/s, this system can measure the fusion power from 50 kW to 1 GW of the ITER operation by using two gamma-ray detectors; one detector faces the water pipe directly, and another has a collimator for higher-neutron yield. Also the calculation shows that the reaction rate is relatively insensitive to the change of the plasma position.

  15. Measurements of fusion neutrons from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion Experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E. C.; Awe, T. J.; Torres, J. A.; Jones, B.; Bur, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Styron, J. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Strong evidence of thermonuclear neutron production has been observed during Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments on the Z accelerator. So far, these experiments have utilized deuterium fuel and produced primary DD fusion neutron yields up to 2e12 with electron and ion stagnation temperatures in the 2-3 keV range. We present MagLIF neutron measurements and compare to other data and implosion simulations. In addition to primary DD and secondary DT yields and ion temperatures, other complex physics regarding the degree of fuel magnetization and liner density are elucidated by the neutron measurements. Neutron diagnostic development for deuterium and future deuterium-tritium fuel experiments are also discussed. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Japanese experience with clinical trails of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiaton with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Patients who had received pre- or postoperative irradiation were excluded from this evaluation. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoasts's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast nuetron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons was 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. This was supported by evidence from the pathological studies that showed that the tumor cells which had deeply invaded into the esophagus were effectively destroyed when fast neutrons were applied.

  17. A simulation-based study of the neutron backgrounds for NaI dark matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, E. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2016-01-01

    Among the direct search experiments for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter, the DAMA experiment observed an annual modulation signal interpreted as WIMP interactions with a significance of 9.2σ. Recently, Jonathan Davis claimed that the DAMA modulation may be interpreted on the basis of the neutron scattering events induced by the muons and neutrinos together. We tried to simulate the neutron backgrounds at the Gran Sasso and Yangyang laboratory with and without the polyethylene shielding to quantify the effects of the ambient neutrons on the direct detection experiments based on the crystals.

  18. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer.

  19. Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Polarized Cold Neutron Capture on the Proton: the NPDGamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Lauss; J.D. Bowman; R. Carlini; T.E. Chupp; W. Chen; S. Corvig; M. Dabaghyan; D. Desai; S.J. Freeman; T.R. Gentile; M.T. Gericke; R.C. Gillis; G.L. Greene; F.W. Hersman; T. Ino; T. Ito; G.L. Jones; M. Kandes; M. Leuschner; B. Lozowski; R. Mahurin; M. Mason; Y. Masuda; J. Mei; G.S. Mitchell; S. Muto; H. Nann; S.A. Page; S.I. Penttila; W.D. Ramsay; S. Santra; P.-N. Seo; E.I. Sharapov; T.B. Smith; W.M. Snow; W.S. Wilburn; V. Yuan; H. Zhu

    2005-10-24

    The NPD{gamma} experiment at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is dedicated to measure with high precision the parity violating asymmetry in the {gamma} emission after capture of spin polarized cold neutrons in para-hydrogen. The measurement will determine unambiguously the weak pion-nucleon-nucleon ({pi} NN) coupling constant (line integral){sub {pi}}{sup l}.

  20. A Ramsey’s Method With Pulsed Neutrons for a T-Violation Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Y.; Ino, T.; Muto, S.; Skoy, V.

    2005-01-01

    A Ramsey’s method with pulsed neutrons is discussed for neutron spin manipulation in a time reversal (T) symmetry violation experiment. The neutron spin (sn) is aligned to the direction of a vector product of the nuclear spin (I) and the neutron momentum (kn) for the measurement of a T-odd correlation term, which is represented as sn · (kn × I), during propagation through a polarized nuclear target. The phase control and amplitude modulation of separated oscillatory fields are discussed for the measurement of the T-odd correlation term. PMID:27308171

  1. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; et al

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  2. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  3. Development of a new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    A new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been developed by Adelphi Technology for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA), and fast neutron radiography. The generator makes an excellent fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron source for laboratories and industrial applications that require the safe production of neutrons, a small footprint, low cost, and small regulatory burden. The generator has three major components: a Radio Frequency Induction Ion Source, a Secondary Electron Shroud, and a Diode Accelerator Structure and Target. Monoenergetic neutrons (2.5MeV) are produced with a yield of 10(10)n/s using 25-50mA of deuterium ion beam current and 125kV of acceleration voltage. The present study characterizes the performance of the neutron generator with respect to neutron yield, neutron production efficiency, and the ionic current as a function of the acceleration voltage at various RF powers. In addition the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) simulation code was used to optimize the setup with respect to thermal flux and radiation protection. PMID:25305524

  4. Apollo experience report: Safety activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, C. N.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the flight safety experiences gained during the Apollo Program and safety, from the viewpoint of program management, engineering, mission planning, and ground test operations was discussed. Emphasis is placed on the methods used to identify the risks involved in flight and in certain ground test operations. In addition, there are discussions on the management and engineering activities used to eliminate or reduce these risks.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and neutron activation of holmium metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, D.W.; Thrash, T.P.; Wilson, L.J.; Alford, M.; Chibante, L.P.F.; Ehrhardt, G.J.

    1996-08-28

    Isolation of the first macroscopic quantities of endohedral holmium metallofullerenes (principally Ho@C{sub 82}, Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} by LD-TOF mass spectrometry) has been accomplished by carbon-arc and preparative HPLC methodologies. The detailed procedure for production and isolation of the metallofullerenes includes a new technique whereby holmium-impregnated electrodes are prepared simply by soaking porous graphite rods in an ethanolic solution of Ho(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}.xH{sub 2}O. Monoisotopic {sup 165}Ho offers a unique combination of advantages for neutron-activation studies of metallofullerenes, and purified samples containing {sup 165}Ho@C{sub 82}, {sup 165}Ho{sub 2}@C{sub 82}, and {sup 165}Ho{sub 3}@C{sub 82} have been activated by high-flux neutron irradiation ({Phi} = 4 x 10{sup 13}n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) to generate {sup 166}Ho metallofullerenes, which undergo {beta}{sup -} decay to produce stable {sup 166}Er. Chemical workup of the irradiated samples, followed by re-irradiation, has been used to demonstrate that observed decomposition of holmium metallofullerenes is due mainly to `fast` neutron damage rather than to holmium atom nuclear recoil (E{sub max} = 200 eV). This implies that metallofullerene damage can be minimized by using neutron fluxes with the highest possible thermal component. 60 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Tripartite entanglement in single-neutron interferometer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erdösi, Daniel; Hasegawa, Yuji; Huber, Marcus; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2014-12-04

    We present experimental evidence of the generation of distinct types of genuine multipartite entanglement between the spin, energy, and path degrees of freedom within single-neutron quantum systems. This is achieved via the development of new spin manipulation apparatuses for neutron interferometry and the entanglement is detected via appropriately designed and optimized non-linear witnesses. We demonstrate the extraordinarily high controllability and fidelity of the generated entangled states.

  7. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment for NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Barmakov, Yu N; Behar, A; Bitulev, A; Bobrovnitsky, Yu; Bogolubov, E P; Boynton, W V; Bragin, S I; Churin, S; Grebennikov, A S; Konovalov, A; Kozyrev, A S; Kurdumov, I G; Krylov, A; Kuznetsov, Yu P; Malakhov, A V; Mokrousov, M I; Ryzhkov, V I; Sanin, A B; Shvetsov, V N; Smirnov, G A; Sholeninov, S; Timoshenko, G N; Tomilina, T M; Tuvakin, D V; Tretyakov, V I; Troshin, V S; Uvarov, V N; Varenikov, A; Vostrukhin, A

    2008-06-01

    We present a summary of the physical principles and design of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The DAN instrument will use the method of neutron-neutron activation analysis in a space application to study the abundance and depth distribution of water in the martian subsurface along the path of the MSL rover. PMID:18598140

  8. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expandmore » the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.« less

  9. D-D Neutron Generator Calibrations and Hardware in the LUX-ZEPLIN Dark Matter Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Will; Lux-Zeplin Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) dark matter search experiment will be a two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber with 7 tonnes of active liquid xenon (LXe) located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. LZ will utilize an in-situ, absolute calibration of nuclear recoils (NR) in LXe using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced by a D-D neutron generator. This technique was used in the LUX detector to measured the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to 0.7 keV recoil energy and the NR light yield in LXe (Ly) to recoil energies of 1.1 keV - both of which were the lowest energy measurements achieved in the field. These absolute, ultra-low energy calibrations of the NR signal yields in LXe provide clear measurements of the detector response used for the WIMP search analysis. The improvements made for LZ will include shorter neutron pulse times, multiple neutron conduit configurations, and lower energy neutrons. The upgrades allow for even lower energy measurements of the nuclear recoil response in LXe and an independent measurement of Ly, as well as providing less uncertainty in energy reconstruction. In addition to discussing the physics of the neutron calibrations, I will describe the hardware systems used to implement them.

  10. Neutron irradiation experiments for fusion reactor materials through JUPITER program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Kohyama, A.; Namba, C.; Wiffen, F. W.; Jones, R. H.

    1998-10-01

    A Japan-USA Program of irradiation experiments for fusion research, "JUPITER", has been established as a 6 year program from 1995 to 2000. The goal is to study "the dynamic behavior of fusion reactor materials and their response to variable and complex irradiation environment". This is phase-three of the collaborative program, which follows RTNS-II Program (Phase-1: 1982-1986) and FFTF/MOTA Program (Phase-2: 1987-1994). This program is to provide a scientific basis for application of materials performance data, generated by fission reactor experiments, to anticipated fusion environments. Following the systematic study on cumulative irradiation effects, done through FFTF/MOTA Program, JUPITER is emphasizing the importance of dynamic irradiation effects on materials performance in fusion systems. The irradiation experiments in this program include low activation structural materials, functional ceramics and other innovative materials. The experimental data are analyzed by theoretical modeling and computer simulation to integrate the above effects.

  11. Measurement and analysis of activation induced in titanium with fusion peak neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klix, A.; Domula, A.; Forrest, R.; Zuber, K.

    2011-10-01

    The intense neutron flux densities in fusion reactor blankets produce activation in the blanket materials relevant to operational safety, decommissioning, etc. The aim of the present work is to check the European Activation System EASY-2007 for its capability to predict important gamma activities induced in titanium in a fusion neutron field. Many advanced low-activation materials for fusion applications contain titanium, most notably in the breeder material Li 2TiO 3. In the present work, a small sample of Ti was irradiated with the intense DT neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden. The gamma-radioactivity following irradiation was measured and nuclide activities were derived. For each of the measured gamma activities, the corresponding value was calculated with EASY, and calculation-to-experiment ratios ( C/ E) were determined. EASY predicted the induced gamma activities, isotopes of scandium, well with some overestimation for 47Sc. The results of this measurement together with available EXFOR and validated state-of-the-art activation libraries are discussed.

  12. Measurement of Neutron Decay Parameters—The abBA Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Wilburn, W. S.; Bowman, J. D.; Mitchell, G. S.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Penttila, S. I.; Seo, P.-N.; Calarco, J. R.; Hersmann, F. W.; Chupp, T. E.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Young, G. R.; De Souza, R. T.; Snow, W. M.; Desai, D.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Frlez, E.; Pocanic, D.; Gentile, T. R.; Gudkov, V.; Jones, G. L.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing an experiment to measure the correlations a, A, and B, and the Fierz interference term b in neutron decay, with a precision of approximately 10−4. The experiment uses an electromagnetic spectrometer in combination with two large-area segmented silicon detectors to detect the proton and electron from the decay in coincidence, with 4π acceptance for both particles. For the neutron-polarization-dependent observables A and B, precision neutron polarimetry is achieved through the combination of a pulsed neutron beam, under construction at the SNS, and a polarized 3He neutron polarizer. Measuring a and A in the same apparatus provides a redundant determination of λ = gA/gV. Uncertainty in λ dominates the uncertainty of CKM unitarity tests. PMID:27308155

  13. CryoEDM: A cryogenic experiment to measure the neutron electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grinten, M. G. D.; CryoEDM Collaboration; Balashov, S. N.; Francis, V.; Green, K.; Iaydjiev, P. S.; Ivanov, S. N.; Khazov, A.; Tucker, M. A. H.; Wark, D. L.; Davidson, A.; Hardiman, M.; Harris, P. G.; Katsika, K.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Shiers, D. B.; Smith, P.; Townsley, C.; Wardell, I.; Clarke, C.; Henry, S.; Kraus, H.; McCann, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Yoshiki, Y.

    2009-12-01

    CryoEDM is an experiment that aims to measure the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron to a precision of 10 -28 e cm. A description of CryoEDM, the apparatus, technologies and commissioning is presented.

  14. Validation of the MCNP computational model for neutron flux distribution with the neutron activation analysis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiyapun, K.; Chimtin, M.; Munsorn, S.; Somchit, S.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the method for validating the predication of the calculation methods for neutron flux distribution in the irradiation tubes of TRIGA research reactor (TRR-1/M1) using the MCNP computer code model. The reaction rate using in the experiment includes 27Al(n, α)24Na and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reactions. Aluminium (99.9 wt%) and gold (0.1 wt%) foils and the gold foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in 9 locations in the core referred to as CT, C8, C12, F3, F12, F22, F29, G5, and G33. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed using MCNP which consisted of the detailed geometrical model of the reactor core. The results from the experimental and calculated normalized reaction rates in the reactor core are in good agreement for both reactions showing that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled very well. The results indicated that the difference between the experimental measurements and the calculation of the reactor core using the MCNP geometrical model was below 10%. In conclusion the MCNP computational model which was used to calculate the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core can be used for others reactor core parameters including neutron spectra calculation, dose rate calculation, power peaking factors calculation and optimization of research reactor utilization in the future with the confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the calculation.

  15. Neutron electric dipole moment and possibilities of increasing accuracy of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Kolomenskiy, E. A.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Krasnoshchekova, I. A.; Vasiliev, A. V.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Lasakov, M. S.; Murashkin, A. N.; Solovey, V. A.; Fomin, A. K.; Shoka, I. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Aleksandrov, E. B.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Geltenbort, P.; Ivanov, S. N.; Zimmer, O.

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports the results of an experiment on searching for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), performed on the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France). The double-chamber magnetic resonance spectrometer (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI)) with prolonged holding of ultra cold neutrons has been used. Sources of possible systematic errors are analyzed, and their influence on the measurement results is estimated. The ways and prospects of increasing accuracy of the experiment are discussed.

  16. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of volcanic samples: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Finnegan, D.L.; Crowe, B.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of volcanic emissions have been collected between and during eruptions of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes during the last three years. Airborne particles have been collected on Teflon filters and acidic gases on base-impregnated cellulose filters. Chemically neutral gas-phase species are collected on charcoal-coated cellulose filters. The primary analytical technique used is nondestructive neutron activation analysis, which has been used to determine the quantities of up to 35 elements on the different filters. The use of neutron activation analysis makes it possible to analyze for a wide range of elements in the different matrices used for the collection and to learn about the distribution between particles and gas phases for each of the elements.

  17. A practical beryllium activation detector for measuring DD neutron yield from ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    A neutron activation detector based on the reaction {sup 9}Be(n,{alpha}){sup 6}He({beta}{sup {minus}}){sup 6}Li has been designed which could potentially allow DD yield determinations within a few minutes after an ICF implosion or other pulsed neutron event with precision comparable to methods currently in use in ICF experiments. The detector is based on previous work, but has been redesigned to allow use in a reentrant tube less than six inches in diameter, and to increase detection efficiency. The detector consists of beryllium rods imbedded in plastic scintillator and coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Neutrons interact with the beryllium to produce {sup 6}He, which decays by emission of a {beta}{sup {minus}} particle with a maximum energy of 3.51 MeV with a half life of 808 ms. The {beta}{sup {minus}} particles are counted, and a neutron yield is determined for the total activity produced. The short half life of {sup 6}He will result in high specific activity and allow quick determination of the amount of {sup 6}He produced.

  18. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  19. Determination of indium in standard rocks by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, O; Steinnes, E

    1966-08-01

    A rapid neutron activation method for the determination of indium in rocks, based on 54 min (116m)In, is described. The method has been applied to a series of geochemical standards including granite G-1 and diabase W-1. The precision is better than +/- 5% for samples containing more than 5 x 10(-10)g indium. Good agreement with previously published values for G-1 and W-1 has been obtained. PMID:18959988

  20. Neutron Flux Spectra Determination by Multiple Foil Activation - Iterative Method.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-07-08

    Version 00 Neutron energy spectra are determined by an analysis of experimental activation detector data. As with the original CCC-112/SAND-II program, which was developed at Air Force Weapons Laboratory, this code system consists of four modules, CSTAPE, SLACTS, SLATPE, and SANDII. The first three modules pre-process the dosimetry cross sections and the trial function spectrum library. The last module, SANDII, actually performs the iterative spectrum characterization.

  1. Fast neutron spectrometry with organic scintillators applied to magnetic fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschuck, Yu. A.; Esposito, B.; Trykov, L. A.; Semenov, V. P.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron spectrometry with NE213 liquid scintillators is commonly used in thermonuclear fusion experiments to measure the 2.45 and 14.1 MeV neutron flux. We present the unfolded neutron spectrum, which was accumulated during several ohmic deuterium plasma discharges in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade using a 2″×2″ NE213 scintillator. In this paper, we review the application of organic scintillator neutron spectrometers to tokamaks, focusing in particular on the comparison between NE213 and stilbene scintillators. Various aspects of the calibration technique and neutron spectra unfolding procedure are considered in the context of their application for fusion neutron spectrometry. Testing and calibration measurements have been carried out using D-D and D-T neutron generator facilities with both NE213 and stilbene scintillators. The main result from these measurements is that stilbene scintillator has better neutron energy resolution than NE213. Our stilbene detector could be used for the determination of the ion temperature ( Ti) from neutron spectrum broadening in tokamak thermonuclear plasmas with Ti=4 keV and higher.

  2. Neutron-induced reactions relevant for Inertial-Cofinement Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, Melissa; Devlin, Mathew; Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Merrill, Frank; Nelson, Ronald; Tonchev, Anton

    2014-09-01

    The typical ignition experiment at the National Ignition Facility ablatively implodes a plastic capsule filled with DT fuel, generating a high flux of 14-MeV neutrons from the d(t,n) α reaction. There is some spread in the energy of these primary 14-MeV neutrons, which is mainly attributable to Doppler shifting from the relative thermal motion of the burning DT fuel. Neutrons created during this reaction have 5--10% chance of scattering before escaping the fuel assembly, losing some fraction of their energy in the scattering process. Neutrons emerging with an energy greater than the reaction energy are generated by a two-step process where neutrons first transfer momentum to a deuteron or tritium ion, these enhanced energy ions then fuse in flight to produce higher energy neutrons; some of these neutrons have energies in excess of 30 MeV. Measuring the fluencies of both the low- and high-energy neutrons is a powerful mechanism for studying the properties of the fuel assembly, and the various parameters important to inertial confinement fusion. We have developed a number of tools to measure the spectral characteristics of the NIF neutron spectrum. Most of these methods rely on exploiting the energy dependence of (n, γ), (n,2n), (n,3n) and (n,p) reactions on a variety o.

  3. A Drabkin energy filter for experiments at a spallation neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Parizzi, A. A.; Felcher, G. P.; Klose, F.

    2000-11-21

    We present a new approach for dynamic monochromatization of neutrons suitable for time-of-flight experiments at spallation neutron sources. The method requires polarized neutrons and is based on the Drabkin energy filter. In its initial application, this magnetic resonator device, consisting of a polarizer/analyzer system and a wavelength-dependent spin flipper, was proposed for extracting a narrow bandwidth from a broad bandwidth polarized neutron beam. At a spallation neutron source, wavelength is determined by time-of-flight (TOF) from the source to the detector. However, at each instant a spread of wavelengths is recorded due to the non-zero emission time of the source/moderator system. Particularly, high-intensity moderators for cold neutrons produce long ''tails'' in the intensity/time distribution for all wavelengths, degrading the resolution of the experiments. The Drabkin energy filter can be used to cut the neutron tails for all wavelengths, by drifting the resonance condition in synchronization with the TOF. Calculations show that the method is viable, and that substantial resolution gains are obtained by application to a TOF neutron reflectometer.

  4. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  5. Simulation of Cold Neutron Experiments using GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frlez, Emil; Hall, Joshua; Root, Melinda; Baessler, Stefan; Pocanic, Dinko

    2013-10-01

    We review the available GEANT4 physics processes for the cold neutrons in the energy range 1-100 meV. We consider the cases of the neutron beam interacting with (i) para- and ortho- polarized liquid hydrogen, (ii) Aluminum, and (iii) carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) targets. Scattering, thermal and absorption cross sections used by GEANT4 and MCNP6 libraries are compared with the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) compilation. NPDGamma detector simulation is presented as an example of the implementation of the resulting GEANT4 code. This work is supported by NSF grant PHY-0970013.

  6. Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Menus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially its the case of the Mars Odyssey GRS, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars. However, orbital gamma ray measurements have low spatial sensitivity (100's of km) due to their low surface emission rates from cosmic rays and subsequent need to be averaged over large surface areas. PNG-GRAND overcomes this impediment by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits high sensitivity surface and subsurface measurements of bulk elemental compositions. PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument to determine subsurface elemental composition without needing to drill into a planet's surface a great advantage in mission design. We are currently testing PNG-GRAND prototypes at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 in x 1 m granite structure placed outdoors in an empty field. Because an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on the material, this granite sample is a known standard with which to compare both Monte Carlo simulations and our experimentally measured elemental composition data. We will present data from operating PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a

  7. Experience with fast neutron therapy for locally advanced sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, R.; Hussey, D.H.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.; Martin, R.G.; Peters, L.J.; Sinkovics, J.G.

    1980-03-01

    Between October 1972 and April 1978, 34 patients with locally advanced sarcomas were treated with fast neutrons using the Texas A and M variable energy cyclotron. The clinical material included 29 patients with soft tissue sarcomas, 4 with chondrosarcomas, and one with an osteosarcoma. The best results were achieved for patients with soft tissue sarcomas; 69% (20/29) had local control of their tumor. Only one of 4 patients with chondrosarcomas was classified as having local tumor control, and one patient with osteosarcoma had persistent disease. With most fractionation schedules, local tumor control was superior for patients who received doses greater than 6500 rad/sub eq/ (2100 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). The incidence of major complications was notably increased when maximum radiation doses of 7500 rad/sub eq/ or greater were administered (2400 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). In patients who underwent subsequent surgery, healing was satisfactory if the maximum radiation dose was limited to 4500 to 5500 rad/sub eq/(1450 to 1775 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons).

  8. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  9. A new aperture for neutron and x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Intrator, M H; Merrill, F E; Volegov, P; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Recent neutron imaging of experiments at the National Ignition Facility has provided useful information about the hotspot shape and cold-fuel distribution and has also given insight into avenues for improvement. Neutron image reconstruction depends on accurate pointing information because the point-spread function of the neutron aperture is not shift invariant. Current pointing techniques are limited in their accuracy and rely upon detailed information about the as-built structure of the array, which is difficult to determine. We present a technique for extracting high-precision pointing information from both neutron and x-ray images, and a new aperture design with features to facilitate this technique, and allow future co-registration of neutron and x-ray images. PMID:23127029

  10. Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Experiment Onboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Varenikov, A. B.; Barmakov, Y. N.; Behar, A.; Bobrovnitsky, Y. I.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Harshman, K.; Kan, E.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Ponomareva, S. N.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Smirnov, G. A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Tomilina, T. M.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    The description of Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment is presented, as a part of the NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission onboard the mars rover Curiosity. The instrument DAN includes Pulsing Neutron Generator (PNG) producing pulses of 14.1 MeV neutrons for irradiation of subsurface material below the rover, and Detectors and Electronics (DE) unit, which operates the instrument itself and measures the die-away time profiles of epithermal and thermal neutrons following each neutron pulse. It is shown that the DAN investigation will measure a content of hydrogen along the path of the MSL rover, and it will also provide information about a depth distribution of hydrogen at 10-20 regions selected for the detailed studies and sampling analysis.

  11. Neutron radiation tolerance of Au-activated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    Double injection devices prepared by the introduction of deep traps, using the Au activation method have been found to tolerate gamma irradiation into the Gigarad (Si) region without significant degradation of operating characteristics. Silicon double injection devices, using deep levels creacted by Au diffusion, can tolerate fast neutron irradiation up to 10 to the 15th n/sq cm. Significant parameter degradation occurs at 10 to the 16th n/sq cm. However, since the actual doping of the basic material begins to change as a result of the transmutation of silicon into phosphorus for neutron fluences greater than 10 to the 17th/sq cm, the radiation tolerance of these devices is approaching the limit possible for any device based on initially doped silicon.

  12. Fusion neutron detector for time-of-flight measurements in z-pinch and plasma focus experiments.

    PubMed

    Klir, D; Kravarik, J; Kubes, P; Rezac, K; Litseva, E; Tomaszewski, K; Karpinski, L; Paduch, M; Scholz, M

    2011-03-01

    We have developed and tested sensitive neutron detectors for neutron time-of-flight measurements in z-pinch and plasma focus experiments with neutron emission times in tens of nanoseconds and with neutron yields between 10(6) and 10(12) per one shot. The neutron detectors are composed of a BC-408 fast plastic scintillator and Hamamatsu H1949-51 photomultiplier tube (PMT). During the calibration procedure, a PMT delay was determined for various operating voltages. The temporal resolution of the neutron detector was measured for the most commonly used PMT voltage of 1.4 kV. At the PF-1000 plasma focus, a novel method of the acquisition of a pulse height distribution has been used. This pulse height analysis enabled to determine the single neutron sensitivity for various neutron energies and to calibrate the neutron detector for absolute neutron yields at about 2.45 MeV. PMID:21456735

  13. Predicting Activation of Experiments Inside the Annular Core Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Joseph Isaac

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this thesis is to create a program to quickly estimate the radioactivity and decay of experiments conducted inside of the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and eliminate the need for users to write code. This is achieved by model the neutron fluxes in the reactor’s central cavity where experiments are conducted for 4 different neutron spectra using MCNP. The desired neutron spectrum, experiment material composition, and reactor power level are then input into CINDER2008 burnup code to obtain activation and decay information for every isotope generated. DREAD creates all of the files required for CINDER2008 through user selected inputs in a graphical user interface and executes the program for the user and displays the resulting estimation for dose rate at various distances. The DREAD program was validated by weighing and measuring various experiments in the different spectra and then collecting dose rate information after they were irradiated and comparing it to the dose rates that DREAD predicted. The program provides results with an average of 17% higher estimates than the actual values and takes seconds to execute.

