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Sample records for neutron capture therapies

  1. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  2. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  3. Iodine neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kazi Fariduddin

    A new technique, Iodine Neutron Capture Therapy (INCT) is proposed to treat hyperthyroidism in people. Present thyroid therapies, surgical removal and 131I treatment, result in hypothyroidism and, for 131I, involve protracted treatment times and excessive whole-body radiation doses. The new technique involves using a low energy neutron beam to convert a fraction of the natural iodine stored in the thyroid to radioactive 128I, which has a 24-minute half-life and decays by emitting 2.12-MeV beta particles. The beta particles are absorbed in and damage some thyroid tissue cells and consequently reduce the production and release of thyroid hormones to the blood stream. Treatment times and whole-body radiation doses are thus reduced substantially. This dissertation addresses the first of the several steps needed to obtain medical profession acceptance and regulatory approval to implement this therapy. As with other such programs, initial feasibility is established by performing experiments on suitable small mammals. Laboratory rats were used and their thyroids were exposed to the beta particles coming from small encapsulated amounts of 128I. Masses of 89.0 mg reagent-grade elemental iodine crystals have been activated in the ISU AGN-201 reactor to provide 0.033 mBq of 128I. This activity delivers 0.2 Gy to the thyroid gland of 300-g male rats having fresh thyroid tissue masses of ˜20 mg. Larger iodine masses are used to provide greater doses. The activated iodine is encapsulated to form a thin (0.16 cm 2/mg) patch that is then applied directly to the surgically exposed thyroid of an anesthetized rat. Direct neutron irradiation of a rat's thyroid was not possible due to its small size. Direct in-vivo exposure of the thyroid of the rat to the emitted radiation from 128I is allowed to continue for 2.5 hours (6 half-lives). Pre- and post-exposure blood samples are taken to quantify thyroid hormone levels. The serum T4 concentration is measured by radioimmunoassay at

  4. Accelerators and Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Valda, A.

    2002-08-01

    Within the frame of Accelerator Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT), the 7Li (p,n) 7Be reaction, relatively near its energy threshold is one of the most promising, due to its high yield and low neutron energy. In this work a thick LiF target irradiated with a proton beam was studied as a neutron source. The 1.88-2.0 MeV proton beam was produced by the tandem accelerator TANDAR at CNEA's facilities in Buenos Aires. A water-filled phantom, containing a boron sample was irradiated with the resulting neutron flux. The 10B(n,αγ)7Li boron neutron capture reaction produces a 0.478 MeV gamma ray in 94% of the cases. The neutron yield was measured through the detection of this gamma ray using a hyperpure germanium detector with an anti-Compton shield. In addition, the thermal neutron flux was evaluated at different depths inside the phantom using bare and Cd-covered gold foils. A maximum neutron thermal flux of 1.4×108 cm-2s-1mA-1 was obtained at 4.2 cm from the phantom surface. In order to optimize the design of the neutron production target and the beam shaping assembly extensive Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon (MCNP) simulations have been performed. Neutron fields from a thick LiF and a Li metal target (with both a D2O-graphite and a Al/AlF3-graphite moderator/reflector assembly) were evaluated along the centerline of a head and a whole body phantom. Simulations were carried out for 1.89, 2.0 and 2.3 MeV proton beams. The results show that it is more advantageous to irradiate the target with 2.3 MeV near-resonance protons, instead of very near threshold, because of the higher neutron yield at this energy. On the other hand, the Al/AlF3-graphite exhibits a more efficient performance than D2O in terms of tumor to maximum healthy tissue dose ratio. Treatment times of less than 15 min and tumor control probabilities larger than 98% are obtained for a 50 mA, 2.3 MeV proton beam. The alternative neutron-producing reaction 13C(d,n) is also briefly reviewed. A

  5. Boron-neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, A. M.; Moschini, G.; Valkovic, Vlado; Zafiropoulos, D.

    1995-03-01

    The final goal of any radiotherapy project is to expose the tumor as the target to a lethal dose of ionizing radiation, sparing thereby the surrounding healthy tissues to a maximum extent. Precise treatment is nevertheless essential for cure, since the danger exists that the tumor might re-establish itself if every cancer cell is not destroyed. The conventional therapy treatments existing to date, e.g., surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, have been successful in curing some kinds of cancers, but still there are many exceptions. In the following, the progress of a promising therapy tool, called the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), which has made its dynamic evolution in recent years, is briefly described. The approach towards clinical trials with BNCT is described in detail.

  6. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  7. Neutron capture therapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Glass, J.D.; Micca, P.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The development of boron-containing compounds which localize selectively in tumor may require a tumor-by-tumor type of approach that exploits any metabolic pathways unique to the particular type of tumor. Melanin-producing melanomas actively transport and metabolize aromatic amino acids for use as precursors in the synthesis of the pigment melanin. It has been shown that the boron-containing amino acid analog p-borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is selectively accumulated in melanoma tissue, producing boron concentrations in tumor that are within the range estimated to be necessary for successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). We report here the results of therapy experiments carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with /sup 10/B in boron containing cells through the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10..mu..m in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils.

  9. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  10. Approach to magnetic neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. . E-mail: spod@sky.chph.ras.ru; Podoynitsyn, Sergey N.; Filippov, Victor I.; Komissarova, Lubov Kh.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: The method of magnetic neutron capture therapy can be described as a combination of two methods: magnetic localization of drugs using magnetically targeted carriers and neutron capture therapy itself. Methods and Materials: In this work, we produced and tested two types of particles for such therapy. Composite ultradispersed ferro-carbon (Fe-C) and iron-boron (Fe-B) particles were formed from vapors of respective materials. Results: Two-component ultradispersed particles, containing Fe and C, were tested as magnetic adsorbent of L-boronophenylalanine and borax and were shown that borax sorption could be effective for creation of high concentration of boron atoms in the area of tumor. Kinetics of boron release into the physiologic solution demonstrate that ultradispersed Fe-B (10%) could be applied for an effective magnetic neutron capture therapy. Conclusion: Both types of the particles have high magnetization and magnetic homogeneity, allow to form stable magnetic suspensions, and have low toxicity.

  11. Gadolinium as a Neutron Capture Therapy Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jing-Luen Allen

    The clinical results of treating brain tumors with boron neutron capture therapy are very encouraging and researchers around the world are once again making efforts to develop this therapeutic modality. Boron-10 is the agent receiving the most attention for neutron capture therapy but ^{157}Gd is a nuclide that also holds interesting properties of being a neutron capture therapy agent. The objective of this study is to evaluate ^{157}Gd as a neutron capture therapy agent. In this study it is determined that tumor concentrations of about 300 mug ^{157}Gd/g tumor can be achieved in brain tumors with some FDA approved MRI contrast agents such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, and up to 628 mug ^{157 }Gd/g tumor can be established in bone tumors with Gd-EDTMP. Monte Carlo calculations show that with only 250 ppm of ^{157}Gd in tumor, neutron capture therapy can deliver 2,000 cGy to a tumor of 2 cm diameter or larger with 5 times 10^{12} n/cm ^2 fluence at the tumor. Dose measurements which were made with films and TLD's in phantoms verified these calculations. More extended Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that neutron capture therapy with Gd possesses comparable dose distribution to B neutron capture therapy. With 5 times 10^{12 } n/cm^2 thermal neutrons at the tumor, Auger electrons from the Gd produced an optical density enhancement on the films that is similar to the effect caused by about 300 cGy of Gd prompt gamma dose which will further enhance the therapeutic effects. A technique that combines brachytherapy with Gd neutron capture therapy has been evaluated. Monte Carlo calculations show that 5,000 cGy of prompt gamma dose can be delivered to a treatment volume of 40 cm^3 with a 3-plane implant of a total of 9 Gd needles. The tumor to normal tissue advantage of this method is as good as ^{60} Co brachytherapy. Measurements of prompt gamma dose with films and TLD-700's in a lucite phantom verify the Monte Carlo evaluation. A technique which displays the Gd

  12. Porphyrins for boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Gabel, Detlef

    1990-01-01

    Novel compounds for treatment of brain tumors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy are disclosed. A method for preparing the compounds as well as pharmaceutical compositions containing said compounds are also disclosed. The compounds are water soluble, non-toxic and non-labile boronated porphyrins which show significant uptake and retention in tumors.

  13. Microdosimetry for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, R.L.; Kota, C.

    2000-09-05

    The specific aims of the research proposal were as follows: (1) To design and construct small volume tissue equivalent proportional counters for the dosimetry and microdosimetry of high intensity thermal and epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT, and of modified fast neutron beams designed for boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). (2) To develop analytical methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of the absorbed dose in BNCT and BNCEFNT based on the measured microdosimetric spectra. (3) To develop an analytical framework for comparing the biological effectiveness of different epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT and BNCEFNT, based on correlated sets of measured microdosimetric spectra and radiobiological data. Specific aims (1) and (2) were achieved in their entirety and are comprehensively documented in Jay Burmeister's Ph.D. dissertation entitled ''Specification of physical and biologically effective absorbed dose in radiation therapies utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction'' (Wayne State University, 1999). Specific aim (3) proved difficult to accomplish because of a lack of sufficient radiobiological data.

  14. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

  16. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V.; Moore, D.E.

    1992-09-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  17. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V. ); Moore, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  18. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  19. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  20. Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, L.E.

    1991-12-16

    This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

  1. Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10..mu.., or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor.

  2. Proton linacs for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-08-01

    Recent advances in the ability to deliver boron-containing drugs to brain tumors have generated interest in {approximately}4 MeV linacs as sources of epithermal neutrons for radiation therapy. In addition, fast neutron therapy facilities have been studying methods to moderate their beams to take advantage of the high cross section for epithermal neutrons on boron-10. This paper describes the technical issues involved in each approach and presents the motivation for undertaking such studies using the Fermilab linac. the problems which must be solved before therapy can begin are outlined. Status of preparatory work and results of preliminary measurements are presented.

  3. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  4. Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, L.E.

    1991-12-16

    This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

  5. Role of gel dosimeters in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Khajeali, Azim; Farajollahi, Ali Reza; Khodadadi, Roghayeh; Kasesaz, Yaser; Khalili, Assef

    2015-09-01

    Gel dosimeters have acquired a unique status in radiotherapy, especially with the advent of the new techniques in which there is a need for three-dimensional dose measurement with high spatial resolution. One of the techniques in which the use of gel dosimeters has drawn the attention of the researchers is the boron neutron capture therapy. Exploring the history of gel dosimeters, this paper sets out to study their role in the boron neutron capture therapy dosimetric process. PMID:26070173

  6. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  7. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  8. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  10. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  11. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Salehi, Rasoul; Nahand, Javid Sadri; Karimi, Ehsan; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer. PMID:27461603

  13. Neutron capture therapy with sup 235 U seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.; Shih, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    A combination of brachytherapy and neutron capture therapy has been evaluated using {sup 235}U metal seeds and external neutron beam irradiation. When thermal neutrons are absorbed by {sup 235}U, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays are produced and some of these deposit energy in surrounding tissue. A Monte Carlo program, using the code MCNP, has been used to evaluate two sizes of {sup 235}U seeds in a water phantom. The results of flux suppression around the seeds and dose distributions are illustrated and discussed. The results show that high doses can be delivered in a relatively short time by using {sup 235}U seeds with neutron capture therapy. This therapy with multiple needles or seeds can be envisioned as a substitute for traditional brachytherapy to give an effective killing dose.

  14. Theoretical and experimental physical methods of neutron-capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. I.

    2011-09-01

    This review is based to a substantial degree on our priority developments and research at the IR-8 reactor of the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute. New theoretical and experimental methods of neutron-capture therapy are developed and applied in practice; these are: A general analytical and semi-empiric theory of neutron-capture therapy (NCT) based on classical neutron physics and its main sections (elementary theories of moderation, diffuse, reflection, and absorption of neutrons) rather than on methods of mathematical simulation. The theory is, first of all, intended for practical application by physicists, engineers, biologists, and physicians. This theory can be mastered by anyone with a higher education of almost any kind and minimal experience in operating a personal computer.

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy: from physics to treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabel, Detlef

    1997-02-01

    For successful application of boron neutron capture therapy for treatment of cancer, it is required that the tumor receives a higher radiation dose than the surrounding healthy tissue. This is achieved by the use of appropriate boron compounds with selective accumulation or retention, and the subsequent irradiation with neutrons of suitable characteristics. The basics of these two requirement are given, and the implementation in clinical trials is discussed.

  16. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles. PMID:26033767

  17. Proceedings of the first international symposium on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Brownell, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    This meeting was arranged jointly by MIT and BNL in order to illuminate progress in the synthesis and targeting of boron compounds and to evaluate and document progress in radiobiological and dosimetric aspects of neutron capture therapy. It is hoped that this meeting will facilitate transfer of information between groups working in these fields, and encourage synergistic collaboration.

  18. First experiments on neutron detection on the accelerator-based source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Malyshkin, G. N.; Makarov, A. N.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    A pilot accelerator-based source of epithermal neutrons, which is intended for wide application in clinics for boron neutron capture therapy, has been constructed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk). A stationary proton beam has been obtained and near-threshold neutron generation regime has been realized. Results of the first experiments on neutron generation using the proposed source are described.

  19. Research in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at MIT LABA

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Howard, W.B.; Song, H.; Blackburn, B.; Binello, E.

    1997-02-01

    A 4.1 MeV tandem electrostatic accelerator designed for research into Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has recently been installed in the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA). This accelerator uses a very high current switch mode high voltage power supply in conjunction with a multi-cusp negative ion source to supply the multimilliampere current required for clinical BNCT applications. A number of individual research projects aimed at evaluating the potential of this accelerator design as a hospital-based neutron source for radiation therapy of both tumors and rheumatoid arthritis are described here. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Gadolinium in human glioblastoma cells for gadolinium neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    De Stasio, G; Casalbore, P; Pallini, R; Gilbert, B; Sanità, F; Ciotti, M T; Rosi, G; Festinesi, A; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Perret, D; Mogk, D W; Perfetti, P; Mehta, M P; Mercanti, D

    2001-05-15

    157Gd is a potential agent for neutron capture cancer therapy (GdNCT). We directly observed the microdistribution of Gd in cultured human glioblastoma cells exposed to Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We demonstrated, with three independent techniques, that Gd-DTPA penetrates the plasma membrane, and we observed no deleterious effect on cell survival. A systematic microchemical analysis revealed a higher Gd accumulation in cell nuclei compared with cytoplasm. This is significant for prospective GdNCT because the proximity of Gd to DNA increases the cell-killing potential of the short-range, high-energy electrons emitted during the neutron capture reaction. We also exposed Gd-containing cells to thermal neutrons and demonstrated the GdNC reaction effectiveness in inducing cell death. These results in vitro stimulated in vivo Gd-DTPA uptake studies, currently underway, in human glioblastoma patients. PMID:11358855

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): A radiation oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1994-03-30

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) offers considerable promise in the search for the ideal cancer therapy, a therapy which selectively and maximally damages malignant cells while sparing normal tissue. This bimodal treatment modality selectivity concentrates a boron compound in malignant cells, and then [open quotes]activates[close quotes] this compound with slow neutrons resulting in a highly lethal event within the cancer cell. This article reviews this treatment modality from a radiation oncology, biology, and physics perspective. The remainder of the articles in this special issue provide a survey of the current [open quotes]state-of-the-art[close quotes] in this rapidly expanding field, including information with regard to boron compounds and their localization. 118 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  3. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  4. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  5. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  6. Boronated monoclonal antibody conjugates for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Elmore, J.J. Jr.; Ferrone, S.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to tumor-associated antigens are attractive for concentrating /sup 10/B in cancer tissue, in part because neutron capture therapy (NCT) is not disadvantaged by the hours to days required to optimize tumor:background concentration ratios of MoAbs or their F(ab')/sub 2/ or Fab fragments. Since direct coupling of /sup 10/B compounds in amounts sufficient for radiotherapy appears to inactivate MoAbs, the authors used dextran intermediate carriers to provide high levels of /sup 10/B per MoAb while modifying fewer amino acid residues.

  7. Carborane derivative development for boron neutron capture therapy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, Beverly A.; Yan Hao; Moore, Roger; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Baum, Kurt

    1999-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy [BNCT] is a binary method of cancer therapy based on the capture of neutrons by a boron-10 atom [{sup 10}B]. Cytotoxic {sup 7}Li nuclei and {alpha}-particles are emitted, with a range in tissue of 9 and 5 {micro}m, respectively, about one cell diameter. The major obstacle to clinically viable BNCT is the selective localization of 5-30 ppm {sup 10}B in tumor cells required for effective therapy. A promising approach to BNCT is based on hydrophilic boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters, or ''trailers'' that have been shown to concentrate selectively in tumor tissue. Examples of these compounds were prepared previously at high cost using an automated DNA synthesizer. Direct synthesis methods are needed for the production of gram-scale quantities for further biological evaluation. The work accomplished as a result of the collaboration between Fluorochem, Inc. and UCLA demonstrates that short oligomers containing at least five carborane units with four phosphodiester linkages can be prepared in substantial quantities. This work was accomplished by the application of standard phosphoramidite coupling chemistry.

  8. Real-time dosimetry for boron-neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Reeder, P.L.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1994-09-01

    Epithermal/thermal boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT) is promising treatment method for malignant tumors. Because the doses and dose rates for medical therapeutic radiation are very close to the normal tissue tolerance, small errors in radiation delivery can result in harmful overdoses. A substantial need exists for a device that will monitor, in real time, the radiation dose being delivered to a patient. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a scintillating glass optical fiber that is sensitive to thermal neutrons. The small size of the fibers offers the possibility of in vivo dose monitoring at several points within the radiation field. The count rate of such detectors can approach 10 MHz because the lifetime of the cerium activator is fast. Fluxes typical of those in BNCT (i.e., 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}/sec) may be measured because of this potentially high count rate and the small diameter of the fiber.

  9. Neutron sources for a neutron capture therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of boron pharmaceuticals have reopened the possibility of using epithermal neutrons to treat brain tumors containing boron-10. This paper summarizes the approaches being used to generate the neutron sources and identifies specific areas where more research and development are needed.

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma: An experimental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, B.S.; Larsson, B.; Roberto, A. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that some thioamides, e.g., thiouracil, are incorporated as false precursors into melanin during its synthesis. If boronated analogs of the thioamides share this property, the melanin of melanotic melanomas offers a possibility for specific tumoural uptake and retention of boron as a basis for neutron capture therapy. We report on the synthesis of boronated 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (B-TZT), boronated 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil (B-CTU), and boronated 5-diethylaminomethyl-2-thiouracil (B-DEAMTU) and the localization of these substances in melanotic melanomas transplanted to mice. The distribution in the mice was studied by boron neutron capture radiography. B-TZT and B-CTU showed the highest tumour:normal tissue concentration ratios, with tumour:liver ratios of about 4 and tumour:muscle ratios of about 14; B-DEAMTU showed corresponding ratios of 1.4 and 5, respectively. The absolute concentration of boron in the tumours, however, was more than three times higher in the mice injected with B-TZT, compared with B-CTU. The results suggest that B-TZT may be the most promising compound of the three tested with regard to possible therapy of melanotic melanomas.

  11. Computational Dosimetry and Treatment Planning Considerations for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, David Waler

    2003-03-01

    Specialized treatment planning software systems are generally required for neutron capture therapy (NCT) research and clinical applications. The standard simplifying approximations that work well for treatment planning computations in the case of many other modalities are usually not appropriate for application to neutron transport. One generally must obtain an explicit three-dimensional numerical solution of the governing transport equation, with energy-dependent neutron scattering completely taken into account. Treatment planning systems that have been successfully introduced for NCT applications over the past 15 years rely on the Monte Carlo stochastic simulation method for the necessary computations, primarily because of the geometric complexity of human anatomy. However, historically, there has also been interest in the application of deterministic methods, and there have been some practical developments in this area. Most recently, interest has turned toward the creation of treatment planning software that is not limited to any specific therapy modality, with NCT as only one of several applications. A key issue with NCT treatment planning has to do with boron quantification, and whether improved information concerning the spatial biodistribution of boron can be effectively used to improve the treatment planning process. Validation and benchmarking of computations for NCT are also of current developmental interest. Various institutions have their own procedures, but standard validation models are not yet in wide use.

