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Sample records for neutron flux optimization

  1. Analysis of neutron flux distribution for the validation of computational methods for the optimization of research reactor utilization.

    PubMed

    Snoj, L; Trkov, A; Jaćimović, R; Rogan, P; Zerovnik, G; Ravnik, M

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify and validate the computational methods for neutron flux calculation in TRIGA research reactor calculations, a series of experiments has been performed. The neutron activation method was used to verify the calculated neutron flux distribution in the TRIGA reactor. Aluminium (99.9 wt%)-Gold (0.1 wt%) foils (disks of 5mm diameter and 0.2mm thick) were irradiated in 33 locations; 6 in the core and 27 in the carrousel facility in the reflector. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed with Monte Carlo code MCNP using detailed geometrical model of the reactor. The calculated and experimental normalized reaction rates in the core are in very good agreement for both isotopes indicating that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled well. In conclusion one can state that our computational model describes very well the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core. In the reflector however, the accuracy of the epithermal and thermal neutron flux distribution and attenuation is lower, mainly due to lack of information about the material properties of the graphite reflector surrounding the core, but the differences between measurements and calculations are within 10%. Since our computational model properly describes the reactor core it can be used for calculations of reactor core parameters and for optimization of research reactor utilization. PMID:20855215

  2. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  3. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  4. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  5. Optimization of neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.

    1993-11-09

    I consider here the optimization of the two component neutron source, allowing beam species and energy to vary. A simple model is developed, based on the earlier publications, that permits the optimum to be obtained simply. The two component plasma, with one species of hot ion (D{sup +} or T{sup +}) and the complementary species of cold ion, is easy to analyze in the case of a spatially uniform cold plasma, as to good approximation the total number of hot ions is important but not their spatial distribution. Consequently, the optimization can ignore spatial effects. The problem of a plasma with both types of hot ions and cold ions is rather more difficult, as the neutron production by hot-hot interactions is sensitive to their spatial distributions. Consequently, consideration of this problem will be delayed to a future memorandum. The basic model is that used in the published articles on the two-component, beam-plasma mirror source. I integrate the Fokker-Planck equation analytically, obtaining good agreement with previous numerical results. This simplifies the optimization, by providing a functional form for the neutron production. The primary result is expressed in terms of the power efficiency: watts of neutrons/watts of primary power. The latter includes the positive ion neutralization efficiency. At 150 keV, the present model obtains an efficiency of 0.66%, compared with 0.53% of the earlier calculation.

  6. Spacecraft-produced neutron fluxes on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quist, T. C.; Furst, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Baum, J. H.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.; Perry, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of neutron fluxes in different energy ranges are reported for the Skylab spacecraft. Detectors composed of uranium, thorium, and bismuth foils with mica as a fission track recorder, as well as boron foils with cellulose acetate as an alpha-particle recorder, were deployed at different positions in the Orbital Workshop. It was found that the Skylab neutron flux was dominated by high energy (greater than 1 MeV) contributions and that there was no significant time variation in the fluxes. Firm upper limits of 7-15 neutrons/sq cm-sec, depending on the detector location in the spacecraft, were established for fluxes above 1 MeV. Below 1 MeV, the neutron fluxes were about an order of magnitude lower. The neutrons are interpreted as originating from the interactions of leakage protons from the radiation belt with the spacecraft.

  7. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; vanderWoerd, Mark; Damon, Michael; Judge, Russell, A.; Myles, Dean; Meilleur, F.

    2006-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is uniquely sensitive to hydrogen positions and protonation state. In that context structural information from neutron data is complementary to that provided through X-ray diffraction. However, there are practical obstacles to overcome in fully exploiting the potential of neutron diffraction, Le. low flux and weak scattering. Several approaches are available to overcome these obstacles and we have investigated the simplest: increasing the diffracting volume of the crystals. Volume is a quantifiable metric that is well suited for experiment design and optimization techniques. By using response surface methods we have optimized xylose isomerase crystal volume, enabling neutron diffraction while we determined the crystallization parameters with the minimum of experiments. Our results suggest a systematic means of enabling neutron diffraction studies for a larger number of samples that require information on hydrogen position and/or protonation state.

  8. Neutron flux assessment of a neutron irradiation facility based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, M L; Miller, M E

    2015-12-01

    Neutron generators based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion were considered for the design of a neutron irradiation facility for explanted organ Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) that could be installed in a health care center as well as in research areas. The chosen facility configuration is "irradiation chamber", a ~20×20×40 cm(3) cavity near or in the center of the facility geometry where samples to be irradiated can be placed. Neutron flux calculations were performed to study different manners for improving scattering processes and, consequently, optimize neutron flux in the irradiation position. Flux distributions were assessed through numerical simulations of several models implemented in MCNP5 particle transport code. Simulation results provided a wide spectrum of combinations of net fluxes and energy spectrum distributions. Among them one can find a group that can provide thermal neutron fluxes per unit of production rate in a range from 4.1·10(-4) cm(-2) to 1.6·10(-3) cm(-2) with epithermal-to-thermal ratios between 0.3% and 13% and fast-to-thermal ratios between 0.01% to 8%. Neutron generators could be built to provide more than 10(10) n s(-1) and, consequently, with an arrangement of several generators appropriate enough neutron fluxes could be obtained that would be useful for several BNCT-related irradiations and, eventually, for clinical practice. PMID:26122974

  9. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  10. STRATIFIED COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON PLANETARY NEUTRON FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    O. GASNAULT; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons [1]. Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium [2, 3], the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium [2] and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass [4]. Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm{sup {minus}2} in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  11. Modulating the Neutron Flux from a Mirror Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D

    2011-09-01

    A 14-MeV neutron source based on a Gas-Dynamic Trap will provide a high flux of 14 MeV neutrons for fusion materials and sub-component testing. In addition to its main goal, the source has potential applications in condensed matter physics and biophysics. In this report, the author considers adding one more capability to the GDT-based neutron source, the modulation of the neutron flux with a desired frequency. The modulation may be an enabling tool for the assessment of the role of non-steady-state effects in fusion devices as well as for high-precision, low-signal basic science experiments favoring the use of the synchronous detection technique. A conclusion is drawn that modulation frequency of up to 1 kHz and modulation amplitude of a few percent is achievable. Limitations on the amplitude of modulations at higher frequencies are discussed.

  12. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  13. Dissipative mode filtration in a “levitating” neutron flux

    SciTech Connect

    Petelin, M. I. Tai, M. L.

    2015-06-15

    In experiments [1–4], where a flux of neutrons is injected into a horizontal channel, the output flux structure proves to be a nonmonotonic function of the vertical coordinate. This flux evolution is explained by the absorption of neutrons in the floor material.

  14. Radial Flux Distribution of Low-Energy Neutrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higinbotham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to illustrate the basic principle involved in the process of moderation of fast neutrons by water, and the monitoring of the low-energy neutron flux using indium as a probe. (GA)

  15. Neutron flux monitoring system for ITER-FEAT (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschuck, Yu.; Krasilnikov, A.; Alekseyev, A.; Amosov, V.; Frunze, V.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the neutron flux measurements for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER-FEAT is discussed. In spite of the fact that ITER-FEAT has reduced fusion power with respect to ITER-FDR, the requirements for neutron flux monitors are similar—wide dynamic range (seven orders), good temporal resolution (1 ms), and high accuracy (10%). It is clear that fission chambers are the most suitable detectors for this application. However high neutron intensity of the fusion plasma and hard requirements lead to a more sophisticated detection system than the ordinary fission chamber. Another problem is an absolute calibration of the detectors. We propose a neutron flux monitoring system, which consist of microfission chambers placed inside the ITER vacuum chamber, three wide range fission chambers placed outside the vacuum chamber, natural diamond detector based compact neutron monitors placed inside the channels of the neutron cameras, and a compact neutron generator for calibration. Microfission chambers could be installed in the standard plugs with other detectors (vacuum x-ray diode, magnetic probe). 235U could be used as well as threshold fission materials (238U, 237Np, 232Th). In the last case the fission chamber will be covered by a boron shield to reduce the changes in the sensitivity. Wide range fission chambers will operate in both pulse count mode and Campbell mode. High linearity is provided by count mode. Temporal resolution of 1 ms is provided by the count mode at low neutron flux and by the Campbell mode at high flux. The nonlinearity of the fission chamber during the switch from count mode to Campbell mode will be corrected by another fission chamber with low sensitivity operating in count mode. Compact neutron flux monitors placed inside neutron cameras will consist of up to ten natural diamond neutron counters with sensitivity to DT neutrons doubled by properly installed poliethilen radiators. Such monitors provide DT neutron flux

  16. An Alpha-Gamma Counter for Absolute Neutron Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A.; Greene, G.; Dewey, M.; Gilliam, D.; Nico, J.; Laptev, A.

    2012-03-01

    An alpha-gamma counter was used to measure the absolute neutron flux of a monochromatic cold neutron beam to sub-0.1,% precision. Simultaneously, the counter was used to calibrate a thin neutron flux monitor based on neutron absorption on ^6Li to the same precision. This monitor was used in the most precise beam-based measurement of the neutron lifetime, where the limiting systematic effect was the uncertainty in the neutron counting efficiency (0.3,%). The counter uses a thick target of ^10B-enriched boron carbide to completely absorb the beam. The rate of absorbed neutrons is determined by counting 478 keV gamma rays from neutron capture on ^10B with calibrated high-purity germanium detectors. The calibration results and the implications for the neutron lifetime will be discussed.

  17. Strong flux of low-energy neutrons produced by thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Antonova, V P; Chubenko, A P; Karashtin, A N; Mitko, G G; Ptitsyn, M O; Ryabov, V A; Shepetov, A L; Shlyugaev, Yu V; Vildanova, L I; Zybin, K P

    2012-03-23

    We report here for the first time about the registration of an extraordinary high flux of low-energy neutrons generated during thunderstorms. The measured neutron count rate enhancements are directly connected with thunderstorm discharges. The low-energy neutron flux value obtained in our work is a challenge for the photonuclear channel of neutron generation in thunderstorm: the estimated value of the needed high-energy γ-ray flux is about 3 orders of magnitude higher than that one observed. PMID:22540588

  18. Neutron Unfolding Code System for Calculating Neutron Flux Spectra from Activation Data of Dosimeter Foils.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1982-04-30

    Version 00 As a part of the measurement and analysis plan for the Dosimetry Experiment at the "JOYO" experimental fast reactor, neutron flux spectral analysis is performed using the NEUPAC (Neutron Unfolding Code Package) code system. NEUPAC calculates the neutron flux spectra and other integral quantities from the activation data of the dosimeter foils.

  19. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    PubMed

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system. PMID:26141293

  20. A Monte Carlo simulation and setup optimization of output efficiency to PGNAA thermal neutron using 252Cf neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Tuo, Xian-Guo

    2014-07-01

    We present the design and optimization of a prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) thermal neutron output setup based on Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 computer code. In these simulations, the moderator materials, reflective materials, and structure of the PGNAA 252Cf neutrons of thermal neutron output setup are optimized. The simulation results reveal that the thin layer paraffin and the thick layer of heavy water moderating effect work best for the 252Cf neutron spectrum. Our new design shows a significantly improved performance of the thermal neutron flux and flux rate, that are increased by 3.02 times and 3.27 times, respectively, compared with the conventional neutron source design.

  1. Validation of the MCNP computational model for neutron flux distribution with the neutron activation analysis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiyapun, K.; Chimtin, M.; Munsorn, S.; Somchit, S.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the method for validating the predication of the calculation methods for neutron flux distribution in the irradiation tubes of TRIGA research reactor (TRR-1/M1) using the MCNP computer code model. The reaction rate using in the experiment includes 27Al(n, α)24Na and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reactions. Aluminium (99.9 wt%) and gold (0.1 wt%) foils and the gold foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in 9 locations in the core referred to as CT, C8, C12, F3, F12, F22, F29, G5, and G33. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed using MCNP which consisted of the detailed geometrical model of the reactor core. The results from the experimental and calculated normalized reaction rates in the reactor core are in good agreement for both reactions showing that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled very well. The results indicated that the difference between the experimental measurements and the calculation of the reactor core using the MCNP geometrical model was below 10%. In conclusion the MCNP computational model which was used to calculate the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core can be used for others reactor core parameters including neutron spectra calculation, dose rate calculation, power peaking factors calculation and optimization of research reactor utilization in the future with the confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the calculation.

  2. Neutron flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.; Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occured. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  3. Global Maps of Lunar Neutron Fluxes from the LEND Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Sanin, A.; Malakhov, A.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Droege, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J.; Golovin, D. V.; Harshman, K.; McClanahan, T. P.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Mazarico, E.; Milikh, G.; Neumann, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Smith, D. E.; Starr, R.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    The latest neutron spectrometer measurements with the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) are presented. It covers more than 1 year of mapping phase starting on 15 September 2009. In our analyses we have created global maps showing regional variations in the flux of thermal (energy range < 0.015 eV) and fast neutrons (>0.5 MeV), and compared these fluxes to variances in soil elemental composition, and with previous results obtained by the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS). We also processed data from LEND collimated detectors and derived a value for the collimated signal of epithermal neutrons based on the comparative analysis with the LEND omnidirectional detectors. Finally, we have compared our final (after the data reduction) global epithermal neutron map with LPNS data.

  4. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  5. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  6. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  7. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  8. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2007-06-01

    The availability of whole-cell-level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate the metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30 000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations has relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reactions are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  9. Optimization of Germanium Monochromators for Neutron Diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, F. U.; Yunus, S. M.; Kamal, I.; Begum, S.; Khan, Aysha A.; Ahsan, M. H.; Ahmad, A. A. Z.

    A computer program TISTA has been employed to study the behavior of reactor-neutrons at the sample position of a neutron spectrometer diffracted from Ge(111), (220), and (311) monochromators. Our aim is to design a double axis neutron spectrometer and to determine the behavior of beam intensity and resolution at the sample position. The study will be helpful to design experiments with the existing triple axis neutron spectrometer at TRIGA Mark II research reactor, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The optimum values of crystal and instrument parameters have been determined through these calculations. The flux density of neutrons and the resolutions of a spectrometer at the sample position have been calculated as functions of beam collimation, zero-Bragg-angle deviation, crystal curvature, distance between sample and monochromator, crystal asymmetry, thickness, mosaic spread, crystal length, etc. The present results are compared with those of copper and silicon monochromators.

  10. Distribution of thermal neutron flux around a PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshimune; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Mochizuki, Shingo; Ito, Kengo; Hatano, Kentaro; Abe, Junichiro; Miyahara, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime

    2011-05-01

    The number of positron emission tomography (PET) examinations has greatly increased world-wide. Since positron emission nuclides for the PET examinations have short half-lives, they are mainly produced using on-site cyclotrons. During the production of the nuclides, significant quantities of neutrons are generated from the cyclotrons. Neutrons have potential to activate the materials around the cyclotrons and cause exposure to the staff. To investigate quantities and distribution of the thermal neutrons, thermal neutron fluxes were measured around a PET cyclotron in a laboratory associating with a hospital. The cyclotron accelerates protons up to 18 MeV, and the mean particle current is 20 μA. The neutron fluxes were measured during both 18F production and C production. Gold foils and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges were used to measure the neutron fluxes. The neutron fluxes in the target box averaged 9.3 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.7 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) during 18F and 11C production, respectively. Those in the cyclotron room averaged 4.1 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.2 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1), respectively. Those outside the concrete wall shielding were estimated as being equal to or less than ∼3 cm s, which corresponded to 0.1 μSv h(-1) in effective dose. The neutron fluxes outside the concrete shielding were confirmed to be quite low compared to the legal limit. PMID:21451309

  11. Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Primm, Trent; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

  12. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    We present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  13. Accurate Relations Between the Neutron Current Densities and the Neutron Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Ronen, Yigal

    2004-02-15

    Accurate relations between neutron current densities and neutron flux are obtained using the integral transport equation. Using these relations and Fick's Law, diffusion constants can be calculated. These diffusion constants are better than those usually used for the cases in which {sigma}{sub a}/{sigma}{sub s} is not small.

  14. Performance improvement of neutron flux monitor at KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-K.; Lee, S.-K.; Kang, B.-H.; Son, J.-B.; Kim, G.-D.

    2012-06-01

    The evaluation of plasma performance in fusion reactors is carried out by various particle or ion detection systems. Neutron diagnostic systems are used to evaluate different aspects of plasma performance and are very important tools because they can directly detect the neutrons of D-D or D-T fusion reactions. Among them, the stilbene scintillator has good Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD), a fast response of 10 ns and it can also evaluate neutron energy using an unfolding method. Because of these properties, it was proposed as a neutron flux monitor in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research magnetic fusion reactor (KSTAR). Under high radiation fields, specially designed electronics are necessary to measure only fast neutron spectra and to reject background gamma rays. In order to increase the data transfer rate for real-time evaluation of plasma performance, we have developed a Flash Analog to Digital Convertor (FADC) with a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) that implements a Digital Charge Comparison (DCC) algorithm. Performance evaluation of stilbene was conducted in a 2011 KSTAR campaign and it showed good results for measuring real-time neutron flux with temporal resolution of 1 ms, and it operated well under high magnetic field conditions.

  15. CR-39 detector based thermal neutron flux measurements, in the photo neutron project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mameli, A.; Greco, F.; Fidanzio, A.; Fusco, V.; Cilla, S.; D'Onofrio, G.; Grimaldi, L.; Augelli, B. G.; Giannini, G.; Bevilacqua, R.; Totaro, P.; Tommasino, L.; Azario, L.; Piermattei, A.

    2008-08-01

    PhoNeS (photo neutron source) is a project aimed at the production and moderation of neutrons by exploiting high energy linear accelerators, currently used in radiotherapy. A feasibility study has been carried out with the scope in mind to use the high energy photon beams from these accelerators for the production of neutrons suitable for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Within these investigations, it was necessary to carry out preliminary measurements of the thermal neutron component of neutron spectra, produced by the photo-conversion of X-ray radiotherapy beams supplied by three LinAcs: 15 MV, 18 MV and 23 MV. To this end, a simple passive thermal neutron detector has been used which consists of a CR-39 track detector facing a new type of boron-loaded radiator. Once calibrated, this passive detector has been used for the measurement of both the thermal neutron component and the cadmium ratio of different neutron spectra. In addition, bubble detectors with a response highly sensitive to thermal neutrons have also been used. Both thermal neutron detectors are simple to use, very compact and totally insensitive to low-ionizing radiation such as electrons and X-rays. The resultant thermal neutron flux was above 10 6 n/cm 2s and the cadmium ratio was no greater than 15 for the first attempt of photo-conversion of X-ray radiotherapy beams.

  16. Thermal neutron flux mapping in a head phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. L.; Zhou, X.-L.; Harmon, J. F.; Bartholomay, R. W.; Harker, Y. D.; Kudchadker, R. J.

    1999-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer treatment modality in which a boron-containing compound is preferentially loaded into a tumor, followed by irradiation by thermal neutrons. In accelerator-based BNCT, neutrons are produced by charged particle-induced reactions such as 7Li(p, n) 7Be. For deeply seated brain tumors, epithermal (1 eV to 10 kev) neutrons are needed to penetrate the skull cap and subsequently thermalize at the tumor location. Cell damage in BNCT is caused by the high linear energy transfer (LET) products from the 10B(n, α) 7Li reaction. Because the cross section for this reaction is of 1/ v character, the dose due to 10B has essentially the same spatial distribution as the thermal neutron flux. A cylindrical acrylic head phantom (15.24 cm diameter by 21.59 cm length) has been constructed to simulate the patient's head and neck, and acrylic spacers of varying width allow placement of small (active sizes: 0.635 cm diameter by 1.27 cm length and 1.5875 cm diameter by 2.54 cm length) BF 3 proportional counters at nearly all radial and axial locations. Measurements of the thermal flux have also been benchmarked with gold and indium foils (bare and cadmium covered), as well as MCNP simulations. Measurement of the thermal neutron flux using these small BF 3 counters is shown to be adequate for experimentally determining the spatial variation of the 10B dose in head phantoms for accelerator-based BNCT.

  17. Improved monitoring system of neutron flux during boron-neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harasawa, S.; Nakamoto, A.; Hayakawa, Y.; Egawa, J.

    1981-10-01

    Continuous and simultaneous monitoring of neutron flux in the course of a boron-neutron capture operation on a brain tumor has been achieved using a new monitoring system. A silicon surface barrier diode mounted with /sup 6/LiF instead of the previously reported borax is used to sense neutrons. The pulse heights of /sup 3/H and ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 6/Li(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 2/H reaction are sufficiently high and well separated from noises due to ..gamma.. rays. The effect of pulse-height reduction due to the radiation damage of the diode thus becomes smaller, permitting continuous monitoring. The relative error of the monitoring is within 2% over 5 hr for a neutron-flux density of 2 x 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2/ sec.

  18. Neutron optics of the ILL high-flux polarized neutron three-axis spectrometer IN20B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulda, Jiri; Courtois, Pierre; Saroun, Jan; Thomas, Michel; Enderle, M.; Flores, P.

    2001-11-01

    The three-axis spectrometer IN20 has been upgraded to enhance significantly the data collection rate in experiments using polarized neutrons to study magnetic excitations in the (higher) thermal energy range. To increase the monochromatic polarized neutron flux, a new geometry of the primary spectrometer, optimized by detailed ray-tracing simulations, has been adopted. The main ingredients are a neutron source of a diameter increased from 100 mm to 170 mm and a large double focusing monochromator, illuminated through a heavy input slit (virtual source) of adjustable width. This geometry permits to keep the background at a possibly low level while maximizing the solid angle available for monochromatic focusing. The real challenge of the project has been the new Heusler monochromator. With its active surface of 230 x 150 mm2, consisting of 75 crystal plates mounted in 15 columns, it is the largest polarizing crystal assembly ever built. In combination with the horizontally focusing analyzer of a similar design, implemented in spring 2000, the data collection rate in the polarization analysis mode has increased by a factor 30 - 50 in April 2001 as compared to the original IN20, which up to now has provided world's highest polarized neutron flux in the thermal energy range.

  19. Designing CNR, a very high thermal neutron flux facility

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    According to a recent study (Eastman-Seitz Committee, National Academy of Science) there is a need for a new generation of steady neutron sources with a thermal neutron flux peak between 5 to 10 times 10/sup 15//cm/sup 2/ sec. Ideally the neutron source would have to operate continuously for several days (two weeks at least) with minimum time (2 to 3 days) for refueling and/or maintenance and it would also be used to irradiate materials and produce isotopes. This paper describes the preliminary design of the nuclear reactor for the proposed Center for Neutron Research (CNR). A duplication of existing designs (HFIR, (ORNL), ILL (Grenoble, France)) would imply high total power and small core life; the necessity of higher efficiencies (in terms of peak-flux-per-unit source or power) then becomes apparent. We have found analytical expressions for the efficiency in terms of a few parameters such as the volume of the source and the Fermi age and diffusion length of thermal neutrons in both the source and reflector regions. A single analytical expression can then be used for scoping the design and to intercompare radically different designs. Higher efficiencies can be achieved by reducing the volume and the moderation of a core immersed in a very low absorbing reflector; on the contrary a very long core life has a negative effect on the efficiency at beginning of life. Consequently, and after detailed calculations, we have found a candidate design with the following characteristics: core, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, 93% enriched, 18.1-kg /sup 235/U, metal fraction 50%, Al cladding, and 35-L volume; reflector and moderator, D/sub 2/O; efficiency at end of life (EOL) with respect to the ILL reactor, 1.29; flux at EOL, 10 x 10/sup 15//cm/sup 2/ sec (power in core 270. MW); core life, 14 days; burnup 28.4%.