  14. Benchmark Experiments of Thermal Neutron and Capture Gamma-Ray Distributions in Concrete Using {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Takeshi; Hirose, Hideyuki; Suzaki, Takenori

    2005-10-15

    The distributions of thermal neutrons and capture gamma rays in ordinary concrete were investigated by using {sup 252}Cf. Two subjects are considered. One is the benchmark experiments for the thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions in ordinary concrete. The thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions were measured by using gold-foil activation detectors and thermoluminescence detectors. These were compared with the simulations by using the discrete ordinates code ANISN with two different group structure types of cross-section library of a new Japanese version, JENDL-3.3, showing reasonable agreement with both fine and rough structure groups of thermal neutron energy. The other is a comparison of the simulations with two different cross-section libraries, JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI, for the deep penetration of neutrons in the concrete, showing close agreement in 0- to 100-cm-thick concrete. However, the differences in flux grow with an increase in concrete thickness, reaching up to approximately eight times near 4-m thickness.

  15. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  16. np Elastic-scattering experiments with polarized neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, J.S.; Ditzler, W.R.; Hill, D.; Hoftiezer, J.; Johnson, K.; Shima, T.; Shimizu, H.; Spinka, H.; Stanek, R.; Underwood, D.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the spin transfer parameters, K/sub NN/ and K/sub LL/, at 500, 650, and 800 MeV are presented for the reaction p-vector d ..-->.. n-vector pp at 0/sup 0/. The data are useful input to the NN data base and indicate that the quasi-free charge exchange (CEX) reaction is a useful mechanism for producing neutrons with at least 40% polarization at energies as low as 500 MeV. Measurements of np elastic scattering observables C/sub LL/ and C/sub SL/ covering 35/sup 0/ to 172/sup 0/ are performed using a polarized neutron beam at 500, 650, and 800 MeV. Preliminary results are presented. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Cosmic and solar gamma ray and neutron experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research supported by NASA grant NAGW-2734 and lists the papers and publications produced through the grant. The basic goal of the work was to complete analysis of data from exposure of a large NaI scintillation detector to fast neutrons and to disseminate the results of the analysis. A secondary goal was to compare the measured detector response to neutrons with Monte Carlo calculations of the response. In Section 2.0, we discuss the goals of the research. In Section 3.0, we summarize the results of the research. In Section 4.0, we list the papers and publications produced under the grant. Preprints or reprints of the publications are attached as appendices.

  18. Advantages and limitations of nuclear physics experiments at an ISIS-class spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocko, M.; Muhrer, G.; Tovesson, F.

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear physics experiments have a long history of being conducted on spallation neutron sources. Like other experiments, these measurements take advantage of the identification of the incident neutron energy by the time-of-flight (ToF) technique. However, in some ways these experiments are often in direct conflict with other experiments. Especially in large (ISIS or SNS class) facilities, the design of the source often reflects a compromise between different experimental needs and requirements. It has been a long standing question for nuclear physics experiments how limiting these compromises are and how they can be dealt with. We have therefore calculated the incident neutron energy spectrum, along with the gamma background spectrum, for flight path (FP) 5 at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) including a detailed evaluation of the signal shape. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of the nuclear physics experiments at FP-5 in the light of our results.

  19. Evaluation of (α,n) induced neutrons as a background for dark matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, D.-M.; Zhang, C.; Hime, A.

    2009-07-01

    Neutrons from (α,n) reactions through thorium and uranium decays are important sources of background for direct dark matter detection. The neutron yields and energy spectra from a range of materials that are used to build dark matter detectors are calculated and tabulated. In addition to thorium and uranium decays, we found that α-particles from samarium, often the dopant of the window materials of photomultiplier tubes (PMT), are also an important source of neutron yield. The results in this paper can be used as the input to Monte Carlo simulations for many materials that will be used for next generation experiments.

  20. The photonuclear neutron and gamma-ray backgrounds in the fast ignition experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Hosoda, H.; Abe, Y.; Kojima, S.; Fujioka, S.; Sarukura, N.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.; Ozaki, T.

    2012-10-15

    In the fast-ignition scheme, very hard x-rays (hereinafter referred to as {gamma}-rays) are generated by Bremsstrahlung radiation from fast electrons. Significant backgrounds were observed around the deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron signals in the experiment in 2010. In this paper the backgrounds were studied in detail, based on Monte Carlo simulations, and they were confirmed to be {gamma}-rays from the target, scattered {gamma}-rays from the experimental bay walls ({gamma}{sup Prime }-rays), and neutrons generated by ({gamma}, n) reactions in either the target vacuum chamber or the diagnostic instruments ({gamma}-n neutrons).

  1. RADSAT Benchmarks for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2011-07-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers are used in these applications to measure the spectrum of the emitted photon flux, which consists of both continuum and characteristic gamma rays with discrete energies. Monte Carlo transport is the most commonly used simulation tool for this type of problem, but computational times can be prohibitively long. This work explores the use of multi-group deterministic methods for the simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems. The main purpose of this work is to benchmark several problems modeled with RADSAT and MCNP to experimental data. Additionally, the cross section libraries for RADSAT are updated to include ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Preliminary findings show promising results when compared to MCNP and experimental data, but also areas where additional inquiry and testing are needed. The potential benefits and shortcomings of the multi-group-based approach are discussed in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  2. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: program objectives; program features; flight experiment features; current activities; MACE development model lab testing; MACE test article deployed on STS middeck; and development model testing.

  3. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: program objectives; program features; flight experiment features; current activities; MACE development model lab testing; MACE test article deployed on STS middeck; and development model testing.

  4. Thermal neutron activation system for confirmatory nonmetallic land mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Cousins, Thomas; Jones, Trevor; Brisson, Jean R.; Jamieson, Terry; Waller, Ed; LeMay, Francois; Ing, Harry; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Selkirk, Barkley

    1998-09-01

    To detect and locate buried landmines, the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) is developing a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multisensor system called ILDP. In operation, a suite of 4 detectors scan ahead of the vehicle. Their outputs are combined through data fusion to indicate the possibility of a mine at a particular location, within a 30 cm radius. A thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor, mounted behind the vehicle, is used to confirm the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.83 MeV gamma-ray associated with neutron capture on 14N. The TNA system developed for this uses a 100 microgram 252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm X 7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. A combination of the use of state-of-the art radiation transport codes for design, judicious choice of specialized shielding materials and development of high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics has led to a system which can; (1) confirm the presence of all surface-laid or shallowly-buried anti-tank mines in a few seconds to a minute (depending on mass of explosive) (2) confirm the presence of anti-tank mines down to 20 cm depth in less than 5 minutes. (3) confirm the presence of large (greater than 100 g Nitrogen) anti-personnel mines in less than five minutes (4) operate in adverse climatic conditions. These results have been verified in field trials using the prototype sensor. Work is now ongoing to miniaturize the electronics, make the system robust and easy to use and investigate the use of an electronic neutron generator expected to enter service by the year 2000.

  5. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  6. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculation for the JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S./Japanese experiments JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for 238.5 EFPD. The maximum fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV was about 2.1E + 22 n/cm{sup 2} for all of the experiments resulting in about 17.3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  7. Neutron activation analysis of an Egyptian monazite ore sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eissa, E. A.; Rofail, N. B.; Ashmawy, L. S.; Hassan, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    The absolute sensitivity of a gamma-ray line following thermal or epithermal neutron activation is expressed as a product of four terms, namely, the intrinsic, irradiation, decay and measurement factors. The total absolute sensitivity is the sum of the absolute sensitivities due to thermal and epithermal activation. A. FORTRAN computer program was prepared on the TANDY 3000 NL PCA to calculate the total absolute sensitivity of the intensive gamma-ray lines from the thermal and epithermal neutron activation of all the naturally occurring nuclides. Another program was prepared for the determination of the total absolute sensitivity for gammarays emitted by radioactive daughters such as233Pa from233Th and239Np from239U. Long time irradiation periods (about 48 hours) for specimens of the monazite ore sample were carried out at the (ET-RR-1) reactor core periphery. The monazite ore sample was separated from the associating minerals in the sand of Abou-Khashaba of Rashied (Rosetta) area on the Mediterranean (North of Egypt). The separated monazite ore sample was provided by the Nuclear Material Authority of Egypt. The cadmium difference method was applied to thin gold foils for absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux determination. The gamma-ray spectra were measured using a spectrometer with a HPGe coaxial detector. The evaluated absolute sensitivity tables were helpful in identifying the radioisotopes contributing to the gamma- ray spectra and in evaluating the elemental concentration of the monazite constitutents. Most of the rare earth elements were observed and their concentrations are reported. La, Ce, Nd, Sd and Th were found as major elements, U, Tb, Hf and Eu as minor elements.

  8. Space radiation accelerator experiments - The role of neutrons and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norbury, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.

    2014-10-01

    The importance of neutrons and light ions is considered when astronauts spend considerable time in thickly shielded regions of a spacecraft. This may be relevant for space missions both in and beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). In addition to heavy ion experiments at accelerators, it is suggested that an increased emphasis on experiments with lighter ions may be useful in reducing biological uncertainties.

  9. Studies on osteoporosis. V. Comparison of methods of evaluation of osteoporosis and study of chromosome changes induced by neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, J.C.; Sirianni, S.R.; Pragay, D.A.; Ambrus, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    In vivo activation analysis was compared with ashing and atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of total skeletal calcium content in mice. The results were close to identical. The possible mutagenic-carcinogenic effect of repeated exposure to whole body neutron irradiation was studied by chromosome analysis. Under the conditions of these experiments, no significant chromosome changes were seen.

  10. Neutron Activation Analysis and Product Isotope Inventory Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1990-10-31

    Version 00 NAC was designed to predict the neutron-induced gamma-ray radioactivity for a wide variety of composite materials. The NAC output includes the input data, a list of all reactions for each constituent element, and the end-of-irradiation disintegration rates for each reaction. NAC also compiles a product isotope inventory containing the isotope name, the disintegration rate, the gamma-ray source strength, and the absorbed dose rate at 1 meter from an unshielded point source. The inducedmore » activity is calculated as a function of irradiation and decay times; the effect of cyclic irradiation can also be calculated.« less

  11. Teaching chemistry with neutron activation analysis at Dalhousie University

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbecher, J.; Chatt, A. )

    1991-11-01

    The Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor (DUSR) has been operating since July 1976 and has proven to be an invaluable tool in many teaching programs. These reactors are inherently safe and are designed to serve teaching and research needs of the universities, research centers, hospitals, etc. Since the DUSR has been, from its inception, associated with the Trace Analysis Research Centre, which is the Analytical Chemistry Division of the Department of Chemistry, the main thrust of its use continues to be in the field of nuclear analytical chemistry. Both teaching and research programs involve trace element analysis by neutron activation.

  12. Neutron distribution and induced activity inside a Linac treatment room.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miró, R; Verdú, G; Díez, S; Campayo, J M

    2015-08-01

    Induced radioactivity and photoneutron contamination inside a radiation therapy bunker of a medical linear accelerator (Linac) is investigated in this work. The Linac studied is an Elekta Precise electron accelerator which maximum treatment photon energy is 15 MeV. This energy exceeds the photonuclear reaction threshold (around 7 MeV for high atomic number metals). The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 has been used for quantifying the neutron contamination inside the treatment room for different gantry rotation configuration. Walls activation processes have also been simulated. The approach described in this paper is useful to prevent the overexposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:26737878

  13. Validation of computational methods for treatment planning of fast-neutron therapy using activation foil techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.; Hartwell, J.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Venhuizen, J.R.; Risler, R.

    1997-12-01

    A closed-form direct method for unfolding neutron spectra from foil activation data is presented. The method is applied to measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum produced by the proton-cyclotron-based fast-neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine. The results compare favorably with theoretical expectations based on an a-priori calculational model of the target and neutron beamline configuration of the UW facility.

  14. Skylab neutron environment experiment (Science Demonstration SD-34 (TV108)). Description and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Neutron and proton induced radioactivity at various locations within Skylab were measured. Samples of five metals were formed into activation packets and deployed at the following locations on the Skylab 4 mission: orbital workshop film vault, water storage tank, and two opposing orbital workshop internal locations. Radioactive nuclides were produced in the packets by nuclear interactions of high-energy protons and secondary neutrons within Skylab. Low-level gamma ray spectroscopy measurements were made on the returned packets to determine the incident neutron and proton fluxes and spectra and their variations with mass distribution.

  15. Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Pace, J.V. III ); Brodzinski, R.L. ); Marcum, J. )

    1990-02-01

    A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R. Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.; Knauer, J. P.

    2015-11-14

    Neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have long been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d + t → n + α (DT) and d + d → n + {sup 3}He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (T{sub ion}) and cold fuel areal density. We report on novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent T{sub ion}, and DSR. These methods invoke a single temperature, static fluid model to describe the neutron peaks from DD and DT reactions and a spline description of the DT spectrum to determine the DSR. Both measurements are performed using a forward modeling technique that includes corrections for line-of-sight attenuation and impulse response of the detection system. These methods produce typical uncertainties for DT T{sub ion} of 250 eV, 7% for DSR, and 9% for the DT neutron yield. For the DD values, the uncertainties are 290 eV for T{sub ion} and 10% for the neutron yield.

  17. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    Neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have long been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d + t → n + α (DT) and d + d → n + 3He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We report on novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion, and DSR. These methods invoke a single temperature, static fluid model to describe the neutron peaks from DD and DT reactions and a spline description of the DT spectrum to determine the DSR. Both measurements are performed using a forward modeling technique that includes corrections for line-of-sight attenuation and impulse response of the detection system. These methods produce typical uncertainties for DT Tion of 250 eV, 7% for DSR, and 9% for the DT neutron yield. For the DD values, the uncertainties are 290 eV for Tion and 10% for the neutron yield.

  18. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Brown, J.; Adroja, D. T.; Manuel, P.; Kouzmenko, G.; Bewley, R. I.; Wotherspoon, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  19. Neutron Activation Analysis for the Demonstration of Amphibolite Rock-Weathering Activity of a Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rades-Rohkohl, E.; Hirsch, P.; Fränzle, O.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was employed in a survey of weathering abilities of rock surface microorganisms. A yeast isolated from an amphibolite of a megalithic grave was found actively to concentrate, in media and in or on cells, iron and other elements when grown in the presence of ground rock. This was demonstrated by comparing a spectrum of neutron-activated amphibolite powder (particle size, 50 to 100 μm) with the spectra of neutron-activated, lyophilized yeast cells which had grown with or without amphibolite powder added to different media. The most active yeast (IFAM 1171) did not only solubilize Fe from the rock powder, but significant amounts of Co, Eu, Yb, Ca, Ba, Sc, Lu, Cr, Th, and U were also mobilized. The latter two elements occurred as natural radioactive isotopes in this amphibolite. When the yeast cells were grown with neutron-activated amphibolite, the cells contained the same elements. Furthermore, the growth medium contained Fe, Co, and Eu which had been solubilized from the amphibolite. This indicates the presence, in this yeast strain, of active rockweathering abilities as well as of uptake mechanisms for solubilized rock components. PMID:16345472

  20. A highly efficient neutron time-of-flight detector for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yamagajo, T.; Nakano, T.; Kasai, T.; Urano, T.; Azechi, H.; Nakai, S.; Iida, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed the highly efficient neutron detector system MANDALA for the inertial-confinement-fusion experiment. The MANDALA system consists of 842 elements plastic scintillation detectors and data acquisition electronics. The detection level is the yield of 1.2×105 for 2.5 MeV and 1×105 for 14.1 MeV neutrons (with 100 detected hits). We have calibrated the intrinsic detection efficiencies of the detector elements using a neutron generator facility. Timing calibration and integrity test of the system were also carried out with a 60Co γ ray source. MANDALA system was applied to the implosion experiments at the GEKKO XII laser facility. The integrity test was carried out by implosion experiments.

  1. Performance of an improved thermal neutron activation detector for buried bulk explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, J. E.; Faust, A. A.; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Mosquera, C. M.

    2013-06-01

    First generation thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors, employing an isotopic source and NaI(Tl) gamma ray detectors, were deployed by Canadian Forces in 2002 as confirmation sensors on multi-sensor landmine detection systems. The second generation TNA detector is being developed with a number of improvements aimed at increasing sensitivity and facilitating ease of operation. Among these are an electronic neutron generator to increase sensitivity for deeper and horizontally displaced explosives; LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, to improve time response and energy resolution; improved thermal and electronic stability; improved sensor head geometry to minimize spatial response nonuniformity; and more robust data processing. The sensor is described, with emphasis on the improvements. Experiments to characterize the performance of the second generation TNA in detecting buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) hidden in culverts are described. Performance results, including comparisons between the performance of the first and second generation systems are presented.

  2. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  3. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  4. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the JP-17, 18 and 19 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-17, 18, and 19 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for two cycles resulting in 43.55 EFPD for JP-17 and 42.06 EFPD for JP-18 and 19. The maximum fast neutron fluence > 0.1 MeV was about 3.7E + 21 n/cm{sup 2} for all three irradiations, resulting in about 3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  5. Review of auditory subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments.

    PubMed

    Fudin, R; Benjamin, C

    1991-12-01

    Subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments using auditory stimuli have yielded only a modicum of support for the contention that such activation produces predictable behavioral changes. Problems in many auditory subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments indicate that those predictions have not been tested adequately. The auditory mode of presentation, however, has several methodological advantages over the visual one, the method used in the vast majority of subliminal psychodynamic activation experiments. Consequently, it should be considered in subsequent research in this area. PMID:1805167

  6. Non-destructive assay of fissile materials through active neutron interrogation technique using pulsed neutron (plasma focus) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, B. S.; Kaushik, T. C.; Andola, Sanjay; Ramniranjan; Rout, R. K.; Kumar, Ashwani; Paranjape, D. B.; Kumar, Pradeep; Ramakumar, K. L.; Gupta, S. C.; Sinha, R. K.

    2013-03-01

    Pulsed neutrons emitted from a plasma focus (PF) device have been used for the first time for the non-destructive assay of 235U content in different chemical forms (oxide and metal). The PF device generates (1.2±0.3)×109 D-D fusion neutrons per shot with a pulse width of 46±5 ns. The method involves the measurement of delayed neutrons from an irradiated sample 50 ms after exposure to the neutron pulse for a time of about 100 s in the multichannel scaling (MCS) mode. The calibration of the active interrogation delayed neutron counter (AIDNEC) system was carried out by irradiating U3O8 samples of varying amounts (0.1-40 g) containing enriched 235U (14.8%) in the device. The delayed neutrons were monitored using a bank of six 3He detectors. The sensitivity of the system was found to be about 100 counts/s/g over the accumulation time of 25 s per neutron pulse of ˜109. The detection limit of the system is estimated to be 18 mg of 235U. The system can be suitably modified for applications toward non-destructive assay of fissile content in waste packets.

  7. Coarse-scaling adjustment of fine-group neutron spectra for epithermal neutron beams in BNCT using multiple activation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-01-01

    In order to provide an improved and reliable neutron source description for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a spectrum adjustment procedure named coarse-scaling adjustment has been developed and applied to the neutron spectrum measurements of both the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) epithermal neutron beam in Taiwan and the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in The Netherlands, using multiple activation detectors. The coarse-scaling adjustment utilizes a similar idea as the well-known two-foil method, which adjusts the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes according to the Maxwellian distribution for thermal neutrons and 1/ E distribution over the epithermal neutron energy region. The coarse-scaling adjustment can effectively suppress the number of oscillations appearing in the adjusted spectrum and provide better smoothness. This paper also presents a sophisticated 9-step process utilizing twice the coarse-scaling adjustment which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with satisfactory continuity and excellently matched reaction rates between measurements and calculation. The spectrum adjustment algorithm applied in this study is the same as the well-known SAND-II.

  8. Experiment for synthesis of neutron-deficient protactinium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huabin; Ma, Long; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Yu, Lin; Jia, Guobin; Huang, Minghui; Gan, Zaiguo; Huang, Tianheng; Li, Guangshun; Wu, Xiaolei; Fang, Yongde; Wang, Zhigang; Gao, Bingshui; Hua, Wei

    2014-10-01

    The complete fusion reaction 40Ca+175Lu was studied at a beam energy of 5.1 MeV u-1. Evaporation residues recoiled from the target were separated from the primary beam by the gas-filled recoil separator SHANS and then implanted into the focal plane detection system. Based on the energy-position-time correlation measurement, neutron-deficient nuclei 208-213Ac, 212Pa and 211Th produced in this reaction were identified. Previously reported decay properties of the ground state in 212Pa were confirmed and improved values of 5.1_{-1.7}^{+5.1} ms and 8.250(20) MeV for the half-life and α-particle energy of 212Pa were obtained. No correlated decay chain arising from 211Pa was observed and an upper limit for the cross section of 211Pa was estimated.

  9. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  10. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis of the Asian Herbal Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baljinnyam, N.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Ostrovnaya, T. M.; Pavlov, S. S.; Jugder, B.; Norov, N.

    2011-06-28

    Asian medicinal herbs Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) are widely used in folk and Ayurvedic medicine for healing and preventing some diseases. The modern medical science has proved that the Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) possesses the following functions: reducing blood press, dispelling cancer cell, coronary artery's expanding and bacteriostating and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) is recommended against headache, toothache, skin diseases, vomiting and sometimes it is taken for treatment of diabetes. Species of Chrysanthemums were collected in the north-eastern and central Mongolia, and the Red Sandalwood powder was imported from India. Samples of Chrysanthemums (branches, flowers and leaves)(0.5 g) and red sandalwood powder (0.5 g) were subjected to the multi-element instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons (ENAA) at the IBR-2 reactor, Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP) JINR, Dubna. A total of 41 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Hf, Ta, W, Sb, Au, Hg, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb, Th, U, Lu) were determined. For the first time such a large group of elements was determined in the herbal plants used in Mongolia. The quality control of the analytical results was provided by using certified reference material Bowen Cabbage. The results obtained are compared to the ''Reference plant? data (B. Markert, 1992) and interpreted in terms of excess of such elements as Se, Cr, Ca, Fe, Ni, Mo, and rare earth elements.

  11. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis of the Asian Herbal Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baljinnyam, N.; Jugder, B.; Norov, N.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Ostrovnaya, T. M.; Pavlov, S. S.

    2011-06-01

    Asian medicinal herbs Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) are widely used in folk and Ayurvedic medicine for healing and preventing some diseases. The modern medical science has proved that the Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) possesses the following functions: reducing blood press, dispelling cancer cell, coronary artery's expanding and bacteriostating and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) is recommended against headache, toothache, skin diseases, vomiting and sometimes it is taken for treatment of diabetes. Species of Chrysanthemums were collected in the north-eastern and central Mongolia, and the Red Sandalwood powder was imported from India. Samples of Chrysanthemums (branches, flowers and leaves) (0.5 g) and red sandalwood powder (0.5 g) were subjected to the multi-element instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons (ENAA) at the IBR-2 reactor, Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP) JINR, Dubna. A total of 41 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Hf, Ta, W, Sb, Au, Hg, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb, Th, U, Lu) were determined. For the first time such a large group of elements was determined in the herbal plants used in Mongolia. The quality control of the analytical results was provided by using certified reference material Bowen Cabbage. The results obtained are compared to the "Reference plant» data (B. Markert, 1992) and interpreted in terms of excess of such elements as Se, Cr, Ca, Fe, Ni, Mo, and rare earth elements.

  12. The DOS 1 neutron dosimetry experiment at the HB-4-A key 7 surveillance site on the HFIR pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Kam, F.B.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive neutron dosimetry experiment was made at one of the prime surveillance sites at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel to aid radiation embrittlement studies of the vessel and to benchmark neutron transport calculations. The thermal neutron flux at the key 7, position 5 site was found, from measurements of radioactivation of four cobalt wires and four silver wires, to be 2.4 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux derived from two helium accumulation monitors was 2.3 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux estimated by neutron transport calculations was 3.7 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. The fast flux, >1 MeV, determined from two nickel activation wires, was 1.5 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}, in keeping with values obtained earlier from stainless steel surveillance monitors and with a computed value of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The fast fluxes given by two reaction-product-type monitors, neptunium-237 and beryllium, were 2.6 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s {sup {minus}1} and 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Follow-up experiments indicate that these latter high values of fast flux are reproducible but are false; they are due to the creation of greater levels of reaction products by photonuclear events induced by an exceptionally high ratio of gamma flux to fast neutron flux at the vessel.

  13. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  14. Sensitivity Reach of the Neutron EDM Experiment: The Electric Field Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Cooper, M.; Currie, S. A.; Makela, M. F.; Ramsey, J. C.; Tajima, S.; Womack, T. L.; Long, J. C.; Stanislaus, S.

    2010-08-04

    The search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron tests physics beyond the Standard Model such as new sources of CP-violation and Supersymmetry. The nEDM experiment aims to improve the sensitivity on the current limit of the electric dipole moment of the neutron to <10{sup -27} e{center_dot}cm. The experiment will use a flux of Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCNs) produced and stored in a bath of superfluid He-II. A change in precession frequency is expected for a non-zero EDM when an electric field is applied parallel and antiparallel to a magnetic field across the neutron storage cell. A dominant parameter in terms of reducing the statistical uncertainty of this measurement is the strength of the applied electric field. An experiment to measure if superfluid He-II can sustain up to 50 kV/cm for a volume and electrode spacings comparable to the nEDM experiment has been constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists in a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter central volume inside a suitable cryostat that in turn is connected to a dilution refrigerator unit. A description of test runs and the status of the experiment is presented.

  15. Sensitivity Reach of the Neutron EDM Experiment: The Electric Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Cooper, M.; Currie, S. A.; Makela, M. F.; Ramsey, J. C.; Tajima, S.; Womack, T. L.; Long, J. C.; Stanislaus, S.

    2010-08-01

    The search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron tests physics beyond the Standard Model such as new sources of CP-violation and Supersymmetry. The nEDM experiment aims to improve the sensitivity on the current limit of the electric dipole moment of the neutron to <10-27 eṡcm. The experiment will use a flux of Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCNs) produced and stored in a bath of superfluid He-II. A change in precession frequency is expected for a non-zero EDM when an electric field is applied parallel and antiparallel to a magnetic field across the neutron storage cell. A dominant parameter in terms of reducing the statistical uncertainty of this measurement is the strength of the applied electric field. An experiment to measure if superfluid He-II can sustain up to 50 kV/cm for a volume and electrode spacings comparable to the nEDM experiment has been constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists in a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter central volume inside a suitable cryostat that in turn is connected to a dilution refrigerator unit. A description of test runs and the status of the experiment is presented.

  16. Evaluation of Am-Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with (α, n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured and theoretical spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. The singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis, being dominated by scattering which is highly dependent on item placement.

  17. Assessing Neutron Generator Output Using Delayed Activation of Silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generators are used for elemental composition analysis and medical applications. Often composition is determined by examining elemental ratios in which the knowledge of the neutron flux is unnecessary. However, the absolute value of the neutron flux is required when t...

