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Sample records for neutron interrogation techniques

  1. Application of neutron interrogation techniques to corrosion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birt, E. A.; Namkung, M.; Vulcan, W.; Welsh, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a technique which may be able to detect corrosion by determining the presence of oxygen at the corroded site via a neutron inelastic gamma reaction. Initial experiments have been performed using a Pu-239/Be neutron source and a NaI(T1) gamma-ray detector. From the results it was concluded that a 1 mm thickness of aluminum oxide would not be detected.

  2. Monte Carlo parametric studies of neutron interrogation with the Associated Particle Technique for cargo container inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyglun, Clément; Carasco, Cédric; Pérot, Bertrand

    2014-06-01

    The detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation is extensively studied by Monte Carlo simulation at the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission). The active inspection system is based on the Associated Particle Technique (APT). Fissions induced by tagged neutrons (i.e. correlated to an alpha particle in the DT neutron generator) in SNM produce high multiplicity coincidences which are detected with fast plastic scintillators. At least three particles are detected in a short time window following the alpha detection, whereas nonnuclear materials mainly produce single events, or pairs due to (n,2n) and (n,n'γ) reactions. To study the performances of an industrial cargo container inspection system, Monte Carlo simulations are performed with the MCNP-PoliMi transport code, which records for each neutron history the relevant information: reaction types, position and time of interactions, energy deposits, secondary particles, etc. The output files are post-processed with a specific tool developed with ROOT data analysis software. Particles not correlated with an alpha particle (random background), counting statistics, and time-energy resolutions of the data acquisition system are taken into account in the numerical model. Various matrix compositions, suspicious items, SNM shielding and positions inside the container, are simulated to assess the performances and limitations of an industrial system.

  3. Multi-isotopic transuranic waste interrogation using delayed neutron nondestructive assay and iterative quadratic programming techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cheng-Wei

    1997-11-01

    Nuclear safeguards for Special Nuclear Materials is to protect the nuclear materials against malevolent use and to insure their peaceful usage. The nondestructive assay technique (NDA) offers an efficient and proliferation resistance method for nuclear safeguards technology. NDA techniques were investigated for multi-isotopic transuranic waste interrogation. This work was originally intended for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development at Argonne National Laboratory. One major feature of the IFR is its integral fuel cycle based on a pyrometallurgical process. More than 99% of transuranics produced in the fuel are returned to the makeup fuel and burned in the reactor. With the long-lived actinides removed from the waste stream, the waste produced will decay sufficiently in 300 years dropping below the cancer risk level of natural uranium ore and easing the perceived waste management problem. The feasibility of using nondestructive assay techniques for the IFR fuel cycle waste interrogation were studied. A special DNNDA experimental device was designed and analysis techniques were developed. The DNNDA technique uses the delayed neutrons emitted after the activation of a 14 MeV neutron source as the characteristic signature for each fissionable isotope. A tantalum/polyethylene filter was employed to enhance the discrimination between the fissile and the fissionable isotopes. Spontaneous fissions from 240Pu were also measured to assist the mass assay. A nonlinear overdetermined system was established based on the DNNDA measurements. An Iterative Quadratic Programming (IQP) method was applied to perform the estimates. The IQP method has several advantages over the linear least squares and Kalman filter methods, it has the flexibility of adding additional constraints, it has superlinear global convergence and it can be utilized for nonlinear problems. The results show that using the IQP method with the DNNDA technique is quite promising for multi-isotopic assay

  4. Non-destructive assay of fissile materials through active neutron interrogation technique using pulsed neutron (plasma focus) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, B. S.; Kaushik, T. C.; Andola, Sanjay; Ramniranjan; Rout, R. K.; Kumar, Ashwani; Paranjape, D. B.; Kumar, Pradeep; Ramakumar, K. L.; Gupta, S. C.; Sinha, R. K.

    2013-03-01

    Pulsed neutrons emitted from a plasma focus (PF) device have been used for the first time for the non-destructive assay of 235U content in different chemical forms (oxide and metal). The PF device generates (1.2±0.3)×109 D-D fusion neutrons per shot with a pulse width of 46±5 ns. The method involves the measurement of delayed neutrons from an irradiated sample 50 ms after exposure to the neutron pulse for a time of about 100 s in the multichannel scaling (MCS) mode. The calibration of the active interrogation delayed neutron counter (AIDNEC) system was carried out by irradiating U3O8 samples of varying amounts (0.1-40 g) containing enriched 235U (14.8%) in the device. The delayed neutrons were monitored using a bank of six 3He detectors. The sensitivity of the system was found to be about 100 counts/s/g over the accumulation time of 25 s per neutron pulse of ˜109. The detection limit of the system is estimated to be 18 mg of 235U. The system can be suitably modified for applications toward non-destructive assay of fissile content in waste packets.

  5. Narcotics detection using fast-neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    Fast-neutron interrogation techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in luggage and cargo containers. This paper discusses two different fast-neutron techniques. The first uses a pulsed accelerator or sealed-tube source to produce monoenergetic fast neutrons. Gamma rays characteristic of carbon and oxygen are detected and the elemental densities determined. Spatial localization is accomplished by either time of flight or collimators. This technique is suitable for examination of large containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays. The second technique uses an accelerator to produce nanosecond pulsed beams of deuterons that strike a target to produce a pulsed beam of neutrons with a continuum of energies. Elemental distributions are obtained by measuring the neutron spectrum after the source neutrons pass through the items being interrogated. Spatial variation of elemental densities is obtained by tomographic reconstruction of projection data obtained for three to five angles and relatively low (2 cm) resolution. This technique is best suited for examination of luggage or small containers with average neutron transmissions greater than about 0.01. Analytic and Monte-Carlo models are being used to investigate the operational characteristics and limitations of both techniques.

  6. Sensitivity Measurements For Cargo Scanning Applications Using Photon Interrogation and Neutron Signature Counting Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankrah, Maxwell

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, non-destructive evaluation techniques which use either photon or neutron sources from accelerators followed by neutron counting signatures have been used in many national security and nuclear nonproliferation applications [4, 60]. Although the United States customs and border protection initiated and implemented a cargo security initiative to discover threats from others countries before they embark to the US, detectors with better sensitivities are more necessary than ever in view of the global threats faced by nations around the world. Photofission based applications which use delayed neutron signal ores as viable detection schemes for fissile material detection have been ongoing for many years. Applications of this technology to include cargo scanning applications are however lacking. This work in this dissertation used the delayed neutron signature counting technique for fissile material detection in conjunction with new formulated Curries' expressions to establish the sensitivity (minimum detectable mass) limits. The fission reactions were induced in a uranyl nitrate solution containing 94.1 g of 238U using bremsstrahlung endpoint cue pies of 9 MeV to 21 MeV in 2 MeV steps. Preliminary data on the sensitvity measurement at bremsstrahlung end point energies of 9, 14, 18 and 22 MeV are also presented. We also present the effect of borated polyethylene and lead shielding on the sensitivity at 9 and 22 N1cV. The sensitivities were calculated for 5%u false positives and 5% fake negatives as well as for 1% false positives and 0.1% false negatives. A dose of 4 Gy, 5 mGy and 1 mGy were assumed to be delivered to Mutt cargo container. For a radiator and target-to-detector distance of 150 cm and 200 cup, the delayed neutron yield from calculation and experiment was also compared. Finally, feasibility studies was conducted to determine if the linac parameters used in this research was capable of detecting 1 mg, 1 g and 1 kg of 238U. This work was funded

  7. Novel applications of fast neutron interrogation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1994-12-01

    The development of non-intrusive inspection methods for contraband consisting primarily of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and hydrogen requires the use of fast neutrons. While most elements can be sufficiently well detected by the thermal neutron capture process, some important ones, e.g., carbon and in particular oxygen, cannot be detected by this process. Fortunately, fast neutrons, with energies above the threshold for inelastic scattering, stimulate relatively strong and specific gamma ray lines from these elements. The main lines are: 6.13 for O, 4.43 for C, and 5.11, 2.31 and 1.64 MeV for N. Accelerator-generated neutrons in the energy range of 7 to 15 MeV are being considered as interrogating radiations in a variety of non-intrusive inspection systems for contraband, from explosives to drugs and from coal to smuggled, dutiable goods. In some applications, mostly for inspection of small items such as luggage, the decision process involves a rudimentary imaging, akin to emission tomography, to obtain the localized concentration of various elements. This technique is called FNA — Fast Neutron Analysis. While this approach offers improvements over the TNA (Thermal Neutron Analysis), it is not applicable to large objects such as shipping containers and trucks. For these challenging applications, a collimated beam of neutrons is rastered along the height of the moving object. In addition, the neutrons are generated in very narrow nanosecond pulses. The point of their interaction inside the object is determined by the time of flight (TOF) method, that is measuring the time elapsed from the neutron generation to the time of detection of the stimulated gamma rays. This technique, called PFNA (Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis), thus directly provides the elemental, and by inference, the chemical composition of the material at every volume element (voxel) of the object. The various neutron-based techniques are briefly described below.

  8. Illicit substance detection using fast-neutron interrogation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, T.J.; Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-06-01

    Fast-neutron interrogation techniques are of interest for detecting illicit substances such as explosives and drugs because of their ability to identify light elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are the primary constituents of these materials. Two particular techniques, Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis, are discussed. Examples of modeling studies are provided which illustrate the applications of these two techniques.

  9. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelashvili, I.; Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A.; Pedersen, B.; Beck, A.; Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J. M.; Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I.

    2015-06-01

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  10. Active Neutron Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-05-01

    Portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) may be used to interrogate suspicious items to detect, characterize, and quantify the presence fissionable material based upon the measurement of prompt and/or delayed emissions of neutrons and/or photons resulting from fission. The small size (<0.2 m3), light weight (<12 kg), and low power consumption (<50 W) of modern ENGs makes them ideally suited for use in field situations, incorporated into systems carried by 2-3 individuals under rugged conditions. At Idaho National Laboratory we are investigating techniques and portable equipment for performing active neutron interrogation of moderate sized objects less than ~2-4 m3 to detect shielded fissionable material. Our research in this area relies upon the use of pulsed deuterium-tritium ENGs and the measurement of die-away prompt fission neutrons and other neutron signatures in-between neutron pulses from the ENG and after the ENG is turned off.

  11. Pulsed neutron interrogation for detection of concealed special nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddy, Frank; Seidel, John; Flammang, Robert; Petrović, Bojan; Dulloo, Abdul; Congedo, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    A new neutron interrogation technique for detection of concealed Special Nuclear Material (SNM) is described. This technique is a combination of timing techniques from pulsed prompt gamma neutron activation analysis with silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor fast neutron detector technology. SiC detectors are a new class of radiation detectors that are ultra-fast and capable of processing high count rates. SiC detectors can operate during and within nanoseconds of the end of an intense neutron pulse, providing the ability to detect the prompt neutron emissions from fission events produced by the neutrons in concealed SNM on a much faster pulsing time scale than has been achieved by other techniques. Neutron-induced fission neutrons in 235U have been observed in the time intervals between pulses of 14-MeV neutrons from a deuterium-tritium electronic neutron generator. Initial measurements have emphasized the detection of SNM using thermal-neutron induced fission. Neutron pulsing and time-sequenced neutron counts were carried out on a hundreds of microseconds time scale, enabling the observation of prompt fission neutrons induced by the die-away of thermal neutrons following the 14-MeV pulse. A discussion of pulsed prompt-neutron measurements and of SiC detectors as well as initial measurement results will be presented.

  12. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  13. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  14. Applications of the associated-particle neutron-time-of-flight interrogation technique - From sheep to unexploded ordnance

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.

    2013-04-19

    The associated-particle technique (APT) will be presented for some diverse applications that include on the one hand, analyzing the body composition of live sheep and on the other, identifying the fillers of unexploded ordnance (UXO). What began with proof-of-concept studies using a large laboratory based 14 MeV neutron generator of the 'associated-particle' type, soon became possible for the first time to measure total body protein, fat and water simultaneously in live sheep using a compact field deployable associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG). This non-invasive technique offered the animal physiologist a tool to monitor the growth of an animal in response to new genetic, nutritional and pharmacologic methods for livestock improvement. While measurement of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) determined protein, fat and water because of the fixed stoichiometric proportions of these elements in these body components, the unique C/N and C/O ratios of high explosives revealed their identity in UXO. The algorithm that was developed and implemented to extract C, N and O counts from an APT generated gamma-ray spectrum will be presented together with the UXO investigations that involved preliminary proofof-concept studies and modeling with Monte Carlo produced synthetic spectra of 57-155 mm projectiles.

  15. System design considerations for fast-neutron interrogation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Curry, B.P.; Fink, C.L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1993-10-01

    Nonintrusive interrogation techniques that employ fast neutrons are of interest because of their sensitivity to light elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The primary requirement of a fast-neutron inspection system is to determine the value of atomic densities, or their ratios, over a volumetric grid superimposed on the object being interrogated. There are a wide variety of fast-neutron techniques that can provide this information. The differences between the various nuclear systems can be considered in light of the trade-offs relative to the performance requirements for each system`s components. Given a set of performance criteria, the operational requirements of the proposed nuclear systems may also differ. For instance, resolution standards will drive scanning times and tomographic requirements, both of which vary for the different approaches. We are modelling a number of the fast-neutron interrogation techniques currently under consideration, to include Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS), Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA), and its variant, 14-MeV Associated Particle Imaging (API). The goals of this effort are to determine the component requirements for each technique, identify trade-offs that system performance standards impose upon those component requirements, and assess the relative advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches. In determining the component requirements, we will consider how they are driven by system performance standards, such as image resolution, scanning time, and statistical uncertainty. In considering the trade-offs between system components, we concentrate primarily on those which are common to all approaches, for example: source characteristics versus detector array requirements. We will then use the analysis to propose some figures-of-merit that enable performance comparisons between the various fast-neutron systems under consideration. The status of this ongoing effort is presented.

  16. Accelerator requirements for fast-neutron interrogation of luggage and cargo

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1995-05-01

    Several different fast-neutron based techniques are being studied for the detection of contraband substances in luggage and cargo containers. The present work discusses the accelerator requirements for fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS), pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA), and 14-MeV neutron interrogation. These requirements are based on the results of Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron or gamma detection rates. Accelerator requirements are driven by count-rate considerations, spatial resolution and acceptable uncertainties in elemental compositions. The authors have limited their analyses to luggage inspection with FNTS and to cargo inspection with PFNA or 14-MeV neutron interrogation.

  17. The Pulsed Interrogation Neutron and Gamma (PING) inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.; Hensley, D.C.; Coffey, D.E.; Chapman, J.A.; Caylor, B.A.; Bailey, R.D. ); Vourvopoulos, G. ); Kehayias, J. . USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts Univ.)

