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Sample records for neutron drip-line topography

  1. Neutron Drip-Line Topography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, E. Minaya; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Naimi, S.; Beck, D.; Herfurth, F.; Blaum, K.; Borgmann, C.; George, S.; Kellerbauer, A.; Boehm, Ch.; Neidherr, D.; Breitenfeldt, M.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L.; Chamel, N.; Goriely, S.; Herlert, A.; Kowalska, M.; Pearson, J. M.

    2009-08-26

    The development of microscopic mass models is a crucial ingredient for the understanding of how most of the elements of our world were fabricated. Confidence in drip-line predictions of such models requires their comparison with new mass data for nuclides far from stability. We combine theory and experiment using results that are state of the art: the latest mass measurements from the Penning-trap spectrometer ISOLTRAP at CERN-ISOLDE are used to confront the predictions of the latest Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) microscopic mass models. In addition, we compare the new data to predictions of other types of mass models and the extrapolative behavior of the various models is analyzed to highlight topographical trends along the shores of the nuclear chart.

  2. Breakup Reactions of Neutron Drip Line Nuclei Near N=20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Coulomb breakup at intermediate energies is a useful experimental tool for investigating the microscopic structure of neutron drip-line nuclei. Here, results from the inclusive Coulomb breakup experiment of 31Ne on a lead target at RIBF(RI Beam Factory) at RIKEN are presented. The experiment was performed as one of day-one campaign experiments at RIBF, using a 48Ca primary beam at 345 MeV/nucleon. A unique feature of a halo nucleus is the enhanced electric dipole strength of the order of 1 W.u.(Weisskopf unit) at very low excitation energies around 1 MeV (soft E1 excitation). Owing to high sensitivity of the Coulomb breakup to the soft E1 excitation, a measurement of inclusive Coulomb breakup cross section can be used to identify the halo structure of a certain drip-line nucleus. We have indeed observed a strong enhancement of the Coulomb breakup cross section of 540(70) mb for 31Ne on Pb at 230 MeV/nucleon, nearly as high as that for the known halo nucleus 19C, thereby giving evidence of the halo structure in 31Ne. The finding of a new halo structure for such a heavy system, compared to the known halo nuclei, is the first step for the understanding of halo phenomena along the neutron drip line towards heavier nuclei. We discuss also the change of shell structure in 31Ne, as a nucleus in the island of inversion.

  3. Odd-even staggering in neutron drip line nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changizi, S. A.; Qi, Chong

    2016-07-01

    We have done systematic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations in coordinate space on the one-quasi-particle energies and binding energy odd-even staggering (OES) in semi-magic nuclei with the zero-range volume, mixed and surface pairing forces in order to explore the influence of their density dependence. The odd-N isotopes are calculated within the blocking scheme. The strengths for the pairing forces are determined in two schemes by fitting locally to reproduce pairing gap in 120Sn and globally to all available data on the OES of semi-magic nuclei with Z ≥ 8. In the former calculations, there is a noticeable difference between the neutron mean gaps in neutron-rich O, Ca, Ni and Sn isotopes calculated with the surface pairing and those with the mixed and volume pairing. The difference gets much smaller if the globally optimized pairing strengths are employed. The heavier Pb isotopes show the opposite trend. Moreover, large differences between the mean gap and the OES may be expected in both calculations when one goes towards the neutron drip line.

  4. Neutron drip line and the equation of state of nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro; Iida, Kei; Koura, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    We investigate how the neutron drip line is related to the density dependence of the symmetry energy by using a macroscopic nuclear model that allows us to calculate nuclear masses in a way that is dependent on the equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter. The neutron drip line obtained from these masses is shown to appreciably shift to a neutron-rich side in a nuclear chart as the density derivative of the symmetry energy increases. Such a shift is clearly seen for light nuclei, a feature coming mainly from the surface property of neutron-rich nuclei.

  5. Discovery of 40Mg and 42Al suggests neutron drip-line slant towards heavier isotopes.

    PubMed

    Baumann, T; Amthor, A M; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Folden, C M; Gade, A; Ginter, T N; Hausmann, M; Matos, M; Morrissey, D J; Portillo, M; Schiller, A; Sherrill, B M; Stolz, A; Tarasov, O B; Thoennessen, M

    2007-10-25

    A fundamental question in nuclear physics is what combinations of neutrons and protons can make up a nucleus. Many hundreds of exotic neutron-rich isotopes have never been observed; the limit of how many neutrons a given number of protons can bind is unknown for all but the lightest elements, owing to the delicate interplay between single particle and collective quantum effects in the nucleus. This limit, known as the neutron drip line, provides a benchmark for models of the atomic nucleus. Here we report a significant advance in the determination of this limit: the discovery of two new neutron-rich isotopes--40Mg and 42Al--that are predicted to be drip-line nuclei. In the past, several attempts to observe 40Mg were unsuccessful; moreover, the observation of 42Al provides an experimental indication that the neutron drip line may be located further towards heavier isotopes in this mass region than is currently believed. In stable nuclei, attractive pairing forces enhance the stability of isotopes with even numbers of protons and neutrons. In contrast, the present work shows that nuclei at the drip line gain stability from an unpaired proton, which narrows the shell gaps and provides the opportunity to bind many more neutrons. PMID:17960237

  6. Structure beyond the neutron drip-line:. 9He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Kalanee, T.; Gibelin, J.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Force, C.; Gaudefroy, L.; Gillibert, A.; Guillot, J.; Iwasaki, H.; Keeley, N.; Krupko, S.; Lapoux, V.; Mittig, W.; Mougeot, X.; Nalpas, L.; Orr, N. A.; Pollacco, E.; Rusek, K.; Roger, T.; Savajols, H.; de Séréville, N.; Sidorchuk, S.; Suzuki, D.; Strojek, I.

    2013-09-01

    In order to solve the nature of 9He ground state, additional information on this unbound nucleus with extreme N/Z ratio was needed. The present study was performed via the (d,p) reaction, a standard tool for determination of neutron single-particle distribution.

  7. Pygmy dipole mode in deformed neutron-rich Mg isotopes close to the drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the microscopic structure of the low-lying isovector-dipole excitation mode in neutron-rich {sup 36,38,40}Mg close to the drip line by means of the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation employing the Skyrme and the local pairing energy-density functionals. It is found that the low-lying bump structure above the neutron emission-threshold energy develops when the drip line is approached, and that the isovector dipole strength at E{sub x}<10 MeV exhausts about 6.0% of the classical Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn dipole sum rule in {sup 40}Mg. We obtained the collective dipole modes at around 8-10 MeV in Mg isotopes, that consist of many two-quasiparticle excitations of the neutron. The transition density clearly shows an oscillation of the neutron skin against the isoscalar core. We found significant coupling effects between the dipole and octupole excitation modes due to the nuclear deformation. It is also found that the responses for the compressional dipole and isoscalar octupole excitations are much enhanced in the lower energy region.

  8. Neutron drip line in odd and even mass calcium and nickel nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Madhubrata; Gangopadhyay, G.

    2005-10-01

    Neutron-rich Ca and Ni nuclei have been studied in a spherical relativistic mean-field formalism in coordinate space. A δ interaction has been adopted to treat the pairing correlations for the neutrons. Odd nuclei have been treated in the blocking approximation. The effect of the positive-energy continuum and the role of pairing in the stability of nuclei have been investigated by use of the resonant-BCS approach. In Ca isotopes, N=50 is no longer a magic number, whereas in Ni nuclei, a new magic number emerges at N=70. There is a remarkable difference in the relative positions of the drip lines for odd and even isotopes. In Ca isotopes, the last bound even and odd nuclei are found to be 72Ca and 59Ca, respectively. In Ni isotopes, the corresponding nuclei are 98Ni and 97Ni, respectively. The origin of this difference in relative positions of the drip line in even and odd isotopes in the two chains is traced to the difference in the single-particle level structures and consequent modification in the magic numbers in the two elements. Pairing interaction is seen to play a major role. The effect of the width of the resonance states on pairing has also been investigated.

  9. Studies of light exotic nuclei in the vicinity of neutron and proton drip lines at FLNR JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, L. V.; Golovkov, M. S.; Krupko, S. A.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Fomichev, A. S.; Chudoba, V.

    2016-04-01

    Defining the limits of the existence of the nuclear structure is one of fundamental problems of natural science, requiring the advancement of studies towards the sites of maximum neutron- and proton-excess nuclei, to the borders of nuclear stability, and further, to the regions of nuclear instability. In such regions, nuclear systems exist only as resonant states in continuous spectra with characteristic 'nuclear' lifetimes. This work is done most effectively with experimental setups providing radioactive ion beams (RIBs). This review discusses the approaches in this field of research developed during the last 20 years at the ACCULINNA fragment separator in the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). The methodology developed is based on the comprehensive study of correlations among the reaction fragments emitted in the decays of nuclear-unstable systems which are populated in direct reactions induced by RIBs with intermediate (20 – 60 MeV per nucleon) energies. This allows us to acquire detailed knowledge about exotic nuclear systems close to and beyond nuclear drip lines. We discuss exotic forms of nuclear dynamics appearing in the vicinity of nuclear drip lines and relevant results of their theoretical analysis. Also discussed are existing facilities and prospective projects aimed at nuclear structure studies with RIBs at JINR.

  10. Investigations of proton-neutron correlations close to the drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Delion, D. S.; Wyss, R.; Liotta, R. J.; Cederwall, Bo; Johnson, A.; Sandzelius, M.

    2010-08-15

    Proton-neutron correlations in nuclei above the Z=50 shell closure are investigated with the aim of understanding the behavior of the 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} states in Te and Xe isotopes, which remain at a rather constant energy as one approaches the shell closure at N=50. Our calculations reveal that standard quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations, involving a quadrupole-quadrupole (QQ) interaction with constant strengths, cannot explain this feature. It is found that to reproduce the experimental data within this model one has to include a variable proton-neutron interaction. It turns out that an increased proton-neutron QQ interaction increases the collectivity (i.e., B(E2) values) when approaching the N=50 region, whereas an increased proton-neutron pairing interaction decreases the collectivity. We thus conclude that the ratio between the B(E2) value and 2{sup +} energy is a ''fingerprint'' of proton-neutron collectivity and it should be determined in future experiments concerning light Te isotopes. Based on this criterion, we conclude that the available experimental data indicate an enhanced proton-neutron pairing interaction by approaching doubly magic Z=N=20 and Z=N=28 regions.

  11. Beyond the neutron drip line: The unbound oxygen isotopes 25O and 26O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caesar, C.; Simonis, J.; Adachi, T.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alcantara, J.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Barr, M.; Beceiro, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamano, M.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkäll, J.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; Dillmann, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Freer, M.; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Golubev, P.; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heine, M.; Heinz, A.; Henriques, A.; Holl, M.; Holt, J. D.; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, A.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Knöbel, R.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Labiche, M.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Lindberg, S.; Machado, J.; Marganiec, J.; Maroussov, V.; Menéndez, J.; Mostazo, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Perea, A.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Röder, M.; Rossi, D.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Savran, D.; Scheit, H.; Schwenk, A.; Simon, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stoica, V.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J.; Tengblad, O.; Terashima, S.; Thies, R.; Togano, Y.; Uberseder, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, P.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, C.; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, P.; Yakorev, D.; Zhukov, M. V.; Zilges, A.; Zoric, M.; Zuber, K.

    2013-09-01

    The very neutron-rich oxygen isotopes 25O and 26O are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The unbound states are populated in an experiment performed at the R3B-LAND setup at GSI via proton-knockout reactions from 26F and 27F at relativistic energies around 442 and 414 MeV/nucleon, respectively. From the kinematically complete measurement of the decay into 24O plus one or two neutrons, the 25O ground-state energy and width are determined, and upper limits for the 26O ground-state energy and lifetime are extracted. In addition, the results provide indications for an excited state in 26O at around 4 MeV. The experimental findings are compared to theoretical shell-model calculations based on chiral two- and three-nucleon (3N) forces, including for the first time residual 3N forces, which are shown to be amplified as valence neutrons are added.

  12. Systematic structure of the neutron drip-line {sup 22}C nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Atef; Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana; Tammam, M.

    2014-10-24

    In the present work we systematically discuss the nuclear structure of the the heaviest particle-bound carbon isotope, {sup 22}C. The ground state wave function of the carbon isotope is calculated using the {sup 20}C core plus two-valence neutron based on a phenomenological mean-field MF potential. We apply the deduced wave function to provide the nuclear matter density which is necessary in the calculations of the total reaction cross section. Calculations show that there is a reasonable good description of the experimental binding energy BE and root-mean square RMS radius. The exotic structure and configuration of the ground state carbon isotope is explained and a consistent explanation on the two-neutron halo (Borromean) nucleus is given.

  13. Spectroscopy of 26F to Probe Proton-Neutron Forces Close to the Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, Gaute; Sorlin, O.; Borcea, C.; Brown, B. A.; Grevy, S.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Jansen, G. R.; Thomas, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    A long-lived J 4 1 isomer, T1=2 2:2 1 ms, has been discovered at 643.4(1) keV in the weakly bound 26 9 F nucleus. It was populated at Grand Acce le rateur National d Ions Lourds in the fragmentation of a 36S beam. It decays by an internal transition to the J 1 1 ground state [82(14)%], by decay to 26Ne, or -delayed neutron emission to 25Ne. From the -decay studies of the J 1 1 and J 4 1 states, new excited states have been discovered in 25;26Ne. Gathering the measured binding energies of the J 1 1 4 1 multiplet in 26 9 F, we find that the proton-neutron 0d5=20d3=2 effective force used in shell-model calculations should be reduced to properly account for the weak binding of 26 9 F. Microscopic coupled cluster theory calculations using interactions derived from chiral effective field theory are in very good agreement with the energy of the low-lying 1 1 , 2 1 , 4 1 states in 26F. Including three-body forces and coupling to the continuum effects improve the agreement between experiment and theory as compared to the use of two-body forces only.

  14. Spectroscopy of 26F to probe proton-neutron forces close to the drip line.

    PubMed

    Lepailleur, A; Sorlin, O; Caceres, L; Bastin, B; Borcea, C; Borcea, R; Brown, B A; Gaudefroy, L; Grévy, S; Grinyer, G F; Hagen, G; Hjorth-Jensen, M; Jansen, G R; Llidoo, O; Negoita, F; de Oliveira, F; Porquet, M-G; Rotaru, F; Saint-Laurent, M-G; Sohler, D; Stanoiu, M; Thomas, J C

    2013-02-22

    A long-lived J(π) = 4(1)(+) isomer, T(1/2) = 2.2(1) ms, has been discovered at 643.4(1) keV in the weakly bound (9)(26)F nucleus. It was populated at Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds in the fragmentation of a (36)S beam. It decays by an internal transition to the J(π) = 1(1)(+) ground state [82(14)%], by β decay to (26)Ne, or β-delayed neutron emission to (25)Ne. From the β-decay studies of the J(π) =1(1)(+) and J(π) = 4(1)(+) states, new excited states have been discovered in (25,26)Ne. Gathering the measured binding energies of the J(π) = 1(1)(+) -4(1)(+) multiplet in (9)(26)F, we find that the proton-neutron π0d(5/2)ν0d(3/2) effective force used in shell-model calculations should be reduced to properly account for the weak binding of (9)(26)F. Microscopic coupled cluster theory calculations using interactions derived from chiral effective field theory are in very good agreement with the energy of the low-lying 1(1)(+), 2(1)(+), 4(1)(+) states in (26)F. Including three-body forces and coupling to the continuum effects improve the agreement between experiment and theory as compared to the use of two-body forces only. PMID:23473138

  15. Exotic structures near the drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M. M.; Saldanha, A. A.; Sharma, J. K.

    2011-10-28

    In our recent study of the isotope shifts of Kr isotopes near rp-process path in the framework of the RMF theory, we have found that due to large shell gaps in the deformed space, several N = Z nuclei exhibit the double magicity of protons and neutrons. These nuclei are known to contribute to large abundances in the rp-process nucleosynthesis and have been shown to be the waiting-point nuclei. In another study of the shell effects at N = 126 near the neutron drip line, we have found that nuclei exhibit additional stability beyond the neutron drip line.

  16. Decays of New Nuclides and Isomers Beyond the Proton Drip Line--The Influence of Neutron Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Cooper, R. J.; Grahn, T.; Judson, D. S.; Sapple, P. J.; Thomson, J.; Simpson, J.; Labiche, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Al-Khalili, J. S.; Cannon, A. J.; Stevenson, P. D.; Suckling, E. B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.

    2008-11-11

    The energy of the vh{sub 9/2} orbital in nuclei above N = 82 drops rapidly in energy relative to the vf{sub 7/2} orbital as the occupancy of the {pi}h{sub 11/2} orbital increases. These two neutron orbitals become nearly degenerate as the proton drip line is approached. In this work, we have discovered the new nuclides {sup 161}Os and {sup 157}W, and studied the decays of the proton emitter {sup 160}Re in detail. The {sup 161}Os and {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced in reactions of 290, 300 and 310 MeV {sup 58}Ni ions with an isotopically enriched {sup 106}Cd target, separated in-flight using the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. The {sup 161}Os{alpha} a decays populated the new nuclide {sup 157}W, which decayed by {beta}-particle emission. The {beta} decay fed the known {alpha}-decaying 1/2{sup +} and 11/2{sup -} states in {sup 157}Ta, which is consistent with a vf{sub 7/2} ground state in {sup 157}W. The measured {alpha}-decay energy and half-life for {sup 161}Os correspond to a reduced {alpha}-decay width that is compatible with s-wave {alpha}-particle emission, implying that its ground state is also a vf{sub 7/2} state. Over 7000 {sup 160}Re nuclei were produced and the {gamma} decays of a new isomeric state feeding the {pi}d{sub 3/2} level in {sup 160}Re were discovered, but no evidence for the proton or a decay of the expected {pi}h{sub 11/2} state could be found. The isomer decays offer a natural explanation for this non-observation and provides a striking example of the influence of the near degeneracy of the vh{sub 9/2} and vf{sub 7/2} orbitals on the properties of nuclei in this region.

  17. Probing the Collective Degrees of Freedom at the Proton Drip Line in the Extremely Neutron Deficient {sup 172}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Sandzelius, M.; Cederwall, B.; Hadinia, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Ganioglu, E.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; and others

    2011-11-30

    Excited states in the extremely neutron-deficient isotope {sup 172}Hg have been established for the first time. The {sup 96}Ru({sup 78}Kr,2n) reaction was employed to populate excited states in {sup 172}Hg with a cross section {sigma}{approx_equal} 15 nb. The highly selective Recoil-Decay Tagging (RDT) technique was used to obtain clean in-beam {gamma}-ray spectra for {sup 172}Hg. The yrast ground-state band has tentatively been established up to I = 6h-bar. The data have been interpreted within the framework of total Routhian surface and quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations. In addition to the well-known features of shape coexistence previously observed in light Hg isotopes, the systematic trends in the energy of the yrast 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} states in the chain of Hg isotopes indicate a pronounced vibrational collectivity which is reduced in strength, but at the same time shows a higher degree of harmonicity, as the neutron number decreases below the neutron midshell.

  18. β -delayed γ -ray spectroscopy of non-yrast states in 138Te near the neutron drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, P.; Moon, C.-B.; Lee, C. S.; Odahara, A.; Lozeva, R.; Yagi, A.; Nishimura, S.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Watanabe, H.; Isobe, T.; Baba, H.; Sakurai, H.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Fang, Y.; Nishibata, H.; Patel, Z.; Rice, S.; Sinclair, L.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z. Y.; Yokoyama, R.; Kubo, T.; Inabe, N.; Suzuki, H.; Fukuda, N.; Kameda, D.; Takeda, H.; Ahn, D. S.; Murai, D.; Bello Garrote, F. L.; Daugas, J. M.; Didierjean, F.; Ideguchi, E.; Ishigaki, T.; Jung, H. S.; Komatsubara, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Morimoto, S.; Niikura, M.; Nishizuka, I.; Tshoo, K.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the first β -decay data of 138Sb to 138Te isotopes beyond the doubly magic 132Sn. The parent nucleus was produced by the in-flight fission of a 238U beam on a 9Be target at 345 MeV per nucleon and measured at the BigRIPS separator of the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory at RIKEN. By using advanced β -γ spectroscopy techniques, the half-life and the tentative spin-parity of 138 were measured to be 346(19) ms and (3-) , respectively. In addition, we observed several low-lying non-yrast states in 138Te for the first time. Our data allowed us to rearrange the positions of the first 2+ and 4+ states in this nucleus and to construct the level scheme of 138 in accordance with shell-model calculations. Additionally, we extend energy systematics of Te isotopes within neutron numbers 54 and 86.

  19. First Penning Trap Mass Measurements beyond the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rauth, C.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Kluge, H.-J.; Maero, G.; Martin, A.; Mukherjee, M.; Rahaman, S.; Blaum, K.; Ferrer, R.; Chaudhuri, A.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Di, Z.; Plass, W. R.; Eliseev, S.; Vorobjev, G.; Habs, D.

    2008-01-11

    The masses of six neutron-deficient rare holmium and thulium isotopes close to the proton drip line were determined with the SHIPTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. For the first time the masses of the proton-unbound isotopes {sup 144,145}Ho and {sup 147,148}Tm were directly measured. The proton separation energies were derived from the measured mass values and compared to predictions from mass formulas. The new values of the proton separation energies are used to determine the location of the proton drip line for holmium and thulium more accurately.

  20. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.

    2011-11-01

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  1. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.; Collaboration: RITU-Gamma Gollaboration

    2011-11-30

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  2. The nuclear shell model toward the drip lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poves, A.; Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Sieja, K.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the 'islands of inversion' that occur when approaching the neutron drip line around the magic numbers N=20, N=28 and N=40 in the framework of the interacting shell model in very large valence spaces. We explain these configuration inversions (and the associated shape transitions) as the result of the competition between the spherical mean field (monopole) that favors magicity and the correlations (multipole) that favor deformed intruder states. We also show that the N=20 and N=28 islands are in reality a single one, which for the magnesium isotopes is limited by N=18 and N=32.

  3. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line: The lowest energy states in 9He via their T = 5/2 isobaric analogs in 9Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uberseder, E.; Rogachev, G. V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Koshchiy, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Alcorta, M.; Chubarian, G.; Davids, B.; Fu, C.; Hooker, J.; Jayatissa, H.; Melconian, D.; Tribble, R. E.

    2016-03-01

    The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound 9He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy 9He states exist with spins Jπ = 1 /2+ and Jπ = 1 /2- and widths on the order of 100-200 keV. These findings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. The present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the 8He+n system, performed via a search for the T = 5 / 2 isobaric analog states in 9Li populated through 8He+p elastic scattering. The present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad Jπ = 1 /2+ state in 9He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.

  4. Collective properties of drip-line nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hamamoto, I.; Sagawa, H.

    1996-12-31

    Performing the spherical Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with Skyrme interactions and, then, using RPA solved in the coordinate space with the Green`s function method, the authors have studied the effect of the unique shell structure as well as the very low particle threshold on collective modes in drip line nuclei. In this method a proper strength function in the continuum is obtained, though the spreading width of collective modes is not included. They have examined also one-particle resonant states in the obtained HF potential. Unperturbed particle-hole (p-h) response functions are carefully studied, which contain all basic information on the exotic behaviour of the RPA strength function in drip line nuclei.

  5. Nuclear structure beyond the neutron drip line. The lowest energy states in 9He via their T=5/2 isobaric analogs in 9Li

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uberseder, E.; Rogachev, G. V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Koshchiy, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Alcorta, M.; Chubarian, G.; Davids, B.; Fu, C.; Hooker, J.; et al

    2016-03-01

    The level structure of the very neutron rich and unbound 9He nucleus has been the subject of significant experimental and theoretical study. Many recent works have claimed that the two lowest energy 9He states exist with spins Jπ=1/2+and Jπ=1/2-and widths on the order of 100–200 keV. These find-ings cannot be reconciled with our contemporary understanding of nuclear structure. Our present work is the first high-resolution study with low statistical uncertainty of the relevant excitation energy range in the 8He+n system, performed via a search for the T =5/2 isobaric analog states in 9Li populated through 8He+p elastic scattering. Moreover, themore » present data show no indication of any narrow structures. Instead, we find evidence for a broad Jπ=1/2+state in 9He located approximately 3 MeV above the neutron decay threshold.« less

  6. Spectroscopy of 28Na : Shell evolution toward the drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepailleur, A.; Wimmer, K.; Mutschler, A.; Sorlin, O.; Thomas, J. C.; Bader, V.; Bancroft, C.; Barofsky, D.; Bastin, B.; Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Bildstein, V.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Brown, B. A.; Caceres, L.; Gade, A.; Gaudefroy, L.; Grévy, S.; Grinyer, G. F.; Iwasaki, H.; Khan, E.; Kröll, T.; Langer, C.; Lemasson, A.; Llidoo, O.; Lloyd, J.; Lunderberg, E.; Negoita, F.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Perdikakis, G.; Recchia, F.; Redpath, T.; Roger, T.; Rotaru, F.; Saenz, S.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Smalley, D.; Sohler, D.; Stanoiu, M.; Stroberg, S. R.; Vandebrouck, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Westerberg, A.

    2015-11-01

    Excited states have been studied in 28Na using the β -decay of implanted 28Ne ions at the Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds/LISE as well as the in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory/S800 facility. New states of positive (Jπ=3+,4+ ) and negative (Jπ=1--5- ) parity are proposed. The former arise from the coupling between 0 d5 /2 protons and 0 d3 /2 neutrons, while the latter are attributable to couplings of 0 d5 /2 protons with 1 p3 /2 or 0 f7 /2 neutrons. While the relative energies between the Jπ=1+-4+ states are well reproduced with the USDA interaction in the N =17 isotones, a progressive shift in the ground-state binding energy (by about 500 keV) is observed between 26F and 30Al . This points to a possible change in the proton-neutron 0 d5 /2 -0 d3 /2 effective interaction when moving from stability to the drip line. The presence of Jπ=1--4- negative-parity states around 1.5 MeV as well as of a candidate for a Jπ=5- state around 2.5 MeV give further support to the collapse of the N =20 gap and to the inversion between the neutron 0 f7 /2 and 1 p3 /2 levels below Z =12 . These features are discussed in the framework of shell-model and energy-density-functional calculations, leading to predicted negative-parity states in the low-energy spectra of the 26F and 25O nuclei.