  18. Active neutron methods for nuclear safeguards applications using Helium-4 gas scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jason M.

    Active neutron methods use a neutron source to interrogate fissionable material. In this work a 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detection system is used to measure neutrons created by the interrogation. Three new applications of this method are developed: spent nuclear fuel assay, fission rate measurement, and special nuclear material detection. Three active neutron methods are included in this thesis. First a non-destructive plutonium assay technique called Multispectral Active Neutron Interrogation Analysis is developed. It is based on interrogating fuel with neutrons at several different energies. The induced fission rates at each interrogation energy are compared with results from a neutron transport model of the irradiation geometry in a system of equations to iteratively solve the inverse problem for isotopic composition. The model is shown to converge on the correct composition for a material with 3 different fissionable components, a representative neutron absorber, and any neutron transparent material such as oxygen in a variety of geometries. Next an experimental fission rate measurement technique is developed using 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detector. Several unique features of this detector allow it to detect and provide energy information on fast neutrons with excellent gamma discrimination efficiency. The detector can measure induced fission rate by energetically differentiating between interrogation neutrons and higher energy fission neutrons. The detector response to a mono-energetic deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a 252Cf source are compared to examine the difference in detected energy range. Finally we demonstrate a special nuclear material detection technique by detecting an unambiguous fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium neutron generator and a high pressure 4He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. Energy histograms resulting from this

  19. Experiment and analyses for 14 MeV neutron streaming through a dogleg duct.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, M; Ochiai, K; Morimoto, Y; Wada, M; Sato, S; Nishitani, T

    2005-01-01

    There are several vacant channels for diagnosis, RF heating and so on through the shielding structure in fusion reactors. Some of them consist of dogleg ducts, through which neutrons stream in a complex manner. An experiment was conducted with the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) facility at JAERI to study the behaviour of neutrons in the duct and assess the reliability of calculation methods for the design of fusion reactors such as ITER. The assembly was an iron slab 180 cm in thickness with a doubly bent duct 30 x 30 cm2 in cross section. The experiment was analysed using a simple design code for radiation streaming, DUCT-III, and the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The results indicate that the simple design code is reliable enough to be used for shielding design analyses as well as the Monte Carlo method, which showed excellent agreement between calculated and measured values. PMID:16604695

  20. Integral Data Benchmark of HENDL2.0/MG Compared with Neutronics Shielding Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jieqiong; Xu, Dezheng; Zheng, Shanliang; He, Zhaozhong; Hu, Yanglin; Li, Jingjing; Zou, Jun; Zeng, Qin; Chen, Mingliang; Wang, Minghuang

    2009-10-01

    HENDL2.0, the latest version of the hybrid evaluated nuclear data library, was developed based upon some evaluated data from FENDL2.1 and ENDF/B-VII. To qualify and validate the working library, an integral test for the neutron production data of HENDL2.0 was performed with a series of existing spherical shell benchmark experiments (such as V, Be, Fe, Pb, Cr, Mn, Cu, Al, Si, Co, Zr, Nb, Mo, W and Ti). These experiments were simulated numerically using HENDL2.0/MG and a home-developed code VisualBUS. Calculations were conducted with both FENDL2.1/MG and FENDL2.1/MC, which are based on a continuous-energy Monte Carlo Code MCNP/4C. By comparison and analysis of the neutron leakage spectra and the integral test, benchmark results of neutron production data are presented in this paper.

  1. Pulsed neutrons: one year of experience with the new source at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source based on a 500-MeV proton accelerator operating at 30 Hz and with an average proton current of approx. 10 ..mu..A. Neutron-scattering instruments for elastic scattering include two powder diffractometers, a single-crystal diffractometer based on the Laue method and employing a large (30 x 30 cm) position-sensitive scintillation detector, a small-angle diffractometer using a position-sensitive detector, and a polarized-neutron diffractometer which will utilize the spin-refrigerator device to obtain a beam of white polarized neutrons. For inelastic scattering, we presently have the crystal-analyzer spectrometer and two chopper spectrometers capable of providing monoenergetic incident neutron beams of between 100 and 600 MeV. From its inception IPNS has been operating in a user mode and the selection of experiments is made by a Program Committee twice a year on the basis of the scientific merit of submitted proposals.

  2. Pulsed neutrons: One year of experience with the new source at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, G. H.

    1983-05-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source based on a 500 MeV proton accelerator operating at 30 Hz and with an average proton current of ≈ 10 μA. Neutron scattering instruments for elastic scattering include two powder diffractometers, a single-crystal diffractometer based on the Laue method and employing a large (30 x 30 cm) position-sensitive scintillation detector, a small-angle diffractometer using a position-sensitive detector, and a polarized-neutron diffractometer which will utilize the spin-refrigerator device to obtain a beam of white polarized neutrons. For inelastic scattering we presently have the crystal-analyzer spectrometer, and two chopper spectrometers capable of providing monoenergetic incident neutron beams of between 100 and 600 meV. From its inception IPNS has been operating in a user mode and the selection of experiments is made by a Program Committee twice a year on the basis of the scientifi cmerit of submitted proposals.

  3. Spectral measurements of neutrons produced by 52 MeV protons with activation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kazuo; Saito, Takatsugu; Fujii, Masahiko; Nakamura, Takashi

    The accuracy of the neutron spectral measurement of energy up to ˜40 MeV with activation detectors was examined using high energy neutrons from thick targets bombarded by 52 MeV protons. The measured activation rates were unfolded with the modified SAND-II code and compared with the neutron spectra measured by the NE-213 scintillator. Quite good agreement in absolute values was obtained between the spectra recorded by these two different detectors. The activation detector was shown to be useful for neutron spectroscopy at energies higher than ˜ 10 MeV.

  4. Neutronics analysis of the DHCE experiment in ATR-ITV

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Tsai, H.

    1997-08-01

    The preliminary analysis of the DHCE experiments in the ITV and ATR was performed and its was concluded that such a vehicle is suitable for this kind of experiment. It is recommended to place an extra filter material in the thermocouple sleeve (such as B-10), to improve the helium to dpa ratio profile during irradiation. Also, it was concluded that a preliminary estimation of period of time for replacement of the external filter would be around 5 dps`s.

  5. Revised neutron dosimetry results for the MOTA-2A experiment in FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Revised neutron fluence and damage values are reported for the MOTA-2A experiment in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This revision corrects an error with processing of the {sup 235}U(n,f) reaction. Net corrections are on the order of 5%.

  6. Measurements of the neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV.

    PubMed

    Yashima, H; Sekimoto, S; Ninomiya, K; Kasamatsu, Y; Shima, T; Takahashi, N; Shinohara, A; Matsumura, H; Satoh, D; Iwamoto, Y; Hagiwara, M; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W; Shibata, S

    2014-10-01

    Neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV were measured by activation method. A quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam was produced using the (7)Li(p,n) reaction. The energy spectrum of these neutrons has a high-energy peak (386 MeV) and a low-energy tail. Two neutron beams, 0° and 25° from the proton beam axis, were used for sample irradiation, enabling a correction for the contribution of the low-energy neutrons. The neutron-induced activation cross sections were estimated by subtracting the reaction rates of irradiated samples for 25° irradiation from those of 0° irradiation. The measured cross sections were compared with the findings of other studies, evaluated in relation to nuclear data files and the calculated data by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System code. PMID:24368868

  7. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress.

  8. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition.

  9. Neutron activation analysis of sea-, lake-, and evaporated salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, G.; Sterba, J. H.; Poljanc, K.; Bichler, M.; Buchtela, K.

    2006-01-01

    Salt is essential for human nutrition. Recently, it has become popular in Europe to rather use exotic sea salt or lake salt instead of purified evaporated salt, because of an alleged higher content of trace elements. In this study the content of trace elements and their bioavailability of 19 samples of different types of salt and 1 sample of brine purification sludge were investigated using instrumental neutron activation analysis. In general, sea-, lake-, and evaporated salt are quite pure. Trace elements determined in salt were Al, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Rb, Sc, Sr, and Zn; some of them only in individual cases. It was found that, in general, the content of trace elements in sea- or lake salt was higher than in purified salt. Nevertheless, the use of sea- or lake salt does not contribute significantly to the human needs of essential trace elements, because their concentration in salt is too low or their compounds are not bioavailable.

  10. Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron-induced activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma-Based Cargo Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Brandis, M.; Dangendorf, V.; Goldberg, M. B.; Kaufmann, F.; Mor, I.; Nolte, R.; Schmiedel, M.; Tittelmeier, K.; Vartsky, D.; Wershofen, H.

    2012-03-01

    An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. The induced activity was determined by analyzing the gamma spectra. Based on the calculated radioactive inventory in the container, the dose levels due to the induced gamma radiation were calculated at several distances from the container and in relevant time windows after the irradiation, in order to evaluate the radiation exposure of the cargo handling staff, air crew and passengers during flight. The possibility of remanent long-lived radioactive inventory after cargo is delivered to the client is also of concern and was evaluated.

  11. Object-oriented data analysis framework for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Jiro; Nakatani, Takeshi; Ohhara, Takashi; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Yonemura, Masao; Morishima, Takahiro; Aoyagi, Tetsuo; Manabe, Atsushi; Otomo, Toshiya

    2009-02-01

    Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is one of the facilities that provided the highest intensity pulsed neutron and muon beams. The MLF computing environment design group organizes the computing environments of MLF and instruments. It is important that the computing environment is provided by the facility side, because meta-data formats, the analysis functions and also data analysis strategy should be shared among many instruments in MLF. The C++ class library, named Manyo-lib, is a framework software for developing data reduction and analysis softwares. The framework is composed of the class library for data reduction and analysis operators, network distributed data processing modules and data containers. The class library is wrapped by the Python interface created by SWIG. All classes of the framework can be called from Python language, and Manyo-lib will be cooperated with the data acquisition and data-visualization components through the MLF-platform, a user interface unified in MLF, which is working on Python language. Raw data in the event-data format obtained by data acquisition systems will be converted into histogram format data on Manyo-lib in high performance, and data reductions and analysis are performed with user-application software developed based on Manyo-lib. We enforce standardization of data containers with Manyo-lib, and many additional fundamental data containers in Manyo-lib have been designed and developed. Experimental and analysis data in the data containers can be converted into NeXus file. Manyo-lib is the standard framework for developing analysis software in MLF, and prototypes of data-analysis softwares for each instrument are being developed by the instrument teams.

  12. FAME: Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Agocs, Tibor; Challita, Zalpha; Jasko, Attila; Kroes, Gabby; Banyai, Evelin; Miller, Chris; Taylor, William; Schnetler, Hermine; Venema, Lars

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the development of a demonstrator freeform active mirror for future astronomical instruments both on Earth and in space. It consists of a system overview and progress in various areas of technology in the building blocks of the mirror: an extreme freeform thin face sheet, an active array, design tools and the metrology and control of the system. The demonstrator aims to investigate the applicability of the technique in high end astronomical systems, also for space and cryogenically.

  13. Tables for simplifying calculations of activities produced by thermal neutrons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Champion, W.R.

    1954-01-01

    The method of calculation described is useful for the types of work of which examples are given. It is also useful in making rapid comparison of the activities that might be expected from several different elements. For instance, suppose it is desired to know which of the three elements, cobalt, nickel, or vanadium is, under similar conditions, activated to the greatest extent by thermal neutrons. If reference is made to a cross-section table only, the values may be misleading unless properly interpreted by a suitable comparison of half-lives and abundances. In this table all the variables have been combined and the desired information can be obtained directly from the values of A 3??, the activity produced per gram per second of irradiation, under the stated conditions. Hence, it is easily seen that, under similar circumstances of irradiation, vanadium is most easily activated even though the cross section of one of the cobalt isotopes is nearly five times that of vanadium and the cross section of one of the nickel isotopes is three times that of vanadium. ?? 1954 Societa?? Italiana di Fisica.

  14. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: Effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation (PGNA) analysis is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV and D-T with...

  15. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV, and D-T wi...

  16. Neutron Spallation Measurements And Impacts On Low Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2014-09-01

    Ultra-low background experiments, such as neutrinoless double beta decay, carried out deep underground to escape cosmic ray backgrounds can nonetheless be limited in sensitivity by cosmogenically induced signals. This limit can either be produced directly during operation from cosmic muon events in the detector volume, or can be produced by radioactive decay of cosmogenically generated radionuclides created while the detector materials were above ground. An accurate knowledge of the production of the latter source of background is of paramount importance in order to be able to interpret the results of low-background experiments.

  17. Environmental Pollution, Student's Book (Experiences/Experiments/Activities).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Elbert C.

    Described in this student's manual are numerous experiments to acquaint the learner with community environmental problems. Experiments are relatively simple and useful in the junior high school grades. Activities are provided which emphasize some of the materials involved in pollution problems, such as carbon dioxide, sulfur compounds, and others,…

  18. Environmental Pollution, Teacher's Manual (Experiences/Experiments/Activities).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Elbert C.

    Described in this teacher's guide are numerous experiments teachers may use to guide students in learning about community environmental problems. Experiments are relatively simple and useful in the junior high school grades. Activities allow the student to become acquainted with the methods for the detection and removal of undesirable materials…

  19. Neutronic analysis for the LBM/LOTUS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kolibal, J.; Ku, L.P.; Liew, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    The LBM/LOTUS experimental results will be compared with the calculated values using the MCC in early 1986 based on the MCNP and DOT models described. The comparison will allow a testing of the features of the MCC in a simplified situation, in preparation for the ultimate experiment of the LBM on TFTR.

  20. Status of the construction and performances of the neutron Zero Degree Calorimeters of the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddi, E.; Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; Cicaló, C.; Cortese, P.; De Falco, A.; Dellacasa, G.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gallio, M.; Masoni, A.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Puddu, G.; Scomparin, E.; Serci, S.; Travaglia, G.; Usai, G.; Vercellin, E.

    2004-12-01

    The details of the construction of the neutron Zero Degree Calorimeters (ZN) of the ALICE Experiment, as well as their performances, will be presented. These spaghetti calorimeters will measure the energy lost by spectator nucleons in heavy-ion collisions. They are made of an absorber (tungsten alloy) filled with silica fibers, in which the charged particles of the shower produce Cherenkov light. The final neutron calorimeters have been built and their performances studied at the CERN SPS using pion and positron beams with momentum ranging from 50 to 150 GeV/ c. The main features like linearity of the response and resolution as a function of energy will be presented.

  1. Modern Rutherford experiment: tunneling of the most neutron-rich nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lemasson, A; Shrivastava, A; Navin, A; Rejmund, M; Keeley, N; Zelevinsky, V; Bhattacharyya, S; Chatterjee, A; de France, G; Jacquot, B; Nanal, V; Pillay, R G; Raabe, R; Schmitt, C

    2009-12-01

    A modern variation of the Rutherford experiment to probe the tunneling of exotic nuclear matter from the measurement of the residues formed in the bombardment of (197)Au by extremely neutron-rich (8)He nuclei is presented. Using a novel off-beam technique the most precise and accurate measurements of fusion and neutron transfer involving reaccelerated unstable beams are reported. The results show unusual behavior of the tunneling of (8)He compared to that for lighter helium isotopes, highlighting the role of the intrinsic structure of composite many-body quantum systems and pairing correlations. PMID:20366144

  2. Modern Rutherford Experiment: Tunneling of the Most Neutron-Rich Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Lemasson, A.; Navin, A.; Rejmund, M.; France, G. de; Jacquot, B.; Raabe, R.; Schmitt, C.; Keeley, N.; Zelevinsky, V.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.

    2009-12-04

    A modern variation of the Rutherford experiment to probe the tunneling of exotic nuclear matter from the measurement of the residues formed in the bombardment of {sup 197}Au by extremely neutron-rich {sup 8}He nuclei is presented. Using a novel off-beam technique the most precise and accurate measurements of fusion and neutron transfer involving reaccelerated unstable beams are reported. The results show unusual behavior of the tunneling of {sup 8}He compared to that for lighter helium isotopes, highlighting the role of the intrinsic structure of composite many-body quantum systems and pairing correlations.

  3. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the Neutron: JLab Experiment E08-025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benali, Meriem; Mazouz, Malek; Fonvieille, Helene

    2016-03-01

    This paper gives the preliminary results of the experimental cross section for deeply virtual Compton scattering on the neutron (en → enγ). The E08-025 experiment was performed at Jefferson Lab Hall A. We measured the (D(e; eX - H(e; e'γ)X) unpolarized cross section and we extracted, for the first time, a non-zero contribution of (neutron-DVCS + coherent-deuteron-DVCS) at Q2 = 1.75 GeV2 and xB = 0.36.

  4. Measurement of residual 60Co activity induced by atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and background contribution by environmental neutrons.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Shimazaki, Tatsuya; Okumura, Yutaka; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2002-12-01

    Residual 60Co activity in five steel samples induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured within about 1000 m from the hypocenter. The chemical separation of cobalt and nickel from steel samples was performed, and cobalt-enriched samples were prepared for all samples. Gamma-ray measurements were carried out with a low-background well-type germanium detector. The gamma-ray spectra for five samples were compared with the spectrum of a control sample to ensure that the observed 60Co was actually induced by A-bomb neutrons. The activation of cobalt by environmental neutrons was also investigated. It has been shown that the present 60Co data are consistent with earlier Hashizume's data. PMID:12674203

  5. An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Matysiak, W.; Bhatia, C.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our γ-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

  6. Neutron skin of (208)Pb, nuclear symmetry energy, and the parity radius experiment.

    PubMed

    Roca-Maza, X; Centelles, M; Viñas, X; Warda, M

    2011-06-24

    A precise determination of the neutron skin Δr(np) of a heavy nucleus sets a basic constraint on the nuclear symmetry energy (Δr(np) is the difference of the neutron and proton rms radii of the nucleus). The parity radius experiment (PREX) may achieve it by electroweak parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) on (208)Pb. We investigate PVES in nuclear mean field approach to allow the accurate extraction of Δr(np) of (208)Pb from the parity-violating asymmetry A(PV) probed in the experiment. We demonstrate a high linear correlation between A(PV) and Δr(np) in successful mean field forces as the best means to constrain the neutron skin of (208)Pb from PREX, without assumptions on the neutron density shape. Continuation of the experiment with higher precision in A(PV) is motivated since the present method can support it to constrain the density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy to new accuracy. PMID:21770635

  7. Neutron Skin of {sup 208}Pb, Nuclear Symmetry Energy, and the Parity Radius Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Roca-Maza, X.; Centelles, M.; Vinas, X.; Warda, M.

    2011-06-24

    A precise determination of the neutron skin {Delta}r{sub np} of a heavy nucleus sets a basic constraint on the nuclear symmetry energy ({Delta}r{sub np} is the difference of the neutron and proton rms radii of the nucleus). The parity radius experiment (PREX) may achieve it by electroweak parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) on {sup 208}Pb. We investigate PVES in nuclear mean field approach to allow the accurate extraction of {Delta}r{sub np} of {sup 208}Pb from the parity-violating asymmetry A{sub PV} probed in the experiment. We demonstrate a high linear correlation between A{sub PV} and {Delta}r{sub np} in successful mean field forces as the best means to constrain the neutron skin of {sup 208}Pb from PREX, without assumptions on the neutron density shape. Continuation of the experiment with higher precision in A{sub PV} is motivated since the present method can support it to constrain the density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy to new accuracy.

  8. Irradiation embrittlement of neutron-irradiated low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayano, H.; Kimura, A.; Narui, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ohta, S.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation and additions of small amounts of alloying elements on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of three different groups of ferritic steels were investigated by means of the Charpy impact test in order to gain an insight into the development of low-activation ferritic steels suitable for the nuclear fusion reactor. The groups of ferritic steels used in this study were (1) basic 0-5% Cr ferritic steels, (2) low-activation ferritic steels which are FeCrW steels with additions of small amounts of V, Mn, Ta, Ti, Zr, etc. and (3) FeCrMo, Nb or V ferritic steels for comparison. In Fe-0-15% Cr and FeCrMo steels, Fe-3-9% Cr steels showed minimum brittleness and provided good resistance against irradiation embrittlement. Investigations on the effects of additions of trace amounts of alloying elements on the fracture toughness of low-activation ferritic steels made clear the optimum amounts of each alloying element to obtain higher toughness and revealed that the 9Cr-2W-Ta-Ti-B ferritic steel showed the highest toughness. This may result from the refinement of crystal grains and improvement of quenching characteristics caused by the complex effect of Ti and B.

  9. Characterization of indoor cooking aerosol using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Larson, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particles in air are potentially harmful to human health, depending on their sizes and chemical composition. Residential indoor particles mainly come from (a) outdoor sources that are transported indoors, (b) indoor dust that is resuspended, and (c) indoor combustion sources, which include cigarette smoking, cooking, and heating. Jedrychowski stated that chronic phlegm in elderly women was strongly related to the cooking exposure. Kamens et al. indicated that cooking could generate small particles (<0.1 [mu]m), and cooking one meal could contribute [approximately]5 to 18% of total daytime particle volume exposure. Although cooking is a basic human activity, there are not many data available on the properties of particles generated by this activity. Some cooking methods, such as stir-frying and frying, which are the most favored for Chinese and other Far East people, generate a large quantity of aerosols. This research included the following efforts: 1. investigating particle number concentrations, distributions, and their variations with four different cooking methods and ventilation conditions; 2. measuring the chemical composition of cooking aerosol samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  10. Active Neutron Interrogation of Non-Radiological Materials with NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; Mihalczo, John T

    2012-02-01

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), although primarily designed for analyzing special nuclear material, is capable of identifying nonradiological materials with a wide range of measurement techniques. This report demonstrates four different measurement methods, complementary to fast-neutron imaging, which can be used for material identification: DT transmission, DT scattering, californium transmission, and active time-tagged gamma spectroscopy. Each of the four techniques was used to evaluate how these methods can be used to identify four materials: aluminum, polyethylene, graphite, and G-10 epoxy. While such measurements have been performed individually in the past, in this project, all four measurements were performed on the same set of materials. The results of these measurements agree well with predicted results. In particular, the results of the active gamma spectroscopy measurements demonstrate the technique's applicability in a future version of NMIS which will incorporate passive and active gamma-ray spectroscopy. This system, designated as a fieldable NMIS (FNMIS), is under development by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Verification.

  11. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, Nevzat; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Batha, Steven H.; Clark, David D.; Clark, Deborah J.; Danly, Chris R.; Day, Robert D.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Finch, Joshua P.; Gallegos, Robert A.; Garcia, Felix P.; Grim, Gary; Hsu, Albert H.; Jaramillo, Steven A.; Loomis, Eric N.; Mares, Danielle; Martinson, Drew D.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Munson, Carter; Murphy, Thomas J.; Oertel, John A.; Polk, Paul J.; Schmidt, Derek W.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Valdez, Adelaida C.; Volegov, Petr L.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Wilde, Carl H.; Wilke, Mark D.; Wilson, Douglas C.; Atkinson, Dennis P.; Bower, Dan E.; Drury, Owen B.; Dzenitis, John M.; Felker, Brian; Fittinghoff, David N.; Frank, Matthias; Liddick, Sean N.; Moran, Michael J.; Roberson, George P.; Weiss, Paul; Buckles, Robert A.; Cradick, Jerry R.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Lutz, Steve S.; Malone, Robert M.; Traille, Albert

    2013-11-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic (CH) capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (10-12 MeV) neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  12. Empirical comparison of neutron activation sample analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillenwalters, Elizabeth

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a research reactor used mainly for neutron activation of samples, which are then shipped to industrial customers. Accurate nuclide identification and activity determination are crucial to remain in compliance with Code of Federal Regulations guidelines. This facility utilized a Canberra high purity germanium detector (HPGe) coupled with Canberra Genie(TM) 2000 (G2K) software for gamma spectroscopy. This study analyzed the current method of nuclide identification and activity determination of neutron activated materials utilized by the USGS reactor staff and made recommendations to improve the method. Additionally, analysis of attenuators, effect of detector dead time on nuclide identification, and validity of activity determination assumptions were investigated. The current method of activity determination utilized the G2K software to obtain ratio of activity per nuclide identified. This determination was performed without the use of geometrically appropriate efficiency calibration curves. The ratio of activity per nuclide was used in conjunction with an overall exposure rate in mR/h obtained via a Fluke Biomedical hand-held ion chamber. The overall exposure rate was divided into individual nuclide amounts based on the G2K nuclide ratios. A gamma energy of 1 MeV and a gamma yield of 100% was assumed for all samples. Utilizing the gamma assumption and nuclide ratios, a calculation was performed to determine total sample activity in muCi (microCuries). An alternative method was proposed, which would eliminate the use of exposure rate and rely solely on the G2K software capabilities. The G2K software was energy and efficiency calibrated with efficiency curves developed for multiple geometries. The USGS reactor staff were trained to load appropriate calibration data into the G2K software prior to sample analysis. Comparison of the current method and proposed method demonstrated that the activity value calculated with the 1 Me

  13. Experiment system of LAMOST active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangqun; Su, Ding; Li, Guoping; Yao, Zhengqiu; Zhang, Zhengcao; Li, Yeping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, You; Xu, Xinqi; Wang, Hai

    2004-10-01

    Active optics is the most difficult part in LAMOST project. Especially for the segmented reflecting Schmidt plate Ma, in which both segmented mirror active optics and thin mirror (or deformable mirror) active optics are applied. To test and optimize the thin mirror active optics of Ma, and to approach the reality of operating environment of the telescope, an outdoor experiment system has been established. This experiment system is also a `small LAMOST" with one sub-mirror of the primary mirror Mb and one sub-mirror of the Schmidt plate Ma, and with full scale in spacing (40 meters) between Ma and Mb. many parts of LAMOST were tested in the experiment system except segmented mirror active optics. Especially for force actuators, thin mirror support system, friction driving of the alt-azimuth mounting and its control system, wave front test along such a long optical path. This paper presents the experiment system, research and developments, and some experiment results.

  14. Reconstruction of Time-Resolved Neutron Energy Spectra in Z-Pinch Experiments Using Time-of-flight Method

    SciTech Connect

    Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Kravarik, J.

    2009-01-21

    We present the reconstruction of neutron energy spectra from time-of-flight signals. This technique is useful in experiments with the time of neutron production in the range of about tens or hundreds of nanoseconds. The neutron signals were obtained by a common hard X-ray and neutron fast plastic scintillation detectors. The reconstruction is based on the Monte Carlo method which has been improved by simultaneous usage of neutron detectors placed on two opposite sides from the neutron source. Although the reconstruction from detectors placed on two opposite sides is more difficult and a little bit inaccurate (it followed from several presumptions during the inclusion of both sides of detection), there are some advantages. The most important advantage is smaller influence of scattered neutrons on the reconstruction. Finally, we describe the estimation of the error of this reconstruction.