    1991-01-01

    Explosives and chemical warfare (CW) agents possess elements and characteristic elemental ratios not commonly found in significant quantities in other items. These elements include nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, phosphorus, sulfur, and chlorine. The research described herein discusses the results to date of the development of a pulsed-neutron interrogation and gamma ({gamma})-ray system for detecting concealed explosives and for discriminating munitions containing CW agents and conventional explosives. Preliminary experimental data has suggested that distinct classes of chemical agents could also be distinguished, for example, nerve agents and mustard gases. Based on there results, the system is currently being designed for the detection of explosives concealed, for example, in airline luggage. Nuclear and x-ray technologies possess unique characteristics to quickly and reliably search for explosives. Both oxygen and nitrogen, present in sufficient concentrations, when detected, uniquely determine the presence of explosives. Carbon would be a third element that is common in all explosives, although it does not correlate uniquely with all known explosives. A system which identifies and quantifies all three elements would provide more reliable information about the interrogated material. We have previously demonstrated that the technique described in this paper can identify certain elements through fast- and slow-neutron interrogation and subsequent prompt- and delayed-{gamma}-ray detection. The identification of CW agent elements such as chlorine, phosphorus, sulfur, and fluorine, is also accomplished through the detection of characteristic capture {gamma}-rays. The Pulsed Interrogation Neutron and Gamma (PING) inspection system is based upon technology developed over twelve years for the determination of fissile mass quantities in radioactive waste, for the determination of sulfur in coal, and for in-vivo body composition measurements.

  18. The Pulsed Interrogation Neutron and Gamma (PING) inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.; Hensley, D.C.; Coffey, D.E.; Chapman, J.A.; Caylor, B.A.; Bailey, R.D.; Vourvopoulos, G.; Kehayias, J.

    1991-12-31

    Explosives and chemical warfare (CW) agents possess elements and characteristic elemental ratios not commonly found in significant quantities in other items. These elements include nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, phosphorus, sulfur, and chlorine. The research described herein discusses the results to date of the development of a pulsed-neutron interrogation and gamma ({gamma})-ray system for detecting concealed explosives and for discriminating munitions containing CW agents and conventional explosives. Preliminary experimental data has suggested that distinct classes of chemical agents could also be distinguished, for example, nerve agents and mustard gases. Based on there results, the system is currently being designed for the detection of explosives concealed, for example, in airline luggage. Nuclear and x-ray technologies possess unique characteristics to quickly and reliably search for explosives. Both oxygen and nitrogen, present in sufficient concentrations, when detected, uniquely determine the presence of explosives. Carbon would be a third element that is common in all explosives, although it does not correlate uniquely with all known explosives. A system which identifies and quantifies all three elements would provide more reliable information about the interrogated material. We have previously demonstrated that the technique described in this paper can identify certain elements through fast- and slow-neutron interrogation and subsequent prompt- and delayed-{gamma}-ray detection. The identification of CW agent elements such as chlorine, phosphorus, sulfur, and fluorine, is also accomplished through the detection of characteristic capture {gamma}-rays. The Pulsed Interrogation Neutron and Gamma (PING) inspection system is based upon technology developed over twelve years for the determination of fissile mass quantities in radioactive waste, for the determination of sulfur in coal, and for in-vivo body composition measurements.

  19. Scoping studies - photon and low energy neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, G.; Harker, Y.; Jones, J.; Harmon, F.

    1997-11-01

    High energy photon interrogation of waste containers, with the aim of producing photo nuclear reactions, in specific materials, holds the potential of good penetration and rapid analysis. Compact high energy ({le} 10 MeV) photon sources in the form of electron linacs producing bremstrahlung radiation are readily available. Work with the Varitron variable energy accelerator at ISU will be described. Advantages and limitations of the technique will be discussed. Using positive ion induced neutron producing reactions, it is possible to generate neutrons in a specific energy range. By this means, variable penetration and specific reactions can be excited in the assayed material. Examples using the {sup 3}H(p,n) and {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions as neutron sources will be discussed. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Hidden explosives detector employing pulsed neutron and x-ray interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Frederick J.; Caldwell, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Methods and systems for the detection of small amounts of modern, highly-explosive nitrogen-based explosives, such as plastic explosives, hidden in airline baggage. Several techniques are employed either individually or combined in a hybrid system. One technique employed in combination is X-ray imaging. Another technique is interrogation with a pulsed neutron source in a two-phase mode of operation to image both nitrogen and oxygen densities. Another technique employed in combination is neutron interrogation to form a hydrogen density image or three-dimensional map. In addition, deliberately-placed neutron-absorbing materials can be detected.

  1. Hidden explosives detector employing pulsed neutron and x-ray interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1993-04-06

    Methods and systems for the detection of small amounts of modern, highly-explosive nitrogen-based explosives, such as plastic explosives, hidden in airline baggage. Several techniques are employed either individually or combined in a hybrid system. One technique employed in combination is X-ray imaging. Another technique is interrogation with a pulsed neutron source in a two-phase mode of operation to image both nitrogen and oxygen densities. Another technique employed in combination is neutron interrogation to form a hydrogen density image or three-dimensional map. In addition, deliberately-placed neutron-absorbing materials can be detected.

  2. High-sensitivity transuranic waste assay by simultaneous proton and thermal-neutron interrogation using an electron linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, L.A.; Pigg, J.L.; Caldwell, J.T.; Cates, M.R.; Kunz, W.E.; Noel, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation from electron linear accelerator pulses is used as the basis for a unique assay technique for transuranics. Both prompt and delayed neutrons from the induced fissions are counted on a single detection system, and the contributions from each interrogating flux are resolved. Detection limits (3 sigma) for /sup 239/Pu were estimated to be 3 mg for prompt fission neutrons and 6 mg for delayed neutrons. The technique also provides a clear distinction between fissile and fertile nuclides.

  3. Radiological risks of neutron interrogation of food.

    PubMed

    Albright, S; Seviour, R

    2015-09-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in the use of neutron scanning techniques for security. Neutron techniques with a range of energy spectra including thermal, white and fast neutrons have been shown to work in different scenarios. As international interest in neutron scanning increases the risk of activating cargo, especially foodstuffs must be considered. There has been a limited amount of research into the activation of foods by neutron beams and we have sought to improve the amount of information available. In this paper we show that for three important metrics; activity, ingestion dose and Time to Background there is a strong dependence on the food being irradiated and a weak dependence on the energy of irradiation. Previous studies into activation used results based on irradiation of pharmaceuticals as the basis for research into activation of food. The earlier work reports that (24)Na production is the dominant threat which motivated the search for (24)Na(n,γ)(24)Na in highly salted foods. We show that (42)K can be more significant than (24)Na in low sodium foods such as Bananas and Potatoes. PMID:26083976

  4. Subthreshold neutron interrogator for detection of radioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Michael L.; Menlove, Howard O.; Baker, Michael P.

    1980-01-01

    A device for detecting fissionable material such as uranium in low concentrations by interrogating with photoneutrons at energy levels below 500 keV, and typically about 26 keV. Induced fast neutrons having energies above 500 keV by the interrogated fissionable material are detected by a liquid scintillator or recoil proportional counter which is sensitive to the induced fast neutrons. Since the induced fast neutrons are proportional to the concentration of fissionable material, detection of induced fast neutrons indicate concentration of the fissionable material.

  5. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  6. Special nuclear material detection using pulsed neutron interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Seidel, John G.; Flammang, Robert W.

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed neutron interrogation methods for detection of Special Nuclear Materials are being developed. Fast prompt neutrons from thermal neutron-induced fissions are detected in the time intervals following 100-μs neutron bursts from a pulsed D-T neutron generator operating at 1000 pulses per second. Silicon Carbide semiconductor neutron detectors are used to detect fission neutrons in the 30-840 μs time intervals following each 14-MeV D-T neutron pulse. Optimization of the neutron detectors has led to dramatic reduction of detector background and improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio for Special Nuclear Material detection. Detection of Special Nuclear Materials in the presence of lead, cadmium and plywood shielding has been demonstrated. Generally, the introduction of shielding leads to short thermal neutron die-away times of 100-200 μs or less. The pulsed neutron interrogation method developed allows detection of the neutron signal even when the die-away time is less than 100 μs.

  7. Active-Interrogation Measurements of Fast Neutrons from Induced Fission in Low-Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani

    2014-02-01

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutron to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials.

  8. Addressing Different Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures from Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-10-01

    In a continuing effort to examine portable methods for implementing active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded fissionable material research is underway to investigate the utility of analyzing multiple time-correlated signatures. Time correlation refers here to the existence of unique characteristics of the fission interrogation signature related to the start and end of an irradiation, as well as signatures present in between individual pulses of an irradiating source. Traditional measurement approaches in this area have typically worked to detect die-away neutrons after the end of each pulse, neutrons in between pulses related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products, or neutrons or gamma rays related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products after the end of an irradiation exposure. In this paper we discus the potential weaknesses of assessing only one signature versus multiple signatures and make the assertion that multiple complimentary and orthogonal measurements should be used to bolster the performance of active interrogation systems, helping to minimize susceptibility to the weaknesses of individual signatures on their own. Recognizing that the problem of detection is a problem of low count rates, we are exploring methods to integrate commonly used signatures with rarely used signatures to improve detection capabilities for these measurements. In this paper we will discuss initial activity in this area with this approach together with observations of some of the strengths and weaknesses of using these different signatures.

  9. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  10. Design and characterisation of a pulsed neutron interrogation facility.

    PubMed

    Favalli, A; Pedersen, B

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre recently obtained a license to operate a new experimental device intended for research in the field of nuclear safeguards. The research projects currently being planned for the new device includes mass determination of fissile materials in matrices and detection of contraband non-nuclear materials. The device incorporates a commercial pulsed neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. In this configuration, a relatively high thermal neutron flux with a long lifetime is achieved inside the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator, a sample may be interrogated by a pure thermal neutron flux during repeated time periods. The paper reports on the design of the new device and the pulsed fast and thermal neutron source. The thermal neutron flux caused by the neutron generator and the graphite structure has been characterised by foil activation, fission chamber and (3)He proportional counter measurements. PMID:17496298

  11. Thermal Neutron Imaging in an Active Interrogation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, Peter E.; Forman, Leon; Norman, Daren R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of excitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutron-emitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  12. Thermal neutron imaging in an active interrogation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L., and Norman, D.R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of xcitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutronemitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  13. Measurement of uranium and plutonium in solid waste by passive photon or neutron counting and isotopic neutron source interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, T.W.

    1980-03-01

    A summary of the status and applicability of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques for the measurement of uranium and plutonium in 55-gal barrels of solid waste is reported. The NDA techniques reviewed include passive gamma-ray and x-ray counting with scintillator, solid state, and proportional gas photon detectors, passive neutron counting, and active neutron interrogation with neutron and gamma-ray counting. The active neutron interrogation methods are limited to those employing isotopic neutron sources. Three generic neutron sources (alpha-n, photoneutron, and /sup 252/Cf) are considered. The neutron detectors reviewed for both prompt and delayed fission neutron detection with the above sources include thermal (/sup 3/He, /sup 10/BF/sub 3/) and recoil (/sup 4/He, CH/sub 4/) proportional gas detectors and liquid and plastic scintillator detectors. The instrument found to be best suited for low-level measurements (< 10 nCi/g) is the /sup 252/Cf Shuffler. The measurement technique consists of passive neutron counting followed by cyclic activation using a /sup 252/Cf source and delayed neutron counting with the source withdrawn. It is recommended that a waste assay station composed of a /sup 252/Cf Shuffler, a gamma-ray scanner, and a screening station be tested and evaluated at a nuclear waste site. 34 figures, 15 tables.

  14. A qualitative analysis of the neutron population in fresh and spent fuel assemblies during simulated interrogation using the differential die-away technique

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tobin, Stephen J.; Lundkvist, Niklas; Goodsell, Alison V.; Grape, Sophie; Hendricks, John S.; Henzl, Vladimir; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the differential die-away (DDA) technique to analyse the time-dependent behaviour of the neutron population in fresh and spent nuclear fuel assemblies as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) Project. Simulations were performed to investigate both a possibly portable as well as a permanent DDA instrument. Taking advantage of a custom made modification to the MCNPX code, the variation in the neutron population, simultaneously in time and space, was examined. The motivation for this research was to improve the design of the DDA instrument, as it is bemore » ing considered for possible deployment at the Central Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Encapsulation Plant in Sweden (Clab), as well as to assist in the interpretation of the both simulated and measured signals.« less

  15. A qualitative analysis of the neutron population in fresh and spent fuel assemblies during simulated interrogation using the differential die-away technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J.; Lundkvist, Niklas; Goodsell, Alison V.; Grape, Sophie; Hendricks, John S.; Henzl, Vladimir; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the differential die-away (DDA) technique to analyse the time-dependent behaviour of the neutron population in fresh and spent nuclear fuel assemblies as part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel (NGSI-SF) Project. Simulations were performed to investigate both a possibly portable as well as a permanent DDA instrument. Taking advantage of a custom made modification to the MCNPX code, the variation in the neutron population, simultaneously in time and space, was examined. The motivation for this research was to improve the design of the DDA instrument, as it is be ing considered for possible deployment at the Central Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Encapsulation Plant in Sweden (Clab), as well as to assist in the interpretation of the both simulated and measured signals.

  16. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  17. Notes on SAW Tag Interrogation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of interrogating a single SAW RFID tag with a known ID and known range in the presence of multiple interfering tags under the following assumptions: (1) The RF propagation environment is well approximated as a simple delay channel with geometric power-decay constant alpha >/= 2. (2) The interfering tag IDs are unknown but well approximated as independent, identically distributed random samples from a probability distribution of tag ID waveforms with known second-order properties, and the tag of interest is drawn independently from the same distribution. (3) The ranges of the interfering tags are unknown but well approximated as independent, identically distributed realizations of a random variable rho with a known probability distribution f(sub rho) , and the tag ranges are independent of the tag ID waveforms. In particular, we model the tag waveforms as random impulse responses from a wide-sense-stationary, uncorrelated-scattering (WSSUS) fading channel with known bandwidth and scattering function. A brief discussion of the properties of such channels and the notation used to describe them in this document is given in the Appendix. Under these assumptions, we derive the expression for the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for an arbitrary combination of transmitted interrogation signal and linear receiver filter. Based on this expression, we derive the optimal interrogator configuration (i.e., transmitted signal/receiver filter combination) in the two extreme noise/interference regimes, i.e., noise-limited and interference-limited, under the additional assumption that the coherence bandwidth of the tags is much smaller than the total tag bandwidth. Finally, we evaluate the performance of both optimal interrogators over a broad range of operating scenarios using both numerical simulation based on the assumed model and Monte Carlo simulation based on a small sample of measured tag waveforms. The performance evaluation results not only

  18. A portable active interrogation system using a switchable AmBe neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew; Hertz, Kristin; Kunz, Christopher; Mascarenhas, Nicholas

    2005-09-01

    Active neutron interrogation is an effective technique used to locate fissionable material. This paper discusses a portable system that utilizes a AmBe neutron source. The AmBe source consists of an americium alpha source and a beryllium target that can be switched into alignment to turn the source on and out of alignment to turn the source off. This offers a battery operated backpack portable source. The detector system that has been fabricated for use with this source is a fifteen tube 3He neutron detector. The results of initial experiments with the detector and MCNP calculations are discussed.