  7. Predicting narrow states in the spectrum of a nucleus beyond the proton drip line.

    PubMed

    Canton, L; Pisent, G; Svenne, J P; Amos, K; Karataglidis, S

    2006-02-24

    Properties of particle-unstable nuclei lying beyond the proton drip line can be ascertained by considering the (usually known) properties of its mirror neutron-rich system. We have used a multichannel algebraic scattering theory to map the known properties of the neutron-14C system to those of the proton-14O one from which we deduce that the particle-unstable 15F will have a spectrum of two low-lying broad resonances of positive parity and, at higher excitation, three narrow negative-parity ones. A key feature is to use coupling to Pauli-hindered states in the target. PMID:16606079

  8. Production of drip-line nuclei at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Atsumi

    2014-09-01

    Production cross-sections and secondary-beam yields of very neutron rich nuclei near neutron drip-line at 200--250 MeV/u have been investigated at RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF). RIBF is the next generation RI beam facility, which can produce a variety of exotic nuclei with high intensity. The measurement of production yields of 19B, 22C, which are located on the neutron drip-line, and neighboring isotopes was made on the occasion of the Coulomb and nuclear breakup experiments of these halo nuclei at SAMURAI (Superconducting Analyzer for MUlti-particle from RAdioIsotope beams) facility at RIBF. We used 345 MeV/u 48Ca beam as primary beam, which impinged on 30 mm-thick Be target, to obtain secondary beams by projectile fragmentation. The projectile fragments were then separated through Superconducting RI beam separator BigRIPS, and were identified by measuring time of flight (TOF), energy loss (ΔE), and magnetic rigidity (Bρ) by the standard detectors at 2nd stage of BigRIPS. We thus obtained production cross-sections and yields of carbon and boron isotopes. The production cross-sections and yields extracted were compared with the simulation code LISE using EPAX. We discuss these results and comparisons in this poster presentation.

  9. Nuclear astrophysics at the east drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Teranishi, T.; Notani, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Saito, A.; He, J. J.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Fujikawa, H.; Amadio, G.; Baba, H.; Fukuchi, T.; Shimoura, S.; Michimasa, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nishimura, M.; Gono, Y.; Odahara, A.; Kato, S.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Lee, C. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Fülöp, Zs.; Guimar Aes, V.; Lichtenthaler, R.

    2006-03-01

    In the first half of the paper, the nuclear astrophysics activities in Japan, especially in experimental studies are briefly overviewed. A variety of beams have been developed and used for nuclear astrophysics experiments in Japan. The activities include the RI beam facilities at low energies by the in-flight method at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo and by the ISOL-based method at the JAERI tandem facility, and the RI beam facility at intermediate energies at RIKEN. Other activities include a study of the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction exclusively at the tandem accelerator at the Kyushu University, and studies at the neutron facility at Tokyo Institute of Technology and at the photon facility at AIST (Sanso-ken). Research opportunities in the future at RIBF, J-PARC, and SPRING8 are also discussed. A discussion on the research activities at CNS has been specifically extended in the latter half, including various possibilities in collaboration at the RI beam factory at RIKEN.

  10. Nucleus 26O: A Barely Unbound System beyond the Drip Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Tanaka, R.; Minakata, R.; Ogoshi, S.; Orr, N. A.; Achouri, N. L.; Aumann, T.; Baba, H.; Delaunay, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Fukuda, N.; Gibelin, J.; Hwang, J. W.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kameda, D.; Kanno, D.; Kim, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Kubo, T.; Leblond, S.; Lee, J.; Marqués, F. M.; Motobayashi, T.; Murai, D.; Murakami, T.; Muto, K.; Nakashima, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Navin, A.; Nishi, S.; Otsu, H.; Sato, H.; Satou, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takeda, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Togano, Y.; Tuff, A. G.; Vandebrouck, M.; Yoneda, K.

    2016-03-01

    The unbound nucleus 26O has been investigated using invariant-mass spectroscopy following one-proton removal reaction from a 27F beam at 201 MeV /nucleon . The decay products, 2424 and two neutrons, were detected in coincidence using the newly commissioned SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 26O ground-state resonance was found to lie only 18 ±3 (stat )±4 (syst ) keV above threshold. In addition, a higher lying level, which is most likely the first 2+ state, was observed for the first time at 1.28-0.08+0.11 MeV above threshold. Comparison with theoretical predictions suggests that three-nucleon forces, p f -shell intruder configurations, and the continuum are key elements to understanding the structure of the most neutron-rich oxygen isotopes beyond the drip line.

  11. Nucleus ^{26}O: A Barely Unbound System beyond the Drip Line.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Y; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, R; Minakata, R; Ogoshi, S; Orr, N A; Achouri, N L; Aumann, T; Baba, H; Delaunay, F; Doornenbal, P; Fukuda, N; Gibelin, J; Hwang, J W; Inabe, N; Isobe, T; Kameda, D; Kanno, D; Kim, S; Kobayashi, N; Kobayashi, T; Kubo, T; Leblond, S; Lee, J; Marqués, F M; Motobayashi, T; Murai, D; Murakami, T; Muto, K; Nakashima, T; Nakatsuka, N; Navin, A; Nishi, S; Otsu, H; Sato, H; Satou, Y; Shimizu, Y; Suzuki, H; Takahashi, K; Takeda, H; Takeuchi, S; Togano, Y; Tuff, A G; Vandebrouck, M; Yoneda, K

    2016-03-11

    The unbound nucleus ^{26}O has been investigated using invariant-mass spectroscopy following one-proton removal reaction from a ^{27}F beam at 201  MeV/nucleon. The decay products, ^{24}O and two neutrons, were detected in coincidence using the newly commissioned SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The ^{26}O ground-state resonance was found to lie only 18±3(stat)±4(syst)  keV above threshold. In addition, a higher lying level, which is most likely the first 2^{+} state, was observed for the first time at 1.28_{-0.08}^{+0.11}  MeV above threshold. Comparison with theoretical predictions suggests that three-nucleon forces, pf-shell intruder configurations, and the continuum are key elements to understanding the structure of the most neutron-rich oxygen isotopes beyond the drip line. PMID:27015476

  12. Magnetic Moment of Proton Drip-Line Nucleus (9)C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuta, K.; Fukuda, M.; Tanigaki, M.; Minamisono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Mihara, M.; Onishi, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Harada, A.; Sasaki, M.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the proton drip-line nucleus C-9(I(sup (pi)) = 3/2, T(sub 1/2) = 126 ms) has been measured for the first time, using the beta-NMR detection technique with polarized radioactive beams. The measure value for the magnetic moment is 1mu(C-9)! = 1.3914 +/- 0.0005 (mu)N. The deduced spin expectation value of 1.44 is unusually larger than any other ones of even-odd nuclei.

  13. Structure Of Rare-Earth Nuclei Around The Proton Drip Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rykaczewski, K.P.; Gross, C.J.; Yu, C.H.; Grzywacz, R.K.; Bingham, C.R.; Danchev, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Tantawy, M.N.; Batchelder, J.C.; Karny, M.; Krolas, W.; Fong, D.; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V.; Piechaczek, A.; Zganjar, E.; Winger, J.A.; Ginter, T.N.; Stolz, A.; Hagino, K.

    2005-04-05

    Decay studies on rare earth nuclei around the proton drip line have been performed by means of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility in Oak Ridge. The proton emission from the odd-odd N=77 isotone 146Tm was reinvestigated, resulting in the assignment of the 1.01 MeV proton line to the decay of a short-lived 146Tm state. A new proton radioactivity of 144Tm was identified. The decays of isomeric levels in the N=77 isotones, 140Eu, 142Tb and 144Ho were remeasured using {gamma} and electron detectors. The analysis of the structure of studied nuclei, which accounts for the coupling between the protons and neutrons and for core excitations, is presented.

  14. Dispersive optical potential for nuclei with N and Z values changing toward the nucleon drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Bespalova, O. V. Romanovsky, E. A.; Spasskaya, T. I.

    2015-01-15

    A method for constructing dispersive optical potentials is proposed for calculating single-particle energies in isotopic chains of spherical and nearly spherical nuclei up to nucleon drip lines. The potential of this method is demonstrated by calculating the neutron and proton single-particle energies in calcium, nickel, and zirconium isotopes. The results agree well with experimental data available for stable isotopes. Predictive calculations of single-particle spectra are performed for isotopes lying far from the beta-stability valley. A comparison of the results with the energies of nucleon separation from nuclei of mass number A and A+1 revealed features of the single-particle spectrum that are characteristic of nuclei containing classical and nonclassical magic numbers of nucleons.

  15. {beta}-delayed proton decays near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S.-W.; Li, Z.-K.; Xie, Y.-X.; Pan, Q.-Y.; Huang, W.-X.; Wang, X.-D.; Yu, Y.; Xing, Y.-B.; Shu, N.-C.; Chen, Y.-S.; Xu, F.-R.; Wang, K.

    2005-05-01

    We briefly reviewed and summarized the experimental study on {beta}-delayed proton decays published by our group over the last 8 years, namely the experimental observation of {beta}-delayed proton decays of nine new nuclides in the rare-earth region near the proton drip line and five nuclides in the mass 90 region with N{approx}Z by utilizing the p-{gamma} coincidence technique in combination with a He-jet tape transport system. In addition, important technical details of the experiments were provided. The experimental results were compared to the theoretical predictions of some nuclear models, resulting in the following conclusions. (1) The experimental half-lives for {sup 85}Mo, {sup 92}Rh, as well as the predicted 'waiting point' nuclei {sup 89}Ru and {sup 93}Pd were 5-10 times longer than the macroscopic-microscopic model predictions of Moeller et al. [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 66,131(1997)]. These data considerably influenced the predictions of the mass abundances of the nuclides produced in the rp process. (2) The experimental assignments of spin and parity for the drip-line nuclei {sup 142}Ho and {sup 128}Pm could not be well predicted by any of the nuclear models. Nevertheless, the configuration-constrained nuclear potential-energy surfaces calculated by means of a Woods-Saxon-Strutinsky method could reproduce the assignments. (3) The ALICE code overestimated by one or two orders of magnitude the production-reaction cross sections of the nine studied rare-earth nuclei, while the HIVAP code overestimated them by approximately one order of magnitude.

  16. Probing the maximally deformed light rare-earth region around the drip-line nucleus 130Sm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, M.; Paul, E. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Boston, A. J.; Cooper, R. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Gros, S.; McGuirk, B. M.; Scraggs, H. C.; Turk, G.; Rossé, B.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Schmitt, Ch; Stézowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph; DeFrance, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.; Rejmund, F.; Rejmund, M.; Savajols, H.; Scheurer, J. N.; Astier, A.; Deloncle, I.; Prévost, A.; Nyakó, B. M.; Gál, J.; Molnár, J.; Timár, J.; Zolnai, L.; Juhász, K.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Wadsworth, R.; Joshi, P.; La Rana, G.; Moro, R.; Trotta, M.; Vardaci, E.; Hackman, G.; Ball, G.

    2006-07-01

    The neutron deficient rare-earth nuclei of the A~130 region are of particular interest since highly deformed prolate ground states are expected. Indeed these nuclei are predicted to show maximal ground-state deformations of β2 ~ 0.40 (axis ratio of 3:2), comparable to the deformation deduced for superdeformed cerium isotopes at high spin. A fusion-evaporation experiment was performed with radioactive ion beams at GANIL in October 2004 which had the goal to reach very proton-rich exotic nuclei located near the proton drip-line. A radioactive 76Kr beam, delivered by the SPIRAL facility, was used to bombard a thin 58Ni target. Emitted γ-rays were detected by the EXOGAM γ-ray spectrometer which was, for the first time, coupled with both the DIAMANT charged-particle array and the VAMOS spectrometer.

  17. Optimizing fumigation efficiency by doubling drip line number and using low permeability film in raised-bed production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern California strawberries are planted in raised-beds covered by polyethylene (PE) film and typically are irrigated with two drip lines placed near the bed surface. To control soil-borne pests, fumigants are commonly applied through the drip lines prior to transplanting strawberries, but effic...

  18. Systematics of isomeric configurations in N=77 odd-Z isotones near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawy, M.N.; Danchev, M.; Hartley, D.J.; Mazzocchi, C.; Bingham, C.R.; Grzywacz, R.; Rykaczewski, K.P.; Gross, C.J.; Shapira, D.; Yu, C.-H.; Batchelder, J.C.; Krolas, W.; Fong, D.; Hamilton, J. H.; Li, K.; Ramayya, A. V.; Ginter, T.N.; Stolz, A.; Hagino, K.; Karny, M.

    2006-02-15

    The systematics of the {pi}h{sub 11/2}x{nu}h{sub 11/2} and {pi}h{sub 11/2}x{nu}s{sub 1/2} isomeric configurations was studied for the odd-Z N=77 isotones near the proton drip line. The isomeric decays in {sup 140}Eu, {sup 142}Tb, {sup 144}Ho, and {sup 146}Tm were measured by means of x-ray, {gamma}-ray, and charged particle spectroscopy at the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (ORNL). The spin and parity of I{sup {pi}}=8{sup +} and 5{sup -} were deduced for the isomers in {sup 140}Eu and {sup 142}Tb. New decay schemes were established, and the half-lives of the 8{sup +} isomers were measured to be 302(4) ns for {sup 140m2}Eu and 25(1) {mu}s for {sup 142m2}Tb. No evidence for the expected 1{sup +} ground-state was found in the {sup 144}Ho decay data. The proton-emission from {sup 146}Tm was restudied. Five proton transitions were assigned to two proton-emitting states. The half-lives of 198(3) ms and 68(3) ms and the spin and parity values of I{sup {pi}}=10{sup +} and 5{sup -} were established for {sup 146m}Tm and {sup 146gs}Tm, respectively. For the first time for an odd-odd nucleus, the interpretation of the observed decay properties and structure of the proton-emitting states was made by accounting for deformation and proton and neutron coupling to the core excitations. A complex wave-function structure was obtained, with dominating components of {pi}h{sub 11/2}x{nu}h{sub 11/2} for the 10{sup +} isomer and {pi}h{sub 11/2}x{nu}s{sub 1/2} for the 5{sup -} ground state.

  19. New Isotopes and Proton Emitters-Crossing the Drip Line in the Vicinity of 100Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čeliković, I.; Lewitowicz, M.; Gernhäuser, R.; Krücken, R.; Nishimura, S.; Sakurai, H.; Ahn, D. S.; Baba, H.; Blank, B.; Blazhev, A.; Boutachkov, P.; Browne, F.; de France, G.; Doornenbal, P.; Faestermann, T.; Fang, Y.; Fukuda, N.; Giovinazzo, J.; Goel, N.; Górska, M.; Ilieva, S.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Jungclaus, A.; Kameda, D.; Kim, Y.-K.; Kwon, Y. K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Lorusso, G.; Lubos, D.; Moschner, K.; Murai, D.; Nishizuka, I.; Park, J.; Patel, Z.; Rajabali, M.; Rice, S.; Schaffner, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Sinclair, L.; Söderström, P.-A.; Steiger, K.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, H.; Wu, J.; Xu, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Several new isotopes, 96In, 94Cd, 92Ag, and 90Pd, have been identified at the RIKEN Nishina Center. The study of proton drip-line nuclei in the vicinity of 93Ag and 89Rh with half-lives in the submicrosecond range. The systematics of the half-lives of odd-Z nuclei with Tz=-1 /2 toward 99Sn shows a stabilizing effect of the Z =50 shell closure. Production cross sections for nuclei in the vicinity of 100Sn measured at different energies and target thicknesses were compared to the cross sections calculated by epax taking into account contributions of secondary reactions in the primary target.

  20. New Isotopes and Proton Emitters-Crossing the Drip Line in the Vicinity of ^{100}Sn.

    PubMed

    Čeliković, I; Lewitowicz, M; Gernhäuser, R; Krücken, R; Nishimura, S; Sakurai, H; Ahn, D S; Baba, H; Blank, B; Blazhev, A; Boutachkov, P; Browne, F; de France, G; Doornenbal, P; Faestermann, T; Fang, Y; Fukuda, N; Giovinazzo, J; Goel, N; Górska, M; Ilieva, S; Inabe, N; Isobe, T; Jungclaus, A; Kameda, D; Kim, Y-K; Kwon, Y K; Kojouharov, I; Kubo, T; Kurz, N; Lorusso, G; Lubos, D; Moschner, K; Murai, D; Nishizuka, I; Park, J; Patel, Z; Rajabali, M; Rice, S; Schaffner, H; Shimizu, Y; Sinclair, L; Söderström, P-A; Steiger, K; Sumikama, T; Suzuki, H; Takeda, H; Wang, Z; Watanabe, H; Wu, J; Xu, Z

    2016-04-22

    Several new isotopes, ^{96}In, ^{94}Cd, ^{92}Ag, and ^{90}Pd, have been identified at the RIKEN Nishina Center. The study of proton drip-line nuclei in the vicinity of ^{100}Sn led to the discovery of new proton emitters ^{93}Ag and ^{89}Rh with half-lives in the submicrosecond range. The systematics of the half-lives of odd-Z nuclei with T_{z}=-1/2 toward ^{99}Sn shows a stabilizing effect of the Z=50 shell closure. Production cross sections for nuclei in the vicinity of ^{100}Sn measured at different energies and target thicknesses were compared to the cross sections calculated by epax taking into account contributions of secondary reactions in the primary target. PMID:27152796

  1. Gamow-Teller {beta}{sup +} decay of deformed nuclei near the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Frisk, F.; Hamamoto, I.; Zhang, X.Z. |

    1995-11-01

    Using a quasiparticle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) based on deformed Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations with Skyrme interactions, the distribution of the Gamow-Teller (GT) {beta}{sup +} decay strength is estimated for the HF local minima of even-even deformed nuclei near the proton drip line in the region of 28{lt}{ital Z}{lt}66. The distribution often depends sensitively on the nuclear shape (namely, oblate or prolate). In the region of {ital Z}{lt}50 the possibility of observing {beta}-delayed proton emission depends sensitively on the excess of {ital Z} over {ital Z}={ital N}. In the region of {ital Z}{gt}50 almost the entire estimated GT strength is found to lie below the ground states of the even-even mother nuclei, and the observation of the total GT strength by {beta}-delayed charged-particle(s) emission will be of essential importance.

  2. Evolution of pre-collective nuclei: Structural signatures near the drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.; Zamfir, N.V. ||

    1994-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that the phenomenology of single-magic and near-magic nuclei has universal characteristics analogous to those of collective nuclei and that, moreover, this phenomenology attaches smoothly to that describing collective nuclei. This has led to a number of new signatures of structure as well as to a new, tripartite, classification of nuclear structure that embraces the gamut of structures from magic, through pre-collective, to fully collective and rotational nuclei. Aside from the natural appeal of simple global correlations of collective observables, these results have particular significance for soon-to-be accessible exotic nuclei near the drip lines since they rely on only the simplest-to-obtain data, in particular, the energies of just the first two excited states, E(4{sub 1}{sup +}) and E(2{sub 1}{sup +}), of even-even nuclei, and the B(E2:2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub 1}{sup +}) value. Indeed, without the need for more extensive level schemes, these basic data alone can reveal information about the goodness of seniority, about the validity of pair-addition mode relationships of adjacent even-even nuclei, about underlying shell structure (validity of magic numbers) and even about the shell model potential itself (e.g., the strengths of the l{center_dot} and l{sup 2} terms).

  3. GAMMASPHERE+FMA : a journey beyond the proton drip-line.

    SciTech Connect

    Seweryniak, D.; Woods, P. J.; Ressler, J. J.; Davids, C. N.; Heinz, A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Cizewski, J. A.; Davinson, T.; Ding, K. Y.; Fotiades, N.; Garg, U.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Reiter, P.; Shergur, J.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2000-11-30

    The majority of experiments performed during the 2-year long stay of GAMMAS-PHERE at the Argonne National Laboratory aimed to study proton-rich nuclei far from the line of stability at and beyond the proton drip-line. A high reaction channel selectivity was required to assign in-beam {gamma}-ray transitions to weakly populated exotic nuclei in the presence of background from strong reaction channels. In many of the experiments this was achieved by using the Argonne fragment mass analyzer to separate heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reaction products from scattered beam and disperse them according to their mass-over-charge-state ratio. For medium mass and heavy a and proton emitters the Recoil-Decay Tagging method was implemented. In-beam {gamma}-ray transitions were observed in several proton emitters between Z=50 and Z=82. Among others, rotational bands were assigned to {sup 141}Ho and {sup 131}Eu. A quadruple deformation of {beta}=0.25(4) was deduced for the ground state in {sup 141}Ho from the extracted dynamic moment of inertia. Based on observed band crossings and signature splittings the 7/2{sup {minus}} [523] and 1/2{sup +}[411] configurations were proposed for the ground state and the isomeric state, respectively. Comparison with particle-rotor calculations indicates, however, that {sup 141}Ho may have significant hexadecapole deformation and could be triaxial.

  4. Isomer Studies for Nuclei near the Proton Drip Line in the Mass 130-160 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. M.; Mason, P. J. R.; Khan, S.; Kishada, A. M.; Varley, B. J.; Rigby, S. V.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P.; Rahkila, P.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A. P.; Nyman, M.; Uusitalo, J.; Grahn, T.; Nieminen, P.; Pakarinen, J.

    2007-11-30

    This report details the status of an experimental research programme which has studied isomeric states in the mass 130-160 region of the nuclear chart. Several new isomers have been established and characterised near the proton drip line using a recoil isomer tagging technique at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The latest experiments have been performed with a modified setup where the standard GREAT focal-plane double-sided silicon-strip detector was changed to a dual multi-wire proportional-counter arrangement. This new setup has improved capability for short-lived isomer studies where high focal-plane rates can be tolerated. The results of key recent experiments for nuclei situated above ({sup 153}Yb,{sup 152}Tm) and below ({sup 136}Pm,{sup 142}Tb) the N = 82 shell gap were presented along with an interpretation for the isomers. Finally, the future prospects of the technique, using an isomer-tagged differential-plunger setup, were discussed. This technique will be capable of establishing the deformation of the states above the isomers and will aid in the process of assigning underlying single-particle configurations to the isomeric states.

  5. Drip Line Flushing with Chlorine May Not Be Effective in Reducing Bacterial Loads in Irrigation Water Distribution Systems.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Mary Theresa; Marine, Sasha C; Everts, Kathryne L; Micallef, Shirley A

    2016-06-01

    Irrigation water distribution systems are used to supply water to produce crops, but the system may also provide a protected environment for the growth of human pathogens present in irrigation water. In this study, the effects of drip tape installation depth and sanitization on the microbial quality of irrigation groundwater were evaluated. Drip tape lines were installed on the soil surface or 5 or 10 cm below the soil surface. Water samples were collected from the irrigation source and the end of each drip line every 2 weeks over an 11-week period, and the levels of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, aerobic mesophilic bacteria, and enterococci were quantified. Half of the lines installed at each depth were flushed with sodium hypochlorite for 1 h during week 6 to achieve a residual of 10 ppm at the end of the line. There was a statistically significant (P = 0.01) effect of drip tape installation depth and sanitizer application on the recovery of E. coli, with increased levels measured at the 5-cm depth and in nonsanitized lines, although the levels were at the limit of detection, potentially confounding the results. There was no significant effect of drip tape depth on total coliforms, aerobic mesophiles, or enterococci. In contrast, a statistically significant increase (P < 0.01) in the recovery of total coliforms was recorded from the ends of lines that received chlorine. This may be indicative of shedding of cells owing to degradation of biofilms that formed on the inner walls of the lines. These findings emphasize the need to better understand conditions that may lead to corrosion and increases in bacterial loads inside drip lines during flushing. Recommendations to growers should suggest collecting groundwater samples for testing at the end of drip lines rather than at the source. Guidelines on flushing drip lines with chlorine may need to include water pH monitoring, a parameter that influences the corrosive properties of chlorine. PMID:27296607

  6. Properties of drip-line nuclei with an m-scheme cluster-orbital shell model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, Hiroshi; Katō, Kiyoshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi

    2011-09-01

    In the drip-line region of oxygen isotopes, an abrupt increase of the r.m.s.radius of 23O is observed from the analysis of the reaction cross section. We develop an m-scheme approach of COSM and perform calculations for oxygen isotopes. We examine the interaction dependence to the calculated energies and r.m.s.radii. Further, the relation between the density and nucleon-nucleon interaction is discussed.

  7. The new neutron rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gridnev, K. A.; Gridnev, D. K.; Tarasov, V. N.; Tarasov, D. V.; Viñas, X.; Greiner, W.

    2014-07-23

    Using HF+BCS method with Skyrme forces we analyze the neutron drip line. It is shown that around magic and new magic numbers the drip line may form stability peninsulas. It is shown that the location of these peninsulas does not depend on the choice of Skyrme forces. It is found that the size of the peninsulas is sensitive to the choice of Skyrme forces and the most extended peninsulas appear with the SkI2 set.

  8. {gamma}-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A{approx}130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stezowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rosse, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2008-11-11

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL {sup 76}Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM {gamma}-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new {gamma}-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A {gamma}-ray belonging to the {sup 130}Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  9. Low-lying continuum states of drip-line oxygen isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukiyama, Koshiroh; Otsuka, Takaharu; Fujimoto, Rintaro

    2015-09-01

    Low-lying continuum states of exotic oxygen isotopes with A=23-26 are studied, by introducing the continuum-coupled shell model (CCSM) characterized by an infinite wall placed very far away and by an interaction for continuum coupling constructed in a close relation to the realistic shell-model Hamiltonian. Neutron-emission spectra from exotic oxygen isotopes are calculated by the doorway-state approach in heavy-ion multi-nucleon transfer reactions. The results agree with experiment remarkably well, providing evidence that the continuum effects are stronger than ˜ 1 MeV, consistent with the shell evolution in exotic nuclei. The peaks in the neutron spectra are understood as doorway-state resonances. The results by this CCSM doorway-state approach are compared with calculations on neutron-scattering resonance peaks made within the CCSM phase-shift approach and also with those obtained in the Gamow shell model, by taking the same Hamiltonian.

  10. Proton emission from the deformed odd-odd nuclei near drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patial, M.; Arumugam, P.; Jain, A. K.; Maglione, E.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2016-01-01

    Proton emission from odd-odd nuclei is studied within the two quasiparticle plus rotor model which includes the non-adiabatic effects and the residual interaction between valence proton and neutron. Justification of the formalism is discussed through corroboration of our results with the experimental spectrum of 180Ta. Exact calculations are performed to get the proton emission halflives. Our results for the proton emitter 130Eu leads to the assignment of spin and parity Jπ = 1+ for the ground state. The role of Coriolis and residual neutron-proton interactions on the proton emission halflives and their interplay are also discussed.

  11. Study of drip-line nuclei with a core plus multi-valence nucleon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, H.; Myo, T.; Katō, K.; Ikeda, K.

    2005-09-01

    We study neutron- and proton-rich nuclei with an extended cluster-orbital shell model (COSM) approach, which we call Neo-COSM. The binding energies and r.m.s. radii of oxygen isotopes are reproduced. For N = 8 isotones, the tendency of the abrupt increase of the r.m.s. radii is qualitatively improved.