  12. Accelerator-based neutron source for the neutron-capture and fast neutron therapy at hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B. F.; Belov, V. P.; Bender, E. D.; Bokhovko, M. V.; Dimov, G. I.; Kononov, V. N.; Kononov, O. E.; Kuksanov, N. K.; Palchikov, V. E.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Salimov, R. A.; Silvestrov, G. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Soloviov, N. A.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    The proton accelerator complex for neutron production in lithium target discussed, which can operate in two modes. The first provides a neutron beam kinematically collimated with good forward direction in 25° and average energy of 30 keV, directly applicable for neutron-capture therapy with high efficiency of proton beam use. The proton energy in this mode is 1.883-1.890 MeV that is near the threshold of the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction. In the second mode, at proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the complex-produced neutron beam with maximum energy board of 790 keV which can be used directly for fast neutron therapy and for neutron-capture therapy after moderation. The project of such a neutron source is based on the 2.5 MeV original electrostatic accelerator tandem with vacuum insulation developed at BINP which is supplied with a high-voltage rectifier. The rectifier is produced in BINP as a part of ELV-type industrial accelerator. Design features of the tandem determining its high reliability in operation with a high-current (up to 40 mA) H - ion beam are discussed. They are: the absence of ceramic accelerator columns around the beam passage region, good conditions for pumping out of charge-exchange gaseous target region, strong focusing optics and high acceleration rate minimizing the space charge effects. The possibility of stabilization of protons energy with an accuracy level of 0.1% necessary for operation in the near threshold region is considered. The design description of H - continuous ion source with a current of 40 mA is also performed. To operate with a 100 kW proton beam it is proposed to use liquid-lithium targets. A thin lithium layer on the surface of a tungsten disk cooled intensively by a liquid metal heat carrier is proposed for use in case of the vertical beam, and a flat liquid lithium jet flowing through the narrow nozzle - for the horizontal beam.

  13. Isodose Curves and Treatment Planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hungyuan B.

    The development of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been progressing in both ^{10 }B compound development and testing and neutron beam delivery. Animal tests are now in progress with several ^{10}B compounds and once the results of these animal tests are promising, patient trials can be initiated. The objective of this study is to create a treatment planning method based on the dose calculations by a Monte Carlo code of a mixed radiation field to provide linkage between phantom dosimetry and patient irradiation. The research started with an overall review of the development of BNCT. Three epithermal neutron facilities are described, including the operating Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) beam, the designed Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) beam, and a designed accelerator based neutron source. The flux and dose distributions in a head model have been calculated for irradiation by these neutron beams. Different beam parameters were inter -compared for effectiveness. Dosimetric measurements in an elliptical lucite phantom and a cylindrical water phantom were made and compared to the MCNP calculations for irradiation by the BMRR beam. Repeated measurements were made and show consistent. To improve the statistical results calculated by MCNP, a neutron source plane was designed to start neutrons at the BMRR irradiation port. The source plane was used with the phantoms for dosimetric calculations. After being verified by different phantom dosimetry and in-air flux measurements at the irradiation port, the source plane was used to calculate the flux and dose distributions in the head model. A treatment planning program was created for use on a PC which uses the MCNP calculated results as input. This program calculates the thermal neutron flux and dose distributions of each component of radiation in the central coronal section of the head model for irradiation by a neutron beam. Different combinations of head orientations and irradiation

  14. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  15. Improved performance in synthetic diamond neutron detectors: Application to boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

    2010-01-01

    An improved thermal and fast neutrons detector is obtained, modifying a recently proposed multilayered homoepitaxial Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond detector (M. Marinelli, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89 (2006) 143509), where a 6LiF layer deposited on the sensing layer was used to convert thermal neutrons into charged particles. By sandwiching this layer between two CVD diamond detectors connected in parallel, a better signal-to-background separation is achieved. This allows to use 10B as converting element, so to realize a detector suitable for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy dosimetry. Also, the doubled detector volume enhances the sensitivity to fast neutrons.

  16. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, María S.; González, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  17. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy for the prevention of restenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Delfaus, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    The potential application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the prevention of restenosis following angioplasty is under investigation at Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications. The process of Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty involves the insertion of a balloon dilation catheter into the occluded artery. The balloon is then inflated for several minutes to dilate the artery. The blockage is decreased, and blood flow through the artery is improved. This procedure is, initially, very successful. However, 30 to 60% of patients treated also show restenosis within 6 months. Although many physiological processes may contribute to restenosis, the primary mechanism is thought to be abnormal proliferation of the smooth muscle cells in the treated artery.

  19. Thiourea derivatives, methods of their preparation and their use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Gabel, D.

    1991-06-04

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  20. Boron containing compounds and their preparation and use in neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Gabel, D.

    1992-09-01

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  1. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhonglu

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm2 treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm2 collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm 10B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm2 fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm2 collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm2 tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm 10B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth in the head phantom for the 5.0-cm thick

  2. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhonglu

    2006-08-01

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiform (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm{sup 2} treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm {sup 10}B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm{sup 2} fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm{sup 2} collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm{sup 2} tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm {sup 10}B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured dose enhancement at 5.0-cm depth in

  3. New compounds for neutron capture therapy (NCT) and their significance

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Clearly the most effective tumor therapy would be obtained by the selective targeting of cytotoxic agents to tumor cells. Although many biomolecules are known to be taken up in tumors, the targeting of cytotoxic agents to tumors is limited by the fact that other essential cell pools compete with equal or even greater effectiveness. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, with activation by means of an external radiation beam, is advantageous for two reasons: (1) it obviates problems associated with high uptake of isotopes in normal tissues, as these cell pools can be excluded from the radiation field, and (2) the general tumor area can be included in the activating beam field; thus, the possibility exists that all microscopic tumor extensions can be irradiated. As long as range of reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to the tumor, with a resultant high therapeutic ratio. This method can be accomplished with either photon activation therapy (PAT) or Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), the latter will be emphasized here. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10 ..mu..m, or one cell diameter; hence this reaction is optimal for cell killing. A number of biomolecules have been investigated as possible vehicles for transport of boron to tumors, including phenothiazines, thiouracils, porphyrins, nucleosides, and amino acids. Biodistributions of these compounds show selective concentration in tumor adequate for therapy. The biological halflives are in the order of days, allowing the possibility of fractionated or protracted irradiations. The radiobiological and physical implication of these parameters on NCT are discussed. The possibility of using an approximately-monoenergetic, scandium-filtered beam of about 2 keV, to reduce the dose from background radiations by about 85%, is also discussed. (ERB)

  4. Accelerator based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy. Annual report, [October 1990--April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.; Kunze, J.

    1991-05-01

    Several investigators have suggested that a charged particle accelerator with light element reactions might be able to produce enough epithermal neutrons to be useful in Neutron Capture Therapy. The reaction choice so far has been the Li(p,n) reaction with protons up to 2.5 MeV. A moderator around the target would reduce the faster neutrons down to the epithermal energy region. The goals of the present research are: identify better reactions; improve the moderators; and find better combinations of 1 and 2. The target is to achieve, at the patient location, an epithermal neutron current of greater than 10{sup 9}n/cm{sup 2}sec, with a dose to tissue from the neutrons alone of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n and a dose from the gamma rays in the beam of less than 10{sup {minus}10} rads/n.

  5. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  6. A Sealed-Accelerator-Tube Neutron Generator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.-N.; Leung, K.N.; Lee, Y.; Verbeke, J.M.; Vurjic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-06-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator applications. By using a 2.5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source and a computer designed 100 keV accelerator column, peak extractable hydrogen current exceeding 1 A from a 3-mm-diameter aperture, together with H{sup +} yields over 94% have been achieved. These experimental findings together with recent moderator design will enable one to develop compact 14 MeV neutron generators based on the D-T fusion reaction. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without pumping. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, it is estimated that a treatment time of {approx} 45 minutes is needed for boron neutron capture therapy.

  7. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  8. Monte Carlo Calculations of Selected Dose Components in a Head Model for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymińska, Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a very promising form of cancer therapy, consisting in irradiating a stable isotope of boron (10B) concentrated in tumor cells with a low energy neutron beam. This technique makes it possible to destroy tumor cells, leaving healthy tissues practically unaffected. In order to carry out the therapy in the proper way, the proper range of the neutron beam energy has to be chosen. In this paper we present the results of the calculations, using the MCNP code, aiming at studying the energetic dependence of the absorbed dose from the neutron capture reaction on boron (the therapeutic dose), and hydrogen and nitrogen (the injuring dose).

  9. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  10. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  11. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy of intracerebral rat gliosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Joel, D D; Fairchild, R G; Laissue, J A; Saraf, S K; Kalef-Ezra, J A; Slatkin, D N

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of intracerebrally implanted rat gliosarcomas was tested. Preferential accumulation of 10B in tumors was achieved by continuous infusion of the sulfhydryl borane dimer, Na4(10)B24H22S2, at a rate of 45-50 micrograms of 10B per g of body weight per day from day 11 to day 14 after tumor initiation (day 0). This infusion schedule resulted in average blood 10B concentrations of 35 micrograms/ml in a group of 12 gliosarcoma-bearing rats and 45 micrograms/ml in a group of 10 similar gliosarcoma-bearing rats treated by BNCT. Estimated tumor 10B levels in these two groups were 26 and 34 micrograms/g, respectively. On day 14, boron-treated and non-boron-treated rats were exposed to 5.0 or 7.5 MW.min of radiation from the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor that yielded thermal neutron fluences of approximately 2.0 x 10(12) or approximately 3.0 x 10(12) n/cm2, respectively, in the tumors. Untreated rats had a median postinitiation survival time of 21 days. Reactor radiation alone increased median postinitiation survival time to 26 (5.0 MW.min) or 28 (7.5 MW.min) days. The 12 rats that received 5 MW.min of BNCT had a median postinitiation survival time of 60 days. Two of these animals survived greater than 15 months. In the 7.5 MW.min group, the median survival time is not calculable since 6 of the 10 animals remain alive greater than 10 months after BNCT. The estimated radiation doses to tumors in the two BNCT groups were 14.2 and 25.6 Gy equivalents, respectively. Similar gliosarcoma-bearing rats treated with 15.0 or 22.5 Gy of 250-kilovolt peak x-rays had median survival times of only 26 or 31 days, respectively, after tumor initiation. Images PMID:2263630

  13. Epithermal neutron beams from the 7 Li(p,n) reaction near the threshold for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Arias de Saavedra, F.; Pedrosa, M.; Esquinas, P.; L. Jiménez-Bonilla, P.

    2016-11-01

    Two applications for neutron capture therapy of epithermal neutron beams calculated from the 7Li ( p , n reaction are discussed. In particular, i) for a proton beam of 1920 keV of a 30 mA, a neutron beam of adequate features for BNCT is found at an angle of 80° from the forward direction; and ii) for a proton beam of 1910 keV, a neutron beam is obtained at the forward direction suitable for performing radiobiology experiments for the determination of the biological weighting factors of the fast dose component in neutron capture therapy.

  14. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  15. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  16. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved method for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue.

  17. GE PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Bosko, A; Zhilchenkov, D; Reece, W D

    2004-11-01

    This paper discusses the use of a General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy. In particular, the standard PETtrace (18)O target is considered. The resulting dose from the neutrons emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at different depths in a brain phantom. MCNP-simulated results are presented at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 cm depth inside this brain phantom. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in the current configuration allows treating tumors at a depth of up to 4 cm with reasonable treatment times. Further increase of a beam current should significantly improve the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths. PMID:15308192

  18. Epithermal neutron formation for boron neutron capture therapy by adiabatic resonance crossing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, A.; Ghafoori-Fard, H.; Sadeghi, M.

    2014-05-01

    Low-energy protons from the cyclotron in the range of 15-30 MeV and low current have been simulated on beryllium (Be) target with a lead moderator around the target. This research was accomplished to design an epithermal neutron beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using the moderated neutron on the average produced from 9Be target via (p, xn) reaction in Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (ARC) concept. Generation of neutron to proton ratio, energy distribution, flux and dose components in head phantom have been simulated by MCNP5 code. The reflector and collimator were designed in prevention and collimation of derivation neutrons from proton bombarding. The scalp-skull-brain phantom consisting of bone and brain equivalent material has been simulated in order to evaluate the dosimetric effect on the brain. Results of this analysis demonstrated while the proton energy decreased, the dose factor altered according to filters thickness. The maximum epithermal flux revealed using fluental, Fe and bismuth (Bi) filters with thicknesses of 9.4, 3 and 2 cm, respectively and also the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio was 103.85. The potential of the ARC method to replace or complement the current reactor-based supply sources of BNCT purposes.

  19. Designing accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D.L.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Vujic, J.

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction has been investigated as an accelerator-driven neutron source for proton energies between 2.1 and 2.6 MeV. Epithermal neutron beams shaped by three moderator materials, Al/AlF{sub 3}, {sup 7}LiF, and D{sub 2}O, have been analyzed and their usefulness for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments evaluated. Radiation transport through the moderator assembly has been simulated with the Monte Carlo {ital N}-particle code (MCNP). Fluence and dose distributions in a head phantom were calculated using BNCT treatment planning software. Depth-dose distributions and treatment times were studied as a function of proton beam energy and moderator thickness. It was found that an accelerator-based neutron source with Al/AlF{sub 3} or {sup 7}LiF as moderator material can produce depth-dose distributions superior to those calculated for a previously published neutron beam design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, achieving up to {approximately}50{percent} higher doses near the midline of the brain. For a single beam treatment, a proton beam current of 20 mA, and a {sup 7}LiF moderator, the treatment time was estimated to be about 40 min. The tumor dose deposited at a depth of 8 cm was calculated to be about 21 Gy-Eq. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.}

  20. PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) Program for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the PBF/BNCT (Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) during March 1990 include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine, analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination, dosimetry, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support, PBF operations.

  1. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mák, Michael; Štefanica, Jirí; Dostál, Václav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  2. Monte Carlo calculations of epithermal and fast neutron dose in a human head model for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyminska, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a very promising form of cancer therapy, consisting in irradiating a stable isotope of boron (10B) concentrated in tumor cells with a low energy neutron beam. This technique makes it possible to destroy tumor cells, leaving healthy tissues practically unaffected. In order to carry out the therapy in the proper way, the proper range of the neutron beam energy has to be chosen. In this paper we continue the earlier started calculations of the optimum energy range for BNCT, taking into account the absorbed dose from fast neutrons.

  3. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  4. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, A.J.

    1997-08-19

    An improved method is disclosed for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue. 1 fig.

  5. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  6. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  7. Gadolinium as an element for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Liu, H.B.; Laster, B.H.; Gordon, C.R.; Greenberg, D.D.; Warkentien, L.S.

    1992-12-31

    At BNL, preparations are being made to test in vitro compounds containing Gd and compare their response to the response of GD-DTPA to determine if one or several compounds can be located that enter the cells and enhance the Auger effect. Two similar rotators with positions for cell vials that have been constructed for these tests. The first rotator is made of only paraffin which simulates healthy tissue and provides control curves. The second rotator has 135 ppM of Gd-157 in the paraffin to simulate a Gd loaded tumor. Cells are irradiated in vials in the paraffin rotator and in the Gd-paraffin rotator at the epithermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This produces an irradiation similar to what a patient would receive In an actual treatment. A combination of irradiations are made with both rotators; with no Gd compound or IdUrd In the cell media, with only Gd compound in the cell media and with both Gd compound and IdUrd in the cell media. The first set shows the effects of gamma rays from the H(n,gamma) reaction and the prompt gamma rays from capture of neutrons by Gd. The second set shows if there is any effect of Gd being in the cell media or inside the cells, i.e., an Auger effect. The third set shows the effect of enhancement by the IdUrd produced by the gamma rays from neutrons captured by either H or Gd. The fourth set combines all of the reactions and enhancements. Preliminary calculations and physical measurements of the doses that the cells will receive In these rotators have been made.

  8. Gadolinium as an element for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Liu, H.B.; Laster, B.H.; Gordon, C.R.; Greenberg, D.D.; Warkentien, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    At BNL, preparations are being made to test in vitro compounds containing Gd and compare their response to the response of GD-DTPA to determine if one or several compounds can be located that enter the cells and enhance the Auger effect. Two similar rotators with positions for cell vials that have been constructed for these tests. The first rotator is made of only paraffin which simulates healthy tissue and provides control curves. The second rotator has 135 ppM of Gd-157 in the paraffin to simulate a Gd loaded tumor. Cells are irradiated in vials in the paraffin rotator and in the Gd-paraffin rotator at the epithermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This produces an irradiation similar to what a patient would receive In an actual treatment. A combination of irradiations are made with both rotators; with no Gd compound or IdUrd In the cell media, with only Gd compound in the cell media and with both Gd compound and IdUrd in the cell media. The first set shows the effects of gamma rays from the H(n,gamma) reaction and the prompt gamma rays from capture of neutrons by Gd. The second set shows if there is any effect of Gd being in the cell media or inside the cells, i.e., an Auger effect. The third set shows the effect of enhancement by the IdUrd produced by the gamma rays from neutrons captured by either H or Gd. The fourth set combines all of the reactions and enhancements. Preliminary calculations and physical measurements of the doses that the cells will receive In these rotators have been made.

  9. A Project of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy System based on a Proton Linac Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshikai; Asano, Kenji; Arakawa, Akihiro; Fukuchi, Shin; Hiraga, Fujio; Kimura, Kenju; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Kubota, Michio; Kumada, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Sakae, Takeji; Saitoh, Kimiaki; Shibata, Tokushi; Yoshioka, Masakazu

    At present, the clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are being performed at research reactor facilities. However, an accelerator based BNCT has a merit that it can be built in a hospital. So, we just launched a development project for the BNCT based on an accelerator in order to establish and to spread the BNCT as an effective therapy in the near future. In the project, a compact proton linac installed in a hospital will be applied as a neutron source, and energy of the proton beam is planned to be less than about 10 MeV to reduce the radioactivity. The BNCT requires epithermal neutron beam with an intensity of around 1x109 (n/cm2/sec) to deliver the therapeutic dose to a deeper region in a body and to complete the irradiation within an hour. From this condition, the current of the proton beam required is estimated to be a few mA on average. Enormous heat deposition in the target is a big issue. We are aiming at total optimization of the accelerator based BNCT from the linac to the irradiation position. Here, the outline of the project is introduced and the moderator design is presented.

  10. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver

    SciTech Connect

    Bortolussi, S.; Altieri, S.

    2007-12-15

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ({phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min}) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a {phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min} ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  11. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations. PMID:18196797

  12. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosko, Andrey

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

  13. Dosimetric implications of new compounds for neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Systemic application of radiolabeled or cytotoxic agents should allow targeting of primary and metastatic neoplasms on a cellular level. In fact, drug uptake in non-target cell pools often exceeds toxic levels before sufficient amounts are delivered to tumor. In addition, at the large concentration of molecules necessary for therapy, effects of saturation are often found. Application of NCT can circumvent problems associated with high uptake in competing non-target cell pools, as the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is activated only within the radiation field. A comparison with other modes of particle therapy indicated that NCT provides significant advantages. It is however, difficult to obtain vehicles for boron transport which demonstrate both the tumor specificity and concentration requisite for NCT. A number of biomolecules have been investigated which show both the necessary concentration and specificity. These include chlorpromazine, thiouracil, porphyrins, amino acids, and nucleosides. However, these analogs have yet to be made available for NCT. Dosimetric implications of binding sites are considered, as well as alternate neutron sources. (ERB)

  14. [Principles of therapy with fission neutrons and boron neutron capture therapy for radioresistant head-neck malignancies].