  15. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron experiments : data processing and spatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    The YALINA-Booster experiments and analyses are part of the collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory of USA and the Joint Institute for Power & Nuclear Research - SOSNY of Belarus for studying the physics of accelerator driven systems for nuclear energy applications using low enriched uranium. The YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly is utilized for studying the kinetics of accelerator driven systems with its highly intensive D-T or D-D pulsed neutron source. In particular, the pulsed neutron methods are used to determine the reactivity of the subcritical system. This report examines the pulsed-neutron experiments performed in the YALINA-Booster facility with different configurations for the subcritical assembly. The 1141 configuration with 90% U-235 fuel and the 1185 configuration with 36% or 21% U-235 fuel are examined. The Sjoestrand area-ratio method is utilized to determine the reactivities of the different configurations. The linear regression method is applied to obtain the prompt neutron decay constants from the pulsed-neutron experimental data. The reactivity values obtained from the experimental data are shown to be dependent on the detector locations inside the subcritical assembly and the types of detector used for the measurements. In this report, Bell's spatial correction factors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo model to remove the detector dependences. The large differences between the reactivity values given by the detectors in the fast neutron zone of the YALINA-Booster are reduced after applying the spatial corrections. In addition, the estimated reactivity values after the spatial corrections are much less spatially dependent.

  16. Analysis of a laboratory experiment on neutron generation by discharges in the open atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.

    2015-10-01

    A recently reported laboratory experiment with a high-voltage long discharge in the open atmosphere producing neutrons "…up to energies above 10 MeV…" [Agafonov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 115003 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.115003] is critically analyzed. Known elementary processes, namely, nuclear synthesis 2H(2H,n )3He and 2H(14N,n )15O , photonuclear, electrodisintegration Anm(e-,n )mprescripts>m n -1 and opposite to the β-decay e-(p+,n ) νe reactions, as well as unconventional mechanisms and the hypothetical increase in the nuclear synthesis cross sections are not capable of accounting for the neutron generation under conditions of the experiment analyzed. In particular, total energy yields of reactions 2H(2H,n )3He and 2H(14N,n )15O are less than the claimed neutron energy above 10 MeV. Trustworthiness of the neutron measurements on the basis of the available study of the C-39 track detectors behavior carried out by Faccini et al. [Eur. Phys. J. C 74, 2894 (2014), 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-2894-3] in connection with claimed observations of neutron emission in electrolytic cells is discussed. Real-time measurements of x-ray and neutron pulses by Agafonov et al. are commented on using the thorough study of the x-ray emissions by discharges under similar conditions [Kochkin et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45, 425202 (2012), 10.1088/0022-3727/45/42/425202].

  17. Compatibility of photomultiplier tube operation with SQUIDs for a neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libersky, Matthew; nEDM Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    An experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the goal of reducing the experimental limit on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron will measure the precession frequencies of neutrons when a strong electric field is applied parallel and anti-parallel to a weak magnetic field. A difference in these frequencies would indicate a nonzero neutron EDM. To correct for drifts of the magnetic field in the measurement volume, polarized 3He will be used as a co-magnetometer. In one of the two methods built into the apparatus, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) will be used to read out the 3He magnetization. Photomultiplier tubes will be used concurrently to measure scintillation light from neutron capture by 3He. However, the simultaneous noise-sensitive magnetic field measurement by the SQUIDs makes conventional PMT operation problematic due to the alternating current involved in generating the high voltages needed. Tests were carried out at Los Alamos National Laboratory to study the compatibility of simultaneous SQUID and PMT operation, using a custom battery-powered high-voltage power supply developed by Meyer and Smith (NIM A 647.1) to operate the PMT. The results of these tests will be presented.

  18. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  19. Accessing Interior Vector Magnetic Field Components in Neutron EDM Experiments via Boundary Value Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaster, Brad

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new technique for the determination and monitoring of the interior vector magnetic field components during the operation of neutron EDM experiments. If a suitable three-dimensional volume surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined which contains no interior currents or magnetization, each of the interior vector field components will satisfy the Laplace Equation within this volume. Therefore, if the field components can be measured on the boundary, the interior vector field components can be determined uniquely via numerical solution of the Laplace Equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the magnetic field components and magnetic field gradients in the fiducial volumes of neutron EDM experiments.

  20. Threshold bubble chamber for measurement of knock-on DT neutron tails from magnetic and inertial confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.K.; Zaveryaev, V.S.; Trusillo, S.V.

    1996-07-01

    We propose a new {open_quotes}threshold{close_quotes} bubble chamber detector for measurement of knock-on neutron tails. These energetic neutrons result from fusion reactions involving energetic fuel ions created by alpha knock-on collisions in tokamak and other magnetic confinement experiments, and by both alpha and neutron knock-on collisions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The energy spectrum of these neutrons will yield information on the alpha population and energy distribution in tokamaks, and on alpha target physics and {rho}R measurements in ICF experiments. The bubble chamber should only detect neutrons with energies above a selectable threshold energy controlled by the bubble chamber pressure. The bubble chamber threshold mechanism, detection efficiency, and proposed applications to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will be discussed.

  1. Threshold bubble chamber for measurement of knock-on DT neutron tails from magnetic and inertial confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.K.; Zaveryaev, V.S.; Trusillo, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a new {open_quotes}threshold{close_quotes} bubble chamber detector for measurement of knock-on neutron tails. These energetic neutrons result from fusion reactions involving energetic fuel ions created by alpha knock-on collisions in tokamak and other magnetic confinement experiments, and by both alpha and neutron knock-on collisions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The energy spectrum of these neutrons will yield information on the alpha population and energy distribution in tokamaks, and on alpha target physics and {rho}R measurements in ICF experiments. The bubble chamber should only detect neutrons with energies above a selectable threshold energy controlled by the bubble chamber pressure. The bubble chamber threshold mechanism, detection efficiency, and proposed applications to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and National Ignition Facility experiments will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-09-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis.

  3. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  4. Real-time active cosmic neutron background reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray‒induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the lowenergy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of manmade neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  5. Fission foil measurements of neutron and proton fluences in the A0015 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    Results are given from sets of fission foil detectors (FFD's) (Ta-181, Bi-209, Th-232, U-238) which were included in the A0015 experiment to measure combined proton/neutron fluences. Use has been made of recent FFD high energy proton calibrations for improved accuracy of response. Comparisons of track density measurements have been made with the predictions of environmental modeling based on simple 1-D (slab) geometry. At 1 g/cm(exp 2) (trailing edge) the calculations were approximately 25 percent lower than measurements; at 13 g/cm(exp 2) (Earthside) calculations were more than a factor of 2 lower. A future 3-D modeling of the experiment is needed for a more meaningful comparison. Approximate mission proton doses and neutron dose equivalents were found. At Earthside (13 g/cm(exp 2) the dose was 171 rad and dose equivalent was 82 rem. At the trailing edge (1 g/cm(exp 2) dose was 315 rad and dose equivalent was 33 rem. The proton doses are less than expected from TLD doses by 16 percent and 37 percent, respectively. These differences can be explained by uncertainties in the proton and neutron spectra and in the method used to separate proton and neutron contributions to the measurements.

  6. Principle and Uncertainty Quantification of an Experiment Designed to Infer Actinide Neutron Capture Cross-Sections

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatorre; G. Imel; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Paul

    2010-01-01

    An integral reactor physics experiment devoted to infer higher actinide (Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) neutron cross sections will take place in the US. This report presents the principle of the planned experiment as well as a first exercise aiming at quantifying the uncertainties related to the inferred quantities. It has been funded in part by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act and has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation. The principle is to irradiate different pure actinide samples in a test reactor like INL’s Advanced Test Reactor, and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation allows the energy integrated neutron cross-sections to be inferred since the relation between the two are the well-known neutron-induced transmutation equations. This approach has been used in the past and the principal novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined with the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) facility located at ANL. While AMS facilities traditionally have been limited to the assay of low-to-medium atomic mass materials, i.e., A < 100, there has been recent progress in extending AMS to heavier isotopes – even to A > 200. The detection limit of AMS being orders of magnitude lower than that of standard mass spectroscopy techniques, more transmutation products could be measured and, potentially, more cross-sections could be inferred from the irradiation of a single sample. Furthermore, measurements will be carried out at the INL using more standard methods in order to have another set of totally uncorrelated information.

  7. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections and calculational methods for the advanced neutron source against the FOEHN critical experiments measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Gallmeier, F.X.; Gehin, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    The FOEHN critical experiment was analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections and Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutronics computer codes in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. The ANSL-V 99-group master cross section library was used for all the calculations. Three different critical configurations were evaluated using the multigroup KENO Monte Carlo transport code, the multigroup DORT discrete ordinates transport code, and the multigroup diffusion theory code VENTURE. The simple configuration consists of only the fuel and control elements with the heavy water reflector. The intermediate configuration includes boron endplates at the upper and lower edges of the fuel element. The complex configuration includes both the boron endplates and components in the reflector. Cross sections were processed using modules from the AMPX system. Both 99-group and 20-group cross sections were created and used in two-dimensional models of the FOEHN experiment. KENO calculations were performed using both 99-group and 20-group cross sections. The DORT and VENTURE calculations were performed using 20-group cross sections. Because the simple and intermediate configurations are azimuthally symmetric, these configurations can be explicitly modeled in R-Z geometry. Since the reflector components cannot be modeled explicitly using the current versions of these codes, three reflector component homogenization schemes were developed and evaluated for the complex configuration. Power density distributions were calculated with KENO using 99-group cross sections and with DORT and VENTURE using 20-group cross sections. The average differences between the measured values and the values calculated with the different computer codes range from 2.45 to 5.74%. The maximum differences between the measured and calculated thermal flux values for the simple and intermediate configurations are {approx} 13%, while the average differences are < 8%.

  8. Investigation of a 129Xe magnetometer for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Michael; Nedm At Triumf Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A non-zero neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) would signify a previously unknown source of CP (or T) violation. New sources of CP violation are believed to be required to explain the baryon asymmetry of the universe. Employing a newly developed high-density UCN source, an experiment at TRIUMF aims to measure the nEDM to the level of 10-27 e . cm in its initial phase. Precession frequency differences for UCN stored in a bottle subject to parallel and anti-parallel E and B fields signify a permanent nEDM. Magnetic field instability and inhomogeneity, as well as field changes resulting from leakage currents (correlated with E fields) are the dominant systematic effects in nEDM measurements. To address this, passive and active magnetic shielding are in development along with a dual species (129Xe and 199Hg) atomic comagnetometer. Simultaneously introducing both atomic species into the UCN cell, the comagnetometer can mitigate false EDMs. 199Hg precession will be detected by Faraday rotation spectroscopy, and 129Xe precession will measured via two-photon excitation and emission. The present comagnetometer progress will be discussed, with focus on polarized 129Xe production and delivery. Work supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  9. Detection sensitivities in 3-8 MeV neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlgren, M. A.; Wing, J.

    1968-01-01

    Study of detection sensitivities of 73 radioactive elements using fast unmoderated neutrons includes experiments for irradiation, cooling and counting conditions. The gamma ray emission spectra is used to identify the unknown material.

  10. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  11. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-01

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 × 105 n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He4 nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T3.

  12. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  13. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-01

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 × 10(5) n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He(4) nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T(3). PMID:23277984

  14. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  15. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Chung, H.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-04-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperatures the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation was completed on May 5, 1996, as planned, after achieving an estimated neutron damage of 4.7 dpa in vanadium. The capsule has since been kept in the ATR water canal for the required radioactivity cool-down. Planning is underway for disassembly of the capsule and test specimen retrieval.

  16. Measurement of residual 152Eu activity induced by atomic bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and the contribution of environmental neutrons to this activity.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Ishikawa, Masayori; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Yamashita, Tomoaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2003-06-01

    Residual 152Eu activities induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb were measured for nine mineral samples located up to 1,061 m in the slant range and one control sample at 2,850 m from the hypocenter. A chemical separation to prepare europium-enriched samples was performed for all samples, and gamma ray measurements were carried out with a low background well-type germanium detector. In this paper, the measured specific activities of 152Eu are compared with activation calculations based on the DS86 neutron fluence and the 93Rev one. The calculated-to-measured ratios are also compared with those of 60Co and 36Cl. The present results indicate that the measurements agree to the calculation within a factor of three as observed in the nuclear tests at Nevada. The activation level of environmental neutrons and the detection limit for 152Eu are also discussed. PMID:13678342

  17. Development and application of setup for ac magnetic field in neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Klimko, Sergey; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P; Zabel, Hartmut

    2010-10-01

    We report on a new setup developed for neutron scattering experiments in periodically alternating magnetic fields at the sample position. The assembly consisting of rf generator, amplifier, wide band transformer, and resonance circuit. It allows to generate homogeneous ac magnetic fields over a volume of a few cm(3) and variable within a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. The applicability of the device is exemplified by ac polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR): a new method established to probe remagnetization kinetics in soft ferromagnetic films. Test experiments with iron films demonstrate that the ac field within the accessible range of frequencies and amplitudes produces a dramatic effect on the PNR signal. This shows that the relevant ac field parameters generated by the device match well with the scales involved in the remagnetization processes. Other possible applications of the rf unit are briefly discussed. PMID:21034083

  18. Development and application of setup for ac magnetic field in neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Klimko, Sergey; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Zabel, Hartmut

    2010-10-15

    We report on a new setup developed for neutron scattering experiments in periodically alternating magnetic fields at the sample position. The assembly consisting of rf generator, amplifier, wide band transformer, and resonance circuit. It allows to generate homogeneous ac magnetic fields over a volume of a few cm{sup 3} and variable within a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. The applicability of the device is exemplified by ac polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR): a new method established to probe remagnetization kinetics in soft ferromagnetic films. Test experiments with iron films demonstrate that the ac field within the accessible range of frequencies and amplitudes produces a dramatic effect on the PNR signal. This shows that the relevant ac field parameters generated by the device match well with the scales involved in the remagnetization processes. Other possible applications of the rf unit are briefly discussed.

  19. Self-triggering readout system for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaisbauer, D.; Konorov, I.; Steffen, D.; Paul, S.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of PENeLOPE (Precision Experiment on Neutron Lifetime Operating with Proton Extraction) at the Forschungsreaktor München II is a high-precision measurement of the neutron lifetime and thereby an improvement of the parameter's precision by one order of magnitude. In order to achieve a higher accuracy, modern experiments naturally require state-of-the-art readout electronics, as well as high-performance data acquisition systems. This paper presents the self-triggering readout system designed for PENeLOPE which features a continuous pedestal tracking, configurable signal detection logic, floating ground up to 30 kV, cryogenic environment and the novel Switched Enabling Protocol (SEP). The SEP is a time-division multiplexing transport level protocol developed for a star network topology.

  20. Neutron radiography activity in the european program cost 524: Neutron imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirco, P.; Bach, P.; Lehmann, E.; Balasko, M.

    2001-07-01

    COST is a framework for scientific and technical cooperation, allowing the coordination of national research on a European level, including 32 member countries. Participation of institutes from non-COST countries is possible. From an initial 7 Actions in 1971, COST has grown to 200 Actions at the beginning of 2000. COST Action 524 is under materials domain, the title of which being "Neutron Imaging Techniques for the Detection of Defects in Materials", under the Chairmanship of Dr. P. Chirco (I.N.F.N.). The following countries are represented in the Management Committee of Action 524: Italy, France, Austria, Germany, United Kingdom, Hungary, Switzerland, Spain, Czech Republic, Slovenia, and Russia. The six working groups of this Action are working respectively on standardization of neutron radiography techniques, on aerospace application, on civil engineering applications, on comparison and integration of neutron imaging techniques with other NDT, on neutron tomography, and on non radiographic techniques such as neutron scattering techniques. A specific effort is devoted to standardization issues, with respect to other non European standards. Results of work performed in the COST frame are published or will be published in the review INSIGHT, edited by the British Institute of Non Destructive Testing.

  1. In vivo neutron activation analysis of sodium and chlorine in tumor tissue after fast neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Auberger, T; Koester, L; Knopf, K; Weissfloch, L

    1996-01-01

    In 12 patients with recurrences and metastases of different primaries (head and neck cancer, breast cancer, malignant melanoma, and osteosarcoma) who were treated with reactor fission neutrons the photon emission of irradiated tissue was measured after each radiotherapy fraction. Spectral analyses of the decay rates resulted in data for the exchange of sodium (Na) and chlorine (Cl) between the irradiated tissue and the body. About 60% of Na and Cl exchanged rapidly with a turnover half-life of 13 +/- 2 min. New defined mass exchange rates for Na and Cl amount to an average of 0.8 mval/min/kg of soft tissue. At the beginning of radiotherapy the turnover of the electrolytes in tissues with large tumor volumes was about twice that in tissues with small tumor volumes. Depending on the dose, neutron therapy led in all cases to variation in the metabolism. A maximum of Cl exchange and a minimum of Na exchange occurred after 10 Gy of neutrons (group of six previously untreated patients) or after 85 Gy (photon equivalent dose) of combined photon-neutron therapy. A significant increase in non-exchangeable fraction of Na from about 40 to 80% was observed in three tumors after a neutron dose of 10 Gy administered in five fractions correlated with a rapid reduction of tissue within 4 weeks after end of therapy. These results demonstrate for the first time the local response of the electrolyte metabolism to radiotherapy. PMID:8949749

  2. Neutron activation analysis: A primary method of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Robert R.; Bode, Peter; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A.

    2011-03-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA), based on the comparator method, has the potential to fulfill the requirements of a primary ratio method as defined in 1998 by the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière — Métrologie en Chimie (CCQM, Consultative Committee on Amount of Substance — Metrology in Chemistry). This thesis is evidenced in this paper in three chapters by: demonstration that the method is fully physically and chemically understood; that a measurement equation can be written down in which the values of all parameters have dimensions in SI units and thus having the potential for metrological traceability to these units; that all contributions to uncertainty of measurement can be quantitatively evaluated, underpinning the metrological traceability; and that the performance of NAA in CCQM key-comparisons of trace elements in complex matrices between 2000 and 2007 is similar to the performance of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS), which had been formerly designated by the CCQM as a primary ratio method.

  3. Neutron Activation Analysis PRognosis and Optimization Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-08-20

    Version 00 NAAPRO predicts the results and main characteristics (detection limits, determination limits, measurement limits and relative precision of the analysis) of neutron activation analysis (instrumental and radiochemical). Gamma-ray dose rates for different points of time after sample irradiation and input count rate of the spectrometry system are also predicted. The code uses standard Windows user interface and extensive graphical tools for the visualization of the spectrometer characteristics (efficiency, response and background) and simulated spectrum.more » Optimization part is not included in the current version of the code. This release is designated NAAPRO, Version 01.beta. The MCNP code was used for generating detector responses. PREPRO-2000 and FCONV programs were used at the preparation of the program nuclear databases. A special program was developed for viewing, editing and updating of the program databases (not included into the present program package). The MCNP, PREPRO-2000 and FCONV software packages are not included in the NAAPRO package.« less

  4. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  5. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.

    1991-07-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: science program objectives and rationale; science requirements; capturing the essential physics; science development approach; development model hardware; development model test plan; and flight hardware and operations.

  6. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) are presented. Topics covered include: science program objectives and rationale; science requirements; capturing the essential physics; science development approach; development model hardware; development model test plan; and flight hardware and operations.

  7. Activation analysis of indium, KCl, and melamine by using a laser-induced neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungman; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2014-04-01

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source with a neutron yield of 4 × 105 n/pulse and a pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz, which was developed using a deuterated polystyrene film target and a 24-TW femtosecond laser, was applied for laser activation analyses of indium, KCl, and melamine samples. The nuclear reactions of the measured gamma spectra for the activated samples were identified as (n, γ), (n, n'), and (n, 2n) reactions. These indicate possible usage of the neutron source for practical activation analyses of various materials.

  8. Manufacture and properties of erythromycin beads containing neutron-activated erbium-171

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, A.F.; Digenis, G.A.; Sandefer, E.P.; Ghebre-Sellassie, I.; Iyer, U.; Nesbitt, R.U.; Scheinthal, B.M. )

    1990-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of a neutron activation radiolabeling technique on an enteric-coated multiparticulate formulation of erythromycin, test quantities were produced under industrial pilot scale conditions. The pellets contained the stable isotope erbium oxide (Er-170), which was later converted by neutron activation into the short-lived gamma ray-emitting radionuclide, erbium-171. In vitro studies indicated that the dissolution profile, acid resistance, and enteric-coated surface of the pellets were minimally affected by the irradiation procedure. Antimicrobial potency was also unaffected, as determined by microbiological assay. Neutron activation thus appears to simplify the radiolabeling of complex pharmaceutical dosage forms for in vivo study by external gamma scintigraphy.

  9. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Marek Koza, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other. PMID:27112937

  10. A neutron activation technique for manganese measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, C; Byun, S H; Chettle, D R; Inskip, M J; Prestwich, W V

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for humans, animals, and plants and is required for growth, development, and maintenance of health. Studies show that Mn metabolism is similar to that of iron, therefore, increased Mn levels in humans could interfere with the absorption of dietary iron leading to anemia. Also, excess exposure to Mn dust, leads to nervous system disorders similar to Parkinson's disease. Higher exposure to Mn is essentially related to industrial pollution. Thus, there is a benefit in developing a clean non-invasive technique for monitoring such increased levels of Mn in order to understand the risk of disease and development of appropriate treatments. To this end, the feasibility of Mn measurements with their minimum detection limits (MDL) has been reported earlier from the McMaster group. This work presents improvement to Mn assessment using an upgraded system and optimized times of irradiation and counting for induced gamma activity of Mn. The technique utilizes the high proton current Tandetron accelerator producing neutrons via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at McMaster University and an array of nine NaI (Tl) detectors in a 4 π geometry for delayed counting of gamma rays. The neutron irradiation of a set of phantoms was performed with protocols having different proton energy, current and time of irradiation. The improved MDLs estimated using the upgraded set up and constrained timings are reported as 0.67 μgMn/gCa for 2.3 MeV protons and 0.71 μgMn/gCa for 2.0 MeV protons. These are a factor of about 2.3 times better than previous measurements done at McMaster University using the in vivo set-up. Also, because of lower dose-equivalent and a relatively close MDL, the combination of: 2.0 MeV; 300 μA; 3 min protocol is recommended as compared to 2.3 MeV; 400 μA; 45 s protocol for further measurements of Mn in vivo. PMID:25169978

  11. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

  12. A benchmarked MCNP model of the in vivo detection of gadolinium by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, J. L.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Chettle, D. R.; Noseworthy, M. D.

    2010-08-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents are a valuable diagnostic aid for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amount of free Gd deposited in tissues following contrast enhanced MRI is of toxicological concern. The McMaster University in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been adapted for the detection of Gd in the kidney, liver, and the leg muscle. A simple model of the HPGe detector used for detection of the prompt γ-rays following Gd neutron capture has been created using Monte Carlo simulation. A separate simulation describing the neutron collimation and shielding apparatus has been modified to determine the neutron capture rate in the Gd phantoms. The MCNP simulation results have been confirmed by experimental measurement. The deviations between MCNP and the experiment were between 1% and 18%, with an average deviation of 3.8 ± 6.7%. The validated MCNP model is to be used to improve the Gd in vivo measurement sensitivity by determining the best neutron moderator/reflector arrangement.

  13. A novel method for active fissile mass estimation with a pulsed neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubi, C.; Ridnik, T.; Israelashvili, I.; Pedersen, B.

    2013-07-01

    Neutron interrogation facilities for mass evaluation of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) samples are divided into two main categories: passive interrogation, where all neutron detections are due to spontaneous events, and active interrogation, where fissions are induced on the tested material by an external neutron source. While active methods are, in general, faster and more effective, their analysis is much harder to carry out. In the paper, we will introduce a new formalism for analyzing the detection signal generated by a pulsed source active interrogation facility. The analysis is aimed to distinct between fission neutrons from the main neutron source in the system, and the surrounding "neutron noise". In particular, we derive analytic expressions for the first three central moments of the number of detections in a given time interval, in terms of the different neutron sources. While the method depends on exactly the same physical assumptions as known models, the simplicity of the suggested formalism allows us to take into account the variance of the external neutron source—an effect that was so far neglected.

  14. Ultra Sensitive Neutron Activation Measurements of {sup 232}Th in Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Clemenza, M.; Previtali, E.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Salvini, A.

    2011-04-27

    Copper, thanks to its low content in radioactive contaminations, is a material widely used for shielding, holders and other objects close to the sensitive parts of the detectors in many experiments in rare event physics. This implies that tools able to reach sensitivity of the order of <10{sup -12} gram of contaminants per gram of copper are of crucial importance. A methodology based in Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been developed to obtain an extremely high sensitivity in the analysis of {sup 232}Th in copper samples. A detection limit of 5x10{sup -13} g {sup 232}Th/g Cu has been achieved through the irradiation of 200 g of copper sample which subsequently was radio-chemically concentrated using nitric acid and then actinide resin from Eichrom Inc. Several elutions were performed with various inorganic acids to concentrate the {sup 232}Th activation product ({sup 233}Pa) from the copper matrix and to also eliminate the radioactive background induced by the neutron bombardment to reach higher sensitivity.

  15. Reconciliation of Measured and TRANSP-calculated Neutron Emission Rates in the National Spherical Torus Experiment: Circa 2002-2005

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-06-15

    A change in the response of the neutron detectors on the National Spherical Torus Experiment occurred between the 2002-2003 and 2004 experimental run periods. An analysis of this behavior by investigating the neutron diagnostic operating conditions and comparing measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates is presented. Also a revised procedure for cross calibration of the neutron scintillator detectors with the fission chamber detectors was implemented that delivers good agreement amongst the measured neutron rates for all neutron detectors and all run periods. For L-mode discharges, the measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates now match closely for all run years. For H-mode discharges over the entire 2002-2004 period, the 2FG scintillator and fission chamber measurements match each other but imply a neutron deficit of 11.5% relative to the TRANSP-calculated neutron. The results of this report impose a modification on all of the previously used calibration factors for the entire neutron detector suite over the 2002-2004 period. A tabular summary of the new calibration factors is provided including certified calibration factors for the 2005 run.

  16. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  17. Design of a backscatter 14-MeV neutron time-of-flight spectrometer for experiments at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Dzysiuk, N.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Skiba, M.

    2014-08-21

    Neutron energy spectrometry diagnostics play an important role in present-day experiments related to fusion energy research. Measurements and thorough analysis of the neutron emission from the fusion plasma give information on a number of basic fusion performance quantities, on the condition of the neutron source and plasma behavior. Here we discuss the backscatter Time-of-Flight (bTOF) spectrometer concept as a possible instrument for performing high resolution measurements of 14 MeV neutrons. The instrument is based on two sets of scintillators, a first scatterer exposed to a collimated neutron beam and a second detector set placed in the backward direction. The scintillators of the first set are enriched in deuterium to achieve neutron backscattering. The energy resolution and efficiency of a bTOF instrument have been determined for various geometrical configurations. A preliminary design of optimal geometry for the two scintillator sets has been obtained by Monte Carlo simulations based on the MCNPX code.