  12. Bound and unbound nuclear systems at the drip lines: a one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschini, L.; Pérez-Bernal, F.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-08-01

    We construct a one-dimensional toy model to describe the main features of Borromean nuclei at the continuum threshold. The model consists of a core and two valence neutrons, unbound in the mean potential, that are bound by a residual point contact density-dependent interaction. Different discretization procedures are used (harmonic oscillator and transformed harmonic oscillator bases, or use of large rigid wall box). Resulting energies and wave functions, as well as inelastic transition intensities, are compared within the different discretization techniques, as well as with the exact results in the case of one particle and with the results of the di-neutron cluster model in the two particles case. Despite its simplicity, this model includes the main physical features of the structure of Borromean nuclei in an intuitive and computationally affordable framework, and will be extended to direct reaction calculations.

  13. Resonances and continuum states of drip-line nuclei using the complex scaling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myo, Takayuki; Katō, Kiyoshi

    2011-09-01

    Resonances and continuum states of He isotopes are investigated using the cluster orbital shell model (COSM) with the complex scaling method (CSM). We discuss the following subjects: 1) Spectroscopic factors of the unbound nucleus 7He into the 6He-n components and their relation to the one-neutron removal strengths of 7He. The importance of the 6He(2+) resonance is shown. 2) Structure of five-body 0+ resonance of 8He from the viewpoint of the two-neutron pair coupling. The monopole strengths into five-body unbound states are also investigated. It is found that the sequential breakup process of 8He → 7He+n → 6He+n+n is dominant in the monopole excitation, while the contribution of 8He(0+2) is negligible.

  14. Epithermal Neutrons, Illumination, Spatial Scale and Topography: A Correlative Analysis of Factors Influencing the Detection of Slope Hydration Using LRO's Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Livengood, T.; Sagdeev, R.; Parsons, A. M.; Su, J. J.; Murray, J.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Harshman, K.; Hamara, D.; Bodnarik, J.

    2014-10-01

    This research correlates the Moon’s south polar epithermal neutron flux, topography and a visible illumination model and shows that there is a widespread hydration of polward-facing (PF) slopes that is occurring at a continuum of spatial scales.

  15. Peninsulas of the neutron stability of nuclei in the vicinity of neutron magic numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, V. N.; Gridnev, K. A.; Greiner, W.; Gridnev, D. K.; Kuprikov, V. I.; Tarasov, D. V.; Vinas, X.

    2012-01-15

    On the basis of the Hartree-Fock method as implemented with Skyrme forces (Ska, SkM*, Sly4, and SkI2) and with allowance for an axial deformation and nucleon pairing in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer approximation, the properties of extremely neutron-rich even-even nuclei were calculated beyond the neutron drip line known earlier from theoretical calculations. It was shown that the chains of isotopes beyond the neutron drip line that contain N = 32, 58, 82, 126, and 184 neutrons form peninsulas of nuclei stable against the emission of one neutron and, in some cases, peninsulas of nuclei stable against the emission of two neutrons. The neutron- and proton-density distributions in nuclei forming stability peninsulas were found to be spherically symmetric. A mechanism via which the stability of nuclei might be restored beyond the neutron drip line was discussed. A comparison with the results of calculations by the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov method was performed for long chains of sulfur and gadolinium isotopes up to the neutron drip line.

  16. Continuum Response and Reaction in Neutron-Rich Be Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Ueda, Manabu; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2004-02-27

    We study E1 resonances, breakup and fusion reactions for weakly bound Be nuclei. The absorbing-boundary condition (ABC) is used to describe both the outgoing and incoming boundary conditions. The neutron continuum plays important roles in response and reaction of neutron drip-line nuclei.

  17. Exotic modes of excitation in deformed neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2011-05-06

    Low-lying dipole excitation mode in neutron-rich Mg isotopes close to the drip line is investigated in the framework of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and the quasiparticle random-phase approximation employing the Skyrme and the pairing energy-density functionals. It is found that the low-lying dipole-strength distribution splits into the K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup -} and 1{sup -} components due to the nuclear deformation. The low-lying dipole strength increases as the neutron drip-line is approached.

  18. Neutron Rich Nuclei in a New Binding Energy Formula and the Astrophysical r-PROCESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Chirashree; Gangopadhyay, G.

    Neutron rich nuclei has been studied with a new phenomenological mass formula. Predictions of different mass formulas for the location of the neutron drip line are compared with those from the present calculation. The implications of the new mass formula for r-process nucleosynthesis are discussed. It is found that though the neutron drip line obtained from this formula differs substantially from other formulas, the r-process abundance upto mass 200 are unlikely to be significantly different. The errors inherent in the mass formula are found to play an insignificant role beyond mass A = 80.

  19. A diurnal study of lunar topography to determine regolith temperature contributions to the inference of hydrogen volatiles using epithermal neutrons from the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Livengood, T. A.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Murray, J.; Parsons, A. M.; Su, J. J.; Bodnarik, J.; Harshman, K.; Sagdeev, R.

    2014-12-01

    In this research we investigate lunar volatiles in the Moon's southern latitudes under diurnal conditions using five years of accumulated epithermal neutron observations by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector. The primary objective of this research is to determine the spatial extent and magnitude of a possible regolith temperature contribution to the Moon's epithermal leakage flux as a function of topography. Ongoing research has suggested that there exists a widespread preferential bias in hydrogen concentrations towards the Moon's poleward-facing slopes as evidenced by a localized 1-2% suppression of the lunar epithermal leakage flux relative to equivalent equator-facing slopes (McClahanan et al., Under Review 2014). Monte Carlo neutron modeling results by (Lawson et al., 2000; Little et al. 2002) found that the epithermal neutron leakage flux may be slightly enhanced ~1% with regolith temperature in lunar conditions. Contrasting temperature conditions on poleward-facing and equator-facing slopes may at least partially explain the observation of biased concentrations of hydrogen towards poleward-facing slopes. To isolate any temperature contribution, LEND night observations are mapped and correlated with temperature maps from LRO's Diviner radiometer and terrain and illumination models derived from the Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter. Night and day results are contrasted to illustrate both the magitude and latitude extent of putative temperature effects and spatial hydrogen distributions.

  20. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüster, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  1. Outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruester, Stefan B.; Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2006-03-15

    The properties of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by using modern nuclear data and theoretical mass tables, updating in particular the classic work of Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland. Experimental data from the atomic mass table from Audi, Wapstra, and Thibault of 2003 are used and a thorough comparison of many modern theoretical nuclear models, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, is performed for the first time. In addition, the influences of pairing and deformation are investigated. State-of-the-art theoretical nuclear mass tables are compared to check their differences concerning the neutron drip line, magic neutron numbers, the equation of state, and the sequence of neutron-rich nuclei up to the drip line in the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars.

  2. Looking for precursors of neutron matter exotica

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1989-10-01

    The question of the possible stability of neutron matter is investigated within the framework of a Thomas-Fermi model of nuclei. Some of the consequences of bound (or slightly unbound) neutron matter are discussed. A comparison is then made between the model predictions and the observed neutron drip line for light nuclei. The tentative conclusion arising from this comparison is that neutron matter is probably unbound, in approximate agreement with an earlier theoretical estimate. Quantum effects that could lead to extremely large neutron halos are also briefly discussed. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Production cross section of neutron-rich isotopes with radioactive and stable beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Myeong-Hwan; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Oh, Yongseok; Kim, Youngman

    2014-03-01

    The production cross section of neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Zn, Te, Xe, and Pt are predicted in the diffusive multinucleon transfer reactions with stable and radioactive beams. With these isotopes one can treat the neutron shell evolution beyond N =28, 50, 82, and 126. Because of the small cross sections, the production of nuclei near the neutron drip line requires the optimal choice of reaction partners and bombarding energies.

  4. Interplay between the 02+ resonance and the nonresonant continuum of the drip-line two-neutron halo nucleus 22C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Kazuyuki; Myo, Takayuki; Furumoto, Takenori; Matsumoto, Takuma; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2013-08-01

    The breakup cross section (BUX) of 22C by 12C at 250 MeV/nucleon is evaluated by the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method incorporating the cluster-orbital shell model (COSM) wave functions. Contributions of the low-lying 02+ and 21+ resonances predicted by COSM to the BUX are investigated. The 21+ resonance gives a narrow peak in the BUX, as in usual resonant reactions, whereas the 02+ resonant cross section has a peculiar shape due to the coupling to the nonresonant continuum, i.e., the background-phase effect (BPE). By changing the scattering angle of 22C after the breakup, a variety of shapes of the 02+ resonant cross sections are obtained. The mechanism of the appearance of the sizable BPE in the breakup of 22C is discussed.

  5. Three-Body Forces and Neutron-Rich Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Suzuki, Toshio

    2013-08-01

    Physics of three-body forces in connection to exotic nuclei will be discussed. Three-nucleon forces (3NF), especially Fujita-Miyazawa 3NF, are shown to be the key for the solution to the long-standing problem of oxygen drip line, which deviates from basic trend towards the stability line. Three-body forces produce repulsive modifications to effective interaction between valence neutrons, and make the ground states less bound. The oxygen drip line is then located at the right place. The relation to the neutron matter is presented. Applications to Ca isotopes will be presented. The shell evolution due to the 3NF depicts the raising of single-particle energies and the widening of splitting among the orbits. This is in contrast to the so-called shell quenching. The 2+ levels are calculated for Ca isotopes, suggesting about the same sub-magic structure for N = 32 and 34.

  6. Neutron Capture Rates and r-PROCESS Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surman, R. A.; Mumpower, M. R.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Sinclair, R.; Hix, W. R.; Jones, K. L.

    2013-03-01

    Simulations of r-process nucleosynthesis require nuclear physics information for thousands of neutron-rich nuclear species from the line of stability to the neutron drip line. While arguably the most important pieces of nuclear data for the r-process are the masses and β decay rates, individual neutron capture rates can also be of key importance in setting the final r-process abundance pattern. Here we consider the influence of neutron capture rates in forming the A ~ 80 and rare earth peaks.

  7. Continuum Effects and Three-Nucleon Forces in Neutron-Rich Oxygen Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, Gaute; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Jansen, G R; Machleidt, R; Papenbrock, T.

    2012-01-01

    We employ interactions from chiral effective field theory and compute binding energies, excited states, and radii for isotopes of oxygen with the coupled-cluster method. Our calculation includes the effects of three-nucleon forces and of the particle continuum, both of which are important for the description of neutron-rich isotopes in the vicinity of the nucleus 24O. Our main results are the placement of the neutron drip-line at 24O, the assignment of spins, parities and resonance widths for several low-lying states of the drip-line nucleus, and an efficient approximation that incorporates the effects of three-body interactions.

  8. Special features of single-particle proton spectra of nickel, zinc, and germanium isotopes in the vicinity of the proton drip line

    SciTech Connect

    Bespalova, O. V. Ermakova, T. A.; Klimochkina, A. A.; Romanovsky, E. A.; Spasskaya, T. I.

    2015-10-15

    The single-particle proton spectra of the neutron-deficient isotopes {sup 50,52}Ni, {sup 56,58,60,62}Zn, and {sup 60,62,64}Ge were calculated on the basis of the dispersive optical model whose parameters were extrapolated from the region of stable isotopes. The resulting parameter values lead to agreement between the total number of protons in bound states and the charge number Z of the respective nucleus. The results of the calculations are indicative of a weakly magic character of the {sup 58}Zn nucleus, which has a traditional magic number of N = 28 and a nearly magic number of Z = 30, and the {sup 64}Ge nucleus, for which N = Z = 32.

  9. Shell And Halo Structure In Neutron-Rich Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nociforo, C.

    2010-06-01

    Spectroscopic investigations performed at the neutron drip line in case of sd shell nuclei have recently shown the existence of the new magic numbers Z = 8 and N = 14,16. Predictions within the nuclear shell model calculations for the {sup 23,24}O ground state have been confirmed measuring their neutron occupancy in breakup reactions performed by using the inflight radioactive ion beams produced at the Fragment Separator FRS of GSI. Some perspectives of studying the evolution of magic numbers in this region of light exotic nuclei are given.

  10. Mixing of di-neutron components in {sup 8}He

    SciTech Connect

    Itagaki, N.; Ito, M.; Arai, K.; Aoyama, S.; Kokalova, Tz.

    2008-07-15

    The mixing of di-neutron components in {sup 8}He is studied. The ground state of {sup 8}He corresponds to the sub-closed-shell configuration of the spin-orbit favored orbits (p{sub 3/2}) for the neutrons, and the shell-model-like configuration is considered to be dominant. However, {sup 8}He is a drip-line nucleus with a two-neutron separation energy of 2.1 MeV, and the di-neutron configuration, which is a characteristic feature of the weakly bound systems, mixes in the ground state. The motion of four neutrons around the {sup 4}He core is solved by superposing the wave functions of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The mixing of di-neutron configurations is estimated by coupling the THSR (Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Roepke) wave function, which successfully describes the {alpha}-condensed state of light nuclei.

  11. Nuclear structure at particle drip lines

    SciTech Connect

    Dobaczewski, J. |; Hamamoto, I. |; Nazarewicz, W. ||; Sheikh, J.A. |

    1993-12-31

    Several examples of mean-field calculations, relevant to the recent and planned low-spin experimental works, are presented. The perspectives for future studies (mainly related to spectroscopy of exotic nuclei) are reviewed.

  12. Lithium isotopes beyond the drip line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksyutina, Yu.; Johansson, H. T.; Adrich, P.; Aksouh, F.; Aumann, T.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Chatillon, A.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Pramanik, U. Datta; Emling, H.; Forssén, C.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Geissel, H.; Hellström, M.; Ickert, G.; Jones, K. L.; Jonson, B.; Kliemkiewicz, A.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Lantz, M.; LeBleis, T.; Lindahl, A. O.; Mahata, K.; Matos, M.; Meister, M.; Münzenberg, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Palit, R.; Pantea, M.; Paschalis, S.; Prokopowicz, W.; Reifarth, R.; Richter, A.; Riisager, K.; Schrieder, G.; Simon, H.; Sümmerer, K.; Tengblad, O.; Walus, W.; Weick, H.; Zhukov, M. V.

    2008-09-01

    The unbound isotopes 10Li, 12Li and 13Li have been observed after nucleon-knockout reactions at relativistic energies with 11Li and 14Be beams impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. The channels 9Li + n, 11Li + n and 11Li + 2 n were analysed in the ALADIN-LAND setup at GSI. The 10Li data confirm earlier findings, while the 12Li and 13Li nuclei were observed for the first time. The 11Li + n relative-energy spectrum shows that the ground state of 12Li can be described as a virtual s-state with a scattering length of -13.7(1.6) fm. A broad energy spectrum was found for the 11Li + 2 n channel. Based on the assumption that the relative-energy spectrum is dominated by a correlated background presumably stemming from initial correlations in the 14Be ground-state, evidence for a 13Li resonance at 1.47(31) MeV above the 11Li + 2 n threshold with a width around 2 MeV has been found.

  13. Roles of deformation and neutron excess on the giant monopole resonance in neutron-rich Zr isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the roles of deformation on the giant monopole resonance (GMR), particularly the mixing of the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) and the effects of the neutron excess in the well-deformed nuclei around {sup 110}Zr and in the drip-line nuclei around {sup 140}Zr by means of the deformed quasiparticle-random-phase approximation employing the Skyrme and the local-pairing energy-density functionals. It is found that the isoscalar (IS) GMR has a two-peak structure, the lower peak of which is associated with the mixing between the ISGMR and the K{sup {pi}=}0{sup +} component of the ISGQR. The transition strength of the lower peak of the ISGMR grows as the neutron number increases. In the drip-line nuclei, the neutron excitation is dominant over the proton excitation. We find that for an isovector (IV) excitation the GMR has a four-peak structure due to the mixing of the IS and IV modes as well as the mixing of the K{sup {pi}=}0{sup +} component of the IVGQR. In addition to the GMR, we find that the threshold strength is generated by neutrons only.

  14. Monopole Modes of Excitation in Deformed Neutron-rich Mg Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenichi

    2009-08-26

    The giant monopole resonance (GMR) and the low-frequency mode of monopole excitation in neutron-rich magnesium isotopes close to the drip line are investigated by means of the deformed Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and quasiparticle random-phase approximations. It is found that the GMR has a two-peak structure due to the deformation. The lower-energy resonance is generated associated with the coupling to the K{sup p}i = 0{sup +} component of the giant quadrupole resonance. Besides the GMR, we obtain the soft K{sup p}i = 0{sup +} mode below the neutron emission threshold energy.

  15. Swelling of nuclei embedded in neutron-gas and consequences for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Horowitz, C. J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Maruhn, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    Fusion of very neutron rich nuclei may be important to determine the composition and heating of the crust of accreting neutron stars. We present an exploratory study of the effect of the neutron-gas environment on the structure of nuclei and the consequences for pycnonuclear fusion cross sections in the neutron drip region. We studied the formation and properties of oxygen and calcium isotopes embedded in varying neutron-gas densities. We observe that the formed isotope is the drip-line nucleus for the given effective interaction. Increasing the neutron-gas density leads to the swelling of the nuclear density. We have used these densities to study the effect of this swelling on the fusion cross sections using the São Paulo potential. At high neutron-gas densities the cross section is substantially increased but at lower densities the modification is minimal.

  16. Impact of a low-energy enhancement in the gamma-ray strength function on the neutron-capture cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, A. C.; Goriely, S.

    2010-07-15

    A low-energy enhancement of the gamma-ray strength function in several light and medium-mass nuclei has been observed recently in {sup 3}He-induced reactions. The effect of this enhancement on (n,gamma) cross sections is investigated for stable and unstable neutron-rich Fe, Mo, and Cd isotopes. Our results indicate that the radiative neutron capture cross sections may increase considerably due to the low-energy enhancement when approaching the neutron drip line. This could have non-negligible consequences on r-process nucleosynthesis calculations.

  17. N=14 Shell Closure in {sup 22}O Viewed through a Neutron Sensitive Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Becheva, E.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Khan, E.; Beaumel, D.; Delaunay, F.; Fallot, M.; Lima, V.; Scarpaci, J.A.; Daugas, J.M.; Roig, O.; Sauvestre, J.E.; Drouart, A.; Gillibert, A.; Keeley, N.; Lapoux, V.; Nalpas, L.; Pollacco, E. C.

    2006-01-13

    To investigate the behavior of the N=14 neutron gap far from stability with a neutron-sensitive probe, proton elastic and 2{sub 1}{sup +} inelastic scattering angular distributions for the neutron-rich nucleus {sup 22}O were measured using the MUr a STrip detector array at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds facility. A deformation parameter {beta}{sub p,p{sup '}}=0.26{+-}0.04 is obtained for the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state, much lower than in {sup 20}O, showing a weak neutron contribution to this state. A microscopic analysis was performed using matter and transition densities generated by continuum Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and quasiparticle random phase approximation calculations, respectively. The ratio of neutron to proton contributions to the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state is found close to the N/Z ratio, demonstrating a strong N=14 shell closure in the vicinity of the neutron drip line.

  18. Orbital topography and other astrophysical consequences of Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity. [black holes hypothesis and neutron star upper mass limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Since Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity provides at present a worthy devil's advocate for the black hole hypothesis, it is important for eventual observational work to elaborate the astrophysical consequences and possibilities peculiar to it. This work is begun by deriving the orbital topography of the spherically symmetric solution to Rosen's field equations - which is relevant to the behavior of relativistic axisymmetric accretion flows - and calculating predicted accretion disk efficiencies, which can be as much as 2.5 times higher than for a disk in Schwarzschild. Thereafter, a brief treatment of the shortest kinematic time scale and the time dilations for in-falling material is given. Finally it is shown that Birkhoff's theorem does not hold in Rosen's theory, and, therefore, that genuine gravitational monopole radiation is possible. The energy it carries, however, is not positive definite.

  19. The Sensitivity of r-PROCESS Nucleosynthesis to the Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surman, R.; Mumpower, M. R.; Cass, J.; Aprahamian, A.

    2014-09-01

    About half of the heavy elements in the Solar System were created by rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis. In the r-process, heavy elements are built up via a sequence of neutron captures and beta decays in which an intense neutron flux pushes material out towards the neutron drip line. The nuclear network simulations used to test potential astrophysical scenarios for the r-process therefore require nuclear physics data (masses, beta decay lifetimes, neutron capture rates, fission probabilities) for thousands of nuclei far from stability. Only a small fraction of this data has been experimentally measured. Here we discuss recent sensitivity studies that aim to determine the nuclei whose properties are most crucial for r-process calculations.

  20. Nuclear Sturcture Along the Neutron Dripline: MoNa-LISA and the dinueutron system

    SciTech Connect

    Spyou, Artemis

    2012-09-05

    Nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios were found to present different structures from what was known for the stable ones. With the current facilities we can now study nuclei that lie even beyond the neutron drip line. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University we use the MoNA/Sweeper setup to perform such studies of neutron unbound nuclei. In a typical experiment, a radioactive beam is employed to produce the nucleus of interest. This unbound nucleus immediately decays into a neutron and a remaining charged fragment, both of which are detected and used to reconstruct the original nucleus and study its properties. In this Colloquium, new exciting findings from recent experiments will be presented. These include the first observation of a dineutron decay from 16Be, the exploration of the “south shore” of the Island of Inversion and the first evidence of the decay of the troubling nucleus 26O.

  1. Conservation of Isospin in Neutron-rich Fission Fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.K.; Choudhury, D.; Maheshwari, B.

    2014-06-15

    On the occasion of the 75{sup th} anniversary of the fission phenomenon, we present a surprisingly simple result which highlights the important role of isospin and its conservation in neutron rich fission fragments. We have analysed the fission fragment mass distribution from two recent heavyion reactions {sup 238}U({sup 18}O,f) and {sup 208}Pb({sup 18}O,f) as well as a thermal neutron fission reaction {sup 245}Cm(n{sup th},f). We find that the conservation of the total isospin explains the overall trend in the observed relative yields of fragment masses in each fission pair partition. The isospin values involved are very large making the effect dramatic. The findings open the way for more precise calculations of fission fragment distributions in heavy nuclei and may have far reaching consequences for the drip line nuclei, HI fusion reactions, and calculation of decay heat in the fission phenomenon.

  2. Conservation of Isospin in Neutron-rich Fission Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A. K.; Choudhury, D.; Maheshwari, B.

    2014-06-01

    On the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the fission phenomenon, we present a surprisingly simple result which highlights the important role of isospin and its conservation in neutron rich fission fragments. We have analysed the fission fragment mass distribution from two recent heavyion reactions 238U(18O,f) and 208Pb(18O,f) as well as a thermal neutron fission reaction 245Cm(nth,f). We find that the conservation of the total isospin explains the overall trend in the observed relative yields of fragment masses in each fission pair partition. The isospin values involved are very large making the effect dramatic. The findings open the way for more precise calculations of fission fragment distributions in heavy nuclei and may have far reaching consequences for the drip line nuclei, HI fusion reactions, and calculation of decay heat in the fission phenomenon.

  3. Microscopic description of quadrupole collectivity in neutron-rich nuclei across the N = 126 shell closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Robledo, L. M.; Sharma, M. M.

    2015-06-01

    The quadrupole collectivity in Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb, Hf and W nuclei with neutron numbers 122 ≤ N ≤ 156 is studied, both at the mean field level and beyond, using the Gogny energy density functional. Besides the robustness of the N = 126 neutron shell closure, it is shown that the onset of static deformations in those isotopic chains with increasing neutron number leads to an enhanced stability and further extends the corresponding two-neutron drip lines far beyond what could be expected from spherical calculations. Independence of the mean-field predictions with respect to the particular version of the Gogny energy density functional employed is demonstrated by comparing results based on the D1S and D1M parameter sets. Correlations beyond mean field are taken into account in the framework of the angular momentum projected generator coordinate method calculation. It is shown that N = 126 remains a robust neutron magic number when dynamical effects are included. The analysis of the collective wave functions, average deformations and excitation energies indicate that, with increasing neutron number, the zero-point quantum corrections lead to dominant prolate configurations in the 0{1/+}, 0{2/+}, 2{1/+} and 2{2/+} states of the studied nuclei. Moreover, those dynamical deformation effects provide an enhanced stability that further supports the mean-field predictions, corroborating a shift of the r-process path to higher neutron numbers. Beyond mean-field calculations provide a smaller shell gap at N = 126 than the mean-field one in good agreement with previous theoretical studies. However, the shell gap still remains strong enough in the two-neutron drip lines.

  4. OpenTopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, R.; Crosby, C.; Nandigam, V.; Phan, M.; Cowart, C.

    2012-04-01

    OpenTopography is a cyberinfrastructure-based facility for online access to high-resolution topography and tools. The project is an outcome of the Geosciences Network (GEON) project, which was a research project funded several years ago in the US to investigate the use of cyberinfrastructure to support research and education in the geosciences. OpenTopography provides online access to large LiDAR point cloud datasets along with services for processing these data. Users are able to generate custom DEMs by invoking DEM services provided by OpenTopography with custom parameter values. Users can track the progress of their jobs, and a private myOpenTopo area retains job information and job outputs. Data available at OpenTopography are provided by a variety of data acquisition groups under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding (MoU). These include national facilities such as the National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping, as well as local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography is also being designed as a hub for high-resolution topography resources. Datasets and services available at other locations can also be registered here, providing a "one-stop shop" for such information. We will describe the OpenTopography system architecture and its current set of features, including the service-oriented architecture, a job-tracking database, and social networking features. We will also describe several design and development activities underway to archive and publish datasets using digital object identifiers (DOIs); create a more flexible and scalable high-performance environment for processing of large datasets; extend support for satellite-based and terrestrial lidar as well as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data; and create a "pluggable" infrastructure for third-party services. OpenTopography has successfully created a facility for sharing lidar data. In the next phase, we are developing a facility that will also enable equally easy and successful sharing of

  5. Dynamic Topography Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, Louis

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic Topography Revisited Dynamic topography is usually considered to be one of the trinity of contributing causes to the Earth's non-hydrostatic topography along with the long-term elastic strength of the lithosphere and isostatic responses to density anomalies within the lithosphere. Dynamic topography, thought of this way, is what is left over when other sources of support have been eliminated. An alternate and explicit definition of dynamic topography is that deflection of the surface which is attributable to creeping viscous flow. The problem with the first definition of dynamic topography is 1) that the lithosphere is almost certainly a visco-elastic / brittle layer with no absolute boundary between flowing and static regions, and 2) the lithosphere is, a thermal / compositional boundary layer in which some buoyancy is attributable to immutable, intrinsic density variations and some is due to thermal anomalies which are coupled to the flow. In each case, it is difficult to draw a sharp line between each contribution to the overall topography. The second definition of dynamic topography does seem cleaner / more precise but it suffers from the problem that it is not measurable in practice. On the other hand, this approach has resulted in a rich literature concerning the analysis of large scale geoid and topography and the relation to buoyancy and mechanical properties of the Earth [e.g. refs 1,2,3] In convection models with viscous, elastic, brittle rheology and compositional buoyancy, however, it is possible to examine how the surface topography (and geoid) are supported and how different ways of interpreting the "observable" fields introduce different biases. This is what we will do. References (a.k.a. homework) [1] Hager, B. H., R. W. Clayton, M. A. Richards, R. P. Comer, and A. M. Dziewonski (1985), Lower mantle heterogeneity, dynamic topography and the geoid, Nature, 313(6003), 541-545, doi:10.1038/313541a0. [2] Parsons, B., and S. Daly (1983), The

  6. Moire topography in odontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Yeras, A.

    2001-08-01

    For several decades measurement optical techniques have been used in different branches of Science and Technology and in medicine. One of these techniques is the so-called Moire topography that allows the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moire, with which precision can be reached up to the order of the microns by the phase shift instrumentation in an original way. Advantages and disadvantages of using the Moire topography and its comparison with other techniques used in the optical metrology are presented. Also, some positive and negative aspects of the implementation of this technique are shown in dentistry.