    PubMed

    Clasen, B

    1990-08-01

    Neutron therapy has proven to be clinically useful in cases of advanced, slow-growing radioresistant head and neck carcinoma. Therapeutic effects might be based on direct DNA damaging and thus immediate cell-killing, on the generation of free oxygen radicals and, among others, on the fact that heavy particle radiation is said to be less dependent on the presence of oxygen than gamma rays, i.e. on a lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER). The smaller difference in reaction between oxygenated and nonoxygenated cells could entail advantages as well as disadvantages, depending on the characteristics of the tumor cell population and of the normal tissue. It is therefore essential to select patients and tumours with an expectedly high therapeutic gain factor. Fission neutrons for tumour therapy: As evaluated by several in vitro and in vivo studies (11/13) the biological efficiency (RBE) of the RENT (Reactor Neutron Therapy) beam in Munich seems to be among the highest of all clinically used neutron beams. For a single dose range between 2 and 8 Gy the RBE for chronic radiation damage is relatively small (2). Consequently, patients with recurrent or metastatic carcinomas of the head and neck are treated with a single dose of 200-250 cGy after previous surgery and/or combined radiochemotherapy. The main limitation of fission neutrons is the small penetration depth. Possibilities of clinical implementation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in otorhinolaryngology: In near surface tumours it is possible to administer high doses of 10boron not selectively, i.e. no selective tumour-seeking compound is needed. Animal experiments with intratumoural injection of 10boron glycine have shown a strong effect on tumour growth delay (18).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2222692

  15. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC): application for photodynamic therapy and boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kawabata, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Hao, Erhong; Vicente, M Graça H

    2015-03-01

    Carboranyl-containing chlorins have emerged as promising dual sensitizers for use in both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), by virtue of their known tumor affinity, low cytotoxicity in dark conditions, and their strong absorptions in the red region of the optical spectrum. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC) is a new synthetic carboranyl-containing chlorin of high boron content (24% by weight). To evaluate TPFC's applicability as sensitizer for both PDT and BNCT, we performed an in vitro and in vivo study using F98 rat glioma cells and F98 rat glioma-bearing brain tumor models. For the in vivo BNCT study, we used boronophenylalanine (BPA), which is currently used in clinical BNCT studies, via intravenous administration (i.v.) and/or used TPFC via convection-enhanced delivery (CED), a method for local drug infusion directly into the brain. In the in vitro PDT study, the cell surviving fraction following laser irradiation (9 J/cm(2) ) was 0.035 whereas in the in vitro BNCT study, the cell surviving fraction following neutron irradiation (thermal neutron = 1.73 × 10(12) n/cm(2) ) was 0.04. In the in vivo BNCT study, the median survival time following concomitant administration of BPA (i.v.) and TPFC (CED) was 42 days (95% confidence interval; 37-43 days). PMID:25546823

  16. Tetrakis(p-Carboranylthio-Tetrafluorophenyl)Chlorin (TPFC): Application for Photodynamic Therapy and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    HIRAMATSU, RYO; KAWABATA, SHINJI; TANAKA, HIROKI; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; SUZUKI, MINORU; ONO, KOJI; MIYATAKE, SHIN-ICHI; KUROIWA, TOSHIHIKO; HAO, ERHONG; VICENTE, M. GRAÇA H.

    2015-01-01

    Carboranyl-containing chlorins have emerged as promising dual sensitizers for use in both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), by virtue of their known tumor affinity, low cytotoxicity in dark conditions, and their strong absorptions in the red region of the optical spectrum. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC) is a new synthetic carboranyl-containing chlorin of high boron content (24% by weight). To evaluate TPFC’s applicability as sensitizer for both PDT and BNCT, we performed an in vitro and in vivo study using F98 rat glioma cells and F98 rat glioma-bearing brain tumor models. For the in vivo BNCT study, we used boronophenylalanine (BPA), which is currently used in clinical BNCT studies, via intravenous administration (i.v.) and/or used TPFC via convection-enhanced delivery (CED), a method for local drug infusion directly into the brain. In the in vitro PDT study, the cell surviving fraction following laser irradiation (9 J/cm2) was 0.035 whereas in the in vitro BNCT study, the cell surviving fraction following neutron irradiation (thermal neutron = 1.73 × 1012 n/cm2) was 0.04. In the in vivo BNCT study, the median survival time following concomitant administration of BPA (i.v.) and TPFC (CED) was 42 days (95% confidence interval; 37–43 days). PMID:25546823

  17. (A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

  18. Neutron capture therapy: a comparison between dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Rahmani, Faezeh; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to compare dose enhancement of various agents, nanoparticles and chemotherapy drugs for neutron capture therapy. A (252)Cf source was simulated to obtain its dosimetric parameters, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and total dose rates. These results were compared with previously published data. Using (252)Cf as a neutron source, the in-tumour dose enhancements in the presence of atomic (10)B, (157)Gd and (33)S agents; (10)B, (157)Gd, (33)S nanoparticles; and Bortezomib and Amifostine chemotherapy drugs were calculated and compared in neutron capture therapy. Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used for simulation of the (252)Cf source, a soft tissue phantom, and a tumour containing each capture agent. Dose enhancement for 100, 200 and 500 ppm of the mentioned media was calculated. Calculated dosimetric parameters of the (252)Cf source were in agreement with previously published values. In comparison to other agents, maximum dose enhancement factor was obtained for 500 ppm of atomic (10)B agent and (10)B nanoparticles, equal to 1.06 and 1.08, respectively. Additionally, Bortezomib showed a considerable dose enhancement level. From a dose enhancement point of view, media containing (10)B are the best agents in neutron capture therapy. Bortezomib is a chemotherapy drug containing boron and can be proposed as an agent in boron neutron capture therapy. However, it should be noted that other physical, chemical and medical criteria should be considered in comparing the mentioned agents before their clinical use in neutron capture therapy. PMID:24961208

  19. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-09-03

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 10}) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity.

  20. Effect of diameter of nanoparticles and capture cross-section library on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of diameter of 10B nanoparticles and various neutron capture cross-section libraries on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of a 252Cf source, a soft tissue phantom and a tumor containing 10B nanoparticles. Using 252Cf as a neutron source, macroscopic dose enhancement factor (MDEF) and total dose rate in tumor in the presence of 100, 200, and 500 ppm of 10B nanoparticles with 25 nm, 50 nm, and 100 nm diameters were calculated. Additionally, the effect of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, and CENDL neutron capture cross-section libraries on MDEF was evaluated. Results There is not a linear relationship between the average MDEF value and nanoparticles’ diameter but the average MDEF grows with increased concentration of 10B nanoparticles. There is an increasing trend for average MDEF with the tumor distance. The average MDEF values were obtained the same for various neutron capture cross-section libraries. The maximum and minimum doses that effect on the total dose in tumor were neutron and secondary photon doses, respectively. Furthermore, the boron capture related dose component reduced in some extent with increase of diameter of 10B nanoparticles. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that from physical point of view, various nanoparticle diameters have no dominant effect on average MDEF value in tumor. Furthermore, it is concluded that various neutron capture cross-section libraries are resulted to the same macroscopic dose enhancements. However, it is predicted that taking into account the biological effects for various nanoparticle diameters will result in different dose enhancements. PMID:25834582

  1. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, {alpha})7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,{gamma})2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning.

  2. Improvement of depth dose distribution using multiple-field irradiation in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, N; Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y; Takata, T; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Nakagawa, Y; Watanabe, T; Kinashi, Y; Masunaga, S; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K; Suzuki, M

    2015-12-01

    It is important that improvements are made to depth dose distribution in boron neutron capture therapy, because the neutrons do not reach the innermost regions of the human body. Here, we evaluated the dose distribution obtained using multiple-field irradiation in simulation. From a dose volume histogram analysis, it was found that the mean and minimum tumor doses were increased using two-field irradiation, because of improved dose distribution for deeper-sited tumors. PMID:26282566

  3. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for Cancer Treatment: Volume 4, No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-05-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program during April 1990 include progress within areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support; and PBF operations -- routine operations continue. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy program for cancer treatment, Volume 4, No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses the monthly progress of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNLT) program for cancer treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during July 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support and PBF operations.

  5. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  6. A state-of-the-art epithermal neutron irradiation facility for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Harling, O K

    2004-08-21

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) the first fission converter-based epithermal neutron beam (FCB) has proven suitable for use in clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The modern facility provides a high intensity beam together with low levels of contamination that is ideally suited for use with future, more selective boron delivery agents. Prescriptions for normal tissue tolerance doses consist of 2 or 3 fields lasting less than 10 min each with the currently available beam intensity, that are administered with an automated beam monitoring and control system to help ensure safety of the patient and staff alike. A quality assurance program ensures proper functioning of all instrumentation and safety interlocks as well as constancy of beam output relative to routine calibrations. Beam line shutters and the medical room walls provide sufficient shielding to enable access and use of the facility without affecting other experiments or normal operation of the multipurpose research reactor at MIT. Medical expertise and a large population in the greater Boston area are situated conveniently close to the university, which operates the research reactor 24 h a day for approximately 300 days per year. The operational characteristics of the facility closely match those established for conventional radiotherapy, which together with a near optimum beam performance ensure that the FCB is capable of determining whether the radiobiological promise of NCT can be realized in routine practice. PMID:15446801

  7. Initial Performance Characterization for a Thermalized Neutron Beam for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; P.E> Sloan; J.R. Venhuizen; C.A. Wemple

    2005-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Washington State University (WSU) have constructed a new epithermal-neutron beam for collaborative Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preclinical research at the WSU TRIGATM research reactor facility1. More recently, additional beamline components were developed to permit the optional thermalization of the beam for certain types of studies where it is advantageous to use a thermal neutron source rather than an epithermal source. This article summarizes the results of some initial neutronic performance measurements for the thermalized system, with a comparison to the expected performance from the design computations.

  8. A beam-modification assembly for experimental neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, D.N.; Kalef-Ezra, J.A.; Saraf, S.K.; Joel, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent attempts to treat intracerebral rat gliomas by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been somewhat disappointing, perhaps in part because of excessive whole-body and nasopharyngeal irradiation. Intracerebral rat gliomas were treated by BNCT with more success using a new beam-modification assembly. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Neutron therapy of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Nellans, H. N.; Shaw, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Reports relate applications of neutrons to the problem of cancer therapy. The biochemical and biophysical aspects of fast-neutron therapy, neutron-capture and neutron-conversion therapy with intermediate-range neutrons are presented. Also included is a computer program for neutron-gamma radiobiology.

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  11. 33S for Neutron Capture Therapy: Nuclear Data for Monte Carlo Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, I.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Esquinas, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    A study of the nuclear data required for the Monte Carlo simulation of boron neutron capture therapy including the 33S isotope as an enhancer of the dose at small depths has been performed. In particular, the controversy on the available data for the 33S(n, α) cross section will be shown, which motivates new measurements. In addition to this, kerma factors for the main components of tissue are calculated with the use of fitting functions. Finally, we have applied these data to a potential neutron capture treatment with boron and sulfur addition to tissue in which part of the hydrogen atoms are replaced by deuterium, which improves the procedure.

  12. Using the TREAT reactor in support of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) experiments: A feasibility analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grasseschi, G.L.; Schaefer, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    The technical feasibility of using the TREAT reactor facility for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research was assessed. Using one-dimensional neutronics calculations, it was shown that the TREAT core neutron spectrum can be filtered to reduce the undesired radiation (contamination) dose per desired neutron more effectively than can the core spectra from two prominent candidate reactors. Using two-dimensional calculations, it was demonstrated that a non-optimized filter replacing the TREAT thermal column can yield a fluence of desired-energy neutrons more than twice as large as the fluence believed to be required and, at the same time, have a contamination dose per desired neutron almost as low as that from any other candidate facility. The time, effort and cost required to adapt TREAT for a mission supporting BNCT research would be modest.

  13. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Stovall, J.E.; Bhatia, T.S.; Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture theory (BNCT). The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of epithermal neutrons. The patient is administered a tumor-specific /sup 10/Be-enriched compound and is irradiated by the neutrons to create a highly localized dose from the reaction /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li. An RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT is compact, which makes it practical to site the facility within a hospital. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Monte Carlo calculations of lung dose in ORNL phantom for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Markovic, V M; Jovanovic, Z; Milenkovic, B; Nikezic, D; Atanackovic, J

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate dose for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of male Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) phantom was used to simulate tumours in the lung. Calculations have been performed by means of the MCNP5/X code. In this simulation, two opposite neutron beams were considered, in order to obtain uniform neutron flux distribution inside the lung. The obtained results indicate that the lung cancer could be treated by BNCT under the assumptions of calculations. PMID:24435912

  15. (A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes accomplishments by this laboratory concerning development of high-resolution alpha-autoradiography design of an optimized epithermal neutron beam dosimetry and treatment planning Using Monte Carlo techniques development of a prompt-gamma {sup 10}B analysis facility.

  16. (A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This document briefly describes recent advances in the author's laboratory. Topics described include neutron beam design, high- resolution autoradiography, boronated phenylalanine (BPA) distribution and survival studies in glioma bearing mice, computer- aided treatment planning, prompt gamma boron 10 analysis facility at MITI-II, non-rodent BPA toxicity studies, and preparations for clinical studies.

  17. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Bergland, R.; Capala, J.

    1995-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. {sup 10}B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the {sup 10}B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the {sup 10}B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 {mu}m, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to {sup 10}B-loaded cells.

  18. [Possibilities of boron neutron capture therapy in the treatment of malignant brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Kanygin, V V; Kichigin, A I; Gubanova, N V; Taskaev, S Yu

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) that is of the highest attractiveness due to its selective action directly on malignant tumor cells is a promising approach to treating cancers. Clinical interest in BNCT focuses in neuro-oncology on therapy for gliomas, glioblastoma in particular, and BNCT may be used in brain metastatic involvement. This needs an epithermal neutron source that complies with the requirements for BNCT, as well as a 10B-containing agent that will selectively accumulate in tumor tissue. The introduction of BNCT into clinical practice to treat patients with glial tumors will be able to enhance therapeutic efficiency. PMID:26999933

  19. Final Stage in the Design of a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility at CEADEN, Cuba

    SciTech Connect

    Cabal, F. Padilla; Martin, G.

    2008-08-11

    A neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Two figures-of-merit, the therapeutic gain and the neutron fluence are utilized as beam assessment parameters. An irradiation cavity is used instead of a parallel beam port for the therapy. Calculations are performed using the MCNP5 code. After the optimization of our beam-shaper a study of the dose distribution in the head, neck, tyroids, lungs and upper and middle spine had been made. The therapeutic gain is increased while the current required for one hour treatment is decreased in comparison with the trading prototypes of NG used for BNCT.

  20. Final Stage in the Design of a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility at CEADEN, Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabal, F. Padilla; Martín, G.

    2008-08-01

    A neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Two figures-of-merit, the therapeutic gain and the neutron fluence are utilized as beam assessment parameters. An irradiation cavity is used instead of a parallel beam port for the therapy. Calculations are performed using the MCNP5 code. After the optimization of our beam-shaper a study of the dose distribution in the head, neck, tyroids, lungs and upper and middle spine had been made. The therapeutic gain is increased while the current required for one hour treatment is decreased in comparison with the trading prototypes of NG used for BNCT

  1. The possible use of a spallation neutron source for neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grusell, E.; Conde, H.; Larsson, B.; Roennqvist, T.; Sornsuntisook, O.; Crawford, J.; Reist, H.; Dahl, B.; Sjoestrand, N.G.; Russel, G. . Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Paul Scherrer Inst. , Villigen; Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg . Dept. of Reactor Physics; Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1989-01-01

    Spallation is induced in a heavy material by 72 MeV protons. The hereby produced neutrons with essentially an evaporation spectrum with a peak energy of less than 2 MeV are moderated in two steps, first in iron, and then in carbon. Results from neutron fluence measurements in a perspex phantom placed close to the moderator are presented. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluence in a water phantom are also presented under some chosen configurations of spallation source and moderator. The calculations and measurements show a good agreement and also show that useful thermal neutron fluences are attainable in the depth of the brain, at proton currents of less than 0.5 mA. 3 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. A comparison of the COG and MCNP codes in computational neutron capture therapy modeling, Part II: gadolinium neutron capture therapy models and therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Wangerin, K; Culbertson, C N; Jevremovic, T

    2005-08-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the COG Monte Carlo radiation transport code, developed and tested by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, for gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) related modeling. The validity of COG NCT model has been established for this model, and here the calculation was extended to analyze the effect of various gadolinium concentrations on dose distribution and cell-kill effect of the GdNCT modality and to determine the optimum therapeutic conditions for treating brain cancers. The computational results were compared with the widely used MCNP code. The differences between the COG and MCNP predictions were generally small and suggest that the COG code can be applied to similar research problems in NCT. Results for this study also showed that a concentration of 100 ppm gadolinium in the tumor was most beneficial when using an epithermal neutron beam. PMID:16010124

  3. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  4. a New Method for Neutron Capture Therapy (nct) and Related Simulation by MCNP4C Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Mousavi; Alireza, Seyed; Ali, Taheri

    2010-01-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is enumerated as one of the most important methods for treatment of some strong maladies among cancers in medical science thus is unavoidable controlling and protecting instances in use of this science. Among of treatment instances of this maladies with use of nuclear medical science is use of neutron therapy that is one of the most important and effective methods in treatment of cancers. But whereas fast neutrons have too destroyer effects and also sake of protection against additional absorbed energy (absorbed dose) by tissue during neutron therapy and also naught damaging to rest of healthy tissues, should be measured absorbed energy by tissue accurately, because destroyer effects of fast neutrons is almost quintuple more than gamma photons. In this article for neutron therapy act of male's liver has been simulated a system by the Monte Carlo method (MCNP4C code) and also with use of analytical method, thus absorbed dose by this tissue has been obtained for sources with different energies accurately and has been compared results of this two methods together.

  5. Improved monitoring system of neutron flux during boron-neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harasawa, S.; Nakamoto, A.; Hayakawa, Y.; Egawa, J.

    1981-10-01

    Continuous and simultaneous monitoring of neutron flux in the course of a boron-neutron capture operation on a brain tumor has been achieved using a new monitoring system. A silicon surface barrier diode mounted with /sup 6/LiF instead of the previously reported borax is used to sense neutrons. The pulse heights of /sup 3/H and ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 6/Li(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 2/H reaction are sufficiently high and well separated from noises due to ..gamma.. rays. The effect of pulse-height reduction due to the radiation damage of the diode thus becomes smaller, permitting continuous monitoring. The relative error of the monitoring is within 2% over 5 hr for a neutron-flux density of 2 x 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2/ sec.

  6. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  7. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality. PMID:18439836

  8. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  9. Carboranyl amino acids for the specific neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, S.B.