  20. Estimating surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical ogive optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, S. E.; Jammet, M. M.; Rysgaard, S.; Sejr, M. K.; Sørensen, L. L.

    2015-02-01

    Estimating representative surface fluxes using eddy covariance leads invariably to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of low-frequency flux contributions. For studies where fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modelling efforts, low-frequency contributions interfere with our ability to isolate local biogeochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. No method currently exists to disentangle low-frequency contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out low-frequency contributions to vertical turbulent surface fluxes. For high flux rates (|Sensible heat flux| > 40 Wm-2, |latent heat flux|> 20 Wm-2 and |CO2 flux|> 100 mmol m-2 d-1 we found that the average relative difference between fluxes estimated by ogive optimization and the conventional method was low (5-20%) suggesting negligible low-frequency influence and that both methods capture the turbulent fluxes equally well. For flux rates below these thresholds, however, the average relative difference between flux estimates was found to be very high (23-98%) suggesting non-negligible low-frequency influence and that the conventional method fails in separating low-frequency influences from the turbulent fluxes. Hence, the ogive optimization method is an appropriate method of flux analysis, particularly in low-flux environments.

  1. Beam-transport optimization for cold-neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kenji; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Osakabe, Toyotaka

    2015-01-01

    We report the design of the beam-transport system (especially the vertical geometry) for a cold-neutron disk-chopper spectrometer AMATERAS at J-PARC. Based on the elliptical shape, which is one of the most effective geometries for a ballistic mirror, the design was optimized to obtain, at the sample position, a neutron beam with high flux without serious degrading in divergence and spacial homogeneity within the boundary conditions required from actual spectrometer construction. The optimum focal point was examined. An ideal elliptical shape was modified to reduce its height without serious loss of transmission. The final result was adapted to the construction requirements of AMATERAS. Although the ideas studied in this paper are considered for the AMATERAS case, they can be useful also to other spectrometers in similar situations.

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF THE EPITHERMAL NEUTRON BEAM FOR BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY AT THE BROOKHAVEN MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HOLDEN,N.E.

    2002-08-18

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven's Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  3. Optimization of the Epithermal Neutron Beam for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.P.; Reciniello, R.N.; Holden, N.E.

    2004-05-01

    Clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for patients with malignant brain tumor had been carried out for half a decade, using an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Reactor. The decision to permanently close this reactor in 2000 cut short the efforts to implement a new conceptual design to optimize this beam in preparation for use with possible new protocols. Details of the conceptual design to produce a higher intensity, more forward-directed neutron beam with less contamination from gamma rays, fast and thermal neutrons are presented here for their potential applicability to other reactor facilities. Monte Carlo calculations were used to predict the flux and absorbed dose produced by the proposed design. The results were benchmarked by the dose rate and flux measurements taken at the facility then in use.

  4. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  5. "Influence Method" applied to measure a moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector, in the count rate of another detector when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency. The method and its detailed mathematical description were recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1]). In this article we apply it to the measurement of the moderated neutron flux produced by an 241AmBe neutron source surrounded by a light water sphere, employing a pair of 3He detectors. For this purpose, the method is extended for its application where particles arriving at the detector obey a Poisson distribution and also, for the case when efficiency is not constant over the energy spectrum of interest. Experimental distributions and derived parameters are compared with theoretical predictions of the method and implications concerning the potential application to the absolute calibration of neutron sources are considered.

  6. Neutronic calculations for a new high flux reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.; Worley, B.A.; Vondy, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has begun the design of a new high flux reactor to be used for basic research, isotope production, and material irradiation. One of the principal goals of the design is the production of a thermal flux peak in the reflector larger than 5 x 10/sup 15//cm/sup 2/sec. A theoretical analysis of the slowing-down and diffusion of neutrons produced by a spherical fission source immersed in a moderator shows that the flux per unit power is maximized by combining a very undermoderated core with a very low absorbing reflector. The theoretical model interrelates total power, power density and transport properties with the thermal flux allowing very inexpensive scoping calculations. Full scale and detailed calculations were made with a numerical model which uses the Bold Venture code system. Calculations show that a highly enriched /sup 235/U reactor with D/sub 2/O as moderator and reflector would produce the desired peak flux, and the reactor would have a reasonable core life.

  7. Determination of TFTR far-field neutron detector efficiencies by local neutron flux spectrum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, D. L.; Ascione, G.; Kugel, H. W.; Roquemore, A. L.; Barcelo, T. W.; Kumar, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron detectors have often been located on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) test cell floor 3 m or more from the vacuum vessel for ease of detector access, to reduce radiation damage, minimize count saturation problems, and to avoid high magnetic fields. These detectors include Si surface-barrier diodes, fission chambers, natural diamond detectors, and T2 production in a moderated 3He cell. To evaluate the performance of these detectors during deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation, we determined the neutron flux spectrum incident on the principal detector enclosure using nuclide sample sets containing Al, Ti, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni, Zr, Nb, In, and Au activation foils. Foils were installed and then removed after ample exposure to TFTR D-T neutrons. High efficiency, high purity Ge detectors were used for gamma spectroscopy of the irradiated foils. The incident neutron fluence and spectral distribution were unfolded from the measured results, and used to derive absolute detector efficiencies.

  8. Origin of neutron flux increases observed in correlation with lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, Leonid P.; Roussel-Dupré, Robert A.

    2007-07-01

    The past decade of research into the phenomenon of lightning has seen an accumulation of evidence for the existence of penetrating radiation (X- and γ-rays) in direct association with many forms of discharges. As a result, our basic understanding of the mechanisms that produce lightning has shifted from the present paradigm based on conventional breakdown to a picture that incorporates the acceleration and avalanche of energetic particles. Experiments conducted at high mountainous facilities in Gulmarg, India, have further confirmed the need for a paradigm shift. These measurements have shown an enhancement in neutron flux in the atmosphere in correlation with lightning electromagnetic pulses. We demonstrate here that the prevailing neutron generation theory based on synthesis of deuterium nuclei in the lightning channel is not feasible. Instead, this phenomenon is most likely connected with photonuclear reactions produced as part of the recently elaborated theory of relativistic runaway breakdown.

  9. Neutron diffraction facilities at the high flux reactor, Petten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohms, C.; Youtsos, A. G.; Bontenbal, A.; Mulder, F. M.

    2000-03-01

    The High Flux Reactor in Petten is equipped with twelve beam tubes for the extraction of thermal neutrons for applications in materials and medical science. Beam tubes HB4 and HB5 are equipped with diffractometers for residual stress and powder investigations. Recently at HB4 the Large Component Neutron Diffraction Facility has been installed. It is a unique facility with respect to its capability of handling heavy components up to 1000 kg in residual stress testing. Its basic features are described and the first applications on thick piping welds are shown. The diffractometer at HB5 can be set up for powder and stress measurements. Recent applications include temperature dependent measurements on phase transitions in intermetallic compounds and on Li ion energy storage materials.

  10. An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Matysiak, W.; Bhatia, C.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our γ-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

  11. Optimizing constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussen, Leo D.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an analytic method to optimize constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. It recasts the accepted mathematical description of resolution and intensity in terms of new variables and includes terms for vertical divergence, wavelength and some sample scattering effects. An undetermined multiplier method is applied to the revised equations to minimize the RMS value of resolution width at constant intensity and fixed wavelength. A new understanding of primary spectrometer transmission (presented elsewhere) can then be applied to choose beam elements to deliver an optimum instrument. Numerical methods can then be applied to choose the best wavelength.

  12. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  13. Experimental study on the performance of an epithermal neutron flux monitor for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xingcai; Manabe, Masanobu; Tamaki, Shingo; Liu, Shuangtong; Sato, Fuminobu; Murata, Isao; Wang, Tieshan

    2016-07-01

    The performance of an epithermal neutron (0.5eVflux monitor designed for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was experimentally studied by using a prototype monitor in an appropriate neutron field at the intense deuterium-tritium neutron source facility OKTAVIAN of Osaka University, Japan. It was convinced from the experimental results that the developed monitor worked well and the epithermal neutron fluxes in BNCT neutron sources can be measured within 5% by the monitor. PMID:27110926

  14. Mapping carbon flux uncertainty and selecting optimal locations for future flux towers in the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Y.; Howard, D.M.; Wylie, B.K.; Zhang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Flux tower networks (e. g., AmeriFlux, Agriflux) provide continuous observations of ecosystem exchanges of carbon (e. g., net ecosystem exchange), water vapor (e. g., evapotranspiration), and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term time series of flux tower data are essential for studying and understanding terrestrial carbon cycles, ecosystem services, and climate changes. Currently, there are 13 flux towers located within the Great Plains (GP). The towers are sparsely distributed and do not adequately represent the varieties of vegetation cover types, climate conditions, and geophysical and biophysical conditions in the GP. This study assessed how well the available flux towers represent the environmental conditions or "ecological envelopes" across the GP and identified optimal locations for future flux towers in the GP. Regression-based remote sensing and weather-driven net ecosystem production (NEP) models derived from different extrapolation ranges (10 and 50%) were used to identify areas where ecological conditions were poorly represented by the flux tower sites and years previously used for mapping grassland fluxes. The optimal lands suitable for future flux towers within the GP were mapped. Results from this study provide information to optimize the usefulness of future flux towers in the GP and serve as a proxy for the uncertainty of the NEP map.

  15. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations. PMID:25479433

  16. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, J.; Casoli, P.; Chappert, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  17. Comparison of HEU and LEU Fuel Neutron Spectrum for ATR Fuel Element and ATR Flux-Trap Positions

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2008-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the high total core power and high neutron flux, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. An optimized low-enriched uranium (LEU) (U-10Mo) core conversion case, which can meet the project requirements, has been selected. However, LEU contains a significant quantity of high density U-238 (80.3 wt.%), which will harden the neutron spectrum in the core region. Based on the reference ATR HEU and the optimized LEU full core plate-by-plate (PBP) models, the present work investigates and compares the neutron spectra differences in the fuel element (FE), Northeast flux trap (NEFT), Southeast flux trap (SEFT), and East flux trap (EFT) positions. A detailed PBP MCNP ATR core model was developed and validated for fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. The current ATR core with HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0wt.% was used as the reference model. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, an optimized LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and the U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt.% was used to calculate the impact of the neutron spectrum in FE and FT positions. MCNP-calculated results show that the neutron spectrum in the LEU FE is slightly harder than in the HEU FE, as expected. However, when neutrons transport through water coolant and beryllium (Be), the neutrons are thermalized to an equilibrium neutron spectrum as a function of water volume fraction in the investigated FT positions. As a result, the neutron spectrum differences of the HEU and LEU in the NEFT, SEFT, and EFT are negligible. To demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the

  18. Neutron flux and power in RTP core-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie; Zin, Muhammad Rawi Md; Usang, Mark Dennis; Bayar, Abi Muttaqin Jalal; Hamzah, Na'im Syauqi Bin

    2016-01-01

    PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. This paper describes the reactor parameters calculation for the PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP); focusing on the application of the developed reactor 3D model for criticality calculation, analysis of power and neutron flux distribution of TRIGA core. The 3D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA reactor. The model represents in detailed all important components of the core with literally no physical approximation. The consistency and accuracy of the developed RTP MCNP model was established by comparing calculations to the available experimental results and TRIGLAV code calculation.

  19. The Effects of Flux Spectrum Perturbation on Transmutation of Actinides: Optimizing the Production of Transcurium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hogle, Susan L; Maldonado, G Ivan; Alexander, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    This research presented herein involves the optimization of transcurium production in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Due to the dependence of isotope cross sections on incoming neutron energy, the efficiency with which an isotope is transmuted is highly dependent upon the flux spectrum. There are certain energy bands in which the rate of fission of transcurium production feedstock materials is minimized, relative to the rate of non-fission absorptions. It is proposed that by perturbing the flux spectrum, it is possible to increase the amount of key isotopes, such as 249Bk and 252Cf, that are produced during a transmutation cycle, relative to the consumption of feedstock material. This optimization process is carried out by developing an iterative objective framework involving problem definition, flux spectrum and cross section analysis, simulated transmutation, and analysis of final yields and transmutation parameters. It is shown that it is possible to perturb the local flux spectrum in the transcurium target by perturbing the composition of the target. It is further shown that these perturbations are able to alter the target yields in a non-negligible way. Future work is necessary to develop the optimization framework, and identify the necessary algorithms to update the problem definition based upon progress towards the optimization goals.

  20. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  1. Relationships between cosmic ray neutron flux and rain flows in dependence on different latitudes and altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, Peter; Velinov, Peter; Belov, Anatolii; Yanke, Viktor; Eroshenko, Evgenia; Mishev, Alexander; Tassev, Yordan

    A convenient tool for investigation of primary cosmic ray variations is the registration of secondary cosmic ray neutrons. A network of neutron monitors, aiming the studies of cosmic ray variations exists. At the same time cosmic ray variations may be related to some atmospheric processes. In this connection, using the data from Moskow neutron monitor (latitude 55 degree) and lead free neutron monitor at BEO Moussala (latitude 42 degree and latitude 2971 m above see level), we studied the correlations between rain flows and neutron flux. In this study we used daily averages on the basis of 10 min data for the neutron flux, corrected for barometric pressure and data for local meteo-stations. The measured data permitted to study such effect at different observation levels and latitudes. The preliminary studies permits to observe correlation between rain flows and neutron flux in several cases.

  2. Neutron flux spectra and radiation damage parameters for the Russian Bor-60 and SM-2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasiov, A.V.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to compare neutron irradiation conditions in Russian reactors and similar US facilities. Neutron fluence and spectral information and calculated radiation damage parameters are presented for the BOR-60 (Fast Experimental Reactor - 60 MW) and SM-2 reactors in Russia. Their neutron exposure characteristics are comparable with those of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (ERB-II), the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States.

  3. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  4. Constraining neutron guide optimizations with phase-space considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelsen, Mads; Lefmann, Kim

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a method named the Minimalist Principle that serves to reduce the parameter space for neutron guide optimization when the required beam divergence is limited. The reduced parameter space will restrict the optimization to guides with a minimal neutron intake that are still theoretically able to deliver the maximal possible performance. The geometrical constraints are derived using phase-space propagation from moderator to guide and from guide to sample, while assuming that the optimized guides will achieve perfect transport of the limited neutron intake. Guide systems optimized using these constraints are shown to provide performance close to guides optimized without any constraints, however the divergence received at the sample is limited to the desired interval, even when the neutron transport is not limited by the supermirrors used in the guide. As the constraints strongly limit the parameter space for the optimizer, two control parameters are introduced that can be used to adjust the selected subspace, effectively balancing between maximizing neutron transport and avoiding background from unnecessary neutrons. One parameter is needed to describe the expected focusing abilities of the guide to be optimized, going from perfectly focusing to no correlation between position and velocity. The second parameter controls neutron intake into the guide, so that one can select exactly how aggressively the background should be limited. We show examples of guides optimized using these constraints which demonstrates the higher signal to noise than conventional optimizations. Furthermore the parameter controlling neutron intake is explored which shows that the simulated optimal neutron intake is close to the analytically predicted, when assuming that the guide is dominated by multiple scattering events.

  5. Neutron Flux Characterization of Irradiation Holes for Irradiation Test at HANARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Park, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    The High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO) is a unique research reactor in the Republic of Korea, and has been used for irradiation testing since 1998. To conduct irradiation tests for nuclear materials, the irradiation holes of CT and OR5 have been used due to a high fast-neutron flux. Because the neutron flux must be accurately calculated to evaluate the neutron fluence of irradiated material, it was conducted using MCNP. The neutron flux was measured using fluence monitor wires to verify the calculated result. Some evaluations have been conducted, however, more than 20% errors have frequently occurred at the OR irradiation hole, while a good agreement between the calculated and measured data was shown at the CT irradiation hole.

  6. TORT/MCNP coupling method for the calculation of neutron flux around a core of BWR.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    For the analysis of BWR neutronics performance, accurate data are required for neutron flux distribution over the In-Reactor Pressure Vessel equipments taking into account the detailed geometrical arrangement. The TORT code can calculate neutron flux around a core of BWR in a three-dimensional geometry model, but has difficulties in fine geometrical modelling and lacks huge computer resource. On the other hand, the MCNP code enables the calculation of the neutron flux with a detailed geometry model, but requires very long sampling time to give enough number of particles. Therefore, a TORT/MCNP coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this method, the TORT code calculates angular flux distribution on the core surface and the MCNP code calculates neutron spectrum at the points of interest using the flux distribution. The coupling method will be used as the DOT-DOMINO-MORSE code system. This TORT/MCNP coupling method was applied to calculate the neutron flux at points where induced radioactivity data were measured for 54Mn and 60Co and the radioactivity calculations based on the neutron flux obtained from the above method were compared with the measured data. PMID:16604689

  7. Neutron optics optimization for the SNS EQ-SANS diffractometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui

    2012-03-01

    The extended Q-range small angle neutron scattering (EQ-SANS) diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source has recently been completed. Initial commissioning has shown that it has achieved its high intensity, low background, and wide dynamic range design goals. One of the key components that enable these performances is its neutron optics, which are extensively optimized using analytical and Monte Carlo methods. The EQ-SANS optics consist of a curved multichannel beam bender and sections of straight neutron guides on both ends of the bender. The bender and the guide are made of float glass coated with supermirror multilayers. The function of the optics is to ensure low instrument background by avoiding the direct line of sight of the neutron moderator at downstream locations, while transporting thermal and cold neutrons to the sample with maximum efficiency. In this work, the optimization of the EQ-SANS optics is presented.

  8. Neutron Optics Optimization for the SNS EQ-SANS Diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui

    2011-01-01

    The extended Q-range small angle neutron scattering (EQ-SANS) diffractometer at the Spallation Neutron Source has recently been completed. Initial commissioning has shown that it has achieved its high intensity, low background, and wide dynamic range design goals. One of the key components that enable these performances is its neutron optics, which are extensively optimized using analytical and Monte Carlo methods. The EQ-SANS optics consist of a curved multichannel beam bender and sections of straight neutron guides on both ends of the bender. The bender and the guide are made of float glass coated with supermirror multilayers. The function of the optics is to ensure low instrument background by avoiding the direct line of sight of the neutron moderator at downstream locations, while transporting thermal and cold neutrons to the sample with maximum efficiency. In this work, the optimization of the EQ-SANS optics is presented.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations for optimization of neutron shielding concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Tomasz; Tefelski, Dariusz; Polański, Aleksander; Skubalski, Janusz

    2012-06-01

    Concrete is one of the main materials used for gamma and neutron shielding. While in case of gamma rays an increase in density is usually efficient enough, protection against neutrons is more complex. The aim of this paper is to show the possibility of using the Monte Carlo codes for evaluation and optimization of concrete mix to reach better neutron shielding. Two codes (MCNPX and SPOT — written by authors) were used to simulate neutron transport through a wall made of different concretes. It is showed that concrete of higher compressive strength attenuates neutrons more effectively. The advantage of heavyweight concrete (with barite aggregate), usually used for gamma shielding, over the ordinary concrete was not so clear. Neutron shielding depends on many factors e.g. neutron energy, barrier thickness and atomic composition. All this makes a proper design of concrete as a very important issue for nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  10. Detailed flux calculations for the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    A detailed MCNP model of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor has been developed. All reactor components inside the reflector tank were included, and all components were highly segmented. Neutron and photon multigroup flux spectra have been calculated for each segment in the model, and thermal-to-fast neutron flux ratios were determined for each component segment. Axial profiles of the spectra are provided for all components of the reactor. Individual segment statistical uncertainties were limited wherever possible, and the group fluxes for all important reflector components have a standard deviation below 10%.

  11. Calculations of neutron flux spectra induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Chandler, K. C.; Barish, J.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the neutron flux induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic protons and alpha particles at solar minimum for a geomagnetic latitude of 42 N. Neutron flux spectra were calculated using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods, and various comparisons with experimental data are presented. The magnitude and shape of the calculated neutron-leakage spectrum at the particular latitude considered support the theory that the cosmic-ray-albedo-neutron-decay mechanism is the source of the protons and electrons trapped in the Van Allen belts.

  12. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  13. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  14. Metabolic Adaptation Processes That Converge to Optimal Biomass Flux Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Altafini, Claudio; Facchetti, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In simple organisms like E.coli, the metabolic response to an external perturbation passes through a transient phase in which the activation of a number of latent pathways can guarantee survival at the expenses of growth. Growth is gradually recovered as the organism adapts to the new condition. This adaptation can be modeled as a process of repeated metabolic adjustments obtained through the resilencings of the non-essential metabolic reactions, using growth rate as selection probability for the phenotypes obtained. The resulting metabolic adaptation process tends naturally to steer the metabolic fluxes towards high growth phenotypes. Quite remarkably, when applied to the central carbon metabolism of E.coli, it follows that nearly all flux distributions converge to the flux vector representing optimal growth, i.e., the solution of the biomass optimization problem turns out to be the dominant attractor of the metabolic adaptation process. PMID:26340476

  15. Upper limit to the 1-20 MeV solar neutron flux.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Ifedili, S. O.; Jenkins, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The upper limit on the quiet time solar neutron flux from 1 to 20 MeV has been measured to be less than .002 neutrons at the 95% confidence level. This result is deduced from the OGO-6 neutron detector measurements of the 'day-night' effect near the equator at low altitudes for the period from June 7 to Dec. 23, 1969. The OGO-6 detector had very low (less than 4%) counting rate contributions from locally produced neutrons in the detecting system and the spacecraft and from charged-particle interactions in the neutron sensor.

  16. The Experimental Determination of Thermal Neutron Flux in the Radiochemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Patrick M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment for determining the thermal neutron flux of the light-water nuclear reactor at the University of California, Irvine. The difficulty of the activity can be varied to match the student's level of proficiency. (SL)

  17. Neutron-flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, M.K.; Valentine, K.H.

    1981-09-15

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occurred. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  18. Abnormal changes in the density of thermal neutron flux in biocenoses near the earth surface.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, N V; Smirnov, A N; Kolesnikov, M V; Semenov, D S; Frolov, V A; Lapshin, V B; Syroeshkin, A V

    2007-04-01

    We revealed an increase in the density of thermal neutron flux in forest biocenoses, which was not associated with astrogeophysical events. The maximum spike of this parameter in the biocenosis reached 10,000 n/(sec x m2). Diurnal pattern of the density of thermal neutron flux depended only on the type of biocenosis. The effects of biomodulation of corpuscular radiation for balneology are discussed. PMID:18214289

  19. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  20. Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kononov, O.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Bokhovko, M.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Soloviev, A.N.; Chu, W.T.