  18. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  19. Metabolic Activity - Skylab Experiment M171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's Metabolic Activity experiment (M171), a medical evaluation facility designed to measure astronauts' metabolic changes while on long-term space missions. The experiment obtained information on astronauts' physiological capabilities and limitations and provided data useful in the design of future spacecraft and work programs. Physiological responses to physical activity was deduced by analyzing inhaled and exhaled air, pulse rate, blood pressure, and other selected variables of the crew while they performed controlled amounts of physical work with a bicycle ergometer. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  20. An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William S; Peerani, Paolo

    2012-08-13

    Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential

  1. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  2. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorova, E.; Goennenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttge, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-22

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  3. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, E.; Gönnenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttgé, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-01

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  4. Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for Elemental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robin P. Gardner

    2006-04-11

    This research project was to improve the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) measurement approach for bulk analysis, oil well logging, and small sample thermal enutron bean applications.

  5. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  6. Active mode calibration of the combined thermal epithermal neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system was developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform active and passive neutron interrogation of waste. The higher energy epithermal neutrons are able to penetrate further into the matrix and active material, thus reducing matrix attenuation and self-shielding effects compared to a thermal neutron pulse alone. The developmental unit was installed in 2001 at the Los Alamos Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) facility to characterize waste for the TRU Waste Characterization Project (TWCP). This paper summarizes the active mode certification results. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable standards were used to determine the system response as a function of mass. Finally, NIST-traceable verification standards were used to verify the calibration in the range 30 milligrams to 25 g of weapons grade plutonium although self-shielding limits the upper active interrogation to 10 g.

  7. Neutron intensity monitor with activation foil for p-Li neutron source for BNCT--Feasibility test of the concept.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isao; Otani, Yuki; Sato, Fuminobu

    2015-12-01

    Proton-lithium (p-Li) reaction is being examined worldwide as a candidate nuclear production reaction for accelerator based neutron source (ABNS) for BNCT. In this reaction, the emitted neutron energy is not so high, below 1 MeV, and especially in backward angles the energy is as low as about 100 keV. The intensity measurement was thus known to be difficult so far. In the present study, a simple method was investigated to monitor the absolute neutron intensity of the p-Li neutron source by employing the foil activation method based on isomer production reactions in order to cover around several hundreds keV. As a result of numerical examination, it was found that (107)Ag, (115)In and (189)Os would be feasible. Their features found out are summarized as follows: (107)Ag: The most convenient foil, since the half life is short. (115)In: The accuracy is the best at 0°, though it cannot be used for backward angles. And (189)Os: Suitable nuclide which can be used in backward angles, though the gamma-ray energy is a little too low. These would be used for p-Li source monitoring depending on measuring purposes in real BNCT scenes. PMID:26242557

  8. Comparison of IUPAC k0 Values and Neutron Cross Sections to Determine a Self-consistent Set of Data for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Revay, Zsolt

    2009-12-01

    Independent databases of nuclear constants for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) have been independently maintained by the physics and chemistry communities for many year. They contain thermal neturon cross sections s0, standardization values k0, and transition probabilities Pg. Chemistry databases tend to rely upon direct measurements of the nuclear constants k0 and Pg which are often published in chemistry journals while the physics databases typically include evaluated s0 and Pg data from a variety of experiments published mainly in physics journals. The IAEA/LBNL Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) also contains prompt and delayed g-ray cross sections sg from Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) measurements that can also be used to determine k0 and s0 values. As a result several independent databases of fundamental constants for NAA have evolved containing slightly different and sometimes discrepant results. An IAEA CRP for a Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis was established to compare these databases and investigate the possibilitiy of producing a self-consistent set of s0, k0, sg, and Pg values for NAA and other applications. Preliminary results of this IAEA CRP comparison are given in this paper.

  9. An investigation of mathematical tools for data reduction techniques in neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopal, R.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced mathematical tools have been developed for calculating corrections that are applied to neutron scattering data in order to account for the finite size of the scattering samples. The multiple scattering events (due to finite size) that occur in a neutron scattering experiment typically comprise 8 to 10% of the total measured scattering events. A Monte Carlo program was developed to simulate the disk geometry arrangement used in the Lowell neutron scattering experiments. A modern random number generator which passes all known randomness tests was implemented in the Monte Carlo program. A direction-biasing method was applied in order to improve the statistical results of the Monte Carlo simulation. The ratio of the probability of n + 1 scatterings to n scatterings was investigated for the disk geometry. The Monte Carlo calculation was also used to simulate the time-of-flight spectra and energy spectra. Corrections for multiple scattering were calculated for two sets of data; one at 128 keV and the other at 200 keV. The Monte Carlo results provided significant improvement over previous results. A parallel study was carried out to determine the feasibility of calculating the corrections analytically. Analytical techniques involving eigenfunction expansion, sparse matrix method and the Rayliegh-Ritz variational method were found to be inadequate to solve the problem.

  10. Status of Neutron Beta Decay Asymmetry Studies from the UCNA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David, II

    2013-04-01

    The UCNA experiment measures the neutron β decay asymmetry parameter A(E) using bottled polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). UCN are produced from a pulsed spallation solid deuterium source coupled to the 800 MeV proton beam at LANSCE. The UCN spin states are selected via a 7 T polarizing field and an adiabatic fast passage spin flipper. The polarized UCN are then transported to a 1 T 2x2π spectrometer where the emitted electrons are measured. In the Standard Model, the leading order value of A(E), A0, is a function of the axial-vector to vector coupling ratio λ≡gA/gV, providing complementary data to the physics probed by measurements of the neutron lifetime τn. When taken together with τn, measurements of the beta decay asymmetry permit a nuclear structure independent determination of the CKM matrix element Vud. This talk presents an overview of the UCNA experiment, the status of the analysis of our 2011 dataset, the work performed in 2012 and the path forward.

  11. Development of an optical co-magnetometer for a neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Takamasa

    2014-09-01

    TRIUMF is now constructing a new facility that will produce high density ultracold neutrons (UCN). One of the important experiments for the new facility is the measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM), an experiment that exploits the fundamental symmetries of nature to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In order to improve the present world's best experimental result for the nEDM by more than an order of magnitude, it is indispensable to develop an extremely sensitive co-magnetometer, which measures the magnetic field inside the nEDM cell while the nEDM measurement is being conducted. For this purpose, our group is proposing to use a dual-species comagnetometer with 199Hg and 129Xe. In this method, polarized 199Hg and 129Xe atoms will be introduced into the nEDM cell at the same time as the neutrons, and the spin-precession frequencies of both species are measured simultaneously. The Xe and Hg atoms are probed continuously by observing the modulation of transmitted probe light, at 253.7 nm, for Hg, and emission in the near infrared (823 nm and 895 nm) for Xe by exciting a two-photon transition at 252.4 nm. This talk will present our progress on the development of the dual-species comagnetometer.

  12. Response of thunderstorm activity in data of neutron monitoring at Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, Valentina; Kryukov, Sergey; Lutsenko, Vadim

    2015-04-01

    We present results of the study of data of the monitoring of high-energy and thermal neutrons at Tien Shan at different stages of thunderstorm activity. The data of the neutron monitoring were used taking into account the barometric effect. The intensity of the neutron component of cosmic rays is recorded in seven energy ranges. The electric field has values of ~ 100 V/m under fair weather conditions. Standard deviation of minute values of the neutron monitor data at the high altitude station does not exceed 0.5-0.6 %. Found that the standard deviation of the data during thunderstorms always exceeds these values. We selected events during the passage of thunderstorm clouds over the high altitude station without lightning discharges or with a small number of them. It was found that the particle rate of the neutron monitor changes in antiphase with the electric field changes. Atmospheric electric field of positive polarity decreases the count rate of the neutron monitor, and negative polarity - increases. Change of the count rate occurs at values of electric field ≥ 10-15 kV/m and reaches 2 %. The neutron monitor at the high-altitude station has the ability to measure the energy of recorded particles through determination of their multiplicity. We experimentally established that the sensitivity of the detected particles to change in Ez increases with decreasing their energy. The upper energy threshold of sensitivity of neutrons to change electric field is ~10 GeV. The physical mechanism of effect is based on lead nucleus capture of soft negative muons with the subsequent generation of neutrons. It is known that 7% of the neutron monitor count rate caused by negative muons. Absence of this effect in thermal neutrons data confirms the conclusion since the main difference of the thermal neutrons detector from the neutron monitor is the absence of the lead. In the active phase of a thunderstorm in the formed thundercloud the picture of distribution of charges is

  13. Determination of boron in materials by cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rick L

    2005-01-01

    An instrument for cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), located at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), has proven useful for the measurement of boron in a variety of materials. Neutrons, moderated by passage through liquid hydrogen at 20 K, pass through a (58)Ni coated guide to the PGAA station in the cold neutron guide hall of the NCNR. The thermal equivalent neutron fluence rate at the sample position is 9 x 10(8) cm(-2) s(-1). Prompt gamma rays are measured by a cadmium- and lead-shielded high-purity germanium detector. The instrument has been used to measure boron mass fractions in minerals, in NIST SRM 2175 (Refractory Alloy MP-35-N) for certification of boron, and most recently in semiconductor-grade silicon. The limit of detection for boron in many materials is <10 ng g(-1). PMID:15614360

  14. Characteristics and application of spherical-type activation detectors in neutron spectrum measurements at a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Heng-Xiao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2016-03-01

    A set of spherical-type activation detectors was developed aiming to provide better determination of the neutron spectrum at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) BNCT facility. An activation foil embedded in a specially designed spherical holder exhibits three advantages: (1) minimizing the effect of neutron angular dependence, (2) creating response functions with broadened coverage of neutron energies by introducing additional moderators or absorbers to the central activation foil, and (3) reducing irradiation time because of improved detection efficiencies to epithermal neutron beam. This paper presents the design concept and the calculated response functions of new detectors. Theoretical and experimental demonstrations of the performance of the detectors are provided through comparisons of the unfolded neutron spectra determined using this method and conventional multiple-foil activation techniques.

  15. Validation Analyses of IEAF-2001 Activation Cross-Section Data for SS-316 and F82H Steels Irradiated in a White d-Li Neutron Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Fischer, U.; v. Möllendorff, U.; Schmuck, I.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.; Wilson, P. P. H.

    2005-05-01

    The evaluated intermediate-energy activation cross-section library IEAF-2001 has been tested against integral experiments with SS-316 and F82H steels exposed to a white neutron flux spectrum extending up to 55 MeV. By making use of the ALARA inventory code the expected γ-active product nuclide inventories were calculated and compared with the measured one. It was found that IEAF-2001 reasonably agrees with experimental data for most of the detected radioisotopes. The reasons for some larger disagreements were found to be the uncertainty of the sample elemental composition, non-validated neutron activation reaction cross sections, and sequential charge particle reactions.

  16. Radiolabeling of intact dosage forms by neutron activation: effects on in vitro performance

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, A.; Jay, M.

    1987-12-01

    Compressed tablets containing various quantities of stable isotopes of Ba, Er, and Sm for use in neutron activation studies were evaluated for the effect of stable isotope incorporation on tablet hardness and disintegration times. At concentrations likely to be used in scintigraphic studies employing neutron activation as a radiolabeling method, no significant effect on in vitro parameters were observed. While the incorporation of stable isotopes influenced tablet hardness to a greater degree than disintegration time, irradiation of tablets in a neutron flux of 4.4 x 10(13) n/cm2 sec had a direct effect on tablet disintegration time. Thus, future neutron activation studies should focus on minimizing the amount of stable isotope to be incorporated with the formulation while using the shortest feasible irradiation time.

  17. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1991-10-01

    This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65{mu}A current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods.

  18. Comparison of Impurities in Charcoal Sorbents Found by Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, Charles G.; Finn, Erin C.; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Neutron activation of gas samples in a reactor often requires a medium to retain sufficient amounts of the gas for analysis. Charcoal is commonly used to adsorb gas and hold it for activation; however, the amount of activated sodium in the charcoal after irradiation swamps most signals of interest. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) was performed on several commonly available charcoal samples in an effort to determine the activation background. The results for several elements, including the dominant sodium element, are reported. It was found that ECN charcoal had the lowest elemental background, containing sodium at 2.65 ± 0.05 ppm, as well as trace levels of copper and tungsten.

  19. DOSE PROFILE MODELING OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY’S ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. M. Zabriskie; J. Wharton; A. J. Caffrey

    2009-06-01

    A new research and development laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for DT fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 108 neutrons per second), DD fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (up to 2 x 106 neutrons per second), and 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.7 x 107 neutrons per second, 30 micrograms). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8 m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for 252Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield wall and entrance maze and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

  20. Utilization of recycled neutron source to teach prompt gamma analysis activation-PGNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Munera, Hector

    2008-03-01

    Neutron activation analysis based on prompt gamma ray emission has significantly developed during the past twenty years. The technique is particularly suited for the identification of low atomic number elements, as nitrogen that is a main component of drugs and explosives. Identification of these substances is important in the context of humanitarian demining, and in the control of illicit traffic of drugs and explosives. As a good example of recycling of radioactive sources, a ^241Am-Be neutron source emitting 10^7neutron/s, that was not longer in use for other purposes at Ingeominas, was used to build a neutron irradiator that can be used to teach prompt gamma ray analysis, and other nuclear techniques. We irradiated individual samples, each about 4 gram, of three different elements: nitrogen in urea, silicon in milled rock, and cadmium in cadmium oxide. The prompt gamma rays emitted in the nuclear reactions ^112Cd (neutron,gamma) ^113Cd, ^28Si (neutron,gamma) ^29Si and ^14N (neutron,gamma) ^15N were identified using a well-type NaI (Tl) detector, connected to a multi-channel analyzer.

  1. Calibration experiments of 3He neutron detectors for analyzing neutron emissivity in the hot-ion mode on the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohagura, J.; Cho, T.; Hirata, M.; Watanabe, H.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ito, H.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.; Ogura, K.; Kondoh, T.; Nishitani, T.; Kwon, M.; England, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    Under the international fusion cooperating research, 3He neutron detectors in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror are calibrated by the use of a 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron source (8.96×104 n/s). The calibration experiments are carried out with a "rail system" placed along the magnetic axis of the GAMMA 10 central-cell region, where hot ions in the plasma experiments with the bulk temperatures of ˜10 keV are produced. As compared to a previous neutron monitoring system with a BF3 detector in GAMMA 10, the present 3He systems are designed with about two orders-of-magnitude higher neutron-counting efficiency for analyzing a neutron emissivity from the plasmas in a single plasma discharge alone. Two 3He systems are installed near the middle and the end of the central cell so as to identify the central-cell hot-ion axial profile. The filling pressure of 3He, the effective length, and the diameter of the detector are designed as 5 bar, 300 mm, and 50 mm, respectively. The detector output spectra are carefully analyzed by the use of a preamplifier, a shaping amplifier, as well as a multichannel analyzer for each 3He detector. In the present article, the neutron-counting data from the two 3He detectors due to the on-axis 252Cf scan are interpreted in terms of the d-2 intensity dependence (d being the distance between the detector and the neutron source) as well as the effects of the central-cell magnetic coils and the other machine structural components.

  2. Confirmatory experiments for the United States Department of Energy Accelerator Production of Tritium Program: Neutron, triton and radionuclide production by thick targets of lead and tungsten bombarded by 800 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.; Cappiello, M.; Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D.; Laird, R.; Mayo, D.; Waters, L.; Zoeller, C.; Staples, P.

    1994-10-01

    Neutron and Triton Production by 800 MeV Protons: The experiments presented in this report were performed in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at the Los Alamos Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility in order to provide data to benchmark and validate physics simulations used in the APT target/blanket design. An experimental apparatus was built that incorporated many of the features of the neutron source region of the {sup 3}He target/blanket. Those features included a tungsten neutron source, flux traps, neutron moderator, lead backstop, lead multiplying annulus, neutron absorbing blanket and a combination neutron de-coupler and tritium producing gas ({sup 3}He). The experiments were performed in two separate proton irradiations each with approximately 100 nA-hr of 800 MeV protons. The first irradiation was made with a small neutron moderating blanket, allowing the authors to measure tritium production in the {sup 3}He gas by sampling, and counting the amount of tritium. The second irradiation was performed with a large neutron moderating blanket (light water with a 1% manganese sulfate solution) that allowed them to measure both the tritium production in the central region and the total neutron production. The authors did this by sampling and counting the tritium produced and by measuring the activation of the manganese solution. Results of the three tritium production measurements show large disagreements with each other and therefore with the values predicted using the LAHET-MCNP code system. The source of the discrepancies may lie with the sampling system or adsorption on the tungsten surfaces. The authors discuss tests that may resolve that issue. The data for the total neutron production measurement is much more consistent. Those results show excellent agreement between calculation and experiment.

  3. SQUIDs as detectors in a new experiment to measure the neutron electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Cooper, M.; Lamoreaux, S.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-12-31

    A new experiment has been proposed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) to 4{times}10{sup {minus}28} ecm, a factor of 250 times better than the current experimental limit. Such a measure of the neutron EDM would challenge the theories of supersymmetry and time reversal violation as the origin of the observed cosmological asymmetry in the ratio of baryons to antibaryons. One possible design for this new experiment includes the use of LTC SQUIDs coupled to large ({approximately}100 cm{sup 2}) pick-up coils to measure the precision frequency of the spin-polarized {sup 3}He atoms that act as polarizer, spin analyzer, detector, and magnetometer for the ultra-cold neutrons used in the experiment. The method of directly measuring the {sup 3}He precession signal eliminates the need for very uniform magnetic fields (a major source of systematic error in these types of experiments). It is estimated that a flux of {approximately}2{times}10{sup {minus}16} Tm{sup 2} (0.1 {Phi}{sub 0}) will be coupled into the pick-up coils. To achieve the required signal-to-noise ratio one must have a flux resolution of d{Phi}{sub SQ} = 2{times}10{sup {minus}6}{Phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz at 10 Hz. While this is close to the sensitivity available in commercial devices, the effects of coupling to such a large pick-up coil and flux noise from other sources in the experiment still need to be understood. To determine the feasibility of using SQUIDs in such an application the authors designed and built a superconducting test cell, which simulates major features of the proposed EDM experiment, and they developed a two-SQUID readout system that will reduce SQUID noise in the experiment. They present an overview of the EDM experiment with SQUIDs, estimations of required SQUID parameters and experimental considerations. The authors also present the measured performance of a single magnetometer in the test cell as well as the performance of the two SQUID

  4. SQUIDs as Detectors in a New Experiment to Measure the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Cooper, M.; Lamoreaux, S.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.; Matlachov, A.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-09-13

    A new experiment has been proposed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) to 4x10{sup {minus}28} ecm, a factor of 250 times better than the current experimental limit. Such a measure of the neutron EDM would challenge the theories of supersymmetry and time reversal violation as the origin of the observed cosmological asymmetry in the ratio of baryons to antibaryons. One possible design for this new experiment includes the use of LTC SQUIDs coupled to large ({approximately}100 cm{sup 2}) pick-up coils to measure the precession frequency of the spin-polarized {sup 3}He atoms that act as polarizer, spin analyzer, detector, and magnetometer for the ultra-cold neutrons used in the experiment. The method of directly measuring the {sup 3}He precession signal eliminates the need for very uniform magnetic fields (a major source of systematic error in these types of experiments). It is estimated that a flux of {approximately}2x10{sup {minus}16} Tm{sup 2} (0.1 F{sub 0}) will be coupled into the pick-up coils. To achieve the required signal-to-noise ratio one must have a flux resolution of d F{sub SQ}=2x10{sup {minus}6} F{sub 0}/{radical}Hz at 10 Hz. While this is close to the sensitivity available in commercial devices, the effects of coupling to such a large pick-up coil and flux noise from other sources in the experiment still need to be understood. To determine the feasibility of using SQUIDs in such an application we designed and built a superconducting test cell, which simulates major features of the proposed EDM experiment, and we developed a two-SQUID readout system that will reduce SQUID noise in the experiment. We present an overview of the EDM experiment with SQUIDs, estimations of required SQUID parameters and experimental considerations. We also present the measured performance of a single magnetometer in the test cell as well as the performance of the two SQUID readout technique

  5. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Caillaud, T; Landoas, O; Briat, M; Kime, S; Rossé, B; Thfoin, I; Bourgade, J L; Disdier, L; Glebov, V Yu; Marshall, F J; Sangster, T C

    2012-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution (~10 μm) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MégaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a (60)Co γ-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 μm were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution. PMID:22462917

  6. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Kime, S.; Rossé, B.; Thfoin, I.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.

    2012-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution (˜10 μm) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MégaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999), 10.1017/S0263034699173087]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a 60Co γ-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997), 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 μm were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  7. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.

  8. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons. PMID:21613268

  9. Development of a xenon polarizer for magnetometry in neutron electric dipole moment experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Troy

    Next generation electric dipole moment experiments require precise knowledge of the local magnetic fields in the experimental volume. Hyperpolarized xenon-129 has been proposed as a comagnetometer gas to be used in the neutron electric dipole moment experiment planned for TRIUMF. A flow through xenon polarizer was constructed and tested, and the hyperpolarized Xe-129 produced was transported to and characterized using a new AFP-NMR spectrometer. The polarization measured in the external AFP-NMR spectrometer was (12 +/- 4)%. The longitudinal spin relaxation time T1 was found to be (77 +/- 24) s in the experimental NMR volume, limited by leaks and field inhomogeneity. This represents good progress towards the eventual system for nEDM experiments where polarizations greater than 50% and T1, T2 relaxation times greater than 1000 s are expected.

  10. Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2008 (SMAPVEX08) was conducted to address specific issues identified by the SMAP satellite mission (launch 2013). SMAP is currently addressing issues related to the development and selection of retrieval algorithms as well as refining the mission de...

  11. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  12. Parity violation in neutron-proton capture—The NPDGamma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Michael; Page, S.; Ramsay, D.; Alarcon, R.; Balascuta, S.; Barron, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R. D.; Chen, W.; Chupp, T. E.; Crawford, C.; Covrig, S.; Dabaghyan, M.; Freedman, S. J.; Gentile, T. R.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hersman, F. W.; Ino, T.; Jones, G. L.; Lauss, B.; Leuschner, M.; Losowki, B.; Mahurin, R.; Masuda, Y.; Mei, J.; Mitchell, G. S.; Muto, S.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Santra, S.; Seo, P.-N.; Sharapov, E.; Sharma, M.; Smith, T.; Snow, W. M.; Wilburn, W. S.; Yuan, V.

    2009-12-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has recently completed the first phase of a measurement to determine the size of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction from cold neutron capture on a liquid hydrogen target. In the framework of the nearly 30 year old DDH model [B. Desplanques, J.F. Donoghue, B.R. Holstein, Annals of Physics 124 (1980) 449], the measured process is explained in terms of the weak pion-nucleon coupling, while the framework of modern effective field theory parameterizes the measured process in terms of the S13-P13, long range transition (essentially the Danilov parameter ρt) [S.L. Zhu et al., Nuclear Physics A 748 (2005) 435; C.-P. Liu, Phys. Rev. C 75 (2007) 065501]. The couplings in terms of either model are directly proportional to the parity violating up-down asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays with respect to the neutron spin direction in the reaction n⇒+p→d+γ. The asymmetry has a predicted size of 5×10-8 and the aim of the NPDGamma collaboration is to measure it to 20%. The first phase of the measurement was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Neutron Science Center Spallation Source with a preliminary result of (-1.1±2.1 stat.±0.2 sys.)×10-7. Here, we report on the measurements and the results obtained so far. The experiment is currently being installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the remainder of its run time.

  13. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments: A 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Neutron Capture Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Reifarth, R.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Alpizar, A.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Folden, C.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Greife, U.; Schwantes, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.

    2005-05-24

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element 4{pi} BaF2 array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as one milligram. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. The design and initial performance results of DANCE is discussed.

  14. Calibration of the Brookhaven National Laboratory delayed gamma neutron activation facility to measure total body calcium.

    PubMed

    Ma, R; Stamatelatos, I E; Yasumura, S

    2000-05-01

    Differences in body size and shape can cause large variances in the in vivo results of neutron activation analysis. To introduce corrections for body size for the delayed gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory, "reference man"-sized and "reference woman"-sized phantoms were constructed. Simulation results using the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport code also provided correction factors for people of different sizes. For individuals with a body mass index (BMI = weight (kg)/height (m)2) between 20 and 30, no correction was required. At BMIs greater than 30, the effects of neutron attenuation were significant and a correction factor of CF = -0.0192 x BMI + 1.5635 can be applied. PMID:10865727

  15. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Plaster, Brad

    2014-09-01

    A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of

  16. Studies of Neutron and Proton Nuclear Activation in Low-Earth Orbit 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The study of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit reported in NASA CR-162051 has been continued with increasing emphasis given to primary and secondary neutron activation. The previously reported activation due to protons has been modified to include: (1) flux attenuation caused by all inelastic reactions; (2) the modification of the proton flux distribution caused by sample covering material; and (3) the activation of the sample as a function of the distance into the sample from the surface of incidence. A method has been developed for including the effects on the activation of the finite width and length of the samples. The reactant product spectra produced by proton-induced reactions has been studied. Cross sections needed for neutron induced reactions leading to long-lived (half-life 1 day) radioisotopes have been identified and, in some cases, compiled.

  17. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. PMID:8083048

  18. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Ensemble Activation of G-Protein -Coupled Receptors Revealed by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiang-Qiang; Perera, Suchithranga; Shrestha, Utsab; Chawla, Udeep; Struts, Andrey; Qian, Shuo; Brown, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein -coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in visual light perception and occurs naturally in a membrane lipid environment. Rhodopsin photoactivation yields cis-trans isomerization of retinal giving equilibrium between inactive Meta-I and active Meta-II states. Does photoactivation lead to a single Meta-II conformation, or do substates exist as described by an ensemble-activation mechanism (EAM)? We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate conformational changes in rhodopsin-detergent and rhodopsin-lipid complexes upon photoactivation. Meta-I state is stabilized in CHAPS-solubilized rhodopsin, while Meta-II is trapped in DDM-solubilized rhodopsin. SANS data are acquired from 80% D2O solutions and at contrast-matching points for both DDM and CHAPS samples. Our experiments demonstrate that for detergent-solubilized rhodopsin, SANS with contrast variation can detect structural differences between the rhodopsin dark-state, Meta-I, Meta-II, and ligand-free opsin states. Dark-state rhodopsin has more conformational flexibility in DDM micelles compared to CHAPS, which is consistent with an ensemble of activated Meta-II states. Furthermore, time-resolved SANS enables study of the time-dependent structural transitions between Meta-I and Meta-II, which is crucial to understanding the ensemble-based activation.