    1991-01-15

    We are pleased to summarize the very significant progress made since our last report dated April 6, 1990. Significant progress has been made toward our twin objectives of both the steroselective and non-steroselective synthesis of carborane-containing amino acids for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma. Additionally, we have developed a new, general procedure for the synthesis of a variety of {alpha}-amino acids which may find wide applicability in this area. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Estimation of absorbed dose in the covering skin of human melanoma treated by neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Hiratsuka, J.; Karashima, H.; Honda, C.; Yamamura, K.; Ichihashi, M.; Kanda, K.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-07-01

    A patient with malignant melanoma was treated by thermal neutron capture therapy using 10B-paraboronophenylalanine. The compound was injected subcutaneously into ten locations in the tumor-surrounding skin, and the patient was then irradiated with thermal neutrons from the Musashi Reactor at reactor power of 100 KW and neutron flux of 1.2 X 10(9) n/cm{sup 2}/s. Total absorbed dose to the skin was 11.7-12.5 Gy in the radiation field. The dose equivalents of these doses were estimated as 21.5 and 24.4 Sv, respectively. Early skin reaction after irradiation was checked from day 1 to day 60. The maximum and mean skin scores were 2.0 and 1.5, respectively, and the therapy was safely completed as far as skin reaction was concerned. Some factors influencing the absorbed dose and dose equivalent to the skin are discussed.

  11. Tandem-ESQ for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Burlon, A. A.; Di Paolo, H.; Minsky, D.; Debray, M.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H. R.

    2007-02-12

    A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed as a machine for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT). The machine is shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep seated tumors in less than an hour.

  12. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations. PMID:25479433

  13. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, H.E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 10{sup 7} neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF{sub 3} composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HOLDEN,N.E.

    2002-08-18

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  15. Optimization of the Epithermal Neutron Beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

    2004-05-01

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  16. A novel approach to the microdosimetry of neutron capture therapy. Part I. High-resolution quantitative autoradiography applied to microdosimetry in neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, G.R.; Zamenhof, R.G. |

    1995-10-01

    A novel approach to the microdosimetry of neutron capture therapy has been developed using high-resolution quantitative autoradiography (HRQAR) and two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation. This approach has been applied using actual cell morophology (nuclear and cytoplasmic cell structures) and the measured microdistribution of boron-10 in a transplanted murine brain tumor (GL261) containing p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron compound. The 2D Monte Carlo transport code for the {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reactions has been developed as a surrogate to a full 3D approach to calculate a variety of different microdosimetric parameters. The HRQAR method and the surrogate 2D Monte Carlo approach are described in detail and examples of their use are presented. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h-1. These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  18. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field. PMID:17440252

  19. Design of neutron beams for neutron capture therapy using a 300-kW slab TRIGA reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.B.

    1995-03-01

    A design for a slab reactor to produce an epithermal neutron beam and a thermal neutron beam for use in neutron capture therapy (NCT) is described. A thin reactor with two large-area faces, a ``slab`` reactor, was planned using eighty-six 20% enriched TRIGA fuel elements and four B{sub 4}C control rods. Two neutron beams were designed: an epithermal neutron beam from one face and a thermal neutron beam from the other. The planned facility, based on this slab-reactor core with a maximum operating power of 300 kW, will provide an epithermal neutron beam of 1.8 {times} 10{sup 9} n{sub epi}/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s intensity with low contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays and a thermal neutron beam of 9.0 {times} 10{sup 9}n{sub th}/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s intensity with low fast-neutron dose and gamma dose. Both neutron beams will be forward directed. Each beam can be turned on and off independently through its individual shutter. A complete NCT treatment using the designed epithermal or thermal neutron beam would take 30 or 20 min, respectively, under the condition of assuming 10{mu}g {sup 10}B/g in the blood. Such exposure times should be sufficiently short to maintain near-optimal target (e.g., {sup 10}B, {sup 157}Gd, and {sup 235}U) distribution in tumor versus normal tissues throughout the irradiation. With a low operating power of 300 kW, the heat generated in the core can be removed by natural convection through a pool of light water. The proposed design in this study could be constructed for a dedicated clinical NCT facility that would operate very safely.

  20. {sup 33}S for Neutron Capture Therapy: Nuclear Data for Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Porras, I.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.M.; Esquinas, P.L.

    2014-06-15

    A study of the nuclear data required for the Monte Carlo simulation of boron neutron capture therapy including the {sup 33}S isotope as an enhancer of the dose at small depths has been performed. In particular, the controversy on the available data for the {sup 33}S(n, α) cross section will be shown, which motivates new measurements. In addition to this, kerma factors for the main components of tissue are calculated with the use of fitting functions. Finally, we have applied these data to a potential neutron capture treatment with boron and sulfur addition to tissue in which part of the hydrogen atoms are replaced by deuterium, which improves the procedure.

  1. Numerical characterization of a tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A. A.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    A tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on the measurement of a specific 478 keV {gamma}-ray emitted after the neutron capture in boron is being developed. In the present work we study by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations the effects of the finite spatial resolution and the limited number of counts, i. e. the statistical noise, on the reconstructed image contrast of numerical phantoms. These phantoms, of simple geometry, mimic the tumor (specific) and the normal tissue (non specific) boron concentrations. The simulated projection data were reconstructed using the expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood algorithm. These studies will help in the improvement of BNCT dosimetry.

  2. Calculation of dose components in head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ademir X; Crispim, Verginia R

    2002-11-01

    Application of neutrons to cancer treatment has been a subject of considerable clinical and research interest since the discovery of the neutron by Chadwick in 1932 (3). Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a technique of radiation oncology which is used in treating brain cancer (glioblastoma multiform) or melanoma and that consists of preferentially loading a compound containing 10B into the tumor location, followed by the irradiation of the patient with a beam of neutron. Dose distribution for BNCT is mainly based on Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, the absorbed dose spatial distribution resultant from an idealized neutron beam incident upon ahead phantom is investigated using the Monte Carlo N-particles code, MCNP 4B. The phantom model used is based on the geometry of a circular cylinder on which sits an elliptical cylinder capped by half an ellipsoid representing the neck and head, both filled with tissue-equivalent material. The neutron flux and the contribution of individual absorbed dose components, as a function of depths and of radial distance from the beam axis (dose profiles) in phantom model, is presented and discussed. For the studied beam the maximum thermal neutron flux is at a depth of 2 cm and the maximum gamma dose at a depth of 4 cm. PMID:12622057

  3. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for Cancer Treatment: Volume 4, No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-04-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program during April 1990 include progress within the areas of: gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; analytical methodologies development for BSH (Borocaptate Sodium) purity determination; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; operator training was conducted and pharmacokinetic data obtained using a laboratory dog; dosimetry development continues on real-time neutron and gamma monitoring to provide treatment control capability; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation -- PBF upgrades, required for environmental, safety, and OSHA compliance, continue; administration and common support; and PBF operations -- training, safety, and preventive maintenance activities continue. 3 figs.

  4. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, α) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg 10B/g blood.

  5. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-22

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, {alpha}) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg {sup 10}B/g blood.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of boron compounds for neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy offers the potentiality for treating brain tumors currently resistant to treatment. The success of this form of therapy is directly dependent upon the delivery of sufficient numbers of thermal-neutrons to tumor cells which possess high concentrations of B-10. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methodology to synthesize boron-containing compounds with the potential for becoming incorporated into rapidly-dividing malignant brain tumor cells and excluded from normal components of the brain and surrounding tissues, to develope biological methods for assessing the potential of the compound by use of cell culture or intratumoral injection, to develop analytical methodology for measuring boron in cells and tissue using direct current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (DCP-AES) and alpha track autoradiography, to develop biochemical and HPLC procedures for evaluating compound uptake and tissue half-life, and to develop procedures required to assess both in vitro and vivo efficacy of BNCT with selected compounds.

  7. Sublethal and potentially lethal damage repair on thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Ichihashi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Elkind, M.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Tonicity shock or caffeine postirradiation treatment makes evident fast-type potentially lethal damage (PLD). Caffeine expresses fast-type PLD more efficiently than tonicity shock in X-irradiated B-16 mouse melanoma cells, compared with V79 Chinese hamster cells. The survival curves of thermal neutrons for either V79 or B-16 cells exhibit no shoulder. Neither V79 nor B-16 cells show the sublethal damage (SLD) repair of thermal neutrons. Caffeine-sensitive fast-type PLD repairs exist in X-irradiated B-16 cells, as well as V79 cells. The fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells exposed to thermal neutrons alone is rather less than that of X-irradiated cells. Furthermore, an extremely low level of fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells with 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (BPA) preincubation (20 hours) followed by thermal neutron irradiation indicated that 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction effectively eradicates actively growing melanoma cells. The plateau-phase B-16 cells are well able to repair the slow-type PLD of X-rays. However, cells can not repair the slow-type PLD induced by thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B1-BPA preincubation. These results suggest that thermal neutron capture therapy can effectively kill radioresistant melanoma cells in both proliferating and quiescent phases.

  8. Characteristics comparison between a cyclotron-based neutron source and KUR-HWNIF for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Masunaga, S.; Kinashi, Y.; Kashino, G.; Liu, Y.; Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Maruhashi, A.; Ono, K.

    2009-06-01

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), 275 clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been performed as of March 2006, and the effectiveness of BNCT has been revealed. In order to further develop BNCT, it is desirable to supply accelerator-based epithermal-neutron sources that can be installed near the hospital. We proposed the method of filtering and moderating fast neutrons, which are emitted from the reaction between a beryllium target and 30-MeV protons accelerated by a cyclotron accelerator, using an optimum moderator system composed of iron, lead, aluminum and calcium fluoride. At present, an epithermal-neutron source is under construction from June 2008. This system consists of a cyclotron accelerator, beam transport system, neutron-yielding target, filter, moderator and irradiation bed. In this article, an overview of this system and the properties of the treatment neutron beam optimized by the MCNPX Monte Carlo neutron transport code are presented. The distribution of biological effect weighted dose in a head phantom compared with that of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is shown. It is confirmed that for the accelerator, the biological effect weighted dose for a deeply situated tumor in the phantom is 18% larger than that for KUR, when the limit dose of the normal brain is 10 Gy-eq. The therapeutic time of the cyclotron-based neutron sources are nearly one-quarter of that of KUR. The cyclotron-based epithermal-neutron source is a promising alternative to reactor-based neutron sources for treatments by BNCT.

  9. Design of neutron beams at the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL) for boron neutron capture therapy and neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.L.; McMichael, G.E.

    1994-10-01

    Neutron beams are designed for capture therapy based on p-Li and p-Sc reactions using the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL). The p-Li beam will provide a 2.5 {times} 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}s epithermal flux with 7 {times} 10{sup 5} {gamma}/cm{sup 2}s contamination. On a human brain phantom, this beam allows an advantage depth (AD) of 10 cm, an advantage depth dose rate (ADDR) of 78 cGy/min and an advantage ratio (AR) of 3.2. The p-Sc beam offers 5.9 {times} 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}s and a dose performance of AD = 8 cm and AR = 3.5, suggesting the potential of near-threshold (p,n) reactions such as the p-Li reaction at E{sub p} = 1.92 MeV. A thermal radiography beam could also be obtained from ACWL.

  10. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV. PMID:26573366

  11. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key

    2014-02-24

    Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography image from boron neutron capture therapy using Monte Carlo simulation. Prompt gamma ray (478 keV) was used to reconstruct image with ordered subsets expectation maximization method. From analysis of receiver operating characteristic curve, area under curve values of three boron regions were 0.738, 0.623, and 0.817. The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.4 cm.

  12. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Jo Hong, Key; Suk Suh, Tae

    2014-02-01

    Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography image from boron neutron capture therapy using Monte Carlo simulation. Prompt gamma ray (478 keV) was used to reconstruct image with ordered subsets expectation maximization method. From analysis of receiver operating characteristic curve, area under curve values of three boron regions were 0.738, 0.623, and 0.817. The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.4 cm.

  13. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT. PMID:26278348

  14. Boron containing magnetic nanoparticles for neutron capture therapy--an innovative approach for specifically targeting tumors.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Dürr, Stephan; Lyer, Stefan; Canella, Lea; Kudejova, Petra; Wagner, Franz M; Petry, Winfried; Taccardi, Nicola; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    The selective delivery of (10)B into the tumor tissue remains to be further improved for successful and reliable Boron Neutron Capture Therapy applications. Magnetic Drug Targeting using intraarterially administered superparamagnetic nanoparticles and external magnetic fields already exhibited convincing results in terms of highly efficient and selective drug deposition. Using the same technique for the targeted (10)B delivery is a promising new approach. Here, systematic irradiation experiments of phantom cubes containing different concentrations of boron and nanoparticles as well as varying three-dimensional arrangements have been performed. PMID:26242559

  15. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  16. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-06-01

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,l-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content. PMID:24447933

  17. Validation of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy using cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Seppälä, Tiina; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Merimaa, Katja; Kotiluoto, Petri; Serén, Tom; Kortesniemi, Mika; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, the accuracy of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain and head and neck cancer was studied at the FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam. A cylindrical water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were applied with two beam aperture-to-surface distances (ASD). The calculations using the simulation environment for radiation application (SERA) treatment planning system were compared to neutron activation measurements with Au and Mn foils, photon dose measurements with an ionization chamber and the reference simulations with the MCNP5 code. Photon dose calculations using SERA differ from the ionization chamber measurements by 2-13% (disagreement increased along the depth in the phantom), but are in agreement with the MCNP5 calculations within 2%. The 55Mn(n,γ) and 197Au(n,γ) reaction rates calculated using SERA agree within 10% and 8%, respectively, with the measurements and within 5% with the MCNP5 calculations at depths >0.5 cm from the phantom surface. The 55Mn(n,γ) reaction rate represents the nitrogen and boron depth dose within 1%. Discrepancy in the SERA fast neutron dose calculation (of up to 37%) is corrected if the biased fast neutron dose calculation option is not applied. Reduced voxel cell size (<=0.5 cm) improves the SERA calculation accuracy on the phantom surface. Despite the slight overestimation of the epithermal neutrons and underestimation of the thermal neutrons in the beam model, neutron calculation accuracy with the SERA system is sufficient for reliable BNCT treatment planning with the two studied treatment distances. The discrepancy between measured and calculated photon dose remains unsatisfactorily high for depths >6 cm from the phantom surface. Increasing discrepancy along the phantom depth is expected to be caused by the inaccurately determined effective point of the ionization chamber.

  18. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi} and 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi}, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  19. NIFTI and DISCOS: New concepts for a compact accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1995-06-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses fluoride compounds, such as lead or beryllium fluoride, to efficiently degrade high energy neutrons from the lithium target to the lower energies required for BNCT. The fluoride compounds are in turn encased in an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron filter, which has a deep window in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films or sheets of discrete droplets--through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is re-accelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator--target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production--resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons--while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current. Parametric trade studies of the NIFTI and DISCOS concepts are described. These include analyses of a broad range of NIFTI designs using the Monte carlo MCNP neutronics code, as well as mechanical and thermal-hydraulic analyses of various DISCOS designs.

  20. Inhibition of human pancreatic cancer growth in nude mice by boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagië, H.; Tomita, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujii, Y.; Nonaka, Y.; Saegusa, Y.; Hasumi, K.; Eriguchi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Ono, K.

    1997-01-01

    Immunoliposomes were prepared by conjugating anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody with liposomes containing [10B]compound. These immunoliposomes were shown to bind selectively to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) bearing CEA on their surface. The cytotoxic effects of locally injected [10B]compound, multilamellar liposomes containing [10B]compound or [10B]immunoliposomes (anti-CEA) on human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were evaluated with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with [10B]solution, 10B-containing liposomes or [10B]immunoliposomes, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Injection of [10B]immunoliposomes caused the greatest tumour suppression with thermal neutron irradiation in vivo. Histopathologically, hyalinization and necrosis were found in 10B-treated tumours, while tumour tissue injected with saline or saline-containing immunoliposomes showed neither destruction nor necrosis. These results suggest that intratumoral injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10B atoms by tumour cells, causing tumour growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with intratumoral injection of immunoliposomes is able to destroy malignant cells in the marginal portion between normal tissues and cancer tissues from the side of 4He generation. Images Figure 2 PMID:9043021

  1. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks. PMID:21459008

  2. Dose homogeneity in boron neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Konijnenberg, M.W.; Dewit, L.G.H.; Mijnheer, B.J.

    1995-06-01

    Simulation models based on the neutron and photon Monte Carlo code MCNP were used to study the therapeutic possibilities of the HB11 epithermal neutron beam at the High Flux Reactor in Petten. Irradiations were simulated in two types of phantoms filled with water or tissue-equivalent material for benchmark treatment planning calculations. In a cuboid phantom the influence of different field sizes on the thermal-neutron-induced dose distribution was investigated. Various shapes of collimators were studied to test their efficacy in optimizing the thermal-neutron distribution over a planning target volume and healthy tissues. Using circular collimators of 8, 12 and 15 cm diameter it was shown that with the 15-cm field a relatively larger volume within 85% of the maximum neutron-induced dose was obtained than with the 8- or 12-cm-diameter field. However, even for this large field the maximum diameter of this volume was 7.5 cm. In an ellipsoid head phantom the neutron-induced dose was calculated assuming the skull to contain 10 ppm {sup 10}B, the brain 5 ppm {sup 10}B and the tumor 30 ppm {sup 10}B. It was found that with a single 15-cm-diameter circular beam a very inhomogeneous dose distribution in a typical target volume was obtained. Applying two equally weighted opposing 15-cm-diameter fields, however, a dose homogeneity within {+-} 10% in this planning target volume was obtained. The dose in the surrounding healthy brain tissue is 30% at maximum of the dose in the center of the target volume. Contrary to the situation for the 8-cm field, combining four fields of 15 cm diameter gave no large improvement of the dose homogeneity over the target volume or a lower maximum dose in the healthy brain. Therapy with BNCT on brain tumors must be performed either with an 8-cm four-field irradiation or with two opposing 15- or 12-cm fields to obtain an optimal dose distribution. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Properties of a Cold-Neutron Irradiation Facility for In Vitro Research on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Luedemann, L.; Kampmann, R.; Sosaat, W.; Staron, P.; Wille, P.

    2000-05-15

    A new irradiation facility, GBET (basic research on boron neutron capture therapy), especially designed for in vitro experiments on boron neutron capture therapy was put into operation at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility of the GKSS Research Center. Its location at a cold-neutron guide without direct view of the reactor core has two advantages: First, contamination of the primary beam with fast neutrons or photons is negligible. Second, GBET yields a high cold-neutron flux of 1.4 x 10{sup 8}/(cm{sup 2}.s) over an area of 3 x 4 cm. As a result of the energy dependence of the neutron absorption cross section of boron, this corresponds to a higher effective thermal flux of 4.7 x 10{sup 8}/(cm{sup 2}.s). This effect is used to reduce the irradiation times by a factor of 3.32.The effective flux is sufficient for irradiation of thin samples like cell monolayers in conventional culture flasks. For such in vitro irradiations, a survival fraction of 1% is achieved at a homogeneous boron concentration of 100 ppm {sup 10}B within {approx}20 min. Furthermore, the beam can be used for boron radiography. The respective experimental conditions are discussed, especially the neutron flux distribution, available for these different types of samples.

  4. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm. PMID:26242558

  5. LaBr3(Ce) gamma-ray detector for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, M.; Shmanin, E.; Galavanov, A.; Shustov, A.; Ulin, S.; Vlasik, K.; Dmitrenko, V.; Novikov, A.; Orlov, A.; Petrenko, D.; Shmurak, S.; Uteshev, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Results of developing of a gamma-ray detector based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillation crystal for neutron capture therapy are presented. An energy resolution of the detector measured by photomultiplier tube Hamamatsu R6233-100 is showed. It was 2.93% for gamma line 662 keV from a source 137Cs. For radiative capture gamma line of isotope 10B (478 keV) and annihilation line (511 keV) the values were 3.33 and 3.24% respectively. Data analysis of gamma spectra for an estimation of energy resolution threshold required for visual identification gamma lines 478 and 511 keV was made.