    2004-02-20

    A modeling investigation was performed to choose moderator material and size for creating optimal epithermal neutron beams for BNCT based on a proton accelerator and the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutrons source. An optimal configuration is suggested for the beam shaping assembly made from polytetrafluoroethylene and magnesium fluorine. Results of calculation were experimentally tested and are in good agreement with measurements.

  1. Combined analysis of neutron and photon flux measurements for the Jules Horowitz reactor core mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J. P.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J. Y.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Merroun, O.; Brun, J.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the combined analysis of nuclear measurements to improve the knowledge of the irradiation conditions in the experimental locations of the future Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The goal of the present work is to measure more accurately neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating in the reactor. In a Material Testing Reactor (MTR), nuclear heating is a crucial parameter to design the experimental devices to be irradiated in harsh nuclear conditions. This parameter drives the temperature of the devices and of the samples. The numerical codes can predict this parameter but in-situ measurements are necessary to reach the expected accuracy. For this reason, one objective of the IN-CORE program [1] is to study the combined measurements of neutron and photon flux and their cross advanced interpretation. It should be reminded that both neutron and photon sensors are not totally selective as their signals are due to neutron and photon interactions. We intend to measure the neutron flux by three different kinds of sensors (Uranium Fission chamber, Plutonium Fission chamber and Self Powered Neutron Detector), the photon flux by two different sensors (Ionization chamber and Self Powered Gamma Detector) and the nuclear heating by two different ones (Differential calorimeter and Gamma Thermometer). For the same parameter, we expect that the use of different kinds of sensors will allow a better estimation of the aimed parameter by mixing different spectrum responses and different neutron and gamma contributions. An experimental test called CARMEN-1 is scheduled in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France) at the end of 2011, with the goal to map irradiation locations in the reactor reflector to get a first validation of the analysis model. This article focuses on the sensor selection for CARMEN-1 experiment and to the way to link neutron and photon flux measurements in view to reduce their uncertainties but also to better assess the neutron and photon contributions to nuclear

  2. Simulation of the Performance of a Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, R.; Greene, Geoffrey L; Koehler, Paul Edward; Cianciolo, Vince

    2005-05-01

    We study the expected performance of the proposed fundamental neutron physics beamline at the upgraded High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A curved neutron guide transmits the neutrons from the new cold source into a guide hall. A novel feature of the proposed guide is the use of vertical focusing to increase the flux for experiments that require relatively small cross-section beams. We use the simulation code IB to model straight, multi-channel curved, and tapered guides of various m values. Guide performance for the current NPDGamma and proposed abBA experiments is evaluated.

  3. Flux and dose transmission through concrete of neutrons from proton induced reactions on various target elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Nandy, Maitreyee; Roy, S. N.; Sarkar, P. K.

    2004-12-01

    Simple empirical expressions for transmission of flux and dose through concrete are presented for neutrons from proton induced reactions. For this purpose the neutron emission from different targets in proton induced reactions in the energy range 25-200 MeV have been considered. The calculated effective dose outside a concrete shield shows overall good agreement with the effective dose estimated from measured neutron flux in the framework of the Moyer model. The calculated effective attenuation length shows a rising trend with incident proton energy and shield thickness.

  4. Simulation of the Performance of a Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Mahurin, Rob; Greene, Geoffrey; Kohler, Paul; Cianciolo, Vince

    2005-01-01

    We study the expected performance of the proposed fundamental neutron physics beamline at the upgraded High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A curved neutron guide transmits the neutrons from the new cold source into a guide hall. A novel feature of the proposed guide is the use of vertical focussing to increase the flux for experiments that require relatively small cross-section beams. We use the simulation code IB to model straight, multi-channel curved, and tapered guides of various m values. Guide performance for the current NPDGamma and proposed abBA experiments is evaluated. PMID:27308114

  5. Investigation of flux line lattices by SANS with unpolarized and polarized neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Ted; Lycett, Richard J.; Bowell, Charlotte; Charalambous, Demetris; Farago, Bela; Laver, Mark; Cubitt, Bob; Dewhurst, Charles

    2007-07-01

    We have investigated flux lines in low- and high- Tc superconductors using unpolarized and polarized neutron techniques. In high- Tc materials, we observe transitions from triangular to square flux line lattices (FLLs) which probably represent the effects of d-wave pairing. In niobium, a supposedly ‘conventional’ superconductor, even more FLL phase transitions can be observed, into structures which spontaneously break the crystal symmetry. Observations of polarized neutron scattering intensities from niobium with a high density of pinning centers show the effects of pinning on the spin-dependence of the signal. Other possible applications of polarized neutrons scattering from the FLL are mentioned.

  6. Simulation of the Performance of a Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor.

    PubMed

    Mahurin, Rob; Greene, Geoffrey; Kohler, Paul; Cianciolo, Vince

    2005-01-01

    We study the expected performance of the proposed fundamental neutron physics beamline at the upgraded High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A curved neutron guide transmits the neutrons from the new cold source into a guide hall. A novel feature of the proposed guide is the use of vertical focussing to increase the flux for experiments that require relatively small cross-section beams. We use the simulation code IB to model straight, multi-channel curved, and tapered guides of various m values. Guide performance for the current NPDGamma and proposed abBA experiments is evaluated. PMID:27308114

  7. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Croci, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Gorini, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-08-21

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  8. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Rebai, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Pasqualotto, R.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Tollin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Gorini, G.

    2014-08-01

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  9. Conformity Between LR0 Mock-Ups and Vvers Npp Rpv Neutron Flux Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Sergey; Ilieva, Krassimira; Kirilova, Desislava

    2009-08-01

    The conformity of the mock-up results and those for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of nuclear power plants (NPP) has been evaluated in order to qualify if the mock-ups data could be used for benchmark's purpose only, or/and for simulating of the NPP irradiation conditions. Neutron transport through the vessel has been calculated by the three-dimensional discrete ordinate code TORT with problem oriented multigroup energy neutron cross-section library BGL. Neutron flux/fluence and spectrum shape represented by normalized group neutron fluxes in the multigroup energy structure, for neutrons with energy above 0.5 MeV, have been used for conformity analysis. It has been demonstrated that the relative difference of the attenuation factor as well as the group neutron fluxes did not exceed 10% at all considered positions for VVER-440. For VVER-1000, it has been obtained the same consistency, except for the location behind the RPV. The neutron flux attenuation behind the RPV is 18% higher than the mock-up attenuation. It has been shown that this difference arises from the dissimilarity of the biological shielding. The obtained results have demonstrated that the VVERs' mock-ups are appropriate for simulating the NPP irradiation conditions. The mock-up results for VVER-1000 have to be applied more carefully i.e. taking into account the existing peculiarity of the biological shielding and RPV attenuation azimuthal dependence.

  10. Operation Hardtack. Project 2. 6. Neutron flux from very-high-altitude bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Hanscome, T.D.; Alers, P.B.; Caldwell, P.A.; Drachman, R.J.; Gorbics, S.G.

    1985-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to measure neutron flux and gamma-ray flux versus range and time from missile-borne, megaton nuclear detonations at high altitudes by means of instrumented pods that were to be ejected, during the missile thrust period, at times that were selected to position the pods at predetermined distances from the burst. Specific objectives were: (1) neutron flux versus time was to be measured at each of three pod positions during each shot and (2) a measurement of gamma-ray dose rate versus time was sought from each pod during each shot.

  11. Boron neutron capture enhancement (BNCE) of fast neutron irradiation for glioblastoma: increase of thermal neutron flux with heavy material collimation, a theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Paquis, P; Pignol, J P; Lonjon, M; Brassart, N; Courdi, A; Chauvel, P; Grellier, P; Chatel, M

    1999-01-01

    Despite the fact that fast neutron irradiation of glioblastoma has shown on autopsies an ability to sterilize tumors, no therapeutic windows have been found for these particles due to their toxicity toward normal brain. Therefore, the Boron Neutron Capture Enhancement (BNCE) of fast neutron beam has been suggested. This paper addresses the problem of fast neutron beam collimation, which induces a dramatic decrease of the thermal neutron flux in the depth of the tissues when smaller irradiation fields are used. Thermoluminescent dosimeter TLD-600 and TLD-700 were used to determine the thermal neutron flux within a Plexiglas phantom irradiated under the Nice Biomedical Cyclotron p(60)+Be(32) fast neutron beam. A BNCE of 4.6% in physical dose was determined for a 10 x 10 cm2 field, and of 10.4% for a 20 x 20 cm2 one. A Dose Modification Factor of 1.19 was calculated for CAL 58 glioblastoma cells irradiated thanks to the larger field. In order to increase the thermal flux in depth while shaping the beam, heavy material collimation was studied with Monte Carlo simulations using coupled FLUKA and MCNP-4A codes. The use of 20 cm width lead blocks allowed a 2 fold thermal neutron flux increase in the depth of the phantom, while shielding the fast neutron beam with a fast neutron dose transmission of 23%. Using the DMF of 1.19, a BNCE of 40% was calculated in the beam axis. This enhancement might be sufficient to open, at least theoretically, a therapeutic window. PMID:10222419

  12. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. A.; Zubarev, P. V.; Ivanenko, S. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Puryga, E. A.; Shvyrev, V. G.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL-3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL-3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of 137Cs and 252Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented.

  13. Optimization of a uranyl nitrate passive neutron counter

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Eric Benton; Bracken, David; West, James; Freeman, Corey; Newell, Matthew R; Bourret, Steven C; Rothrock, Richard B; Ladd - Lively, Jennifer L; Schuh, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding natural uranium as it enters the fuel cycle has become a priority for the safeguards community in recent years. Uranyl nitrate is a material of interest in this endeavor because it is normally a step in the process from converting uranium ores to more concentrated forms like UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This paper will detail the improvements and design optimizations made for a uranyl nitrate neutron detector. The original design of the detector was based on standard neutron counter designs and featured 2 rings of He-3 tubes fully moderated and shielded from background. Several areas for enhancement were identified after months of testing in three different locations. An operating uranyl nitrate facility was included as one of the test locations. Three significant upgrades to the counter addressed in the redesign were: real time background detection, counter reliability improvements, and optimization of the detector design for the detection of neutrons emitted by the uranyl nitrate flowing through the monitored process pipe. The optimized detector design includes significant electronics upgrades, the ability to detect neutrons (background and signal) with 36 degree spatial resolution around the process pipe for signal and 45 degree spatial resolution for background, inner and outer rings of He-3 tubes for real time background corrections, and notably more reliable cabling. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) modeling was used to optimize the signal (neutrons from uranyl nitrate in the monitored process pipe) to noise (background neutrons from all sources) ratio of the inner ring of He-3 tubes. Additionally, MCNP modeling maximized noise to signal on the outer ring of He-3 tubes. Details of the detector optimization as well as all the additional detector enhancements will be discussed. The neutron counter will be field tested on the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  14. Intensity modulated neutron radiotherapy optimization by photon proxy

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Michael; Hammoud, Ahmad; Bossenberger, Todd; Spink, Robyn; Burmeister, Jay

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Introducing intensity modulation into neutron radiotherapy (IMNRT) planning has the potential to mitigate some normal tissue complications seen in past neutron trials. While the hardware to deliver IMNRT plans has been in use for several years, until recently the IMNRT planning process has been cumbersome and of lower fidelity than conventional photon plans. Our in-house planning system used to calculate neutron therapy plans allows beam weight optimization of forward planned segments, but does not provide inverse optimization capabilities. Commercial treatment planning systems provide inverse optimization capabilities, but currently cannot model our neutron beam. Methods: We have developed a methodology and software suite to make use of the robust optimization in our commercial planning system while still using our in-house planning system to calculate final neutron dose distributions. Optimized multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions for segments designed in the commercial system using a 4 MV photon proxy beam are translated into static neutron ports that can be represented within our in-house treatment planning system. The true neutron dose distribution is calculated in the in-house system and then exported back through the MATLAB software into the commercial treatment planning system for evaluation. Results: The planning process produces optimized IMNRT plans that reduce dose to normal tissue structures as compared to 3D conformal plans using static MLC apertures. The process involves standard planning techniques using a commercially available treatment planning system, and is not significantly more complex than conventional IMRT planning. Using a photon proxy in a commercial optimization algorithm produces IMNRT plans that are more conformal than those previously designed at our center and take much less time to create. Conclusions: The planning process presented here allows for the optimization of IMNRT plans by a commercial treatment planning

  15. SNM Detection with an Optimized Water Cherenkov Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, S.; Sweany, M.; Bernstein, A.

    2012-07-23

    Special Nuclear Material (SNM) can either spontaneously fission or be induced to do so: either case results in neutron emission. For this reason, neutron detection performs a crucial role in the functionality of Radiation Portal Monitoring (RPM) devices. Since neutrons are highly penetrating and difficult to shield, they could potentially be detected escaping even a well-shielded cargo container. If the shielding were sophisticated, detecting escaping neutrons would require a highly efficient detector with close to full solid angle coverage. In 2008, we reported the successful detection of neutrons with a 250 liter (l) gadolinium doped water Cherenkov prototype—a technology that could potentially be employed cost effectively with full solid angle coverage. More recently we have built and tested both 1-kl and 3.5-kl versions, demonstrating that very large, cost effective, non-flammable and environmentally benign neutron detectors can be operated efficiently without being overwhelmed by background. In our paper, we present a new design for a modular system of water-based neutron detectors that could be deployed as a real RPM. The modules contain a number of optimizations that have not previously been combined within a single system. We present simulations of the new system, based on the performance of our previous detectors. These simulations indicate that an optimized system such as is presented here could achieve SNM sensitivity competitive with a large 3He-based system. Moreover, the realization of large, cost effective neutron detectors could, for the first time, enable the detection of multiple neutrons per fission from within a large object such as a cargo container. Such a signal would provide a robust indication of the presence of fissioning material, reducing the frequency of false alarms while increasing sensitivity.

  16. SNM Detection with an Optimized Water Cherenkov Neutron Detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dazeley, S.; Sweany, M.; Bernstein, A.

    2012-07-23

    Special Nuclear Material (SNM) can either spontaneously fission or be induced to do so: either case results in neutron emission. For this reason, neutron detection performs a crucial role in the functionality of Radiation Portal Monitoring (RPM) devices. Since neutrons are highly penetrating and difficult to shield, they could potentially be detected escaping even a well-shielded cargo container. If the shielding were sophisticated, detecting escaping neutrons would require a highly efficient detector with close to full solid angle coverage. In 2008, we reported the successful detection of neutrons with a 250 liter (l) gadolinium doped water Cherenkov prototype—a technology thatmore » could potentially be employed cost effectively with full solid angle coverage. More recently we have built and tested both 1-kl and 3.5-kl versions, demonstrating that very large, cost effective, non-flammable and environmentally benign neutron detectors can be operated efficiently without being overwhelmed by background. In our paper, we present a new design for a modular system of water-based neutron detectors that could be deployed as a real RPM. The modules contain a number of optimizations that have not previously been combined within a single system. We present simulations of the new system, based on the performance of our previous detectors. These simulations indicate that an optimized system such as is presented here could achieve SNM sensitivity competitive with a large 3He-based system. Moreover, the realization of large, cost effective neutron detectors could, for the first time, enable the detection of multiple neutrons per fission from within a large object such as a cargo container. Such a signal would provide a robust indication of the presence of fissioning material, reducing the frequency of false alarms while increasing sensitivity.« less

  17. Neutron beam optimization based on a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for treatment of deep-seated brain tumors by BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra Ahmadi, Ganjeh; S. Farhad, Masoudi

    2014-10-01

    Neutron beam optimization for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is investigated using a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. Design and optimization have been carried out for the target, cooling system, moderator, filter, reflector, and collimator to achieve a high flux of epithermal neutron and satisfy the IAEA criteria. Also, the performance of the designed beam in tissue is assessed by using a simulated Snyder head phantom. The results show that the optimization of the collimator and reflector is critical to finding the best neutron beam based on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. Our designed beam has 2.49×109n/cm2s epithermal neutron flux and is suitable for BNCT of deep-seated brain tumors.

  18. Verification and validation of the maximum entropy method of moment reconstruction of energy dependent neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Douglas Spencer

    Verification and Validation of reconstructed neutron flux based on the maximum entropy method, is presented in this paper. The verification is carried out by comparing the neutron flux spectrum from the maximum entropy method with Monte Carlo N Particle 5 version 1.40 (MCNP5) and Attila-7.1.0-beta (Attila). A spherical 100% 235U critical assembly is modeled as the test case to compare the three methods. The verification error range for the maximum entropy method is 15% to 23% where MCNP5 is taken to be the comparison standard. Attila relative error for the critical assembly is 20% to 35%. Validation is accomplished by comparing a neutron flux spectrum that is back calculated from foil activation measurements performed in the GODIVA experiment (GODIVA). The error range of the reconstructed flux compared to GODIVA is 0%-10%. The error range of the neutron flux spectrum from MCNP5 compared to GODIVA is 0%-20% and the Attila error range compared to the GODIVA is 0%-35%. The maximum entropy method for reconstructing flux is shown to be a fast reliable method, compared to either Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) or 30 multienergy group methods (Attila) and with respect to the GODIVA experiment.

  19. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  20. Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Optimized thermal neutron source for neutron radiography with a static DIANE device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzeau, S.; Huet, J.; Huriet, J. R.; Le Tourneur, P.

    1993-06-01

    The mobile neutron radiography DIANE device presented during the previous Denton accelerator conference and operating at Loral Vought Systems Corporation (USA) and IABG (Germany) is now also developed as a static device with a high resolution channel for parts inspection. For this purpose an optimized moderator has been designed which allows improvement in the thermal neutron flow. The theoretical approach and first experimental results are presented.

  2. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Riemer, Bernard W.

    2013-12-15

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter)

  3. Optimizing moderator dimensions for neutron scattering at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J K; Robertson, J L; Herwig, Kenneth W; Gallmeier, Franz X; Riemer, Bernard W

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). In a recent study of the planned second target station at the SNS facility, we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter over a smaller viewing area. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories: those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. For instruments using natural collimation, the optimal moderator selection depends on the size of the moderator, the sample, and the moderator brightness. The desired beam divergence only plays a role in determining the distance between sample and moderator. For instruments using neutron optical systems, the smallest moderator available that is larger than the entrance dimension of the closest optical element will perform the best (assuming, as is the case here that smaller moderators are brighter). PMID:24387465

  4. Experimental neutron flux measurements with a diamond detector at the QUINTA setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlev, A. I.; Rodionov, N. B.; Tyutyunnikov, S. I.; Amosov, V. N.; Meshchaninov, S. A.; Yudin, I. P.

    2016-05-01

    The operational capability of a diamond detector used to measure the neutron spectrum by the response function on the QUINTA setup [1] installed at the proton beam of the phasotron [2] (Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) was demonstrated in the energy interval of 2.1-20 MeV. The neutron-flux count rate was measured. The energy of neutrons was estimated at 7.4-25.7 MeV based on the diamond-detector response spectrum. The dependence of the diamond-detector response spectra on the angle between the proton beam and the line going through the detector and the center of the QUINTA setup was investigated. The angular anisotropy of the neutron flux was demonstrated. Measurements at different distances from the detector to the QUINTA setup were performed.

  5. Progress on performance assessment of ITER enhanced heat flux first wall technology after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, T.; Bao, L.; Barabash, V.; Chappuis, Ph; Eaton, R.; Escourbiac, F.; Giqcuel, S.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Raffray, R.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Wirtz, M.; Boomstra, D.; Magielsen, A.; Chen, J.; Wang, P.; Gervash, A.; Safronov, V.

    2016-02-01

    ITER first wall (FW) panels are irradiated by energetic neutrons during the nuclear phase. Thus, an irradiation and high heat flux testing programme is undertaken by the ITER organization in order to evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation on the performance of enhanced heat flux (EHF) FW components. The test campaign includes neutron irradiation (up to 0.6-0.8 dpa at 200 °C-250 °C) of mock-ups that are representative of the final EHF FW panel design, followed by thermal fatigue tests (up to 4.7 MW m-2). Mock-ups were manufactured by the same manufacturing process as proposed for the series production. After a pre-irradiation thermal screening, eight mock-ups will be selected for the irradiation campaigns. This paper reports the preparatory work of HHF tests and neutron irradiation, assessment results as well as a brief description of mock-up manufacturing and inspection routes.

  6. Altitude and latitude variations in avionics SEU and atmospheric neutron flux

    SciTech Connect

    Normand, E.; Baker, T.J. )

    1993-12-01

    The direct cause of single event upsets in SRAMs at aircraft altitudes by the atmospheric neutrons has previously been documented. The variation of the in-flight SEU rate with latitude is demonstrated by new data over a wide range of geographical locations. New measurements and models of the atmospheric neutron flux are also evaluated to characterize its variation with altitude, latitude and solar activity.

  7. The prototype of a detector for monitoring the cosmic radiation neutron flux on ground

    SciTech Connect

    Lelis Goncalez, Odair; Federico, Claudio Antonio; Mendes Prado, Adriane Cristina; Galhardo Vaz, Rafael; Tizziani Pazzianotto, Mauricio

    2013-05-06

    This work presents a comparison between the results of experimental tests and Monte Carlo simulations of the efficiency of a detector prototype for on-ground monitoring the cosmic radiation neutron flux. The experimental tests were made using one conventional {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source in several incidence angles and the results were compared to that ones obtained with a Monte Carlo simulation made with MCNPX Code.

  8. The effect of craters on the lunar neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eke, V. R.; Bower, K. E.; Diserens, S.; Ryder, M.; Yeomans, P. E. L.; Teodoro, L. F. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Hermalyn, B.; Lavelle, C. M.; Lawrence, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    The variation of remotely sensed neutron count rates is measured as a function of cratercentric distance using data from the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer. The count rate, stacked over many craters, peaks over the crater center, has a minimum near the crater rim, and at larger distances, it increases to a mean value that is up to 1% lower than the mean count rate observed over the crater. A simple model is presented, based upon an analytical topographical profile for the stacked craters fitted to data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter. The effect of topography coupled with neutron beaming from the surface largely reproduces the observed count rate profiles. However, a model that better fits the observations can be found by including the additional freedom to increase the neutron emissivity of the crater area by ˜0.35% relative to the unperturbed surface. It is unclear what might give rise to this effect, but it may relate to additional surface roughness in the vicinities of craters. The amplitude of the crater-related signal in the neutron count rate is small, but not too small to demand consideration when inferring water-equivalent hydrogen (WEH) weight percentages in polar permanently shaded regions (PSRs). If the small crater-wide count rate excess is concentrated into a much smaller PSR, then it can lead to a large bias in the inferred WEH weight percentage. For instance, it may increase the inferred WEH for Cabeus crater at the Moon's south pole from ˜1% to ˜4%.

  9. Optimizing Moderator Dimensions for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui; Robertson, Lee; Herwig, Kenneth W; Gallmeier, Franz X; Riemer, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  10. COMPTEL measurements of the omnidirectional high-energy neutron flux in near-earth orbit.