  19. Determining plutonium mass in spent fuel using Cf-252 interrogation with prompt neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jianwei; Tobin, Stephen J; Menlove, Howard O; Croft, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron (CIPN) detection is proposed as one of 14 NDA techniques to determine Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies (FAs). CIPN is a low-cost and portable instrument, and it looks like a modified fork detector combined with an active interrogation source. Fission chamber (FC) is chosen as neutron detector because of its insensitivity to {gamma} radiation. The CIPN assay is comprised of two measurements, a background count and an active count, without and with the {sup 252}Cf source next to the fuel respectively. The net signal above background is primarily due to the multiplication of Cf source neutrons caused by the fissile content. The capability of CIPN to detect diversion and to determine fissile content was quantified using MCNPX simulations. New schemes were proposed (such as burnup and cooling time correction, etc.) and the results show that the fissile content of a target spent fuel assembly can be determined using CIPN signal.

  20. Optimized performance for neutron interrogation to detect SNM

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Asztalos, S J; Biltoft, P J; Church, J A; Descalle, M; Hall, J M; Luu, T C; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; Norman, E B; Petersen, D C; Pruet, J A; Prussin, S G

    2007-02-14

    A program of simulations and validating experiments was utilized to evaluate a concept for neutron interrogation of commercial cargo containers that would reliably detect special nuclear material (SNM). The goals were to develop an interrogation system capable of detecting a 5 kg solid sphere of high-enriched uranium (HEU) even when deeply embedded in commercial cargo. Performance goals included a minimum detection probability, P{sub d} {ge} 95%, a maximum occurrence of false positive indications, P{sub fA} {le} 0.001, and maximum scan duration of t {le} 1 min. The conditions necessary to meet these goals were demonstrated in experimental measurements even when the SNM is deeply buried in any commercial cargo, and are projected to be met successfully in the most challenging cases of steel or hydrocarbons at areal density {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. Optimal performance was obtained with a collimated ({Delta}{Theta} = {+-} 15{sup o}) neutron beam at energy E{sub n} = 7 MeV produced by the D(d,n) reaction with the deuteron energy E{sub d} = 4 MeV. Two fission product signatures are utilized to uniquely identify SNM, including delayed neutrons detected in a large array of polyethylene moderated 3He proportional counters and high energy {beta}-delayed fission product {gamma}-radiation detected in a large array of 61 x 61 x 25 cm{sup 3} plastic scintillators. The latter detectors are nearly blind to normal terrestrial background radiation by setting an energy threshold on the detection at E{sub min} {ge} 3 MeV. Detection goals were attained with a low beam current (I{sub d} = 15-65 {micro}A) source up to {rho}L = 75 g/cm{sup 2} utilizing long irradiations, T = 30 sec, and long counting times, t = 30-100 sec. Projecting to a higher beam current, I{sub d} {ge} 600 {micro}A and larger detector array the detection and false alarm goals would be attained even with intervening cargo overburden as large as {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. The latter cargo thickness corresponds to

  1. Signal predictions for a proposed fast neutron interrogation method

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K.E.

    1992-12-01

    We have applied the Monte Carlo radiation transport code COG) to assess the utility of a proposed explosives detection scheme based on neutron emission. In this scheme a pulsed neutron beam is generated by an approximately seven MeV deuteron beam incident on a thick Be target. A scintillation detector operating in the current mode measures the neutrons transmitted through the object as a function of time. The flight time of unscattered neutrons from the source to the detector is simply related to the neutron energy. This information along with neutron cross section excitation functions is used to infer the densities of H, C, N and O in the volume sampled. The code we have chosen to use enables us to create very detailed and realistic models of the geometrical configuration of the system, the neutron source and of the detector response. By calculating the signals that will be observed for several configurations and compositions of interrogated object we can investigate and begin to understand how a system that could actually be fielded will perform. Using this modeling capability many early on with substantial savings in time and cost and with improvements in performance. We will present our signal predictions for simple single element test cases and for explosive compositions. From these studies it is dear that the interpretation of the signals from such an explosives identification system will pose a substantial challenge.

  2. Performance report for a small package counter that uses active neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, R.A.; Wishard, B.E.; Santopietro, R.D.; Anderson, B.P.

    1993-07-07

    An active neutron interrogation system utilizing the differential die-away technique (DDT), was built to assay fissile material in small waste packages for a variety of matrices. Within minutes the system can make a ``go/no-go`` decision for sorting low-level waste (LLW) from transuranic waste (TRUW). It can also provide gram-level accountability of weapons-grade (WG) Pu in TRUW providing lumps of self-shielding fissile material are absent.

  3. INL Neutron Interrogation R&D: FY2010 MPACT End of Year Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. Wharton; S. M. Watson

    2010-08-01

    Experiments have been carried out to investigate the feasibility and utility of using neutron interrogation and small-scale, portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) instruments for assaying uranium for safeguards applications. Prior work has shown the potential of the PGNAA technique for assaying uranium using reactor-based neutron sources and high-yield electronic neutron generators (ENGs). In this project we adapted Idaho National Laboratory's portable isotopic neutron spectroscopy (PINS) PGNAA system for measuring natural-enrichment uranium yellowcake and metallic depleted uranium and highly enriched uranium. This work used 252Cf as well as deuterium-deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) ENGs. For PGNAA measurements a limiting factor when assaying large objects is the detector dead time due to fast-neutron scattering off of the uranium; this limits the maximum useable neutron source strength to O(107) neutrons per second. Under these conditions the low PGNAA reaction cross sections for uranium prohibited the collection of useful uranium PGNAA signatures from either the yellowcake or metallic uranium samples. Measurement of the decay product activation in these materials following irradiation in the PGNAA geometry similarly did not produce useful uranium activation product – fission product signatures. A customized irradiation geometry tailored to optimally thermalize the interrogation neutron source, intended only for generating long-lived activation products – fission products and not intended for PGNAA measurements, might be possible using small scale ENGs but an application need and a modeling and simulation exercise would be recommended before advancing to experiments. Neutron interrogation PGNAA using a DT-ENG was found to be a quick and useful qualitative method for detecting the presence of oxygen in natural-enrichment uranium yellowcake. With a low effort of development work it would be reasonable to expect this measurement

  4. Neutron Interrogation System For Underwater Threat Detection And Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-03-10

    Wartime and terrorist activities, training and munitions testing, dumping and accidents have generated significant munitions contamination in the coastal and inland waters in the United States and abroad. Although current methods provide information about the existence of the anomaly (for instance, metal objects) in the sea bottom, they fail to identify the nature of the found objects. Field experience indicates that often in excess of 90% of objects excavated during the course of munitions clean up are found to be non-hazardous items (false alarm). The technology to detect and identify waterborne or underwater threats is also vital for protection of critical infrastructures (ports, dams, locks, refineries, and LNG/LPG). We are proposing a compact neutron interrogation system, which will be used to confirm possible threats by determining the chemical composition of the suspicious underwater object. The system consists of an electronic d-T 14-MeV neutron generator, a gamma detector to detect the gamma signal from the irradiated object and a data acquisition system. The detected signal then is analyzed to quantify the chemical elements of interest and to identify explosives or chemical warfare agents.

  5. Neutron Interrogation System For Underwater Threat Detection And Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-03-01

    Wartime and terrorist activities, training and munitions testing, dumping and accidents have generated significant munitions contamination in the coastal and inland waters in the United States and abroad. Although current methods provide information about the existence of the anomaly (for instance, metal objects) in the sea bottom, they fail to identify the nature of the found objects. Field experience indicates that often in excess of 90% of objects excavated during the course of munitions clean up are found to be non-hazardous items (false alarm). The technology to detect and identify waterborne or underwater threats is also vital for protection of critical infrastructures (ports, dams, locks, refineries, and LNG/LPG). We are proposing a compact neutron interrogation system, which will be used to confirm possible threats by determining the chemical composition of the suspicious underwater object. The system consists of an electronic d-T 14-MeV neutron generator, a gamma detector to detect the gamma signal from the irradiated object and a data acquisition system. The detected signal then is analyzed to quantify the chemical elements of interest and to identify explosives or chemical warfare agents.

  6. Transuranic waste detection by photon interrogation and on-line delayed neutron counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyoussi, A.; Romeyer-Dherbey, J.; Jallu, F.; Payan, E.; Buisson, A.; Nurdin, G.; Allano, J.

    2000-02-01

    A comprehensive program is currently in progress at several laboratories for the development of sensitive, practical, non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of low-level transuranics (TRUs) in bulk solid wastes. This paper describes the method being developed to assay high density TRU waste packages using photon interrogation. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from an electron linear accelerator to produce high-energy photon bursts from a metallic converter. The photons induce fissions in a TRU waste package which is inside an original neutron separating and counting cavity (NS2C). When fission is induced in trace amounts of TRU contaminants in waste material, it provides “signatures” from fission products that can be used to assay the material before disposal. We give here the results from counting photofission-induced delayed neutrons from 239Pu, 235U and 238U in sample matrices. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse of the LINAC by using the sequential photon interrogation and neutron counting signatures (SPHINCS) technique which had been developed in the present framework. The SPHINCS method enhances the available counts by a factor of about 20 compared with the counting of delayed neutrons only, after the irradiation period. Furthermore, the use of SPHINCS measurement technique coupled with the NS2C facility improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of about 30. This decreases the detection limit. The electron linear accelerator operates at 15 MeV, 140 mA, and 2.5 μs wide pulse at a 50 and 6.25 Hz rate. The dynamics of photofission and delayed neutron production, NS2C advantages and performances, use of an electron linear accelerator as a particle source, experimental and electronics details, and future experimental works are discussed.

  7. Transuranic waste detection by photon interrogation and on-line delayed neutron counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyoussi, A.; Romeyer-Dherbey, J.; Jallu, F.; Payan, E.; Buisson, A.; Nurdin, G.; Allano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A comprehensive program is currently in progress at several laboratories for the development of sensitive, practical, non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of low-level transuranics (TRUs) in bulk solid wastes. This paper describes the method being developed to assay high density TRU waste packages using photon interrogation. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from an electron linear accelerator to produce high-energy photon bursts from a metallic converter. The photons induce fissions in a TRU waste package which is inside an original neutron separating and counting cavity (NS2C). When fission is induced in trace amounts of TRU contaminants in waste material, it provides "signatures" from fission products that can be used to assay the material before disposal. We give here the results from counting photofission-induced delayed neutrons from 239Pu, 235U and 238U in sample matrices. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse of the LINAC by using the sequential photon interrogation and neutron counting signatures (SPHINCS) technique which had been developed in the present framework. The SPHINCS method enhances the available counts by a factor of about 20 compared with the counting of delayed neutrons only, after the irradiation period. Furthermore, the use of SPHINCS measurement technique coupled with the NS2C facility improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of about 30. This decreases the detection limit. The electron linear accelerator operates at 15 MeV, 140 mA, and 2.5 μs wide pulse at a 50 and 6.25 Hz rate. The dynamics of photofission and delayed neutron production, NS2C advantages and performances, use of an electron linear accelerator as a particle source, experimental and electronics details, and future experimental works are discussed.

  8. Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2008-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at Idaho National Laboratory to study methodology and instrumentation for performing neutron active interrogation die-away analyses for the purpose of detecting shielded fissionable material. Here we report initial work using a portable DT electronic neutron generator with a He-3 fast neutron detector to detect shielded fissionable material including >2 kg quantities of enriched uranium and plutonium. Measurements have been taken of bare material as well as of material hidden within a large plywood cube. Results from this work have demonstrated the efficacy of the die-away neutron measurement technique for quickly detecting the presence of special nuclear material hidden within plywood shields by analyzing the time dependent neutron signals in-between neutron generator pulses. Using a DT electronic neutron generator operating at 300 Hz with a yield of approximately 0.36 x 10**8 neutrons per second, 2.2 kg of enriched uranium hidden within a 0.60 m x 0.60 m x 0.70 m volume of plywood was positively detected with a measurement signal 2-sigma above the passive background within 1 second. Similarly, for a 500 second measurement period a lower detection limit of approaching the gram level could be expected with the same simple set-up.

  9. Polarization multiplexed interrogation technique for FBG sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikdar, Debabrata; Tiwari, Vinita; Soni, Anupam; Jaiswal, Ritesh; Bhanot, Surekha

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes a polarization multiplexed interrogation technique for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor array. The novelty of the proposed model is its ability to reduce interference and cross talk, thus allowing larger number of FBG sensors to be interrogated in an array. The calibration technique has been illustrated in this work for the FBG sensor array, where data from each sensor are linearly polarized and multiplexed before co-propagation, to find out the tapping points that enable identification of each sensor data uniquely. Simulation has been carried out for odd number and even number of sensors in an array. Even with interfering input, this proposed scheme can interrogate and distinctively identify each sensor data using appropriate tuning of polarization-splitter, polarization-rotator, and polarization-attenuator at the detector end during the calibration process. The significance of the proposed method is its compact size, which makes this calibration system ready to be deployed in real-time sensing applications and data acquisition from the FBG sensor array.

  10. Experimental benchmark of MCNPX calculations against self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (SINRD) fresh fuel measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; La Fleur, Adrienne M; Charlton, William S; Lee, S Y; Tobin, S J

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to measure the {sup 235}U concentration in a PWR 15 x 15 fresh LEU fuel assembly in air. Different measurement configurations were simulated in Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended transport code (MCNPX) and benchmarked against experimental results. The sensitivity of SINRD is based on using the same fissile materials in the fission chambers as are present in the fuel because the effect of resonance absorption lines in the transmitted flux is amplified by the corresponding (n,j) reaction peaks in fission chamber. Due to the low spontaneous fission rate of {sup 238}U (i.e. no curium in the fresh fuel), {sup 252}Cf sources were used to self-interrogate the fresh fuel pins. The resonance absorption of these neutrons in the fresh fuel pins can be measured using {sup 235}U fission chambers placed adjacent to the assembly. We used ratios of different fission chambers to reduce the number of unknowns we are trying measure because the neutron source strength and detector-fuel assembly coupling cancel in the ratios. The agreement between MCNPX results and experimental measurements confirms the accuracy of the MCNPX models used. The development of SINRD to measure the fissile content in spent fuel is important to the improvement of nuclear safeguards and material accountability. Future work includes the use of this technique to measure the fissile content in LWR spent fuel in water.