  6. Optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for the Treatment of Undifferentiated Thyroid Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Thomasz, Lisa M.Sc.; Longhino, Juan; Perona, Marina; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Blaumann, Herman; Rebagliati, Raul Jimenez; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the possible increase in efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC) by using p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) plus 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX (BOPP) and BPA plus nicotinamide (NA) as a radiosensitizer of the BNCT reaction. Methods and Materials: Nude mice were transplanted with a human UTC cell line (ARO), and after 15 days they were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) NCT (neutrons alone), (3) NCT plus NA (100 mg/kg body weight [bw]/day for 3 days), (4) BPA (350 mg/kg bw) + neutrons, (5) BPA + NA + neutrons, and (6) BPA + BOPP (60 mg/kg bw) + neutrons. The flux of the mixed (thermal + epithermal) neutron beam was 2.8 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}/sec for 83.4 min. Results: Neutrons alone or with NA caused some tumor growth delay, whereas in the BPA, BPA + NA, and BPA + BOPP groups a 100% halt of tumor growth was observed in all mice at 26 days after irradiation. When the initial tumor volume was 50 mm{sup 3} or less, complete remission was found with BPA + NA (2 of 2 mice), BPA (1 of 4), and BPA + BOPP (7 of 7). After 90 days of complete regression, recurrence of the tumor was observed in BPA + NA (2 of 2) and BPA + BOPP (1 of 7). The determination of apoptosis in tumor samples by measurements of caspase-3 activity showed an increase in the BNCT (BPA + NA) group at 24 h (p < 0.05 vs. controls) and after the first week after irradiation in the three BNCT groups. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis confirmed these results. Conclusions: Although NA combined with BPA showed an increase of apoptosis at early times, only the group irradiated after the combined administration of BPA and BOPP showed a significantly improved therapeutic response.

  7. Comparative assessment of single-dose and fractionated boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Fisher, C.D.

    1995-12-01

    The effects of fractionating boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) were evaluated in the intracerebral rat 9L gliosarcoma and rat spinal cord models using the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) thermal neutron beam. The amino acid analog p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) was administered prior to each exposure to the thermal neutron beam. The total physical absorbed dose to the tumor during BNCT using BPA was 91% high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Two tumor doses of 5.2 Gy spaced 48 h apart (n = 14) or three tumor doses of 5.2 Gy, each separated by 48 h (n = 10), produced 50 and 60% long-term (>1 year) survivors, respectively. The outcome of neither the two nor the three fractions of radiation was statistically different from that of the corresponding single-fraction group. In the rat spinal cord, the ED{sub 50} for radiation myelopathy (as indicated by limb paralysis within 7 months) after exposure to the thermal beam alone was 13.6 {+-} 0.4 Gy. Dividing the beam-only irradiation into two or four consecutive daily fractions increased the ED{sub 50} to 14.7 {+-} 0.2 Gy and 15.5 {+-} 0.4 Gy, respectively. Thermal neutron irradiation in the presence of BPA resulted in an ED{sub 50} for myelopathy of 13.8 {+-} 0.6 Gy after a single fraction and 14.9 {+-} 0.9 Gy after two fractions. An increase in the number of fractions to four resulted in an ED{sub 50} of 14.3 {+-} 0.6 Gy. The total physical absorbed dose to the blood in the vasculature of the spinal cord during BNCT using BPA was 80% high-LET radiation. It was observed that fractionation was of minor significance in the amelioration of damage to the normal central nervous system in the rat after boron neutron capture irradiation. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Hemorrhage in mouse tumors induced by dodecaborate cluster lipids intended for boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schaffran, Tanja; Jiang, Nan; Bergmann, Markus; Küstermann, Ekkehard; Süss, Regine; Schubert, Rolf; Wagner, Franz M; Awad, Doaa; Gabel, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The potential of boron-containing lipids with three different structures, which were intended for use in boron neutron capture therapy, was investigated. All three types of boron lipids contained the anionic dodecaborate cluster as the headgroup. Their effects on two different tumor models in mice following intravenous injection were tested; for this, liposomes with boron lipid, distearoyl phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol as helper lipids, and containing a polyethylene glycol lipid for steric protection, were administered intravenously into tumor-bearing mice (C3H mice for SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma and BALB/c mice for CT26/WT colon carcinoma). With the exception of one lipid (B-THF-14), the lipids were well tolerated, and no other animal was lost due to systemic toxicity. The lipid which led to death was not found to be much more toxic in cell culture than the other boron lipids. All of the lipids that were well tolerated showed hemorrhage in both tumor models within a few hours after administration. The hemorrhage could be seen by in vivo magnetic resonance and histology, and was found to occur within a few hours. The degree of hemorrhage depended on the amount of boron administered and on the tumor model. The observed unwanted effect of the lipids precludes their use in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25114527

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy and radiation synovectomy research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Nwanguma, C.I.; Wazer, D.E.; Saris, S.; Madoc-Jones, H. ); Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, current research in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and radiation synovectomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor is reviewed. In the last few years, major emphasis has been placed on the development of BNCT primarily for treatment of brain tumors. This has required a concerted effort in epithermal beam design and construction as well as the development of analytical capabilities for {sup 10}B analysis and patient treatment planning. Prompt gamma analysis and high-resolution track-etch autoradiography have been developed to meet the needs, respectively, for accurate bulk analysis and for quantitative imaging of {sup 10}B in tissue at subcellular resolutions. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning codes have been developed to ensure optimized and individualized patient treatments. In addition, the development of radiation synovectomy as an alternative therapy to surgical intervention is joints that are affected by rheumatoid arthritis is described.

  10. A theoretical model for the production of Ac-225 for cancer therapy by neutron capture transmutation of Ra-226.

    PubMed

    Melville, G; Melville, P

    2013-02-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. We are investigating the reduction of radium by transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy neutrons from a neutron source to produce Ra-225 and hence Ac-225, which can be used as a generator to produce Bi-213 for use in 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' for cancer. This paper examines the possibility of producing Ac-225 by neutron capture using a theoretical model in which neutron energy is convoluted with the corresponding neutron cross sections of Ra-226. The total integrated yield can then be obtained. This study shows that an intense beam of high-energy neutrons could initiate neutron capture on Ra-226 to produce Ra-225 and hence practical amounts of Ac-225 and a useful reduction of Ra-226. PMID:23220026

  11. Comparison of Snyder Head Phantom Models Used for Neutron Capture Therapy Benchmark Monte Carlo Dosimetry Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorley, T.; Kiger, W. S.; Zamenhof, R.

    As Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) clinical trials are initiated in more countries, new treatment planning software programs are being developed to calculate dose distributions in patient specific models. A reference suite of test problems, i.e., head phantom irradiations and resulting depth-dose curves, would allow quantitative comparison of the treatment planning software. This paper presents sets of central axis depth vs. dose curves calculated with the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP4B for five different representations of the Snyder head phantom. The first is a multi-shell analytic ellipsoidal representation, and the remaining four are voxelized representations with cube edge lengths of 16, 10, 8 and 4 mm. For these calculations, 10 cm diameter monoenergetic and monodirectional neutron and photon beams were incident along the central axes of the models. Individual beams of 0.0253 eV, 1, 2, 10, 100 and 1000 keV neutrons, and 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 MeV photons were simulated to high statistical convergence, with statistical error less than 1% in the center of the model. A "generic" epithermal neutron beam, with 1% fast flux contamination and 10% thermal flux contamination, similar to those proposed for BNCT treatments, was also simulated with all five models. Computations for both of the smaller sized voxel models produced thermal neutron, fast neutron, and gamma dose rates within 4% of those from the analytical representation. It is proposed that these data sets be used by the BNCT community for the verification of existing and new BNCT treatment planning software.

  12. Insights into the use of gadolinium and gadolinium/boron-based agents in imaging-guided neutron capture therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Deagostino, Annamaria; Protti, Nicoletta; Alberti, Diego; Boggio, Paolo; Bortolussi, Silva; Altieri, Saverio; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is currently under development as an alternative approach for cancer therapy. All of the clinical experience to date with NCT is done with (10)B, known as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a binary treatment combining neutron irradiation with the delivery of boron-containing compounds to tumors. Currently, the use of Gd for NCT has been getting more attention because of its highest neutron cross-section. Although Gd-NCT was first proposed many years ago, its development has suffered due to lack of appropriate tumor-selective Gd agents. This review aims to highlight the recent advances for the design, synthesis and biological testing of new Gd- and B-Gd-containing compounds with the task of finding the best systems able to improve the NCT clinical outcome. PMID:27195428

  13. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Rorer, D.C.; Patti, F.J.; Liu, H.B.; Reciniello, R.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of {sup 235}U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures.

  14. Experimental imaging and profiling of absorbed dose in phantoms exposed to epithermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gambarini, G.; Colombi, C.

    2003-08-26

    Absorbed-dose images and depth-dose profiles have been measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose has been measured by means of gel dosimeters, imaged with optical analysis. From differential measurements with gels having different isotopic composition, the contributions of all the components of the neutron field have been separated. This separation is important, owing to the different biological effectiveness of the various kinds of emitted radiation. The doses coming from the reactions 1H(n,{gamma})2H and 14N(n,p)14C and the fast-neutron dose have been imaged. Moreover, a volume simulating a tumour with accumulation of 10B and/or 157Gd has been incorporated in the phantom and the doses due to the reactions with such isotopes have been imaged and profiled too. The results have been compared with those obtained with other experimental techniques and the agreement is very satisfactory.

  15. Imaging of boron in tissue at the cellular level for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Arlinghaus, H F; Spaar, M T; Switzer, R C; Kabalka, G W

    1997-08-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme, and other tumors involving the brain, are undergoing experimental treatment with a promising new technique: boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). BNCT relies on the capture of thermal neutrons by boron deposited biochemically in the tumor and the subsequent fission of the boron into energetic lithium ions and alpha particles. An important requirement for improved BNCT is the development of more selective boron delivery mechanisms. The ability to image the boron concentration in tissue sections and even inside individual cells would be an important aid in the development of these delivery mechanisms. We have compared both sputter-initiated resonance ionization microprobe (SIRIMP), which combines resonance ionization with a high-energy pulsed focused sputter ion beam and mass spectrometric detection of ions, with laser atomization resonance ionization microprobe (LARIMP), which uses a laser pulse instead of an ion pulse for the atomization process, to determine their characteristics in locating and quantifying boron concentrations as a function of position in tissues obtained from a rat which had been infused with a BNCT drug. The data show that the SIRIMP/LARIMP techniques are well suited for quantitative and ultrasensitive imaging of boron trace element concentrations in biological tissue sections. The LARIMP mode could be used to quickly determine the spatial boron concentration with intercellular resolution over large areas down to the low nanograms-per-gram level, while the SIRIMP mode could be used to determine the spatial boron concentration and its variability in intracellular areas. PMID:9271061

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of depth dose distribution in several organic models for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate depth-dose distributions for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ICRU computational model of ADAM & EVA was used as a phantom to simulate tumors at a depth of 5 cm in central regions of the lungs, liver and pancreas. Tumors of the prostate and osteosarcoma were also centered at the depth of 4.5 and 2.5 cm in the phantom models. The epithermal neutron beam from a research reactor was the primary neutron source for the MCNP calculation of the depth-dose distributions in those cancer models. For brain tumor irradiations, the whole-body dose was also evaluated. The MCNP simulations suggested that a lethal dose of 50 Gy to the tumors can be achieved without reaching the tolerance dose of 25 Gy to normal tissue. The whole-body phantom calculations also showed that the BNCT could be applied for brain tumors without significant damage to whole-body organs.

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis: therapeutic efficacy in an experimental model

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. The present study evaluates tumor control and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in an experimental model of liver metastasis. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA–BNCT, boronophenylalanine (BPA) ? neutron irradiation; Beam only, neutron irradiation; Sham, matched manipulation. The total absorbed dose administered with BPA–BNCT was 13 ± 3 Gy in tumor and 9 ± 2 Gy in healthy liver. Three weeks posttreatment, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 0.46 ± 0.20 for BPA–BNCT, 2.7 ± 1.8 for Beam only and 4.5 ± 3.1 for Sham. The pre-treatment tumor nodule mass of 48 ± 19 mgfell significantly to 19 ± 16 mg for BPA–BNCT, but rose significantly to 140 ± 106 mg for Beam only and to 346 ± 302 mg for Sham. For both end points, the differences between the BPA–BNCT group and each of the other groups were statistically significant (ANOVA). No clinical, macroscopic or histological normal liver radiotoxicity was observed. It is concluded that BPA– BNCT induced a significant remission of experimental colorectal tumor nodules in liver with no contributory liver toxicity.

  18. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Yoshinori Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a “dual phantom technique” for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. Methods: One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the

  19. Characteristics of a heavy water photoneutron source in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danial, Salehi; Dariush, Sardari; M. Salehi, Jozani

    2013-07-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators are currently the most commonly used method of radiation therapy for cancerous tumors. Photons with energies greater than 8-10 MeV potentially generate neutrons through photonuclear interactions in the accelerator's treatment head, patient's body, and treatment room ambient. Electrons impinging on a heavy target generate a cascade shower of bremsstrahlung photons, the energy spectrum of which shows an end point equal to the electron beam energy. By varying the target thickness, an optimum thickness exists for which, at the given electron energy, maximum photon flux is achievable. If a source of high-energy photons i.e. bremsstrahlung, is conveniently directed to a suitable D2O target, a novel approach for production of an acceptable flux of filterable photoneturons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application is possible. This study consists of two parts. 1. Comparison and assessment of deuterium photonuclear cross section data. 2. Evaluation of the heavy water photonuclear source.

  20. Carborane derivatives loaded into liposomes as efficient delivery systems for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Altieri, S; Balzi, M; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Ciani, L; Clerici, A M; Faraoni, P; Ferrari, C; Gadan, M A; Panza, L; Pietrangeli, D; Ricciardi, G; Ristori, S

    2009-12-10

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an anticancer therapy based on the incorporation of (10)B in tumors, followed by neutron irradiation. Recently, the synthesis and delivery of new boronated compounds have been recognized as some of the main challenges in BNCT application. Here, we report on the use of liposomes as carriers for BNCT active compounds. Two carborane derivatives, i.e., o-closocarboranyl beta-lactoside (LCOB) and 1-methyl-o-closocarboranyl-2-hexylthioporphyrazine (H(2)PzCOB), were loaded into liposomes bearing different surface charges. The efficacy of these formulations was tested on model cell cultures, that is, DHD/K12/TRb rat colon carcinoma and B16-F10 murine melanoma. These induce liver and lung metastases, respectively, and are used to study the uptake of standard BNCT drugs, including borophenylalanine (BPA). Boron concentration in treated cells was measured by alpha spectrometry at the TRIGA mark II reactor (University of Pavia). Results showed high performance of the proposed formulations. In particular, the use of cationic liposomes increased the cellular concentration of (10)B by at least 30 times more than that achieved by BPA. PMID:19954249

  1. Long-circulating gadolinium-encapsulated liposomes for potential application in tumor neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Le, Uyen M; Cui, Zhengrong

    2006-04-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (Gd-NCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality. One of the key factors for a successful Gd-NCT is to deliver and maintain a sufficient amount of Gd in tumor tissues during neutron irradiation. We proposed to prepare a Gd delivery system by complexing a Gd-containing compound, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), with a polycationic peptide, poly-L-lysine (pLL), and then encapsulate the complexed Gd-DTPA into PEGylated liposomes. Complexation of Gd-DTPA with pLL not only enhanced the encapsulation efficiency of Gd-DTPA in liposomes, but also significantly limited the release of Gd-DTPA from the liposomes. A Gd-DTPA-encapsulated liposome formulation that contained 6.8+/-0.3 mg/mL of pure encapsulated Gd was prepared. The blood half-life of the Gd encapsulated into the liposome formulation was estimated to be about 24 h in healthy tumor-free mice. About 12 h after the Gd-encapsulated liposomes were intravenously injected into mice with pre-established model tumors, the Gd content in the tumors reached an average of 159 microg/g of wet tumor tissue. This Gd-DTPA encapsulated liposome may be used to deliver Gd into solid tumors for NCT and tumor imaging. PMID:16457973

  2. The EORTC Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Group: achievements and future projects.

    PubMed

    Sauerwein, W; Zurlo, A

    2002-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is an experimental treatment modality that takes place in a nuclear research reactor. To progress from preclinical studies to patient treatment is a challenge requiring strict quality management and special solutions to licensing, liability, insurance, responsibility and logistics. The European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BNCT group has started the first European clinical trial of BNCT for glioblastoma patients at the European High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands, conducted by the Department of Radiotherapy of the University of Essen, Germany. A very strict quality management had to be installed following the European rules on safety and quality assurance for nuclear research reactors, for radioprotection, for radiotherapy and for clinical trials. The EORTC BNCT Group has created a virtual European-wide hospital to handle the complex management of patients treated with BNCT. New clinical trials are currently under development. PMID:11858961

  3. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-05-15

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy of ocular melanoma and intracranial glioma using p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Greenberg, D.; Micca, P.L.; Joel, D.D.; Saraf, S. ); Packer, S. . Div. of Ophthalmology)

    1990-01-01

    During conventional radiotherapy, the dose that can be delivered to the tumor is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) represents a promising modality for selective tumor irradiation. The key to effective BNCT is selective localization of {sup 10}B in the tumor. We have shown that the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) will selectively deliver boron to melanomas and other tumors such as gliosarcomas and mammary carcinomas. Systemically delivered BPA may have general utility as a boron delivery agent for BNCT. In this paper, BNCT with BPA is used in treatment of experimentally induced gliosarcoma in rats and nonpigmented melanoma in rabbits. The tissue distribution of boron is described, as is response to the BNCT. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Treatment of malignant melanoma by selective thermal neutron capture therapy using melanoma-seeking compound

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Tsuji, M.; Hatta, S.; Ueda, M.; Honda, C.; Suzuki, T.

    1989-05-01

    As pigment cells undergo melanoma genesis, accentuated melanogenesis concurrently occurs in principle. Subsequent to the understanding of intrinsic factors controlling both processes, we found our selective melanoma neutron capture therapy (NCT) using 10B-dopa (melanin substrate) analogue, 10B1-p-boronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA), followed by 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction, induced by essentially harmless thermal neutrons, which releases energy of 2.33 MeV to 14 mu, the diameter of melanoma cells. In vitro/in vivo radiobiological analysis revealed the highly enhanced melanoma killing effect of 10B1-BPA. Chemical and prompt gamma ray spectrometry assays of 10B accumulated within melanoma cells after 10B1-BPA administration in vitro and in vivo show high affinity, e.g., 10B melanoma/blood ratio of 11.5. After successfully eradicating melanoma transplanted into hamsters with NCT, we advanced to preclinical studies using spontaneously occurring melanoma in Duroc pig skin. We cured three melanoma cases, 4.6 to 12 cm in diameter, by single neutron capture treatment. Complete disappearance of melanoma was obtained without substantial side effects. Acute and subacute toxicity as well as pharmacodynamics of 10B1-BPA have been studied in relation to therapeutic dosage requirements. Clinical radiation dosimetry using human phantom has been carried out. Further preclinical studies using human melanoma transplanted into nude mouse have been a useful model for obtaining optimal results for each melanoma type. We recently treated the first human melanoma patient with our NCT, using essentially the method for Duroc pig melanoma, and obtained similar regression time course leading to cure.

  6. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Head and neck carcinomas that recur locally after conventional irradiation pose a difficult therapeutic problem. We evaluated safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of such cancers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with inoperable, recurred, locally advanced (rT3, rT4, or rN2) head and neck cancer were treated with BNCT in a prospective, single-center Phase I-II study. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 56-74 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed using the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria and adverse effects using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity grading v3.0. Intravenously administered boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F, 400 mg/kg) was used as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Ten patients received BNCT twice; 2 were treated once. Ten (83%) patients responded to BNCT, and 2 (17%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.5 and 7.6 months. The median duration of response was 12.1 months; six responses were ongoing at the time of analysis or death (range, 4.9-19.2 months). Four (33%) patients were alive without recurrence with a median follow-up of 14.0 months (range, 12.8-19.2 months). The most common acute adverse effects were mucositis, fatigue, and local pain; 2 patients had a severe (Grade 3) late adverse effect (xerostomia, 1; dysphagia, 1). Conclusions: Boron neutron capture therapy is effective and safe in the treatment of inoperable, locally advanced head and neck carcinomas that recur at previously irradiated sites.