    PubMed

    Morris, D J; Aarts, H; Bennett, K; Lockwood, J A; McConnell, M L; Ryan, J M; Schonfelder, V; Steinle, H; Weidenspointner, G

    1998-01-01

    On four occasions, twice in 1991 (near solar maximum) and twice in 1994 (near solar minimum), one COMPTEL D1 detector module was used as an omnidirectional detector to measure the high-energy (> 12.8 MeV) neutron flux near an altitude of 450 km. The D1 modules are cylindrical, with radius 13.8 cm and depth 8 cm, and are filled with liquid scintillator (NE213A). The combined flux measurements can be fit reasonably well by a product of the Mt. Washington neutron monitor rate, a linear function in the spacecraft geocenter zenith angle, and an exponential function of the vertical geomagnetic cutoff rigidity in which the coefficient of the rigidity is a linear function of the neutron monitor rate. When pointed at the nadir, the flux is consistent with that expected from the atmospheric neutron albedo alone. When pointed at the zenith the flux is reduced by a factor of about 0.54. Thus the production of secondary neutrons in the massive (16000 kg) Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory spacecraft is negligible. Rather, the mass of the spacecraft provides shielding from the earth albedo. PMID:11542901

  11. Design Optimization for a Maglev System Employing Flux Eliminating Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davey, Kent R.

    1996-01-01

    Flux eliminating coils have received no little attention over the past thirty years as an alternative for realizing lift in a MAGLEV system. When the magnets on board the vehicle are displaced from the equilibrium or null flux point of these coils, they induce current in those coils which act to restore the coil to its null flux or centerline position. The question being addressed in this paper is that of how to choose the best coil for a given system. What appears at first glance to be an innocent question is in fact one that is actually quite involved, encompassing both the global economics and physics of the system. The real key in analyzing that question is to derive an optimization index or functional which represents the cost of the system subject to constraints, the primary constraint being that the vehicle lift itself at a certain threshold speed. Outlined in this paper is one scenario for realizing a total system design which uses sequential quadratic programming techniques.

  12. Comparison of three-dimensional neutron flux calculations for Maine Yankee

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Crotzer, L.A.; Waters, L.S.; Parsons, D.K.; Alcouffe, R.E.; Spinney, K.B.; Cacciapouti, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Calculations have been performed on the Maine Yankee Power Plant to obtain three-dimensional neutron fluxes using the spatial synthesis with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT, the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code THREEDANT and the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP. Neutron fluxes are compared for energies above 0.1 MeV and 1.0 MeV as well as dpa. Results were obtained at the Yankee dosimetry locations and special test regions within the pressure vessel, in the reactor cavity, and in a shield tank detector well.

  13. Digital Real-Time Multiple Channel Multiple Mode Neutron Flux Estimation on FPGA-based Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenin, Mathieu; Barbot, Loïc; Corre, Gwénolé; Woo, Romuald; Destouches, Christophe; Normand, Stéphane

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a complete custom full-digital instrumentation device that was designed for real-time neutron flux estimation, especially for nuclear reactor in-core measurement using subminiature Fission Chambers (FCs). Entire fully functional small-footprint design (about 1714 LUTs) is implemented on FPGA. It enables real-time acquisition and analysis of multiple channels neutron's flux both in counting mode and Campbelling mode. Experimental results obtained from this brand new device are consistent with simulation results and show good agreement within good uncertainty. This device paves the way for new applications perspectives in real-time nuclear reactor monitoring.

  14. Bayesian Statistical Analysis Applied to NAA Data for Neutron Flux Spectrum Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, D.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present a statistical method, based on Bayesian statistics, to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum from the activation data of different isotopes. The experimental data were acquired during a neutron activation analysis (NAA) experiment [A. Borio di Tigliole et al., Absolute flux measurement by NAA at the Pavia University TRIGA Mark II reactor facilities, ENC 2012 - Transactions Research Reactors, ISBN 978-92-95064-14-0, 22 (2012)] performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of Pavia University (Italy). In order to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum, subdivided in energy groups, we must solve a system of linear equations containing the grouped cross sections and the activation rate data. We solve this problem with Bayesian statistical analysis, including the uncertainties of the coefficients and the a priori information about the neutron flux. A program for the analysis of Bayesian hierarchical models, based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, is used to define the problem statistical model and solve it. The energy group fluxes and their uncertainties are then determined with great accuracy and the correlations between the groups are analyzed. Finally, the dependence of the results on the prior distribution choice and on the group cross section data is investigated to confirm the reliability of the analysis.

  15. Optimization of a moderator-neutron guide system for diffractometers of beam line 7A of the IBR-2M reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoshin, S. A.; Belushkin, A. V.; Kulikov, S. A.; Shabalin, E. P.; Walther, K.; Scheffzuek, C.; Zhuravlev, V. V.

    2009-09-01

    Neutron guides are widely used to transport the neutrons from the moderator to the sample. Due to the constructive features of the ring corridor of the fast pulsed reactor IBR-2, the minimal distance between the moderator and the guide entrance is around 6 m. The main goal of the paper is to optimize the neutron optical system between the moderator and the entrance of the new neutron guides. Using Monte Carlo simulations we calculate the possible best gain of the neutron flux density at the guide exit. After the described optimization process, the optimal system is obtained. The recommendations for construction of the new beam line are provided too. Similar technique and the proposed system could be easily adapted for another similar beam line at the neutron sources.

  16. Neutron Flux Spectra Determination by Multiple Foil Activation - Iterative Method.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-07-08

    Version 00 Neutron energy spectra are determined by an analysis of experimental activation detector data. As with the original CCC-112/SAND-II program, which was developed at Air Force Weapons Laboratory, this code system consists of four modules, CSTAPE, SLACTS, SLATPE, and SANDII. The first three modules pre-process the dosimetry cross sections and the trial function spectrum library. The last module, SANDII, actually performs the iterative spectrum characterization.

  17. Computer simulation tests of optimized neutron powder diffractometer configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussen, L. D.; Lieutenant, K.

    2016-06-01

    Recent work has developed a new mathematical approach to optimally choose beam elements for constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. This article compares Monte Carlo computer simulations of existing instruments with simulations of instruments using configurations chosen using the new approach. The simulations show that large performance improvements over current best practice are possible. The tests here are limited to instruments optimized for samples with a cubic structure which differs from the optimization for triclinic structure samples. A novel primary spectrometer design is discussed and simulation tests show that it performs as expected and allows a single instrument to operate flexibly over a wide range of measurement resolution.

  18. A neutron pinhole camera for PF-24 source: Conceptual design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielecki, J.; Wójcik-Gargula, A.; Wiacek, U.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Drozdowicz, K.; Woźnicka, U.

    2015-07-01

    A fast-neutron pinhole camera based on small-area (5mm × 5 mm) BCF-12 scintillation detectors with nanosecond time resolution has been designed. The pinhole camera is dedicated to the investigation of the spatial and temporal distributions of DD neutrons from the Plasma Focus (PF-24) source. The geometrical parameters of the camera have been optimized in terms of maximum neutron flux at the imaging plane by means of MCNP calculations. The detection system consists of four closely packed scintillation detectors coupled via long optical fibres to Hamamatsu H3164-10 photomultiplier tubes. The pinhole consists of specially designed 420 mm long copper collimator with an effective aperture of 1.7 mm mounted inside a cylindrical polyethylene tube. The performance of the presented detection system in the mixed (hard X-ray and neutron) radiation field of the PF-24 plasma focus device has been tested. The results of the tests showed that the small-area BCF-12 scintillation detectors can be successfully applied as the detection system of the neutron pinhole camera for the PF-24 device.

  19. Simulations towards optimization of a neutron/anti-neutron oscillation experiment at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Matthew; Kamyshkov, Yuri; Castellanos, Luis; Klinkby, Esben; US NNbar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The observation of Neutron/Anti-neutron oscillation would prove the existence of Baryon Number Violation (BNV), and thus an explanation for the dominance of matter over anti-matter in the universe. The latest experiments have shown the oscillation time to be greater than 8.6 x 107 seconds, whereas current theoretical predictions suggest times on the order of 108 to 109 seconds. A neutron oscillation experiment proposed at the European Spallation Source (ESS) would provide sensitivity of more than 1000 times previous experiments performed, thus providing a result well-suited to confirm or deny current theory. A conceptual design of the proposed experiment will be presented, as well as the optimization of key experiment components using Monte-Carlo simulation methods, including the McStas neutron ray-trace simulation package. This work is supported by the Organized Research Units Program funded by The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Office of Research and Engagement.

  20. Optimization of Depletion Modeling and Simulation for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Betzler, Benjamin R; Ade, Brian J; Chandler, David; Ilas, Germina; Sunny, Eva E

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo based depletion tools used for the high-fidelity modeling and simulation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) come at a great computational cost; finding sufficient approximations is necessary to make the use of these tools feasible. The optimization of the neutronics and depletion model for the HFIR is based on two factors: (i) the explicit representation of the involute fuel plates with sets of polyhedra and (ii) the treatment of depletion mixtures and control element position during depletion calculations. A very fine representation (i.e., more polyhedra in the involute plate approximation) does not significantly improve simulation accuracy. The recommended representation closely represents the physical plates and ensures sufficient fidelity in regions with high flux gradients. Including the fissile targets in the central flux trap of the reactor as depletion mixtures has the greatest effect on the calculated cycle length, while localized effects (e.g., the burnup of specific isotopes or the power distribution evolution over the cycle) are more noticeable consequences of including a critical control element search or depleting burnable absorbers outside the fuel region.

  1. A unique method of neutron flux determination from experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, Frank A.

    1998-12-01

    A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

  2. Transmission Probability Code System for Calculating Neutron Flux Distributions in Hexagonal Geometry.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-01-25

    Version 00 TPHEX calculates the multigroup neutron flux distribution in an assembly of hexagonal cells using a transmission probability (interface current) method. It is primarily intended for calculations on hexagonal LWR fuel assemblies but can be used for other purposes subject to the qualifications mentioned in Restrictions/Limitations.

  3. Computer program calculates gamma ray source strengths of materials exposed to neutron fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiser, P. C.; Ricks, L. O.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program contains an input library of nuclear data for 44 elements and their isotopes to determine the induced radioactivity for gamma emitters. Minimum input requires the irradiation history of the element, a four-energy-group neutron flux, specification of an alloy composition by elements, and selection of the output.

  4. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  5. Flux pinning in neutron irradiated YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x

    SciTech Connect

    Lessure, H.A.; Simizu, S.; Baumert, B.A.; Sankar, S.G.; McHenry, M.E. ); Maley, M.P.; Cost, J.R.; Willis, J.O. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on identical polycrystalline samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} irradiated with fast neutrons (E {gt} 0.1 MeV) in eight steps between 0 and 2.1 {times} 10{sup 18} n/cm{sup 2}. Notable irradiation effects include a T{sub c} depression of nearly 2 K at the highest fluence and large improvement in the critical current density for fields from 0-9 T and temperatures between 4-80 K. Critical currents approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2} are observed for optimally irradiated materials at 5K (in zero field) while at 77 K, J{sub c} (O kOe) approaches 5 {times} 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}. Irradiation is seen to take a nearly equilibrium magnetization curve at 77 K and broaden it to a significantly hysteretic curve. A substantial shift in the effective pinning potential as a function of current density is inferred from magnetic relaxation measurements at H = 1T. This is the first such measurement in which systematically increased activation energies for flux creep (as a function of current density) are noted.

  6. MONDO: A neutron tracker for particle therapy secondary emission fluxes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafini, M.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Spiriti, E.

    2016-07-01

    Cancer treatment is performed, in Particle Therapy, using accelerated charged particles whose high irradiation precision and conformity allows the tumor destruction while sparing the surrounding healthy tissues. Dose release monitoring devices using photons and charged particles produced by the beam interaction with the patient body have already been proposed, but no attempt based on the detection of the abundant secondary radiation neutron component has been made yet. The reduced attenuation length of neutrons yields a secondary particle sample that is larger in number when compared to photons and charged particles. Furthermore, neutrons allow for a backtracking of the emission point that is not affected by multiple scattering. Since neutrons can release a significant dose far away from the tumor region, a precise measurement of their flux, production energy and angle distributions is eagerly needed in order to improve the Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) software, so to predict not only the normal tissue toxicity in the target region but also the risk of late complications in the whole body. All the aforementioned issues underline the importance for an experimental effort devoted to the precise characterization of the neutron production gaining experimental access both to the emission point and production energy. The technical challenges posed by a neutron detector aiming for a high detection efficiency and good backtracking precision will be addressed within the MONDO (MOnitor for Neutron Dose in hadrOntherapy) project. The MONDO's main goal is to develop a tracking detector targeting fast and ultrafast secondary neutrons. The tracker is composed by a scintillating fiber matrix (4 × 4 × 8cm3). The full reconstruction of protons, produced in elastic interactions, will be used to measure energy and direction of the impinging neutron. The neutron tracker will measure the neutron production yields, as a function of production angle and energy, using different

  7. Improving Epithermal Transmission Measurements by Optimizing Neutron Production and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piela, Sean Garrigan

    Methods of improving the neutron count rate in the energy range 3 to 100-300 [keV] at the 100 [m] detector station for the Gaerttner LINAC Center were studied. One part of this undertaking was the explore alterations to the main photonuclear target used for this energy range. Detailed simulations using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP, version 5) were carried out and the results used to synthesize an optimized target design. Simulation predicted a gain in neutron intensity of 1.63 at 4.49 [keV], above the current target capability. Experiment found a gain of 1.42 at 4.89 [keV] over the current target. An addition of 1% boric acid to the water in the moderating ring of the current target is predicted to result in a factor of 111 +/- 12 increase in the neutron to photon ratio above baseline for 3.51 [keV] neutrons at 100 [m]; this value is for photons above 700 [keV]. The gain in neutron intensity for the optimized target comes with a gain in photon intensity. A 1% boric acid addition to this design has same neutron to photon ratio as with the boric acid addition to the current target (for 3.51 [keV] neutrons). In an alternate approach to enhancing the neutron counts, a prototype plastic scintillator was studied as a possible replacement for the extant lithium glass scintillators, with experiments finding major increases to the neutron counts in the energy range of interest. The plastic scintillator prototype was found to produce gains of 1.86, 3.61, 1.76 and 3.16 at 70.1, 127, 219, and 307 [keV], respectively, over a lithium glass detector. However, at 24.5 [keV] the plastic prototype count rate was only 36% of that measured with the lithium glass detector. The prototype detector geometry and its associated electronics need to be altered in order to actualize the true potential of the plastic scintillator detector.

  8. One directional polarized neutron reflectometry with optimized reference layer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Jahromi, Saeed S.

    2012-09-01

    In the past decade, several neutron reflectometry methods for determining the modulus and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of an unknown multilayer thin film have been worked out among which the method of variation of surroundings and reference layers are of highest interest. These methods were later modified for measurement of the polarization of the reflected beam instead of the measurement of the intensities. In their new architecture, these methods not only suffered from the necessity of change of experimental setup but also another difficulty was added to their experimental implementations. This deficiency was related to the limitations of the technology of the neutron reflectometers that could only measure the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam. As the instruments are limited, the theory has to be optimized so that the experiment could be performed. In a recent work, we developed the method of variation of surroundings for one directional polarization analysis. In this new work, the method of reference layer with polarization analysis has been optimized to determine the phase and modulus of the unknown film with measurement of the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam.

  9. Diurnally Varying Hydrogen Volatiles or Regolith Temperature? Mare and Highlands Studies of the Moon's Diurnally Modulating Epithermal Neutron Flux Using LRO's LEND, Diviner, and LOLA Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; LEND Team; Parsons, A. M.; Williams, J. P.; Mazarico, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we seek to discriminate the source of variation that is diurnally modulating the Moon's neutron emission flux. We characterize the neutron emission flux from the topography in the northern mare and highlands regions.

  10. Neutron flux from a 14-MeV neutron generator with tungsten filter for research in NDA methods for nuclear safeguards and security

    SciTech Connect

    Rennhofer, H.; Pedersen, B.; Crochemore, J.-M.

    2009-12-02

    The Joint Research Centre has taken into operation a new experimental device designed for research in the fields of nuclear safeguards and security applications. The research projects currently undertaken include detection of shielded contraband materials, detection of fissile materials, and mass determination of small fissile materials in shielded containers. The device, called the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly (PUNITA), incorporates a pulsed 14-MeV (D-T) neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator with a frequency in the range of 10 to 150 Hz, a sample may be interrogated first by fast neutrons and a few hundred micro-seconds later by a pure thermal neutron flux. The permanent detection systems incorporated in PUNITA include {sup 3}He neutrons detectors, HPGe gamma detectors, and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors.We have studied the effects of placing a tungsten liner around the neutron generator target. The 14-MeV neutrons induce (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) reactions. In addition the mean neutron energy emitted from generator/tungsten assembly is reduced to about 1 MeV. Both of these effects increase the thermal neutron flux in the sample cavity. The paper describes the observed advantages of the tungsten liner with respect to increase in thermal flux, and better shielding capabilities of the nearby gamma and neutron detectors.

  11. Applicability of the Ge(n,γ) Reaction for Estimating Thermal Neutron Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, J.; Medić, Ž.; Jovančević, N.; Hansman, J.; Todorović, N.; Krmar, M.

    A simple experimental setup was used to measure gamma lines appearing in spectra after interactions of neutrons with Ge in the active volume of a high-purity germanium detector placed in a low-background shield. As source of neutrons a 252Cf spontaneous fission source and different thicknesses of PVC plates were used to slow down neutrons. A cadmiumenvelope was placed over the detector dipstick to identify the effect from slow and fast neutrons. Intensities of several characteristic γ-lines were measured, including intensity of the 139.9 keV γ-line from the reaction 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe, usually used for estimation of thermal neutron flux. Obtained results signify that only a part of the detected 139.9 keV γ-rays originate from thermal neutron capture. Some preliminary results indicate that in our detection setup thermal neutron capture contributes with 30% to 50% to the total intensity of the 139.9 keV γ-line, depending on the thickness of the PVC plates.

  12. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  13. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  14. On the 252Cf primary and secondary gamma rays and epithermal neutron flux for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassoun, J.; Merzouki, A.; El Morabiti, A.; Jehouani, A.

    2007-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation has been used to calculate the different components of neutrons and secondary gamma rays originated by 252Cf fission and also the primary gamma rays emitted directly by the 252Cf source at the exit face of a compact system designed for the BNCT. The system consists of a 252Cf source and a moderator/reflector/filter assembly. To study the material properties and configuration possibilities, the MCNP code has been used. The moderator/reflector/filter arrangement is optimised to moderate neutrons to epithermal energy and, as far as possible, to get rid of fast and thermal neutrons and photons from the therapeutic beam. To reduce the total gamma contamination and to have a sufficiently high epithermal neutron flux we have used different photon filters of different thickness. Our analysis showed that the use of an appropriate filter leads to a gamma ray flux reduction without affecting the epithermal neutron beam quality at the exit face of the system.

  15. Neutron Imager and Flux Monitor Based on Micro Channel Plates (MCP) in Electrostatic Mirror Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    In this paper, a new high transparency device based on MCP for the monitoring the flux and spatial profile of a neutron beam will be described. The assembly consists of a carbon foil with a 6Li deposit, placed in the beam, and a MCP equipped with a phosphor screen readout viewed by a CCD camera, placed outside the beam. Secondary emitted electrons (SEE) produced in the carbon foil by the alpha-particles and tritons from the 6Li+n reaction, are deflected to the MCP detector by means of an electrostatic mirror, suitably designed to preserve the spatial resolution. The conductive layer on the phosphor can be used for neutron counting, and to obtain time-of-flight information. A peculiar feature of this device is that the use of an electrostatic mirror minimizes the perturbation of the neutron beam, i.e. absorption and scattering. It can be used at existing time-of-flight (TOF) facilities, in particular at the n_TOF facility at CERN, for monitoring the flux and special profile of the neutron beam in the thermal and epithermal region. In this work, the device principle and design will be presented, together with the main features in terms of resolution and neutron detection efficiency.

  16. Relationship between neutron yield rate of tokamak plasmas and spectrometer measured flux for different sight lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gorini, G.; Kaellne, J.; Ognissanto, F.; Tardocchi, M.

    2011-03-15

    A parametric relationship between total neutron yield rate and collimated fluxes related to the brightness (B) of plasma chords ({lambda}) is developed for different emissivity distributions of tokamak plasmas. Specifically, the brightness was expressed as a function of chord coordinates of radial position using a simple model for the emissivity profiles of width parameter w. The functional brightness dependence B({lambda},w) was calculated to examine the relationship between measured flux and deduced yield rate, and its plasma profile dependence. The results were used to determine the chord range of minimum profile sensitivity in order to identify the preferred collimator sight for the determination of yield rate from neutron emission spectroscopy (YNES) measurements. The YNES method is discussed in comparison to conventional methods to determine the total neutron yield rates and related plasma fusion power relying on uncollimated flux measurements and a different calibration base for the flux-yield relationship. The results have a special bearing for tokamaks operating with both deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasmas and future high power machines such as for ITER, DEMO, and IGNITOR.

  17. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Isobe, M; Ogawa, K; Miyake, H; Hayashi, H; Kobuchi, T; Nakano, Y; Watanabe, K; Uritani, A; Misawa, T; Nishitani, T; Tomitaka, M; Kumagai, T; Mashiyama, Y; Ito, D; Kono, S; Yamauchi, M; Takeiri, Y

    2014-11-01

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10(9) counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10(16) n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design. PMID:25430293

  18. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, M. Takeiri, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T.; Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A.; Misawa, T.; Nishitani, T.; Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    2014-11-15

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  19. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, Lance

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  20. Flux stabilization in neutron problems with fixed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatis, D.; Dall'Osso, A.

    2012-07-01

    Although critical core calculations are the most common in design and safety analysis, fixed source calculations are needed for specific applications, e.g. to compute ex-core detector response functions, to develop new methodologies for dilution and reload error accidents and more in general for all situations involving sub-critical shut-down states. It is well known that the source problem becomes difficult to be solved with core configuration close to criticality, i.e. with the multiplication factor approaching unity, for the occurrence of numerical ill-conditioning and very high number of iterations, possibly leading to failure in the flux convergence. In this work, the Wielandt Eigen-shift technique used in iterative methods of critical problems is developed for source problems too, in order to stabilize the solution. The mathematical basis and the proof of the convergence are discussed. Compared to the existing methods, this technique allows also more control to avoid singular behavior at inner iterations. Numerical tests with a 1D analytical benchmark are reported to prove the robustness of the technique. (authors)

  1. Monitoring method for neutron flux for a spallation target in an accelerator driven sub-critical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang, He, Zhi-Yong; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Cui, Wen-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a monitoring method for neutron flux for the spallation target used in an accelerator driven sub-critical (ADS) system, where a spallation target located vertically at the centre of a sub-critical core is bombarded vertically by high-energy protons from an accelerator. First, by considering the characteristics in the spatial variation of neutron flux from the spallation target, we propose a multi-point measurement technique, i.e. the spallation neutron flux should be measured at multiple vertical locations. To explain why the flux should be measured at multiple locations, we have studied neutron production from a tungsten target bombarded by a 250 MeV-proton beam with Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation results indicate that the neutron flux at the central location is up to three orders of magnitude higher than the flux at lower locations. Secondly, we have developed an effective technique in order to measure the spallation neutron flux with a fission chamber (FC), by establishing the relation between the fission rate measured by FC and the spallation neutron flux. Since this relation is linear for a FC, a constant calibration factor is used to derive the neutron flux from the measured fission rate. This calibration factor can be extracted from the energy spectra of spallation neutrons. Finally, we have evaluated the proposed calibration method for a FC in the environment of an ADS system. The results indicate that the proposed method functions very well. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03010000 and XDA03030000) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China(91426301).