  20. 252Cf fission-neutron spectrum using a simplified time-of-flight setup: An advanced teaching laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Febbraro, M.; Torres-Isea, R.; Ojaruega, M.; Baum, L.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of PuBe and AmBe neutron sources from many university teaching laboratories (due to heightened security issues) has often left a void in teaching various aspects of neutron physics. We have recently replaced such sources with sealed 252Cf oil-well logging sources (nominal 10-100 μCi), and developed several experiments using them as neutron sources. This includes a fission-neutron time-of-flight experiment using plastic scintillators, which utilizes the prompt γ rays emitted in 252Cf spontaneous fission as a fast timing start signal. The experiment can be performed with conventional nuclear instrumentation and a 1-D multi-channel pulse-height analyzer, available in most advanced teaching laboratories. Alternatively, a more sophisticated experiment using liquid scintillators and n/γ pulse-shape discrimination can be performed. Several other experiments using these neutron sources are also feasible. The experiments can introduce students to the problem of detecting the dark matter thought to dominate the universe and to the techniques used to detect contraband fissionable nuclear materials.

  1. Medical applications of in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis: Technical similarities to detection of explosives and contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, J. J.

    2001-07-01

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in elemental body composition. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used in vivo to assess elements characteristic of specific body compartments. There are similarities between the body composition techniques and the detection of hidden explosives and narcotics. All samples have to be examined in depth and the ratio of elements provides a "signature" of the chemical of interest. The N/H and C/O ratios measure protein and fat content in the body. Similarly, a high C/O ratio is characteristic of narcotics and a low C/O together with a strong presence of N is a signature of some explosives. The available time for medical applications is about 20 min—compared to a few seconds for the detection of explosives—but the permitted radiation exposure is limited. In vivo neutron analysis is used to measure H, O, C, N, P, Na, Cl, and Ca for the study of the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and wasting diseases, and to investigate methods of preserving function and quality of life in the elderly.

  2. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Guler, N; Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms. PMID:23126842

  3. Implementation of an enhanced, permanently installed neutron activation diagnostic hardware for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovec, Donald R.; Edwards, Ellen R.; Carrera, Jorge A.; Yeamans, Charles B.

    2015-08-01

    Neutron activation diagnostics are commonly employed as baseline neutron yield and relative spatial flux measurement instruments. Much insight into implosion performance has been gained by deployment of up to 19 identical activation diagnostic samples distributed around the target chamber at unique angular locations. Their relative simplicity and traceability provide neutron facilities with a diagnostic platform that is easy to implement and verify. However, the current National Ignition Facility (NIF) implementation relies on removable activation samples, creating a 1-2 week data turn-around time and considerable labor costs. The system described here utilizes a commercially-available lanthanum bromide (cerium-doped) scintillator with an integrated MCA emulator as the counting system and a machined zirconium-702 cap as the activation medium. The device is installed within the target bay and monitored remotely. Additionally, this system allows the placement of any activation medium tailored to the specific measurement needs. We discuss the design and function of a stand-alone and permanently installed neutron activation detector unit to measure the yield and average energy of a nominal 14 MeV neutron source with a pulse length less than one nanosecond.

  4. Analysis of improved neutron activation technique using thick foils for application on medical LINAC environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagena, E.; Stoulos, S.; Manolopoulou, M.

    2016-01-01

    An improved neutron activation technique is analyzed that can be used for the characterization of the neutron field in low neutron flux environments, such as medical Linacs. Due to the much lower neutron fluence rates, thick materials instead of thin have been used. The study is focused on the calculations of basic components of the neutron activation analysis that are required for accurate results, such as the efficiency of the gamma detector used for γ-spectrometry as well as crucial correction factors that are required when dealing with thick samples in different geometries and forms. A Monte Carlo detector model, implemented by Geant4 MC Code was adjusted in accordance to results from various measurements performed. Moreover, regarding to estimate the self-shielding correction factors a new approach using both Monte Carlo and analytical approach was presented. This improvement gives more accurate results, which are important for both activation and shielding studies that take place in many facilities. A quite good agreement between the neutron fluxes is achieved; according to the data obtained a mean value of (2.13±0.34)×105 ncm-2 s-1 is representative for the isocenter of the specific Linac that corresponds to fluence of (5.53±0.94)×106 ncm-2 Gy-1. Comparable fluencies reported in the literature for similar Linacs operating with photon beams at 15 MeV.

  5. A measurement of correlation parameters in the decay of polarized free neutrons: The abBA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, L.; Chávez, E.; Crawford, C.; Curiel-García, Q.; Huerta, A.; Juárez-Rosete, M. A.; Marín-Lámbarri, D. J.; Martin, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Penttilä, S. I.; Rodríguez-Zamora, P.; Salas, A.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2010-07-01

    The abBA experiment will measure, in the same apparatus, four correlation parameters in the free neutron β-decay: the electron-antineutrino angular correlation (a), the Fierz interference term (6), and the asymmetries, with respect to the neutron spin direction, of the electron (A)and antineutrino (B).The precise determination of these parameters, together with the neutron lifetime, will provide important information about the Standard Model (SM) and will establish constraints for new physics. In this paper we describe the experimental methodology of abBA as well as some of the advances that have been done so far.

  6. Fission and activation of uranium by fusion-plasma neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are discussed in terms of two main purposes: to breed fissile materials (Pu 233 and Th 233 from U 238 or Th 232) for use in low-reactivity breeders, and to produce tritium from lithium to refuel fusion plasma cores. Neutron flux generation is critical for both processes. Various methods for generating the flux are described, with attention to new geometries for multiple plasma focus arrays, e.g., hypocycloidal pinch and staged plasma focus devices. These methods are evaluated with reference to their applicability to D-D fusion reactors, which will ensure a virtually unlimited energy supply. Accurate observations of the neutron flux from such schemes are obtained by using different target materials in the plasma focus.

  7. Multiple-Coincidence Active Neutron Interrogation of Fissionable Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsley, J.R., Hurley, J.P., Trainham, R., Keegan, R.P.

    2008-11-14

    In an extension of the Associated Particle Imaging technique that is used for the detection and imaging of hidden explosives, the present measurements use a beam of tagged 14.1 MeV neutrons in coincidence with two or more gammas to probe for the presence of fissionable materials. We have measured neutron-gamma-gamma coincidences with targets of depleted uranium, tungsten, lead, iron, and carbon and will present results that show the multiple-coincidence counting rate for the depleted uranium is substantially higher than any of the non-fissionable materials. In addition, the presence of coincidences involving delayed particle spectra provides a signature for fissionable materials that is distinct from that for non-fissionable ones. Information from the tagged neutron involved in the coincidence event is used to compute the position of the fissionable material in all three dimensions. The result is an imaging probe for fissionable materials that is compact and portable, and produces relatively low levels of background radiation. Simultaneous measurements on packages of interest for both explosives and fissionable materials are now feasible.

  8. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  9. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  10. Determination of aluminium, silicon and magnesium in geological matrices by delayed neutron activation analysis based on k0 instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Baidoo, I K; Dampare, S B; Opata, N S; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Quagraine, R E

    2013-12-01

    In this work, concentrations of silicon, aluminium and magnesium in geological matrices were determined by Neutron Activation Analysis based on k0-IAEA software. The optimum activation and delay times were found to be 5 min and 15-20 min respectively for the determination of Si via (29)Si (n,p) (29)Al reaction. The adopted irradiation scheme did not work for the determination of magnesium. Each sample was irradiated under a thermal neutron flux density of 5.0 × 10(11) ncm(-2)s(-1). Cadmium covered activation indicated that a permanent epithermal irradiation site for research reactors would be very useful for routine determination of silicon in environmental samples. PMID:23999324

  11. Development of Enhanced, Permanently-Installed, Neutron Activation Diagnostic Hardware for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, E. R.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Carrera, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Neutron activation diagnostics are baseline neutron yield and flux measurement instruments at the National Ignition Facility. Up to 19 activation samples are distributed around the target chamber. Currently the samples must be removed to be counted, creating a 1-2 week data turn-around time and considerable labor costs. An improved system consisting of a commercially available LaBr3(Ce) scintillator and Power over Ethernet electronics is under development. A machined zirconium-702 cap over the detector is the activation medium to measure the 90Zr(n,2n)89Zr reaction. The detectors are located at the current neutron activation diagnostic sites and monitored remotely. Because they collect data in real time yield values are returned within a few hours after a NIF shot.

  12. Neutron Activation Analysis of Soil Samples from Different Parts of Edirne in Turkey*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaim, N.; Dogan, C.; Camtakan, Z.

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of constituent elements were determined in soil samples collected from different parts of the Maritza Basin, Edirne, Turkey. Neutron activation analysis, an extremely accurate technique, and the comparator method (using a standard) were applied for the first time in this region. After preparing the soil samples for neutron activation analysis, they were activated with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor, TRIGA-MARK II, at Istanbul Technical University. The activated samples were analyzed using a high-efficiency high-purity germanium detector, and gamma spectrometry was employed to determine the elemental concentration in the samples. Eight elements (chromium, manganese, cobalt, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, cadmium, and barium) were qualitatively and quantitatively identified in 36 samples. The concentrations of some elements in the soil samples were high compared with values reported in the literature.

  13. Search for supersolid 4He in neutron scattering experiments at ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.

    2009-02-01

    The observation of a non-classical rotation inertia (NCRI) fraction in bulk solid 4He by M. Chan and E. Kim [1, 2] attracted significant interest as a possible manifestation of supersolid state of matter. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies inspired by this observation, an explicit explanation for this phenomenon is still missing. Neutron scattering experiments on solid helium may help to shed light on the physical grounds of NCRI and answer the question on whether this phenomenon could be caused by Bose-Einstein Condensation. In this paper we are going to discuss the results obtained in experiments involving neutron scattering on solid 4He. Microscopic quantitative data such as mean kinetic energy, mean square momentum and mean square displacement of helium atoms as well as the lattice parameter have been obtained for the first time for solid 4He in temperature range 70mK - 500 mK. No change was seen in the single atom kinetic energy (within statistical error better than 1%) as well as change in the lattice parameter (within 0.03%). The mean square displacement did not change in the region of expected supersolid transition either. All these results suggest that the NCRI transition is quite different from the superfluid transition in liquid 4He.

  14. Verification and validation of the maximum entropy method for reconstructing neutron flux, with MCNP5, Attila-7.1.0 and the GODIVA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas S. Crawford; Tony Saad; Terry A. Ring

    2013-03-01

    Verification and validation of reconstructed neutron flux based on the maximum entropy method is presented in this paper. The verification is carried out by comparing the neutron flux spectrum from the maximum entropy method with Monte Carlo N Particle 5 version 1.40 (MCNP5) and Attila-7.1.0-beta (Attila). A spherical 100% 235U critical assembly is modeled as the test case to compare the three methods. The verification error range for the maximum entropy method is 15–21% where MCNP5 is taken to be the comparison standard. Attila relative error for the critical assembly is 20–35%. Validation is accomplished by comparing a neutron flux spectrum that is back calculated from foil activation measurements performed in the GODIVA experiment (GODIVA). The error range of the reconstructed flux compared to GODIVA is 0–10%. The error range of the neutron flux spectrum from MCNP5 compared to GODIVA is 0–20% and the Attila error range compared to the GODIVA is 0–35%. The maximum entropy method is shown to be a fast reliable method, compared to either Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) or 30 multienergy group methods (Attila) and with respect to the GODIVA experiment.

  15. Validation of MCNP NPP Activation Simulations for Decommissioning Studies by Analysis of NPP Neutron Activation Foil Measurement Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volmert, Ben; Pantelias, Manuel; Mutnuru, R. K.; Neukaeter, Erwin; Bitterli, Beat

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an overview of the Swiss Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) activation methodology is presented and the work towards its validation by in-situ NPP foil irradiation campaigns is outlined. Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG) in The Netherlands has been given the task of performing the corresponding neutron metrology. For this purpose, small Aluminium boxes containing a set of circular-shaped neutron activation foils have been prepared. After being irradiated for one complete reactor cycle, the sets have been successfully retrieved, followed by gamma-spectrometric measurements of the individual foils at NRG. Along with the individual activities of the foils, the reaction rates and thermal, intermediate and fast neutron fluence rates at the foil locations have been determined. These determinations include appropriate corrections for gamma self-absorption and neutron self-shielding as well as corresponding measurement uncertainties. The comparison of the NPP Monte Carlo calculations with the results of the foil measurements is done by using an individual generic MCNP model functioning as an interface and allowing the simulation of individual foil activation by predetermined neutron spectra. To summarize, the comparison between calculation and measurement serve as a sound validation of the Swiss NPP activation methodology by demonstrating a satisfying agreement between measurement and calculation. Finally, the validation offers a chance for further improvements of the existing NPP models by ensuing calibration and/or modelling optimizations for key components and structures.

  16. How to organize a neutron imaging user lab? 13 years of experience at PSI, CH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Vontobel, P.; Frei, G.; Kuehne, G.; Kaestner, A.

    2011-09-01

    allocation is handled more directly and in time in order to fulfill the companies' demands. Here, the confidentiality plays a more important role than in scientific studies that are done with the aim of a free publication. It has been possible to earn money regularly from the industrial projects in order to cover the salary cost of some positions within the NIAG group. The permanent improvement of the methodology and performance in neutron imaging is a third major activity of the NIAG team. Running projects in this direction are the permanent insert of a grating interferometry device, improved energy selection with the help of single graphite crystals and utilization of the beam line BOA at SINQ for the energy range between 4 and 15 Å.

  17. A Precision Measurement of Neutron {beta}-Decay Angular Correlations with Pulsed Cold Neutrons -- The abBA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, P.-N.; Bowman, J.D.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Mitchell, G.S.; Penttilae, S.I.; Wilburn, W.S.; Calarco, J.R.; Hersman, F.W.; Chupp, T.E.; Cianciolo, T.V.; Rykaczewski, K.P.; Young, G.R.; Desai, D.; Grzywacz, R.K.; Souza, R.T. de; Snow, W.M.; Frlez, E.; Pocanic, D.; Gentile, T.; Greene, G.L.

    2005-05-24

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer to measure neutron beta decay angular parameters, a, b, B, and A, to the 0.1% precision level. This precision will be achieved by combining three new technical approaches; a pulsed cold neutron beam, a 3He neutron spin filter, and segmented large-area thin-dead layer silicon detectors. Both the electron and proton resulting from the decay will be guided by electric and magnetic fields and detected in coincidence by two 2{pi} solid-angle silicon detectors. For the neutron polarization-dependent observables A and B, a novel precision neutron polarimetry technique has been developed. The parameters a and b will be obtained from the proton time-of-flight and the measured electron energy spectrum. Measurement of the four parameters in the same apparatus provides a redundant determination of parameter {lambda}=gA/gV, providing a test of the standard electroweak interaction.

  18. A Precision Measurement of Neutron β-Decay Angular Correlations with Pulsed Cold Neutrons — The abBA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, P.-N.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J. R.; Chupp, T. E.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Desai, D.; De Souza, R. T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Frlež, E.; Gentile, T.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Gudkov, V.; Hersman, F. W.; Jones, G. L.; Mitchell, G. S.; Penttilä, S. I.; Počanić, D.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Snow, W. M.; Wilburn, W. S.; Young, G. R.

    2005-05-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer to measure neutron beta decay angular parameters, a, b, B, and A, to the 0.1% precision level. This precision will be achieved by combining three new technical approaches; a pulsed cold neutron beam, a 3He neutron spin filter, and segmented large-area thin-dead layer silicon detectors. Both the electron and proton resulting from the decay will be guided by electric and magnetic fields and detected in coincidence by two 2π solid-angle silicon detectors. For the neutron polarization-dependent observables A and B, a novel precision neutron polarimetry technique has been developed. The parameters a and b will be obtained from the proton time-of-flight and the measured electron energy spectrum. Measurement of the four parameters in the same apparatus provides a redundant determination of parameter λ=gA/gV, providing a test of the standard electroweak interaction.

  19. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring via External Measurements for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Brown, Michael; Carr, Robert; Filippone, Bradley; Osthelder, Charles; Plaster, Bradley; Slutsky, Simon; Swank, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a magnetic field monitoring system designed to reconstruct the vector magnetic field components (and, hence, all nine of the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior measurement fiducial volume solely from external measurements is under development for the SNS neutron EDM experiment. A first-generation room-temperature prototype array has already been tested. A second-generation prototype array consisting of 12 cryogenic-compatible fluxgate magnetometer probes will be deployed within the cold region of the experiment's 1 / 3 -scale cryogenic magnet testing apparatus. We will report progress towards the development of this second-generation prototype. This work was supported in part by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics under Award No. DE-FG02-08ER41557.

  20. Calculation of the neutron source distribution in the VENUS PWR Mockup Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L.; Morakinyo, P.; Kam, F.B.K.; Leenders, L.; Minsart, G.; Fabry, A.

    1984-01-01

    The VENUS PWR Mockup Experiment is an important component of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program goal of benchmarking reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fluence calculations in order to determine the accuracy to which RPV fluence can be computed. Of particular concern in this experiment is the accuracy of the source calculation near the core-baffle interface, which is the important region for contributing to RPV fluence. Results indicate that the calculated neutron source distribution within the VENUS core agrees with the experimental measured values with an average error of less than 3%, except at the baffle corner, where the error is about 6%. Better agreement with the measured fission distribution was obtained with a detailed space-dependent cross-section weighting procedure for thermal cross sections near the core-baffle interface region. The maximum error introduced into the predicted RPV fluence due to source errors should be on the order of 5%.

  1. Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

    1993-05-01

    The planned reactor for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will use closely spaced arrays of involute-shaped fuel plates that will be cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities, adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported. The tests were conducted using full-scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute-shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as functions of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted.

  2. Cooperative dynamics in homopolymer melts: a comparison of theoretical predictions with neutron spin echo experiments.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, M; Wischnewski, A; Monkenbusch, M; Willner, L; Richter, D; Falus, P; Farago, B; Guenza, M G

    2008-12-18

    We present a comparison between theoretical predictions of the generalized Langevin equation for cooperative dynamics (CDGLE) and neutron spin echo data of dynamic structure factors for polyethylene melts. Experiments cover an extended range of length and time scales, providing a compelling test for the theoretical approach. Samples investigated include chains with increasing molecular weights undergoing dynamics across the unentangled to entangled transition. Measured center-of-mass (com) mean-square displacements display a crossover from subdiffusive to diffusive dynamics. The generalized Langevin equation for cooperative dynamics relates this anomalous diffusion to the presence of the interpolymer potential, which correlates the dynamics of a group of slowly diffusing molecules in a dynamically heterogeneous liquid. Theoretical predictions of the subdiffusive behavior, of its crossover to free diffusion, and of the number of macromolecules undergoing cooperative motion are in quantitative agreement with experiments. PMID:19072142

  3. Active Targets for Experiments with Rare Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the active-target technique in the ANASEN detector, which was developed by researchers from Louisiana State University and Florida State University. ANASEN was used in a number of stable and rare iosotope experiments in α- and proton scattering, as well as (α , p) and (d , p) reactions at FSU's in-flight radioactive beam facility RESOLUT. ANASEN also was used to perform the first experiment, proton scattering off a 37K beam at the ReA3 facility. Another active-target detector with a very different approach is found in the Active Target Time-Projection Chamber, which was developed by a collaboration between researchers from MSU, the University of Notre Dame, Western Michigan University, LLNL, LBNL, and St. Mary's University (Canada). First experiments with an AT-TPC prototype have been reported. The talk will summarize the results from the first experiments with these systems, describe further development and future research projects. Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the

  4. DIVERSE ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE COUNTER UTILITY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-01-08

    In this paper we describe use of the Aquila active well neutron coincidence counter for nuclear material assays of {sup 235}U in multiple analytical techniques at Savannah River Site (SRS), at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and at Argonne West National Laboratory (AWNL). The uses include as a portable passive neutron counter for field measurements searching for evidence of {sup 252}Cf deposits and storage; as a portable active neutron counter using an external activation source for field measurements searching for trace {sup 235}U deposits and holdup; for verification measurements of U-Al reactor fuel elements; for verification measurements of uranium metal; and for verification measurements of process waste of impure uranium in a challenging cement matrix. The wide variety of uses described demonstrate utility of the technique for neutron coincidence verification measurements over the dynamic ranges of 100 g-5000 g for U metal, 200 g-1300 g for U-Al, and 8 g-35 g for process waste. In addition to demonstrating use of the instrument in both the passive and active modes, we also demonstrate its use in both the fast and thermal neutron modes.

  5. Investigation of the neutron activation of endohedral rare earth metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Shilin, V. A. Lebedev, V. T.; Kolesnik, S. G.; Kozlov, V. S.; Grushko, Yu. S.; Sedov, V. P.; Kukorenko, V. V.

    2011-12-15

    Endohedral lanthanide metallofullerenes and their water-soluble biocompatible derivatives have been synthesized. The effect that fast-neutron irradiation has on the stability and nuclear physical properties of endohedral metallofullerenes that are used as magnetocontrast materials ({sup 46}Sc, {sup 140}La, {sup 141}Nd, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 160}Tb, {sup 169}Yb, {sup 170}Tm (isomers I and III), and {sup 177}Lu) is studied. Our hypothesis, according to which carbon-shell relaxation is based on the fast nonradiative processes of an electron shake-off type, is confirmed.

  6. Testing of regolith of celestial bolides with active neutron gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrukhin, Andrey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Golovin, Dmitry; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Current space instruments for studying planet's surface include gamma ray spectrometers that detect natural radioactive isotopes as well as gamma-rays induced in subsurface by galactic cosmic rays. When measuring from celestial body's surface, statistics and amount of detected elements can be dramatically increased with active methods, where soil exposed to artificial flux of particles. One good example is the Russian Dynamic Albedo of Neutron (DAN) instrument onboard Martian Science Laboratory mission (Curiosity rover) developed in 2005-2011. It is the first active neutron spectrometer flown to another planet as part of a landed mission to investigate subsurface water distribution and which has now successfully operated for more than two years on the Martian surface. Presentation describes a number of space instruments for different landers and rovers being developed in Russian Space Research Institute for studying Moon and Mars, as well as method of active neutron and gamma spectrometry overview.

  7. Device and software used to carry out Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-García, M. P.; Rey-Ronco, M. A.; Alonso-Sánchez, T.

    2014-11-01

    This paper discusses the device and software used to carry out Cyclic Neutron Activation Analysis (CNAA). The aim of this investigation is defining through this device the fluorite content present on different samples from fluorspar concentration plant through the DGNAA (Delayed Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis) method. This device is made of americium-beryllium neutron source, NaI (2"×2") and BGO (2"×2") gamma rays detectors, multichannel and an automatic mechanism which moves the samples from activation and reading position. This mechanism is controlled by a software which allows moving the samples precisely and in a safe way (~ms), which it is very useful when the radioactive isotopes have to be detected with a half time less than 8s.

  8. ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tasi, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Hins, A.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    To study the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys under neutron irradiation at low temperatures, an experiment was designed and constructed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment contained Charpy, tensile, compact tension, TEM, and creep specimens of vanadium alloys. It also contained limited low-activation ferritic steel specimens as part of the collaborative agreement with Monbusho of Japan. The design irradiation temperatures for the vanadium alloy specimens in the experiment are {approx}200 and 300{degrees}C, achieved with passive gap-gap sizing and fill gas blending. To mitigate vanadium-to-chromium transmutation from the thermal neutron flux, the test specimens are contained inside gadolinium flux filters. All specimens are lithium-bonded. The irradiation started in Cycle 108A (December 3, 1995) and is expected to have a duration of three ATR cycles and a peak influence of 4.4 dpa.

  9. Metabolic activity of sodium, measured by neutron activation, in the hands of patients suffering from bone diseases: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Spinks, T.J.; Bewley, D.K.; Paolillo, M.; Vlotides, J.; Joplin, G.F.; Ranicar, A.S.O.

    1980-01-01

    Turnover of sodium in the human hand was studied by neutron activation. Patients suffering from various metabolic abnormalities affecting the skeleton, who were undergoing routine neutron activation for the measurement of calcium, were investigated along with a group of healthy volunteers. Neutron activation labels the sodium atoms simultaneously and with equal probability regardless of the turnover time of individual body compartments. The loss of sodium can be described either by a sum of two exponentials or by a single power function. Distinctions between patients and normal subjects were not apparent from the exponential model but were brought out by the power function. The exponent of time in the latter is a measure of clearance rate. The mean values of this parameter in (a) a group of patients suffering from acromegaly; (b) a group including Paget's disease, osteoporosis, Cushing's disease, and hyperparathyroidism; and (c) a group of healthy subjects, were found to be significantly different from each other.

  10. The hydrogen anomaly in neutron Compton scattering: new experiments and a quantitative theoretical explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, E. B.; Hartmann, O.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Abdul-Redah, T.

    2016-08-01

    No consensus has been reached so far about the hydrogen anomaly problem in Compton scattering of neutrons, although strongly reduced H cross-sections were first reported almost 20 years ago. Over the years, this phenomenon has been observed in many different hydrogen-containing materials. Here, we use yttrium hydrides as test objects, YH2, YH3, YD2 and YD3, Y(H x D1‑x )2 and Y(H x D1‑x )3, for which we observe H anomalies increasing with transferred momentum q. We also observe reduced deuteron cross-sections in YD2 and YD3 and have followed those up to scattering angles of 140° corresponding to high momentum transfers. In addition to data taken using the standard Au-197 foils for neutron energy selection, the present work includes experiments with Rh-103 foils and comparisons were also made with data from different detector setups. The H and D anomalies are discussed in terms of the different models proposed for their interpretation. The ‘electron loss model’ (which assumes energy transfer to excited electrons) is contradicted by the present data, but it is shown here that exchange effects in scattering from two or more protons (or deuterons) in the presence of large zero-point vibrations, can explain quantitatively the reduction of the cross-sections as well as their q-dependence. Decoherence processes also play an essential role. In a scattering time representation, shake-up processes can be followed on the attosecond scale. The theory also shows that large anomalies can appear only when the neutron coherence lengths (determined by energy selection and detector geometry) are about the same size as the distance between the scatterers.