  11. Fissile material measurements using the differential die-away self interrogation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Schear, Melissa A; Menlove, Howard O; Tobin, Stephen J; Evans, Louise G; Lee, S Y

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is substantial research effort focused on quantifying plutonium (Pu) mass in spent fuel using non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques. Of the several techniques being investigated for this purpose, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation (DDSI) is a recently proposed, neutron-based NDA technique capable of quantifying the total fissile content in an assembly. Unlike the conventional Differential Die-Away (DDA) technique, DOSI does not require an external neutron source for sample interrogation, but rather, uses the spontaneous fission neutrons originating from {sup 244}Cm within the spent fuel for self-interrogation. The essence of the technique lies in the time separation between the detection of spontaneous fission neutrons from {sup 244}Cm and the detection of induced fission neutrons at a later time. The DDSI detector design imposes this time separation by optimizing the die-away times ({tau}) of the detector and sample interrogation regions to obtain an early and late neutron distribution respectively. The ratio of the count rates in the late gate to the early gate for singles, doubles, and triples is directly proportional to the fissile content present in the sample, which has already been demonstrated for simplified fuel cases using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The current work applies the DDSI concept to more complex samples, specifically spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies with varying isotopics resulting from a range of initial enrichment, bumup, and cooling time. We assess the feasibility of using the late gate to early gate ratio as a reliable indicator of overall fissile mass for a range of assemblies by defining a {sup 239}Pu effective mass which indicates the mass of {sup 239}Pu that would yield the same DDSI signal as the combined mass of major fissile isotopes present in the sample. This work is important for assessing the individual capability of the DDSI instrument in quantifying fissile mass in

  12. Active Interrogation for Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Dougan, Arden

    2015-11-05

    The DDA instrument for nuclear safeguards is a fast, non-destructive assay, active neutron interrogation technique using an external 14 MeV DT neutron generator for characterization and verification of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  13. Neutron absorbers and detector types for spent fuel verification using the self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossa, Riccardo; Borella, Alessandro; Labeau, Pierre-Etienne; Pauly, Nicolas; van der Meer, Klaas

    2015-08-01

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive non-destructive assay (NDA) technique that is proposed for the direct measurement of 239Pu in a spent fuel assembly. The insertion of neutron detectors wrapped with different neutron absorbing materials, or neutron filters, in the central guide tube of a PWR fuel assembly is envisaged to measure the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of 239Pu. In addition, the measurement of the fast neutron flux is foreseen. This paper is focused on the determination of the Gd and Cd neutron filters thickness to maximize the detection of neutrons within the resonance region. Moreover, several detector types are compared to identify the optimal condition and to assess the expected total neutron counts that can be obtained with the SINRD measurements. Results from Monte Carlo simulations showed that ranges between 0.1-0.3 mm and 0.5-1.0 mm ensure the optimal conditions for the Gd and Cd filters, respectively. Moreover, a 239Pu fission chamber is better suited to measure neutrons close to the 0.3 eV resonance and it has the highest sensitivity to 239Pu, in comparison with a 235U fission chamber, with a 3He proportional counter, and with a 10B proportional counter. The use of a thin Gd filter and a thick Cd filter is suggested for the 239Pu and 235U fission chambers to increase the total counts achieved in a measurement, while a thick Gd filter and a thin Cd filter are envisaged for the 3He and 10B proportional counters to increase the sensitivity to 239Pu. We concluded that an optimization process that takes into account measurement time, filters thickness, and detector size is needed to develop a SINRD detector that can meet the requirement for an efficient verification of spent fuel assemblies.

  14. Multiple-Coincidence Active Neutron Interrogation of Fissionable Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsley, J.R., Hurley, J.P., Trainham, R., Keegan, R.P.

    2008-11-14

    In an extension of the Associated Particle Imaging technique that is used for the detection and imaging of hidden explosives, the present measurements use a beam of tagged 14.1 MeV neutrons in coincidence with two or more gammas to probe for the presence of fissionable materials. We have measured neutron-gamma-gamma coincidences with targets of depleted uranium, tungsten, lead, iron, and carbon and will present results that show the multiple-coincidence counting rate for the depleted uranium is substantially higher than any of the non-fissionable materials. In addition, the presence of coincidences involving delayed particle spectra provides a signature for fissionable materials that is distinct from that for non-fissionable ones. Information from the tagged neutron involved in the coincidence event is used to compute the position of the fissionable material in all three dimensions. The result is an imaging probe for fissionable materials that is compact and portable, and produces relatively low levels of background radiation. Simultaneous measurements on packages of interest for both explosives and fissionable materials are now feasible.

  15. Low-level transuranic waste assay by photon interrogation and neutron counting

    SciTech Connect

    Lyoussi, A.; Edeline, J.C.; Romeyer-Dherbey, J.; Buisson, A.

    1993-12-31

    A comprehensive program is currently in progress at several laboratories for the development of sensitive, practical, non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of low-level transuranics (TRU) in bulk solid wastes. This report describes the method being developed to assay high density TRU waste packages using photon interrogation. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from a linear accelerator (LINAC) to produce high-energy photon bursts from a metallic converter. The photons induce fissions in TRU. When fission is induced in trace amounts of TRU contaminants in waste material, it provides ``signatures`` from fission products that can be used to assay the material before disposal. The authors give here the results from counting photofission-induced delayed neutrons from {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U in sample matrices. They counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse of the LINAC. This enhances the available counts by a factor about 20 compared with the counting of delayed neutrons only after the irradiation period. The electron linear accelerator operates at 15 MeV, 140 mA, and 2.5 {mu}s wide pulse at a 50 Hz rate. The dynamics of photofission and delayed neutron production, use of an electron linear accelerator as a particle source, experimental and electronics details, and a future experimental works are discussed.

  16. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than −36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated. PMID:26927098

  17. An Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Using RF Interrogation Technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Ho; Choi, Sang-Jin; Jeon, Keum Soo; Pan, Jae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel non-contact optical fiber displacement sensor. It uses a radio frequency (RF) interrogation technique which is based on bidirectional modulation of a Mach-Zehnder electro-optical modulator (MZ-EOM). The displacement is measured from the free spectral range (FSR) which is determined by the dip frequencies of the modulated MZ-EOM transfer function. In experiments, the proposed sensor showed a sensitivity of 456 kHz/mm or 1.043 kHz/V in a measurement range of 7 mm. The displacement resolution of the proposed sensor depends on the linewidth and the power of the optical source. Resolution better than 0.05 μm would be achieved if an optical source which has a linewidth narrower than 1.5 nm and a received power larger than -36 dBm is used. Also, the multiplexing characteristic of the proposed sensor was experimentally validated. PMID:26927098

  18. Detection of Special Nuclear Material in Cargo Containers Using Neutron Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D; Accatino, M; Bernstein, A; Candy, J; Dougan, A; Hall, J; Loshak, A; Manatt, D; Meyer, A; Pohl, B; Prussin, S; Walling, R; Weirup, D

    2003-08-01

    The goal of the work reported here is to develop a concept for an active neutron interrogation system that can detect small targets of SNM contraband in cargo containers, roughly 5 kg HEU or 1 kg Pu, even when well shielded by a thick cargo. It is essential that the concept be reliable and have low false-positive and false-negative error rates. It also must be rapid to avoid interruption of commerce, completing the analysis in minutes. A new radiation signature unique to SNM has been identified that utilizes high-energy (E{sub {gamma}} = 3-7 MeV) fission product {gamma}-ray emission. Fortunately, this high-energy {gamma}-ray signature is robust in that it is very distinct compared to normal background radiation where there is no comparable high-energy {gamma}-ray radiation. Equally important, it has a factor of 10 higher yield than delayed neutrons that are the basis of classical interrogation technique normally used on small unshielded specimens of SNM. And it readily penetrates two meters of low-Z and high-Z cargo at the expected density of {approx} 0.5 gm/cm{sup 3}. Consequently, we expect that in most cases the signature flux at the container wall is at least 2-3 decades more intense than delayed neutron signals used historically and facilitates the detection of SNM even when shielded by thick cargo. Experiments have verified this signature and its predicted characteristics. However, they revealed an important interference due to the activation of {sup 16}O by the {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N reaction that produces a 6 MeV {gamma}-ray following a 7-sec {beta}-decay of the {sup 16}N. This interference is important when irradiating with 14 MeV neutrons but is eliminated when lower energy neutron sources are utilized since the reaction threshold for {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N is 10 MeV. The signature {gamma}-ray fluxes exiting a thick cargo can be detected in large arrays of scintillation detectors to produce useful signal count rates of 2-4 x 10{sup 4} cps. That is high

  19. Fissile and fertile nuclear material measurements using a new differential die-away self-interrogation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Tobin, Stephen J; Menlove, S H

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for the measurement of fissile and fertile nuclear materials in spent fuel and plutonium laden materials such as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The technique, called differential die-away self-interrogation, is similar to traditional differential die-away analysis, but it does not require a pulsed neutron generator or pulsed beam accelerator, and it can measure the fertile mass in addition to the fissile mass. The new method uses the spontaneous fission neutrons from {sup 244}Cm in spent fuel and {sup 240}Pu effective neutrons in MOX as the 'pulsed' neutron source with an average of {approx} 2.7 neutrons per pulse. The time correlated neutrons from the spontaneous fission and the subsequent induced fissions are analyzed as a function of time to determine the spontaneous fission rate, the induced fast-neutron fissions, and the induced thermal-neutron fissions. The fissile mass is determined from the induced thermal-neutron fissions that are produced by reflected thermal neutrons that originated from the spontaneous fission reaction. The sensitivity of the fissile mass measurement is enhanced by the use of two measurements, with and without a cadmium liner between the sample and the hydrogenous moderator. The fertile mass is determined from the multiplicity analysis of the neutrons detected soon after the initial triggering neutron is detected. The method obtains good sensitivity by the optimal design of two different neutron die-away regions: a short die-away for the neutron detector region and a longer die-away for the sample interrogation region.

  20. Active Neutron Interrogation of Non-Radiological Materials with NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; Mihalczo, John T

    2012-02-01

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), although primarily designed for analyzing special nuclear material, is capable of identifying nonradiological materials with a wide range of measurement techniques. This report demonstrates four different measurement methods, complementary to fast-neutron imaging, which can be used for material identification: DT transmission, DT scattering, californium transmission, and active time-tagged gamma spectroscopy. Each of the four techniques was used to evaluate how these methods can be used to identify four materials: aluminum, polyethylene, graphite, and G-10 epoxy. While such measurements have been performed individually in the past, in this project, all four measurements were performed on the same set of materials. The results of these measurements agree well with predicted results. In particular, the results of the active gamma spectroscopy measurements demonstrate the technique's applicability in a future version of NMIS which will incorporate passive and active gamma-ray spectroscopy. This system, designated as a fieldable NMIS (FNMIS), is under development by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Verification.

  1. Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, Howard O.; Stewart, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the .sup.235 U nuclide content of samples containing UF.sub.6, UF.sub.4, or UO.sub.2 utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1.sigma.) for cylinders containing UF.sub.6 with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF.sub.6 takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures.

  2. Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    DOEpatents

    Menlove, H.O.; Stewart, J.E.

    1985-02-04

    Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the /sup 235/U nuclide content of samples containing UF/sub 6/, UF/sub 4/, or UO/sub 2/ utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1sigma) for cylinders containing UF/sub 6/ with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF/sub 6/ takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Molecular techniques to interrogate and edit the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome.

    PubMed

    Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-05-01

    The success of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism is to a large extent due to the wide range of molecular techniques that are available for its characterization. Here, we review some of the techniques currently used to modify and interrogate the C. reinhardtii nuclear genome and explore several technologies under development. Nuclear mutants can be generated with ultraviolet (UV) light and chemical mutagens, or by insertional mutagenesis. Nuclear transformation methods include biolistic delivery, agitation with glass beads, and electroporation. Transforming DNA integrates into the genome at random sites, and multiple strategies exist for mapping insertion sites. A limited number of studies have demonstrated targeted modification of the nuclear genome by approaches such as zinc-finger nucleases and homologous recombination. RNA interference is widely used to knock down expression levels of nuclear genes. A wide assortment of transgenes has been successfully expressed in the Chlamydomonas nuclear genome, including transformation markers, fluorescent proteins, reporter genes, epitope tagged proteins, and even therapeutic proteins. Optimized expression constructs and strains help transgene expression. Emerging technologies such as the CRISPR/Cas9 system, high-throughput mutant identification, and a whole-genome knockout library are being developed for this organism. We discuss how these advances will propel future investigations. PMID:25704665

  4. Neutron detection technique

    SciTech Connect

    Oblath, N.S.; Poon, A.W.P.

    2000-09-14

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has the ability to measure the total flux of all active flavors of neutrinos using the neutral current reaction, whose signature is a neutron. By comparing the rates of the neutral current reaction to the charged current reaction, which only detects electron neutrinos, one can test the neutrino oscillation hypothesis independent of solar models. It is necessary to understand the neutron detection efficiency of the detector to make use of the neutral current reaction. This report demonstrates a coincidence technique to identify neutrons emitted from the {sup 252}Cf neutron calibration source. The source releases on average four neutrons when a {sup 252}Cf nucleus spontaneously fissions. Each neutron is detected as a separate event when the neutron is captured by a deuteron, releasing a gamma ray of approximately 6.25 MeV. This gamma ray is in turn detected by the photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. By investigating the time and spatial separation between neutron-like events, it is possible to obtain a pure sample of neutrons for calibration study. Preliminary results of the technique applied to two calibration runs are presented.

  5. Neutron-based nonintrusive inspection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1997-02-01

    Non-intrusive inspection of large objects such as trucks, sea-going shipping containers, air cargo containers and pallets is gaining attention as a vital tool in combating terrorism, drug smuggling and other violation of international and national transportation and Customs laws. Neutrons are the preferred probing radiation when material specificity is required, which is most often the case. Great strides have been made in neutron based inspection techniques. Fast and thermal neutrons, whether in steady state or in microsecond, or even nanosecond pulses are being employed to interrogate, at high speeds, for explosives, drugs, chemical agents, and nuclear and many other smuggled materials. Existing neutron techniques will be compared and their current status reported.

  6. A simulation study of fast neutron interrogation for standoff detection of improvised explosive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heider, S. A.; Dunn, W. L.

    2015-11-01

    The signature-based radiation-scanning technique utilizes radiation detector responses, called "signatures," and compares these to "templates" in order to differentiate targets that contain certain materials, such as explosives or drugs, from those that do not. Our investigations are aimed at the detection of nitrogen-rich explosives contained in improvised explosive devices. We use the term "clutter" to refer to any non-explosive materials with which the interrogating radiation may interact between source and detector. To deal with the many target types and clutter configurations that may be encountered in the field, the use of "artificial templates" is proposed. The MCNP code was used to simulate 14.1 MeV neutron source beams incident on one type of target containing various clutter and sample materials. Signatures due to inelastic-scatter and prompt-capture gamma rays from hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen and two scattered neutron signatures were considered. Targets containing explosive materials in the presence of clutter were able to be identified from targets that contained only non-explosive ("inert") materials. This study demonstrates that a finite number of artificial templates is sufficient for IED detection with fairly good sensitivity and specificity.

  7. X-ray and neutron interrogation of air cargo for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Liew, Seth

    2015-06-01

    A system for scanning break-bulk cargo for mobile applications is presented. This combines a 140 kV multi-view, multi-energy X-ray system with 2.5 MeV neutrons. The system uses dual energy X-ray radiography with neutron radiography. The X-ray and neutron systems were designed to be collocated in a mobile environment. Various materials were interrogated with the intent of distinguishing threat materials such as explosives from similar benign materials. In particular, the identification of threats and bengins with nearly identical effective atomic numbers has been demonstrated.

  8. Analysis of experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies using Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.

    2015-05-01

    Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a new NDA technique that was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to improve existing nuclear safeguards measurements for LWR fuel assemblies. The SINRD detector consists of four fission chambers (FCs) wrapped with different absorber filters to isolate different parts of the neutron energy spectrum and one ion chamber (IC) to measure the gross gamma rate. As a result, two different techniques can be utilized using the same SINRD detector unit and hardware. These techniques are the Passive Neutron Multiplication Counter (PNMC) method and the SINRD method. The focus of the work described in this paper is the analysis of experimental measurements of fresh and spent PWR fuel assemblies that were performed at LANL and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), respectively, using the SINRD detector. The purpose of these experiments was to assess the following capabilities of the SINRD detector: 1) reproducibility of measurements to quantify systematic errors, 2) sensitivity to water gap between detector and fuel assembly, 3) sensitivity and penetrability to the removal of fuel rods from the assembly, and 4) use of PNMC/SINRD ratios to quantify neutron multiplication and/or fissile content. The results from these simulations and measurements provide valuable experimental data that directly supports safeguards research and development (R&D) efforts on the viability of passive neutron NDA techniques and detector designs for partial defect verification of spent fuel assemblies.