  2. Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, B. L.; Robertson, J. L.; Iverson, Erik B.; Selby, D. L.

    2009-05-03

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a super-critical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source at reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 Å to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

  3. Integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from a critical mockup of the Hiroshima bomb Little Boy at Los Alamos National Laobratory with detector systems developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Bonner ball detectors were used to map the neutron fluxes in the horizontal midplane at various distances from the mockup and for selected polar angles, keeping the source-detector separation constant. Gamma-ray energy deposition measurements were made with thermoluminescent detectors at several locations on the iron shell of the source mockup. The measurements were performed as part of a larger progam to provide benchmark data for testing the methods used to calculate the radiation released from the Little Boy bomb over Hiroshima. 3 references, 10 figures.

  4. Optimizing Laser-accelerated Ion Beams for a Collimated Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Ellison and J. Fuchs

    2010-09-23

    High-flux neutrons for imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator- and reactor-based neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultraintense (>1018W/cm2) lasers to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons from a dual target configuration. In this article, the production capabilities of present and upcoming laser facilities are estimated while independently maximizing neutron yields and minimizing beam divergence. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. Tailoring of the incident distribution via laser parameters and microlens focusing modifies the emerging neutrons. Projected neutron yields and distributions are compared to conventional sources, yielding comparable on-target fluxes per discharge, shorter time resolution, larger neutron energies and greater collimation.

  5. Neutron Radiography Facility at IBR-2 High Flux Pulsed Reactor: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lukin, E. V.; Rutkauskas, A. V.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Savenko, B. N.; Pakhnevich, A. V.; Rozanov, A. Yu.

    A neutron radiography and tomography facilityhave been developed recently at the IBR-2 high flux pulsed reactor. The facility is operated with the CCD-camera based detector having maximal field of view of 20x20 cm, and the L/D ratio can be varied in the range 200 - 2000. The first results of the radiography and tomography experiments with industrial materials and products, paleontological and geophysical objects, meteorites, are presented.

  6. LaBr3 scintillator response to admixed neutron and γ-ray fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Grosso, G.; Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.; Weller, A.

    2013-12-01

    The γ-ray spectroscopy is a promising method for diagnosing fast ions and confined α particles in a fusion plasma device. This application requires γ-ray detectors with high energy resolution (say a few percent for γ-ray energies in the range 1-5 MeV), high efficiency and high count rate capability, ideally up to a few MHz. Furthermore, the detector will have to withstand the high 14 MeV and 2.45 MeV neutron fluxes produced by the main fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium. Experimental results demonstrate that the requirements on energy resolution, efficiency and count rate can be met with a LaBr3(Ce) scintillator detector equipped with fast digital data acquisition. The measured response of the detector to 2.45 MeV neutrons is presented in this paper and discussed in terms of the interaction mechanism between neutrons and detector.

  7. Glass-fiber-based neutron detectors for high- and low-flux environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Mary; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, Richard A.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Knopf, Michael A.; Miley, Harry S.; Perkins, Richard W.; Reeder, Paul L.; Sunberg, Debra S.; Warner, Ray A.; Wogman, Ned A.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has fabricated cerium-activated lithium silicate scintillating fibers via a hot-downdraw process. These fibers typically have a operational transmission length (e(superscript -1) length) of greater than 2 meters. This permits the fabrication of devices which were not possible to consider. Scintillating fibers permit conformable devices, large-area devices, and extremely small devices; in addition, as the thermal-neutron sensitive elements in a fast neutron detection system, scintillating fibers can be dispersed within moderator, improving neutron economy, over that possible with commercially available (superscript 3)He or BF(subscript 3) proportional counters. These fibers can be used for national-security applications, in medical applications, in the nuclear-power industry, and for personnel protection at experimental facilities. Data are presented for devices based on single fibers and devices made up of ribbons containing many fibers under high-and low-flux conditions.

  8. Neutron flux characterisation of the Pavia TRIGA Mark II research reactor for radiobiological and microdosimetric applications.

    PubMed

    Alloni, D; Prata, M; Salvini, A; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays the Pavia TRIGA reactor is available for national and international collaboration in various research fields. The TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor of the Pavia University offers different in- and out-core neutron irradiation channels, each characterised by different neutron spectra. In the last two years a campaign of measurements and simulations has been performed in order to guarantee a better characterisation of these different fluxes and to meet the demands of irradiations that require precise information on these spectra in particular for radiobiological and microdosimetric studies. Experimental data on neutron fluxes have been collected analysing and measuring the gamma activity induced in thin target foils of different materials irradiated in different TRIGA experimental channels. The data on the induced gamma activities have been processed with the SAND II deconvolution code and finally compared with the spectra obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison between simulated and measured spectra showed a good agreement allowing a more precise characterisation of the neutron spectra and a validation of the adopted method. PMID:25958412

  9. High-Flux Neutron Generator Facility for Geochronology and Nuclear Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, Cory; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being commissioned at UC Berkeley. The generator is designed to produce monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at outputs exceeding 1011 n/s. The HFNG is designed around two RF-driven multi-cusp ion sources that straddle a titanium-coated copper target. D + ions, accelerated up to 150 keV from the ion sources, self-load the target and drive neutron generation through the d(d,n)3 He fusion reaction. A well-integrated cooling system is capable of handling beam power reaching 120 kW impinging on the target. The unique design of the HFNG target permits experimental samples to be placed inside the target volume, allowing the samples to receive the highest neutron flux (1011 cm-2 s-1) possible from the generator. In addition, external beams of neutrons will be available simultaneously, ranging from thermal to 2.45 MeV. Achieving the highest neutron yields required carefully designed schemes to mitigate back-streaming of high energy electrons liberated from the cathode target by deuteron bombardment. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40 Ar/39 Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science, and education. An end goal is to become a user facility for researchers. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  10. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Rebecca; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews

  11. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 × 1021 m-2 s-1, ion fluence: 4 × 1025 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  12. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  13. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-01

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  14. Characterisation of CVD diamond detectors used for fast neutron flux monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, F.; Bergonzo, P.; Amosov, V. N.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Frunze, V.; Tromson, D.; Brambilla, A.

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detectors (NDD) have been successfully used for fast neutron spectrometry on various fusion installations in plasma diagnostics. These detectors can work at high temperature, are radiation hard and exhibit a high energy resolution. However, the use of NDD is limited by the availability of IIa type diamonds exhibiting high electronic properties. With the recent advance in the growth of high quality chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond at LETI, CVD diamond appears to be a very promising material for plasma diagnostics. We present here for the first time results of the use of CVD diamond detectors for fast neutron flux monitoring on a neutron generator. The characteristics of CVD diamond detectors are compared with that of high quality NDD made by TRINITI. Pulse height spectra have been measured with CVD detectors and NDD under both 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 14.1 MeV neutrons. The quality of CVD diamond enables the recording of structured spectra allowing the distinction between the different neutron reactions on carbon. The efficiency of CVD diamond monitors and their actual limitations are analysed and discussed.

  15. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  16. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  17. A Numerical Method for Obtaining Monoenergetic Neutron Flux Distributions and Transmissions in Multiple-Region Slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Harold

    1959-01-01

    This method is investigated for semi-infinite multiple-slab configurations of arbitrary width, composition, and source distribution. Isotropic scattering in the laboratory system is assumed. Isotropic scattering implies that the fraction of neutrons scattered in the i(sup th) volume element or subregion that will make their next collision in the j(sup th) volume element or subregion is the same for all collisions. These so-called "transfer probabilities" between subregions are calculated and used to obtain successive-collision densities from which the flux and transmission probabilities directly follow. For a thick slab with little or no absorption, a successive-collisions technique proves impractical because an unreasonably large number of collisions must be followed in order to obtain the flux. Here the appropriate integral equation is converted into a set of linear simultaneous algebraic equations that are solved for the average total flux in each subregion. When ordinary diffusion theory applies with satisfactory precision in a portion of the multiple-slab configuration, the problem is solved by ordinary diffusion theory, but the flux is plotted only in the region of validity. The angular distribution of neutrons entering the remaining portion is determined from the known diffusion flux and the remaining region is solved by higher order theory. Several procedures for applying the numerical method are presented and discussed. To illustrate the calculational procedure, a symmetrical slab ia vacuum is worked by the numerical, Monte Carlo, and P(sub 3) spherical harmonics methods. In addition, an unsymmetrical double-slab problem is solved by the numerical and Monte Carlo methods. The numerical approach proved faster and more accurate in these examples. Adaptation of the method to anisotropic scattering in slabs is indicated, although no example is included in this paper.

  18. A comparative study of the neutron flux spectra in the MNSR irradiation sites for the HEU and LEU cores using the MCNP4C code.

    PubMed

    Dawahra, S; Khattab, K; Saba, G

    2015-10-01

    A comparative study for fuel conversion from the HEU to LEU in the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) has been performed in this paper using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy and lethargy flux spectra in the first inner and outer irradiation sites of the MNSR reactor for the existing HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched) and the potential LEU fuels (U3Si2-Al, U3Si-Al, U9Mo-Al, 19.75% enriched and UO2, 12.6% enriched) were investigated using the MCNP4C code. The neutron energy flux spectra for each group was calculated by dividing the neutron flux by the width of each energy group. The neutron flux spectra per unit lethargy was calculated by multiplying the neutron energy flux spectra for each energy group by the average energy of each group. The thermal neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.0 to 0.625 eV, the fast neutron flux was calculated by summing the neutron fluxes from 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV for the existing HEU and potential LEU fuels. Good agreements have been noticed between the flux spectra for the potential LEU fuels and the existing HEU fuels with maximum relative differences less than 10% and 8% in the inner and outer irradiation sites. PMID:26142805

  19. Estimation method of planetary fast neutron flux by a Ge gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, M.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Karouji, Y.; Nagaoka, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; d'Uston, C.; Kim, K. J.; Hasebe, N.

    2016-08-01

    An intensity map of lunar fast neutrons (LFNs) and their temporal variation has been estimated by fitting "sawtooth" peaks in the energy spectra of lunar gamma rays observed by the Kaguya (SELENE) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) consisting of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a BGO scintillator. While an ordinary peak in the spectrum is produced by only gamma ray lines, the sawtooth peak is produced by gamma ray lines and recoil nuclei in the detector by Ge(n ,n‧ γ) reaction. We develop a model for the shape of the sawtooth peak and apply it to fit sawtooth peaks together with ordinary peaks in actual observed spectra on the Moon. The temporal variation of LFNs is synchronous with that of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), and the global distribution of fast neutrons on the lunar surface agrees well with the past observation reported by the Neutron Spectrometer aboard Lunar Prospector. Based on these results, a new method is established to estimate the flux of fast neutrons by fitting sawtooth peaks on the gamma ray spectrum observed by the HPGe detector.

  20. Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

    2009-02-26

    The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

  1. Influence of neutron flux, frequency and temperature to electrical impedance of nano silica particles

    SciTech Connect

    Huseynov, Elchin E-mail: hus.elchin@gmail.com; Garibov, Adil; Mehdiyeva, Ravan; Andreja, Eršte; Rustamov, Anar

    2014-11-15

    We studied electric impedance of SiO{sub 2} nanomaterial at its initial state and after being exposed to continuous neutron irradiation for up to 20 hours. In doing so we employed a flux of neutrons of 2x10{sup 13} n⋅cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} while the frequency and temperature ranges amounted to 0,09 – 2.3 MHz and 100 – 400 K correspondingly. Analysis in terms of the Cole-Cole expression revealed that with increasing irradiation period the polarization and relaxation times decrease as a result of combination of nanoparticles. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the electric conductivity of samples, on the other hand, increases with the increasing irradiation period. At low temperatures formations of clusters at three distinct states with different energies were resolved.

  2. VERITAS: a high-flux neutron reflectometer with vertical sample geometry for a long pulse spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Menelle, A.; Ott, F.; Medic, Z.

    2016-04-01

    An instrument concept of a reflectometer with a vertical sample geometry fitted to the long pulse structure of a spallation source, called “VERITAS” at the ESS, is presented. It focuses on designing a reflectometer with high intensity at the lowest possible background following the users' demand to investigate thin layers or interfacial areas in the sub-nanometer length scale. The high intensity approach of the vertical reflectometer fits very well to the long pulse structure of the ESS. Its main goal is to deliver as much usable intensity as possible at the sample position and be able to access a reflectivity range of 8 orders of magnitude and more. The concept assures that the reflectivity measurements can be performed in its best way to maximize the flux delivered to the sample. The reflectometer is optimized for studies of (magnetic) layers having thicknesses down to 5Å and a surface area of 1x1cm2. With reflectivity measurements the depth-resolved, laterally averaged chemical and magnetic profile can be investigated. By using polarised neutrons, additional vector information on the in-plane magnetic correlations (off-specular scattering at the pm length scale, GISANS at the nm length scale) can be studied. The full polarisation analysis could be used for soft matter samples to correct for incoherent scattering which is presently limiting neutron reflectivity studies to a reflectivity range on the order of 10-6.

  3. Anisn-Dort Neutron-Gamma Flux Intercomparison Exercise for a Simple Testing Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmer, B.; Konheiser, J.; Borodkin, G.; Brodkin, E.; Egorov, A.; Kozhevnikov, A.; Zaritsky, S.; Manturov, G.; Voloschenko, A.

    2003-06-01

    The ability of transport codes ANISN, DORT, ROZ-6, MCNP and TRAMO, as well as nuclear data libraries BUGLE-96, ABBN-93, VITAMIN-B6 and ENDF/B-6 to deliver consistent gamma and neutron flux results was tested in the calculation of a one-dimensional cylindrical model consisting of a homogeneous core and an outer zone with a single material. Model variants with H2O, Fe, Cr and Ni in the outer zones were investigated. The results are compared with MCNP-ENDF/B-6 results. Discrepancies are discussed. The specified test model is proposed as a computational benchmark for testing calculation codes and data libraries.

  4. In-situ monitoring the realkalisation process by neutron diffraction: Electroosmotic flux and portlandite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Castellote, Marta . E-mail: martaca@ietcc.csic.es; Llorente, Irene; Andrade, Carmen; Turrillas, Xavier; Alonso, Cruz; Campo, Javier

    2006-05-15

    Even though the electroosmotic flux through hardened cementitious materials during laboratory realkalisation trials had been previously noticed, it has never been in-situ monitored, analysing at the same time the establishment of the electroosmotic flux and the microstructure changes in the surroundings of the rebar. In this paper, two series of cement pastes, cast with CEM I and CEM I substituted in a 35% by fly ash, previously carbonated at 100% CO{sub 2}, were submitted to realkalisation treatments followed on line by simultaneous acquisition of neutron diffraction data. As a result, it has been possible to confirm the electroosmosis as the driving force of carbonates towards the rebar and to determine the range of pH in the anolyte in which most of the relevant electroosmotic phenomena takes place. On the other hand, the behaviour of the main crystalline phases involved in the process has been monitored during the treatment, with the precipitation of portlandite as main result.

  5. Numerical studies of the flux-to-current ratio method in the KIPT neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The reactivity of a subcritical assembly has to be monitored continuously in order to assure its safe operation. In this paper, the flux-to-current ratio method has been studied as an approach to provide the on-line reactivity measurement of the subcritical system. Monte Carlo numerical simulations have been performed using the KIPT neutron source facility model. It is found that the reactivity obtained from the flux-to-current ratio method is sensitive to the detector position in the subcritical assembly. However, if multiple detectors are located about 12 cm above the graphite reflector and 54 cm radially, the technique is shown to be very accurate in determining the k{sub eff} this facility in the range of 0.75 to 0.975. (authors)

  6. Design of a high-flux epithermal neutron beam using 235U fission plates at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, H B; Brugger, R M; Rorer, D C; Tichler, P R; Hu, J P

    1994-10-01

    Beams of epithermal neutrons are being used in the development of boron neutron capture therapy for cancer. This report describes a design study in which 235U fission plates and moderators are used to produce an epithermal neutron beam with higher intensity and better quality than the beam currently in use at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Monte Carlo calculations are used to predict the neutron and gamma fluxes and absorbed doses produced by the proposed design. Neutron flux measurements at the present epithermal treatment facility (ETF) were made to verify and compare with the computed results where feasible. The calculations indicate that an epithermal neutron beam produced by a fission-plate converter could have an epithermal neutron intensity of 1.2 x 10(10) n/cm2.s and a fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10(-11) cGy.cm2/nepi plus being forward directed. This beam would be built into the beam shutter of the ETF at the BMRR. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed. PMID:7869995

  7. The Vertical Distribution of Buried Volatiles at the Moon revealed by Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Fluxes from LEND Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Su, J. J.; Murray, J.; Livengood, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the quantity and vertical distribution of volatile species on and below the surface of planetary bodies is vital to understand the primordial chemical inventory and subsequent evolution of planets. Volatiles may provide resources to support future human exploration. This is particularly true for the Moon, which is well observed by many methods from ground-based, lunar orbit, and in situ, and is an accessible destination or way station for human exploration. We present Geant4 models of relative fluxes of Fast, Epithermal, and Thermal neutron emission generated in a planetary regolith by galactic cosmic rays to reveal the first 1-2 meters vertical structure of embedded hydrogen or water. Varying ratios of Thermal versus Epithermal, low-energy-Epithermal versus high-energy-Epithermal, and Thermal versus Fast neutron emissions are diagnostics of the depth in which hydrogen/water layers are buried within the top 1-2 meters of the regolith. In addition, we apply model calculations to Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) thermal and epithermal data, acquired on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), in specific regions of the Moon to retrieve the vertical distribution of buried ice from the remote sensing information. GEANT4 is a set of particle physics transport simulation codes that exploits object-oriented software methods to deliver a comprehensive and flexible toolkit that is modular and extensible, based on a free open-source development model. GEANT4 has become a standard tool to simulate applications as diverse as particle telescope and detector response, space radiation shielding and optimization, total ionizing dose in spacecraft components, and biological effects of radiation.

  8. Neutron and Gamma Fluxes and dpa Rates for HFIR Vessel Beltline Region (Present and Upgrade Designs)

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, E.D.

    2001-01-11

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is currently undergoing an upgrading program, a part of which is to increase the diameters of two of the four radiation beam tubes (HB-2 and HB-4). This change will cause increased neutron and gamma radiation dose rates at and near locations where the tubes penetrate the vessel wall. Consequently, the rate of radiation damage to the reactor vessel wall at those locations will also increase. This report summarizes calculations of the neutron and gamma flux (particles/cm{sup 2}/s) and the dpa rate (displacements/atom/s) in iron at critical locations in the vessel wall. The calculated dpa rate values have been recently incorporated into statistical damage evaluation codes used in the assessment of radiation induced embrittlement. Calculations were performed using models based on the discrete ordinates methodology and utilizing ORNL two-dimensional and three-dimensional discrete ordinates codes. Models for present and proposed beam tube designs are shown and their results are compared. Results show that for HB-2, the dpa rate in the vessel wall where the tube penetrates the vessel will be increased by {approximately}10 by the proposed enlargement. For HB-4, a smaller increase of {approximately}2.6 is calculated.

  9. Triga Mark III Reactor Operating Power and Neutron Flux Study by Nuclear Track Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Raya-Arredondo, R.; Cruz-Galindo, S.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    The operating power of a TRIGA Mark III reactor was studied using Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM). The facility has a Highly Enriched Uranium core that provides a neutron flux of around 2 x 1012 n cm-2 s-1 in the TO-2 irradiation channel. The detectors consisted of a Landauer® CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) chip covered with a 3 mm Plexiglas® converter. After irradiation, the detectors were chemically etched in a 6.25M-KOH solution at 60±1 °C for 6 h. Track density was determined by a custom-made Digital Image Analysis System. The results show a direct proportionality between reactor power and average nuclear track density for powers in the range 0.1-7 kW. Data reproducibility and relatively low uncertainty (±3%) were achieved. NTM is a simple, fast and reliable technique that can serve as a complementary procedure to measure reactor operating power. It offers the possibility of calibrating the neutron flux density in any low power reactor.

  10. Method for measuring dose-equivalent in a neutron flux with an unknown energy spectra and means for carrying out that method

    DOEpatents

    Distenfeld, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    A method for measuring the dose-equivalent for exposure to an unknown and/or time varing neutron flux which comprises simultaneously exposing a plurality of neutron detecting elements of different types to a neutron flux and combining the measured responses of the various detecting elements by means of a function, whose value is an approximate measure of the dose-equivalent, which is substantially independent of the energy spectra of the flux. Also, a personnel neutron dosimeter, which is useful in carrying out the above method, comprising a plurality of various neutron detecting elements in a single housing suitable for personnel to wear while working in a radiation area.

  11. Optimizing laboratory-based radon flux measurements for sediments.

    PubMed

    Chanyotha, Supitcha; Kranrod, Chutima; Kritsananuwat, Rawiwan; Lane-Smith, Derek; Burnett, William C

    2016-07-01

    Radon flux via diffusion from sediments and other materials may be determined in the laboratory by circulating air through the sample and a radon detector in a closed loop. However, this approach is complicated by the necessity of having to determine the total air volume in the system and accounting for any small air leaks that can arise if using extended measurement periods. We designed a simple open-loop configuration that includes a measured mass of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight reaction flask connected to a drying system and a radon-in-air analyzer. Ambient air flows through two charcoal columns before entering the reaction vessel to eliminate incoming radon. After traveling through the reaction flask, the air passes the drier and the radon analyzer and is then vented. After some time, the radon activity will reach a steady state depending upon the airflow rate. With this approach, the radon flux via diffusion is simply the product of the steady-state radon activity (Bq/m(3)) multiplied by the airflow rate (mL/min). We demonstrated that this setup could produce good results for materials that produce relatively high radon fluxes. We also show that a modified closed system approach, including radon removal of the incoming air by charcoal filtration in a bypass, can produce very good results including samples with very low emission rates. PMID:27064564

  12. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; Smith, G.W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1991-12-01

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4--12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate {approx}.05 V/rad responsivity with {ge}1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or ``peaks`` binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} range indicate smearing over {approx}1 to 10% of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

  13. Development of micro-pocket fission detectors (MPFD) for near-core and in-core neutron flux monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmes, Martin F.; McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, J. Kenneth; Whaley, P. Michael; Ahmed, A. S. M. Sabbir; Bolinger, Clayton C.; Pinsent, Tracy C.