  7. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  8. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-09

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  9. New neutron-deficient isotopes from 78Kr fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, B.; Goigoux, T.; Ascher, P.; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grévy, S.; Kurtukian Nieto, T.; Magron, C.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Guadilla, V.; Montaner-Piza, A.; Morales, A. I.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Rubio, B.; Ahn, D. S.; Doornenbal, P.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Kiss, G.; Kubo, T.; Kubono, S.; Nishimura, S.; Phong, V. H.; Sakurai, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wu, J.; Fujita, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Gelletly, W.; Aguilera, P.; Molina, F.; Diel, F.; Lubos, D.; de Angelis, G.; Napoli, D.; Borcea, C.; Boso, A.; Cakirli, R. B.; Ganioglu, E.; Chiba, J.; Nishimura, D.; Oikawa, H.; Takei, Y.; Yagi, S.; Wimmer, K.; de France, G.; Go, S.

    2016-06-01

    In an experiment with the RIKEN projectile fragment separator called BigRIPS at the RIKEN Nishina Center, the fragmentation of a 78Kr beam allowed the observation of new neutron-deficient isotopes at the proton drip line. Clean identification spectra could be produced and 63Se,67Kr, and 68Kr were identified for the first time. In addition, 59Ge was also observed. Three of these isotopes, 59Ge,63Se, and 67Kr, are potential candidates for ground-state two-proton radioactivity. In addition, the isotopes 58Ge,62Se, and 66Kr were also sought but without success. The present experiment also allowed the determination of production cross sections for some of the most exotic isotopes. These measurements confirm the trend already observed that the empirical parametrization of fragmentation cross sections, EPAX, significantly overestimates experimental cross sections in this mass region.

  10. Universal multifractal Martian topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, F.; Schmidt, F.; Lovejoy, S.

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigate the scaling properties of the topography of Mars. Planetary topographic fields are well known to roughly exhibit (mono)fractal behavior. Indeed, the fractal formalism reproduces much of the variability observed in topography. Still, a single fractal dimension is not enough to explain the huge variability and intermittency. Previous studies have claimed that fractal dimensions might be different from one region to another, excluding a general description at the planetary scale. In this article, we analyze the Martian topographic data with a multifractal formalism to study the scaling intermittency. In the multifractal paradigm, the apparent local variation of the fractal dimension is interpreted as a statistical property of multifractal fields. We analyze the topography measured with the Mars Orbiter Laser altimeter (MOLA) at 300 m horizontal resolution, 1 m vertical resolution. We adapted the Haar fluctuation method to the irregularly sampled signal. The results suggest a multifractal behavior from the planetary scale down to 10 km. From 10 to 300 m, the topography seems to be simple monofractal. This transition indicates a significant change in the geological processes governing the Red Planet's surface.

  11. Universal multifractal Martian topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, F.; Schmidt, F.; Lovejoy, S.

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we investigate the scaling properties of the topography of Mars. Planetary topographic fields are well known to roughly exhibit (mono)fractal behavior. Indeed, the fractal formalism is reproduces much of the variability observed in topography. Still, a single fractal dimension is not enough to explain the huge variability and intermittency. Previous studies have claimed that fractal dimensions might be different from one region to an other, excluding a general description at the planetary scale. In this article, we are analyzing the Martian topographic data with a multifractal formalism to study the scaling intermittency. In the multifractal paradigm, the apparent local variation of the fractal dimension is interpreted as a statistical property of multifractal fields. We analyze the topography measured with the laser altimeter MOLA at 300 m horizontal resolution, 1 m vertical resolution. We adapted the Haar fluctuation method to the the irregularly sampled signal. The results suggest a multifractal behavior from planetary scale down to 10 km. From 10 km to 300 m, the topography seems to be simple monofractal. This transition indicates a significant change in the geological processes governing the Red Planet's surface.

  12. Mass, radius and composition of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Matthias; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    The properties and composition of the outer crust of nonaccreting cold neutron stars are studied by applying the model of Baym, Pethick and Sutherland, which was extended by including higher order corrections of the atomic binding, screening, exchange and zero-point energy. The most recent experimental nuclear data from the atomic mass table of Audi, Wapstra and Thibault from 2003 are used. Extrapolation to the drip line is utilized by various state-of-the-art theoretical nuclear models (finite range droplet, relativistic nuclear field and non-relativistic Skyrme Hartree Fock parameterizations). The different nuclear models are compared with respect to the mass and radius of the outer crust for different neutron star configurations and the nuclear compositions of the outer crust.

  13. Simulation of two neutron detection for invariant mass spectroscopy of unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Jyunichi; Samuraicommissioning Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Two neutron detection in invariant mass spectroscopy is essential to study neutron rich nuclei near and beyond neutron drip line. Recently, Coulomb breakup measurements of 19B and 22C, and study of the unbound nucleus 26O were performed at RIBF. Goal of the Coulomb breakup measurements is to study di-neutron like correlation, while 26O is interesting as a candidate of two neutron radioactivity. In these measurements, decay products, 24O and two neutrons from 26O, for example, are detected in coincidence by SAMURAI spectrometer. The neutrons are detected by large acceptance plastic scintillator array NEBULA. If a neutron scatters twice or more, this may cause a fake signal (crosstalk), and become a background. The crosstalk background can be eliminated by causality cut using time, position, pulse height information. The cut condition is investigated by a Monte-Carlo simulation based on the Geant4 tool kit to obtain high detection efficiency with small crosstalk background. The simulation is compared with experimental data of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons at 200 MeV and 250 MeV produced in the 7Li(p,n)7Be(g.s. + 0.43 MeV) reaction. A new algorithm of crosstalk cut will also be discussed.

  14. The Dawn Topography Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Jaumann, R.; Nathues, A.; Sierks, H.; Roatsch, T.; Preusker, E; Scholten, F.; Gaskell, R. W.; Jorda, L.; Keller, H.-U.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Mastrodemos, N.; Mottola, S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the Dawn topography investigation is to derive the detailed shapes of 4 Vesta and 1 Ceres in order to create orthorectified image mosaics for geologic interpretation, as well as to study the asteroids' landforms, interior structure, and the processes that have modified their surfaces over geologic time. In this paper we describe our approaches for producing shape models, plans for acquiring the needed image data for Vesta, and the results of a numerical simulation of the Vesta mapping campaign that quantify the expected accuracy of our results. Multi-angle images obtained by Dawn's framing camera will be used to create topographic models with 100 m/pixel horizontal resolution and 10 m height accuracy at Vesta, and 200 m/pixel horizontal resolution and 20 m height accuracy at Ceres. Two different techniques, stereophotogrammetry and stereophotoclinometry, are employed to model the shape; these models will be merged with the asteroidal gravity fields obtained by Dawn to produce geodetically controlled topographic models for each body. The resulting digital topography models, together with the gravity data, will reveal the tectonic, volcanic and impact history of Vesta, and enable co-registration of data sets to determine Vesta's geologic history. At Ceres, the topography will likely reveal much about processes of surface modification as well as the internal structure and evolution of this dwarf planet.

  15. Toward optical coherence topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayegh, Samir; Jiang, Yanshui

    2012-03-01

    Commercial OCT systems provide pachymetry measurements. Full corneal topographic information of anterior and posterior corneal surfaces for use in cataract surgery and refractive procedures is a desirable goal and would add to the usefulness of anterior and posterior segment evaluation. While substantial progress has been made towards obtaining "average" central corneal power (D Huang), power in different meridians and topography are still missing. This is usually reported to be due to eye movement. We analyze the role of centration, eye movements and develop a model that allows for the formulation of criteria for obtaining reliable topographic data within ¼ diopter.

  16. Structure and reactions of drip-line nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    Secondary radioactive beams produced at intermediate-energy heavy-ion accelerators have in a short time span added a new dimension to the research on nuclear species at the limits of particle stability, and new detection techniques have made it possible to study reactions caused by incident beams of as little as one particle per second. Imminent developments such as the M.S.U. Coupled-Cyclotron Facility are expected to extend the range and to permit the observation of many previously inaccessible species. For a perspective on the progress in this area one only needs to go about fifteen years back to a time when it had just become possible to study the radioactivity of rare nuclear species such as {sup 11}Li. In presenting early experiments with secondary beams produced in fragmentation James Symons said {open_quotes}... In the introduction to this paper we questioned the applicability of high-energy heavy-ion accelerators to this field. Our experience at the Bevalac leads us to believe that this question does indeed have a positive answer. If the physics interest justifies it, then high-energy heavy-ion beams can certainly be expected to play a role in the study of nuclei at the limits of stability.{close_quotes} At the time, very few, if any, realized how prophetic this remark was. In the present paper the interpretation of the longitudinal-momentum distributions from the nuclear fragmentation of single-nucleon halos is discussed. It is pointed out that these measurements, at least for the cases studied so far, directly reflect the halo wave function, and that there is no direct contribution from the reaction mechanism. This is an important difference from the radial momentum distributions, for which diffractive processes play an important role. The author discusses stripping reactions of {sup 11}Be and {sup 8}B on light nuclei yielding {sup 10}Be and {sup 7}Be.

  17. Theoretical studies of proton emission from drip-line nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Ring, P.

    2011-11-30

    In this work, we discuss proton radioactivity from spherical nuclei in a modern perspective, based on a fully self--consistent relativistic density functional calculation with fundamental interactions.

  18. RADAR Reveals Titan Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. L.; Callahan, P.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Paganelli, F.; Lopes, R.; Elachi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan RADAR Mapper is a K(sub u)-band (13.78 GHz, lambda = 2.17 cm) linear polarized RADAR instrument capable of operating in synthetic aperture (SAR), scatterometer, altimeter and radiometer modes. During the first targeted flyby of Titan on 26 October, 2004 (referred to as Ta) observations were made in all modes. Evidence for topographic relief based on the Ta altimetry and SAR data are presented here. Additional SAR and altimetry observations are planned for the T3 encounter on 15 February, 2005, but have not been carried out at this writing. Results from the T3 encounter relevant to topography will be included in our presentation. Data obtained in the Ta encounter include a SAR image swath

  19. Topography of Io (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The images used to create this color composite of Io were acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter and are part of a sequence of images designed to map the topography or relief on Io and to monitor changes in the surface color due to volcanic activity. Obtaining images at low illumination angles is like taking a picture from a high altitude around sunrise or sunset. Such lighting conditions emphasize the topography of the volcanic satellite. Several mountains up to a few miles high can be seen in this view, especially near the upper right. Some of these mountains appear to be tilted crustal blocks. Most of the dark spots correspond to active volcanic centers.

    North is to the top of the picture which merges images obtained with the clear, red, green, and violet filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. . The resolution is 8.3 kilometers per picture element. The image was taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 817,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  20. Isostasy, flexure, and dynamic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvirtzman, Zohar; Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten W.

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental scientific question is, what controls the Earth's topography? Although the theoretical principles of isostasy, flexure, and dynamic topography are widely discussed, the parameters needed to apply these principles are frequently not available. Isostatic factors controlling lithospheric buoyancy are frequently uncertain and non-isostatic factors, such as lithospheric bending towards subduction zones and dynamic topography, are hard to distinguish. The question discussed here is whether a set of simple rules that relate topography to lithospheric structure in various tectonic environments can be deduced in a way that missing parameters can be approximated; or does each area behave differently, making generalizations problematic. We contribute to this issue analyzing the Asia-Africa-Arabia-Europe domain following a top-down strategy. We compile a new crustal thickness map and remove the contribution of the crust from the observed elevation. Then, the challenge is to interpret the residual topography in terms of mantle lithosphere buoyancy and dynamics. Based on systematic relationships between tectonic environments and factors controlling topography, we argue that crustal buoyancy and mantle lithospheric density can be approximated from available geological data and that regions near mantle upwelling or downwelling are easily identified by their extreme residual topography. Yet, even for other areas, calculating lithospheric thickness from residual topography is problematic, because distinguishing variations in mantle lithosphere thickness from sub-lithospheric dynamics is difficult. Fortunately, the area studied here provides an opportunity to examine this issue. Based on the conjunction between the Afar Plume and the mid-ocean ridge in the nearby Gulf of Aden and southern Red Sea, we constrain the maximal amplitude of dynamic topography to ~ 1 km. This estimate is based on a narrow definition of dynamic topography that only includes sub

  1. Topography of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Io was acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter as part of a sequence of images designed to cover Io at low illumination angles to map the landforms. Obtaining images at such illuminations is like taking a picture from a high altitude around sunrise or sunset. Such lighting conditions emphasize the topography of the volcanic satellite. Several mountains up to a few miles high can be seen in this view, especially near the upper right. Some of these mountains appear to be tilted crustal blocks.

    North is to the top of the picture. The resolution is 8.3 kilometers per picture element. The image was taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 817,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  2. Shape and topography corrections for planetary nuclear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Hendricks, John S.

    2015-11-01

    The elemental composition of planetary surfaces can be determined using gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. Most planetary bodies for which nuclear spectroscopy data have been acquired are round, and simple, analytic corrections for measurement geometry can be applied; however, recent measurements of the irregular asteroid 4 Vesta by Dawn required more detailed corrections using a shape model (Prettyman et al., Science 2012). In addition, subtle artifacts of topography have been observed in low altitude measurements of lunar craters, with potential implications for polar hydrogen content (Eke et al., JGR 2015). To explore shape and topography effects, we have updated the general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX to include a polygonal shape model (Prettyman and Hendricks, LPSC 2015). The shape model is fully integrated with the code’s 3D combinatorial geometry modules. A voxel-based acceleration algorithm enables fast ray-intersection calculations needed for Monte Carlo. As modified, MCNPX can model neutron and gamma ray transport within natural surfaces using global and/or regional shape/topography data (e.g. from photogrammetry and laser altimetry). We are using MCNPX to explore the effect of small-scale roughness, regional-, and global-topography for asteroids, comets and close-up measurements of high-relief features on larger bodies, such as the lunar surface. MCNPX can characterize basic effects on measurements by an orbiting spectrometer such as 1) the angular distribution of emitted particles, 2) shielding of galactic cosmic rays by surrounding terrain and 3) re-entrant scattering. In some cases, re-entrant scattering can be ignored, leading to a fast ray-tracing model that treats effects 1 and 2. The algorithm is applied to forward modeling and spatial deconvolution of epithermal neutron data acquired at Vesta. Analyses of shape/topography effects and correction strategies are presented for Vesta, selected small bodies and cratered

  3. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  4. Mantle convection, topography and geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golle, Olivia; Dumoulin, Caroline; Choblet, Gaël.; Cadek, Ondrej

    2010-05-01

    The internal evolution of planetary bodies often include solid-state convection. This phenomenon may have a large impact on the various interfaces of these bodies (dynamic topography occurs). It also affects their gravity field (and the geoid). Since both geoid and topography can be measured by a spacecraft, and are therefore available for several planetary bodies (while seismological measurements are still lacking for all of them but the Moon and the Earth), these are of the first interest for the study of internal structures and processes. While a classical approach now is to combine gravity and altimetry measurements to infer the internal structure of a planet [1], we propose to complement it by the reverse problem, i.e., producing synthetic geoid and dynamic topography from numerical models of convection as proposed by recent studies (e.g. for the CMB topography of the Earth,[2]). This procedure first include a simple evaluation of the surface topography and geoid from the viscous flow obtained by the 3D numerical tool OEDIPUS [3] modeling convection in a spherical shell. An elastic layer will then be considered and coupled to the viscous model - one question being whether the elastic shell shall be included 'on top' of the convective domain or within it, in the cold 'lithospheric' outer region. What we will present here corresponds to the first steps of this work: the comparison between the response functions of the topography and the geoid obtained from the 3D convection program to the results evaluated by a spectral method handling radial variations of viscosity [4]. We consider the effect of the elastic layer whether included in the convective domain or not. The scale setting in the context of a full thermal convection model overlaid by an elastic shell will be discussed (thickness of the shell, temperature at its base...). References [1] A.M. Wieczorek, (2007), The gravity and topography of the terrestrial planets, Treatise on Geophysics, 10, 165-206. [2

  5. New Neutron Rich Nuclei Near {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Aeystoe, J.; Andreyev, A.; Evensen, A.-H.; Hoff, P.; Huhta, M.; Huyse, M.; ISOLDE Collaboration; Jokinen, A.; Karny, M.; Kugler, E.; Kurpeta, J.; Lettry, J.; Nieminen, A.; Plochocki, A.; Ramdhane, M.; Ravn, H.; Rykaczewski, K.; Szerypo, J.; VanDuppen, P.; Walter, G.; Woehr, A.

    1998-11-13

    The level properties near the stable doubly-magic nuclei formed the experimental grounds for the theoretical description of nuclear structure. However with a departure from the beta-stability line, the classical well-established shell structure might be modified. In particular, it may even vanish for extremely exotic neutron-rich nuclei near the neutron-drip line. Presently, it is impossible to verify such predictions by a direct experimental studies of these exotic objects. However, one may try to observe and understand the evolution of the nuclear structure while departing in the experiment as far as possible from the stable nuclei. An extension of experimental nuclear structure studies towards the nuclei characterized by high neutron excess is crucial for such verifications as well as for the {tau}-process nucleosynthesis scenario. Heavy neutron-rich nuclei, south-east of doubly-magic {sup 208}Pb, were always very difficult to produce and investigate. The nuclei like {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Pb or {sup 210}Tl marked the border line of known nuclei from the beginning of the radioactivity era for over ninety years. To illustrate the difficulties, one can refer to the experiments employing the on-line mass separator technique. A spallation of heavy targets like {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U by high-energy protons was proven as a source of heavy neutron-rich nuclei. The isotopes near and beyond doubly-magic {sup 208}Pb were produced too. However, such studies often suffered from an isobaric contamination of much more strongly produced and efficiently released elements like francium or radon and their decay products. A new experimental technique, based on the pulsed release element selective method recently developed at the PS Booster-ISOLDE at CERN [7,8,9] greatly reduces the contamination of these very short-lived {alpha}-emitters (Z {ge} 84) for the isobaric mass chains A=215 to A=218.

  6. Statistics of topography : multifractal approach to describe planetary topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, Francois; Schmidt, Frédéric; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades, a huge amount of topographic data has been obtained by several techniques (laser and radar altimetry, DTM…) for different bodies in the solar system. In each case, topographic fields exhibit an extremely high variability with details at each scale, from millimeters to thousands of kilometers. In our study, we investigate the statistical properties of the topography. Our statistical approach is motivated by the well known scaling behavior of topography that has been widely studied in the past. Indeed, scaling laws are strongly present in geophysical field and can be studied using fractal formalism. More precisely, we expect multifractal behavior in global topographic fields. This behavior reflects the high variability and intermittency observed in topographic fields that can not be generated by simple scaling models. In the multifractal formalism, each statistical moment exhibits a different scaling law characterized by a function called the moment scaling function. Previous studies were conducted at regional scale to demonstrate that topography present multifractal statistics (Gagnon et al., 2006, NPG). We have obtained similar results on Mars (Landais et al. 2015) and more recently on different body in the the solar system including the Moon, Venus and Mercury. We present the result of different multifractal approaches performed on global and regional basis and compare the fractal parameters from a body to another.

  7. Earth rotation and core topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, Bradford H.; Clayton, Robert W.; Spieth, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Geodynamics program has as one of its missions highly accurate monitoring of polar motion, including changes in length of day (LOD). These observations place fundamental constraints on processes occurring in the atmosphere, in the mantle, and in the core of the planet. Short-timescale (t less than or approx 1 yr) variations in LOD are mainly the result of interaction between the atmosphere and the solid earth, while variations in LOD on decade timescales result from the exchange of angular momentum between the mantle and the fluid core. One mechanism for this exchange of angular momentum is through topographic coupling between pressure variations associated with flow in the core interacting with topography at the core-mantel boundary (CMB). Work done under another NASA grant addressing the origin of long-wavelength geoid anomalies as well as evidence from seismology, resulted in several models of CMB topography. The purpose of work supported by NAG5-819 was to study further the problem of CMB topography, using geodesy, fluid mechanics, geomagnetics, and seismology. This is a final report.

  8. PREFACE: Fundamental Neutron Physics: Introduction and Overview Fundamental Neutron Physics: Introduction and Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein, Barry R.

    2009-10-01

    In the 77 years since its discovery by Chadwick in 1932, the neutron has come to play an increasingly important role in contemporary physics. As the next to lightest baryon, it is, of course, one of the two primary components of the atomic nucleus and studies of isotopes (nuclei with varying numbers of neutrons but the same proton number) and of the neutron drip line are one of the important focuses of the recently approved radioactive beam machine to be built at Michigan State University. Precise knowledge of its ~900 second lifetime is crucial to determination of the time at which nucleosynthesis occurs in the early universe. Because it is electrically neutral, the neutron can penetrate the atomic cloud and neutron scattering has become a powerful tool in the study of the structure of materials in condensed matter and biophysics. These are all important issues, but will not be addressed in the articles presented below. Rather, in the set of manuscripts published herein, we show various ways in which the neutron has come to probe fundamental questions in physics. We present six such articles: Because of its simple structure, neutron beta decay has served as a laboratory for the study of possible symmetry violations, including search for possible Script T-violation via measurement of the D coefficient, search for second class currents and/or possible CVC violation via examination of recoil terms, search for right-handed currents via examination of correlations, search for S, T couplings via measurement of the b parameter, etc. The study of neutron decay is reviewed in the article by Jeff Nico. The use of the neutron as a probe of possible Script T-violation via the existence of a non-zero electric dipole moment is discussed in the article by Steve Lamoreaux. The neutron is a prime player in the experimental study of hadronic parity violation, via experiments involving radiative capture and spin rotation, as examined in the article by Barry Holstein. Because of its

  9. Production of Extremely Neutron-Rich Rare Isotopes at Texas A&M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souliotis, G. A.; Veselsky, M.; Yennello, S. J.

    2002-03-01

    The production of extermely neutron-rich isotopes in heavy-ion collisions around and below the Fermi energy ( 30 MeV/ncleon) has been investigated using the MARS recoil separator at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University. At present, the reactions: 25 MeV/nucleon ^86Kr + ^64Ni and 21 MeV/nucleon ^124Sn+^124Sn have been investigated. The experimental results on cross sections obtained to date will be presented and compared with reaction simulations appropriate for this energy domain. The current calculations involve a deep inelastic transfer code for the primary interaction stage and a modern statistical evaporation code for the deexcitation stage. The results are also compared with higher energy projectile fragmentation data and available parametrizations. In general, we show that such reactions, near or below the Fermi energy, involving substantial nucleon exchange between the projectile and the target, can be a fruitful pathway to approach extremely neutron-rich nuclei towards the neutron drip-line. Apart from in-flight possibilities, the option of utilizing this type of reaction for rare isotope production in ISOL-based facilities will be mentioned. Finally, application of such reactions in current plans of both in-flight and ISOL-type rare beam production at Texas A&M will be discussed.

  10. Topography, Cell Response, and Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2010-01-01

    In the body, cells encounter a complex milieu of signals, including topographical cues. Imposed topography can affect cells on surfaces by promoting adhesion, spreading, alignment, morphological changes, and changes in gene expression. Neural response to topography is complex, and depends on the dimensions and shapes of physical features. Looking toward repair of nerve injuries, strategies are being explored to engineer guidance conduits with precise surface topographies. How neurons and other cell types sense and interpret topography remains to be fully elucidated. Studies reviewed here include those of topography on cellular organization and function as well as potential cellular mechanisms of response. PMID:20438370

  11. Landscape response to changes in dynamic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetenik, Gregory A.; Moucha, Robert; Hoke, Gregory D.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic topography is characterized by broad wavelength, low amplitude undulations of the Earth's surface maintained by stresses arising from mantle convection. Earth's topography is thus an aggregate of both dynamic and isostatic topography that is modulated by surface processes and changes in topography and/or the climate can be recorded in the offshore sedimentary record. However, it is generally difficult to deconvolve this record into contributions from changes in climate, isostatic topography, and dynamic topography. Herein, we use a landscape evolution model that is capable of producing simulations at the necessary scale and resolution for quantifying landscape response to moderate changes in dynamic topography in the presence of flexural unloading and loading due to erosion and deposition. We demonstrate that moderate changes in dynamic topography coupled with flexural response imposed on a landscape with pre-existing relief and drainage divide, disequilibrates the landscape resulting in a measurable increase in erosion rates and corresponding sedimentary flux to the margin. The magnitude and timing of this erosional response to dynamic topography is dependent on several key landscape evolution parameters, most notably the erosion (advection) coefficient and effective elastic thickness. Moreover, to maximize this response, we find that changes in dynamic topography must be slow enough and long-lived for given rates of erosion otherwise the landscape will not have sufficient time to generate a response. Lastly, this anomalous flux can persist for a significant amount of time beyond the influence of dynamic topography change as the landscape strives to re-equilibrate.