  9. Irradiation Effects for the Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    2001-02-02

    At the request of Safety and Ecology Corporation of Tennessee, radiation effects of the proposed Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) Cargo Interrogation System have been examined. First, fissile cargo were examined to determine if a significant neutron signal would be observable during interrogation. Results indicated that ample multiplication would be seen for near critical bare targets. The water-reflected sphere showed relatively little multiplication. By implication, a fissile target shielded by hydrogenous cargo might not be detectable by neutron interrogation, particularly if reliance is placed on the neutron signal. The cargo may be detectable if use can be made of the ample increase in the photon signal. Second, dose rates were calculated at various locations within and just outside the facility building. These results showed that some dose rates may be higher than the target dose rate of 0.05 mrem/h. However, with limited exposure time, the total dose may be well below the allowed total dose. Lastly, estimates were made of the activation of structures and typical cargo. Most cargo will not be exposed long enough to be activated to levels of concern. On the other hand, portions of the structure may experience buildup of some radionuclides to levels of concern.

  10. Explosives (and other threats) detection using pulsed neutron interrogation and optimized detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strellis, Dan A.; Elsalim, Mashal; Gozani, Tsahi

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported results from a human-portable system using neutron interrogation to detect contraband and explosives. We summarized our methodology for distinguishing threat materials such as narcotics, C4, and mustard gas in the myriad of backgrounds present in the maritime environment. We are expanding our mission for the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) to detect Special Nuclear Material (SNM) through the detection of multiple fission signatures without compromising the conventional threat detection performance. This paper covers our initial investigations into using neutrons from compact pulsed neutron generators via the d(D,n)3He or d(T,n)α reactions with energies of ~2.5 and 14 MeV, respectively, for explosives (and other threats) detection along with a variety of gamma-ray detectors. Fast neutrons and thermal neutrons (after successive collisions) can stimulate the emission of various threat detection signatures. For explosives detection, element-specific gamma-ray signatures via the (n,n'γ) inelastic scattering reaction and the (n,'γ) thermal capture reaction are detected. For SNM, delayed gamma-rays following fission can be measured with the same detector. Our initial trade-off investigations of several gamma-ray detectors types (NaI, CsI, LaBr3, HPGe) for measuring gamma-ray signatures in a pulsed neutron environment for potential application in a human-portable active interrogation system are covered in this paper.

  11. Neutron interrogation to identify chemical elements with an ion-tube neutron source (INS)

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.; Dougan, A.D.; Rowland, M.R.; Wang, T.F.

    1994-04-07

    A non-destructive analysis technique using a portable, electric ion-tube neutron source (INS) and gamma ray detector has been used to identify the key constituent elements in a number of sealed munitions, and from the elemental makeup, infer the types of agent within each. The high energy (14 MeV) and pulsed character of the neutron flux from an INS provide a method of measuring, quantitatively, the oxygen, carbon, and fluorine content of materials in closed containers, as well as the other constituents that can be measured with low-energy neutron probes. The broad range of elements that can be quantitatively measured with INS-based instruments provides a capability of verifying common munition fills; it provides the greatest specificity of any portable neutron-based technique for determining the full matrix of chemical elements in completely unrestricted sample scenarios. The specific capability of quantifying the carbon and oxygen content of materials should lead to a fast screening technique which, can discriminate very quickly between high-explosive and chemical agent-filled containers.

  12. Neutron interrogation of shielded/unshielded uranium by a 4 MeV linac.

    PubMed

    Lakosi, L; Nguyen, C Tam; Serf, E

    2011-09-01

    A non-destructive active assay method was developed for revealing illicit trafficking of uranium. Photoneutrons produced in beryllium or heavy water by bremsstrahlung from a linac induced fission in the samples. Delayed fission neutrons were detected by a neutron collar built up of (3)He counters embedded in polyethylene moderator. High-enriched uranium samples shielded and unshielded by lead up to 14 mm thickness were detected, with a performance practically unaltered. 25 mg (235)U can be revealed in a 1 min interrogation time. PMID:21507663

  13. DOSE PROFILE MODELING OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY’S ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. M. Zabriskie; J. Wharton; A. J. Caffrey

    2009-06-01

    A new research and development laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for DT fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 108 neutrons per second), DD fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (up to 2 x 106 neutrons per second), and 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.7 x 107 neutrons per second, 30 micrograms). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8 m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for 252Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield wall and entrance maze and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

  14. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of nuclear and CW weapons, explosives, and drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; De Volpi, A. ); Peters, C.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed- portal requirements for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions and detection of contraband explosives and drugs. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron inelastic scattering and fission reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in chemical warfare agents, explosives, and drugs, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system; a collimator is not required since scattered neutrons are removed by electronic collimation'' (detected neutrons not having the proper flight time to be uncollided are discarded). The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs.

  15. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of nuclear and CW weapons, explosives, and drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; De Volpi, A.; Peters, C.W.

    1992-07-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed- portal requirements for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions and detection of contraband explosives and drugs. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron inelastic scattering and fission reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in chemical warfare agents, explosives, and drugs, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system; a collimator is not required since scattered neutrons are removed by ``electronic collimation`` (detected neutrons not having the proper flight time to be uncollided are discarded). The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs.

  16. Investigation of Active Interrogation Techniques to Detect Special Nuclear Material in Maritime Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    The detection and interdiction of special nuclear material (SNM) is still a high-priority focus area for many organizations around the world. One method that is commonly considered a leading candidate in the detection of SNM is active interrogation (AI). AI is different from its close relative, passive interrogation, in that an active source is used to enhance or create a detectable signal (usually fission) from SNM, particularly in shielded scenarios or scenarios where the SNM has a low activity. The use of AI thus makes the detection of SNM easier or, in some scenarios, even enables previously impossible detection. In this work the signal from prompt neutrons and photons as well as delayed neutrons and photons will be combined, as is typically done in AI. In previous work AI has been evaluated experimentally and computationally. However, for the purposes of this work, past scenarios are considered lightly shielded and tightly coupled spatially. At most, the previous work interrogated the contents of one standard cargo container (2.44 x 2.60 x 6.10 m) and the source and detector were both within a few meters of the object being interrogated. A few examples of this type of previous work can be found in references 1 and 2. Obviously, more heavily shielded AI scenarios will require larger source intensities, larger detector surface areas (larger detectors or more detectors), greater detector efficiencies, longer count times, or some combination of these.

  17. APSTNG: neutron interrogation for detection of explosives, drugs, and nuclear and chemical warfare materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar A.; Peters, Charles W.

    1993-02-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed-portal requirements for nondestructive detection, including monitoring of contraband explosives, drugs, and weapon materials, and treaty verification of sealed munitions. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14- MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in explosives, drugs, and chemical warfare agents, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs. The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Surveillance systems based on APSTNG technology can avoid the large physical size, high capital and operating expenses, and reliability problems associated with complex accelerators.

  18. Long fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogation using discrete-time microwave photonic filtering techniques.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Amelia Lavinia; Barrera, David; Sales, Salvador; Thevenaz, Luc; Capmany, José

    2013-11-18

    A novel technique for interrogating photonic sensors based on long fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is presented and experimentally demonstrated, dedicated to detect the presence and the precise location of several spot events. The principle of operation is based on a technique used to analyze microwave photonics (MWP) filters. The long FBGs are used as quasi-distributed sensors. Several hot-spots can be detected along the FBG with a spatial accuracy under 0.5 mm using a modulator and a photo-detector (PD) with a modest bandwidth of less than 1 GHz. The proposed interrogation system is intrinsically robust against environmental changes. PMID:24514329

  19. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  20. Neutron interrogation of high-enriched uranium by a 4 MeV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakosi, László; Nguyen, Cong Tam

    2008-07-01

    For revealing unauthorized transport (illicit trafficking) of nuclear materials, a non-destructive method reported earlier, utilizing a 4 MeV linear accelerator for photoneutron interrogation, was further developed. The linac served as a pulsed neutron source for assay of highly enriched uranium. Produced in beryllium or heavy water by bremsstrahlung, neutrons subsequently induced fission in the samples. Delayed neutrons were detected by a newly designed neutron collar built up of 14 3He counters embedded in a polyethylene moderator. A PC controlled multiscaler served as a time analyzer, triggering the detector startup by the beam pulse. Significant progress was achieved in enhancing the detector response, hence the sensitivity for revealing illicit material. A lower sensitivity limit of the order of 10 mg 235U was determined in a 20 s measurement time with a reasonable amount of beryllium (170 g) or of heavy water (100 g) and a mean electron current of 10 μA. Sensitivity can be further enhanced by increasing the measurement time.

  1. A more accurate and penetrating method to measure the enrichment and mass of UF6 storage containers using passive neutron self-interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Miller, Karen A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an unattended mode neutron measurement that can provide the enrichment of the uranium in UF{sub 6} cylinders. The new passive neutron measurement provides better penetration into the uranium mass than prior gamma-ray enrichment measurement methods. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Monitor (PNEM) provides a new measurement technique that uses passive neutron totals and coincidence counting together with neutron self-interrogation to measure the enrichment in the cylinders. The measurement uses the neutron rates from two detector pods. One of the pods has a bare polyethylene surface next to the cylinder and the other polyethylene surface is covered with Cd to prevent thermal neutrons from returning to the cylinder. The primary neutron source from the enriched UF{sub 6} is the alpha-particle decay from the {sub 234}U that interacts with the fluorine to produce random neutrons. The singles neutron counting rate is dominated by the {sub 234}U neutrons with a minor contribution from the induced fissions in the {sub 235}U. However, the doubles counting rate comes primarily from the induced fissions (i.e., multiplication) in the {sub 235}U in enriched uranium. The PNEM concept makes use of the passive neutrons that are initially produced from the {sub 234}U reactions that track the {sub 235}U enrichment during the enrichment process. The induced fission reactions from the thermal-neutron albedo are all from the {sub 235}U and provide a measurement of the {sub 235}U. The Cd ratio has the desirable feature that all of the thermal-neutron-induced fissions in {sub 235}U are independent of the original neutron source. Thus, the ratio is independent of the uranium age, purity, and prior reactor history.

  2. Police training in interviewing and interrogation methods: A comparison of techniques used with adult and juvenile suspects.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Hayley M D; Warner, Todd C

    2016-06-01

    Despite empirical progress in documenting and classifying various interrogation techniques, very little is known about how police are trained in interrogation methods, how frequently they use various techniques, and whether they employ techniques differentially with adult versus juvenile suspects. This study reports the nature and extent of formal (e.g., Reid Technique, PEACE, HUMINT) and informal interrogation training as well as self-reported technique usage in a diverse national sample (N = 340) of experienced American police officers. Officers were trained in a variety of different techniques ranging from comparatively benign pre-interrogation strategies (e.g., building rapport, observing body language or speech patterns) to more psychologically coercive techniques (e.g., blaming the victim, discouraging denials). Over half the sample reported being trained to use psychologically coercive techniques with both adults and juveniles. The majority (91%) receive informal, "on the job" interrogation training. Technique usage patterns indicate a spectrum of psychological intensity where information-gathering approaches were used most frequently and high-pressure tactics less frequently. Reid-trained officers (56%) were significantly more likely than officers without Reid training to use pre-interrogation and manipulation techniques. Across all analyses and techniques, usage patterns were identical for adult and juvenile suspects, suggesting that police interrogate youth in the same manner as adults. Overall, results suggest that training in specific interrogation methods is strongly associated with usage. Findings underscore the need for more law enforcement interrogation training in general, especially with juvenile suspects, and highlight the value of training as an avenue for reducing interrogation-induced miscarriages of justice. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26651619

  3. Dose profile modeling of Idaho National Laboratory's active neutron interrogation laboratory.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Seabury, E H; Zabriskie, J M; Wharton, J; Caffrey, A J

    2009-06-01

    A new laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 10(8) n/s), deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (1 x 10(7) n/s), and (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.96 x 10(7) n/s, 30 microg). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for (252)Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield walls and entrance mazes and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults. PMID:19217792

  4. Active interrogation of highly enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C. E.; Hollas, C. L.; Myers, W. L.

    2004-01-01

    Active interrogation techniques provide reliable detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) even when passive detection is difficult. We use 50-Hz pulsed beams of bremsstrahlung photons from a 10-MeV linac or 14-MeV neutrons from a neutron generator for interrogation, thus activating the HEU. Detection of neutrons between pulses is a positive indicator of the presence of fissionable material. We detect the neutrons with three neutron detector designs based on {sup 3}He tubes. This report shows examples of the responses in these three detectors, for unshielded and shielded kilogram quantities of HEU, in containers as large as cargo containers.

  5. Intense combined source of neutrons and photons for interrogation based on compact deuteron RF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Garnett, R. W.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2015-06-18

    Interrogation of special nuclear materials can benefit from mobile sources providing significant fluxes of neutrons (108/s at 2.5 MeV, 1010/s at 14.1 MeV) and of photons (>1012/s at 1-3 MeV). We propose a source that satisfies these requirements simultaneously plus also provides, via the reaction 11B(d,n)12C(γ15.1), a significant flux of 15-MeV photons, which are highly penetrating and optimal for inducing photo-fission in actinides. The source is based on a compact (< 5 m) deuteron RF accelerator that delivers an average current of a few mA of deuterons at 3-4 MeV to a boron target. The accelerator consists of a short RFQ followed by efficient inter-digital H-mode structures with permanent-magnet-quadrupole beam focusing [Kurennoy et al. (2012)], which suit perfectly for deuteron acceleration at low energies. Our estimates, based on recent measurements, indicate that the required fluxes of both neutrons and photons can be achieved at ~1 mA of 4-MeV deuterons. The goal of the proposed study is to confirm feasibility of the approach and develop requirements for future full system implementation.

  6. Intense combined source of neutrons and photons for interrogation based on compact deuteron RF accelerator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Garnett, R. W.; Rybarcyk, L. J.

    2015-06-18

    Interrogation of special nuclear materials can benefit from mobile sources providing significant fluxes of neutrons (108/s at 2.5 MeV, 1010/s at 14.1 MeV) and of photons (>1012/s at 1-3 MeV). We propose a source that satisfies these requirements simultaneously plus also provides, via the reaction 11B(d,n)12C(γ15.1), a significant flux of 15-MeV photons, which are highly penetrating and optimal for inducing photo-fission in actinides. The source is based on a compact (< 5 m) deuteron RF accelerator that delivers an average current of a few mA of deuterons at 3-4 MeV to a boron target. The accelerator consists of a shortmore » RFQ followed by efficient inter-digital H-mode structures with permanent-magnet-quadrupole beam focusing [Kurennoy et al. (2012)], which suit perfectly for deuteron acceleration at low energies. Our estimates, based on recent measurements, indicate that the required fluxes of both neutrons and photons can be achieved at ~1 mA of 4-MeV deuterons. The goal of the proposed study is to confirm feasibility of the approach and develop requirements for future full system implementation.« less

  7. Parametric Evaluation of Active Neutron Interrogation for the Detection of Shielded Highly-Enriched Uranium in the Field

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chcihester; E. H. Seabury; S. J. Thompson; R. R. C. Clement

    2011-10-01

    Parametric studies using numerical simulations are being performed to assess the performance capabilities and limits of active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). Varying the shield material, HEU mass, HEU depth inside the shield, and interrogating neutron source energy, the simulations account for both neutron and photon emission signatures from the HEU with resolution in both energy and time. The results are processed to represent different irradiation timing schemes and several different classes of radiation detectors, and evaluated using a statistical approach considering signal intensity over background. This paper describes the details of the modeling campaign and some preliminary results, weighing the strengths of alternative measurement approaches for the different irradiation scenarios.