  11. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  12. First principle active neutron coincidence counting measurements of uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William; Peerani, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Uranium is present in most nuclear fuel cycle facilities ranging from uranium mines, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear reactors, and reprocessing plants. The isotopic, chemical, and geometric composition of uranium can vary significantly between these facilities, depending on the application and type of facility. Examples of this variation are: enrichments varying from depleted (~0.2 wt% 235U) to high enriched (>20 wt% 235U); compositions consisting of U3O8, UO2, UF6, metallic, and ceramic forms; geometries ranging from plates, cans, and rods; and masses which can range from a 500 kg fuel assembly down to a few grams fuel pellet. Since 235U is a fissile material, it is routinely safeguarded in these facilities. Current techniques for quantifying the 235U mass in a sample include neutron coincidence counting. One of the main disadvantages of this technique is that it requires a known standard of representative geometry and composition for calibration, which opens up a pathway for potential erroneous declarations by the State and reduces the effectiveness of safeguards. In order to address this weakness, the authors have developed a neutron coincidence counting technique which uses the first principle point-model developed by Boehnel instead of the "known standard" method. This technique was primarily tested through simulations of 1000 g U3O8 samples using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The results of these simulations showed good agreement between the simulated and exact 235U sample masses.

  13. Characterization of the CALIBAN Critical Assembly Neutron Spectra using Several Adjustment Methods Based on Activation Foils Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casoli, Pierre; Grégoire, Gilles; Rousseau, Guillaume; Jacquet, Xavier; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    CALIBAN is a metallic critical assembly managed by the Criticality, Neutron Science and Measurement Department located on the French CEA Center of Valduc. The reactor is extensively used for benchmark experiments dedicated to the evaluation of nuclear data, for electronic hardening or to study the effect of the neutrons on various materials. Therefore CALIBAN irradiation characteristics and especially its central cavity neutron spectrum have to be very accurately evaluated. In order to strengthen our knowledge of this spectrum, several adjustment methods based on activation foils measurements are being studied for a few years in the laboratory. Firstly two codes included in the UMG package have been tested and compared: MAXED and GRAVEL. More recently, the CALIBAN cavity spectrum has been studied using CALMAR, a new adjustment tool currently under development at the CEA Center of Cadarache. The article will discuss and compare the results and the quality of spectrum rebuilding obtained with the UMG codes and with the CALMAR software, from a set of activation measurements carried out in the CALIBAN irradiation cavity.

  14. Activation measurements for the E.C. bulk shield benchmark experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelone, M.; Arpesella, C.; Martone, M.; Pillon, Mario

    1995-03-01

    The use of the absolute radiometric techniques for the E. C. bulk shield experiment at the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) is reported. In this application, the activity level, in some cases, results too low to be measured at the Frascati counting station. In these cases the radiometric measurements are performed using the low background HPGe detectors located at the underground laboratory of Gran Sasso d'Italia. The use of these detectors enhances the FNG capability of performing bulk shield benchmark experiments allowing the measurements of very low activation levels.

  15. Critical experiments on an enriched uranium solution system containing periodically distributed strong thermal neutron absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-09-30

    A series of 62 critical and critical approach experiments were performed to evaluate a possible novel means of storing large volumes of fissile solution in a critically safe configuration. This study is intended to increase safety and economy through use of such a system in commercial plants which handle fissionable materials in liquid form. The fissile solution`s concentration may equal or slightly exceed the minimum-critical-volume concentration; and experiments were performed for high-enriched uranium solution. Results should be generally applicable in a wide variety of plant situations. The method is called the `Poisoned Tube Tank` because strong neutron absorbers (neutron poisons) are placed inside periodically spaced stainless steel tubes which separate absorber material from solution, keeping the former free of contamination. Eight absorbers are investigated. Both square and triangular pitched lattice patterns are studied. Ancillary topics which closely model typical plant situations are also reported. They include the effect of removing small bundles of absorbers as might occur during inspections in a production plant. Not taking the tank out of service for these inspections would be an economic advantage. Another ancillary topic studies the effect of the presence of a significant volume of unpoisoned solution close to the Poisoned Tube Tank on the critical height. A summary of the experimental findings is that boron compounds were excellent absorbers, as expected. This was true for granular materials such as Gerstley Borate and Borax; but it was also true for the flexible solid composed of boron carbide and rubber, even though only thin sheets were used. Experiments with small bundles of absorbers intentionally removed reveal that quite reasonable tanks could be constructed that would allow a few tubes at a time to be removed from the tank for inspection without removing the tank from production service.

  16. Recent Research with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (dance) at the LOS Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The DANCE detector at Los Alamos is a 160 element, nearly 4π BaF2 detector array designed to make measurements of neutron capture on rare or radioactive nuclides. It has also been used to make measurements of gamma-ray multiplicity following capture and gamma-ray output from fission. Several examples of measurements are briefly discussed.

  17. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  18. Active-Interrogation Measurements of Fast Neutrons from Induced Fission in Low-Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani

    2014-02-01

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutron to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials.

  19. Dosimetric characterization of the irradiation cavity for accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Byun, S H; Pejović-Milić, A; McMaster, S; Matysiak, W; Aslam; Liu, Z; Watters, L M; Prestwich, W V; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R

    2007-03-21

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo activation analysis has been characterized to estimate its dosimetric specifications. The cavity is defined to confine irradiation to the hand and modifies the neutron spectrum produced by a low energy accelerator neutron source to optimize activation per dose. Neutron and gamma-ray dose rates were measured with the microdosimetric technique using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter at the hand irradiation site and inside the hand access hole. For the outside of the cavity, a spherical neutron dose equivalent meter and a Farmer dosemeter were employed instead due to the low intensity of the radiation field. The maximum dose equivalent rate at the outside of the cavity was 2.94 microSv/100 microA min, which is lower by a factor of 1/2260 than the dose rate at the hand irradiation position. The local dose contributions from a hand, an arm and the rest of a body to the effective dose rate were estimated to be 1.73, 0.782 and 2.94 microSv/100 microA min, respectively. For the standard irradiation protocol of the in vivo hand activation, 300 microA min, an effective dose of 16.3 microSv would be delivered. PMID:17455391

  20. A Neutron Detector for the Electron Calorimeter (ECAL) Long Duration Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Binns, W. R.; Chang, J.; Cherry, M. L.; Christl, M. J.; Guzik, t. G.; Isbert, J.; Israel, M. H.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Watts, J. W.; Wefel, J. P.; Zatsepin, V.

    2007-01-01

    The highest energy measurements of cosmic ray electrons extend just beyond 1 TeV. High energy electrons are of particular interest because energy losses during interstellar propagation insure that they arrive primarily from nearby sources. This may produce observable structure in their spectrum. Further, it is predicted that electrons and positrons result from the annihilation of many exotic particles deposited as dark matter candidates. These electrons may appear as excesses in the cosmic ray electron spectrum from 200 GeV to 1000 GeV. A new long duration balloon experiment, ECAL, is being planned to provide direct cosmic ray electron measurements from approx.50 GeV to >1 TeV. To make these measurements ECAL must discriminate strongly against showers from protons and heavier ions. One of the techniques used to make this discrimination may be based on measuring the secondary neutrons produced by events in the instrument. The neutron detector configuration and technique will be discussed along with its expected performance based on Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Storage of ultracold neutrons in the magneto-gravitational trap of the UCNτ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvat, D. J.; Adamek, E. R.; Barlow, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Broussard, L. J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Fox, W.; Geltenbort, P.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Medina, J.; Morley, D. J.; Morris, C. L.; Penttilä, S. I.; Ramsey, J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Slaughter, B. A.; Vanderwerp, J.; VornDick, B.; Walstrom, P. L.; Wang, Z.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.

    2014-05-01

    The UCNτ experiment is designed to measure the lifetime τn of the free neutron by trapping ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a magneto-gravitational trap. An asymmetric bowl-shaped NdFeB magnet Halbach array confines low-field-seeking UCN within the apparatus, and a set of electromagnetic coils in a toroidal geometry provides a background "holding" field to eliminate depolarization-induced UCN loss caused by magnetic field nodes. We present a measurement of the storage time τstore of the trap by storing UCN for various times and counting the survivors. The data are consistent with a single exponential decay, and we find τstore=860±19 s, within 1σ of current global averages for τn. The storage time with the holding field deactivated is found to be τstore=470±160 s; this decreased storage time is due to the loss of UCN, which undergo Majorana spin flips while being stored. We discuss plans to increase the statistical sensitivity of the measurement and investigate potential systematic effects.

  2. Storage of Ultracold Neutrons in the Magneto-Gravitational Trap of the UCN Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Salvat, D. J.; Adamek, E. R.; Barlow, D.; Bowman, James D; Broussard, L. J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Fox, W.; Geltenbort, P.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Medina, J.; Morley, D. J.; Morris, C. L.; Penttila, Seppo I; Ramsey, J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Slaughter, B. A.; Vanderwerp, J.; VornDick, B.; Walstrom, P. L.; Wang, Z.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The UCN experiment is designed to measure the lifetime n of the free neutron by trapping ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a magneto-gravitational trap. An asymmetric bowl-shaped NdFeB magnet Halbach array confines low-field-seeking UCN within the apparatus, and a set of electromagnetic coils in a toroidal geometry provides a background holding field to eliminate depolarization-induced UCN loss caused by magnetic field nodes. We present a measurement of the storage time store of the trap by storing UCN for various times and counting the survivors. The data are consistent with a single exponential decay, and we find store = 860 19 s, within 1 of current global averages for n. The storage time with the holding field deactivated is found to be store = 470 160 s; this decreased storage time is due to the loss of UCN, which undergo Majorana spin flips while being stored. We discuss plans to increase the statistical sensitivity of the measurement and investigate potential systematic effects.

  3. 3D reconstruction of carbon nanotube networks from neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Mostafa; Baniassadi, Majid; Baghani, Mostafa; Dadmun, Mark; Tehrani, Mehran

    2015-09-01

    Structure reconstruction from statistical descriptors, such as scattering data obtained using x-rays or neutrons, is essential in understanding various properties of nanocomposites. Scattering based reconstruction can provide a realistic model, over various length scales, that can be used for numerical simulations. In this study, 3D reconstruction of a highly loaded carbon nanotube (CNT)-conducting polymer system based on small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS, respectively) data was performed. These light-weight and flexible materials have recently shown great promise for high-performance thermoelectric energy conversion, and their further improvement requires a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationships. The first step in achieving such understanding is to generate models that contain the hierarchy of CNT networks over nano and micron scales. The studied system is a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). SANS and USANS patterns of the different samples containing 10, 30, and 50 wt% SWCNTs were measured. These curves were then utilized to calculate statistical two-point correlation functions of the nanostructure. These functions along with the geometrical information extracted from SANS data and scanning electron microscopy images were used to reconstruct a representative volume element (RVE) nanostructure. Generated RVEs can be used for simulations of various mechanical and physical properties. This work, therefore, introduces a framework for the reconstruction of 3D RVEs of high volume faction nanocomposites containing high aspect ratio fillers from scattering experiments.

  4. Analysis of active neutron multiplicity data for Y-12 skull oxide samples

    SciTech Connect

    Krick, M.S.; Ensslin, N.; Ceo, R.N.; May, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Previous work on active neutron multiplicity measurements and analyses is summarized. New active multiplicity measurements are described for samples of Y-12 skull oxide using an Active Well Coincidence Counter and MSR4 multiplicity electronics. Neutron multiplication values for the samples were determined from triples/doubles ratios. Neutron multiplication values were also obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP code and the results compared with the experimental values. A calibration curve of AmLi source-sample coupling vs neutron multiplication was determined and used for active multiplicity assay of the skull oxides. The results are compared with those obtained from assay with the conventional calibration-curve technique, where the doubles rate is calibrated vs the {sup 235}U mass. The coupling-multiplication relationship determined for the skull oxides is compared with that determined earlier for pure high-enrichment uranium metal and pure uranium oxide. Conclusions are drawn about the application of active multiplicity techniques to uranium assay. Additional active multiplicity measurements and calculations are recommended.

  5. An evaluation of Compton suppression neutron activation analysis for determination of trace elements in some geological samples.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S; Kapsimalis, R

    2009-12-01

    Compton suppressed neutron activation analysis has been used for a variety of applications, but never has a detailed discussion of its use in far more complex matrices, such as geological samples, been fully addressed. This investigation seeks to serve as a qualitative evaluation of Compton suppression neutron activation analysis (CSNAA) and to illustrate the benefits of using Compton suppression with thermal and epithermal neutrons for the analysis of several geological specimens. PMID:19577479

  6. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  7. Active array design for FAME: Freeform Active Mirror Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskó, Attila; Aitink-Kroes, Gabby; Agócs, Tibor; Venema, Lars; Hugot, Emmanuel; Schnetler, Hermine; Bányai, Evelin

    2014-07-01

    In this paper a status report is given on the development of the FAME (Freeform Active Mirror Experiment) active array. Further information regarding this project can be found in the paper by Venema et al. (this conference). Freeform optics provide the opportunity to drastically reduce the complexity of the future optical instruments. In order to produce these non-axisymmetric freeform optics with up to 1 mm deviation from the best fit sphere, it is necessary to come up with new design and manufacturing methods. The way we would like to create novel freeform optics is by fine tuning a preformed high surface-quality thin mirror using an array which is actively controlled by actuators. In the following we introduce the tools deployed to create and assess the individual designs. The result is an active array having optimal number and lay-out of actuators.

  8. Studies of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The expected induced radioactivity of experimental material in low Earth orbit was studied for characteristics of activating particles such as cosmic rays, high energy Earth albedo neutrons, trapped protons, and secondary protons and neutrons. The activation cross sections for the production of long lived radioisotopes and other existing nuclear data appropriate to the study of these reactions were compiled. Computer codes which are required to calculate the expected activation of orbited materials were developed. The decreased computer code used to predict the activation of trapped protons of materials placed in the expected orbits of LDEF and Spacelab II. Techniques for unfolding the fluxes of activating particles from the measured activation of orbited materials are examined.

  9. Probing Planetary Bodies for Subsurface Volatiles: GEANT4 Models of Gamma Ray, Fast, Epithermal, and Thermal Neutron Response to Active Neutron Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Su, J. J.; Murray, J.

    2014-12-01

    Using an active source of neutrons as an in situ probe of a planetary body has proven to be a powerful tool to extract information about the presence, abundance, and location of subsurface volatiles without the need for drilling. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument on Curiosity is an example of such an instrument and is designed to detect the location and abundance of hydrogen within the top 50 cm of the Martian surface. DAN works by sending a pulse of neutrons towards the ground beneath the rover and detecting the reflected neutrons. The intensity and time of arrival of the reflection depends on the proportion of water, while the time the pulse takes to reach the detector is a function of the depth at which the water is located. Similar instruments can also be effective probes at the polar-regions of the Moon or on asteroids as a way of detecting sequestered volatiles. We present the results of GEANT4 particle simulation models of gamma ray, fast, epithermal, and thermal neutron responses to active neutron illumination. The results are parameterized by hydrogen abundance, stratification and depth of volatile layers, versus the distribution of neutron and gamma ray energy reflections. Models will be presented to approximate Martian, lunar, and asteroid environments and would be useful tools to assess utility for future NASA exploration missions to these types of planetary bodies.

  10. EXPERIENCE WITH COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE FROM A PARTNER LAB PERSPECTIVE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-10-10

    Collaborative development and operation of large physics experiments is fairly common. Less common is the collaborative development or operation of accelerators. A current example of the latter is the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The SNS project was conceived as a collaborative effort between six DOE facilities. In the SNS case, the control system was also developed collaboratively. The SNS project has now moved beyond the collaborative development phase and into the phase where Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is integrating contributions from collaborating ''partner labs'' and is beginning accelerator operations. In this paper, the author reflects on the benefits and drawbacks of the collaborative development of an accelerator control system as implemented for the SNS project from the perspective of a partner lab.

  11. Stabilization of Model Membrane Systems by Disaccharides. Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Experiments and Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doxastakis, Emmanouil; Garcia Sakai, Victoria; Ohtake, Satoshi; Maranas, Janna K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2006-03-01

    Trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, is often used for the stabilization of cell membranes in the absence of water. This work studies the effects of trehalose on model membrane systems as they undergo a melting transition using a combination of experimental methods and atomistic molecular simulations. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments on selectively deuterated samples provide the incoherent dynamic structure over a wide time range. Elastic scans probing the lipid tail dynamics display clear evidence of a main melting transition that is significantly lowered in the presence of trehalose. Lipid headgroup mobility is considerably restricted at high temperatures and directly associated with the dynamics of the sugar in the mixture. Molecular simulations provide a detailed overview of the dynamics and their spatial and time dependence. The combined simulation and experimental methodology offers a unique, molecular view of the physics of systems commonly employed in cryopreservation and lyophilization processes.

  12. Measuring neutron yield and ρR anisotropies with activation foils at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Cooper, G. W.; Drury, O. B.; Hagmann, C. A.; Knittel, K. M.; Leeper, R. J.; Ruiz, C. L.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2013-11-01

    Neutron yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are measured with a suite of diagnostics, including activation of ˜20-200 g samples of materials undergoing a variety of energy-dependent neutron reactions. Indium samples were mounted on the end of a Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM), 25-50 cm from the implosion, to measure 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutron yield. The 336.2 keV gamma rays from the 4.5 hour isomer of 115mIn produced by (n,n') reactions are counted in high-purity germanium detectors. For capsules producing D-T fusion reactions, zirconium and copper are activated via (n,2n) reactions at various locations around the target chamber and bay, measuring the 14 MeV neutron yield to accuracies on order of 7%. By mounting zirconium samples on ports at nine locations around the NIF chamber, anisotropies in the primary neutron emission due to fuel areal density asymmetries can be measured to a relative precision of 3%.

  13. Neutron interferometry in a temperature controlled vacuum environment for the search of dark energy and other precision experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggu, Parminder; Cory, D.; Pushin, D.; Nsofini, J.; Sarenac, D.; Huber, M.; Arif, M.; Shahi, C.; Haun, R.; Snow, M.; Li, K.; Skavysh, V.; Heacock, B.; Young, A.; iNDEX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The neutron interferometer is a sensitive tool to study neutron interactions in materials. Vibrations, acoustic waves, and temperature gradients can introduce phase shifts and reduce the SNR. Low neutron flux and an interest in measuring increasingly smaller phases makes it necessary for experiments to run over long periods of time. Hence, the interferometer needs to have excellent phase stability. It has been shown that by using Quantum Information Algorithms, one can make the interferometer insensitive to vibrations. In this work, we are trying to remove phase instability due to T variations. At the NCNR, the interferometer has been placed inside a vacuum chamber to decouple it from the environment and increase overall temperature stability. An Al vacuum chamber was machined and assembled to test the concept of an interferometer in vacuum and measure phase stability with the ultimate goal of using an interferometer in vacuum in an experiment searching for dark energy.

  14. Neutron emission spectroscopy results for internal transport barrier and mode conversion ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Sunden, E. Andersson; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sjoestrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Kaellne, J.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2008-10-15

    The effect of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on ({sup 3}He)D plasmas at JET was studied with the time of flight optimized rate (TOFOR) spectrometer dedicated to 2.5 MeV dd neutron measurements. In internal transport barrier (ITB) plasma experiments with large {sup 3}He concentrations (X({sup 3}He)>15%) an increase in neutron yield was observed after the ITB disappeared but with the auxiliary neutral beam injection and ICRH power still applied. The analysis of the TOFOR data revealed the formation of a high energy (fast) D population in this regime. The results were compared to other mode conversion experiments with similar X({sup 3}He) but slightly different heating conditions. In this study we report on the high energy neutron tails originating from the fast D ions and their correlation with X({sup 3}He) and discuss the light it can shed on ICRH-plasma power coupling mechanisms.

  15. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  16. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. III. analysis of samples of biological origin

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of biological materials is discussed. A group separation of a number of highly volatile elements from sodium and bromine radionuclides has been achieved. The limit of detection of the elements by INAA and neutron activation analysis was estimated using GTC. The advantages of the procedure and the analytical parameters are discussed.

  17. Neutron activation analysis of fluid inclusions for copper, manganese, and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Roedder, E.; Burns, F.C.

    1963-01-01

    Microgram quantities of copper, manganese, and zinc, corresponding to concentrations greater than 100 parts per million, were found in milligram quantities of primary inclusion fluid extracted from samples of quartz and fluorite from two types of ore deposits. The results indicate that neutron activation is a useful analytical method for studying the content of heavy metal in fluid inclusions.

  18. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  19. LOFT experimental measurements uncertainty analyses. Volume XX. Fluid-velocity measurement using pulsed-neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lassahn, G.D.; Taylor, D.J.N.

    1982-08-01

    Analyses of uncertainty components inherent in pulsed-neutron-activation (PNA) measurements in general and the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) system in particular are given. Due to the LOFT system's unique conditions, previously-used techniques were modified to make the volocity measurement. These methods render a useful, cost-effective measurement with an estimated uncertainty of 11% of reading.

  20. TFT-Based Active Pixel Sensors for Large Area Thermal Neutron Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnen, George

    Due to diminishing availability of 3He, which is the critical component of neutron detecting proportional counters, large area flexible arrays are being considered as a potential replacement for neutron detection. A large area flexible array, utilizing semiconductors for both charged particle detection and pixel readout, ensures a large detection surface area in a light weight rugged form. Such a neutron detector could be suitable for deployment at ports of entry. The specific approach used in this research, uses a neutron converter layer which captures incident thermal neutrons, and then emits ionizing charged particles. These ionizing particles cause electron-hole pair generation within a single pixel's integrated sensing diode. The resulting charge is then amplified via a low-noise amplifier. This document begins by discussing the current state of the art in neutron detection and the associated challenges. Then, for the purpose of resolving some of these issues, recent design and modeling efforts towards developing an improved neutron detection system are described. Also presented is a low-noise active pixel sensor (APS) design capable of being implemented in low temperature indium gallium zinc oxide (InGaZnO) or amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor process compatible with plastic substrates. The low gain and limited scalability of this design are improved upon by implementing a new multi-stage self-resetting APS. For each APS design, successful radiation measurements are also presented using PiN diodes for charged particle detection. Next, detection array readout methodologies are modeled and analyzed, and use of a matched filter readout circuit is described as well. Finally, this document discusses detection diode integration with the designed TFT-based APSs.

  1. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  2. Simultaneous neutron and x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion experiments along a single line of sight at Omega

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Danly, C. R.; Day, T. H.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Kim, Y. H.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Schmidt, D. W.; Simpson, R. A.; et al

    2015-04-16

    Neutron and x-ray imaging provide critical information about the geometry and hydrodynamics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. However, existing diagnostics at Omega and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) cannot produce images in both neutrons and x-rays along the same line of sight. This leads to difficulty comparing these images, which capture different parts of the plasma geometry, for the asymmetric implosions seen in present experiments. Further, even when opposing port neutron and x-ray images are available, they use different detectors and cannot provide positive information about the relative positions of the neutron and x-ray sources. A technique has been demonstratedmore » on implosions at Omega that can capture x-ray images along the same line of sight as the neutron images. Thus, the technique is described, and data from a set of experiments are presented, along with a discussion of techniques for coregistration of the various images. It is concluded that the technique is viable and could provide valuable information if implemented on NIF in the near future.« less

  3. Simultaneous neutron and x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion experiments along a single line of sight at Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Day, T. H.; Herrmann, H.; Kim, Y. H.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Schmidt, D. W.; Simpson, R. A.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Izumi, N.

    2015-04-15

    Neutron and x-ray imaging provide critical information about the geometry and hydrodynamics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. However, existing diagnostics at Omega and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) cannot produce images in both neutrons and x-rays along the same line of sight. This leads to difficulty comparing these images, which capture different parts of the plasma geometry, for the asymmetric implosions seen in present experiments. Further, even when opposing port neutron and x-ray images are available, they use different detectors and cannot provide positive information about the relative positions of the neutron and x-ray sources. A technique has been demonstrated on implosions at Omega that can capture x-ray images along the same line of sight as the neutron images. The technique is described, and data from a set of experiments are presented, along with a discussion of techniques for coregistration of the various images. It is concluded that the technique is viable and could provide valuable information if implemented on NIF in the near future.

  4. Development of lower-energy neutron spectroscopy for areal density measurement in implosion experiment at NIF and OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Lerche, Richard A.; Phillips, Thomas W.; Schmid, Gregory J.; Moran, Michael J.; Sangster, Thomas C.

    2001-12-01

    Areal density ((sigma) R) is a fundamental parameter that characterizes the performance of an ICF implosion. For high areal densities ((sigma) R>0.1 g/cm2), which will be realized in implosion experiments at NIF and LMJ, the target areal density exceeds the stopping range of charged particles and measurements with charged particle spectroscopy will be difficult. In this region, an areal density measurement method using down shifted neutron counting is a promising alternative. The probability of neutron scattering in the imploded plasma is proportional to the areal density of the plasma. The spectrum of neutrons scattered by the specific target nucleus has a characteristic low energy cut off. This enables separate, simultaneous measurements of fuel and pusher (sigma) Rs. To apply this concept in implosion experiments, the detector should have extremely large dynamic range. Sufficient signal output for low energy neutrons is also required. A lithium-glass scintillation-fiber plate (LG-SCIFI) is a promising candidate for this application. In this paper we propose a novel technique based on down shifted neutron measurements with a lithium-glass sctintillation-fiber plate. The details of instrumentation and background estimation with Monte Carlo calculation are reported.

  5. Simultaneous neutron and x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion experiments along a single line of sight at Omega.

    PubMed

    Danly, C R; Day, T H; Fittinghoff, D N; Herrmann, H; Izumi, N; Kim, Y H; Martinez, J I; Merrill, F E; Schmidt, D W; Simpson, R A; Volegov, P L; Wilde, C H

    2015-04-01

    Neutron and x-ray imaging provide critical information about the geometry and hydrodynamics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. However, existing diagnostics at Omega and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) cannot produce images in both neutrons and x-rays along the same line of sight. This leads to difficulty comparing these images, which capture different parts of the plasma geometry, for the asymmetric implosions seen in present experiments. Further, even when opposing port neutron and x-ray images are available, they use different detectors and cannot provide positive information about the relative positions of the neutron and x-ray sources. A technique has been demonstrated on implosions at Omega that can capture x-ray images along the same line of sight as the neutron images. The technique is described, and data from a set of experiments are presented, along with a discussion of techniques for coregistration of the various images. It is concluded that the technique is viable and could provide valuable information if implemented on NIF in the near future. PMID:25933858

  6. Simultaneous neutron and x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion experiments along a single line of sight at Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Day, T. H.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Kim, Y. H.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Schmidt, D. W.; Simpson, R. A.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-04-16

    Neutron and x-ray imaging provide critical information about the geometry and hydrodynamics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. However, existing diagnostics at Omega and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) cannot produce images in both neutrons and x-rays along the same line of sight. This leads to difficulty comparing these images, which capture different parts of the plasma geometry, for the asymmetric implosions seen in present experiments. Further, even when opposing port neutron and x-ray images are available, they use different detectors and cannot provide positive information about the relative positions of the neutron and x-ray sources. A technique has been demonstrated on implosions at Omega that can capture x-ray images along the same line of sight as the neutron images. Thus, the technique is described, and data from a set of experiments are presented, along with a discussion of techniques for coregistration of the various images. It is concluded that the technique is viable and could provide valuable information if implemented on NIF in the near future.