  7. Evaluation of an iron-filtered epithermal neutron beam for neutron-capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Musolino, S.V. ); McGinley, P.H. ); Greenwood, R.C. ); Kliauga, P. ); Fairchild, R.G. )

    1991-07-01

    An epithermal neutron filter using iron, aluminum, and sulfur was evaluated to determine if the therapeutic performance could be improved with respect to aluminum--sulfur-based filters. An empirically optimized filter was developed that delivered a 93% pure beam of 24-keV epithermal neutrons. It was expected that a thick filter using iron with a density thickness {gt}200 g/cm{sup 2} would eliminate the excess gamma contamination found in Al--S filters. This research showed that prompt gamma production from neutron interactions in iron was the dominant dose component. Dosimetric parameters of the beam were determined from the measurement of absorbed dose in air, thermal neutron flux in a head phantom, neutron and gamma spectroscopy, and microdosimetry.

  8. Exploring Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Farías, Rubén O; Bortolussi, Silva; Menéndez, Pablo R; González, Sara J

    2014-12-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy that combines biological targeting and high LET radiation. It consists in the enrichment of tumour with (10)B and in the successive irradiation of the target with low energy neutrons producing charged particles that mainly cause non-repairable damages to the cells. The feasibility to treat Non Small Cells Lung Cancer (NSCLC) with BNCT was explored. This paper proposes a new approach to determine treatment plans, introducing the possibility to choose the irradiation start and duration to maximize the tumour dose. A Tumour Control Probability (TCP) suited for lung BNCT as well as other high dose radiotherapy schemes was also introduced. Treatment plans were evaluated in localized and disseminated lung tumours. Semi-ideal and real energy spectra beams were employed to assess the best energy range and the performance of non-tailored neutron sources for lung tumour treatments. The optimal neutron energy is within [500 eV-3 keV], lower than the 10 keV suggested for the treatment of deep-seated tumours in the brain. TCPs higher than 0.6 and up to 0.95 are obtained for all cases. Conclusions drawn from [Suzuki et al., Int Canc Conf J 1 (4) (2012) 235-238] supporting the feasibility of BNCT for shallow lung tumours are confirmed, however discussions favouring the treatment of deeper lesions and disseminated disease are also opened. Since BNCT gives the possibility to deliver a safe and potentially effective treatment for NSCLC, it can be considered a suitable alternative for patients with few or no treatment options. PMID:25176019

  9. Neutrons in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    1995-03-01

    The role of neutrons in the management of cancer has a long history. However, it is only in recent years that neutrons are beginning to find an accepted place as an efficacious radiation modality. Fast neutron therapy is already well established for the treatment of certain cancers, and clinical trials are ongoing. Californium neutron sources are being used in brachytherapy. Boron neutron capture therapy has been well tested with thermal neutrons and epithermal neutron dose escalation studies are about to commence in the USA and Europe. Possibilities of neutron induced auger electron therapy are also discussed. With respect to chemotherapy, prompt neutron capture analysis is being used to study the dose optimization of chemotherapy in the management of breast cancer. The rationales behind these applications of neutrons in the management of cancer are examined.

  10. Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kononov, O.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Bokhovko, M.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Soloviev, A.N.; Chu, W.T.

    2004-02-20

    A modeling investigation was performed to choose moderator material and size for creating optimal epithermal neutron beams for BNCT based on a proton accelerator and the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutrons source. An optimal configuration is suggested for the beam shaping assembly made from polytetrafluoroethylene and magnesium fluorine. Results of calculation were experimentally tested and are in good agreement with measurements.

  11. A coupled deterministic/stochastic method for computing neutron capture therapy dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Thomas Richard

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is an experimental method of treating brain tumors and other cancers by: (1) injecting or infusing the patient with a tumor-seeking, neutron target-labeled drug; and (2) irradiating the patient in an intense epithermal neutron fluence. The nuclear reaction between the neutrons and the target nuclei (e.g. sp{10}B(n,alpha)sp7Lirbrack releases energy in the form of high-LET (i.e. energy deposited within the range of a cell diameter) reaction particles which selectively kill the tumor cell. The efficacy of NCT is partly dependent on the delivery of maximum thermal neutron fluence to the tumor and the minimization of radiation dose to healthy tissue. Since the filtered neutron source (e.g. research reactor) usually provides a broad energy spectrum of highly-penetrating neutron and gamma-photon radiation, detailed transport calculations are necessary in order to plan treatments that use optimal treatment facility configurations and patient positioning. Current computational methods for NCT use either discrete ordinates calculation or, more often, Monte Carlo simulation to predict neutron fluences in the vicinity of the tumor. These methods do not, however, accurately calculate the transport of radiation throughout the entire facility or the deposition of dose in all the various parts of the body due to shortcomings of using either method alone. A computational method, specifically designed for NCT problems, has been adapted from the MASH methodology and couples a forward discrete ordinates (Ssb{n}) calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo run to predict the dose at any point within the patient. The transport from the source through the filter/collimator is performed with a forward DORT run, and this is then coupled to adjoint MORSE results at a selected coupling parallelepiped which surrounds human phantom. Another routine was written to allow the user to generate the MORSE models at various angles and positions within the treatment room. The

  12. Reference dosimetry calculations for neutron capture therapy with comparison of analytical and voxel models.

    PubMed

    Goorley, J T; Kiger, W S; Zamenhof, R G

    2002-02-01

    As clinical trials of Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) are initiated in the U.S. and other countries, new treatment planning codes are being developed to calculate detailed dose distributions in patient-specific models. The thorough evaluation and comparison of treatment planning codes is a critical step toward the eventual standardization of dosimetry, which, in turn, is an essential element for the rational comparison of clinical results from different institutions. In this paper we report development of a reference suite of computational test problems for NCT dosimetry and discuss common issues encountered in these calculations to facilitate quantitative evaluations and comparisons of NCT treatment planning codes. Specifically, detailed depth-kerma rate curves were calculated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP4B for four different representations of the modified Snyder head phantom, an analytic, multishell, ellipsoidal model, and voxel representations of this model with cubic voxel sizes of 16, 8, and 4 mm. Monoenergetic and monodirectional beams of 0.0253 eV, 1, 2, 10, 100, and 1000 keV neutrons, and 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 MeV photons were individually simulated to calculate kerma rates to a statistical uncertainty of <1% (1 std. dev.) in the center of the head model. In addition, a "generic" epithermal neutron beam with a broad neutron spectrum, similar to epithermal beams currently used or proposed for NCT clinical trials, was computed for all models. The thermal neutron, fast neutron, and photon kerma rates calculated with the 4 and 8 mm voxel models were within 2% and 4%, respectively, of those calculated for the analytical model. The 16 mm voxel model produced unacceptably large discrepancies for all dose components. The effects from different kerma data sets and tissue compositions were evaluated. Updating the kerma data from ICRU 46 to ICRU 63 data produced less than 2% difference in kerma rate profiles. The depth-dose profile data

  13. Dynamic infrared imaging for biological and medical applications in Boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; González, Sara J.; Dagrosa, Alejandra; Schwint, Amanda E.; Carpano, Marina; Trivillin, Verónica A.; Boggio, Esteban F.; Bertotti, José; Marín, Julio; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Molinari, Ana J.; Albero, Miguel

    2011-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality, currently focused on the treatment of cancer, which involves a tumor selective 10B compound and a specially tuned neutron beam to produce a lethal nuclear reaction. BNCT kills target cells with microscopic selectivity while sparing normal tissues from potentially lethal doses of radiation. In the context of the Argentine clinical and research BNCT projects at the National Atomic Energy Commission and in a strong collaboration with INVAP SE, we successfully implemented Dynamic Infrared Imaging (DIRI) in the clinical setting for the observation of cutaneous melanoma patients and included DIRI as a non invasive methodology in several research protocols involving small animals. We were able to characterize melanoma lesions in terms of temperature and temperature rate-of-recovery after applying a mild cold thermal stress, distinguishing melanoma from other skin pigmented lesions. We observed a spatial and temporal correlation between skin acute reactions after irradiation, the temperature pattern and the dose distribution. We studied temperature distribution as a function of tumor growth in mouse xenografts, observing a significant correlation between tumor temperature and drug uptake; we investigated temperature evolution in the limbs of Wistar rats for a protocol of induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA), DIRI being especially sensitive to RA induction even before the development of clinical signs and studied surface characteristics of tumors, precancerous and normal tissues in a model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch.

  14. Induced radioactivity in the blood of cancer patients following Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiko; Kinashi, Yuko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Yashima, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Kouta; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-07-01

    Since 1990, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been used for over 400 cancer patients at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI). After BNCT, the patients are radioactive and their (24)Na and (38)Cl levels can be detected via a Na-I scintillation counter. This activity is predominantly due to (24)Na, which has a half-life of 14.96 h and thus remains in the body for extended time periods. Radioactive (24)Na is mainly generated from (23)Na in the target tissue that is exposed to the neutron beam in BNCT. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the radioactivity of blood (24)Na following BNCT and the absorbed gamma ray dose in the irradiated field. To assess blood (24)Na, 1 ml of peripheral blood was collected from 30 patients immediately after the exposure, and the radioactivity of blood (24)Na was determined using a germanium counter. The activity of (24)Na in the blood correlated with the absorbed gamma ray doses in the irradiated field. For the same absorbed gamma ray dose in the irradiated field, the activity of blood (24)Na was higher in patients with neck or lung tumors than in patients with brain or skin tumors. The reasons for these findings are not readily apparent, but the difference in the blood volume and the ratio of bone to soft tissue in the irradiated field, as well as the dose that leaked through the clinical collimator, may be responsible. PMID:23392825

  15. Intracellular distribution of various boron compounds for use in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T; Brownell, G L; Holden, S A; Teicher, B A

    1993-01-01

    The neutron capture reaction in boron (10B(n, alpha)7Li) generates two short-range particles with high linear energy transfer. The effect of neutron capture therapy depends on the selective localization of 10B atoms in target cells. The determination of the distribution of boron compounds in cancer cells at the subcellular level is required for the understanding of the effect of this treatment. The monomeric sulfhydryl borane (BSH) compound has been used clinically in Japan and preclinically in the U.S.A. Recently, new compounds have been developed: a dimeric sulfhydryl borane (BSSB), a boronophenylalanine (BPA), and two porphyrin complexes (BOPP and VCDP). This study demonstrates that the porphyrin complexes (BOPP and VCDP) are more cytotoxic than the other three compounds to the rat 9L gliosarcoma cell line. Using atomic absorption spectrophotometry to determine boron content for cellular uptake studies of these agents, we found that of the five compounds tested BOPP (25 microM) exposure resulted in the greatest boron uptake averaging 305 ng B/10(6) cells. BSSB (500 microM) was second averaging 93 ng B/10(6) cells, BSH (500 microM) third averaging 62 ng B/10(6) cells, VCDP (25 microM) fourth averaging 58 ng B/10(6) cells, and BPA (500 microM) fifth averaging 7.4 ng B/10(6) cells. Data on the distribution of boron in the nuclei, mitochondria, lysosomes, microsomes, and cytosomes of 9L cells are also presented. PMID:8424808

  16. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy, Part I: Absorbed dose measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Binns, P.J.; Riley, K.J.; Harling, O.K.

    2005-12-15

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 {mu}g g{sup -1} that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  17. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study. PMID:16475772

  18. Hyaluronan as carrier of carboranes for tumor targeting in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Meo, Chiara Di; Panza, Luigi; Capitani, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Banzato, Alessandra; Rondina, Maria; Renier, Davide; Rosato, Antonio; Crescenzi, Vittorio

    2007-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) represents a promising approach for tumor therapy. A critical requirement for BNCT is tumor targeting, a goal that is currently addressed with the development of low and high molecular weight agents capable of interacting with receptors expressed by cancer cells. Here, we describe a new bioconjugate (HApCB) composed by n-propyl carborane linked to hyaluronan (HA) via an ester linkage for a degree of substitution of approximately 30%, leading to a water-soluble derivative. The structure and main physicochemical characteristics of the new HA derivative were determined by means of Fourier transform infrared, fluorescence, and 1H, 13C, and 10B NMR analysis and are herein reported in detail. As HA is recognized by the CD44 antigen, densely populating the surface of many tumor cells, HApCB is expected to deliver boron atoms from the locally released carborane cages directly to target cells for antitumor application in BNCT. In vitro biological experiments showed that HApCB was not toxic for a variety of human tumor cells of different histotypes, specifically interacted with CD44 as the native unconjugated HA, and underwent uptake by tumor cells, leading to accumulation of amounts of boron atoms largely exceeding those required for a successful BNCT approach. Thus, HApCB may be regarded as a promising new BNCT agent for specific targeting of cancer cells overexpressing the CD44 receptor. PMID:17291079

  19. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  20. Monte Carlo based treatment planning systems for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in Petten, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nievaart, V. A.; Daquino, G. G.; Moss, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiotherapy for the treatment of tumour lesions. Since the cancer cells in the treatment volume are targeted with 10B, a higher dose is given to these cancer cells due to the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction, in comparison with the surrounding healthy cells. In Petten (The Netherlands), at the High Flux Reactor, a specially tailored neutron beam has been designed and installed. Over 30 patients have been treated with BNCT in 2 clinical protocols: a phase I study for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and a phase II study on the treatment of malignant melanoma. Furthermore, activities concerning the extra-corporal treatment of metastasis in the liver (from colorectal cancer) are in progress. The irradiation beam at the HFR contains both neutrons and gammas that, together with the complex geometries of both patient and beam set-up, demands for very detailed treatment planning calculations. A well designed Treatment Planning System (TPS) should obey the following general scheme: (1) a pre-processing phase (CT and/or MRI scans to create the geometric solid model, cross-section files for neutrons and/or gammas); (2) calculations (3D radiation transport, estimation of neutron and gamma fluences, macroscopic and microscopic dose); (3) post-processing phase (displaying of the results, iso-doses and -fluences). Treatment planning in BNCT is performed making use of Monte Carlo codes incorporated in a framework, which includes also the pre- and post-processing phases. In particular, the glioblastoma multiforme protocol used BNCT_rtpe, while the melanoma metastases protocol uses NCTPlan. In addition, an ad hoc Positron Emission Tomography (PET) based treatment planning system (BDTPS) has been implemented in order to integrate the real macroscopic boron distribution obtained from PET scanning. BDTPS is patented and uses MCNP as the calculation engine. The precision obtained by the Monte Carlo based TPSs exploited at Petten

  1. Application of boronated anti-CEA immunoliposome to tumour cell growth inhibition in in vitro boron neutron capture therapy model.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagië, H.; Tomita, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Fujii, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Hasumi, K.; Nariuchi, H.; Sekiguchi, M.

    1991-01-01

    An immunoliposome containing a 10B-compound has been examined as a selective drug delivery system in boron neutron-capture therapy. Liposomes, conjugated with monoclonal antibodies specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were shown to bind selectively to cells bearing CEA on their surface. The immunoliposomes attached to tumour cells suppressed growth in vitro upon thermal neutron irradiation and suppression was dependent upon the concentration of the 10B-compound in the liposomes and on the density of antibody conjugated to the liposomes. The results suggest that immunoliposomes containing the 10B-compound could act as a selective and efficient carrier of 10B atoms to target tumour cells in boron neutron-capture therapy. Images Figure 1 PMID:2021537

  2. Microdosimetric spectra of the THOR neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F Y; Tung, C J; Watt, D E

    2003-01-01

    A primary objective of the BNCT project in Taiwan, involving THOR (Tsing Hua Open Pool Reactor), was to examine the potential treatment of hepatoma. To characterise the epithermal neutron beam in THOR, the microdosimetry distributions in lineal energy were determined using paired tissue-equivalent proportional counters with and without boron microfoils. Microdosimetry results were obtained in free-air and at various depths in a PMMA phantom near the exit of the beam port. A biological weighting function, dependent on lineal energy, was used to estimate the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. An effective RBE of 2.7 was found at several depths in the phantom. PMID:12918789

  3. Neutron beam optimization for boron neutron capture therapy using the D-D and D-T high-energy neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Vujic, J.L.; Leung, K.N.

    2000-02-01

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of boron neutron capture therapy. Two figures-of-merit--the absorbed skin dose and the absorbed tumor dose at a given depth in the brain--are used to measure the neutron beam quality. Based on the results of this study, moderators, reflectors, and delimiters are designed and optimized to moderate the high-energy neutrons from the fusion reactions {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He and {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He down to a suitable energy spectrum. Two different computational models (MCNP and BNCT-RTPE) have been used to study the dose distribution in the brain. With the optimal beam-shaping assembly, a 1-A mixed deuteron/triton beam of energy 150 keV accelerated onto a titanium target leads to a treatment time of 1 h. The dose near the center of the brain obtained with this configuration is > 65% higher than the dose from a typical spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-produced neutron beams.

  4. Neutron capture therapy of murine melanoma on new boron carriers with use of capillary neutron optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. I.; Naidenov, M. G.; Koldaeva, E. Y.; Petrov, S. A.; Zhizhin, K. Y.; Kuznettsov, N. T.; Brattsev, V. A.; Grigorieva, E. Y.

    2005-07-01

    The Boron-10 NCT is one of the most perspective methods of human anticancer treatment. The introduction of this efficient method into medical practice makes possible more selective and precise destruction of tumour cells without any damage of normal tissues. The basis of NCT method is destructive effect of products of nuclear reaction 10B(n,α,γ)7Li. This reaction produces particles-helium nuclei (alpha-particles) and lithium nuclei-with too high linear energetic loss in animal tissues and poor integrated sweep (to 14 μm) what is comparable with single cell diameter. Actual use of BNCT for treatment of human malignant tumours is dependent on resolution of various and complex scientific and technical problems. Namely: the development of novel boron preparations selectively carrying 10B into cancer cells, providing optimal concentration and microdistribution of 10B in these and remaining there during all necessary irradiation time; formation of therapeutic neutron fluxes of needed power, spectrum and intensity; provision of adequate planning and monitoring methods for current 10B-NCT making possible to evaluate a boron concentration in animal tissues in real time, to see macro- and microdistribution of the same, allowing precise microdosimetry; optimization of irradiation regimens and of drug administration schedules conformably to concrete neutron flux in different objects.

  5. Development of an optical fiber type detector using a Eu:LiCaAlF6 scintillator for neutron monitoring in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Kawabata, Yuya; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uritani, Akira; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a small neutron detector probe as a thermal neutron flux monitor for boron neutron capture therapy. The detector consists of an optical fiber and a small Eu:LiCaAlF6 scintillator. In order to improve neutron-gamma ray discrimination capability, we use the small-size scintillator, whose size is controlled to be smaller than fast electron range produced by gamma-rays and larger than the range of charged particles induced by 6Li(n,t) reactions. We confirmed the improved neutron-gamma ray discrimination capability by comparing the detector responses between a small-size scintillator and a slab one. We also evaluated the neutron sensitivity of the fabricated optical fiber type neutron detector to be 2×10-4 cm2.