  12. The Topography Tub Learning Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, G. B.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the basic elements of a topographic map (i.e. contour lines and intervals) is just a small part of learning how to use this abstract representational system as a resource in geologic mapping. Interpretation of a topographic map and matching its features with real-world structures requires that the system is utilized for visualizing the shapes of these structures and their spatial orientation. To enrich students' skills in visualizing topography from topographic maps a spatial training activity has been developed that uses 3D objects of various shapes and sizes, a sighting tool, a plastic basin, water, and transparencies. In the first part of the activity, the student is asked to draw a topographic map of one of the 3D objects. Next, the student places the object into a plastic tub in which water is added to specified intervals of height. The shoreline at each interval is used to reference the location of the contour line the student draws on a plastic inkjet transparency directly above the object. A key part of this activity is the use of a sighting tool by the student to assist in keeping the pencil mark directly above the shoreline. It (1) ensures the accurate positioning of the contour line and (2) gives the learner experience with using a sight before going out into the field. Finally, after the student finishes drawing the contour lines onto the transparency, the student can compare and contrast the two maps in order to discover where improvements in their visualization of the contours can be made. The teacher and/or peers can also make suggestions on ways to improve. A number of objects with various shapes and sizes are used in this exercise to produce contour lines representing the different types of topography the student may encounter while field mapping. The intended outcome from using this visualization training activity is improvement in performance of visualizing topography as the student moves between the topographic representation and

  13. Precision Measurement Of Corneal Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, Paul R.; Macri, Timothy F.; Telfair, William B.; Bennett, Peter S.; Martin, Clifford A.; Warner, John W.

    1989-05-01

    We describe a new electro-optical device being developed to provide precise measurements of the three-dimensional topography of the human cornea. This device, called a digital keratoscope, is intended primarily for use in preparing for and determining the effect of corneal surgery procedures such as laser refractive keratectomy, radial keratotomy or corneal transplant on the refractive power of the cornea. It also may serve as an aid in prescribing contact lenses. The basic design features of the hardware and of the associated computer software are discussed, the means for alignment and calibration are described and typical results are given.

  14. Spectral Topography Generation for Arbitrary Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    A new topography generation tool utilizing spectral transformation technique for both structured and unstructured grids is presented. For the source global digital elevation data, the NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 15 arc-second dataset (gap-filling by Jonathan de Ferranti) is used and for land/water mask source, the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 30 arc-second land water mask dataset v5 is used. The original source data is coarsened to a intermediate global 2 minute lat-lon mesh. Then, spectral transformation to the wave space and inverse transformation with wavenumber truncation is performed for isotropic topography smoothness control. Target grid topography mapping is done by bivariate cubic spline interpolation from the truncated 2 minute lat-lon topography. Gibbs phenomenon in the water region can be removed by overwriting ocean masked target coordinate grids with interpolated values from the intermediate 2 minute grid. Finally, a weak smoothing operator is applied on the target grid to minimize the land/water surface height discontinuity that might have been introduced by the Gibbs oscillation removal procedure. Overall, the new topography generation approach provides spectrally-derived, smooth topography with isotropic resolution and minimum damping, enabling realistic topography forcing in the numerical model. Topography is generated for the cubed-sphere grid and tested on the KIAPS Integrated Model (KIM).

  15. Bedrock topography of northwest Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, R.E.; Runkle, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Bedrock in Iowa (Hershey, 1969) generally is overlain by deposits of glacial drive and alluvium. The drift, consisting of glacial till and glacial outwash, ranges in thickness from zero to more than 500 feet in western Iowa; the alluvium in stream valleys ranges in thickness from less than 1 foot to more than 70 feet. The configuration of the bedrock surface is the result of a complex system of ancient drainage courses that were developed during a long period of preglacial erosion. This map, for a 12 county area in west-central Iowa, is the eighth in a series of nine reports that will provide statewide coverage of the bedriock topography of Iowa. 

  16. Large scale topography of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, R. W.; Synnott, S. P.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the large scale topography of the Jovian satellite Io, both limb observations and stereographic techniques applied to landmarks are used. The raw data for this study consists of Voyager 1 images of Io, 800x800 arrays of picture elements each of which can take on 256 possible brightness values. In analyzing this data it was necessary to identify and locate landmarks and limb points on the raw images, remove the image distortions caused by the camera electronics and translate the corrected locations into positions relative to a reference geoid. Minimizing the uncertainty in the corrected locations is crucial to the success of this project. In the highest resolution frames, an error of a tenth of a pixel in image space location can lead to a 300 m error in true location. In the lowest resolution frames, the same error can lead to an uncertainty of several km.

  17. Enhanced characterization of niobium surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Tian, Hui; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2011-12-01

    Surface topography characterization is a continuing issue for the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) particle accelerator community. Efforts are under way to both improve surface topography and its characterization and analysis using various techniques. In measurement of topography, power spectral density (PSD) is a promising method to quantify typical surface parameters and develop scale-specific interpretations. PSD can also be used to indicate how the process modifies topography at different scales. However, generating an accurate and meaningful topographic PSD of an SRF surface requires careful analysis and optimization. In this report, niobium surfaces with different process histories are sampled with atomic force microscopy and stylus profilometry and analyzed to trace topography evolution at different scales. An optimized PSD analysis protocol to serve SRF needs is presented.

  18. Further explorations of Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mass formulas. XII. Stiffness and stability of neutron-star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.; Chamel, N.; Pearson, J. M.

    2010-09-15

    We construct three new Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mass models, labeled HFB-19, HFB-20, and HFB-21, with unconventional Skyrme forces containing t{sub 4} and t{sub 5} terms, i.e., density-dependent generalizations of the usual t{sub 1} and t{sub 2} terms, respectively. The new forces underlying these models are fitted respectively to three different realistic equations of state of neutron matter for which the density dependence of the symmetry energy ranges from the very soft to the very stiff, reflecting thereby our present lack of complete knowledge of the high-density behavior of nuclear matter. All unphysical instabilities of nuclear matter, including the transition to a polarized state in neutron-star matter, are eliminated with the new forces. At the same time the new models fit essentially all the available mass data with rms deviations of 0.58 MeV and give the same high-quality fits to measured charge radii that we obtained in earlier models with conventional Skyrme forces. Being constrained by neutron matter, these new mass models, which all give similar extrapolations out to the neutron drip line, are highly appropriate for studies of the r process and the outer crust of neutron stars. Moreover, the underlying forces, labeled BSk19, BSk20 and BSk21, respectively, are well adapted to the study of the inner crust and core of neutron stars. The new family of Skyrme forces thus opens the way to a unified description of all regions of neutron stars.

  19. Topography and Landforms of Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Warner, Michael B.

    2005-01-01

    EXPLANATION The digital elevation model of Ecuador represented in this data set was produced from over 40 individual tiles of elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Each tile was downloaded, converted from its native Height file format (.hgt), and imported into a geographic information system (GIS) for additional processing. Processing of the data included data gap filling, mosaicking, and re-projection of the tiles to form one single seamless digital elevation model. For 11 days in February of 2000, NASA, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), the German Aerospace Center (DLR), and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) flew X-band and C-band radar interferometry onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor. The mission covered the Earth between 60?N and 57?S and will provide interferometric digital elevation models (DEMs) of approximately 80% of the Earth's land mass when processing is complete. The radar-pointing angle was approximately 55? at scene center. Ascending and descending orbital passes generated multiple interferometric data scenes for nearly all areas. Up to eight passes of data were merged to form the final processed SRTM DEMs. The effect of merging scenes averages elevation values recorded in coincident scenes and reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the amount of area with layover and terrain shadow effects. The most significant form of data processing for the Ecuador DEM was gap-filling areas where the SRTM data contained a data void. These void areas are a result of radar shadow, layover, standing water, and other effects of terrain, as well as technical radar interferometry phase unwrapping issues. To fill these gaps, topographic contours were digitized from 1:50,000 - scale topographic maps which date from the mid-late 1980's (Souris, 2001). Digital contours were gridded to form elevation models for void areas and subsequently were merged with the SRTM data through GIS and remote sensing image-processing techniques

  20. Flat Subduction and Dynamic Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Dávila, F. M.; Eakin, C. M.; Crameri, F.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle dynamics manifests at the surface via the horizontal motions of plates and the vertical deflections that influence topography and the non-hydrostatic geoid. The pioneering work of Mitrovica et al. (1989) and Gurnis (1990) on this dynamic topography revolutionized our understanding of sedimentary basin formation, sea level changes and continental flooding. The temporal evolution of subduction can explain the migration of basins and even the drainage reversal of the Amazon (Shephard et al., 2012; Eakin et al., 2014). Until recently, flat subduction has been seen as enhancing downward deflection of the overriding plate and increasing flooding. However, this interpretation depends crucially on the details of the morphology and density structure of the slab, which controls the loci and amplitude of the deflection. We tend to ignore morphological details in mantle dynamics because flow can smooth out short wavelength variations. We have shown instead that details matter! Using South America as a natural laboratory because of the large changes in morphology of the Nazca slab along strike, we show that downward deflection of the overriding plate and hence basin formation, do not occur over flat segments but at the leading edge, where slabs plunge back into the mantle. This is true in both Argentina and Peru. The temporal evolution from a 'normally' dipplng slab to a flat slab leads to uplift over flat segments rather than enhanced subsidence. Critical for this result is the use of a detailed morphological model of the present-day Nazca slab with a spatial resolution of 50-100 km and based on relocated seismicity and magnetotelluric results. The density structure of the slab, due to age and the presence of overthickened crust from aseismic ridge subduction is essential. Overthickened crust leads to buoyant slabs. We reproduce formation and deposition of the Acres-Solimoes basin and the evolution of the Amazon drainage basin in Peru as well as the Mar Chiquita

  1. Phobos' shape and topography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, K.; Shi, X.; Oberst, J.

    2014-11-01

    The global shape and the dynamic environment are fundamental properties of a body. Other properties such as volume, bulk density, and models for the dynamic environment can subsequently be computed based on such models. Stereo-photogrammetric methods were applied to derive a global digital terrain model (DTM) with 100 m/pixel resolution using High Resolution Stereo Camera images of the Mars Express mission and Viking Orbiter images. In a subsequent least-squares fit, coefficients of the spherical harmonic function to degree and order 45 are computed. The dynamic models for Phobos were derived from a polyhedron representation of the DTM. The DTM, spherical harmonic function model, and dynamic models, have been refined and represent Phobos' dynamic and geometric topography with much more detail when compared to Shi et al. (2012) and Willner et al. (2010) models, respectively. The volume of Phobos has been re-determined to be in the order of 5741 km3 with an uncertainty of only 0.6% of the total volume. This reduces the bulk density to 1.86±0.013 g/cm3 in comparison to previous results. Assuming a homogeneous mass distribution a forced libration amplitude for Phobos of 1.14° is computed that is in better agreement with observations by Willner et al. (2010) than previous estimates.

  2. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2009-01-01

    Under an agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense's National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is distributing elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The SRTM is a joint project of NASA and NGA to map the Earth's land surface in three dimensions at an unprecedented level of detail. As part of space shuttle Endeavour's flight during February 11-22, 2000, the SRTM successfully collected data over 80 percent of the Earth's land surface for most of the area between latitudes 60 degrees north and 56 degrees south. The SRTM hardware included the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (X-SAR) systems that had flown twice previously on other space shuttle missions. The SRTM data were collected with a technique known as interferometry that allows image data from dual radar antennas to be processed for the extraction of ground heights.

  3. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2003-01-01

    Under an agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense's National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is now distributing elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The SRTM is a joint project between NASA and NIMA to map the Earth's land surface in three dimensions at a level of detail unprecedented for such a large area. Flown aboard the NASA Space Shuttle Endeavour February 11-22, 2000, the SRTM successfully collected data over 80 percent of the Earth's land surface, for most of the area between 60? N. and 56? S. latitude. The SRTM hardware included the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (X-SAR) systems that had flown twice previously on other space shuttle missions. The SRTM data were collected specifically with a technique known as interferometry that allows image data from dual radar antennas to be processed for the extraction of ground heights.

  4. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.; Kobrick, M.

    2001-05-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew successfully aboard Endeavour in February 2000, is a cooperative project between NASA and the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60 degrees north and 56 degrees south latitude. The DEM will have 30 m horizontal resolution and about 15 m vertical errors. Two ortho-rectified C-band image mosaics are also planned. SRTM used a modification of the radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Radar Laboratory that flew twice on the Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the interferometric data, a 60 m mast, additional C-band antenna, and improved tracking and navigation devices were added. A second X-band antenna was also added by the German Space Agency, and produced higher resolution topographic measurements in strips nested within the full, C-band coverage. First results indicate that the radars and ancillary instruments worked very well. Data played back to the ground during the flight were processed to DEMs and products released hours after acquisition. An extensive program for calibration and verification of the SRTM data is now underway. When complete later this year, systematic processing of the data will begin, with final products emerging a continent at a time. Data processing will be completed by the end of 2002. Products will be transferred to the US Geological Survey's EROS Data Center for civilian archive and distribution. NIMA will handle Department of Defense distribution. * Work performed under contract to NASA.

  5. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, T. G.; Kobrick, M.

    2001-12-01

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), which flew successfully aboard Endeavour in February 2000, is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency, and the German and Italian Space Agencies. The mission was designed to use a single-pass radar interferometer to produce a digital elevation model of the Earth's land surface between about 60 degrees north and 56 degrees south latitude. The DEM will have 30 m horizontal resolution and better than 15 m vertical errors. Two ortho-rectified C-band image mosaics are also planned. Data processing will be completed by the end of 2002. SRTM used a modification of the radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Radar Laboratory that flew twice on the Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. To collect the interferometric data, a 60 m mast, additional C-band antenna, and improved tracking and navigation devices were added. A second X-band antenna was also added by the German Space Agency, and produced higher resolution topographic measurements in strips nested within the full, C-band coverage. First results indicate that the radars and ancillary instruments worked very well. Data played back to the ground during the flight were processed to DEMs and products released hours after acquisition. An extensive program for calibration and verification of the SRTM data is now underway. When complete later this year, systematic processing of the data will begin, with final products emerging a continent at a time. Products will be transferred to the US Geological Survey's EROS Data Center for civilian archive and distribution. NIMA will handle Department of Defense distribution. * Work performed under contract to NASA.

  6. Enhanced Characterization of Niobium Surface Topography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu, Hui Tian, Charles Reece, Michael Kelley

    2011-12-01

    Surface topography characterization is a continuing issue for the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) particle accelerator community. Efforts are underway to both to improve surface topography, and its characterization and analysis using various techniques. In measurement of topography, Power Spectral Density (PSD) is a promising method to quantify typical surface parameters and develop scale-specific interpretations. PSD can also be used to indicate how chemical processes modifiesy the roughnesstopography at different scales. However, generating an accurate and meaningful topographic PSD of an SRF surface requires careful analysis and optimization. In this report, polycrystalline surfaces with different process histories are sampled with AFM and stylus/white light interferometer profilometryers and analyzed to indicate trace topography evolution at different scales. evolving during etching or polishing. Moreover, Aan optimized PSD analysis protocol will be offered to serve the SRF surface characterization needs is presented.

  7. Problems in determining sea surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, J. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Anticipated problems for determining ocean dynamics signals from sea surface topography are discussed. The needs for repeated tracks are listed if oceanic tides or ocean turbulence are to be determined.

  8. Diurnally Varying Hydrogen Volatiles or Regolith Temperature? Mare and Highlands Studies of the Moon's Diurnally Modulating Epithermal Neutron Flux Using LRO's LEND, Diviner, and LOLA Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; LEND Team; Parsons, A. M.; Williams, J. P.; Mazarico, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we seek to discriminate the source of variation that is diurnally modulating the Moon's neutron emission flux. We characterize the neutron emission flux from the topography in the northern mare and highlands regions.

  9. Corneal topography measurements for biometric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nathan D.

    The term biometrics is used to describe the process of analyzing biological and behavioral traits that are unique to an individual in order to confirm or determine his or her identity. Many biometric modalities are currently being researched and implemented including, fingerprints, hand and facial geometry, iris recognition, vein structure recognition, gait, voice recognition, etc... This project explores the possibility of using corneal topography measurements as a trait for biometric identification. Two new corneal topographers were developed for this study. The first was designed to function as an operator-free device that will allow a user to approach the device and have his or her corneal topography measured. Human subject topography data were collected with this device and compared to measurements made with the commercially available Keratron Piccolo topographer (Optikon, Rome, Italy). A third topographer that departs from the standard Placido disk technology allows for arbitrary pattern illumination through the use of LCD monitors. This topographer was built and tested to be used in future research studies. Topography data was collected from 59 subjects and modeled using Zernike polynomials, which provide for a simple method of compressing topography data and comparing one topographical measurement with a database for biometric identification. The data were analyzed to determine the biometric error rates associated with corneal topography measurements. Reasonably accurate results, between three to eight percent simultaneous false match and false non-match rates, were achieved.

  10. Shortwave radiation parameterization scheme for subgrid topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, N.; LöWe, H.

    2012-02-01

    Topography is well known to alter the shortwave radiation balance at the surface. A detailed radiation balance is therefore required in mountainous terrain. In order to maintain the computational performance of large-scale models while at the same time increasing grid resolutions, subgrid parameterizations are gaining more importance. A complete radiation parameterization scheme for subgrid topography accounting for shading, limited sky view, and terrain reflections is presented. Each radiative flux is parameterized individually as a function of sky view factor, slope and sun elevation angle, and albedo. We validated the parameterization with domain-averaged values computed from a distributed radiation model which includes a detailed shortwave radiation balance. Furthermore, we quantify the individual topographic impacts on the shortwave radiation balance. Rather than using a limited set of real topographies we used a large ensemble of simulated topographies with a wide range of typical terrain characteristics to study all topographic influences on the radiation balance. To this end slopes and partial derivatives of seven real topographies from Switzerland and the United States were analyzed and Gaussian statistics were found to best approximate real topographies. Parameterized direct beam radiation presented previously compared well with modeled values over the entire range of slope angles. The approximation of multiple, anisotropic terrain reflections with single, isotropic terrain reflections was confirmed as long as domain-averaged values are considered. The validation of all parameterized radiative fluxes showed that it is indeed not necessary to compute subgrid fluxes in order to account for all topographic influences in large grid sizes.

  11. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  12. Electronic Cigarette Topography in the Natural Environment

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, P. N.; Roundtree, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a clinical, observational, descriptive study to quantify the use patterns of electronic cigarette users in their natural environment. Previously published work regarding puff topography has been widely indirect in nature, and qualitative rather than quantitative, with the exception of three studies conducted in a laboratory environment for limited amounts of time. The current study quantifies the variation in puffing behaviors among users as well as the variation for a given user throughout the course of a day. Puff topography characteristics computed for each puffing session by each subject include the number of subject puffs per puffing session, the mean puff duration per session, the mean puff flow rate per session, the mean puff volume per session, and the cumulative puff volume per session. The same puff topography characteristics are computed across all puffing sessions by each single subject and across all subjects in the study cohort. Results indicate significant inter-subject variability with regard to puffing topography, suggesting that a range of representative puffing topography patterns should be used to drive machine-puffed electronic cigarette aerosol evaluation systems. PMID:26053075

  13. Moiré topography in odontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Yeras, A.

    2003-07-01

    For several decades, measurement of optical techniques has been used in different branches of science and technology. One of these techniques is the so-called moiré topography (MT) that enables the accurate measurement of different parts of the human body topography. This investigation presents the measurement of topographies of teeth and gums using an automated system of shadow moiré and the phase shift method in an original way. The fringe patterns used to compute the shape and the shape matrix itself are presented in the article. The phase shift method ensures precisions up to the order of microns. Advantages and disadvantages of using the MT are included. Besides, some positive and negative aspects concerned with the implementation of this technique in odontology are shown in the article.

  14. Experiments on topographies lacking tidal conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Leo; Paci, Alexandre; Yuan, Bing

    2015-11-01

    In a stratified sea, internal tides are supposedly generated when the tide passes over irregular topography. It has been shown that for any given frequency in the internal wave band there are an infinite number of exceptions to this rule of thumb. This ``stealth-like'' property of the topography is due to a subtle annihilation of the internal waves generated during the surface tide's passage over the irregular bottom. We here demonstrate this in a lab-experiment. However, for any such topography, subsequently changing the surface tide's frequency does lead to tidal conversion. The upshot of this is that a tidal wave passing over an irregular bottom is for a substantial part trapped to this irregularity, and only partly converted into freely propagating internal tides. Financially supported by the European Community's 7th Framework Programme HYDRALAB IV.

  15. Topography Restoration of Historic City Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ho, L. Sung; soo, H. Dong

    2015-08-01

    The preservation of historic cities requires a balance between conservation and development because the urban structures of the old and new city are interwoven on same space. Existing restoration plans rely on old records and excavation reports and are based on the present topography. However, historic cities have undergone significant natural and anthropogenic topographic changes such as alluvial sediment accumulation and uneven terrain construction. Therefore, considering only the present topography is misleading. Thus, to understand a historic city's structure more appropriately, it is necessary to comprehend the ancient geographic environment. This study provides an analysis and GIS visualization of the ancient topography of a historic city, Sabi capital city of the Baekje Dynasty, which collapsed 1,500 years ago.

  16. Mars topography harmonics and geophysical implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, B. G.; Ferrari, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes an improved model of Martian global topography which has been obtained by fitting a sixteenth-degree harmonic series to occultation, radar, spectral, and photogrammetric measurements. Empirical elevation data based on photographic data are used to supplement the observations in areas without data. Values for the mean radius, the mean density, and the displacement of the center of the figure from the center of mass are presented. The reported geometric flattening is too great and the reported dynamic flattening is too small for Mars to be homogeneous and hydrostatic. Maps of the data distribution, global topography, and Bouguer gravity anomaly are interpreted in terms of a crustal thickness map which is consistent with gravity, topography, and recent preliminary Viking seismic results.

  17. Correlated Observations of Epithermal Neutrons and Polar Illumination for Orbital Neutron Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Droege, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J.; Harshman, K.; Malakhov, A.; Livengood, T.; Milikh, G. M.; Namkung, M.; Nandikotkur, G.; Neumann, G.; Smith, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sanin, A. G.; Starr, R. D.; Trombka, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We correlate Lunar Reconnaisance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) and the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer's (LPNS) orbital epithermal neutron maps of the Lunar high-latitudes with co-registered illumination maps derived from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography. Epithermal neutron count rate maps were derived from the LEND: 1) Collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons, CSETNI-4 2) Uncollimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons, SETN and the Uncollimated Lunar Prospector: 3) Low-altitude and 4) High-altitude mapping phases. In this abstract we illustrate 1) and 3) and include 2) and 4) in our presentation. The correlative study provides unique perspectives on the regional epithermal neutron fluences from the Lunar polar regions under different detector and altitude configurations.

  18. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  19. Noninterferometric topography measurements of fast moving surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinhasi, Shirly Vinikman; Eliezer, Shalom; Glam, Benny; Appelbaum, Gabi; Bakshi, Lior

    2011-08-01

    The topography of moving surfaces is recovered by noninterferometric measurements. The phase reconstruction is derived by measuring the intensities of a backscattered pulsed laser light and solving the transport intensity equation (TIE). The TIE is solved by expanding the phase into a series of Zernike polynomials, leading to a set of appropriate algebraic equations. This technique, which enables us to make a direct connection between experiments and the TIE, has been successfully tested in gas gun experiments. In particular, the topographies of a moving projectile and the free surface of a shocked target were recovered. PMID:21811317

  20. The topography of Iapetus' leading side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, B.; Denk, T.; Neukum, G.; Porco, C. C.; Roatsch, T.; Wagner, R.

    2005-08-01

    We have used Cassini-stereo images to derive a topographic model of Iapetus' leading side. The model reveals that Iapetus has substantial topography with heights (referenced to a 747 x 744 x 713 km ellipsoid (Thomas et al., in preparation)) in the range of -9 km to +15 km, much more than observed on the icy satellites of Jupiter. There is an old 800 km impact basin centered at 270 degrees E, 40 degrees N with rim topography of more than 10 km extending over scales of 300-400 km. The fact that this topography did not relax over time may suggest that the lithosphere reached depths larger than the excavation depth at the time of formation, or, if the impact has probed the asthenosphere, that rapid cooling and associated thickening of the lithosphere has prevented relaxation of the rim topography. However, the basin floor is almost level with the surroundings and may indicate that asthenospheric flow was important. In this case the flow could have uplifted the rim. Moreover, the model reveals four impact basins (diameters > 300 km) showing central peak massifs but no rings (including inner rings) are observed. This is consistent with a lithosphere sufficiently thick to prevent ring formation. One of the basins with a weakly pronounced central peak has a slightly updomed floor suggesting isostatic rebound. There is a prominent equatorial ridge with heights of more than 12 km and widths < 100 km. The morphology of the ridge suggests a tectonic origin involving upwarping of the surface.

  1. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology. PMID:27288809

  2. Detecting and Quantifying Topography in Neural Maps

    PubMed Central

    Yarrow, Stuart; Razak, Khaleel A.; Seitz, Aaron R.; Seriès, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Topographic maps are an often-encountered feature in the brains of many species, yet there are no standard, objective procedures for quantifying topography. Topographic maps are typically identified and described subjectively, but in cases where the scale of the map is close to the resolution limit of the measurement technique, identifying the presence of a topographic map can be a challenging subjective task. In such cases, an objective topography detection test would be advantageous. To address these issues, we assessed seven measures (Pearson distance correlation, Spearman distance correlation, Zrehen's measure, topographic product, topological correlation, path length and wiring length) by quantifying topography in three classes of cortical map model: linear, orientation-like, and clusters. We found that all but one of these measures were effective at detecting statistically significant topography even in weakly-ordered maps, based on simulated noisy measurements of neuronal selectivity and sparse sampling of the maps. We demonstrate the practical applicability of these measures by using them to examine the arrangement of spatial cue selectivity in pallid bat A1. This analysis shows that significantly topographic arrangements of interaural intensity difference and azimuth selectivity exist at the scale of individual binaural clusters. PMID:24505279

  3. The structure and shape of exotic nuclei beyond the proton drip-line

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Arumugam, P.; Maglione, E.

    2008-11-11

    Proton emission from deformed nuclei with triaxial symmetry is discussed within the non-adiabatic quasi-particle approach. As an example, we consider decay from {sup 161}Re, where we were able to reproduce the experimental half-life with a noticeable {gamma} deformation.

  4. Linking Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Structure on the Way to the Drip Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickhoff, Willem

    2012-10-01

    The present understanding of the role of short- and long-range physics in determining proton properties near the Fermi energy for stable closed-shell nuclei has relied on data from the (e,e'p) reaction. Hadronic tools to extract such spectroscopic information have been hampered by the lack of a consistent reaction description that provides unambiguous and undisputed results. The dispersive optical model (DOM), originally conceived by Claude Mahaux, provides a unified description of both elastic nucleon scattering and structure information related to single-particle properties below the Fermi energy. The DOM provides the starting point to provide a framework in which nuclear reactions and structure data can be analyzed consistently to provide unambiguous spectroscopic information including its asymmetry dependence. Recent extensions of this approach include the treatment of non-locality to describe experimental data like the nuclear charge density based on information of the spectral density below the Fermi energy, the application of the DOM ingredients to the description of transfer reactions, a comparison of the microscopic content of the nucleon self-energy based on Faddeev-RPA calculations emphasizing long-range correlations with DOM potentials, and a study of the relation between a self-energy which includes the effect of short-range correlations with DOM potentials. The most recent Dom implementation currently in progress abandons the constraint of local potentials completely to allow an accurate description of various properties of the nuclear ground state.