  7. Development of Lower Energy Neutron Spectroscopy for Areal Density Measurement in Implosion Experiment at NIF and Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Isumi, N; Lerche, R A; Phillips, T W; Schmid, G J; Moran, M J; Sangster, T C

    2001-08-02

    Areal density ({rho}R) is a fundamental parameter that characterizes the performance of an ICF implosion. For high areal densities ({rho}R> 0.1 g/cm{sup 2}), which will be realized in implosion experiments at NIF and LMJ, the target areal density exceeds the stopping range of charged particles and measurements with charged particle spectroscopy will be difficult. In this region, an areal density measurement method using down shifted neutron counting is a promising alternative. The probability of neutron scattering in the imploded plasma is proportional to the areal density of the plasma. The spectrum of neutrons scattered by the specific target nucleus has a characteristic low energy cut off. This enables separate, simultaneous measurements of fuel and pusher {rho}Rs. To apply this concept in implosion experiments, the detector should have extremely large dynamic range. Sufficient signal output for low energy neutrons is also required. A lithium-glass scintillation-fiber plate (LG-SCIFI) is a promising candidate for this application. In this paper we propose a novel technique based on downshifted neutron measurements with a lithium-glass scintillation-fiber plate. The details of instrumentation and background estimation with Monte Carlo calculation are reported.

  8. Simultaneous neutron and x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion experiments along a single line of sight at Omega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danly, C. R.; Day, T. H.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Kim, Y. H.; Martinez, J. I.; Merrill, F. E.; Schmidt, D. W.; Simpson, R. A.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron and x-ray imaging provide critical information about the geometry and hydrodynamics of inertial confinement fusion implosions. However, existing diagnostics at Omega and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) cannot produce images in both neutrons and x-rays along the same line of sight. This leads to difficulty comparing these images, which capture different parts of the plasma geometry, for the asymmetric implosions seen in present experiments. Further, even when opposing port neutron and x-ray images are available, they use different detectors and cannot provide positive information about the relative positions of the neutron and x-ray sources. A technique has been demonstrated on implosions at Omega that can capture x-ray images along the same line of sight as the neutron images. The technique is described, and data from a set of experiments are presented, along with a discussion of techniques for coregistration of the various images. It is concluded that the technique is viable and could provide valuable information if implemented on NIF in the near future.

  9. A New Automated Sample Transfer System for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    A fully automated and fast pneumatic transport system for short-time activation analysis was recently developed. It is suitable for small nuclear research reactors or laboratories that are using neutron generators and other neutron sources. It is equipped with a programmable logic controller, software package, and 12 devices to facilitate optimal analytical procedures. 550 ms were only necessary to transfer the irradiated capsule (diameter: 15 mm, length: 50 mm, weight: 4 gram) to the counting chamber at a distance of 20 meters using pressurized air (4 bars) as a transport gas. PMID:20369063

  10. (A neutron scattering experiment to study the high-energy spin dynamics of the itinerant antiferromagnet Mn sub 90 Cu sub 10 )

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1990-10-26

    The traveler performed a neutron scattering experiment to study the high-energy spin dynamics of the itinerant antiferromagnet. This experiment was conducted at a unique instrument located at the hot-neutron source at the ILL. The traveler also held various scientific discussions with ILL research staff members and visiting scientists.

  11. Importance of neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis in relatively dry, low-porosity rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Philbin, P.W.; Boynton, G.R.; Wager, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of variations in the neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis, capture gamma-ray measurements were made in relatively dry, low-porosity gabbro of the Duluth Complex. Although sections of over a meter of solid rock were encountered in the borehole, there was significant fracturing with interstitial water leading to a substantial variation of water with depth in the borehole. The linear-correlation coefficients calculated for the peak intensities of several elements compared to the chemical core analyses were generally poor throughout the depth investigated. The data suggest and arguments are given which indicate that the variation of the thermal-to-intermediate-to-fast neutron flux density as a function of borehole depth is a serious source of error and is a major cause of the changes observed in the capture gamma-ray peak intensities. These variations in neutron energy may also cause a shift in the observed capture gamma-ray energy.

  12. Activation of Nanoscale Allosteric Protein Domain Motion Revealed by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farago, Bela; Li, Jianquan; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2010-01-01

    NHERF1 is a multidomain scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 Ångstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length-scales and on submicrosecond timescales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much-simplified coarse-grained model suffices to describe interdomain motion of a multidomain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves changes in long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond timescales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE. PMID:21081097

  13. Determination of laser-evaporated uranium dioxide by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, R.

    1987-05-01

    Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require information about the loss of fuel which may occur at high temperatures. In this study, the surface of a uranium dioxide target was heated rapidly by a laser. The uranium surface was vaporized into a vacuum. The uranium bearing species condensed on a graphite disk placed in the pathway of the expanding uranium vapor. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis showed very little droplet ejection directly from the laser target surface. Neutron activation analysis was used to measure the amount of uranium deposited. The surface temperature was measured by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperature ranged from 2400 to 3700/sup 0/K. The Hertz-Langmuir formula, in conjunction with the measured surface temperature transient, was used to calculate the theoretical amount of uranium deposited. There was good agreement between theory and experiment above the melting point of 3120/sup 0/K. Below the melting point much more uranium was collected than was expected theoretically. This was attributed to oxidation of the surface. 29 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Recent upgrade of the in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Dilmanian, F.A..; Rarback, H.; Meron, M.; Kamen, Y.; Yasumura, S.; Weber, D.A.; Stamatelatos, I.E.; Lidofsky, L.J.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of a delayed- and a prompt-gamma neutron activation (DGNA and PGNA) system and an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. The total body contents of several basic elements, including potassium, calcium, chlorine, sodium, and phosphorus are measured at the DGNA system; total body carbon is measured at the INS system; and the nitrogen-tohydrogen ratio is measured at the PGNA system. Based on the elemental composition, body compartments, such as total body fat and total body protein can be computed with additional independently measured parameters, such as total body water, body size, and body weight. Information on elemental and compartmental body composition obtained through neutron activation analysis is useful, if not essential, for research on growth, malnutrition, aging diseases, such as osteoporosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in which the progression of the illness is closely related to changes in major body compartments, such as bone, adipose tissue, and muscle. The DGNA system has been modified and upgraded several times since it was first built. Recently, all three systems underwent major upgrades. This upgrading and some preliminary studies carried out with the modified facilities are reported here.

  15. Study of proton and neutron activation of metal samples in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The analysis of the gamma-ray spectra taken from samples flown in Spacelab 1; the search for and review of neutron and proton activation cross-sections needed to analyze the results of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) activation measurements; additional calculations of neutron induced activation for the LDEF samples; the data analysis plan for the LDEF and Spacelab 2 samples; the measurement of relevant cross-sections with activation of samples of V, Co, In, and Ta at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility; and the preparation of an extended gamma-ray calibration source through the development of a proper technique to accurately deposit equal quantities of radioactive material onto a large number of point on the source are discussed.

  16. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Sepe, Raymond B.; Rey, Daniel; Saarmaa, Erik; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is a NASA In-Step and Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Office funded Shuttle middeck experiment. The objective is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero-gravity (0-g) can be predicted. This prediction becomes particularly difficult when dynamic behavior during ground testing exhibits extensive suspension and direct gravity coupling. On-orbit system identification and control reconfiguration is investigated to improve performance which would otherwise be limited due to errors in prediction. The program is presently in its preliminary design phase with launch expected in the summer of 1994. The MACE test article consists of three attitude control torque wheels, a two axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this will represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. This paper presents on-going work in the areas of modelling and control of the MACE test article in the zero and one-gravity environments. Finite element models, which include suspension and gravity effects, and measurement models, derived from experimental data, are used as the basis for Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller designs. Finite element based controllers are analytically used to study the differences in closed-loop performance as the test article transitions between the 0-g and 1-g environments. Measurement based controllers are experimentally applied to the MACE test article in the 1-g environment and achieve over an order of magnitude improvement in payload pointing accuracy when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The various aspects of the flight portion of the experiment are also discussed.

  17. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David W.; Sepe, Raymond B.; Rey, Daniel; Saarmaa, Erik; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-02-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is a NASA In-Step and Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Office funded Shuttle middeck experiment. The objective is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero-gravity (0-g) can be predicted. This prediction becomes particularly difficult when dynamic behavior during ground testing exhibits extensive suspension and direct gravity coupling. On-orbit system identification and control reconfiguration is investigated to improve performance which would otherwise be limited due to errors in prediction. The program is presently in its preliminary design phase with launch expected in the summer of 1994. The MACE test article consists of three attitude control torque wheels, a two axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this will represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. This paper presents on-going work in the areas of modelling and control of the MACE test article in the zero and one-gravity environments. Finite element models, which include suspension and gravity effects, and measurement models, derived from experimental data, are used as the basis for Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller designs. Finite element based controllers are analytically used to study the differences in closed-loop performance as the test article transitions between the 0-g and 1-g environments. Measurement based controllers are experimentally applied to the MACE test article in the 1-g environment and achieve over an order of magnitude improvement in payload pointing accuracy when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The various aspects of the flight portion of the experiment are also discussed.

  18. Convoy Active Safety Technologies Warfighter Experiment I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenherr, Edward; Theisen, Bernard L.; Animashaun, Asisat; Davis, James, Jr.; Day, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. Warfigher Experiment I, held at A.P. Hill, VA in the fall of 2007, tested the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail the Warfigher Experiment's methodology, analysis, results and conclusions.

  19. Measurement of neutron ambient dose equivalent in carbon-ion radiotherapy with an active scanned delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yonai, S; Furukawa, T; Inaniwa, T

    2014-10-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, secondary neutrons contribute to an undesired dose outside the target volume, and consequently the increase of secondary cancer risk is a growing concern. In this study, neutron ambient dose equivalents in carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT) with an active beam delivery system were measured with a rem meter, WENDI-II, at National Institute of Radiological Sciences. When the same irradiation target was assumed, the measured neutron dose with an active beam was at most ∼15 % of that with a passive beam. This percentage became smaller as larger distances from the iso-centre. Also, when using an active beam delivery system, the neutron dose per treatment dose in CIRT was comparable with that in proton radiotherapy. Finally, it was experimentally demonstrated that the use of an active scanned beam in CIRT can greatly reduce the secondary neutron dose. PMID:24126486

  20. Validation of energy moments from the one-dimensional energy dependent neutron diffusion equation, MCNP5 and Attila-7.1.0 with the GODIVA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas S. Crawford; Terry A. Ring

    2012-12-01

    Normalized neutron energy moments (moments) from the one-dimensional energy dependent neutron diffusion equation (EDNDE), Monte Carlo N Particle 5 version 1.40 (MCNP5) and Attila-7.1.0-beta version (Attila) are validated with the GODIVA experiment (GODIVA). Energy moments 0–5 for all three methods are compared to GODIVA moments. GODIVA moments are measured with two methods. The 1st method is a time of flight (T-O-F) measurement of the average energy (moment 1) of the leaking neutrons from the surface of GODIVA and the 2nd method is from back calculating moments from foil activation analysis of various metal foils at the center of GODIVA. The error range of the EDNDE normalized moments compared to GODIVA is from 0% to 24%. The MCNP5 error range compared to GODIVA is 0–12% and the Attila error range is 0–79%. The method of moments is shown to be a fast reliable method, compared to either Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) or 30 multi-energy group methods (Attila) with regard to the GODIVA experiment.

  1. Simulation of Charged Particle Trajectories in the Neutron Decay Correlation Experiment abBA

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Dharmin; Greene, Geoffrey; Mahurin, Rob; Bowman, David; Calarco, John

    2005-01-01

    The proposed neutron decay correlation experiment, abBA, will directly detect the direction of emission of decay protons and electrons as well as providing spectroscopic information for both particles. In order to provide this information, the abBA experiment incorporates spatially varying electric and magnetic fields. We report on detailed simulations of the decay particle trajectories in order to assess the impact of various systematic effects on the experimental observables. These include among others; adiabaticity of particle orbits, tracking of orbits, reversal of low energy protons due to inhomogeneous electric field, and accuracy of proton time of flight measurements. Several simulation methods were used including commercial software (Simion), custom software, as well as analytical tools based on the use of adiabatic invariants. Our results indicate that the proposed field geometry of the abBA spectrometer will be substantially immune to most systematic effects and that transport calculations using adiabatic invariants agree well with solution of the full equations of motion. PMID:27308165

  2. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. II. thermochromatographic separation of elements in the analysis of geological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of difficulty soluble samples with a strongly activating substrate is discussed. The effect of sample coarseness and ore type on the rate of extraction of gold and accompanying elements was studied. The limits of detection of 22 elements were compared using neutron activation analysis with GTC and INAA. The analytical parameters of the procedure were estimated.

  3. Neutron-activation analysis by standard addition and solvent extraction Determination of traces of antimony.

    PubMed

    Alian, A; Shabana, R; Sanad, W; Allam, B; Khalifa, K

    1968-02-01

    The application of neutron activation analysis by standard addition and solvent extraction to the determination of traces of antimony in aluminium and rocks is reported. Three simple extraction procedures, using isopropyl ether, hexone, and tributyl phosphate, are described for the selective separation of radioantimony from interfering radionuclides. Antimony concentration is measured by counting the activities of the (122)Sb and (124)Sb photopeaks at 0.564 and 0.603 MeV. PMID:18960289

  4. Spin-density correlations in the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory: Comparison with polarized neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, N. B.; Reser, B. I.; Paradezhenko, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    To study the spin-density correlations in the ferromagnetic metals above the Curie temperature, we relate the spin correlator and neutron scattering cross-section. In the dynamic spin-fluctuation theory, we obtain explicit expressions for the effective and local magnetic moments and spatial spin-density correlator. Our theoretical results are demonstrated by the example of bcc Fe. The effective and local moments are found in good agreement with results of polarized neutron scattering experiment over a wide temperature range. The calculated short-range order is small (up to 4 Å) and slowly decreases with temperature.

  5. Exploration of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing Through Neutron Activator Design for Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Formation in (99)Mo Production and BNCT Applications.

    PubMed

    Khorshidi, Abdollah

    2015-10-01

    A feasibility study was performed to design thermal and epithermal neutron sources for radioisotope production and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by moderating fast neutrons. The neutrons were emitted from the reaction between (9)Be, (181)Ta, and (184)W targets and 30 MeV protons accelerated by a small cyclotron at 300 μA. In this study, the adiabatic resonance crossing (ARC) method was investigated by means of (207)Pb and (208)Pb moderators, graphite reflector, and boron absorber around the moderator region. Thermal/epithermal flux, energy, and cross section of accumulated neutrons in the activator were examined through diverse thicknesses of the specified regions. Simulation results revealed that the (181)Ta target had the highest neutron yield, and also tungsten was found to have the highest values in both surface and volumetric flux ratio. Transmutation in the (98)Mo sample through radiative capture was investigated for the natural lead moderator. When the sample radial distance from the target was increased inside the graphite region, the production yield had the greatest value of activity. The potential of the ARC method is a replacement or complements the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes. PMID:26397967

  6. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  7. The affect of industrial activities on zinc in alluvial Egyptian soil determined using neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sabour, M F; Abdel-Basset, N

    2002-07-01

    Thirty-two surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from different locations in Egypt representing non-polluted, moderately and highly polluted soils. The aim of this study was to evaluate total Zn content in alluvial soils of Nile Delta in Egypt by using the delayed neutron activation analysis technique (DNAA), in the irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1). The gamma-ray spectra were recorded with a hyper pure germanium detection system. The well resolved gamma-ray peak at 1116.0 keV was efficiently used for 65Zn content determination. Zn content in non-polluted soil samples ranged between 74.1 and 103.8 ppm with an average of 98.5 +/- 5.1 ppm. Zn content in moderately polluted soils ranged between 136.0 and 232.5 ppm with an average of 180.1 +/- 32.6 ppm. The highest Zn levels ranging from 240.0 and 733.0 ppm with an average of 410.3 +/- 54.4 ppm, were observed in soil samples collected from, either highly polluted agricultural soils exposed to prolonged irrigation with industrial wastewater or surface soil samples from industrial sites. PMID:12211982

  8. Using the TREAT reactor in support of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) experiments: A feasibility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grasseschi, G.L.; Schaefer, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    The technical feasibility of using the TREAT reactor facility for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research was assessed. Using one-dimensional neutronics calculations, it was shown that the TREAT core neutron spectrum can be filtered to reduce the undesired radiation (contamination) dose per desired neutron more effectively than can the core spectra from two prominent candidate reactors. Using two-dimensional calculations, it was demonstrated that a non-optimized filter replacing the TREAT thermal column can yield a fluence of desired-energy neutrons more than twice as large as the fluence believed to be required and, at the same time, have a contamination dose per desired neutron almost as low as that from any other candidate facility. The time, effort and cost required to adapt TREAT for a mission supporting BNCT research would be modest.

  9. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  10. Post irradiation experiment analysis using the APOLLO2 deterministic tool. Validation of JEFF-3.1.1 thermal and epithermal actinides neutron induced cross sections through MELUSINE experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, D.; Fabbris, O.

    2012-07-01

    Two different experiments performed in the 8 MWth MELUSINE experimental power pool reactor aimed at analyzing 1 GWd/t spent fuel pellets doped with several actinides. The goal was to measure the averaged neutron induced capture cross section in two very different neutron spectra (a PWR-like and an under-moderated one). This paper summarizes the combined deterministic APOLLO2-stochastic TRIPOLI4 analysis using the JEFF-3.1.1 European nuclear data library. A very good agreement is observed for most of neutron induced capture cross section of actinides and a clear underestimation for the {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}) as an accurate validation of its associated isomeric ratio are emphasized. Finally, a possible huge resonant fluctuation (factor of 2.7 regarding to the 1=0 resonance total orbital momenta) is suggested for isomeric ratio. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  12. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  13. Determination of tin in human blood serum by radiochemical neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Versieck, J; Vanballenberghe, L

    1991-06-01

    A method was developed for the determination of tin in human serum by radiochemical neutron activation analysis, using the long-lived radioisotope Sn(T1/2 = 115.09 days). This radioisotope decays to a daughter isotope 113mIn, the most suitable nuclide for counting (T1/2 = 1.658 h, gamma-ray of 391.7 keV). Experience showed that, with the exception of the serum samples with the lowest tin levels, in the experimental conditions of the present study tin could mostly also be determined by using its radioisotope 117mSn(T1/2 = 13.61 days, gamma-ray of 158.5 keV). Samples were collected and prepared by using the procedure elaborated by the authors, which proved its effectiveness in preventing significant sample contamination on several occasions. Because samples had to be irradiated at 10(14) n.cm-2.s-1, dry ashing was necessary. After irradiation, tin was separated by solvent extraction of tin(IV) iodide from a sulfuric acid-ammonium iodide solution with toluene. The dry ashing and solvent extraction steps were exhaustively tested by means of radioactive tracer experiments whereas the accuracy and precision of the analytical method were thoroughly checked by analyzing biological reference materials (Bowen's kale powder, the NBS' bovine liver, the NBS' nonfat milk powder, and the "second-generation" biological reference material--freeze-dried human serum--for trace element determinations, developed by the authors).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1883071

  14. Analysis of the size, shape, and spatial distribution of microinclusions by neutron-activation autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Flitsiyan, E.S.; Romanovskii, A.V.; Gurvich, L.G.; Kist, A.A.

    1987-02-01

    The local concentration and spatial distribution of some elements in minerals, rocks, and ores can be determined by means of neutron-activation autoradiography. The local element concentration is measured in this method by placing an activated section of the rock to be analyzed, together with an irradiated standard, against a photographic emulsion which acts as a radiation detector. The photographic density of the exposed emulsion varies as a function of the tested element content in the part of the sample next to the detector. In order to assess the value of neutron-activation autoradiography in the analysis of element distribution, we considered the main factors affecting the production of selective autoradiographs, viz., resolution, detection limit, and optimal irradiation conditions, holding time, and exposure.

  15. New models for carrying out cyclic neutron activation. Discussion of the theoretical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-García, M. P.; Rey-Ronco, M. A.; Alonso-Sánchez, T.

    2014-11-01

    This paper studies two specific procedures for analyzing mining samples through a neutron activation technique called DGNAA (Delayed Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis). This particular study is part of a broader line of research, whose overall objective is to find the optimal procedure for analyzing the fluorite content of samples taken from different parts of a fluorite concentration plant, using the DGNAA method [1-2]. The mining sample is fluorspar, which contains other minerals in addition to fluorite, such as silica, barite, iron oxides and silicates. The main contribution of the article is the development of a new method for determining the fluorite content in minerals and the increase of sensitivity in respect to the symmetrical method and single-cycle activation.

  16. Preparation of a one-curie 171Tm target for the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.

    2008-05-15

    Roughly one curie of 171Tm (t1/2=1.92a) has been produced and purified for the purpose of making a nuclear target for the first measurements of its neutron capture cross section. Target preparation consisted of three key steps: (1) material production; (2) separation and purification; and (3) electrodeposition onto a suitable backing material. Approximately 1.5 mg of the target material (at the time of separation) was produced by irradiating roughly 250 mg of its stable enriched 170Er lanthanide neighbor with neutrons at the ILL reactor in France. This production method resulted in a “difficult-to-separate” 1:167 mixture of near-neighboring lanthanides, Tm and Er. Separation and purification was accomplished using high-performance liquid chromatorgraphy (HPLC), with a proprietary cation exchange column (Dionex, CS-3) and alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (a-HIB) eluent. This technique yielded a final product of ~95% purity with respect to Tm. A portion (20 ug) of the Tm was electrodeposited on thin Be foil and delivered to the Los Alamos Neutron Science CEnter (LANSCE) for preliminary analysis of its neutron capture cross section using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This paper discusses the major hurdles associated with the separation and purification step including, scale-up issues related to the use of HPLC for material separation and purification of the target material from a-HIB and 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) colorant.

  17. Modeling active memory: Experiment, theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Daniel J.

    2001-06-01

    Neuro-physiological experiments on cognitively performing primates are described to argue that strong evidence exists for localized, non-ergodic (stimulus specific) attractor dynamics in the cortex. The specific phenomena are delay activity distributions-enhanced spike-rate distributions resulting from training, which we associate with working memory. The anatomy of the relevant cortex region and the physiological characteristics of the participating elements (neural cells) are reviewed to provide a substrate for modeling the observed phenomena. Modeling is based on the properties of the integrate-and-fire neural element in presence of an input current of Gaussian distribution. Theory of stochastic processes provides an expression for the spike emission rate as a function of the mean and the variance of the current distribution. Mean-field theory is then based on the assumption that spike emission processes in different neurons in the network are independent, and hence the input current to a neuron is Gaussian. Consequently, the dynamics of the interacting network is reduced to the computation of the mean and the variance of the current received by a cell of a given population in terms of the constitutive parameters of the network and the emission rates of the neurons in the different populations. Within this logic we analyze the stationary states of an unstructured network, corresponding to spontaneous activity, and show that it can be stable only if locally the net input current of a neuron is inhibitory. This is then tested against simulations and it is found that agreement is excellent down to great detail. A confirmation of the independence hypothesis. On top of stable spontaneous activity, keeping all parameters fixed, training is described by (Hebbian) modification of synapses between neurons responsive to a stimulus and other neurons in the module-synapses are potentiated between two excited neurons and depressed between an excited and a quiescent neuron

  18. Long Range Active Detection of HEU Based on Thermal Neutron Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Forman L.; Dioszegi I.; Salwen, C.; and Vanier, P.E.

    2010-05-24

    We report on the results of measurements of proton irradiation on a series of targets at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron Facility (AGS), in collaboration with LANL and SNL. We examined the prompt radiation environment in the tunnel for the DTRA-sponsored series (E 972), which investigated the penetration of air and subsequent target interaction of 4 GeV proton pulses. Measurements were made by means of an organic scintillator with a 500 MHz bandwidth system. We found that irradiation of a depleted uranium (DU) target resulted in a large gamma-ray signal in the 100-500 µsec time region after the proton flash when the DU was surrounded by polyethylene, but little signal was generated if it was surrounded by boron-loaded polyethylene. Subsequent Monte Carlo (MCNPX) calculations indicated that the source of the signal was consistent with thermal neutron capture in DU. The MCNPX calculations also indicated that if one were to perform the same experiment with a highly enriched uranium (HEU) target there would be a distinctive fast neutron yield in this 100-500 µsec time region from thermal neutron-induced fission. The fast neutrons can be recorded by the same direct current system and differentiated from gamma ray pulses in organic scintillator by pulse shape discrimination.

  19. Benchmark test of transport calculations of gold and nickel activation with implications for neutron kerma at Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Sawada, S; Munaka, M; Kuramoto, A; Oka, T; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hasai, H

    1992-11-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a 252Cf fission neutron source to validate the use of the code for the energy spectrum analyses of Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons. Nuclear data libraries used in the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code calculation were ENDF/B-III, ENDF/B-IV, LASL-SUB, and ENDL-73. The neutron moderators used were granite (the main component of which is SiO2, with a small fraction of hydrogen), Newlight [polyethylene with 3.7% boron (natural)], ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and water (H2O). Each moderator was 65 cm thick. The neutron detectors were gold and nickel foils, which were used to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons (4.9 eV) and fast neutrons (> 0.5 MeV), respectively. Measured activity data from neutron-irradiated gold and nickel foils in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which correspond to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For both gold and nickel detectors, the measured activities and the calculated values agreed within 10%. The slopes of the depth-yield relations in each moderator, except granite, were similar for neutrons detected by the gold and nickel foils. From the results of these studies, the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code was verified to be accurate enough for use with the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, chlorine, and cadmium, and for the incident 252Cf fission spectrum neutrons. PMID:1399639

  20. Mantid-Data analysis and visualization package for neutron scattering and μ SR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, O.; Bilheux, J. C.; Borreguero, J. M.; Buts, A.; Campbell, S. I.; Chapon, L.; Doucet, M.; Draper, N.; Ferraz Leal, R.; Gigg, M. A.; Lynch, V. E.; Markvardsen, A.; Mikkelson, D. J.; Mikkelson, R. L.; Miller, R.; Palmen, K.; Parker, P.; Passos, G.; Perring, T. G.; Peterson, P. F.; Ren, S.; Reuter, M. A.; Savici, A. T.; Taylor, J. W.; Taylor, R. J.; Tolchenov, R.; Zhou, W.; Zikovsky, J.

    2014-11-01

    The Mantid framework is a software solution developed for the analysis and visualization of neutron scattering and muon spin measurements. The framework is jointly developed by software engineers and scientists at the ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objectives, functionality and novel design aspects of Mantid are described.