  6. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed. PMID:12408308

  7. A new analytical formula for neutron capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Hosein; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Background Photoneutrons are produced in radiation therapy with high energy photons. Also, capture gamma rays are the byproduct of neutrons interactions with wall material of radiotherapy rooms. Aim In the current study an analytical formula was proposed for capture gamma dose calculations in double bend mazes in radiation therapy rooms. Materials and methods A total of 40 different layouts with double-bend mazes and a 18 MeV photon beam of Varian 2100 Clinac were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) code. Neutron capture gamma ray dose equivalent was calculated by the MC method along the maze and at the maze entrance door of all the simulated rooms. Then, all MC resulted data were fitted to an empirical formula for capture gamma dose calculations. Wu–McGinley analytical formula for capture gamma dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in single-bend mazes was also used for comparison purposes. Results For capture gamma dose equivalents at the maze entrance door, the difference of 2–11% was seen between MC and the derived equation, while the difference of 36–87% was found between MC and the Wu–McGinley methods. Conclusion Our results showed that the derived formula results were consistent with the MC results for all of 40 different geometries. However, as a new formula, further evaluations are required to validate its use in practical situations. Finally, its application is recommend for capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes to improve shielding calculations. PMID:24377027

  8. Macroscopic geometric heterogeneity effects in radiation dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.; Nigg, D.W.; Wheeler, F.J.; Bauer, W.F. )

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This paper describes such a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for the tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for this model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous-tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10%--20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  9. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  10. Effect of bevacizumab combined with boron neutron capture therapy on local tumor response and lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    MASUNAGA, SHIN-ICHIRO; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; TANO, KEIZO; TANAKA, HIROKI; SUZUKI, MINORU; KONDO, NATSUKO; NARABAYASHI, MASARU; WATANABE, TSUBASA; NAKAGAWA, YOSUKE; MARUHASHI, AKIRA; ONO, KOJI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on local tumor response and lung metastatic potential during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and in particular, the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) tumor cells. The tumors were irradiated with thermal neutron beams following the administration of a 10B-carrier [L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-10B (BSH)], with or without the administration of bevacizumab. This was further combined with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH, 40°C for 60 min). Immediately following the irradiation, cells from certain tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q cells and the total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days following irradiation, lung metastases were enumerated. Three days following bevacizumab administration, the sensitivity of the total tumor cell population following BPA-BNCT had increased more than that following BSH-BNCT. The combination with MTH, but not with nicotinamide, further enhanced total tumor cell population sensitivity. Regardless of the presence of a 10B-carrier, MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the Q cell population. Regardless of irradiation, the administration of bevacizumab, as well as nicotinamide treatment, demonstrated certain potential in reducing the number of lung metastases especially in BPA-BNCT compared with BSH-BNCT. Thus, the current study revealed that BNCT combined with bevacizumab has the potential to sensitize total tumor cells and cause a reduction in the number of lung metastases to a similar level as nicotinamide. PMID:24944637

  11. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key; Sil Lee, Keum

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations.

  12. Lithium Nitride Synthesized by in situ Lithium Deposition and Ion Implantation for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitama, Shintaro; Baba, Yuji; Fujii, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaru; Imahori, Yoshio

    Li3N synthesis on Li deposition layer was conducted without H2O and O2 by in situ lithium deposition in high vacuum chamber of 10-6 Pa and ion implantation techniques and the thermo-chemical stability of the Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) under laser heating and air exposure was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following conclusions were derived; (1) Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target with very low oxide and carbon contamination was synthesized by in situ lithium vacuum deposition and N2+ ion implantation without H2O and O2 additions, (2) The starting temperature of evaporation of Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target increased by 120K compared to that of the Li/Cu target and (3) Remarkable oxidation and carbon contamination were observed on the surface of Li3N/Li/Cu after air exposure and these contaminated compositions was not removed by Ar+ heavy sputtering.

  13. Whole-body dose evaluation with an adaptive treatment planning system for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Takada, Kenta; Kumada, Hiroaki; Isobe, Tomonori; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Kamizawa, Satoshi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Dose evaluation for out-of-field organs during radiotherapy has gained interest in recent years. A team led by University of Tsukuba is currently implementing a project for advancing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), along with a radiation treatment planning system (RTPS). In this study, the authors used the RTPS (the 'Tsukuba-Plan') to evaluate the dose to out-of-field organs during BNCT. Computed tomography images of a whole-body phantom were imported into the RTPS, and a voxel model was constructed for the Monte Carlo calculations, which used the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System. The results indicate that the thoracoabdominal organ dose during BNCT for a brain tumour and maxillary sinus tumour was 50-360 and 120-1160 mGy-Eq, respectively. These calculations required ∼29.6 h of computational time. This system can evaluate the out-of-field organ dose for BNCT irradiation during treatment planning with patient-specific irradiation conditions. PMID:25520378

  14. Gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid-loaded chitosan microspheres for gadolinium neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tapan Kumar; Ichikawa, Hideki; Fukumori, Yoshinobu

    2006-12-11

    In order to provide a suitable device that would contain water-soluble drugs, highly water-soluble gadolinium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid-loaded chitosan microspheres (CMS-Gd-DTPA) were prepared by the emulsion method using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker and Span 80 as a surfactant for gadolinium neutron-capture therapy of cancer. The gadolinium content and the mass median diameter of CMS-Gd-DTPA were estimated. The size and morphology of the CMS-Gd-DTPA were strongly influenced by the initial applied weight ratio of Gd-DTPA:chitosan. FTIR spectra showed that the electrostatic interaction between chitosan and Gd-DTPA accelerated the formation of gadolinium-enriched chitosan microspheres. Sufficient amounts of glutaraldehyde and Span 80 were necessary for producing discrete CMS-Gd-DTPA. The CMS-Gd-DTPA having a mass median diameter 11.7microm and 11.6% of gadolinium could be used in Gd-NCT following intratumoral injection. PMID:17045253

  15. MAGIC polymer gel for dosimetric verification in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Heikkinen, Sami; Kotiluoto, Petri; Serén, Tom; Seppälä, Tiina; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli

    2007-01-01

    Radiation sensitive polymer gels are among the most promising three-dimensional dose verification tools developed to date. Polymer gel dosimeter known by the acronym MAGIC has been tested for evaluation of its use in boron neutron capture (BNCT) dosimetry. We irradiated a large (diameter 10 cm, length 20 cm) cylindrical gel phantom in the epithermal neutron beam of the Finnish BNCT facility at the FiR 1 nuclear reactor. Neutron irradiation was simulated with a Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP. Gel samples from the same production batch were also irradiated with 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator to compare dose response in the two different types of beams. Irradiated gel phantoms were imaged using MRI to determine their relaxation rate R2 maps. The measured and normalized dose distribution in the epithermal neutron beam was compared to the dose distribution calculated by computer simulation. The results support the feasibility MAGIC gel in BNCT dosimetry. PMID:17592463

  16. Clinical potential of boron neutron capture therapy for locally recurrent inoperable previously irradiated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana; Quah, Daniel S C; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2015-12-01

    This review compares the safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of previously irradiated, inoperable locoregional recurrent HNC patients and compares BNCT against the standard treatment of platinum-based chemotherapy. Our analysis of published clinical trials highlights efficacy of BNCT associated with mild side effects. However, the use of BNCT should be explored in stratified randomised trials. PMID:26277052

  17. Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy [in humans] [at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center][at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Christine

    2001-05-29

    Assessment of research records of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Regulations and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines. Clinical data were collected from subjects' research charts, and differences in conduct of studies at both centers were examined. Records maintained at Brookhaven National Laboratory were not in compliance with regulatory standards. Beth Israel's records followed federal regulations. Deficiencies discovered at both sites are discussed in the reports.

  18. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed. PMID:26235186

  19. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  20. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT. PMID:23743325

  1. Radiation injury of boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Nagahiro, S; Mizobuchi, Y; Toi, H; Nakagawa, Y; Kumada, H

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the radiation injury in acute or delayed stage after boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma. Eighteen patients with malignant glioma underwent mixed epithermal- and thermal neutron beam and sodium borocaptate between 1998 and 2004. The radiation dose (i.e. physical dose of boron n-alpha reaction) in the protocol used between 1998 and 2000 (Protocol A, n = 8) prescribed a maximum tumor volume dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a new dose-escalated protocol was introduced (Protocol B, n = 4); it prescribes a minimum tumor volume dose of 18 Gy or, alternatively, a minimum target volume dose of 15 Gy. Since 2002, the radiation dose was reduced to 80-90% dose of Protocol B because of acute radiation injury. A new Protocol was applied to 6 glioblastoma patients (Protocol C, n = 6). The average values of the maximum vascular dose of brain surface in Protocol A, B and C were 11.4+/-4.2 Gy, 15.7+/-1.2 and 13.9+/-3.6 Gy, respectively. Acute radiation injury such as a generalized convulsion within 1 week after BNCT was recognized in three patients of Protocol B. Delayed radiation injury such as a neurological deterioration appeared 3-6 months after BNCT, and it was recognized in 1 patient in Protocol A, 5 patients in Protocol B. According to acute radiation injury, the maximum vascular dose was 15.8+/-1.3 Gy in positive and was 12.6+/-4.3 Gy in negative. There was no significant difference between them. According to the delayed radiation injury, the maximum vascular dose was 13.8+/-3.8 Gy in positive and was 13.6+/-4.9 Gy in negative. There was no significant difference between them. The dose escalation is limited because most patients in Protocol B suffered from acute radiation injury. We conclude that the maximum vascular dose does not exceed over 12 Gy to avoid the delayed radiation injury, especially, it should be limited under 10 Gy in the case that tumor

  2. First application of dynamic infrared imaging in boron neutron capture therapy for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Cruz, G. A.; Gonzalez, S. J.; Bertotti, J.; Marin, J.

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the potential of dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) as a functional, noninvasive technique for evaluating the skin acute toxicity and tumor control within the framework of the Argentine boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) program for cutaneous malignant melanoma. Methods: Two patients enrolled in the Argentine phase I/II BNCT clinical trial for cutaneous malignant melanoma were studied with DIRI. An uncooled infrared camera, providing a video output signal, was employed to register the temperature evolution of the normal skin and tumor regions in patients subjected to a mild local cooling (cold stimulus). In order to study the spatial correlation between dose and acute skin reactions, three-dimensional representations of the superficial dose delivered to skin were constructed and cameralike projections of the dose distribution were coregistered with visible and infrared images. Results: The main erythematous reaction was observed clinically between the second and fifth week post-BNCT. Concurrently, with its clinical onset, a reactive increase above the basal skin temperature was observed with DIRI in the third week post-BNCT within regions that received therapeutic doses. Melanoma nodules appeared as highly localized hyperthermic regions. 2 min after stimulus, these regions reached a temperature plateau and increased in size. Temperature differences with respect to normal skin up to 10 deg. C were observed in the larger nodules. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that DIRI, enhanced by the application of cold stimuli, may provide useful functional information associated with the metabolism and vasculature of tumors and inflammatory processes related to radiation-induced changes in the skin as well. These capabilities are aimed at complementing the clinical observations and standard imaging techniques, such as CT and Doppler ultrasound.

  3. Power burst facility/boron neutron capture therapy program for cancer treatment. [Borocaptate sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-11-01

    Highlights of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program in November, 1990 are described. One of our major projects is support of technological development. In this area, progress has been seen in gross boron analysis of biological samples, higher purity borocaptate sodium (BSH), planning of experiments to investigate BSH biochemistry and oxidation products, bidding out for an ion microscope to investigate subcellular distribution of boron, and reduction of the gamma field in the irradiation room due to addition of lithiated polyethylene shielding. No progress was made on noninvasive boron quantitation, because the MRI system used is being upgraded, and the boron MR software must be rewritten. Brandy'' Hoff, a canine patient in the Large Animal Model studies, passed her one year physical and neurological exam. Three of the last four dogs treated for spontaneous brain tumors are doing well. Researchers at the University of Utah are planning human pharmacokinetic studies of BSH. BSH and BSS uptake in exemptions of terminal glioblastoma patients will be investigated. Layout and planning of tasks to begin PBF/BNCT Program reactor modifications have been initiated. The final design review for the bismuth reflector core partition sheet and lower orifice plate was completed on November 20, 1990. Agreements with DOE-ID relating to expenditure of the $13M for the PBF/BNCT Program have been reached. A review of the program by the National Academy of Science was requested by Admiral Watkins and took place in Washington, DC on November 5, 1990. This progress report also contains a summary of the 1990 accomplishments within the melanoma project. 2 figs. (MHB)

  4. The combined effect of electroporation and borocaptate in boron neutron capture therapy for murine solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Ono, K; Kinashi, Y; Suzuki, M; Takagaki, M; Masunaga, S I

    2000-08-01

    10 B-Enriched borocaptate (BSH) was administered intraperitoneally to SCCVII tumor-bearing C3H / He mice. Electroporation (EP) was conducted by using a tweezers-type electrode. The (10) B contents in tumors were measured by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry. The colony formation assay was applied to investigate the antitumor effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and thereby to estimate the intratumor localization of BSH. The (10) B concentrations in tumors decreased with time following BSH administration, falling to 5.4(0. 1) ppm at 3 h, whereas EP treatment (3 repetitions) 15 min after BSH injection delayed the clearance of BSH from tumors, and the (10) B level remained at 19.4(0.9) ppm at 3 h. The effect of BNCT increased with the (10) B concentration in tumors, and the combination with EP showed a remarkably large cell killing effect even at 3 h after BSH injection. The effect of BNCT, i.e., slope coefficient of the cell survival curve of tumors, without EP was proportional to tumor (10) B level (r = 0.982), and that of BSH-BNCT combined with EP lay close to the same correlation line. However, tumors subjected to EP after BSH injection did not show high radiosensitivity when irradiated after conversion to a single cell suspension by enzymatic digestion. This indicates that the increase of the BNCT effect by EP was a consequence of enclosure of BSH in the interstitial space of tumor tissue and not within tumor cells. This is different from a previous in vitro study. The combination of EP and BNCT may be clinically useful, if a procedure to limit EP to the tumor region becomes available or if an alternative similar method is employed. PMID:10965028

  5. Experimental evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy of human breast carcinoma implanted on nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Satya Ranjan

    2000-06-01

    An in-pool small animal irradiation neutron tube (SAINT) facility was designed, constructed and installed at the University of Virginia Nuclear Research Reactor (UVAR). Thermal neutron flux profiles were measured by foil activation analysis (gold) and verified with DORT and MCNP computer code models. The gamma-ray absorbed dose in the neutron-gamma mixed field was determined from TLD measurements. The SAINT thermal neutron flux was used to investigate the well characterized human breast cancer cell line MCF-7B on both in-vitro samples and in- vivo animal subjects. Boronophenylalanine (BPA enriched in 95% 10B) was used as a neutron capturing agent. The in-vitro response of MCF-7B human breast carcinoma cells to BPA in a mixed field of neutron-gamma radiation or pure 60Co gamma radiation was investigated. The best result (lowest surviving fraction) was observed in cell cultures pre-incubated with BPA and given the neutron irradiation. The least effective treatment consisted of 60Co irradiation only. Immunologically deficient nude mice were inoculated subcutaneously with human breast cancer MCF-7B cells and estradiol pellets (to support tumor growth). The tumor volume in the mouse control group increased over time, as expected. The group of mice exposed only to neutron treatment exhibited initial tumor volume reduction lasting until 35 days following the treatment, followed by renewed tumor growth. Both groups given BPA plus neutron treatment showed continuous reduction in tumor volume over the 55-day observation period. The group given the higher BPA concentration showed the best tumor reduction response. The results on both in-vitro and in-vivo studies showed increased cell killing with BPA, substantiating the incorporation of BPA into the tumor or cell line. Therefore, BNCT may be a possible choice for the treatment of human breast carcinoma. However, prior to the initiation of any clinical studies, it is necessary to determine the therapeutic efficacy in a large

  6. Studies on depth-dose-distribution controls by deuteration and void formation in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori

    2004-08-01

    Physical studies on (i) replacement of heavy water for body water (deuteration), and (ii) formation of a void in human body (void formation) were performed as control techniques for dose distribution in a human head under neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were performed for a human-head-size cylindrical phantom using a two-dimensional transport calculation code for mono-energetic incidences of higher-energy epi-thermal neutrons (1.2-10 keV), lower-energy epi-thermal neutrons (3.1-23 eV) and thermal neutrons (1 meV to 0.5 eV). The deuteration was confirmed to be effective both in thermal neutron incidence and in epi-thermal neutron incidence from the viewpoints of improvement of the thermal neutron flux distribution and elimination of the secondary gamma rays. For the void formation, a void was assumed to be 4 cm in diameter and 3 cm in depth at the surface part in this study. It was confirmed that the treatable depth was improved almost 2 cm for any incident neutron energy in the case of the 10 cm irradiation field diameter. It was made clear that the improvement effect was larger in isotropic incidence than in parallel incidence, in the case that an irradiation field size was delimited fitting into a void diameter. PMID:15379019

  7. Combination of the vascular targeting agent ZD6126 with boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro . E-mail: smasuna@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Minoru; Nagata, Kenji; Maruhashi, Akira; Kinash, Yuko; Ono, Koji

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of the vascular targeting agent ZD6126 (N-acetylcochinol-O-phosphate) in the rodent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) VII carcinoma model, in combination with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Methods and materials: Sodium borocaptate-{sup 10}B (BSH, 125 mg/kg, i.p.) or l-p-boronophenylalanine-{sup 10}B (BPA, 250 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into SCC VII tumor-bearing mice, and 15 min later, ZD6126 (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered. Then, the {sup 10}B concentrations in tumors and normal tissues were measured by prompt {gamma}-ray spectrometry. On the other hand, for the thermal neutron beam exposure experiment, SCC VII tumor-bearing mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells in the tumors, followed by treatment with a {sup 10}B-carrier and ZD6126 in the same manner as the above-mentioned {sup 10}B pharmacokinetics analyses. To obtain almost similar intratumor {sup 10}B concentrations during neutron exposure, thermal neutron beam irradiation was started from the time point of 30 min after injection of BSH only, 90 min after BSH injection for combination with ZD6126, 120 min after the injection of BPA only, and 180 min after BPA injection for combination with ZD6126. Right after irradiation, the tumors were excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions thus obtained were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (quiescent [Q] cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Meanwhile, the MN frequency in total (P + Q) tumor cells was determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. The clonogenic cell survival assay was also performed in mice given no BrdU. Results: Pharmacokinetics analyses showed that combination with ZD6126 greatly increased the {sup 10}B concentrations in tumors after 60 min after BSH injection and

  8. A nude rat model for neutron capture therapy of human intracerebral melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.F.; Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Staubus, A.E.; Soloway, A.H.; Moeschberger, M.L. ); Coderre, J.A. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1994-03-30

    The present study was carried out to determine the efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for intracerebral melanoma using nude rats, the human melanoma cell line MRA 27, and boronophenylalanine as the capture agent. MRA 27 cells (2 [times] 10[sup 5]) were implanted intracerebrally, and 30 days later, 120 mg of [sup 10]B-L-BPA were injected intraperitoneally into nude rats. Thirty days following implantation, tumor bearing rats were irradiated at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. Six hours following administration of BPA, tumor, blood, and normal brain boron-10 levels were 23.7, 9.4, and 8.4 [mu]g/g respectively. Median survival time of untreated rats was 44 days compared to 76 days and 93 days for those receiving physical doses of 2.73 Gy and 3.64 Gy, respectively. Rats that have received both [sup 10]B-BPA and physical doses of 1.82, 2.73, or 3.64 Gy had median survival times of 170, 182, and 262 days, respectively. Forty percent of rats that had received the highest tumor dose (10.1 Gy) survived for > 300 days and in a replicate experiment 21% of the rats were longterm survivors (>220 days). Animals that received 12 Gy in a single dose or 18 Gy fractionated (2 Gy [times] 9) of gamma photons from a [sup 137]Cs source had median survival times of 86 and 79 days, respectively, compared to 47 days for untreated animals. Histopathologic examination of the brains of longterm surviving rats, euthanized at 8 or 16 months following BNCT, showed no residual tumor, but dense accumulations of melanin laden macrophages and minimal gliosis were observed. Significant prolongations in median survival time were noted in nude rats with intracerebral human melanoma that had received BNCT, thereby suggesting therapeutic efficacy. Large animal studies should be carried out to further assess BNCT of intracerebral melanoma before any human trials are contemplated. 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A rat model for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the brain by means of neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Barth, R.F.; Staubus, A.E.; Adams, D.M.; Soloway, A.H.; James, S.M.; Goodman, J.H. ); Coderre, J.A.; Fairchild, R.G. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Melanoma metastatic to the brain is a serious clinical problem for which there currently is no satisfactory treatment. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been shown by Mishima et al. to be clinically effective in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma using {sup 10}B-enriched boronophenylalaine (BPA) as the capture agent. In the present pilot study we have observed a significant prolongation in survival time of nude rats bearing intracerebral implants of the human melanoma cell line MRA 27 following administration of BPA and neutron irradiation. These findings suggest therapeutic efficacy, but unequivocal proof depends upon confirmation in a more definitive experiment using large numbers of animals with both solitary and multiple implants of melanoma. If our preliminary results are confirmed, then this will lay the groundwork for a clinical study of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the brain. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A Small-Animal Irradiation Facility for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the RA-3 Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Emiliano Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Marcelo Miller; Silvia I. Thorp; Amanda E. Schwint; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica A. Trivillin; Leandro Zarza; Guillermo Estryk

    2007-11-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) has constructed a thermal neutron source for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CNEA have jointly conducted some initial neutronic characterization measurements for one particular configuration of this source. The RA-3 reactor (Figure 1) is an open pool type reactor, with 20% enriched uranium plate-type fuel and light water coolant. A graphite thermal column is situated on one side of the reactor as shown. A tunnel penetrating the graphite structure enables the insertion of samples while the reactor is in normal operation. Samples up to 14 cm height and 15 cm width are accommodated.