  8. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  9. Simulated Performance of the Integrated Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity and Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry Detector Designed for Spent Fuel Measurement at the Fugen Reactor in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Lafleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Seya, Michio; Bolind, Alan M.

    2012-07-16

    An integrated nondestructive assay instrument, which combined the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) and the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) techniques, is the research focus for a collaborative effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative. We will quantify the anticipated performance of this experimental system in two physical environments: (1) At LANL we will measure fresh Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) assemblies for which the average enrichment can be varied from 0.2% to 3.2% and for which Gd laced rods will be included. (2) At Fugen we will measure spent Mixed Oxide (MOX-B) and LEU spent fuel assemblies from the heavy water moderated Fugen reactor. The MOX-B assemblies will vary in burnup from {approx}3 GWd/tHM to {approx}20 GWd/tHM while the LEU assemblies ({approx}1.9% initial enrichment) will vary from {approx}2 GWd/tHM to {approx}7 GWd/tHM. The estimated count rates will be calculated using MCNPX. These preliminary results will help the finalization of the hardware design and also serve a guide for the experiment. The hardware of the detector is expected to be fabricated in 2012 with measurements expected to take place in 2012 and 2013. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  10. Microwave photonics filtering technique for interrogating long weak fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchiuti, Amelia Lavinia; Barrera, David; Sales, Salvador; Thévenaz, Luc; Capmany, José

    2014-05-01

    A system to interrogate photonic sensors based on long weak fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is presented and experimentally demonstrated, dedicated to measure the precise location of several spot events. The principle of operation is based on a technique used to analyze microwave photonics (MWP) filters. The long weak FBGs are used as quasi-distributed sensors. Several events can be detected along the FBG device with a spatial accuracy under 1 mm using a modulator and a photo-detector (PD) with a modest bandwidth of less than 500 MHz. The simple proposed scheme is intrinsically robust against environmental changes and easy to reconfigure.

  11. Interrogation of a cascaded FBG sensor using a wavelength-to-delay mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Juan; Hervás, Javier; Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R.; Barrera, David; Pastor, Daniel; Sales, Salvador; Capmany, José

    2015-09-01

    An optical fiber sensor composed of six standard FBGs in cascade is interrogated by use of a technique based on wavelength to delay mapping. A microwave-modulated optical signal enters the FBG cascade and, after being sliced and reflected, experiences dispersion in standard single-mode fiber. The Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are mapped into the delays that determine the peaks in the system's electrical impulse response. The Bragg wavelength shifts are calculated from the difference of the delays undergone by FBGs samples. A resolution of 9.2 pm in Bragg wavelength shift is demonstrated.

  12. Investigation of active interrogation techniques to detect special nuclear material in maritime environments: Boarded search of a cargo container ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogan, Brandon R.; Henkel, James J.; Johnson, Jeffrey O.; Mihalczo, John T.; Miller, Thomas M.; Patton, Bruce W.

    2013-12-01

    The detonation of a terrorist nuclear weapon in the United States would result in the massive loss of life and grave economic damage. Even if a device was not detonated, its known or suspected presence aboard a cargo container ship in a U.S. port would have major economic and political consequences. One possible means to prevent this threat would be to board a ship at sea and search for the device before it reaches port. The scenario considered here involves a small Coast Guard team with strong intelligence boarding a container ship to search for a nuclear device. Using active interrogation, the team would nonintrusively search a block of shipping containers to locate the fissile material. Potential interrogation source and detector technologies for the team are discussed. The methodology of the scan is presented along with a technique for calculating the required interrogation source strength using computer simulations. MCNPX was used to construct a computer model of a container ship, and several search scenarios were simulated. The results of the simulations are presented in terms of the source strength required for each interrogation scenario. Validation measurements were performed in order to scale these simulation results to expected performance. Interrogations through the short (2.4 m) axis of a standardized shipping container appear to be feasible given the entire range of container loadings tested. Interrogations through several containers at once or a single container through its long (12.2 m) axis do not appear to be viable with a portable interrogation system.

  13. [INVITED] Cascade FBGs distributed sensors interrogation using microwave photonics filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricchiuti, Amelia L.; Hervás, Javier; Sales, Salvador

    2016-03-01

    Systems to interrogate photonic sensors based on long fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are illustrated and experimentally validated. The FBGs-based devices are used as quasi-distributed sensors and have demonstrated their ability to detect and measure the precise location of several spot events. The principle of operation is based on a technique used to analyze microwave photonics (MWP) filters. The overall idea beyond this work has been borne out and demonstrated step by step starting from preliminary test that have led to the development of a very-long distributed sensor based on an array of 500 equal and weak FBGs. Firstly, we have demonstrated the feasibility of the MWP filtering technique to interrogate a 10 cm-long high reflectivity (≈99%) FBG. Then, a pair of low-reflectivity (<6%) FBGs has been employed as sensing device. The latter has laid the foundation for the development and implementation of a 5 m-long fiber optic sensor based on 500 very weak FBGs. Spot events have been detected with a good spatial accuracy of less than 1 mm using a modulator and a photo-detector (PD) with a modest bandwidth of only 500 MHz. The simple proposed schemes result cost effective, intrinsically robust against environmental changes and easy to reconfigure.

  14. FBGs cascade interrogation technique based on wavelength-to-delay mapping and KLT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervás, J.; Barrera, D.; Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R.; Sales, S.

    2016-05-01

    The Karhunen-Loeve transform is applied to the coarsely sampled impulse response generated by an FBG cascade in order to calculate the temperature change suffered by the FBGs. Thanks to a dispersive media, the wavelength change performed by the temperature change produces a delay shift in the sample generated by an FBG, delay shift which is recorded in the eigenvalues calculated by the KLT routine, letting to measure the temperature variation. Although the FBGs samples are represented only by four points, a continuous temperature measurement can be performed thanks to the KLT algorithm. This means a three order reduction in the number of points giving this method a low computational complexity. Simulations are performed to validate the interrogation technique and estimate performance and an experimental example is provided to demonstrate real operation.

  15. Expanding applications for surface-contaminant sensing using the laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Christesen, Steven D.; Wong, Anna

    2004-02-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a UV-Raman technique that provides short-range standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division, is currently developing and expanding the LISA technology under several programs that span a variety of missions for homeland defense. We will present and discuss some of these applications, while putting in perspective the overall evolution undergone by the technique within the last years. These applications include LISA-Recon (now called the Joint Contaminated Surface Detector--JCSD) which was developed under a cost-sharing arrangement with the U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) for incorporation on the Army"s future reconnaissance vehicles, and designed to demonstrate single-shot on-the-move measurements of chemical contaminants at concentration levels below the Army's requirements. In parallel, LISA-Shipboard is being developed to optimize the sensor technique for detection of surface contaminants in the operational environment of a ship. The most recently started activity is LISA-Inspector that is being developed to provide a transportable sensor in a 'cart-like' configuration.

  16. Californium interrogation prompt neutron (CIPN) instrument for non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel-Design concept and experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzlova, D.; Menlove, H. O.; Rael, C. D.; Trellue, H. R.; Tobin, S. J.; Park, Se-Hwan; Oh, Jong-Myeong; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Kwon, In-Chan; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the first experimental demonstration of the Californium Interrogation Prompt Neutron (CIPN) instrument developed within a multi-year effort launched by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel Project of the United States Department of Energy. The goals of this project focused on developing viable non-destructive assay techniques with capabilities to improve an independent verification of spent fuel assembly characteristics. For this purpose, the CIPN instrument combines active and passive neutron interrogation, along with passive gamma-ray measurements, to provide three independent observables. This paper describes the initial feasibility demonstration of the CIPN instrument, which involved measurements of four pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies with different levels of burnup and two initial enrichments. The measurements were performed at the Post-Irradiation Examination Facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Institute in the Republic of Korea. The key aim of the demonstration was to evaluate CIPN instrument performance under realistic deployment conditions, with the focus on a detailed assessment of systematic uncertainties that are best evaluated experimentally. The measurements revealed good positioning reproducibility, as well as a high degree of insensitivity of the CIPN instrument's response to irregularities in a radial burnup profile. Systematic uncertainty of individual CIPN instrument signals due to assembly rotation was found to be <4.5%, even for assemblies with fairly extreme gradients in the radial burnup profile. These features suggest that the CIPN instrument is capable of providing a good representation of assembly average characteristics, independent of assembly orientation in the instrument.

  17. Neutron interrogation system using high gamma ray signature to detect contraband special nuclear materials in cargo

    DOEpatents

    Slaughter, Dennis R.; Pohl, Bertram A.; Dougan, Arden D.; Bernstein, Adam; Prussin, Stanley G.; Norman, Eric B.

    2008-04-15

    A system for inspecting cargo for the presence of special nuclear material. The cargo is irradiated with neutrons. The neutrons produce fission products in the special nuclear material which generate gamma rays. The gamma rays are detecting indicating the presence of the special nuclear material.

  18. On-line analysis of bulk materials using pulsed neutron interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, P.; Tourneur, P. Le; Poumarede, B.; Möller, H.; Bach, P.

    1999-06-01

    On the basis of our joint experience in neutronics for SODERN and in cement plant engineering for KRUPP POLYSIUS, we have developed a new on-line bulk materials analyser for the cement industry. This equipment includes a pulsed neutron generator GENIE 16, some gamma ray and neutron detectors, specially designed electronics with high counting rate, software delivering the mean elemental composition of raw material, and adequate shielding. This material is transported through the equipment on a conveyor belt, the size of which is adapted to the requirements. This paper briefly describes the equipment and some results, as obtained in dynamic test from a demonstrator installed in Germany.

  19. The Nuclear Car Wash: Neutron interrogation of cargo containers to detect hidden SNM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. M.; Asztalos, S.; Biltoft, P.; Church, J.; Descalle, M.-A.; Luu, T.; Manatt, D.; Mauger, G.; Norman, E.; Petersen, D.; Pruet, J.; Prussin, S.; Slaughter, D.

    2007-08-01

    LLNL is actively involved in the development of advanced technologies for use in detecting threats in sea-going cargo containers, particularly the presence of hidden special nuclear materials (SNM). The "Nuclear Car Wash" (NCW) project presented here uses a high-energy (En ≈ 3.5-7.0 MeV) neutron probe to scan a container and then takes high-energy (Eγ ⩾ 2.5 MeV), β-delayed γ-rays emitted during the subsequent decay of any short-lived, neutron-induced fission products as a signature of fissionable material. The components of the proposed system (e.g. neutron source, gamma detectors, etc.) will be discussed along with data processing schemes, possible threat detection metrics and potential interference signals. Results from recent laboratory experiments using a prototype system at LLNL will also be presented.

  20. Classifying threats with a 14-MeV neutron interrogation system.

    PubMed

    Strellis, Dan; Gozani, Tsahi

    2005-01-01

    SeaPODDS (Sea Portable Drug Detection System) is a non-intrusive tool for detecting concealed threats in hidden compartments of maritime vessels. This system consists of an electronic neutron generator, a gamma-ray detector, a data acquisition computer, and a laptop computer user-interface. Although initially developed to detect narcotics, recent algorithm developments have shown that the system is capable of correctly classifying a threat into one of four distinct categories: narcotic, explosive, chemical weapon, or radiological dispersion device (RDD). Detection of narcotics, explosives, and chemical weapons is based on gamma-ray signatures unique to the chemical elements. Elements are identified by their characteristic prompt gamma-rays induced by fast and thermal neutrons. Detection of RDD is accomplished by detecting gamma-rays emitted by common radioisotopes and nuclear reactor fission products. The algorithm phenomenology for classifying threats into the proper categories is presented here. PMID:15985373

  1. Planetary Geochemistry Techniques: Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lin, L.; McClanahan, T.; Nankung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our technology development program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Astrochemistry Laboratory is to extend the application of neutron interrogation techniques to landed in situ planetary composition measurements by using a 14 MeV Pulsed Neutron Generator (PNG) combined with neutron and gamma ray detectors, to probe the surface and subsurface of planetary bodies without the need to drill. We are thus working to bring the PING instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets.

  2. Cadmium Subtraction Method for the Active Albedo Neutron Interrogation of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Worrall, Louise G.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    This report describes work performed under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Cadmium Subtraction Project. The project objective was to explore the difference between the traditional cadmium (Cd) ratio signature and a proposed alternative Cd subtraction (or Cd difference) approach. The thinking behind the project was that a Cd subtraction method would provide a more direct measure of multiplication than the existing Cd ratio method. At the same time, it would be relatively insensitive to changes in neutron detection efficiency when properly calibrated. This is the first published experimental comparison and evaluation of the Cd ratio and Cd subtraction methods.

  3. A flag-based algorithm and associated neutron interrogation system for the detection of explosives in sea-land cargo containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, A. L.; Kearfott, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    Recent efforts in the simulation of sea-land cargo containers in active neutron interrogation scenarios resulted in the identification of several flags indicating the presence of conventional explosives. These flags, defined by specific mathematical manipulations of the neutron and photon spectra, have been combined into a detection algorithm for screening cargo containers at international borders and seaports. The detection algorithm's steps include classifying the cargo type, identifying containers filled with explosives, triggering in the presence of concealed explosives, and minimizing the number of false positives due to cargo heterogeneity. The algorithm has been implemented in a system that includes both neutron and photon detectors. This system will take about 10 min to scan a container and cost approximately 1M to construct. Dose calculations resulted in estimates of less than 0.5 mSv for a person hidden in the container, and an operator annual dose of less than 0.9 mSv.

  4. Fiber Bragg grating interrogation technique for remote sensing (100km) using a hybrid Brillouin-Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Vallejo, M.; Leandro, D.; Loayssa, A.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2011-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate the feasibility of a novel Fiber Bragg Grating interrogation technique for remote sensing based on the use of a hybrid Raman-Brillouin fiber laser configuration. The laser comprises 100 km of standard singlemode fiber (SMF) in a linear cavity configuration with four Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) arranged in series. The FBGs are used both for the sensing function and for the selection of the lasing wavelengths. A wavelength-swept laser pumps Brillouin gain in the fiber cavity, which is previously set just under lasing threshold by the Raman gain. Furthermore, the sensor signal is detected in the radio frequency domain instead of the optical domain so as to avoid signal to noise ratio limitations produced by Rayleigh scattering. Experimental results demonstrate that the shift of the Bragg wavelength of the FBG sensors can be precisely measured with good signal to noise ration when the FBG are used for temperature sensing.