  5. Investigations of Titan's topography and surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Priyanka

    Saturn's moon, Titan is a geomorphologically active planetary object, and its surface is influenced by multiple processes like impact cratering, fluvial and aeolian erosion, lacustrine processes, tectonics, cryovolcanism and mantling. Disentangling the processes that compete to shape Titan's landscape is difficult in the absence of global topography data. In this thesis, I utilize techniques in topographic statistics, fractal theory, study of terrestrial analogs and landscape evolution modeling to characterize Titan's topography and surface roughness and investigate the relative roles of surface processes in sculpting its landscape. I mapped the shorelines of 290 North Polar Titanian lakes using the Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar dataset. The fractal dimensions of the shorelines were calculated via the divider/ruler method and box-counting method, at length scales of (1--10) km and found to average 1.27 and 1.32, respectively. The inferred power-spectral exponent of Titan's topography was found to be ≤ 2, which is lower than the values obtained from the global topography of the Earth or Venus. In order to interpret fractal dimensions of Titan's shorelines in terms of the surficial processes at work, I repeated a similar statistical analysis with 114 terrestrial analogous lakes formed by different processes, using C-band radar backscatter data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). I found different lake generation mechanisms on Earth produce 'statistically different' shorelines; however, no specific set of processes could be identified for forming Titanian lake basins. Using the Cassini RADAR altimetry data, I investigated Titan's global surface roughness and calculated median absolute slopes, average relief and Hurst exponent (H) for the surface of Titan. I detected a clear trend with latitude in these roughness parameters. Equatorial regions had the smallest slopes, lowest values of H and smallest intra-footprint relief, compared to the mid

  6. Role of nuclear couplings in the inelastic excitation of weakly-bound neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C.H.; Lenzi, S.M.; Vitturi, A.

    1996-12-31

    Much effort is presently devoted to the study of nuclear systems far from the stability line. Particular emphasis has been placed in light systems such as {sup 11}Li, {sup 8}B and others, where the very small binding energy of the last particles causes their density distribution to extend considerably outside of the remaining nuclear core. Some of the properties associated with this feature are expected to characterize also heavier systems in the vicinity of the proton or neutron drip lines. It is by now well established that low-lying concentrations of multipole strength arise from pure configurations in which a peculiar matching between the wavelength of the continuum wavefunction of the particles and the range of the weakly-bound hole states occurs. To this end the authors consider the break-up of a weakly-bound system in a heavy-ion collision and focus attention in the inelastic excitation of the low-lying part of the continuum. They make use of the fact that previous investigations have shown that the multipole response in this region is not of a collective nature and describe their excited states as pure particle-hole configurations. Since the relevant parameter determining the strength distributions is the binding energy of the last bound orbital they find it most convenient to use single-particle wavefunctions generated by a sperical square-well potential with characteristic nuclear dimensions and whose depth has been adjusted to give rise to a situation in which the last occupied neutron orbital is loosely-bound. Spin-orbit couplings are, for the present purpose, ignored. The results of this investigation clearly indicate that nuclear couplings have the predominant role in causing projectile dissociation in many circumstances, even at bombarding energies remarkably below the Coulomb barrier.

  7. Impact of watershed topography on hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, Alice; Ridolfi, Luca; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-08-01

    Among the interactions between surface water bodies and aquifers, hyporheic exchange has been recognized as a key process for nutrient cycling and contaminant transport. Even though hyporheic exchange is strongly controlled by groundwater discharge, our understanding of the impact of the regional groundwater flow on hyporheic fluxes is still limited because of the complexity arising from the multi-scale nature of these interactions. In this work, we investigate the role of watershed topography on river-aquifer interactions by way of a semi-analytical model, in which the landscape topography is used to approximate the groundwater head distribution. The analysis of a case study shows how the complex topographic structure is the direct cause of a substantial spatial variability of the aquifer-river exchange. Groundwater upwelling along the river corridor is estimated and its influence on the hyporheic zone is discussed. In particular, the fragmentation of the hyporeic corridor induced by groundwater discharge at the basin scale is highlighted.

  8. Topography over South America from ERS altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Anita; Frey, Herb; DiMarzio, John; Tsaoussi, Lucia

    1997-01-01

    The results of the surface topography mapping of South America during the ERS-1 geodetic mission are presented. The altimeter waveforms, the range measurement, and the internal and Doppler range corrections were obtained. The atmospheric corrections and solid tides were calculated. Comparisons between Shuttle laser altimetry and ERS-1 altimetry grid showed good agreement. Satellite radar altimetry data can be used to improve the topographic knowledge of regions for which only poor elevation data currently exist.

  9. ATM Coastal Topography-Alabama 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Alabama coastline, acquired October 3-4, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative scanning Lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning Lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface, and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of Lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for pre-survey flight line definition, flight path plotting, Lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS is routinely used to create maps that

  10. ATM Coastal Topography-Mississippi, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, A.H.; Klipp, Emily S.; Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Mississippi coastline, from Lakeshore to Petit Bois Island, acquired September 9-10, 2001. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative scanning lidar instrument originally developed by NASA, and known as the Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), was used during data acquisition. The ATM system is a scanning lidar system that measures high-resolution topography of the land surface and incorporates a green-wavelength laser operating at pulse rates of 2 to 10 kilohertz. Measurements from the laser-ranging device are coupled with data acquired from inertial navigation system (INS) attitude sensors and differentially corrected global positioning system (GPS) receivers to measure topography of the surface at accuracies of +/-15 centimeters. The nominal ATM platform is a Twin Otter or P-3 Orion aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the ATM system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in an interactive or batch mode. Modules for presurvey flight-line definition, flight-path plotting, lidar raster and waveform investigation, and digital camera image playback have been developed. Processing algorithms have been developed to extract the range to the first and last significant return within each waveform. ALPS

  11. Diffraction imaging (topography) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Kuriyama, Masao; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Laor, Uri

    1988-01-01

    Structural information of special interest to crystal growers and device physicists is now available from high resolution monochromatic synchrotron diffraction imaging (topography). In the review, the importance of superior resolution in momentum transfer and in space is described, and illustrations are taken from a variety of crystals: gallium arsenide, cadmium telluride, mercuric iodide, bismuth silicon oxide, and lithium niobate. The identification and understanding of local variations in crystal growth processes are shown. Finally, new experimental opportunities now available for exploitation are indicated.

  12. EAARL topography: Gateway National Recreation Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains Lidar-derived topography (bare earth) maps and GIS files for the Sandy Hook Unit within Gateway National Recreation Area in New Jersey. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  13. EAARL Topography-Padre Island National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Matt; Wilson, Iris; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 116 Lidar-derived bare earth topography maps and GIS files for Padre Island National Seashore-Texas. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) St. Petersburg, Florida, the National Park Service (NPS) Gulf Coast Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  14. Corneal topography of excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy.

    PubMed

    Klyce, S D; Smolek, M K

    1993-01-01

    The application of the 193 nm excimer laser for keratorefractive surgery promises to deliver a higher degree of precision and predictability than traditional procedures such as radial keratotomy. The development and evaluation of keratorefractive surgery have benefited from the parallel advances made in the field of corneal topography analysis. We used the Computed Anatomy Topography Modeling System (TMS-1) to analyze a Louisiana State University (LSU) Eye Center series of patients who had photorefractive keratectomy for the treatment of myopia with the VISX Twenty/Twenty excimer laser system. The excimer ablations were characterized by a relatively uniform distribution of surface powers within the treated zone. In the few cases that exhibited marked refractive regression, corneal topography analysis showed correlative changes. With topographical analysis, centration of the ablations relative to the center of the pupil could be evaluated. Marked improvement in centration occurred in the patients of LSU Series IIB in which the procedure to locate the point on the cornea directly over the pupil's center during surgery was refined. Corneal topographical analysis provides objective measures of keratorefractive surgical results and is able to measure the precise tissue removal effect of excimer laser ablation without the uncertainties caused by measuring visual acuity alone. Our observations forecast the need for improved aids to center the laser ablations and for the development of a course of treatment to prevent post-ablation stromal remodeling. PMID:8450433

  15. EAARL topography: George Washington Birthplace National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains Lidar-derived topography (first return and bare earth) maps and GIS files for George Washington Birthplace National Monument in Virginia. These lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to coastal resource managers.

  16. Solutions of barotropic trapped waves over topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Sanson, Luis

    2010-05-01

    Solutions of free, barotropic waves over variable topography are derived. In particular, we examine two cases: waves around axisymmetric seamounts and waves along a sloping bottom. Even though these types of oscillations have been studied before, we revisit the problem because of two main reasons: (i) The linear, barotropic, shallow-water equations with a rigid lid are now solved with no further approximations, in contrast with previous studies. (ii) The solutions are applied to a wide family of seamounts and bottom slopes with profiles proportional to exp(rs) and ys, respectively, where r is the radial distance from the centre of the mountain, y is the direction perpendicular to the slope, and s is an arbitrary positive real number. Most of previous works on seamounts are restricted to the special case s = 2. By varying the shape parameter one can study trapped waves around flat-topped seamounts or guyots (s > 2) or sharp, cone-shaped topographies (s < 2). Similarly, most of previous studies on sloping bottoms report cases with s = 1 (linear slopes), whilst the present results are applied to more general bottom profiles. The resulting dispersion relation in both cases possess a remarkable simplicity that reveals a number of wave characteristics as a function of the topography shape.

  17. Digital holography system for topography measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amezquita, R.; Rincon, O. J.; Torres, Y. M.; Amezquita, S.

    2011-08-01

    The optical characteristics of Diffractive Optical Elements are determined by the properties of the photosensitive film on which they are produced. When working with photoresist plates, the most important property is the change in the plate's topography for different exposures. In this case, the required characterization involves a topographic measurement that can be made using digital holography. This work presents a digital holography system in which a hologram's phase map is obtained from a single recorded image. The phase map is calculated by applying a phase-shifting algorithm to a set of images that are created using a digital phase-shifting/tilteliminating procedure. Also, the curvatures, introduced by the imaging elements used in the experimental setup, are digitally compensated for using a polynomial fitting-method. The object's topography is then obtained from this modified phase map. To demonstrate the proposed procedure, the topography of patches exposed on a Shipley 1818 photoresist plate by microlithography equipment-which is currently under construction-is shown.

  18. Evolution of Neogene Dynamic Topography in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jonathan; Roberts, Gareth; White, Nicky

    2013-04-01

    The characteristic basins and swells of Africa's surface topography probably reflect patterns of convective circulation in the sub-lithospheric mantle. We have interrogated drainage networks to determine the spatial and temporal pattern of convectively driven uplift. ~560 longitudinal river profiles were extracted from a digital elevation model of Africa. An inverse model is then used to minimise the misfit between observed and calculated river profiles as a function of uplift rate history. During inversion, the residual misfit decreases from ~22 to ~5. Our results suggest that Africa's topography began to grow most rapidly after ~30 Ma at peak uplift rates of 0.1-0.15 mm/yr. The algorithm resolves distinct phases of uplift which generate localized swells of high topography and relief (e.g. the Angolan Dome). Uplift rate histories are shown to vary significantly from swell to swell. The calculated magnitudes, timing, and location of uplift agree well with local independent geological constraints, such as intense volcanism at Hoggar (42-39 Ma) and Afar (31-29 Ma), uplifted marine terraces, and warped peneplains. We have also calculated solid sediment flux histories for major African deltas which have persisted through time. This onshore record provides an important indirect constraint on the history of vertical motions at the surface, and agrees well with the offshore flux record, obtained from mapping isopachs of deltaic sediments. Our modelling and reconstructed sedimentary flux histories indicate that the evolution of drainage networks may contain useful information about mantle convective processes.

  19. EAARL topography: Thomas Stone National Historic Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains Lidar-derived topography (first return and bare earth) maps and GIS files for Thomas Stone National Historic Site in Maryland. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  20. HEND Maps of Fast Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in high-energy, or fast, neutrons. These maps are based on data acquired by the high-energy neutron detector, one of the instruments in the gamma ray spectrometer suite. Fast neutrons, like epithermal neutrons, are sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. Unlike epithermal neutrons, however, they are not affected by the presence of carbon dioxide, which at the time of these observations covered the north polar area as 'dry ice' frost. The low flux of fast neutrons (blue and purple colors) in the north polar region suggests an abundance of hydrogen in the soil comparable to that determined in the south from the flux of epithermal neutrons. These observations were acquired during the first two months of mapping operations. Contours of topography are superimposed on these maps for geographic reference.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. OpenTopography: Enabling Online Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography Data and Processing Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Baru, Chaitan; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the Earth's surface and overlying vegetation. These data, collected from airborne, tripod, or mobile-mounted scanners have emerged as a fundamental tool for research on topics ranging from earthquake hazards to hillslope processes. Lidar data provide a digital representation of the earth's surface at a resolution sufficient to appropriately capture the processes that contribute to landscape evolution. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is a web-based system designed to democratize access to earth science-oriented lidar topography data. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including the raw point cloud and associated geospatial-processing tools for customized analysis. The point cloud data are co-located with on-demand processing tools to generate digital elevation models, and derived products and visualizations which allow users to quickly access data in a format appropriate for their scientific application. The OpenTopography system is built using a service-oriented architecture (SOA) that leverages cyberinfrastructure resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego to allow users, regardless of expertise level, to access these massive lidar datasets and derived products for use in research and teaching. OpenTopography hosts over 500 billion lidar returns covering 85,000 km2. These data are all in the public domain and are provided by a variety of partners under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding with OpenTopography. Partners include national facilities such as the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM), as well as non-governmental organizations and local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography has become a hub for high-resolution topography

  2. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  3. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  4. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  5. Topography Influences Adherent Cell Regulation of Osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, M; Cooper, L F; Ogino, Y; Mendonca, D; Liang, R; Yang, S; Mendonca, G; Uoshima, K

    2016-03-01

    The importance of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in the process of osseointegration has not been widely considered. In this study, cell culture was used to investigate the hypothesis that the function of implant-adherent bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in osteoclastogenesis is influenced by surface topography. BMSCs isolated from femur and tibia of Sprague-Dawley rats were seeded onto 3 types of titanium surfaces (smooth, micro, and nano) and a control surface (tissue culture plastic) with or without osteogenic supplements. After 3 to 14 d, conditioned medium (CM) was collected. Subsequently, rat bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were cultured in media supplemented with soluble receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) as well as BMSC CM from each of the 4 surfaces. Gene expression levels of soluble RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor α, and M-CSF in cultured BMSCs at different time points were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The number of differentiated osteoclastic cells was determined after tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Analysis of variance and t test were used for statistical analysis. The expression of prominent osteoclast-promoting factors tumor necrosis factor α and M-CSF was increased by BMSCs cultured on both micro- and nanoscale titanium topographies (P < 0.01). BMSC CM contained a heat-labile factor that increased BMMs osteoclastogenesis. CM from both micro- and nanoscale surface-adherent BMSCs increased the osteoclast number (P < 0.01). Difference in surface topography altered BMSC phenotype and influenced BMM osteoclastogenesis. Local signaling by implant-adherent cells at the implant-bone interface may indirectly control osteoclastogenesis and bone accrual around endosseous implants. PMID:26553885

  6. Macromolecular Topography Leaps into the Digital Age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    A low-cost, real-time digital topography system is under development which will replace x-ray film and nuclear emulsion plates. The imaging system is based on an inexpensive surveillance camera that offers a 1000x1000 array of 8 im square pixels, anti-blooming circuitry, and very quick read out. Currently, the system directly converts x-rays to an image with no phosphor. The system is small and light and can be easily adapted to work with other crystallographic equipment. Preliminary images have been acquired of cubic insulin at the NSLS x26c beam line. NSLS x26c was configured for unfocused monochromatic radiation. Six reflections were collected with stills spaced from 0.002 to 0.001 degrees apart across the entire oscillation range that the reflections were in diffracting condition. All of the reflections were rotated to the vertical to reduce Lorentz and beam related effects. This particular CCD is designed for short exposure applications (much less than 1 sec) and so has a relatively high dark current leading to noisy raw images. The images are processed to remove background and other system noise with a multi-step approach including the use of wavelets, histogram, and mean window filtering. After processing, animations were constructed with the corresponding reflection profile to show the diffraction of the crystal volume vs. the oscillation angle as well as composite images showing the parts of the crystal with the strongest diffraction for each reflection. The final goal is to correlate features seen in reflection profiles captured with fine phi slicing to those seen in the topography images. With this development macromolecular topography finally comes into the digital age.

  7. Welcome to Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard

    2013-11-01

    I am delighted to welcome readers to this inaugural issue of Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties (STMP). In these days of citation indexes and academic reviews, it is a tough, and maybe a brave, job to start a new journal. But the subject area has never been more active and we are seeing genuine breakthroughs in the use of surfaces to control functional performance. Most manufactured parts rely on some form of control of their surface characteristics. The surface is usually defined as that feature on a component or device, which interacts with either the environment in which it is housed (or in which the device operates), or with another surface. The surface topography and material characteristics of a part can affect how fluids interact with it, how the part looks and feels and how two bearing parts will slide together. The need to control, and hence measure, surface features is becoming increasingly important as we move into a miniaturized world. Surface features can become the dominant functional features of a part and may become large in comparison to the overall size of an object. Research into surface texture measurement and characterization has been carried out for over a century and is now more active than ever, especially as new areal surface texture specification standards begin to be introduced. The range of disciplines for which the function of a surface relates to its topography is very diverse; from metal sheet manufacturing to art restoration, from plastic electronics to forensics. Until now, there has been no obvious publishing venue to bring together all these applications with the underlying research and theory, or to unite those working in academia with engineering and industry. Hence the creation of Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties . STMP will publish the best work being done across this broad discipline in one journal, helping researchers to share common themes and highlighting and promoting the extraordinary benefits this

  8. EAARL Coastal Topography - Sandy Hook 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey, acquired on May 16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  9. Carbon contamination topography analysis of EUV masks

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.-J.; Yankulin, L.; Thomas, P.; Mbanaso, C.; Antohe, A.; Garg, R.; Wang, Y.; Murray, T.; Wuest, A.; Goodwin, F.; Huh, S.; Cordes, A.; Naulleau, P.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Gullikson, E.; Denbeaux, G.

    2010-03-12

    The impact of carbon contamination on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks is significant due to throughput loss and potential effects on imaging performance. Current carbon contamination research primarily focuses on the lifetime of the multilayer surfaces, determined by reflectivity loss and reduced throughput in EUV exposure tools. However, contamination on patterned EUV masks can cause additional effects on absorbing features and the printed images, as well as impacting the efficiency of cleaning process. In this work, several different techniques were used to determine possible contamination topography. Lithographic simulations were also performed and the results compared with the experimental data.

  10. Investigating nuclear shell structure in the vicinity of 78Ni: Low-lying excited states in the neutron-rich isotopes Zn,8280

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiga, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Steppenbeck, D.; Aoi, N.; Doornenbal, P.; Lee, J.; Liu, H.; Matsushita, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Wang, H.; Baba, H.; Bednarczyk, P.; Dombradi, Zs.; Fulop, Zs.; Go, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Honma, M.; Ideguchi, E.; Ieki, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kondo, Y.; Minakata, R.; Motobayashi, T.; Nishimura, D.; Otsuka, T.; Otsu, H.; Sakurai, H.; Shimizu, N.; Sohler, D.; Sun, Y.; Tamii, A.; Tanaka, R.; Tian, Z.; Tsunoda, Y.; Vajta, Zs.; Yamamoto, T.; Yang, X.; Yang, Z.; Ye, Y.; Yokoyama, R.; Zenihiro, J.

    2016-02-01

    The low-lying level structures of nuclei in the vicinity of 78Ni were investigated using in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy to clarify the nature of the nuclear magic numbers Z =28 and N =50 in systems close to the neutron drip line. Nucleon knockout reactions were employed to populate excited states in 80Zn and 82Zn. A candidate for the 41+ level in 80Zn was identified at 1979(30) keV, and the lifetime of this state was estimated to be 136-67+92 ps from a line-shape analysis. Moreover, the energy of the 21+ state in 82Zn is reported to lie at 621(11) keV. The large drop in the 21+ energy at 82Zn indicates the presence of a significant peak in the E (21+) systematics at N =50 . Furthermore, the E (41+) /E (21+) and B (E 2 ;41+→21+) /B (E 2 ;21+→0g.s . +) ratios in 80Zn were deduced to be 1.32 (3 ) and 1 .12-60+80 , respectively. These results imply that 80Zn can be described in terms of two-proton configurations with a 78Ni core and are consistent with a robust N =50 magic number along the Zn isotopic chain. These observations, therefore, indicate a persistent N =50 shell closure in nuclei far from the line of β stability, which in turn suggests a doubly magic structure for 78Ni.

  11. On the dynamics of proto-neutron star winds and r-process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, I. V.; Janka, H.-Th.

    2009-02-01

    We study here the formation of heavy r-process nuclei in the high-entropy environment of rapidly expanding neutrino-driven winds from compact objects. In particular, we explore the sensitivity of the element creation in the A ⪆ 130 region to the low-temperature behavior of the outflows. For this purpose we employ a simplified model of the dynamics and of the thermodynamical evolution for radiation dominated, adiabatic outflows. It consists of a first stage of fast, exponential cooling with timescale τ_dyn, followed by a second phase of slower evolution, assuming either constant density and temperature or a power-law decay of these quantities. These cases describe a strong deceleration or decreasing acceleration of the transsonic outflows, respectively, and thus are supposed to capture the most relevant effects associated with a change in the wind expansion behavior at large radii, for example because of the collision with the slower, preceding supernova ejecta and the possible presence of a wind termination shock. We find that for given entropy, expansion timescale, and proton-to-baryon ratio not only the transition temperature between the two expansion phases can make a big difference in the formation of the platinum peak, but also the detailed cooling law during the later phase. Because the nuclear photodisintegration rates between about 2× 108 K and roughly 109 K are more sensitive to the temperature than the neutron-capture rates are to the free neutron density, a faster cooling but continuing high neutron density in this temperature regime allow the r-process path to move closer to the neutron-drip line. With low (γ,n)- but high β-decay rates, the r-processing does then not proceed through a (γ, n)-(n, γ) equilibrium but through a quasi-equilibrium of (n, γ)-reactions and β-decays, as recently also pointed out by Wanajo. Unless the transition temperature and corresponding (free neutron) density become too low (T ⪉ 2× 108 K), a lower temperature or

  12. HEND Maps of Epithermal Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in intermediate-energy, or epithermal, neutrons. These maps are based on data acquired by the high-energy neutron detector, one of the instruments in the gamma ray spectrometer suite. Soil enriched by hydrogen is indicated by the purple and deep blue colors on the maps, which show a low intensity of epithermal neutrons. Progressively smaller amounts of hydrogen are shown in the colors light blue, green, yellow and red. Hydrogen in the far north is hidden at this time beneath a layer of carbon dioxide frost (dry ice). These observations were acquired during the first two months of mapping operations. Contours of topography are superimposed on these maps for geographic reference.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Support of long-wavelength topography on Mercury inferred from MESSENGER measurements of gravity and topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Peter B.; Zuber, Maria T.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-02-01

    To explore the mechanisms of support of surface topography on Mercury, we have determined the admittances and correlations of topography and gravity in Mercury's northern hemisphere from measurements obtained by NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. These admittances and correlations can be interpreted in the context of a number of theoretical scenarios, including flexural loading and dynamic flow. We find that long-wavelength (spherical harmonic degree l < 15) surface topography on Mercury is primarily supported through a combination of crustal thickness variations and deep mass anomalies. The deep mass anomalies may be interpreted either as lateral variations in mantle density or as relief on compositional interfaces. Domical topographic swells are associated with high admittances and are compensated at 300-400 km depth in the lower reaches of Mercury's mantle. Quasi-linear topographic rises are primarily associated with shallow crustal compensation and are weakly correlated with positive mass anomalies in the mantle. The center of the Caloris basin features some of the thinnest crust on the planet, and the basin is underlain by a large negative mass anomaly. We also explore models of dynamic flow in the presence of compositional stratification above the liquid core. If there is substantial compositional stratification in Mercury's solid outer shell, relaxation of perturbed compositional interfaces may be capable of creating and sustaining long-wavelength topography.

  14. Analysis Of Scoliosis By Back Shape Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Smith, Alan R.; Harris, John D.

    1983-07-01

    The use of surface topography for the assessment of scoliotic deformity in the clinic depends firstly on the quality of measures which reliably characterise deformity of the back, and secondly on the ease and speed with which these measures can be applied. A method of analysis of back shape measurements is presented which can be applied to any topographic measurement system. Measures presented are substantially independent of minor changes in the patient's posture in rotation and flexion from one clinic to the next, and yet sensitive enough to indicate significant improvement or degeneration of the disease. The presentation shows (1) horizontal cross-sections at ten levels up the back from sacrum to vertebra prominens, (2) angles of rotation of the surface over a small region about the spine, (3) three vertical profiles following the line of the spine, and (4) measures of maximum kyphosis and lordosis. Dependence on the operator has been reduced to a minimum. Extreme care in positioning the patient is unnecessary and those spinous processes which are easily palpable, the vertebra prominens and the two dimples over the posterior superior iliac spines are marked. Analysis proceeds entirely automatically once the basic shape data have been supplied. Applications of the technique to indirect moire topography and a television topographic measurement system are described.

  15. Surface topography dependence of biomolecular hydrophobic hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuen-Kit; Rossky, Peter J.

    1998-04-01

    Many biomolecules are characterized by surfaces containing extended nonpolar regions, and the aggregation and subsequent removal of such surfaces from water is believed to play a critical role in the biomolecular assembly in cells. A better understanding of the hydrophobic hydration of biomolecules may therefore yield new insights into intracellular assembly. Conventional views hold that the hydration shell of small hydrophobic solutes is clathrate-like, characterized by local cage-like hydrogen-bonding structures and a distinct loss in entropy. The hydration of extended nonpolar planar surfaces, however, appears to involve structures that are orientationally inverted relative to clathrate-like hydration shells,, with unsatisfied hydrogen bonds that are directed towards the hydrophobic surface. Here we present computer simulations of the interaction between the polypeptide melittin and water that demonstrate that the two different hydration structures also exist near a biomolecular surface. We find that the two structures are distinguished by a substantial difference in the water-water interaction enthalpy, and that their relative contributions depend strongly on the surface topography of the melittin molecule: clathrate-like structures dominate near convex surface patches, whereas the hydration shell near flat surfaces fluctuates between clathrate-like and less-ordered or inverted structures. The strong influence of surface topography on the structure and free energy of hydrophobic hydration is likely to hold in general, and will be particularly important for the many biomolecules whose surfaces contain convex patches, deep or shallow concave grooves and roughly planar areas.