    2004-01-01

    Miniaturized Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) are under investigation as real-time neutron flux monitors. The devices are capable of performing near-core and in-core reactor power measurements. The basic design utilizes neutron reactive material confined within a miniaturized gas pocket, similar to that of a fission chamber. Device size ranges from 500 microns to a few millimeters thick, thereby allowing them to be inserted directly between fuel elements of a reactor core. Fabricated from inexpensive ceramic materials, the detectors can be fashioned into a linear array to facilitate 3-D mapping of a reactor core neutron flux profile in "real-time". Initial tests have shown these devices to be extremely radiation hard and potentially capable of operating in a neutron fluence exceeding 1016 n cm-2 without noticeable degradation.

  14. Optimized rotary flux compressors for powering laser flashlamps

    SciTech Connect

    Carder, B.; Lundberg, R.

    1983-01-01

    Two ARFC's were optimized with the LLNL code. The large machine had a 42-inch diameter rotor. It provided 14 MJ of energy to a flashlamp load in a 900 ..mu..sec, 16 GW pulse. Its mass was 30 tonnes. The small machine provided a peak power of 8 GW in a 590 ..mu..sec pulse, and delivered 5.4 MJ to the flashlamp load. Its mass was 13 tonnes. The parameters of these optimized machines are summarized in Table 1. Both of these devices were 8 pole ARFC's with two turns per pole.

  15. Capacitively coupled RF voltage probe having optimized flux linkage

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1999-02-02

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  16. Spectrum and density of neutron flux in the irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E. P.; Verkhoglyadov, A. E.; Bulavin, M. V.; Rogov, A. D.; Kulagin, E. N.; Kulikov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Methodology and results of measuring the differential density of the neutron flux in irradiation beam line no. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor using neutron activation analysis (NAA) are presented in the paper. The results are compared to the calculation performed on the basis of the 3D MCNP model. The data that are obtained are required to determine the integrated radiation dose of the studied samples at various distances from the reactor.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations for high-rate fast neutron flux measurements made at the RAON neutron science facility by using MICROMEGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-10-01

    RAON is a Korean heavy-ion accelerator complex that is planned to be built by 2021. Deuterons (53 MeV) and protons (88 MeV) accelerated by using a low-energy driver linac (SCL1) are delivered to the neutron production target in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) to produce high-energy neutrons in the interval from 1 to 88 MeV with high fluxes of the order of 1012 n/cm2-sec. The repetition rate of the neutron beam ranges from 1 kHz to 1 MHz, and the maximum beam current is ~12 μA at 1 MHz. The beam width is 1 ~ 2 ns. The high-energy and high-rate fast neutrons are used to estimate accurate neutron-induced cross sections for various nuclides at the NSF. A MICROMEGAS (MICRO Mesh Gaseous Structure), which is a gaseous detector initially developed for tracking in high-rate, high-energy physics experiments, is tentatively being considered as a neutron beam monitor. It can be used to measure both the energy distribution and the flux of the neutron beam. In this study, a MICROMEGAS detector for installation at the NSF was designed and investigated. 6Li, 10B, 235U and 238U targets are being considered as neutron/charged particle converters. For the low-energy region, 6Li(n,α)t and 10B(n,α)7Li are used in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f) reactions are used for high-energy region up to 90 MeV. All calculations are performed by using the GEANT4 toolkit.

  18. A semi-experimental nodal synthesis method for the on-line reconstruction of three-dimensional neutron flux-shapes and reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, R.P.

    1991-12-10

    The safety and optimal performance of large, commercial, light-water reactors require the knowledge at all time of the neutron-flux distribution in the core. In principle, this information can be obtained by solving the time-dependent neutron diffusion equations. However, this approach is complicated and very expensive. Sufficiently accurate, real-time calculations (time scale of approximately one second) are not yet possible on desktop computers, even with fast-running, nodal kinetics codes. A semi-experimental, nodal synthesis method which avoids the solution of the time-dependent, neutron diffusion equations is described. The essential idea of this method is to approximate instantaneous nodal group-fluxes by a linear combination of K, precomputed, three-dimensional, static expansion-functions. The time-dependent coefficients of the combination are found from the requirement that the reconstructed flux-distribution agree in a least-squares sense with the readings of J ({ge}K) fixed, prompt-responding neutron-detectors. Possible numerical difficulties with the least-squares solution of the ill-conditioned, J-by-K system of equations are brought under complete control by the use of a singular-value-decomposition technique. This procedure amounts to the rearrangement of the original, linear combination of K expansion functions into an equivalent more convenient, linear combination of R ({le}K) orthogonalized modes'' of decreasing magnitude. Exceedingly small modes are zeroed to eliminate any risk of roundoff-error amplification, and to assure consistency with the limited accuracy of the data. Additional modes are zeroed when it is desirable to limit the sensitivity of the results to measurement noise.

  19. A semi-experimental nodal synthesis method for the on-line reconstruction of three-dimensional neutron flux-shapes and reactivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, R.P.

    1991-12-10

    The safety and optimal performance of large, commercial, light-water reactors require the knowledge at all time of the neutron-flux distribution in the core. In principle, this information can be obtained by solving the time-dependent neutron diffusion equations. However, this approach is complicated and very expensive. Sufficiently accurate, real-time calculations (time scale of approximately one second) are not yet possible on desktop computers, even with fast-running, nodal kinetics codes. A semi-experimental, nodal synthesis method which avoids the solution of the time-dependent, neutron diffusion equations is described. The essential idea of this method is to approximate instantaneous nodal group-fluxes by a linear combination of K, precomputed, three-dimensional, static expansion-functions. The time-dependent coefficients of the combination are found from the requirement that the reconstructed flux-distribution agree in a least-squares sense with the readings of J ({ge}K) fixed, prompt-responding neutron-detectors. Possible numerical difficulties with the least-squares solution of the ill-conditioned, J-by-K system of equations are brought under complete control by the use of a singular-value-decomposition technique. This procedure amounts to the rearrangement of the original, linear combination of K expansion functions into an equivalent more convenient, linear combination of R ({le}K) orthogonalized ``modes`` of decreasing magnitude. Exceedingly small modes are zeroed to eliminate any risk of roundoff-error amplification, and to assure consistency with the limited accuracy of the data. Additional modes are zeroed when it is desirable to limit the sensitivity of the results to measurement noise.

  20. Solar flux forecasting using mutual information with an optimal delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Conway, D.; Rokni, M.; Sperling, R.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flux F(sub 10.7) directly affects the atmospheric density, thereby changing the lifetime and prediction of satellite orbits. For this reason, accurate forecasting of F(sub 10.7) is crucial for orbit determination of spacecraft. Our attempts to model and forecast F(sub 10.7) uncovered highly entangled dynamics. We concluded that the general lack of predictability in solar activity arises from its nonlinear nature. Nonlinear dynamics allow us to predict F(sub 10.7) more accurately than is possible using stochastic methods for time scales shorter than a characteristic horizon, and with about the same accuracy as using stochastic techniques when the forecasted data exceed this horizon. The forecast horizon is a function of two dynamical invariants: the attractor dimension and the Lyapunov exponent. In recent years, estimation of the attractor dimension reconstructed from a time series has become an important tool in data analysis. In calculating the invariants of the system, the first necessary step is the reconstruction of the attractor for the system from the time-delayed values of the time series. The choice of the time delay is critical for this reconstruction. For an infinite amount of noise-free data, the time delay can, in principle, be chosen almost arbitrarily. However, the quality of the phase portraits produced using the time-delay technique is determined by the value chosen for the delay time. Fraser and Swinney have shown that a good choice for this time delay is the one suggested by Shaw, which uses the first local minimum of the mutual information rather than the autocorrelation function to determine the time delay. This paper presents a refinement of this criterion and applies the refined technique to solar flux data to produce a forecast of the solar activity.

  1. Upper limits to the quiet-time solar neutron flux from 10 to 100 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, S.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The UCR large area solid-angle double scatter neutron telescope was flown to search for solar neutrons on 3 balloon flights on September 26, 1971, May 14, 1972 and September 19, 1972. The first two flights were launched from Palestine, Texas and the third from Cape Girardeau, Missouri. The float altitude on each flight was at about 5 g/sq cm residual atmosphere. Neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV were measured. No solar flares occurred during the flights. Upper limits to the quiet time solar neutron fluxes at the 95% confidence level are .00028, .00046, .00096 and .00090 neutrons/sq cm-sec in the energy intervals of 10-30, 30-50, 50-100 and 10-100 MeV, respectively.

  2. High-flux white neutron source based on p(35)-Be reactions for activation experiments at NPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanik, Milan; Bem, Pavel; Gotz, Miloslav; Katovsky, Karel; Majerle, Mitja; Novak, Jan; Simeckova, Eva

    2014-11-01

    The concept of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is based on the d(40)-Li neutron source reaction which produces the white neutron spectrum with mean energy of 14 MeV, energy range with high intensity of neutron beam up to 35 MeV, and weak tail up to 55 MeV. At the Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR in Rez near Prague, the source reaction of p+Be was investigated for proton energy of 35 MeV and beam current intensity of 9.2 μA. The produced white spectrum with neutron flux up to 1011 cm-2 s-1 was determined by the dosimetry foils activation technique at two sample-to-target distances and validated against the Monte Carlo predictions. The neutron field of these high-flux p(35)-Be white neutron source represents the useful tool for experimental simulation of the spectrum of the IFMIF facility, validating the activation cross-section data in the energy range relevant to the IFMIF, studying the radiation hardness of electronics against the high-energy neutron fields, and various activation experiments.

  3. Neutron Activation Analysis PRognosis and Optimization Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-08-20

    Version 00 NAAPRO predicts the results and main characteristics (detection limits, determination limits, measurement limits and relative precision of the analysis) of neutron activation analysis (instrumental and radiochemical). Gamma-ray dose rates for different points of time after sample irradiation and input count rate of the spectrometry system are also predicted. The code uses standard Windows user interface and extensive graphical tools for the visualization of the spectrometer characteristics (efficiency, response and background) and simulated spectrum.more » Optimization part is not included in the current version of the code. This release is designated NAAPRO, Version 01.beta. The MCNP code was used for generating detector responses. PREPRO-2000 and FCONV programs were used at the preparation of the program nuclear databases. A special program was developed for viewing, editing and updating of the program databases (not included into the present program package). The MCNP, PREPRO-2000 and FCONV software packages are not included in the NAAPRO package.« less

  4. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi} and 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi}, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  5. Upgrade of the wide-angle neutron diffractometer at the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Katano, S.; Morii, Y.; Child, H.R.

    1997-07-15

    The Wide-Angle Neutron Diffractometer (WAND) is a flat-cone geometry diffractometer located at the High Flux Reactor (HFIR). This instrument is currently being upgraded. The central part of this upgrade is the development of a new curved one-dimensional position sensitive detector which covers a 125 degree angular range with an effective radius of 71 cm. This detector will be a multi-anode (624 anodes on a 0.2 degree pitch) {sup 3}He gas-filled proportional counter. This totally new system will give high resolution, good uniformity and high counting range - a maximum capability of 10{sup 5} cps/pixel and a 10{sup 7} cps overall. A prototype of this detector has shown that these design targets can be met. The new WAND will greatly broaden its capabilities for single-crystal diffraction experiments and for time-resolved measurements.

  6. Study of blend composition of nano silica under the influence of neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseynov, Elchin; Garibov, Adil; Mehdiyeva, Ravan

    2014-08-01

    Nano SiO2 compound with 160 m2/g specific surface area and 20 nm sizes has been irradiated continuously with neutron flux up to 20 hours in various periods in TRIGA Mark II type research reactor. The initial activities of different type radionuclides defined in the result of eight day activity analysis changes between wide range of 1,5 kBq- 1,5GBq. In the result of activity analysis carried out after the irradiation, the element content of 0,5% mixture existing in nano SiO2 compound has been defined with radionuclides of relevant element. It has been defined percentage amounts of elements in blend composition according to the performed activities.

  7. Verification of MCNP simulation of neutron flux parameters at TRIGA MK II reactor of Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yavar, A R; Khalafi, H; Kasesaz, Y; Sarmani, S; Yahaya, R; Wood, A K; Khoo, K S

    2012-10-01

    A 3-D model for 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor was simulated. Neutron flux parameters were calculated using MCNP-4C code and were compared with experimental results obtained by k(0)-INAA and absolute method. The average values of φ(th),φ(epi), and φ(fast) by MCNP code were (2.19±0.03)×10(12) cm(-2)s(-1), (1.26±0.02)×10(11) cm(-2)s(-1) and (3.33±0.02)×10(10) cm(-2)s(-1), respectively. These average values were consistent with the experimental results obtained by k(0)-INAA. The findings show a good agreement between MCNP code results and experimental results. PMID:22885391

  8. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, S. C.

    1998-01-14

    A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

  9. Optimization of Neutron Shielding for the PICASSO Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, S.; Aubin, F.; Auger, M.; Genest, M.-H.; Giroux, G.; Gornea, R.; Faust, R.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, L.; Martin, J.-P.; Kumaratunga, S.; Piro, M.-C.; Starinski, N.; Zacek, V.; Behnke, E.; Levine, I.; Shepherd, T.; Beltran, B.; Krauss, C.; MacDonald, R.

    2009-11-09

    The PICASSO experiment searches WIMPs via their spin-dependent interactions with nuclei. At their operating temperatures, PICASSO threshold detectors are not sensitive to {gamma}-rays, while it is necessary to suppress neutron and {alpha}-ray backgrounds. The different types of neutron shielding (water, polyethylene, borated water and polyethylene doped with different compounds of boron and lithium) were studied via the Monte Carlo method using MCNPX code. Efficiencies of these different types of neutron shielding were compared from the point of view of neutron suppression as well as number of newly born y-rays. The neutrons and {gamma}-rays were followed up to the PICASSO detector active material. The most suitable neutron shielding for the PICASSO experiment was determined following these simulations.

  10. A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Rei, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le} 200 dpa) and in-situ He generation ({le} 2000 appm) at prototypical reactor temperatures and chemical environments is still required. There is currently no experimental facility in the U.S. that can meet these requirements for macroscopic samples. The E.U. and U.S. fusion communities have recently concluded that a fusion-relevant, high-flux neutron source for accelerated characterization of the effects of radiation damage to materials is a top priority for the next decade. Data from this source will be needed to validate designs for the multi-$B next-generation fusion facilities such as the CTF, ETF, and DEMO, that are envisioned to follow ITER and NIF.

  11. Operation Sun Beam shots Little Feller I and II, Johnie boy, and Small Boy. Project Officer's report. Project 2. 3. Neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, D.L.; McNeilly, J.H.; Brady, R.E.; Tarbox, J.L.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) to measure free-field neutron flux and spectrum as required in support of other projects; (2) to document the neutron flux versus ground range; and (3) to determine the effect of various blast containers and shields on detector activation.

  12. Optimized performance for neutron interrogation to detect SNM

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Asztalos, S J; Biltoft, P J; Church, J A; Descalle, M; Hall, J M; Luu, T C; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; Norman, E B; Petersen, D C; Pruet, J A; Prussin, S G

    2007-02-14

    A program of simulations and validating experiments was utilized to evaluate a concept for neutron interrogation of commercial cargo containers that would reliably detect special nuclear material (SNM). The goals were to develop an interrogation system capable of detecting a 5 kg solid sphere of high-enriched uranium (HEU) even when deeply embedded in commercial cargo. Performance goals included a minimum detection probability, P{sub d} {ge} 95%, a maximum occurrence of false positive indications, P{sub fA} {le} 0.001, and maximum scan duration of t {le} 1 min. The conditions necessary to meet these goals were demonstrated in experimental measurements even when the SNM is deeply buried in any commercial cargo, and are projected to be met successfully in the most challenging cases of steel or hydrocarbons at areal density {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. Optimal performance was obtained with a collimated ({Delta}{Theta} = {+-} 15{sup o}) neutron beam at energy E{sub n} = 7 MeV produced by the D(d,n) reaction with the deuteron energy E{sub d} = 4 MeV. Two fission product signatures are utilized to uniquely identify SNM, including delayed neutrons detected in a large array of polyethylene moderated 3He proportional counters and high energy {beta}-delayed fission product {gamma}-radiation detected in a large array of 61 x 61 x 25 cm{sup 3} plastic scintillators. The latter detectors are nearly blind to normal terrestrial background radiation by setting an energy threshold on the detection at E{sub min} {ge} 3 MeV. Detection goals were attained with a low beam current (I{sub d} = 15-65 {micro}A) source up to {rho}L = 75 g/cm{sup 2} utilizing long irradiations, T = 30 sec, and long counting times, t = 30-100 sec. Projecting to a higher beam current, I{sub d} {ge} 600 {micro}A and larger detector array the detection and false alarm goals would be attained even with intervening cargo overburden as large as {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. The latter cargo thickness corresponds to

  13. Searching for Gravitational Waves from Unknown Galactic Neutron Stars - Evaluation of the PowerFlux Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Orion; Riles, Keith; Dergachev, Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    Isolated rotating neutron stars with significant non-axisymmetry can emit gravitational radiation of nearly constant frequency and amplitude. Because the resulting amplitudes are expected to be extremely weak, long time integrations must be carried out to detect a signal. This task is made difficult in all-sky searches for unknown galactic stars by the motion of the Earth (daily rotation and orbital motion) which induces substantial, location-dependent modulations of detected frequency and amplitude. Several software pipelines have been developed to search for such signals in recent data from Advanced LIGO. An evaluation of the performances of these pipelines in data containing instrumental artifacts has been carried out in a mock data challenge, using software injections in Initial LIGO data, We present here the performance of the PowerFlux search program in a search band of 40-2000 Hz, including detection of ``blind'' injections. The program uses a multi-stage hierarchical algorithm, based on semi-coherent and loosely coherent power sums. Results indicate that PowerFlux is well suited to analysis of Advanced LIGO data.

  14. Determining the Magnitude of Neutron and Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Fluxes at the Moon using the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector during the Historic Space-Age Era of High GCR Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Boynton, W. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Milikh, G. M.; Su, J. J.; Livengood, T. A.; McClanahan, T. P.; Evans, L.; Starr, R. D.; litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched June 18, 2009 during an historic space-age era of minimum solar activity [1]. The lack of solar sunspot activity signaled a complex set of heliospheric phenomena [2,3,4] that also gave rise to a period of unprecedentedly high Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux [5]. These events coincided with the primary mission of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND, [6]), onboard LRO in a nominal 50-km circular orbit of the Moon [7]. Methods to calculate the emergent neutron albedo population using Monte Carlo techniques [8] rely on an estimate of the GCR flux and spectra calibrated at differing periods of solar activity [9,10,11]. Estimating the actual GCR flux at the Moon during the LEND's initial period of operation requires a correction using a model-dependent heliospheric transport modulation parameter [12] to adjust the GCR flux appropriate to this unique solar cycle. These corrections have inherent uncertainties depending on model details [13]. Precisely determining the absolute neutron and GCR fluxes is especially important in understanding the emergent lunar neutrons measured by LEND and subsequently in estimating the hydrogen/water content in the lunar regolith [6]. LEND is constructed with a set of neutron detectors to meet differing purposes [6]. Specifically there are two sets of detector systems that measure the flux of epithermal neutrons: a) the uncollimated Sensor for Epi-Thermal Neutrons (SETN) and b) the Collimated Sensor for Epi-Thermal Neutrons (CSETN). LEND SETN and CSETN observations form a complementary set of simultaneous measurements that determine the absolute scale of emergent lunar neutron flux in an unambiguous fashion and without the need for correcting to differing solar-cycle conditions. LEND measurements are combined with a detailed understanding of the sources of instrumental back-ground, and the performance of CSETN and SETN. This comparison allows us to calculate a constant scale factor

  15. Optimal gate-width setting for passive neutrons multiplicity counting

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A

    2010-01-01

    When setting up a passive neutron coincidence counter it is natural to ask what coincidence gate settings should be used to optimize the counting precision. If the gate width is too short then signal is lost and the precision is compromised because in a given period only a few coincidence events will be observed. On the other hand if the gate is too large the signal will be maximized but it will also be compromised by the high level of random pile-up or Accidental coincidence events which must be subtracted. In the case of shift register electronics connected to an assay chamber with an exponential dieaway profile operating in the regime where the Accidentals rate dominates the Reals coincidence rate but where dead-time is not a concern, simple arguments allow one to show that the relative precision on the net Reals rate is minimized when the coincidence gate is set to about 1.2 times the lie dieaway time of the system. In this work we show that making the same assumptions it is easy to show that the relative precision on the Triples rates is also at a minimum when the relative precision of the Doubles (or Reals) is at a minimum. Although the analysis is straightforward to our knowledge such a discussion has not been documented in the literature before. Actual measurement systems do not always behave in the ideal we choose to model them. Fortunately however the variation in the relative precision as a function of gate width is rather flat for traditional safeguards counters and so the performance is somewhat forgiving of the exact choice. The derivation further serves to delineate the important parameters which determine the relative counting precision of the Doubles and Triples rates under the regime considered. To illustrate the similarities and differences we consider the relative standard deviation that might be anticipated for a passive correlation count of an axial section of a spent nuclear fuel assembly under practically achievable conditions.

  16. Neutron flux measurements in the side-core region of Hunterston B advanced gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.A.; Shaw, S.E.; Huggon, A.P.; Steadman, R.J.; Thornton, D.A.; Whiley, G.S.

    2011-07-01

    The core restraints of advanced gas-cooled reactors are important structural components that are required to maintain the geometric integrity of the cores. A review of neutron dosimetry for the sister stations Hunterston B and Hinkley Point B identified that earlier conservative assessments predicted high thermal neutron dose rates to key components of the restraint structure (the restraint rod welds), with the implication that some of them may be predicted to fail during a seismic event. A revised assessment was therefore undertaken [Thornton, D. A., Allen, D. A., Tyrrell, R. J., Meese, T. C., Huggon, A.P., Whiley, G. S., and Mossop, J. R., 'A Dosimetry Assessment for the Core Restraint of an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor,' Proceedings of the 13. International Symposium on Reactor Dosimetry (ISRD-13, May 2008), World Scientific, River Edge, NJ, 2009, W. Voorbraak, L. Debarberis, and P. D'hondt, Eds., pp. 679-687] using a detailed 3D model and a Monte Carlo radiation transport program, MCBEND. This reassessment resulted in more realistic fast and thermal neutron dose recommendations, the latter in particular being much lower than had been thought previously. It is now desirable to improve confidence in these predictions by providing direct validation of the MCBEND model through the use of neutron flux measurements. This paper describes the programme of work being undertaken to deploy two neutron flux measurement 'stringers' within the side-core region of one of the Hunterston B reactors for the purpose of validating the MCBEND model. The design of the stringers and the determination of the preferred deployment locations have been informed by the use of detailed MCBEND flux calculations. These computational studies represent a rare opportunity to design a flux measurement beforehand, with the clear intention of minimising the anticipated uncertainties and obtaining measurements that are known to be representative of the neutron fields to which the vulnerable steel

  17. The development of a high count rate neutron flux monitoring channel using silicon carbide semiconductor radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisi Fard, Mehdi

    In this dissertation, a fast neutron flux-monitoring channel, which is based on the use of SiC semiconductor detectors is designed, modeled and experimentally evaluated as a power monitor for the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactors. A detailed mathematical model of the SiC diode detector and the electronic processing channel is developed using TRIM, MATLAB and PSpice simulation codes. The flux monitoring channel is tested at the OSU Research Reactor. The response of the SiC neutron-monitoring channel to neutrons is in close agreement to simulation results. Linearity of the channel response to thermal and fast neutron fluxes, pulse height spectrum of the channel, energy calibration of the channel and the detector degradation in a fast neutron flux are presented. Along with the model of the neutron monitoring channel, a Simulink model of the GT-MHR core has been developed to evaluate the power monitoring requirements for the GT-MHR that are most demanding for the SiC diode power monitoring system. The Simulink model is validated against a RELAP5 model of the GT-MHR. This dyanamic model is used to simulate reactor transients at the full power and at the start up, in order to identify the response time requirements of the GT-MHR. Based on the response time requirements that have been identified by the Simulink model and properties of the monitoring channel, several locations in the central reflector and the reactor cavity are identified to place the detector. The detector lifetime and dynamic range of the monitoring channel at the detector locations are calculated. The channel dynamic range in the GT-MHR central reflector covers four decades of the reactor power. However, the detector does not survive for a reactor refueling cycle in the central reflector. In the reactor cavity, the detector operates sufficiently long; however, the dynamic range of the channel is smaller than the dynamic range of the channel in the central reflector.