  5. Development of self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (sinrd) to measure the fissile content in nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Adrienne Marie

    The development of non-destructive assay (NDA) capabilities to directly measure the fissile content in spent fuel is needed to improve the timely detection of the diversion of significant quantities of fissile material. Currently, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not have effective NDA methods to verify spent fuel and recover continuity of knowledge in the event of a containment and surveillance systems failure. This issue has become increasingly critical with the worldwide expansion of nuclear power, adoption of enhanced safeguards criteria for spent fuel verification, and recent efforts by the IAEA to incorporate an integrated safeguards regime. In order to address these issues, the use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) has been developed to improve existing nuclear safeguards and material accountability measurements. The following characteristics of SINRD were analyzed: (1) ability to measure the fissile content in Light Water Reactors (LWR) fuel assemblies and (2) sensitivity and penetrability of SINRD to the removal of fuel pins from an assembly. The Monte Carlo Neutral Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to simulate SINRD for different geometries. Experimental measurements were also performed with SINRD and were compared to MCNPX simulations of the experiment to verify the accuracy of the MCNPX model of SINRD. Based on the results from these simulations and measurements, we have concluded that SINRD provides a number of improvements over current IAEA verification methods. These improvements include: (1) SINRD provides absolute measurements of burnup independent of the operator's declaration. (2) SINRD is sensitive to pin removal over the entire burnup range and can verify the diversion of 6% of fuel pins within 3o from LWR spent LEU and MOX fuel. (3) SINRD is insensitive to the boron concentration and initial fuel enrichment and can therefore be used at multiple spent fuel storage facilities. (4) The

  6. Performance evaluation tools for nuclear based interrogation techniques — an application of the PFNA technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, R. L.; Keeley, D. A.; Bendahan, J.

    1995-02-01

    To facilitate the design and tuning of the Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) system, under development for non-intrusive inspection of large cargo containers, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has developed and utilized a family of computational tools to encapsulate the essential physics and system characteristics and to serve as a framework for hardware and software trade-off studies. One such tool is the PFNASIM code, a physics based, end-to-end simulator of the entire PFNA technology that maps the atomic densities of any material container to the observed γ-ray counts in each detector. Another tool is the PFNA Performance Evaluation Tool (PFNAPET) that utilizes estimation theory and the output of PFNASIM to predict the minimum error in estimated atomic densities inside the container. These two codes are described and an example of performance evaluation on a cargo container is included.

  7. Detection of thermal-induced prompt fission neutrons of highly-enriched uranium: A position sensitive technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglione, A.; Di Lorenzo, F.; Mayer, R. E.

    2009-07-01

    Cargo interrogation in search for special nuclear materials like highly-enriched uranium or 239Pu is a first priority issue of international borders security. In this work we present a thermal-pulsed neutron-based approach to a technique which combines the time-of-flight method and demonstrates a capability to detect small quantities of highly-enriched uranium shielded with high or low Z materials providing, in addition, a manner to know the approximate position of the searched material.

  8. Novel FBG interrogation technique for achieving < 100 nɛ accuracies at remote distances > 70 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Tom; O'Connor, Peter; Levins, John; McDonald, David

    2005-06-01

    Due to the development of Fibre Bragg Grating sensors for the measurement of temperature, strain and pressure many markets can benefit from optical technology. These markets are the oil and gas industry, structural and civil engineering, rail and aerospace to name a few. The advantages of using optical sensing technology are that high accuracy measurements can be performed with a passive optical system. By running one fibre along the structure or down the well, multiple points along the fibre can be tested to measure strain, temperature and pressure. Of importance with these systems is the reach that can be obtained while maintaining accuracy. A major problem with long reach system is the back reflection due to SBS and Rayleigh scattering processes which reflect part of the laser light back into the receiver which affect the sensitivity of system. This paper shows a technique to enable a reach of >70km by using a tunable laser and receiver. Techniques for the suppression of receiver noise from SBS and Raleigh scattering are implemented. In addition polarisation dependence of the FBG is considered and results of techniques to limit the effect of polarisation at long and short reaches are shown.

  9. Combined neutron imaging techniques for cultural heritage purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Materna, T.

    2009-01-28

    This article presents the different new neutron techniques developed by the Ancient Charm collaboration to image objects of cultural heritage importance: Prompt-gamma-ray activation imaging (PGAI) coupled to cold/thermal neutron transmission tomography, Neutron Resonance Capture Imaging (NRCI) and Neutron Resonance Tomography.

  10. Interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensors using a VCSEL and correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triana, Cristian; Varón, Margarita; Pastor, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    We describe a demodulation technique for optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors based in the utilization of a long wavelength Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL). The identification of the FBG wavelength is performed by sweeping the VCSEL wavelength over the operation range of the sensors and correlating its raising and falling periods in order to automatically determine the initial and final points of the wavelength to time mapping readout. The process is carried out by a simple computational routine, which allows the identification of the FBGs' spectral position leading to a cost-effective scheme.

  11. An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William S; Peerani, Paolo

    2012-08-13

    Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential

  12. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-27

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  13. Pulsed fast neutron analysis technique for the detection of explosives and other contraband

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, T.

    1993-12-31

    The Pulsed Fast Neutron Activation (PFNA) method was conceived by Science Applications International Corporation in 1987. It is currently being developed for the non-intrusive detection of explosives, drugs, and other hazardous material in objects of all sizes from luggage to shipping containers. The PFNA method provides identification, quantification and 3-D mapping of elemental components, C, N, O, Cl, Si, most metals, etc. in scanned objects. It uses nanosecond pulsed fast neutrons to induce (n, x{gamma})-process in interrogated luggage and employs inbeam gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the elements and time of flight technique to determine where the elements are present. The principles and experimental data demonstrating the validity of the PFNA method are presented.

  14. The API 120: A portable neutron generator for the associated particle technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Lemchak, M.; Simpson, J. D.

    2005-12-01

    The API 120 is a lightweight, portable neutron generator for active neutron interrogation (ANI) field work exploiting the associated particle technique. It incorporates a small sealed-tube accelerator, an all digital control system with smart on-board diagnostics, a simple platform-independent control interface and a comprehensive safety interlock philosophy with provisions for wireless control. The generator operates in a continuous output mode using either the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. To register the helium ion associated with fusion, the system incorporates a high resolution fiber optic imaging plate that may be coated with one of several different phosphors. The ion beam on the target measures less than 2 mm in diameter, thus making the system suitable for multi-dimensional imaging. The system is rated at 1E7 n/s for over 1000 h although higher yields are possible. The overall weight is 12 kg; power consumption is less than 50 W.

  15. Comparison of tests with14-MeV neutrons to a Monte Carlo model for interrogation of thick cargos for clandestine fissionable materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prussin, S. G.; Descalle, M.-A.; Hall, J. M.; Pruet, J. A.; Slaughter, D. R.; Accatino, M. R.; Alford, O. J.; Asztalos, S. J.; Bernstein, A.; Church, J. A.; Gosnell, T.; Loshak, A.; Madden, N. W.; Manatt, D. R.; Mauger, G. J.; Meyer, A. W.; Moore, T. L.; Norman, E. B.; Pohl, B. A.; Petersen, D. C.; Rusnak, B.; Sundsmo, T. B.; Tenbrook, W. K.; Walling, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    A Monte Carlo model has been developed for interrogation of fissionable material embedded in thick cargos when high-energy β-delayed γ-rays are detected following neutron-induced fission. The model includes the principal structural components of the laboratory, the neutron source and collimator assembly in which it resides, the assembly that represents cargo of given characteristics, a target of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and large external plastic scintillators for photon detection. The ability of this model to reproduce experimental measurements was tested by comparing simulations with measurements of the number of induced fissions and the number of detected photons when the HEU target was irradiated with 14.25-MeV neutrons in the absence of any cargo and while embedded in assemblies of plywood and iron pipes. The simulations agreed with experimental measurements within a factor of about 2 for irradiation of the bare target and when the areal density of intervening cargo was 33 g cm -2 (wood) and 61 g cm -2 (steel pipes). This suggests that the model can permit exploration of a large range in parameter space with reasonable fidelity.

  16. High signal-to-noise ratio acoustic sensor using phase shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2015-03-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices.

  17. High signal-to-noise acoustic sensor using phase-shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-11-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices.

  18. General Approach To Materials Classification Using Neutron Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyev, Vladimir G.; Koltick, David S.

    2006-03-01

    The `neutron in, gamma out' method of elemental analysis has been known and used in many applications as an elemental analysis tool. This method is non-intrusive, non-destructive, fast and precise. This set of advantages makes neutron analysis attractive for even wider variety of uses beyond simple elemental analysis. The question that is addressed within this study is under what conditions neutron analysis can be used to differentiate materials of interest from a group or class of materials in the face of knowing that what is truly of interest is the molecular content of any sample under interrogation. Purpose of the study was to develop a neutron-based scanner for rapid differentiation of classes of materials sealed in small bottles. Developed scanner employs D-T neutron generator as a neutron source and HPGe gamma detectors. Materials can be placed into classes by many different properties. However, neutron analysis method can be used only few of them, such as elemental content, stoichiometric ratios and density of the scanned material. Set of parameters obtainable through neutron analysis serves as a basis for a hyperspace, where each point corresponds to a certain scanned material. Sub-volumes of the hyperspace correspond to different classes of materials. One of the most important properties of the materials are stoichiometric ratios of the elements comprising the materials. Constructing an algorithm for converting the observed gamma ray counts into quantities of the elements in the scanned sample is a crucial part of the analysis. Gamma rays produced in both fast inelastic scatterings and neutron captures are considered. Presence of certain elements in materials, such as hydrogen and chlorine can significantly change neutron dynamics within the sample, and, in turn, characteristic gamma lines development. These effects have been studied and corresponding algorithms have been developed to account for them.

  19. NEUTRON SPECTROSCOPY BY DOUBLE SCATTER AND ASSOCIATED PARTICLE TECHNIQUES.

    SciTech Connect

    DIOSZEGI,I.

    2007-10-28

    Multiple detectors can provide [1,2] both directional and spectroscopic information. Neutron spectra may be obtained by neutron double scatter (DSNS), or the spontaneous fission associated particle (AP) technique. Spontaneous fission results in the creation of fission fragments and the release of gamma rays and neutrons. As these occur at the same instant, they are correlated in time. Thus gamma ray detection can start a timing sequence relative to a neutron detector where the time difference is dominated by neutron time-of-flight. In this paper we describe these techniques and compare experimental results with Monte Carlo calculations.

  20. The dynamic nature of interrogation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Christopher E; Miller, Jeaneé C; Redlich, Allison D

    2016-06-01

    Building on a substantial body of literature examining interrogation methods employed by police investigators and their relationship to suspect behaviors, we analyzed a sample of audio and video interrogation recordings of individuals suspected of serious violent crimes. Existing survey research has focused on the tactics reportedly used, at what rate, and under what conditions; observational studies detail which methods are actually employed. With a few notable exceptions, these foundational studies were static examinations of interrogation methods that documented the absence or presence of various approaches. In the present study, we cast interrogation as a dynamic phenomenon and code the recordings in 5-min intervals to examine how interrogation methods and suspect cooperation change over time. Employing the interrogation taxonomy framework, particularly 4 discrete domains-rapport and relationship building, emotion provocation, presentation of evidence, and confrontation/competition-we found that the emphasis of the domains varied across interrogations and were significantly different when suspects confessed versus when they denied involvement. In regression models, suspect cooperation was positively influenced by the rapport and relationship building domain, though it was negatively impacted by presentation of evidence and confrontation/competition. Moreover, we found that the negative effects of confrontation/competition on suspect cooperation lasted for up to 15 min. The implications of the findings for practice and future research include the benefits of a rapport-based approach, the deleterious effects of accusatorial methods, and the importance of studying when, not just if, certain interrogation techniques are employed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26651622

  1. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L; Chung, Kiwhan; Greene, Steven J; Hogan, Gary E; Makela, Mark; Mariam, Fesseha; Milner, Edward C; Murray, Matthew; Saunders, Alexander; Spaulding, Randy; Wang, Zhehui; Waters, Laurie; Wysocki, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  2. An FBG sensor interrogation technique based on a precise optical recirculating frequency shifter driven by RF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zifei; Yang, Tianxin; Jia, Dongfang; Wang, Zhaoying; Sang, Mei

    2013-03-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors have numerous advantages to sense multi-physical quantities such as the temperature and strain simultaneously by monitoring the shift of the returned "Bragg" wavelength resulting from changes in these quantities. Several FBG interrogation systems have been set up using photo detectors instead of an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) to convert wavelength to time measurements. However, in those systems, it is necessary to use mechanical tuning components to generate fast-speed wavelength-swept light sources for high-precision FBG interrogation. In this paper, a low-cost and delicate wavelength-shift detection system, without any mechanical scanning parts, is proposed and demonstrated. The wavelength scanning system is a recirculating frequency shifter (RFS) which consists of an optical amplifier, an under test FBG sensor and an optical single-sideband (SSB) modulator driven by RF signals at 10 GHz. The measurement accuracy of this system is 0.08nm.

  3. Systems report on the analysis of spent, highly enriched U-235 reactor fuel by delayed neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, T.C.; Kirkham, R.J.

    1990-05-01

    Design aspects are briefly given of a neutron source shuffler used to measure fissile material content of spent, highly enriched reactor fuel. The mode of operation used, results of analyzing 176 fuel packages and recommended system improvements are discussed. Four measurements were made on each of the fuel packages with the mean of the 176 standard deviations being 2.03 percent of value. The maximum individual standard deviation was 9.27 percent. Appendixes concerning imprecisions introduced by counting statistics and crane speed irregularities are given. Use of an improved neutron source shuffler, an improved fuel package motion system and modernized computer system should permit system performance to be limited mainly by counting statistics, to about 1.5 percent of measured value. A stronger source could then be installed to further enhance system operation. 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Monte Carlo Simulation for LINAC Standoff Interrogation of Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Shaun D; Flaska, Marek; Miller, Thomas Martin; Protopopescu, Vladimir A; Pozzi, Sara A

    2007-06-01

    The development of new techniques for the interrogation of shielded nuclear materials relies on the use of Monte Carlo codes to accurately simulate the entire system, including the interrogation source, the fissile target and the detection environment. The objective of this modeling effort is to develop analysis tools and methods-based on a relevant scenario-which may be applied to the design of future systems for active interrogation at a standoff. For the specific scenario considered here, the analysis will focus on providing the information needed to determine the type and optimum position of the detectors. This report describes the results of simulations for a detection system employing gamma rays to interrogate fissile and nonfissile targets. The simulations were performed using specialized versions of the codes MCNPX and MCNP-PoliMi. Both prompt neutron and gamma ray and delayed neutron fluxes have been mapped in three dimensions. The time dependence of the prompt neutrons in the system has also been characterized For this particular scenario, the flux maps generated with the Monte Carlo model indicate that the detectors should be placed approximately 50 cm behind the exit of the accelerator, 40 cm away from the vehicle, and 150 cm above the ground. This position minimizes the number of neutrons coming from the accelerator structure and also receives the maximum flux of prompt neutrons coming from the source. The lead shielding around the accelerator minimizes the gamma-ray background from the accelerator in this area. The number of delayed neutrons emitted from the target is approximately seven orders of magnitude less than the prompt neutrons emitted from the system. Therefore, in order to possibly detect the delayed neutrons, the detectors should be active only after all prompt neutrons have scattered out of the system. Preliminary results have shown this time to be greater than 5 ?s after the accelerator pulse. This type of system is illustrative of a

  5. INL Active Interrogation Testing In Support of the GNEP Safeguards Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester

    2008-04-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. Work at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the area of active interrogation, using neutron and photon sources, has been under way for many years to develop methods for detecting and quantifying nuclear material for national and homeland security research areas. This research knowledge base is now being extended to address nuclear safeguards and process monitoring issues related to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). As a first step in this area preliminary scoping studies have been performed to investigate the usefulness of using active neutron interrogation, with a low-power electronic neutron generator, to assay Department of Transportation 6M shipping drums containing uranium oxide fuel rodlets from INL’s zero power physics reactor. Using the paired-counting technique during the die-away time period of interrogation, a lower detection limit of approximately 4.2 grams of enriched uranium (40% 235U) was calculated for a 40 minute measurement using a field portable 2.5 MeV neutron source and an array of 16 moderated helium-3 neutron tubes. Future work in this area, including the use of a more powerful neutron source and a better tailored detector array, would likely improve this limit to a much lower level. Further development work at INL will explore the applicability of active interrogation in association with the nuclear safeguards and process monitoring needs of the advanced GNEP facilities under consideration. This work, which will include both analyses and field demonstrations, will be performed in collaboration with colleagues at INL and elsewhere that have expertise in nuclear fuel reprocessing as well as active interrogation and its use for nuclear material analyses.