  16. EAARL Topography-Colonial National Historical Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nayegandhi, Amar; Stevens, Sara; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2008-01-01

    These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) St. Petersburg, the National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring Program, Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs, barrier islands, and various nearshore coastal environments for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to coastal resource managers.

  17. Nicotinic alteration of functional thalamocortical topography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles C; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Imaizumi, Kazuo

    2015-08-19

    The thalamocortical pathways form highly topographic connections from the primary sensory thalamic nuclei to the primary cortical areas. The synaptic properties of these thalamocortical connections are modifiable by activation from various neuromodulators, such as acetylcholine. Cholinergic activation can alter functional properties in both the developing and the mature nervous system. Moreover, environmental factors, such as nicotine, can activate these receptors, although the circuit-level alterations resulting from such nicotinic activation of sensory neural circuits remain largely unexplored. Therefore, we examined alterations to the functional topography of thalamocortical circuits in the developing sensory pathways of the mouse. Photostimulation by uncaging of glutamate was used to map these functional thalamocortical alterations in response to nicotinic receptor activation. As a result, we found that activation of forebrain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors results in an expansion and enhancement of functional thalamocortical topographies as assessed in brain slice preparations using laser-scanning photostimulation by uncaging of glutamate. These physiological changes were correlated with the neuroanatomical expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes (α7 and β2). These circuit-level alterations may provide a neural substrate underlying the plastic development and reshaping of thalamocortical circuitry in response to nicotinic receptor activation. PMID:26164456

  18. Uncertainty in measurement of surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haitjema, Han

    2015-09-01

    The 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) roughness parameters were standardized in 2012. With their increasing use in science and industry, the request for traceability and uncertainty evaluation for these parameters follows logically. This paper gives an overview of the problems and possibilities that appear when uncertainties have to be associated with values that are derived from a measured surface topography, such as the Ra-value of a periodic specimen, the RSm value of a type-D standard, and the Sa-value of a single cutoff length of a type D standard. It is shown that straightforward implementation of the methods described in the ‘Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement’ (GUM) leads to impossible and impracticable equations because of the correlations between some millions of measurement points. A practical solution is found by considering the main aspects of uncertainty, as these are given in the recent ISO 25178 standards series, and applying these to a measured surface topography as a whole.

  19. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, Abby; Wright, C. Wayne; Travers, Laurinda J.; Lebonitte, James

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived coastal topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey areas for the purposes of geomorphic change studies following major storm events. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program's National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project is a multi-year undertaking to identify and quantify the vulnerability of U.S. shorelines to coastal change hazards such as effects of severe storms, sea-level rise, and shoreline erosion and retreat. Airborne Lidar surveys conducted during periods of calm weather are compared to surveys collected following extreme storms in order to quantify the resulting coastal change. Other applications of high-resolution topography include habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, volumetric change detection, and event assessment. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northern Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, acquired on September 19, 2004, immediately following Hurricane Ivan. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532 nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking RGB (red-green-blue) digital camera, a high-resolution multi

  20. A 360-degree and -order model of Venus topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, Nicole; Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the most recent spherical harmonic topography model of Venus developed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It was produced by a spherical harmonic analysis of the most complete set of Magellan altimetry data, augmented by Pioneer Venus and Venera data. The harmonic coefficients of the topography were computed to degree and order 360. Compared to previous topography models, this one has the highest correlation with the gravity field of Venus.

  1. A 360-Degree and -Order Model of Venus Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Nicole; Plaut, Jeffry J.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the most recent spherical harmonic topography model of Venus developed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It was produced by a spherical harmonic analysis of the most complete set of Magellan altimetry data, augmented by Pioneer Venus and Venera data. The harmonic coefficients of the topography were computed to degree and order 360. Compared to previous topography models, this one has the highest correlation with the gravity field of Venus.

  2. A 360-degree and -order model of Venus topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Nicole; Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the most recent spherical harmonic topography model of Venus developed at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It was produced by a spherical harmonic analysis of the most complete set of Magellan altimetry data, augmented by Pioneer Venus and Venera data. The harmonic coefficients of the topography were computed to degree and order 360. Compared to previous topography models, this one has the highest correlation with the gravity field of Venus.

  3. Origin of bending in uncoated microcantilever - Surface topography?

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshmoji, K.; Prabakar, K.; Tripura Sundari, S. Jayapandian, J.; Tyagi, A. K.; Sundar, C. S.

    2014-01-27

    We provide direct experimental evidence to show that difference in surface topography on opposite sides of an uncoated microcantilever induces bending, upon exposure to water molecules. Examination on opposite sides of the microcantilever by atomic force microscopy reveals the presence of localized surface features on one side, which renders the induced stress non-uniform. Further, the root mean square inclination angle characterizing the surface topography shows a difference of 73° between the opposite sides. The absence of deflection in another uncoated microcantilever having similar surface topography confirms that in former microcantilever bending is indeed induced by differences in surface topography.

  4. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  5. Australian topography from Seasat overland altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert; Brenner, Anita C.

    1990-01-01

    Retracking of overland returns from the Seasat altimeter using algorithms originally developed for recovering elevations over ice has led to the successful recovery of high quality continental topography over Australia and other continents. Cross-over analysis both before and after orbit adjustment shows the altimetric data over land to have a 2-3 m quality. Direct comparison of gridded Seasat data with surface data re-averaged in the same way shows excellent agreement except where Seasat data are sparse, due either to poor track spacing or to dropouts caused by loss of tracker lock over steeply sloping ground. These results suggest that useful topographic data can be derived from Seasat and the more recent Geosat altimeters for parts of the world where surface data are few or of poor quality.

  6. Mean Dynamic Topography of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Sinead Louise; Mcadoo, David C.; Laxon, Seymour W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Yi, Donghui; Ridout, Andy; Giles, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    ICESat and Envisat altimetry data provide measurements of the instantaneous sea surface height (SSH) across the Arctic Ocean, using lead and open water elevation within the sea ice pack. First, these data were used to derive two independent mean sea surface (MSS) models by stacking and averaging along-track SSH profiles gathered between 2003 and 2009. The ICESat and Envisat MSS data were combined to construct the high-resolution ICEn MSS. Second, we estimate the 5.5-year mean dynamic topography (MDT) of the Arctic Ocean by differencing the ICEn MSS with the new GOCO02S geoid model, derived from GRACE and GOCE gravity. Using these satellite-only data we map the major features of Arctic Ocean dynamical height that are consistent with in situ observations, including the topographical highs and lows of the Beaufort and Greenland Gyres, respectively. Smaller-scale MDT structures remain largely unresolved due to uncertainties in the geoid at short wavelengths.

  7. Measurement Of Kyphosis Using Moire Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drerup, Burkhard

    1983-07-01

    Contour line patterns, as they are produced by moire topography are dependent on position, posture and body shape of the patient. For all medical applications data are needed, which are only dependent on shape and posture and which therefore are independent of positioning. The measurement of the kyphotic angle from topograms can be performed to meet these requirements and to yield results, which are independent of positioning. Different techniques for measuring this angle are discussed. Digitization and reconstruction of profiles from moire topograms are presented. In order to get reproducible results, landmarks are needed on the body surface. Landmarks may be found either by palpation or by analytical investigation of the back shape. Here, the inflectional points of the sagittal back profile are taken as intrinsic landmarks. Their relation to anatomical landmarks, which are found e.g. by palpation, is studied.

  8. A harmonic analysis of lunar topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, B. G.; Ferrari, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    A global lunar topographic map has been derived from existing earth-based and orbital observations supplemented in areas without data by a linear autocovariance predictor. Of 2592 bins, each 5 deg square, 1380 (64.7% by area) contain at least one measurement. A spherical harmonic analysis to degree 12 yields a mean radius of 1737.53 plus or minus 0.03 km (formal standard error) and an offset of the center of figure of 1.98 plus or minus 0.06 km toward (19 plus or minus 2) deg S, (194 plus or minus 1) deg E. A Bouguer gravity map, derived from a 12-degree free-air gravity model and the present topography data, is presented for an elevation of 100 km above the mean surface. It is confirmed that the low-degree gravity harmonics are determined primarily by surface height variations and only secondarily by lateral density variations.

  9. A new method for mapping macromolecular topography.

    PubMed

    Mezei, Mihaly

    2003-03-01

    A new method, using circular variance, is introduced for mapping macromolecular topography. Circular variance, generally used to measures angular spread, can be used to characterize of molecular structures based on a simple idea. It will be shown that the circular variance of vectors drawn from some origin to a set of points is well correlated with the degree to which that origin is inside/outside the chosen points. In addition, it has continuous derivatives that are also easy to compute. This concept will be shown to be useful for: (i) distinguishing between atoms near the surface of a macromolecule and those in either the deep interior or remote exterior; (ii) identifying invaginations (even shallow ones); and (iii) detecting linker regions that interconnect two domains. PMID:12543141

  10. Gravity and topography. [of planet Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, P. B.; Banerdt, W. B.; Lindal, G. F.; Sjogren, W. L.; Slade, M. A.; Bills, B. G.; Smith, D. E.; Balmino, G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper summarizes the fundamental gravity field constants for Mars and a brief historical review of early determinations and current-day accurate estimates. These include the planetary gravitational constant, global figure, dynamical oblateness, mean density, and rotational period. Topographic results from data acquired from the 1967 opposition to the most recent, 1988, opposition are presented. Both global and selected local topographic variations and features are discussed. The inertia tensor and the nonhydrostatic component of Mars are examined in detail. The dimensionless moment of inertia about the rotational axis is 0.4 for a body of uniform density and 0.37621 if Mars were in hydrostatic equilibrium. By comparing models of both gravity and topography, inferences are made about the degree and depth of compensation in the interior and stresses in the lithosphere.

  11. Assimilation of altimeter topography into oceanic models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demey, Pierre; Menard, Yves; Pinardi, Nadia; Schroeter, J.; Verron, J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary goals of the authors are to build an intuition for assimilation techniques and to investigate the impact of variable altimeter topography on simple or complex oceanic models. In particular, applying various techniques and sensitivity studies to model and data constraints plays a key role. We are starting to use quasi-geostrophic, semigeostrophic, and primitive-equation (PE) models and to test the schemes in regions of interest to the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), as well as in the northeast Atlantic and the Mediterranean. The impact of scatterometer wind forcing on the results is also investigated. The use of Geosat, European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1), and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry data is crucial in fine tuning the models and schemes to the selected areas of interest.

  12. Mean dynamic topography of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Sinéad Louise; McAdoo, David C.; Laxon, Seymour W.; Zwally, H. Jay; Yi, Donghui; Ridout, Andy; Giles, Katharine

    2012-01-01

    ICESat and Envisat altimetry data provide measurements of the instantaneous sea surface height (SSH) across the Arctic Ocean, using lead and open water elevation within the sea ice pack. First, these data were used to derive two independent mean sea surface (MSS) models by stacking and averaging along-track SSH profiles gathered between 2003 and 2009. The ICESat and Envisat MSS data were combined to construct the high-resolution ICEn MSS. Second, we estimate the 5.5-year mean dynamic topography (MDT) of the Arctic Ocean by differencing the ICEn MSS with the new GOCO02S geoid model, derived from GRACE and GOCE gravity. Using these satellite-only data we map the major features of Arctic Ocean dynamical height that are consistent with in situ observations, including the topographical highs and lows of the Beaufort and Greenland Gyres, respectively. Smaller-scale MDT structures remain largely unresolved due to uncertainties in the geoid at short wavelengths.

  13. EAARL submarine topography: Biscayne National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd; Harris, Melanie S.; Mosher, Lance

    2006-01-01

    This lidar-derived submarine topography map was produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs for the purposes of habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment (for example: bleaching, hurricanes, disease outbreaks). As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring water depth and conducting cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to managers of coastal tropical habitats.

  14. EAARL topography: Dry Tortugas National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2008-01-01

    This lidar-derived submarine topography map was produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs for the purposes of habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, ad event assessment (for example: bleaching, hurricanes, disease outbreaks). As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring water depth and conducting cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to managers of coastal tropical habitats.

  15. EAARL topography: Fire Island National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayagandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 31 LIDAR-derived first return topography maps and GIS files for Fire Island National Seashore. These lidar-derived topographic maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. The aims of the partnership that created this product are to develop advanced survey techniques for mapping barrier island geomorphology and habitats, and to enable the monitoring of ecological and geological change within National Seashores. This product is based on data from an innovative airborne lidar instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL).

  16. Bedrock topography beneath the Red Lake peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.; Shaw, G.H. . Geology Dept.); Glaser, P. . Limnological Research Center); Siegel, D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Detailed hydrologic investigations of peat landforms in the Red Lake Peatlands have revealed that groundwater flow is significantly related to the type of landform and vegetation community present at a given site. Hydrogeologic modeling of shallow groundwater systems suggests that bedrock topography is an important, perhaps the vital, boundary condition controlling groundwater flow. Determination of depth to bedrock beneath different peat landforms is necessary to test the hydrogeologic models and obtain a better understanding of the processes which produce them. Direct determination of bedrock depth in peatlands is hampered by the difficult conditions and high costs of boring. In addition, environmental impacts from boring activities would probably be substantial in these sensitive ecosystems. Shallow seismic methods appear to be the most promising approach to obtain the necessary data. Unfortunately the 2+ meters of peat covering Lake Agassiz sediments overlying the bedrock is not only a poor substrate for geophone emplacement, but is a strong attenuator of seismic waves. These difficulties have been overcome by constructing a tool which allows the geophones to be emplaced beneath the peat and into the top of the sediments. The shotgun cartridge source is also located beneath the peat. This combination results in very good seismic records, far better than those possible with surface sources and geophones. The results from a preliminary survey along a 600m line show that there are significant variations in bedrock topography below the peat. In a distance of less than 500m, depth to bedrock changes by about 30%, from about 55m to about 40m. This is similar to variations indicated by the models.

  17. Corneal topography matching by iterative registration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjie; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Davey, Pinakin G; Wang, Weizhuo; Bao, Fangjun; Mottershead, John E

    2014-11-01

    Videokeratography is used for the measurement of corneal topography in overlapping portions (or maps) which must later be joined together to form the overall topography of the cornea. The separate portions are measured from different viewpoints and therefore must be brought together by registration of measurement points in the regions of overlap. The central map is generally the most accurate, but all maps are measured with uncertainty that increases towards the periphery. It becomes the reference (or static) map, and the peripheral (or dynamic) maps must then be transformed by rotation and translation so that the overlapping portions are matched. The process known as registration, of determining the necessary transformation, is a well-understood procedure in image analysis and has been applied in several areas of science and engineering. In this article, direct search optimisation using the Nelder-Mead algorithm and several variants of the iterative closest/corresponding point routine are explained and applied to simulated and real clinical data. The measurement points on the static and dynamic maps are generally different so that it becomes necessary to interpolate, which is done using a truncated series of Zernike polynomials. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point variant has the advantage of releasing certain optimisation constraints that lead to persistent registration and alignment errors when other approaches are used. The point-to-plane iterative closest/corresponding point routine is found to be robust to measurement noise, insensitive to starting values of the transformation parameters and produces high-quality results when using real clinical data. PMID:25500860

  18. Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Lindstrom, Eric J.; Vaze, Parag V.; Fu, Lee-Lueng

    2012-09-01

    The Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission was recommended in 2007 by the National Research Council's Decadal Survey, "Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond", for implementation by NASA. The SWOT mission is a partnership between two communities, the physical oceanography and the hydrology, to share high vertical accuracy and high spatial resolution topography data produced by the science payload, principally a Ka-band radar Interferometer (KaRIn). The SWOT payload also includes a precision orbit determination system consisting of GPS and DORIS receivers, a Laser Retro-reflector Assembly (LRA), a Jason-class nadir radar altimeter, and a JASON-class radiometer for tropospheric path delay corrections. The SWOT mission will provide large-scale data sets of ocean sea-surface height resolving scales of 15km and larger, allowing the characterization of ocean mesoscale and submesoscale circulation. The SWOT mission will also provide measurements of water storage changes in terrestrial surface water bodies and estimates of discharge in large (wider than 100m) rivers globally. The SWOT measurements will provide a key complement to other NASA spaceborne global measurements of the water cycle measurements by directly measuring the surface water (lakes, reservoirs, rivers, and wetlands) component of the water cycle. The SWOT mission is an international partnership between NASA and the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) is also expected to contribute to the mission. SWOT is currently nearing entry to Formulation (Phase A). Its launch is targeted for October 2020.

  19. Evaluation of the PAR corneal topography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Prateek; Cheung, Susan; Pirouzian, Amir; Keates, Richard H.; Ren, Qiushi

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the raster photogrammetry based Corneal Topography System by determining: inter-operator variability, reproducibility of images, effects of defocused and decentered images, and the precision of data at different optical zones. 4 human cadaver eyes were used to study the inter-operator variability. To study the reproducibility of images, 3 human cadaver eyes and a test surface doped with flourescine (provided by PAR Vision Systems Corporation) were focused and their images taken four successive times. Defocused and decentered images were taken of 4 human cadaver eyes and four times of the test surface mentioned above. The precision of defocused/decentered cadaver eyes was evaluated at the following optical zones: 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm. All human cadaver eyes used in the above experiments had their epithelial layer removed before imaging. Average inter-operator variability was 0.06 D. In reproducibility attempts, there was an average deviation of 0.28 D for the human cadaver eyes and 0.04 D for the test surface. The defocused and decentered test surface gave an average deviation of 0.09 D. Defocused and decentered cadaver eyes resulted in an average deviation of 0.52 D, 0.37 D, 0.24 D, and 0.22 D at optical zones of 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm, respectively. The imaging method employed by PAR Vision Systems Corporation virtually eliminates inter-operator variability. The PAR Corneal Topography System's clinical usefulness, however, could be improved by improving the reproducibility of images, decreasing the sensitivity to spatial alignment, and increasing accuracy over smaller optical zones.

  20. Electroencephalographic topography measures of experienced utility.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, Andreas; Langer, Nicolas; Koenig, Thomas; Allemand, Michael; Jäncke, Lutz

    2011-07-20

    Economic theory distinguishes two concepts of utility: decision utility, objectively quantifiable by choices, and experienced utility, referring to the satisfaction by an obtainment. To date, experienced utility is typically measured with subjective ratings. This study intended to quantify experienced utility by global levels of neuronal activity. Neuronal activity was measured by means of electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to gain and omission of graded monetary rewards at the level of the EEG topography in human subjects. A novel analysis approach allowed approximating psychophysiological value functions for the experienced utility of monetary rewards. In addition, we identified the time windows of the event-related potentials (ERP) and the respective intracortical sources, in which variations in neuronal activity were significantly related to the value or valence of outcomes. Results indicate that value functions of experienced utility and regret disproportionally increase with monetary value, and thus contradict the compressing value functions of decision utility. The temporal pattern of outcome evaluation suggests an initial (∼250 ms) coarse evaluation regarding the valence, concurrent with a finer-grained evaluation of the value of gained rewards, whereas the evaluation of the value of omitted rewards emerges later. We hypothesize that this temporal double dissociation is explained by reward prediction errors. Finally, a late, yet unreported, reward-sensitive ERP topography (∼500 ms) was identified. The sources of these topographical covariations are estimated in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the medial frontal gyrus, the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and the hippocampus/amygdala. The results provide important new evidence regarding "how," "when," and "where" the brain evaluates outcomes with different hedonic impact. PMID:21775593

  1. Evolution of Neogene Dynamic Topography in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J. D.; Roberts, G.; White, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Madagascar is located on the fringes of the African superswell. Its position and the existence of a +30 mGal long wavelength free-air gravity anomaly suggest that its present-day topography is maintained by convective circulation of the sub-lithospheric mantle. Residual depth anomalies of oceanic crust encompassing the island imply that Madagascar straddles a dynamic topographic gradient. In June-July 2012, we examined geologic evidence for Neogene uplift around the Malagasy coastline. Uplifted coral reef deposits, fossil beach rock, and terraces demonstrate that the northern and southern coasts are probably being uplifted at a rate of ~0.2 mm/yr. Rates of uplift clearly vary around the coastline. Inland, extensive peneplains occur at elevations of 1 - 2 km. These peneplains are underlain by 10 - 20 m thick laterite deposits, and there is abundant evidence for rapid erosion (e.g. lavaka). Basaltic volcanism also occurred during Neogene times. These field observations can be combined with an analysis of drainage networks to determine the spatial and temporal pattern of convectively driven uplift. ~100 longitudinal river profiles were extracted from a digital elevation model of Madagascar. An inverse model is then used to minimize the misfit between observed and calculated river profiles as a function of uplift rate history. During inversion, the residual misfit decreases from ~20 to ~4. Our results suggest that youthful and rapid uplift of 1-2 km occurred at rates of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr during the last ˜15 Myr. The algorithm resolves distinct phases of uplift which generate localized swells of high topography and relief (e.g. the Hauts Plateaux). Our field observations and modeling indicate that the evolution of drainage networks may contain useful information about mantle convective processes.

  2. Mass Measurement of 56Sc Reveals a Small A =56 Odd-Even Mass Staggering, Implying a Cooler Accreted Neutron Star Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Z.; George, S.; Ahn, S.; Bazin, D.; Brown, B. A.; Browne, J.; Carpino, J. F.; Chung, H.; Cole, A. L.; Cyburt, R. H.; Estradé, A.; Famiano, M.; Gade, A.; Langer, C.; Matoš, M.; Mittig, W.; Montes, F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Pereira, J.; Schatz, H.; Schatz, J.; Scott, M.; Shapira, D.; Smith, K.; Stevens, J.; Tan, W.; Tarasov, O.; Towers, S.; Wimmer, K.; Winkelbauer, J. R.; Yurkon, J.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2015-10-01

    We present the mass excesses of 52-57Sc, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The masses of 56Sc and 57Sc were determined for the first time with atomic mass excesses of -24.85 (59 )(-54+0) MeV and -21.0 (1.3 ) MeV , respectively, where the asymmetric uncertainty for 56Sc was included due to possible contamination from a long-lived isomer. The 56Sc mass indicates a small odd-even mass staggering in the A =56 mass chain towards the neutron drip line, significantly deviating from trends predicted by the global FRDM mass model and favoring trends predicted by the UNEDF0 and UNEDF1 density functional calculations. Together with new shell-model calculations of the electron-capture strength function of 56Sc, our results strongly reduce uncertainties in model calculations of the heating and cooling at the 56Ti electron-capture layer in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars. We find that, in contrast to previous studies, neither strong neutrino cooling nor strong heating occurs in this layer. We conclude that Urca cooling in the outer crusts of accreting neutron stars that exhibit superbursts or high temperature steady-state burning, which are predicted to be rich in A ≈56 nuclei, is considerably weaker than predicted. Urca cooling must instead be dominated by electron capture on the small amounts of adjacent odd-A nuclei contained in the superburst and high temperature steady-state burning ashes. This may explain the absence of strong crust Urca cooling inferred from the observed cooling light curve of the transiently accreting x-ray source MAXI J0556-332.

  3. Mass Measurement of 56Sc Reveals a Small A = 56 Odd-Even Mass Staggering, Implying a Cooler Accreted Neutron Star Crust.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Z; George, S; Ahn, S; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Browne, J; Carpino, J F; Chung, H; Cole, A L; Cyburt, R H; Estradé, A; Famiano, M; Gade, A; Langer, C; Matoš, M; Mittig, W; Montes, F; Morrissey, D J; Pereira, J; Schatz, H; Schatz, J; Scott, M; Shapira, D; Smith, K; Stevens, J; Tan, W; Tarasov, O; Towers, S; Wimmer, K; Winkelbauer, J R; Yurkon, J; Zegers, R G T

    2015-10-16

    We present the mass excesses of (52-57)Sc, obtained from recent time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. The masses of 56Sc and 57Sc were determined for the first time with atomic mass excesses of -24.85(59)((-54)(+0))  MeV and -21.0(1.3)  MeV, respectively, where the asymmetric uncertainty for 56Sc was included due to possible contamination from a long-lived isomer. The 56Sc mass indicates a small odd-even mass staggering in the A = 56 mass chain towards the neutron drip line, significantly deviating from trends predicted by the global FRDM mass model and favoring trends predicted by the UNEDF0 and UNEDF1 density functional calculations. Together with new shell-model calculations of the electron-capture strength function of 56Sc, our results strongly reduce uncertainties in model calculations of the heating and cooling at the 56Ti electron-capture layer in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars. We find that, in contrast to previous studies, neither strong neutrino cooling nor strong heating occurs in this layer. We conclude that Urca cooling in the outer crusts of accreting neutron stars that exhibit superbursts or high temperature steady-state burning, which are predicted to be rich in A≈56 nuclei, is considerably weaker than predicted. Urca cooling must instead be dominated by electron capture on the small amounts of adjacent odd-A nuclei contained in the superburst and high temperature steady-state burning ashes. This may explain the absence of strong crust Urca cooling inferred from the observed cooling light curve of the transiently accreting x-ray source MAXI J0556-332. PMID:26550869

  4. Graphene Topographies: Multiscale Graphene Topographies Programmed by Sequential Mechanical Deformation (Adv. Mater. 18/2016).

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yen; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Qiu, Yang; Valentin, Thomas M; Steinberg, Ruben Spitz; Wang, Zhongying; Hurt, Robert H; Wong, Ian Y

    2016-05-01

    P.-Y. Chen, R. H. Hurt, I. Y. Wong and co-workers demonstrate a hierarchical graphene surface architecture generated by using various sequences and combinations of extreme mechanical deformation, as shown in the false-colored SEM image. As described on page 3564, the sequential patterning approach enables the design of feature sizes and orientations across multiple length scales which are retained during mechanical deformations of similar extent. This results in sequence-dependent surface topographies with structural memory. PMID:27151628

  5. Micromegas neutron beam monitor neutronics.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Andrew C; Miller, Laurence F

    2005-01-01

    The Micromegas is a type of ionising radiation detector that consists of a gas chamber sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes, with the gas chamber divided by a Frisch grid into drift and amplification gaps. Investigators have applied it to a number of different applications, such as charged particle, X-ray and neutron detection. A Micromegas device has been tested as a neutron beam monitor at CERN and is expected to be used for that purpose at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction in Oak Ridge, TN. For the Micromegas to function effectively as neutron beam monitor, it should cause minimal disruption to the neutron beam in question. Specifically, it should scatter as few neutrons as possible and avoid neutron absorption when it does not contribute to generating useful information concerning the neutron beam. Here, we present the results of Monte Carlo calculations of the effect of different types of wall materials and detector gases on neutron beams and suggest methods for minimising disruption to the beam. PMID:16381746

  6. Simulation of 3D Seismic Wave Propagation with Volcano Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripperger, J.; Igel, H.; Wassermann, J.