  18. Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Fluxes of fast and epithermal neutrons from Lunar Prospector: evidence for water ice at the lunar poles.

    PubMed

    Feldman, W C; Maurice, S; Binder, A B; Barraclough, B L; Elphic, R C; Lawrence, D J

    1998-09-01

    Maps of epithermal- and fast-neutron fluxes measured by Lunar Prospector were used to search for deposits enriched in hydrogen at both lunar poles. Depressions in epithermal fluxes were observed close to permanently shaded areas at both poles. The peak depression at the North Pole is 4.6 percent below the average epithermal flux intensity at lower latitudes, and that at the South Pole is 3.0 percent below the low-latitude average. No measurable depression in fast neutrons is seen at either pole. These data are consistent with deposits of hydrogen in the form of water ice that are covered by as much as 40 centimeters of desiccated regolith within permanently shaded craters near both poles. PMID:9727973

  20. Optimizing diode thickness for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, John W.; Mejia, Israel; Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel A.; Gnade, Bruce; Kunnen, George R.; Allee, David

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the optimal thickness of a semiconductor diode for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors. We evaluate several diode materials, Si, CdTe, GaAs, C (diamond), and ZnO, and two neutron converter materials, {sup 10}B and {sup 6}LiF. Investigating a coplanar diode/converter geometry, we determine the minimum semiconductor thickness needed to achieve maximum neutron detection efficiency. By keeping the semiconductor thickness to a minimum, gamma rejection is kept as high as possible. In this way, we optimize detector performance for different thin-film semiconductor materials.

  1. ATR LEU Fuel and Burnable Absorber Neutronics Performance Optimization by Fuel Meat Thickness Variation

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff between the HEU core and the LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U-235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized. The depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU cases with foil (U-10Mo) types demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar to the reference ATR HEU case. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm. In this work, the proposed LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm and the same U-235 enrichment (15.5 wt%) can be used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel plate thickness from 0.254 to 0.457 mm at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19). In addition, a 0.7g of burnable absorber Boron-10 was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the inner/outer heat

  2. ATR LEU fuel and burnable absorber neutronics performance optimization by fuel meat thickness variation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.S.

    2008-07-15

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U-235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff between the HEU core th and the LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U-235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized. The depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU cases with foil (U-10Mo) types demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar to the reference ATR HEU case. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm. In this work, the proposed LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.381 mm and the same U-235 enrichment (19.7 wt%) can be used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness from 0.191 mm (7.5 mil) to 0.343 mm (13.5 mil) at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19). In addition, 0.8g of a burnable absorber, Boron-10, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess

  3. Neutron beam optimization for boron neutron capture therapy using the D-D and D-T high-energy neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Vujic, J.L.; Leung, K.N.

    2000-02-01

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of boron neutron capture therapy. Two figures-of-merit--the absorbed skin dose and the absorbed tumor dose at a given depth in the brain--are used to measure the neutron beam quality. Based on the results of this study, moderators, reflectors, and delimiters are designed and optimized to moderate the high-energy neutrons from the fusion reactions {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He and {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He down to a suitable energy spectrum. Two different computational models (MCNP and BNCT-RTPE) have been used to study the dose distribution in the brain. With the optimal beam-shaping assembly, a 1-A mixed deuteron/triton beam of energy 150 keV accelerated onto a titanium target leads to a treatment time of 1 h. The dose near the center of the brain obtained with this configuration is > 65% higher than the dose from a typical spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-produced neutron beams.

  4. Neutron conversion and cascaded cooling in paramagnetic systems for a high-flux source of very cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron-cooling mechanism is proposed with potential benefits for novel intense sources of very cold neutrons with wavelengths >2 nm, and for enhancing the production of ultracold neutrons. It employs inelastic magnetic scattering in weakly absorbing, cold paramagnetic systems. Kinetic energy is removed from the neutron stepwise in constant decrements determined by the Zeeman energy of paramagnetic atoms or ions in an external magnetic field, or by zero-field level splittings in magnetic molecules. The stationary neutron transport equation is analyzed for an infinite, homogeneous medium with Maxwellian neutron sources, using inelastic scattering cross sections derived in an appendix. Nonmagnetic inelastic scattering processes are neglected. The solution therefore still underestimates very cold neutron densities that should be achievable in a real medium. Molecular oxygen with its triplet ground state appears particularly promising, notably as a host in fully deuterated O2-clathrate hydrate. Other possibilities are dry O2-4He van der Waals clusters and O2 intercalated in fcc-C60. For conversion of cold to ultracold neutrons, where an incident neutron imparts only a single energy quantum to the medium, the paramagnetic scattering in the clathrate system is found to be stronger, by more than an order of magnitude, than the single-phonon emission in superfluid helium, when evaluated for an incident neutron spectrum with the optimum temperature for the respective medium. Moreover, the multistep paramagnetic cooling cascade leads to further strong enhancements of very cold neutron densities, e.g., by a factor 14 (57) for an initial neutron temperature of 30 K (100 K ), for the moderator held at about 1.3 K . Due to a favorable Bragg cutoff of the O2 clathrate, the cascade-cooling can take effect in a moderator with linear extensions smaller than a meter.

  5. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; et al

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  6. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  7. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  8. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg). PMID:26827330

  9. Optimal representation of source-sink fluxes for mesoscale carbon dioxide inversion with synthetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Bocquet, Marc; Lauvaux, Thomas; Chevallier, FréDéRic; Rayner, Peter; Davis, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The inversion of CO2 surface fluxes from atmospheric concentration measurements involves discretizing the flux domain in time and space. The resolution choice is usually guided by technical considerations despite its impact on the solution to the inversion problem. In our previous studies, a Bayesian formalism has recently been introduced to describe the discretization of the parameter space over a large dictionary of adaptive multiscale grids. In this paper, we exploit this new framework to construct optimal space-time representations of carbon fluxes for mesoscale inversions. Inversions are performed using synthetic continuous hourly CO2 concentration data in the context of the Ring 2 experiment in support of the North American Carbon Program Mid Continent Intensive (MCI). Compared with the regular grid at finest scale, optimal representations can have similar inversion performance with far fewer grid cells. These optimal representations are obtained by maximizing the number of degrees of freedom for the signal (DFS) that measures the information gain from observations to resolve the unknown fluxes. Consequently information from observations can be better propagated within the domain through these optimal representations. For the Ring 2 network of eight towers, in most cases, the DFS value is relatively small compared to the number of observations d (DFS/d < 20%). In this multiscale setting, scale-dependent aggregation errors are identified and explicitly formulated for more reliable inversions. It is recommended that the aggregation errors should be taken into account, especially when the correlations in the errors of a priori fluxes are physically unrealistic. The optimal multiscale grids allow to adaptively mitigate the aggregation errors.

  10. Observation of Periodic and Transient Cosmic Ray Flux Variations by the Daejeon Neutron Monitor and the Seoul muon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Suyeon; Kang, Jeongsoo

    2013-09-01

    Recently, two instruments of cosmic ray are operating in South Korea. One is Seoul muon detector after October 1999 and the other is Daejeon neutron monitor (Kang et al. 2012) after October 2011. The former consists of four small plastic scintillators and the latter is the standard 18 NM 64 type. In this report, we introduce the characteristics of both instruments. We also analyze the flux variations of cosmic ray such as diurnal variation and Forbush decrease. As the result, the muon flux shows the typical seasonal and diurnal variations. The neutron flux also shows the diurnal variation. The phase which shows the maximum flux in the diurnal variation is around 13-14 local time. We found a Forbush decrease on 7 March 2012 by both instruments. It is also identified by Nagoya multi-direction muon telescope and Oulu neutron monitor. The observation of cosmic ray at Jangbogo station as well as in Korean peninsula can support the important information on space weather in local area. It can also enhance the status of Korea in the international community of cosmic ray experiments.

  11. Design and optimization of a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation using a simulated head phantom.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2012-12-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to design a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator. The optimization of this configuration has been realized in different steps. This proposed system consists of metallic uranium as neutron multiplier, TiF(3) and Al(2)O(3) as moderators, Pb as reflector, Ni as shield and Li-Poly as collimator to guide neutrons toward the patient position. The in-air parameters recommended by IAEA were assessed for this proposed configuration without using any filters which enables us to have a high epithermal neutron flux at the beam port. Also a simulated Snyder head phantom was used to evaluate dose profiles due to the irradiation of designed beam. The dose evaluation results and depth-dose curves show that the neutron beam designed in this work is effective for deep-seated brain tumor treatments even with D-T neutron generator with a neutron yield of 2.4×10(12) n/s. The Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4C is used in order to perform these calculations. PMID:23041781

  12. On Poynting-flux-driven bubbles and shocks around merging neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-05-01

    Merging binaries of compact relativistic objects (neutron stars and black holes) are thought to be progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts and sources of gravitational waves, hence their study is of great importance for astrophysics. Because of the strong magnetic field of one or both binary members and high orbital frequencies, these binaries are strong sources of energy in the form of Poynting flux (e.g. magnetic-field-dominated outflows, relativistic leptonic winds, electromagnetic and plasma waves). The steady injection of energy by the binary forms a bubble (or a cavity) filled with matter with the relativistic equation of state, which pushes on the surrounding plasma and can drive a shock wave in it. Unlike the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor blast wave solution for a point-like explosion, the shock wave here is continuously driven by the ever-increasing pressure inside the bubble. We calculate from the first principles the dynamics and evolution of the bubble and the shock surrounding it and predict that such systems can be observed as radio sources a few hours before and after the merger. At much later times, the shock is expected to settle on to the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor solution, thus resembling an explosion.

  13. Neutron flux measurements at the TRIGA reactor in Vienna for the prediction of the activation of the biological shield.

    PubMed

    Merz, Stefan; Djuricic, Mile; Villa, Mario; Böck, Helmuth; Steinhauser, Georg

    2011-11-01

    The activation of the biological shield is an important process for waste management considerations of nuclear facilities. The final activity can be estimated by modeling using the neutron flux density rather than the radiometric approach of activity measurements. Measurement series at the TRIGA reactor Vienna reveal that the flux density next to the biological shield is in the order of 10(9)cm(-2)s(-1) at maximum power; but it is strongly influenced by reactor installations. The data allow the estimation of the final waste categorization of the concrete according to the Austrian legislation. PMID:21646026

  14. Neutron proton crystallography station (PCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Zoe; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Johnson, Hannah; Mustyakimov, Marat

    2009-01-01

    The PCS (Protein Crystallography Station) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a unique facility in the USA that is designed and optimized for detecting and collecting neutron diffraction data from macromolecular crystals. PCS utilizes the 20 Hz spallation neutron source at LANSCE to enable time-of-flight measurements using 0.6-7.0 {angstrom} neutrons. This increases the neutron flux on the sample by using a wavelength range that is optimal for studying macromolecular crystal structures. The diagram below show a schematic of PCS and photos of the detector and instrument cave.

  15. Modeling the optimal central carbon metabolic pathways under feedback inhibition using flux balance analysis.

    PubMed

    De, Rajat K; Tomar, Namrata

    2012-12-01

    Metabolism is a complex process for energy production for cellular activity. It consists of a cascade of reactions that form a highly branched network in which the product of one reaction is the reactant of the next reaction. Metabolic pathways efficiently produce maximal amount of biomass while maintaining a steady-state behavior. The steady-state activity of such biochemical pathways necessarily incorporates feedback inhibition of the enzymes. This observation motivates us to incorporate feedback inhibition for modeling the optimal activity of metabolic pathways using flux balance analysis (FBA). We demonstrate the effectiveness of the methodology on a synthetic pathway with and without feedback inhibition. Similarly, for the first time, the Central Carbon Metabolic (CCM) pathways of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens have been modeled and compared based on the above understanding. The optimal pathway, which maximizes the amount of the target product(s), is selected from all those obtained by the proposed method. For this, we have observed the concentration of the product inhibited enzymes of CCM pathway and its influence on its corresponding metabolite/substrate. We have also studied the concentration of the enzymes which are responsible for the synthesis of target products. We further hypothesize that an optimal pathway would opt for higher flux rate reactions. In light of these observations, we can say that an optimal pathway should have lower enzyme concentration and higher flux rates. Finally, we demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method by comparing it with the extreme pathway analysis. PMID:22913632

  16. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon

    2016-03-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 Grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  17. High thermal neutron flux effects on structural and macroscopic properties of alkali-borosilicate glasses used as neutron guide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffy, R.; Peuget, S.; Schweins, R.; Beaucour, J.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    The behaviour of four alkali-borosilicate glasses under homogeneous thermal neutron irradiation has been studied. These materials are used for the manufacturing of neutron guides which are installed in most facilities as devices to transport neutrons from intense sources such as nuclear reactors or spallation sources up to scientific instruments. Several experimental techniques such as Raman, NMR, SANS and STEM have been employed in order to understand the rather different macroscopic behaviour under irradiation of materials that belong to a same glass family. The results have shown that the remarkable glass shrinking observed for neutron doses below 0.5 ·1018 n/cm2 critically depends upon the presence of domains where silicate and borate network do not mix.

  18. Energy spectrum and flux of 3- to 20-Mev neutrons and 1- to 10-Mev gamma rays in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Lockwood, J. A.; Saint Onge, R. N.; Friling, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment is described which was designed to measure the neutron and gamma ray energy spectrums and fluxes in the energy intervals 3 to 20 MeV and 1 to 10 MeV, respectively. In addition, from the 3 to 20-MeV proton recoil spectrums it is possible to infer the shape of the neutron energy spectrum from 20 to 50 MeV. The detecting system utilized a separate charged particle rejection scheme and a two-parameter display system for the output from the pulse shape discrimination which separated gamma rays from neutrons (n). Two long-duration flights were made with this detector in 1970 at Palestine, Tex. (P sub c = 4.6 Gv) and at Ft. Churchill, Canada (P sub c = 0.3 Gv).

  19. Optimization of a partially non-magnetic primary radiation. shielding for the triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyka, N. M.; Noack, K.; Rogov, A.

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to optimize the monochromator shielding of the polarized cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II. By using the Monte Carlo program MCNP-4B, the density of the total spectrum of incoming neutrons and γ radiation from the beam tube SR-2 has been determined during the three-dimensional diffusion process in different types of heavy concrete and other absorbing material. Special attention has been paid to build a compact and highly efficient shielding, partially non-magnetic, with a total biological radiation dose of less than 10 μSv/h at its outsides. Especially considered was the construction of an albedo reducer, which serves to reduce the background in the experiment outside the shielding.

  20. Characterization of neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites of a 37 GBq 241Am-Be isotopic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Haluk; Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yüksel, Alptuğ Özer

    2014-11-01

    For the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique, an irradiation unit with a 37 GBq 241Am-Be neutron source was installed at Institute of Nuclear Sciences of Ankara University. Design and configuration properties of the irradiation unit are described. It has two different sample irradiation positions, one is called site #1 having a pneumatic sample transfer system and the other is site #2 having a location for manual use. In order to characterize neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites, the measurement results were obtained for thermal (Фth) and epithermal neutron fluxes (Фepi), thermal to epithermal flux ratio (f) and epithermal spectrum shaping factors (α) by employing cadmium ratios of gold (Au) and molybdenum (Mo) monitors. The activities produced in these foils were measured by using a p-type, 44.8% relative efficiency HPGe well detector. For the measured γ-rays, self-absorption and true coincidence summing effects were taken into account. Additionally, thermal neutron self-shielding and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in the measured results. For characterization of site #1, the required parameters were found to be Фth = (2.11 ± 0.05) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (3.32 ± 0.17) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 63.6 ± 1.5, α = 0.045 ± 0.009, respectively. Similarly, those parameters were measured in site #2 as Фth = (1.49 ± 0.04) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (2.93 ± 0.15) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 50.9 ± 1.3 and α = 0.038 ± 0.008. The results for f-values indicate that good thermalization of fast neutrons on the order of 98% was achieved in both sample irradiation sites. This is because an optimum combination of water and paraffin moderator is used in the present configuration. In addition, the shielding requirements are met by using natural boron oxide powder (5.5 cm) and boron loaded paraffin layers against neutrons, and a 15 cm thick lead bricks against gamma-rays from source and its

  1. Monochromatic Neutron Tomography Using 1-D PSD Detector at Low Flux Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashari, N. Abidin; Saleh, J. Mohamad; Abdullah, M. Zaid; Mohamed, A. Aziz; Azman, A.; Jamro, R.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes the monochromatic neutron tomography experiment using the 1-D Position Sensitive Neutron Detector (PSD) located at Nuclear Malaysia TRIGA MARK II Research reactor. Experimental work was performed using monochromatic neutron source from beryllium filter and HOPG crystal monochromator. The principal main aim of this experiment was to test the detector efficiency, image reconstruction algorithm and the usage of 0.5 nm monochromatic neutrons for the neutron tomography setup. Other objective includes gathering important parameters and features to characterize the system.

  2. Monochromatic Neutron Tomography Using 1-D PSD Detector at Low Flux Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ashari, N. Abidin; Saleh, J. Mohamad; Abdullah, M. Zaid; Mohamed, A. Aziz; Azman, A.; Jamro, R.

    2008-03-17

    This paper describes the monochromatic neutron tomography experiment using the 1-D Position Sensitive Neutron Detector (PSD) located at Nuclear Malaysia TRIGA MARK II Research reactor. Experimental work was performed using monochromatic neutron source from beryllium filter and HOPG crystal monochromator. The principal main aim of this experiment was to test the detector efficiency, image reconstruction algorithm and the usage of 0.5 nm monochromatic neutrons for the neutron tomography setup. Other objective includes gathering important parameters and features to characterize the system.

  3. Evaluation of neutron flux parameters in irradiation sites of research reactor using the Westcott-formalism for the k0 neutron activation analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasban, H.; Hamid, Ashraf

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using k0 (k0-INAA) method has been used to determine a number of elements in sediment samples collected from El-Manzala Lake in Egypt. k0-INAA according to Westcott's formalism has been implemented using the complete irradiation kit of the fast pneumatic rabbit and some selected manually loaded irradiation sites for short and long irradiation at Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2). Zr-Au and Co sets as neutron flux monitors are used to determine the neutron flux parameters (f and α) in each irradiation sites. Two reference materials IAEA Soil-7 samples have been inserted and implemented for data validation and an internal monostandard multi monitor used (k0 based IM-NAA). It was given a good agreement between the experimental analyzed values and that obtained of the certified values. The major and trace elements in the sediment samples have been evaluated with the use of Co as an internal and Au as an external monostandard comparators. The concentrations of the elements (Cr, Mn and Zn) in the sediment samples of the present work are discussed regarding to those obtained from other sites.

  4. Optimization of fed-batch Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation using dynamic flux balance models.

    PubMed

    Hjersted, Jared L; Henson, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    We developed a dynamic flux balance model for fed-batch Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation that couples a detailed steady-state description of primary carbon metabolism with dynamic mass balances on key extracellular species. Model-based dynamic optimization is performed to determine fed-batch operating policies that maximize ethanol productivity and/or ethanol yield on glucose. The initial volume and glucose concentrations, the feed flow rate and dissolved oxygen concentration profiles, and the final batch time are treated as decision variables in the dynamic optimization problem. Optimal solutions are generated to analyze the tradeoff between maximal productivity and yield objectives. We find that for both cases the prediction of a microaerobic region is significant. The optimization results are sensitive to network model parameters for the growth associated maintenance and P/O ratio. The results of our computational study motivate continued development of dynamic flux balance models and further exploration of their application to productivity optimization in biochemical reactors. PMID:17022660

  5. Estimation of low energy neutron flux (En <= 15 MeV) in India-based Neutrino Observatory cavern using Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokania, N.; Singh, V.; Mathimalar, S.; Garai, A.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Bhushan, K. G.

    2015-12-01

    The neutron flux at low energy (En <= 15 MeV) resulting from the radioactivity of the rock in the underground cavern of the India-based Neutrino Observatory is estimated using Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron production rate due to the spontaneous fission of 235, 238U, 232Th and (α, n) interactions in the rock is determined employing the actual rock composition. It is shown that the total flux is equivalent to a finite size cylindrical rock (D=L=140 cm) element. The energy integrated neutron flux thus obtained at the center of the underground tunnel is 2.76 (0.47) × 10-6 n cm-2 s-1. The estimated neutron flux is of the same order (~10-6 n cm-2 s-1) as measured in other underground laboratories.

  6. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, N. G.; Simeoni, G. G.; Lefmann, K.

    2016-04-01

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (adjustable supermirror curvature) and the compact size (only 0.5 m long). We have simulated the neutron transport across the entire guide system. We present a detailed computer characterization of the existing device, along with the study of the factors mostly influencing the future improvement. We have optimized the simulated prototype as a function of the neutron wavelength, accounting also for all relevant features of a real instrument like the non-reflecting side edges. The results confirm the "chromatic" displacement of the focal point (flux density maximum) at fixed supermirror curvature, and the ability of a variable curvature to keep the focal point at the sample position. Our simulations are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the experimentally measured beam profile. With respect to the possibility of a further upgrade, we find that supermirror coatings with m-values higher than 3.5 would have only marginal influence on the optimal behaviour, whereas comparable spectrometers could take advantage of longer focusing segments, with particular impact for the thermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  7. ORR core re-configuration measurements to increase the fast neutron flux in the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. W.; Stinnett, R. M.; Sims, T. M.