  11. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Valda, Alejandro A.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andrés J.

    2010-08-01

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  12. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  13. A Bystander Effect Observed in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Study of the Induction of Mutations in the HPRT Locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kinashi, Yuko . E-mail: kinashi@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Takahashi, Sentaro; Ono, Koji

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander mutagenic effects induced by {alpha}-particles during boron neutron capture therapy, we mixed cells that were electroporated with borocaptate sodium (BSH), which led to the accumulation of {sup 10}B inside the cells, and cells that did not contain the boron compound. The BSH-containing cells were irradiated with {alpha}-particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, whereas cells without boron were affected only by the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. Methods and Materials: The lethality and mutagenicity measured by the frequency of mutations induced in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells irradiated with neutrons (Kyoto University Research Reactor: 5 MW). Neutron irradiation of 1:1 mixtures of cells with and without BSH resulted in a survival fraction of 0.1, and the cells that did not contain BSH made up 99.4% of the resulting cell population. The molecular structures of the mutations were determined using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: Because of the bystander effect, the frequency of mutations increased in the cells located nearby the BSH-containing cells compared with control cells. Molecular structural analysis indicated that most of the mutations induced by the bystander effect were point mutations and that the frequencies of total and partial deletions induced by the bystander effect were less than those induced by the original neutron irradiation. Conclusion: These results suggested that in boron neutron capture therapy, the mutations caused by the bystander effect and those caused by the original neutron irradiation are induced by different mechanisms.

  14. The microdosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy in a randomised ellipsoidal cell geometry.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T L; Miller, L F; Kabalka, G W

    2005-01-01

    Two reactions deliver the majority of local dose in boron neutron capture therapy. The ionised particles (protons, alpha particles and lithium nuclei) produced in the two reactions, 10B(n,alpha,gamma)7Li and 14N(n,p)14O, have short ranges that are less than -14 microm (which is on the order of the diameter of a typical human cell). The ionised particles are heavy and are in the 2+ charge state in the case of the boron reactions. These heavy 2+ ions will do significant damage to molecules near their tracks. Thus, the distribution of nitrogen and, in particular, of boron determines the spatial characteristics of the radiation field. Since the distribution of nitrogen is nearly homogeneous in the brain and is not easily altered for the purpose of radiotherapy, the spatial variation in the radiation dose is due mainly to the spatial distribution of boron. This implies that the spatial distribution of boron determines the microscopic energy deposition and therefore the spatial characteristics of the microscopic dose. The microscopic dose from the (n,alpha) and (n,p) reactions has been examined in detail and, as averred, the proton dose is relatively homogeneous except for statistical variability. The statistical variability in essence adds a false spatial variability that would not be seen if a large number of histories were performed. Since the majority of spatial variability occurs in the boron distribution, the (n,p) reaction can be suppressed to better understand the spatial distribution effects on the microscopic dose. Programs have been written in FORTRAN using Monte Carlo techniques to model ellipsoidal cells that are either randomly sized and located in the region of interest or are arranged in a face centred cubic array and are identical except for the location of the nuclei, which may be random. It is shown that closely packed prolate ellipsoidal cells with a large eccentricity in one dimension will receive a larger nuclear dose than cells that are more

  15. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2005-04-07

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are amphiphilic

  16. Design and preparation of ethyl cellulose microcapsules of gadopentetate dimeglumine for neutron-capture therapy using the Wurster process.

    PubMed

    Fukumori, Y; Ichikawa, H; Tokumitsu, H; Miyamoto, M; Jono, K; Kanamori, R; Akine, Y; Tokita, N

    1993-06-01

    Microcapsules of hygroscopic, highly water-soluble gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA-DM) for use in preliminary in vivo experiments for neutron-capture therapy were designed. They were prepared with such properties as a particle size small enough to be suspended and injected through a syringe, a negligible release of Gd-DTPA-DM, and a high drug content by means of the Wurster process, a spray coating method using a spouted bed with a draft tube. They were composed of lactose cores of 53-63 microm, an undercoat of ethyl cellulose (EC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), a drug-layer of Gd-DTPA-DM, EC and PVP, a waterproof coat and a release-sustaining overcoat of EC and cholesterol (1:1), and a surface treated with hydrogenated egg lecithin. By curing at 110 degrees C for 30 min after mixing with 20% pulverized mannitol powder, the 20% overcoating suppressed the release of Gd-DTPA-DM from 75-106 microm microcapsules to less than 10% for the first 20 min, which was the period required to prepare a suspension, inject it and irradiate the neutron. The microcapsules could be used to confirm that the intracellular presence of Gd is not critical in gadolinium neutron-capture therapy. PMID:8370113

  17. Evaluation of the dose enhancement of combined ¹⁰B + ¹⁵⁷Gd neutron capture therapy (NCT).

    PubMed

    Protti, N; Geninatti-Crich, S; Alberti, D; Lanzardo, S; Deagostino, A; Toppino, A; Aime, S; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Postuma, I; Altieri, S; Nikjoo, H

    2015-09-01

    An innovative molecule, GdBLDL, for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been developed and its effectiveness as a BNCT carrier is currently under evaluation using in vivo experiments on small animal tumour models. The molecule contains both (10)B (the most commonly used NCT agent) and (157)Gd nuclei. (157)Gd is the second most studied element to perform NCT, mainly thanks to its high cross section for the capture of low-energy neutrons. The main drawback of (157)Gd neutron capture reaction is the very short range and low-energy secondary charged particles (Auger electrons), which requires (157)Gd to be very close to the cellular DNA to have an appreciable biological effect. Treatment doses were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations to ensure the optimised tumour irradiation and the sparing of the healthy organs of the irradiated animals. The enhancement of the absorbed dose due to the simultaneous presence of (10)B and (157)Gd in the experimental set-up was calculated and the advantage introduced by the presence of (157)Gd was discussed. PMID:26246584

  18. Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on Normal Liver Regeneration: Towards a Novel Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge E. Cardoso; Elisa M. Heber; David W. Nigg; Osvaldo Calzetta; Herman Blaumann; Juan Longhino; Maria E. Itoiz; Eduardo Bumaschny; Emiliano Pozzi; Amanda E.Schwint; Verónica A. Trivillin

    2007-10-01

    The “TAORMINA project” developed a new method for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of human multifocal unresectable liver metastases based on whole liver ex-situ BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA), followed by whole liver autograft. This technique involved a high risk, prolonged anhepatic phase. The Roffo Institute liver surgeons (JEC) herein propose a novel technique to pursue ex-situ liver BNCT studies with a drastically lower surgical risk for the patient. The technique would involve, sequentially, ex-situ BNCT of left liver segments II and III, partial liver autograft, and induction of partial atrophy of the untreated right liver. The working hypothesis is that the atrophy of the right, untreated, diseased liver would stimulate regeneration of the left, treated, “cured” liver to yield a healthy liver mass, allowing for the resection of the remaining portion of diseased liver. This technique does not involve an anhepatic phase and would thus pose a drastically lower surgical risk to the patient but requires sine qua non that BNCT should not impair the regenerative capacity of normal hepatocytes. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of therapeutic doses of BNCT mediated by BPA, GB-10 (Na2 10B10H10) or (GB- 10 + BPA) on normal liver regeneration in the Wistar rat employing partial hepatectomy as a regenerative stimulus. BNCT did not cause alterations in the outcome of normal liver regeneration, regenerated liver function or histology. We provide proof of principle to support the development of a novel, promising BNCT technique for the treatment of liver metastases.

  19. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, G. W.

    2005-06-28

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

  20. Verification of nuclear data for the Tsukuba plan, a newly developed treatment planning system for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Takada, Kenta; Yamanashi, Koichi; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    Various verifications were performed to apply JENDL-4.0 as nuclear data for a newly developed treatment planning system with a homogeneous or precise human-like phantom. The nitrogen dose calculated by JENDL-4.0 differed slightly from that calculated by ENDF/B-VII.0. However, the total weighted dose-based dose volume histogram in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatment for brain tumors calculated by JENDL-4.0 was in good agreement with the results of the ENDF/B-VII.0 calculation. Therefore, calculation with JENDL-4.0 can be applied to the BNCT dose calculation. PMID:26361835

  1. Dose-response analysis for boron neutron capture therapy of the B16 murine melanoma using p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Micca, P.L.; Slatkin, D.N.; Makar, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of a well-pigmented B16 melanoma implanted subcutaneously in the mouse thigh has been carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) using the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron delivery agent. The response of the B16 melanoma to BNCT was compared with the response to 250 kVp x-rays using both tumor growth delay and in vivo/in vitro assay that measures clonogenic survival. These experiments allow a comparison of tumor growth delay, log cell kill and damage to normal tissues produced by BNCT or photon irradiation.

  2. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. Methods The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. Results The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Conclusions Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma. PMID:23915425

  3. Opportunities afforded by the intense nanosecond neutron pulses from a plasma focus source for neutron capture therapy and the preliminary simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, G.; Gribkov, V.; Longo, F.; Ramos Aruca, M.; Tuniz, C.

    2012-11-01

    The use of short and powerful neutron pulses for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can potentially increase selectivity and reduce the total dose absorbed by the patient. The biological effects of radiation depend on the dose, the dose power and the spatial distribution of the microscopic energy deposition. A dense plasma focus (DPF) device emits very short (in the nanosecond range) and extremely intense pulses of fast neutrons (2.5 or 14 MeV neutrons—from D-D or D-T nuclear reactions) and x-rays. Optimal spectra of neutrons formed for use in BNCT must contain an epithermal part to ensure a reasonable penetration depth into tissues at high enough cross-section on boron. So the powerful nanosecond pulses of fast neutrons generated by DPF must be moderated. After this moderation, the pulse duration must be shorter compared with the duration of the reaction with free radicals, that is, ⩾1 μs. In this work we focus on the development of a detailed simulation of interaction of short-pulse radiation from a DPF with the device's materials and with different types of moderators to estimate the dose power at the cells for this dynamic case. The simulation was carried out by means of the Geant4 toolkit in two main steps: the modeling of the pulsed neutron source device itself; the study of the interaction of fast mono-energetic neutrons with a moderator specific for BNCT.

  4. Computational and experimental physics performance characterization of the neutron capture therapy research facility at Washington State Univ

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D. W.; Sloan, P. E.; Venhuizen, J. R.; Wemple, C. A.; Tripard, G. E.; Fox, K.; Corwin, E.

    2006-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the final beam characterization measurements for a dual mode epithermal-thermal beam facility for neutron capture therapy research that was recently constructed at the Washington State Univ. TRIGA{sup TM} research reactor. The results show that the performance of the beam facility is consistent with the design computations and with international standards for the intended application. A useful epithermal neutron flux of 1.3 x 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}-s is produced at the irradiation point with the beam in epithermal mode and shaped by a 10-cm circular aperture plate. When the beam is thermalized with approximately 34 cm of heavy water, the useful thermal flux at the irradiation point is approximately 3.5 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}-s. The new WSU facility is one of only two such installations currently operating in the US. (authors)

  5. Apoptosis through Bcl-2/Bax and Cleaved Caspase Up-Regulation in Melanoma Treated by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Faião-Flores, Fernanda; Coelho, Paulo Rogério Pinto; Toledo Arruda-Neto, João Dias; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Tiago, Manoela; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Giorgi, Ricardo Rodrigues; Maria, Durvanei Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment involving selective accumulation of boron carriers in a tumor followed by irradiation with a thermal or epithermal neutron beam. The neutron capture reaction with a boron-10 nucleus yields high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, alpha and 7Li, with a range of 5 to 9 µm. These particles can only travel very short distances and release their damaging energy directly into the cells containing the boron compound. We aimed to evaluate proliferation, apoptosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) modifications of B16F10 melanoma and normal human melanocytes after BNCT. The amounts of soluble collagen and Hsp47, indicating collagen synthesis in the ECM, as well as the cellular markers of apoptosis, were investigated. BNCT decreased proliferation, altered the ECM by decreasing collagen synthesis and induced apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2/Bax in melanoma. Additionally, BNCT also increased the levels of TNF receptor and the cleaved caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9 in melanoma. These results suggest that multiple pathways related to cell death and cell cycle arrest are involved in the treatment of melanoma by BNCT. PMID:23527236

  6. Biological activity of N(4)-boronated derivatives of 2'-deoxycytidine, potential agents for boron-neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nizioł, Joanna; Uram, Łukasz; Szuster, Magdalena; Sekuła, Justyna; Ruman, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary anticancer therapy that requires boron compound for nuclear reaction during which high energy alpha particles and lithium nuclei are formed. Unnatural, boron-containing nucleoside with hydrophobic pinacol moiety was investigated as a potential BNCT boron delivery agent. Biological properties of this compound are presented for the first time and prove that boron nucleoside has low cytotoxicity and that observed apoptotic effects suggest alteration of important functions of cancer cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of DNA from cancer cells proved that boron nucleoside is inserted into nucleic acids as a functional nucleotide derivative. NMR studies present very high degree of similarity of natural dG-dC base pair with dG-boron nucleoside system. PMID:26344594

  7. The Perspectives of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy-Clinical Applications Research and Development in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badhrees, I.; Alrumayan, F.; Mahube, F.

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary form of experimental radiotherapy which is based on the administration of a drug able to concentrate the isotopes in a tumor cell that later are irradiated with a neutron beam. Even though the first evidence of the success of this treatment dates back many years ago, BNCT showed successful treatment results in malignant melanoma, and Glioblastoma. In order for BNCT to be successful, a sufficient amount of Boron (10B) must be selectively delivered to the tumor cell, and then irradiated by neutrons of sufficient enough. The CS-30 cyclotron at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center is a positive-ion machine capable of accelerating protons at 26MeV, and other isotopes as well. Although the peak beam intensity from the CS-30 is low, the key to success of using it for the BNCT is by using a high average beam current at low energy. This work is aimed at testing the capability of the CS-30 Cyclotron to produce a low-energy neutron beam to be used to activate the Boron atoms injected into the tumor cell, through simulation of a compatible moderator. We are also planning to measure the overall dosimetry of the energy dose as well as that for the boron in the tumor cell.

  8. Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and the Development of a Dedicated Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Di Paolo, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Valda, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Somacal, H. R.; Minsky, D. M.; Kesque, J. M.; Giboudot, Y.; Levinas, P.; Fraiman, M.; Romeo, V.

    2007-10-26

    There is a generalized perception that the availability of suitable particle accelerators installed in hospitals, as neutron sources, may be crucial for the advancement of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Progress on an ongoing project to develop a Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator for Accelerator-Based (AB)-BNCT is described here. The project goal is a machine capable of delivering 30 mA of 2.5 MeV protons to be used in conjunction with a neutron production target based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction slightly beyond its resonance at 2.25 MeV. A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ESQ chain is being designed and constructed. A 30 mA proton beam of 2.5 MeV are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep-seated tumors in less than an hour. The first design and construction of an ESQ module is discussed and its electrostatic fields are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Also new beam transport calculations through the accelerator are presented.

  9. The acceleration of boron neutron capture therapy using multi-linked mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) fused cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kondo, Natsuko; Kitamatsu, Mizuki; Bin, Feng; Nakajima, Kiichiro; Hirota, Yuki; Kawabata, Shinji; Nishiki, Tei-ichi; Ohmori, Iori; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Ono, Koji; Matsui, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    New anti-cancer therapy with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction of boron-10 with neutron irradiation. The median survival of BNCT patients with glioblastoma was almost twice as long as those receiving standard therapy in a Japanese BNCT clinical trial. In this clinical trial, two boron compounds, BPA (boronophenylalanine) and BSH (sodium borocaptate), were used for BNCT. BPA is taken up into cells through amino acid transporters that are expressed highly in almost all malignant cells, but BSH cannot pass through the cell membrane and remains outside the cell. We simulated the energy transfer against the nucleus at different locations of boron from outside the cell to the nuclear region with neutron irradiation and concluded that there was a marked difference between inside and outside the cell in boron localization. To overcome this disadvantage of BSH in BNCT, we used a cell-penetrating peptide system for transduction of BSH. CPP (cell-membrane penetrating peptide) is very common peptide domains that transduce many physiologically active substances into cells in vitro and in vivo. BSH-fused CPPs can penetrate the cell membrane and localize inside a cell. To increase the boron ratio in one BSH-peptide molecule, 8BSH fused to 11R with a dendritic lysine structure was synthesized and administrated to malignant glioma cells and a brain tumor mouse model. 8BSH-11R localized at the cell nucleus and showed a very high boron value in ICP results. With neutron irradiation, the 8BSH-11R administrated group showed a significant cancer killing effect compared to the 100 times higher concentration of BSH-administrated group. We concluded that BSH-fused CPPs were one of the most improved and potential boron compounds in the next-stage BNCT trial and 8BSH-11R may be applied in the clinical setting. PMID:24452095

  10. The medical-irradiation characteristics for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    At the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor, the mix irradiation of thermal and epi-thermal neutrons, and the solo irradiation of epi-thermal neutrons are available additionally to the thermal neutron irradiation, and then the neutron capture therapy (NCT) at this facility became more flexible, after the update in 1996. The estimation of the depth dose distributions in NCT clinical irradiation, were performed for the standard irradiation modes of thermal, mixed and epi-thermal neutrons, from the both sides of experiment and calculation. On the assumption that the 10B concentration in tumor part was 40 ppm and the ratio of tumor to normal tissue was 3.5, the advantage depth were estimated to 5.4, 6.0, and 8.0, for the respective standard irradiation modes. It was confirmed that the various irradiation conditions can be selected according to the target-volume conditions, such as size, depth, etc. Besides, in the viewpoint of the radiation shielding for patient, it was confirmed that the whole-body exposure is effectively reduced by the new clinical collimators, compared with the old one. PMID:12408307