    2001-12-01

    We investigate the possibilities of using three-dimensional finite difference (FD) methods for numerical simulation of the seismic wave field at active volcanoes. We put special emphasis on the implementation of the boundary conditions for free surface topography. We compare two different approaches to solve the free surface boundary conditions. The algorithms are implemented on parallel hardware and have been tested for correctness and stability. We apply them to smooth artificial topographies and to the real topography of Mount Merapi, Indonesia. We conclude, that grid stretching type methods (e.g. Hestholm & Ruud, 1994) are not well suited for realistic volcano topography as they tend to become unstable for large topographic gradients. The representation of topography through staircase shaped grids (Ohminato & Chouet, 1997) results in stable calculations, while demanding very fine gridding. The simulations show the effects of a three-dimensional surface topography on elastic wave propagation. Ground motion at the surface is severely affected by topography. If neglected, this may jeopardize attempts to determine source location by analyzing particle motion. Numerical studies like this can help to understand wave propagation phenomena observed on field recordings in volcano seismology. Future studies will aim at separating the wave effects of internal scattering, topography and sources (tremors, tectonic events, pyroclastic flows).

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  8. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  9. Video Animation of Ocean Topography From TOPEX/POSEIDON

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Leconte, Denis; Pihos, Greg; Davidson, Roger; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Tapley, Byron

    1993-01-01

    Three video loops showing various aspects of the dynamic ocean topography obtained from the TOPEX/POSEIDON radar altimetry data will be presented. The first shows the temporal change of the global ocean topography during the first year of the mission. The time-averaged mean is removed to reveal the temporal variabilities. Temporal interpolation is performed to create daily maps for the animation. A spatial smoothing is also performed to retain only the large-sale features. Gyre-scale seasonal changes are the main features. The second shows the temporal evolution of the Gulf Stream. The high resolution gravimetric geoid of Rapp is used to obtain the absolute ocean topography. Simulated drifters are used to visualize the flow pattern of the current. Meanders and rings of the current are the main features. The third is an animation of the global ocean topography on a spherical earth. The JGM-2 geoid is used to obtain the ocean topography...

  10. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  11. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  12. Stereo Pair: Inverted Topography, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Meseta de Somuncura is a broad plateau capped by basalt. Near its western edge is evidence of multiple volcanic events and a complex erosion history. Most notable are the long, narrow-, and winding lava flows that run across most of the right side of the image. These formed from low-viscosity lava that flowed down gullies over fairly flat terrain. Later, erosion of the landscape continued and the solidified flows were more resistant than the older surrounding rocks. Consequently, the flows became the ridges we see here. This natural process of converting gullies to ridges is called topographic inversion. See image PIA02755 (upper left corner) for a good example of topographic inversion in its earlier stages.

    Other features seen here include numerous and varied closed depressions. The regional drainage is not well integrated, and drainage ends up in salty lakes (blue if shallow, black if deep). Wind streaks indicate that winds blow toward the east (right) and blow salt grains off the lakebeds when dry. The bowtie pattern in the upper left has resulted from differing grazing practices among fenced fields.

    This cross-eyed stereoscopic image pair was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, combined with an enhanced Landsat 7satellite color image. The topography data are used to create two differing perspectives of a single image, one perspective for each eye. In doing so, each point in the image is shifted slightly, depending on its elevation. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to

  13. Topography and Volcanoes on Io (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The images used to create this enhanced color composite of Io were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its seventh orbit (G7) of Jupiter. Low sun angles near the terminator (day-night boundary near the left side of the image) offer lighting conditions which emphasize the topography or relief on the volcanic satellite. The topography appears very flat near the active volcanic centers such as Loki Patera (the large dark horse-shoe shaped feature near the terminator) while a variety of mountains and plateaus exist elsewhere. The big reddish-orange ring in the lower right is formed by material deposited from the eruption of Pele, Io's largest volcanic plume.

    North is to the top of this picture which merges images obtained with the clear, red, green, and violet filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The resolution is 6.1 kilometers per picture element. The images were taken on April 4th, 1997 at a range of 600,000 kilometers.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    Concurrent results from Galileo's exploration of Io appear in the October 15th, 1997 issue of Geophysical Research Letters. The papers are: Temperature and Area Constraints of the South Volund Volcano on Io from the NIMS and SSI Instruments during the Galileo G1 Orbit, by A.G. Davies, A.S. McEwen, R. Lopes-Gautier, L. Keszthelyi, R.W. Carlson and W.D. Smythe. High-temperature hot spots on Io as seen by the Galileo Solid-State Imaging (SSI) experiment, by A. McEwen, D. Simonelli, D. Senske, K. Klassen, L. Keszthelyi, T. Johnson, P. Geissler, M. Carr, and M. Belton. Io: Galileo evidence for major variations in regolith properties, by D. Simonelli, J. Veverka, and A. McEwen.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home

  14. Epitope topography controls bioactivity in supramolecular nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Shantanu; Tantakitti, Faifan; Matson, John B.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating bioactivity into artificial scaffolds using peptide epitopes present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a well-known approach. A common strategy has involved epitopes that provide cells with attachment points and external cues through interaction with integrin receptors. Although a variety of bioactive sequences have been identified so far, less is known about their optimal display in a scaffold. We report here on the use of self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofiber matrices to investigate the impact of spatial presentation of the fibronectin derived epitope RGDS on cell response. Using one, three, or five glycine residues, RGDS epitopes were systematically spaced out from the surface of the rigid nanofibers. We found that cell morphology was strongly affected by the separation of the epitope from the nanofiber surface, with the longest distance yielding the most cell-spreading, bundling of actin filaments, and a round-to-polygonal transformation of cell shape. Cell response to this type of epitope display was also accompanied with activated integrin-mediated signaling and formation of stronger adhesions between cells and substrate. Interestingly, unlike length, changing the molecular flexibility of the linker had minimal influence on cell behavior on the substrate for reasons that remain poorly understood. The use in this study of high persistence length nanofibers rather than common flexible polymers allows us to conclude that epitope topography at the nanoscale structure of a scaffold influences its bioactive properties independent of epitope density and mechanical properties. PMID:25745558

  15. Shape, Topography and Roughness of 25143 Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Barnouin-Jha, O. S.

    2007-12-01

    The recent visit of the Hayabusa spacecraft to the small near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 25143 Itokawa yielded the surprising discovery that Itokawa was not an intact object but a low density, gravitationally accumulated, rubble pile. This contrasts with the finding, from the only other NEA visited by an asteroid lander, that 433 Eros was an intact object and not a rubble pile. Eros was visited by the NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft which landed in 2001. Accurately co-registered, high resolution imager and lidar data from NEAR Shoemaker have demonstrated the fractal properties of small scale surface topography on Eros, where boulders tend to be found on the tops of long ridges, consistent with the presence of an underlying globally coherent structure. However, Itokawa is a rubble pile with a fundamentally different collisional history. Here we analyze co-registered, high resolution lidar and imager data from Itokawa, obtained by Hayabusa, to explore fractal properties and surface roughness distributions on Itokawa for comparison with the results from Eros.

  16. Predicting Maximum Lake Depth from Surrounding Topography

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Milstead, W. Bryan; Urrutia, M. Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Information about lake morphometry (e.g., depth, volume, size, etc.) aids understanding of the physical and ecological dynamics of lakes, yet is often not readily available. The data needed to calculate measures of lake morphometry, particularly lake depth, are usually collected on a lake-by-lake basis and are difficult to obtain across broad regions. To span the gap between studies of individual lakes where detailed data exist and regional studies where access to useful data on lake depth is unavailable, we developed a method to predict maximum lake depth from the slope of the topography surrounding a lake. We use the National Elevation Dataset and the National Hydrography Dataset – Plus to estimate the percent slope of surrounding lakes and use this information to predict maximum lake depth. We also use field measured maximum lake depths from the US EPA's National Lakes Assessment to empirically adjust and cross-validate our predictions. We were able to predict maximum depth for ∼28,000 lakes in the Northeastern United States with an average cross-validated RMSE of 5.95 m and 5.09 m and average correlation of 0.82 and 0.69 for Hydrological Unit Code Regions 01 and 02, respectively. The depth predictions and the scripts are openly available as supplements to this manuscript. PMID:21984945

  17. Inversion of topography in Martian highland terrains

    SciTech Connect

    De Hon, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Ring furrows are flat-floored trenches, circulate in plan view, forming rings 7 to 50 km in diameter. Typically, ring furrows, which are 0.5 km deep and 2 to 10 km wide, surround a central, flat-topped, circular mesa or plateau. The central plateau is about the same elevation or lower than the plain outside the ring. Ring furrows are unique features of the dissected martian uplands. Related landforms range from ring furrows with fractured central plateaus to circular mesas without encircling moats. Ring furrows are superposed on many types of materials, but they are most common cratered plateau-type materials that are interpreted as volcanic flow material overlying ancient cratered terrain. The ring shape and size suggest that they are related to craters partially buried by lava flows. Ring furrows were formed by preferential removal of exposed rims of partially buried craters. Evidence of overland flow of water is lacking except within the channels. Ground ice decay and sapping followed by fluvial erosion are responsible for removal of the less resistant rim materials. Thus, differential erosion has caused a reversal of topography in which the originally elevated rim is reduced to negative relief.

  18. Basins of attraction on random topography.

    PubMed

    Schorghofer, N; Rothman, D H

    2001-02-01

    We investigate the consequences of fluid flowing on a continuous surface upon the geometric and statistical distribution of the flow. We find that the ability of a surface to collect water by its mere geometrical shape is proportional to the curvature of the contour line divided by the local slope. Consequently, rivers tend to lie in locations of high curvature and flat slopes. Gaussian surfaces are introduced as a model of random topography. For Gaussian surfaces the relation between convergence and slope is obtained analytically. The convergence of flow lines correlates positively with drainage area, so that lower slopes are associated with larger basins. As a consequence, we explain the observed relation between the local slope of a landscape and the area of the drainage basin geometrically. To some extent, the slope-area relation comes about not because of fluvial erosion of the landscape, but because of the way rivers choose their path. Our results are supported by numerically generated surfaces as well as by real landscapes. PMID:11308547

  19. Nano-topography sensing by osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Geblinger, Dafna; Addadi, Lia; Geiger, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Bone resorption by osteoclasts depends on the assembly of a specialized, actin-rich adhesive ‘sealing zone’ that delimits the area designed for degradation. In this study, we show that the level of roughness of the underlying adhesive surface has a profound effect on the formation and stability of the sealing zone and the associated F-actin. As our primary model substrate, we use ‘smooth’ and ‘rough’ calcite crystals with average topography values of 12 nm and 530 nm, respectively. We show that the smooth surfaces induce the formation of small and unstable actin rings with a typical lifespan of ~8 minutes, whereas the sealing zones formed on the rough calcite surfaces are considerably larger, and remain stable for more than 6 hours. It was further observed that steps or sub-micrometer cracks on the smooth surface stimulate local ring formation, raising the possibility that similar imperfections on bone surfaces may stimulate local osteoclast resorptive activity. The mechanisms whereby the physical properties of the substrate influence osteoclast behavior and their involvement in osteoclast function are discussed. PMID:20375065

  20. The length-scaling properties of topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissel, Jeffrey K.; Pratson, Lincoln F.; Malinverno, Alberto

    1994-01-01

    The scaling properties of synthetic topographic surfaces and digital elevation models (DEMs) of topography are examined by analyzing their 'structure functions,' i.e., the qth order powers of the absolute elevation differences: delta h(sub q) (l) = E((absolute value of h(x + l) - h(x))(exp q)). We find that the relation delta h(sub 1 l) approximately equal cl(exp H) describes well the scaling behavior of natural topographic surfaces, as represented by DEMs gridded at 3 arc sec. Average values of the scaling exponent H between approximately 0.5 and 0.7 characterize DEMs from Ethiopia, Saudi Arabia, and Somalia over 3 orders of magnitude range in length scale l (approximately 0.1-150 km). Differences in appparent topographic roughness among the three areas most likely reflect differences in the amplitude factor c. Separate determination of scaling properties in the x and y coordinate directions allows us to assess whether scaling exponents are azimuthally dependent (anisotropic) or whether they are isotropic while the surface itself is anisotropic over a restricted range of length scale. We explore ways to determine whether topographic surfaces are characterized by simple or multiscaling properties.

  1. Imaging, Reconstruction, And Display Of Corneal Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyce, Stephen D.; Wilson, Steven E.

    1989-12-01

    The cornea is the major refractive element in the eye; even minor surface distortions can produce a significant reduction in visual acuity. Standard clinical methods used to evaluate corneal shape include keratometry, which assumes the cornea is ellipsoidal in shape, and photokeratoscopy, which images a series of concentric light rings on the corneal surface. These methods fail to document many of the corneal distortions that can degrade visual acuity. Algorithms have been developed to reconstruct the three dimensional shape of the cornea from keratoscope images, and to present these data in the clinically useful display of color-coded contour maps of corneal surface power. This approach has been implemented on a new generation video keratoscope system (Computed Anatomy, Inc.) with rapid automatic digitization of the image rings by a rule-based approach. The system has found clinical use in the early diagnosis of corneal shape anomalies such as keratoconus and contact lens-induced corneal warpage, in the evaluation of cataract and corneal transplant procedures, and in the assessment of corneal refractive surgical procedures. Currently, ray tracing techniques are being used to correlate corneal surface topography with potential visual acuity in an effort to more fully understand the tolerances of corneal shape consistent with good vision and to help determine the site of dysfunction in the visually impaired.

  2. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  3. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  4. An Improved 360 Degree and Order Model of Venus Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Nicole J.; Konopliv, Alex S.; Kucinskas, Algis B.; Ford, Peter G.

    1999-01-01

    We present an improved 360 degree and order spherical harmonic solution for Venus' topography. The new model uses the most recent set of Venus altimetry data with spacecraft positions derived from a recent high resolution gravity model. Geometric analysis indicates that the offset between the center of mass and center of figure of Venus is about 10 times smaller than that for the Earth, the Moon, or Mars. Statistical analyses confirm that the RMS topography follows a power law over the central part of the spectrum. Compared to the previous topography model, the new model is more highly correlated with Venus' harmonic gravity field.

  5. Dewetting of evaporating thin films over nanometer-scale topographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh, A. M.; Moosavi, A.; Moghimi Kheirabadi, A.

    2014-07-01

    A lubrication model is used to study dewetting of an evaporating thin film layer over a solid substrate with a nanometer-scale topography. The effects of the geometry of the topography, the contact angle, the film thickness, and the slippage on the dewetting have been studied. Our results reveal that the evaporation enhances the dewetting process and reduces the depinning time over the topography. Also it is shown that the depinning time is inversely proportional to the slippage and increasing the contact angle may considerably reduce the depinning time, while the film thickness increases the depinning time.

  6. An Improved 360 Degree and Order Model of Venus Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, Nicole J.; Konopliv, Alex S.; Kucinskas, Algis B.; Ford, Peter G.

    1999-05-01

    We present an improved 360 degree and order spherical harmonic solution for Venus' topography. The new model uses the most recent set of Venus altimetry data with spacecraft positions derived from a recent high resolution gravity model. Geometric analysis indicates that the offset between the center of mass and center of figure of Venus is about 10 times smaller than that for the Earth, the Moon, or Mars. Statistical analyses confirm that the RMS topography follows a power law over the central part of the spectrum. Compared to the previous topography model, the new model is more highly correlated with Venus' harmonic gravity field.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  9. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  10. SRTM Anaglyph: Inverted Topography, Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Meseta de Somuncura is a broad plateau capped by basalt. Near its western edge is evidence of multiple volcanic events and a complex erosion history. Most notable are the long, narrow, and winding lava flows that run across most of the right side of the image. These formed from low-viscosity lava that flowed down gullies over fairly flat terrain. Later, erosion of the landscape continued, and the solidified flows were more resistant than the older surrounding rocks. Consequently, the flows became the ridges we see here. This natural process of converting gullies to ridges is called topographic inversion. See image PIA02755 (upper left corner) for a good example of topographic inversion in its earlier stages.

    Other features seen here include numerous and varied closed depressions. The regional drainage is not well integrated, but instead the drainage ends up in salty lakes (dark water, some with bright shores). Wind streaks indicate that winds blow toward the east (right) and blow salt grains off the lake beds when dry. The bowtie pattern in the upper left has resulted from differing grazing practices among fenced fields.

    This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat Thematic Mapper image over a topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, then producing the two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat satellites have provided visible light and infrared images of the Earth continuously since 1972. SRTM topographic data match the 30-meter (99-foot) spatial resolution of most Landsat images and provide a valuable complement for studying the historic and growing Landsat data archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological

  11. Global dynamic topography: geoscience communities requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T.; Costeraste, J.

    2012-04-01

    The advent of free-of-charge global topographic data sets SRTM and Aster GDEM have enabled testing a host of geoscience hypotheses. This is because they first revealed the relief of previously unavailable earth landscapes, enabled quantitative geomorphometric analyses across entire landscapes and improved the resolution of measurements. Availability of such data is now considered standard, and though resolved at 30-m to 90-m pixel, which is amazing seeing where we come from, they are now regarded as mostly obsolete given the sub-meter imagery coming through web services like Google Earth. Geoscientists now appear to desire two additional features: field-scale-compatible elevation datasets (i.e. meter-scale digital models and sub-meter elevation precision) and dispose of regularly updated topography to retrieve earth surface changes, while retaining the key for success: data availability at no charge. A new satellite instrument is currently under phase 0 study at CNES, the French space agency, to fulfil these aims. The scientific community backing this demand is that of natural hazards, glaciology and to a lesser extent the biomass community. The system under study combines a native stereo imager and a lidar profiler. This combination provides spatially resolved elevation swaths together with absolute along-track elevation control point profiles. Data generated through this system, designed for revisit time better than a year, is intended to produce not only single acquisition digital surface models, colour orthoimages and small footprint full-wave-form lidar profiles to update existing topographic coverages, but also time series of them. This enables 3D change detection with centimetre-scale planimetric precision and metric vertical precision, in complement of classical spectral change appoaches. The purpose of this contribution, on behalf of the science team, is to present the mission concepts and philosophy and the scientific needs for such instrument including

  12. Science in Motion: Isolated Araneiform Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Have you ever found that to describe something you had to go to the dictionary and search for just the right word?

    The south polar terrain is so full of unearthly features that we had to visit Mr. Webster to find a suitable term. 'Araneiform' means 'spider-like'. These are channels that are carved in the surface by carbon dioxide gas. We do not have this process on Earth.

    The channels are somewhat radially organized (figure 1) and widen and deepen as they converge. In the past we've just refered to them as 'spiders.' 'Isolated araneiform topography' means that our features look like spiders that are not in contact with each other.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003087_0930 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 24-Mar-2007. The complete image is centered at -87.1 degrees latitude, 126.3 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 244.4 km (152.8 miles). At this distance the image scale is 24.5 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 73 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 08:22 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 81 degrees, thus the sun was about 9 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 206.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  13. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Marcia; Fons, Juan Manuel; Popa, Elena Mădălina; Chatzeli, Lemonia; Tucker, Abigail S

    2015-01-01

    During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2(+) cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2(+)/Sox9(+) cells. PMID:26538639

  14. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Marcia; Fons, Juan Manuel; Popa, Elena Mădălina; Chatzeli, Lemonia; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells. PMID:26538639

  15. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  17. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  18. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  19. Fission and Properties of Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Joseph H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Carter, H. K.

    2008-08-01

    Opening session. Nuclear processes in stellar explosions / M. Wiescher. In-beam [symbol]-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei at NSCL / A. Gade -- Nuclear structure I. Shell-model structure of neutron-rich nuclei beyond [symbol]Sn / A. Covello ... [et al.]. Shell structure and evolution of collectivity in nuclei above the [symbol]Sn core / S. Sarkar and M. S. Sarkar. Heavy-ion fusion using density-constrained TDHF / A. S. Umar and V. E. Oberacker. Towards an extended microscopic theory for upper-fp shell nuclei / K. P. Drumev. Properties of the Zr and Pb isotopes near the drip-line / V. N. Tarasov ... [et al.]. Identification of high spin states in [symbol] Cs nuclei and shell model calculations / K. Li ... [et al.]. Recent measurements of spherical and deformed isomers using the Lohengrin fission-fragment spectrometer / G. S. Simpson ... [et al.] -- Nuclear structure II. Nuclear structure investigation with rare isotope spectroscopic investigations at GSI / P. Boutachkov. Exploring the evolution of the shell structures by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Anaelis. Probing shell closures in neutron-rich nuclei / R. Krücken for the S277 and REX-ISOLDEMINIBALL collaborations. Structure of Fe isotopes at the limits of the pf-shell / N. Hoteling ... [et al.]. Spectroscopy of K isomers in shell-stabilized trans-fermium nuclei / S. K. Tandel ... [et al.] -- Radioactive ion beam facilities. SPIRAL2 at GANIL: a world leading ISOL facility for the next decade / S. Gales. New physics at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) next to GSI / I. Augustin ... [et al.]. Radioactive beams from a high powered ISOL system / A. C. Shotter. RlKEN RT beam factory / T. Motobayashi. NSCL - ongoing activities and future perspectives / C. K. Gelbke. Rare isotope beams at Argonne / W. F. Henning. HRIBF: scientific highlights and future prospects / J. R. Beene. Radioactive ion beam research done in Dubna / G. M. Ter-Akopian ... [et al.] -- Fission I

  20. EAARL coastal topography--North Shore, Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Fredericks, Xan; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Barras, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived coastal topography GIS datasets of a portion of the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana. These datasets were acquired on February 28, March 1, and March 5, 2010.

  1. Influence of local topography on precision irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision irrigation management is currently accomplished using spatial information about soil properties through soil series maps or electrical conductivity (EC measurements. Crop yield, however, is consistently influenced by local topography, both in rain-fed and irrigated environments. Utilizing ...

  2. 2. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING RELATION OF BRIDGE TO THE TOPOGRAPHY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW SHOWING RELATION OF BRIDGE TO THE TOPOGRAPHY OF THE APPROACH ROAD. - Speicher Bridge, Church Road over Tulpehocken Creek between Penn & North Heidelberg Townships, Bernville, Berks County, PA

  3. 23. SPILLWAY NO. 1 LOWER END TOPOGRAPHY AND SECTIONS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. SPILLWAY NO. 1 - LOWER END TOPOGRAPHY AND SECTIONS. February 1934. Reference BS-150. - Cushman No. 1 Hydroelectric Power Plant, Spillway, North Fork of Skokomish River, 5 miles West of Hood Canal, Hoodsport, Mason County, WA

  4. Stimulus control topography coherence theory: Foundations and extensions

    PubMed Central

    McIlvane, William J.; Dube, William V.

    2003-01-01

    Stimulus control topography refers to qualitative differences among members of a functional stimulus class. Stimulus control topography coherence refers to the degree of concordance between the stimulus properties specified as relevant by the individual arranging a reinforcement contingency (behavior analyst, experimenter, teacher, etc.) and the stimulus properties that come to control the behavior of the organism (experimental subject, student, etc.) that experiences those contingencies. This paper summarizes the rationale for analyses of discrimination learning outcomes in terms of stimulus control topography coherence and briefly reviews some of the foundational studies that led to this perspective. We also suggest directions for future research, including pursuit of conceptual and methodological challenges to a complete stimulus control topography coherence analysis of processes involved in discriminated and generalized operants. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5 PMID:22478402

  5. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography.

    PubMed

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J; Montgomery, David R

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 10(4) years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain. PMID:26271245

  6. Engineering microscale topographies to control the cell–substrate interface

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhah, Mehdi; Edalat, Faramarz; Manoucheri, Sam; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Cells in their in vivo microenvironment constantly encounter and respond to a multitude of signals. While the role of biochemical signals has long been appreciated, the importance of biophysical signals has only recently been investigated. Biophysical cues are presented in different forms including topography and mechanical stiffness imparted by the extracellular matrix and adjoining cells. Microfabrication technologies have allowed for the generation of biomaterials with microscale topographies to study the effect of biophysical cues on cellular function at the cell–substrate interface. Topographies of different geometries and with varying microscale dimensions have been used to better understand cell adhesion, migration, and differentiation at the cellular and sub-cellular scales. Furthermore, quantification of cell-generated forces has been illustrated with micropillar topographies to shed light on the process of mechanotransduction. In this review, we highlight recent advances made in these areas and how they have been utilized for neural, cardiac, and musculoskeletal tissue engineering application. PMID:22521491

  7. Geoid height versus topography for oceanic plateaus and swells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Mackenzie, Kevin R.

    1989-01-01

    Gridded geoid height data (Marsh et al.l, 1986) and gridded bathymetry data (Van Wykhouse, 1973) are used to estimate the average compensation depths of 53 oceanic swells and plateaus. The relationship between geoid height and topography is examined using Airy and thermal compensation models. It is shown that geoid height is linearly related to topography between wavelengths of 400 and 4000 m as predicted by isostatic compensation models. The geoid/topography ratio is dependent on the average depth of compensation. The intermediate geoid/topography ratios of most thermal swells are interpreted as a linear combination of the decaying thermal swell signature and that of the persisting Airy-compensated volcanic edifice.

  8. Surface topography and the impact on fatigue performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardi, D. T.; Li, Y. G.; Chan, K. H. K.; Blunt, L.; Bache, M. R.

    2015-03-01

    Areal characterization was applied to plain fatigue specimens manufactured from a nickel-based superalloy, Alloy 720Li, to determine the impact of machined/finished surface topography on fatigue performance of this material. Samples were subjected to fatigue testing in the as-turned and shot peened conditions to study the interaction between residual stresses and topography in influencing the fatigue performance. The turning process was deliberately manipulated to produce three distinct finishes which were subsequently given an identical shot peening, resulting in six grades of surface topography. Surface topography was found to influence fatigue even in the presence of peened compressive residual stresses by promoting crack initiation at valley sites. Both the roughness amplitude and spatial characteristics of the surface were found to be important when correlating to fatigue performance.

  9. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography

    PubMed Central

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J.; Montgomery, David R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 104 years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain. PMID:26271245

  10. Calculation of irrotational wind pattern with application to Cleveland topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1972-01-01

    Small perturbation theory is applied to compute the deflection of the wind blowing across land that has an irregular topography. As an illustration, the method is applied first to the flow around a single hill of Gaussian profile. Then calculations are made for the irregular topography on the east side of Cleveland where the elevation changes by several hundred feet. It was found that the topography produced small wind deflections that would not be of practical importance in air pollution dispersion studies. The calculations were for a neutrally stable atmosphere. Although they are not investigated here, other factors such as thermal stratification of the atmosphere, diurnal variations, and convection currents resulting from the proximity of Lake Erie and the city heat island effect are expected to be more significant than the influence of topography.