    1985-06-01

    The relative increases obtainable in the fast neutron flux in the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) experiment positions were studied by reconfiguring the current ORR core. The percentage increase possible in the current displacement per atom (dpa) rate was examined. The principle methods to increase the fast flux, consisted of reducing the current core size (number of fuel elements), to increase the core average power density and arrangement of the fuel elements in the reduced-size core to tilt the core power distribution towards the MFE positions were investigated. It is concluded that fast fluxes in the E-3 core position can be increased by approximately 15 to 20% over current values and in E-5 by approximately 45 to 55%.

  8. SPHERES, Juelich's high-flux neutron backscattering spectrometer at FRM II

    SciTech Connect

    Wuttke, Joachim; Budwig, Alfred; Drochner, Matthias; Kaemmerling, Hans; Kayser, Franz-Joseph; Kleines, Harald; Ossovyi, Vladimir; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Prager, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Schneider, Gerald J.; Schneider, Harald; Staringer, Simon

    2012-07-15

    SPHERES is a third-generation neutron backscattering spectrometer, located at the 20 MW German neutron source FRM II and operated by the Juelich Centre for Neutron Science. It offers an energy resolution (fwhm) better than 0.65 {mu}eV, a dynamic range of {+-} 31 {mu}eV, and a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 1750:1.

  9. Arrangement Analysis of Leaves Optimized on Photon Flux Density or Photosynthetic Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shin'ya; Tanno, Itaru

    By clarifying a plant evolutive process, useful information may be obtained on engineering. Consequently, an analysis algorithm that investigates the optimal arrangement of plant leaves was developed. In the developed algorithm, the Monte Carlo method is introduced and sunlight is simulated. Moreover, the arrangement optimization of leaves is analyzed using a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The number of light quanta (photon flux density) that reaches leaves, or the average photosynthetic rate of the same was set as the objective function, and leaf models of a dogwood and a ginkgo tree were analyzed. The number of leaf models was set between two to four, and the position of the leaf was expressed in terms of the angle of direction, elevation angle, rotation angle, and the representative length of the branch of a leaf. The chromosome model introduced into GA consists of information concerning the position of the leaf. Based on the analysis results, the characteristics of the leaf of an actual plant could be simulated by ensuring the algorithm had multiple constrained conditions. The optimal arrangement of leaves differs in maximization of the photon flux density, and that of the average value of a photosynthetic rate. Furthermore, the leaf form affecting the optimal arrangement of leave and also having a significant influence also on a photosynthetic rate was shown.

  10. Differential Bees Flux Balance Analysis with OptKnock for In Silico Microbial Strains Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Choon, Yee Wen; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Illias, Rosli Md.; Chong, Chuii Khim; Chai, Lian En; Omatu, Sigeru; Corchado, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Microbial strains optimization for the overproduction of desired phenotype has been a popular topic in recent years. The strains can be optimized through several techniques in the field of genetic engineering. Gene knockout is a genetic engineering technique that can engineer the metabolism of microbial cells with the objective to obtain desirable phenotypes. However, the complexities of the metabolic networks have made the process to identify the effects of genetic modification on the desirable phenotypes challenging. Furthermore, a vast number of reactions in cellular metabolism often lead to the combinatorial problem in obtaining optimal gene deletion strategy. Basically, the size of a genome-scale metabolic model is usually large. As the size of the problem increases, the computation time increases exponentially. In this paper, we propose Differential Bees Flux Balance Analysis (DBFBA) with OptKnock to identify optimal gene knockout strategies for maximizing the production yield of desired phenotypes while sustaining the growth rate. This proposed method functions by improving the performance of a hybrid of Bees Algorithm and Flux Balance Analysis (BAFBA) by hybridizing Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm into neighborhood searching strategy of BAFBA. In addition, DBFBA is integrated with OptKnock to validate the results for improving the reliability the work. Through several experiments conducted on Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Clostridium thermocellum as the model organisms, DBFBA has shown a better performance in terms of computational time, stability, growth rate, and production yield of desired phenotypes compared to the methods used in previous works. PMID:25047076

  11. Optimization of multiply acquired magnetic flux density Bz using ICNE-Multiecho train in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyun Soo; In Kwon, Oh

    2010-05-01

    The aim of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to visualize the electrical properties, conductivity or current density of an object by injection of current. Recently, the prolonged data acquisition time when using the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method has been advantageous for measurement of magnetic flux density data, Bz, for MREIT in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the ICNE method results in undesirable side artifacts, such as blurring, chemical shift and phase artifacts, due to the long data acquisition under an inhomogeneous static field. In this paper, we apply the ICNE method to a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) multi-echo train pulse sequence in order to provide the multiple k-space lines during a single RF pulse period. We analyze the SNR of the measured multiple Bz data using the proposed ICNE-Multiecho MR pulse sequence. By determining a weighting factor for Bz data in each of the echoes, an optimized inversion formula for the magnetic flux density data is proposed for the ICNE-Multiecho MR sequence. Using the ICNE-Multiecho method, the quality of the measured magnetic flux density is considerably increased by the injection of a long current through the echo train length and by optimization of the voxel-by-voxel noise level of the Bz value. Agarose-gel phantom experiments have demonstrated fewer artifacts and a better SNR using the ICNE-Multiecho method. Experimenting with the brain of an anesthetized dog, we collected valuable echoes by taking into account the noise level of each of the echoes and determined Bz data by determining optimized weighting factors for the multiply acquired magnetic flux density data.

  12. Optimizing Neutron Thermal Scattering Effects in very High Temperature Reactors. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08

    This project aims to develop a holistic understanding of the phenomenon of neutron thermalization in the VHTR. Neutron thermalization is dependent on the type and structure of the moderating material. The fact that the moderator (and reflector) in the VHTR is a solid material will introduce new and interesting considerations that do not apply in other (e.g. light water) reactors. The moderator structure is expected to undergo radiation induced changes as the irradiation (or burnup) history progresses. In this case, the induced changes in structure will have a direct impact on many properties including the neutronic behavior. This can be easily anticipated if one recognizes the dependence of neutron thermalization on the scattering law of the moderator. For the pebble bed reactor, it is anticipated that the moderating behavior can be tailored, e.g. using moderators that consist of composite materials, which could allow improved optimization of the moderator-to-fuel ratio.

  13. Optimization of the Efficiency of a Neutron Detector to Measure (α, n) Reaction Cross-Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perello, Jesus; Montes, Fernando; Ahn, Tony; Meisel, Zach; Joint InstituteNuclear Astrophysics Team

    2015-04-01

    Nucleosynthesis, the origin of elements, is one of the greatest mysteries in physics. A recent particular nucleosynthesis process of interest is the charge-particle process (cpp). In the cpp, elements form by nuclear fusion reactions during supernovae. This process of nuclear fusion, (α,n), will be studied by colliding beam elements produced and accelerated at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) to a helium-filled cell target. The elements will fuse with α (helium nuclei) and emit neutrons during the reaction. The neutrons will be detected for a count of fused-elements, thus providing us the probability of such reactions. The neutrons will be detected using the Neutron Emission Ratio Observer (NERO). Currently, NERO's efficiency varies for neutrons at the expected energy range (0-12 MeV). To study (α,n), NERO's efficiency must be near-constant at these energies. Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP6), a software package that simulates nuclear processes, was used to optimize NERO configuration for the experiment. MCNP6 was used to simulate neutron interaction with different NERO configurations at the expected neutron energies. By adding additional 3He detectors and polyethylene, a near-constant efficiency at these energies was obtained in the simulations. With the new NERO configuration, study of the (α,n) reactions can begin, which may explain how elements are formed in the cpp. SROP MSU, NSF, JINA, McNair Society.

  14. Flux pinning and flux creep in neutron irradiated (Y,Gd)Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, J.O. Superconductivity Research Lab., Tokyo ); Sickafus, K.E.; Peterson, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Powder samples of Y{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} were irradiated with mixed spectrum ({approximately}50% E<0.5eV, 50% E>0.5eV) neutrons with most interactions expected to occur at the Gd site. As a function of fluence the samples showed increased ({approximately}X3-X8) magnetically measured critical current densities J{sub c} at low fluences, falling off at the highest values. An analysis of magnetic relaxation data, which allows for a nonlinear pinning potential U vs J relationship, revealed substantial increases in U at constant J, indicating that the irradiation introduced more effective pinning centers than those originally present. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. BEAM-LOSS DRIVEN DESIGN OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DANBY,G.; GARDNER,C.J.; JACKSON,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; LUDEWIG,H.; MALITSKY,N.; RAPARIA,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; WENG,W.T.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes three-stage design optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring: linear machine design (lattice, aperture, injection, magnet field errors and misalignment), beam core manipulation (painting, space charge, instabilities, RF requirements), and beam halo consideration (collimation, envelope variation, e-p issues etc.).

  16. Diurnally modulating neutron flux in the Moon's high-latitudes: Evidence for transported hydrogen volatiles and/ or complex regolith compositions in topographic slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, Timothy; Mirofanov, Igor; Boynton, William; Chin, Gordon; Livengood, Timothy; Su, Jiao Jang; Sagdeev, Raold; Parsons, Ann; Evans, Larry; Starr, Richard; Hamara, Dave; Bodnarik, Julia; Williams, Jeane-Pierre; Mazarico, Erwan; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton; Murray, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    We report evidence that the Moon's diurnally modulating neutron flux is being forced by a latitude dependent mix of 1) transient hydrogen-bearing volatiles near the surface in the upper latitudes and 2) regolith temperature variation in lower latitudes. In this study we investigate diurnally varying neutron flux measurements from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector's Collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons (LEND CSETN) and surface temperature observations from the Diviner radiometer poleward of >±45°. Our presentation shows that the modulating neutron flux is not consistent with a regolith temperature control for latitudes >70°. The anticorrelation may be evidence for transported lunar hydrogen volatiles or highly non-uniform regolith compositional dynamics. Observational evidence is consistent with regolith temperature being the source of the neutron flux modulation in the northern mare (45° to 60°) and may be related to its mafic composition and fast neutron contributions. Predictions for hypothesized regolith temperature effects are evaluated using insolation inferred from the Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography.

  17. An Optimal Estimation Method to Obtain Surface Layer Turbulent Fluxes from Profile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of direct turbulence measurements, the turbulence characteristics of the atmospheric surface layer are often derived from measurements of the surface layer mean properties based on Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST). This approach requires two levels of the ensemble mean wind, temperature, and water vapor, from which the fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and water vapor can be obtained. When only one measurement level is available, the roughness heights and the assumed properties of the corresponding variables at the respective roughness heights are used. In practice, the temporal mean with large number of samples are used in place of the ensemble mean. However, in many situations the samples of data are taken from multiple levels. It is thus desirable to derive the boundary layer flux properties using all measurements. In this study, we used an optimal estimation approach to derive surface layer properties based on all available measurements. This approach assumes that the samples are taken from a population whose ensemble mean profile follows the MOST. An optimized estimate is obtained when the results yield a minimum cost function defined as a weighted summation of all error variance at each sample altitude. The weights are based one sample data variance and the altitude of the measurements. This method was applied to measurements in the marine atmospheric surface layer from a small boat using radiosonde on a tethered balloon where temperature and relative humidity profiles in the lowest 50 m were made repeatedly in about 30 minutes. We will present the resultant fluxes and the derived MOST mean profiles using different sets of measurements. The advantage of this method over the 'traditional' methods will be illustrated. Some limitations of this optimization method will also be discussed. Its application to quantify the effects of marine surface layer environment on radar and communication signal propagation will be shown as well.

  18. Optimal control of electric drive with simultaneous control inputs for motor current and flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansyuk, V. I.

    1984-08-01

    A detailed mathematical analysis of the optimal control of a dc electric drive with a variable magnetic flux is presented. Expressions are found for the optimal controller. When this controller uses real time microprocessors control hardware, formulas are also derived for the various portions of the optimal process as well as the logic expressions for the switching of these parts of the process. The resulting optimal process differs from previous determinations in that the braking portion, when a resistance moment is present, contains a free run-down (passive braking) region, before and after which there can be regions of active braking, when the motor produces an electromagnetic moment. In one numerical example of step dc motor control, which is used to compare the optimal process found here with one developed earlier, power losses are found to be reduced by 5.44% with the new process. The entire solution of the problem using the procedure presented here reduces to finding the conditional extremum of some function of several variables whose number is no greater than the dimensionality of the system and does not lead to a boundary value problem.

  19. Flux and instrumentation upgrade for the epithermal neutron beam facility at Washington State University.

    PubMed

    Nigg, D W; Venhuizen, J R; Wemple, C A; Tripard, G E; Sharp, S; Fox, K

    2004-11-01

    An epithermal neutron beam facility for preclinical neutron capture therapy research has been constructed at the Washington State University TRIGA research reactor installation. Subsequent to a recent upgrade, this new facility offers a high-purity epithermal beam with intensity on the order of 1.2x10(9)n/cm(2)s. Key features include a fluoride-based design for the neutron filtering and moderating components as well as a novel collimator design that allows ease of assembly and disassembly of the beamline components. PMID:15308181

  20. Flux and Instrumentation Upgrade for the Epithermal Neutron Beam Facility at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; J.R. Venhuizen; C.E. Wemple; G. E. Tripard; S. Sharp; K. Fox

    2004-11-01

    An epithermal neutron beam facility for preclinical neutron capture therapy research has been constructed at the Washington State University TRIGA research reactor installation. Subsequent to a recent upgrade, this new facility offers a high-purity epithermal beam with intensity on the order of 1.2×109 n/cm2 s. Key features include a fluoride-based design for the neutron filtering and moderating components as well as a novel collimator design that allows ease of assembly and disassembly of the beamline components.

  1. Flux-lines lattice order and critical current studied by time-of-flight small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pautrat, Alain; Brulet, Annie; Simon, Charles; Mathieu, Patrice

    2012-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering is a historical technique to study the flux-lines lattice (FLL) in a superconductor. Structural characteristics of the FLL can be revealed, providing fundamental information for the physics of a vortex lattice. However, the spatial resolution is limited and all of the correlation lengths of order are difficult to extract with precision. We show here that a time-of-flight technique reveals the Bragg peak of the FLL, and also its translational order with a better resolution. We discuss the implication of these results for pinning mechanisms in a niobium sample.

  2. Optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for the Treatment of Undifferentiated Thyroid Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Thomasz, Lisa M.Sc.; Longhino, Juan; Perona, Marina; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Blaumann, Herman; Rebagliati, Raul Jimenez; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the possible increase in efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC) by using p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) plus 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX (BOPP) and BPA plus nicotinamide (NA) as a radiosensitizer of the BNCT reaction. Methods and Materials: Nude mice were transplanted with a human UTC cell line (ARO), and after 15 days they were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) NCT (neutrons alone), (3) NCT plus NA (100 mg/kg body weight [bw]/day for 3 days), (4) BPA (350 mg/kg bw) + neutrons, (5) BPA + NA + neutrons, and (6) BPA + BOPP (60 mg/kg bw) + neutrons. The flux of the mixed (thermal + epithermal) neutron beam was 2.8 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}/sec for 83.4 min. Results: Neutrons alone or with NA caused some tumor growth delay, whereas in the BPA, BPA + NA, and BPA + BOPP groups a 100% halt of tumor growth was observed in all mice at 26 days after irradiation. When the initial tumor volume was 50 mm{sup 3} or less, complete remission was found with BPA + NA (2 of 2 mice), BPA (1 of 4), and BPA + BOPP (7 of 7). After 90 days of complete regression, recurrence of the tumor was observed in BPA + NA (2 of 2) and BPA + BOPP (1 of 7). The determination of apoptosis in tumor samples by measurements of caspase-3 activity showed an increase in the BNCT (BPA + NA) group at 24 h (p < 0.05 vs. controls) and after the first week after irradiation in the three BNCT groups. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis confirmed these results. Conclusions: Although NA combined with BPA showed an increase of apoptosis at early times, only the group irradiated after the combined administration of BPA and BOPP showed a significantly improved therapeutic response.

  3. Geometric optimization of a neutron detector based on a lithium glass-polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M.; Nattress, J.; Trivelpiece, C.; Jovanovic, I.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the simulation and optimization of a neutron detector based on a glass-polymer composite that achieves high gamma rejection. Lithium glass is embedded in polyvinyltoluene in three geometric forms: disks, rods, and spheres. Optimal shape, geometric configuration, and size of the lithium glass fragments are determined using Geant4 simulations. All geometrical configurations maintain an approximate 7% glass to polymer mass ratio. Results indicate a 125-mm diameter as the optimal detector size for initial prototype design achieving a 10% efficiency for the thermalization of incident fission neutrons from 252Cf. The geometrical features of a composite detector are shown to have little effect on the intrinsic neutron efficiency, but a significant effect on the gamma rejection is observed. The sphere geometry showed the best overall performance with an intrinsic neutron efficiency of approximately 6% with a gamma rejection better than 10-7 for 280-μm diameter spheres. These promising results provide a motivation for prototype composite detector development based on the simulated designs.

  4. Magnetic field optimization and design of a superconducting neutron Wollaston prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Pynn, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present finite element simulations of a superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism (WP) for neutron scattering with high encoding efficiency and low Larmor phase aberrations. To achieve this, we develop and quantify the design criteria. The validation of simulation tools used for this work are investigated by using two software packages: RADIA and MagNet©. Based on the optimization criteria, various possible configurations of WP are explored with MagNet, from which the best configuration is chosen for further optimization. To optimize the best configuration, the influence of various physical parameters is investigated, including the dimensions, shapes and arrangements of components of the device. The optimum WP was built and measured at both pulsed and constant wavelength neutron sources. In flipping mode, a neutron spin flipping efficiency of ∼98.5% was measured independent of neutron wavelength and applied current. In a precession mode, measurements showed a highly linear Larmor phase variation along the horizontal direction with low depolarization. Simulations of the device agree well with the experimental measurements. Possible applications of the device are also discussed.

  5. Ground-based observations of thunderstorm-correlated fluxes of high-energy electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, A.; Daryan, A.; Arakelyan, K.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Mailyan, B.; Melkumyan, L.; Hovsepyan, G.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.; Vanyan, L.

    2010-08-15

    The Aragats Space Environmental Center facilities continuously measure fluxes of neutral and charged secondary cosmic ray incidents on the Earth's surface. Since 2003 in the 1-minute time series we have detected more than 100 enhancements in the electron, gamma ray, and neutron fluxes correlated with thunderstorm activities. During the periods of the count rate enhancements, lasting tens of minutes, millions of additional particles were detected. Based on the largest particle event of September 19, 2009, we show that our measurements support the existence of long-lasting particle multiplication and acceleration mechanisms in the thunderstorm atmosphere. For the first time we present the energy spectra of electrons and gamma rays from the particle avalanches produced in the thunderstorm atmosphere, reaching the Earth's surface.

  6. Optimizing Neutron Production Rates from D-D Fusion in an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Device

    SciTech Connect

    Wehmeyer, A.L.; Radel, R.F.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    2005-05-15

    Detection of explosives has been identified as a near term commercial opportunity for using a fusion plasma. Typical explosive compositions contain low Z material (C, N, O) which are not easily detected using conventional x-rays or metal detectors. However, 2.45 MeV neutrons produced in a D-D fusion reaction can be used for detection of explosives or other clandestine materials in suitcases, packages, or shipping containers.Steady-state D-D operation is possible using an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion device. The University of Wisconsin IEC device has produced D-D neutrons at 1.8 x 10{sup 8} neutrons/second at a true cathode voltage of 166 kV and a meter current of 68 mA. These neutron production rates are approaching the levels required for the detection of explosives. In order to increase and optimize the neutron production rate in the IEC device, experiments were performed altering the cathode's size (diameter), geometry, and material composition. Preliminary results indicate that significant differences in neutron production rates are not achieved by altering the geometry or material composition of the cathode. However, the neutron production rate was found to increase approximately 20% by doubling the cathode's diameter from 10 cm to 20 cm. In addition, increasing the cathode voltage from 34 kV to 94 kV at a meter current of 30 mA increased the neutron production rate from 1.24 x 10{sup 6} n/s to 2.83 x 10{sup 7} n/s.

  7. Optimal results on TV bounds for scalar conservation laws with discontinuous flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Shyam Sundar

    2015-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the total variation of the solution of scalar conservation law with discontinuous flux in one space dimension. One of the main unsettled questions concerning conservation law with discontinuous flux was the boundedness of the total variation of the solution near interface. In [1], it has been shown by a counter-example at T = 1, that the total variation of the solution blows up near interface, but in that example the solution become of bounded variation after time T > 1. So the natural question is what happens to the BV-ness of the solution for large time. Here we give a complete picture of the bounded variation of the solution for all time. For a uniform convex flux with only L∞ data, we obtain a natural smoothing effect in BV for all time t >T0. Also we give a counter-example (even for a BV data) to show that the assumptions which have been made are optimal.

  8. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  9. Defect profile estimation from magnetic flux leakage signal via efficient managing particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenhua; Xu, Jun; Wang, Ping; Tian, Guiyun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, efficient managing particle swarm optimization (EMPSO) for high dimension problem is proposed to estimate defect profile from magnetic flux leakage (MFL) signal. In the proposed EMPSO, in order to strengthen exchange of information among particles, particle pair model was built. For more efficient searching when facing different landscapes of problems, velocity updating scheme including three velocity updating models was also proposed. In addition, for more chances to search optimum solution out, automatic particle selection for re-initialization was implemented. The optimization results of six benchmark functions show EMPSO performs well when optimizing 100-D problems. The defect simulation results demonstrate that the inversing technique based on EMPSO outperforms the one based on self-learning particle swarm optimizer (SLPSO), and the estimated profiles are still close to the desired profiles with the presence of low noise in MFL signal. The results estimated from real MFL signal by EMPSO-based inversing technique also indicate that the algorithm is capable of providing an accurate solution of the defect profile with real signal. Both the simulation results and experiment results show the computing time of the EMPSO-based inversing technique is reduced by 20%-30% than that of the SLPSO-based inversing technique. PMID:24926693

  10. The influence of plasma horizontal position on the neutron rate and flux of neutral atoms in injection heating experiment on the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, V. A.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Melnik, A. D.; Askinazi, L. G.; Wagner, F.; Vildjunas, M. I.; Zhubr, N. A.; Krikunov, S. V.; Lebedev, S. V.; Razumenko, D. V.; Tukachinsky, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    Horizontal displacement of plasma along the major radius has been found to significantly influence the fluxes of 2.45 MeV DD neutrons and high-energy charge-exchange atoms from neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasma of the TUMAN-3M tokamak. An inward shift by Δ R = 1 cm causes 1.2-fold increase in the neutron flux and 1.9-fold increase in the charge-exchange atom flux. The observed increase in the neutron flux is attributed to joint action of several factors-in particular, improved high-energy ion capture and confinement and, probably, decreased impurity inflow from the walls, which leads to an increase in the density of target ions. A considerable increase in the flux of charge-exchange neutrals in inward-shifted plasma is due to the increased number of captured high-energy ions and, to some extent, the increased density of the neutral target. As a result of the increase in the content of high-energy ions, the central ion temperature T i (0) increased from 250 to 350 eV. The dependence of the neutron rate on major radius R 0 should be taken into account when designing compact tokamak-based neutron sources.