  6. Application of Wavelet Unfolding Technique in Neutron Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica; Barzilov, Alexander

    Nonproliferation of nuclear materials is important in nuclear power industry and fuel cycle facilities. It requires technologies capable of measuring and assessing the radiation signatures of fission events. Neutrons produced in spontaneous or induced fission reactions are mainly fast. The neutron energy information allows characterization of nuclear materials and neutron sources. It can also be applied in remote sensing and source search tasks. The plastic scintillator EJ-299-33A was studied as a fast neutron detector. The detector response to a polyenergetic flux was unfolded usingthe multiple linear regression method. It yields the intensities of neutron flux of particular energy, hence, enabling the spectroscopic analysis. The wavelet technique was evaluated for the unfolding of neutron spectrum using the scintillator's response functions between 1 MeV and 14 MeV computed with the MCNPX code. This paperpresents the computational results of the wavelet-based spectrum unfolding applied to a scintillator detector with neutron / photon pulse shape discrimination properties.

  7. Calibrating and training of neutron based NSA techniques with less SNM standards

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, William H; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Bracken, David S; Freeman, Corey R; Newell, Matthew R

    2010-01-01

    Accessing special nuclear material (SNM) standards for the calibration of and training on nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments has become increasingly difficult in light of enhanced safeguards and security regulations. Limited or nonexistent access to SNM has affected neutron based NDA techniques more than gamma ray techniques because the effects of multiplication require a range of masses to accurately measure the detector response. Neutron based NDA techniques can also be greatly affected by the matrix and impurity characteristics of the item. The safeguards community has been developing techniques for calibrating instrumentation and training personnel with dwindling numbers of SNM standards. Monte Carlo methods have become increasingly important for design and calibration of instrumentation. Monte Carlo techniques have the ability to accurately predict the detector response for passive techniques. The Monte Carlo results are usually benchmarked to neutron source measurements such as californium. For active techniques, the modeling becomes more difficult because of the interaction of the interrogation source with the detector and nuclear material; and the results cannot be simply benchmarked with neutron sources. A Monte Carlo calculated calibration curve for a training course in Indonesia of material test reactor (MTR) fuel elements assayed with an active well coincidence counter (AWCC) will be presented as an example. Performing training activities with reduced amounts of nuclear material makes it difficult to demonstrate how the multiplication and matrix properties of the item affects the detector response and limits the knowledge that can be obtained with hands-on training. A neutron pulse simulator (NPS) has been developed that can produce a pulse stream representative of a real pulse stream output from a detector measuring SNM. The NPS has been used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for detector testing and training applications at the

  8. Evaluation of neutron dosimetry techniques for well-logging operations

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Haggard, D.L.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1985-07-01

    Neutron dose and energy spectral measurements from /sup 241/AmBe and a 14 MeV neutron generator were performed at a well-logging laboratory. The measurement technique included the tissue equivalent proportional counter, multisphere, two types of remmeters and five types of personnel neutron dosimeters. Several source configurations were used to attempt to relate data to field situations. The results of the measurements indicated that the thermoluminescent albedo dosimeter was the most appropriate personnel neutron dosimeter, and that the most appropriate calibration source would be the source normally employed in the field with the calibration source being used in the unmoderated configuration. 7 refs., 35 figs., 14 tabs.

  9. Pulsed photoneutron interrogation: The GNT demonstration system

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.L.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.; Hoggan, J.M.; McManus, G.J.

    1994-10-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed and tested an active photon interrogation technique to support the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of National Security and Nonproliferation (NN) mission related to verification technologies development. The INEL concept, referred to as the Gamma-Neutron Threshold (GNT) technology, uses a transportable, field-deployable, selective-energy (2 to 10 MeV), pulsed, electron accelerator to produce energetic X-rays having a bremsstrahlung spectrum. The energetic X-rays induce neutrons in many proliferation-limited items via direct photoneutron/photofission interactions. The time-dependent neutron response, as a function of the electron beam energy, is measured with a tripod-mounted, detector assembly and a portable data acquisition system. The portable detector assembly has been specifically designed to operate in very intense, pulsed X-ray environments. The GNT technique measures both the prompt and delayed neutron emission after each accelerator pulse. This report fully describes each component of this system and presents various signature results based on these emissions.

  10. Calibration technique for the neutron surface moisture measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.T.; Shreve, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for calibrating the response of a surface neutron moisture measurement probe to material moisture concentration has been devised. Tests to ensure that the probe will function in the expected in-tank operating environment are also outlined.

  11. Interrogating protonated/deuterated fibronectin fragment layers adsorbed to titania by neutron reflectivity and their concomitant control over cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Lisa; Whitelaw, Christine; Rekas, Agata; Holt, Stephen A.; van der Walle, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    The fibronectin fragment, 9th–10th-type III domains (FIII9–10), mediates cell attachment and spreading and is commonly investigated as a bioadhesive interface for implant materials such as titania (TiO2). How the extent of the cell attachment–spreading response is related to the nature of the adsorbed protein layer is largely unknown. Here, the layer thickness and surface fraction of two FIII9–10 mutants (both protonated and deuterated) adsorbed to TiO2 were determined over concentrations used in cell adhesion assays. Unexpectedly, the isotopic forms had different adsorption behaviours. At solution concentrations of 10 mg l−1, the surface fraction of the less conformationally stable mutant (FIII9′10) was 42% for the deuterated form and 19% for the protonated form (fitted to the same monolayer thickness). Similarly, the surface fraction of the more stable mutant (FIII9′10–H2P) was 34% and 18% for the deuterated and protonated forms, respectively. All proteins showed a transition from monolayer to bilayer between 30 and 100 mg l−1, with the protein longitudinal orientation moving away from the plane of the TiO2 surface at high concentrations. Baby hamster kidney cells adherent to TiO2 surfaces coated with the proteins (100 mg l−1) showed a strong spreading response, irrespective of protein conformational stability. After surface washing, FIII9′10 and FIII9′10–H2P bilayer surface fractions were 30/25% and 42/39% for the lower/upper layers, respectively, implying that the cell spreading response requires only a partial protein surface fraction. Thus, we can use neutron reflectivity to inform the coating process for generating bioadhesive TiO2 surfaces. PMID:25926699

  12. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Mechanism and Measurement of Neutron Asymmetry Using Time of Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Azzawe, A. J. M.

    2007-02-01

    Inelastic scattering is an essential reaction for other nuclear reactions to detect the optical model and compound nucleus formation within the range of (0.4- 5.0) MeV neutron incident energy by using time of flight technique. The time of flight system (TOFS) installed on the horizontal channel reactor RRA has been used to measure the asymmetry of scattered fast neutrons, when data acquisition and system control were recorded event by event by HP — computer via CAMAC system. Eight NE 213 neutron counters were used in order to detect neutron inelastic scattering in the forward direction (4 neutron counters at 0° angle) and in the backward direction (4 neutron counters at 180° angle) to measure the asymmetry of fast neutron. Each neutron counter was 50cm in length and 8cm in diameter, viewed by two (58 — DVP) photomultiplier tubes. The contribution of direct interaction to the compound nucleus formation was deduced from the asymmetry in the neutron detection at the same direction of these eight neutron counters. A time resolution of 8.2 ns between the eight neutron counters and one of the two Ge(Li) detectors has been obtained.

  13. Novel Neutron Imaging Techniques for Cultural Heritage Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, C.; Gorini, G.; Materna, T.

    The use of neutrons for cultural heritage (CH) research is illustrated with special reference to neutron tomography (NT) methods, providing three-dimensional (3D) images of neutron attenuation, and the analysis techniques known as prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) and neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA), providing the elemental composition of an object. PGAA and NRCA are well-established nondestructive methods for bulk analysis of CH objects, with sensitivities that can reach the parts-per-million range. By improving the spatial resolution of PGAA and NRCA it will be possible to measure the composition of small parts inside a large object or even to provide a full 3D map of the elemental composition of an artifact. The imaging techniques under development are called prompt gamma-ray activation imaging (PGAI), neutron resonance capture imaging (NRCI) and neutron resonance transmission (NRT) tomography. The NRCA experience at the GELINA neutron source is the starting point for the development of NRCI/NRT now taking place at the 100 times more powerful ISIS pulsed neutron source.

  14. Benchmark validation comparisons of measured and calculated delayed neutron detector responses for a pulsed photonuclear assessment technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterbentz, J. W.; Jones, J. L.; Yoon, W. Y.; Norman, D. R.; Haskell, K. J.

    2007-08-01

    An MCNPX-based calculational methodology has been developed to numerically simulate the complex electron-photon-neutron transport problem for the active interrogation system known as the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technique. The PPA technique uses a pulsed electron accelerator to generate bremsstrahlung photons in order to fission nuclear materials. Delayed neutron radiation is then detected with helium-3 neutron detectors as evidence of the nuclear material presence. Two experimental tests were designed, setup and run to generate experimental data for benchmarking purposes. The first test irradiated depleted uranium in air, and the second test, depleted uranium in a simulated cargo container (plywood pallet), using 10 MeV electron pulses. Time-integrated, post-flash, delayed neutron counts were measured and compared to calculated count predictions in order to benchmark the calculational methodology and computer models. Comparisons between the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of the delayed neutron detector responses resulted in reasonable experiment/calculated ratios of 1.42 and 1.06 for the two tests. High-enriched uranium (HEU) predictions were also made with the benchmarked models.

  15. Benchmark validation comparisons of measured and calculated delayed neutron detector responses for a pulsed photonuclear assessment technique

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; J. L. Jones; W. Y. Yoon; D. R. Norman; K. J. Haskell

    2007-08-01

    An MCNPX-based calculational methodology has been developed to numerically simulate the complex electron–photon–neutron transport problem for the active interrogation system known as the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technique. The PPA technique uses a pulsed electron accelerator to generate bremsstrahlung photons in order to fission nuclear materials. Delayed neutron radiation is then detected with helium-3 neutron detectors as evidence of the nuclear material presence. Two experimental tests were designed, setup and run to generate experimental data for benchmarking purposes. The first test irradiated depleted uranium in air, and the second test, depleted uranium in a simulated cargo container (plywood pallet), using 10 MeV electron pulses. Time-integrated, post-flash, delayed neutron counts were measured and compared to calculated count predictions in order to benchmark the calculational methodology and computer models. Comparisons between the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of the delayed neutron detector responses resulted in reasonable experiment/calculated ratios of 1.42 and 1.06 for the two tests. High-enriched uranium (HEU) predictions were also made with the benchmarked models.

  16. Identification of Fissionable Materials Using the Tagged Neutron Technique

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Keegan, J.P. Hurley, J.R. Tinsley, R. Trainham

    2009-06-30

    This summary describes experiments to detect and identify fissionable materials using the tagged neutron technique. The objective of this work is to enhance homeland security capability to find fissionable material that may be smuggled inside shipping boxes, containers, or vehicles. The technique distinguishes depleted uranium from lead, steel, and tungsten. Future work involves optimizing the technique to increase the count rate by many orders of magnitude and to build in the additional capability to image hidden fissionable materials. The tagged neutron approach is very different to other techniques based on neutron die-away or photo-fission. This work builds on the development of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) technique at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) [1]. Similar investigations have been performed by teams at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia, and by the EURITRACK collaboration in the European Union [2,3,4].

  17. Evaluation of neutron spectrometer techniques for ITER using synthetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson Sundén, E.; Ballabio, L.; Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Ognissanto, F.; Ronchi, E.; Sjöstrand, H.; Tardocchi, M.; Weiszflog, M.

    2013-02-01

    A neutron spectrometer at ITER is expected to provide estimates of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, Ti, fuel ion ratio, nt/nd, and Qthermal/Qtot, with 10-20% precision at a time resolution, Δt, of at least 100 ms. The present paper describes a method for evaluating different neutron spectroscopy techniques based on their instrumental response functions and synthetic measurement data. We include five different neutron spectrometric techniques with realistic response functions, based on simulations and measurements where available. The techniques are magnetic proton recoil, thin-foil proton recoil, gamma discriminating organic scintillator, diamond and time-of-flight. The reference position and line of sight of a high resolution neutron spectrometer on ITER are used in the study. ITER plasma conditions are simulated for realistic operating scenarios. The ITER conditions evaluated are beam and radio frequency heated and thermal deuterium-tritium plasmas. Results are given for each technique in terms of the estimated time resolution at which the parameter determination can be made within the required precision (here 10% for Ti and the relative intensities of NB and RF emission components). It is shown that under the assumptions made, the thin-foil techniques out-perform the other spectroscopy techniques in practically all measurement situations. For thermal conditions, the range of achieved Δt in the determination of Ti varies in time scales from ms (for the magnetic and thin-foil proton recoil) to s (for gamma discriminating organic scintillator).

  18. Applied Interpersonal Communication in a Cross-Cultural Context: The Use of Interpreters as an Interrogation Technique When Interviewing Spanish Speaking Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, James A.

    Interrogation of Spanish speaking sources by English speaking interrogators continues to be a realistic scenario due to continued United States involvement in Central America. The use of bilingual interpreters, when applied correctly, enhances applied interpersonal communication in this cross-cultural context. Analysis of the interrogation…

  19. Neutron radiography activity in the european program cost 524: Neutron imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirco, P.; Bach, P.; Lehmann, E.; Balasko, M.

    2001-07-01

    COST is a framework for scientific and technical cooperation, allowing the coordination of national research on a European level, including 32 member countries. Participation of institutes from non-COST countries is possible. From an initial 7 Actions in 1971, COST has grown to 200 Actions at the beginning of 2000. COST Action 524 is under materials domain, the title of which being "Neutron Imaging Techniques for the Detection of Defects in Materials", under the Chairmanship of Dr. P. Chirco (I.N.F.N.). The following countries are represented in the Management Committee of Action 524: Italy, France, Austria, Germany, United Kingdom, Hungary, Switzerland, Spain, Czech Republic, Slovenia, and Russia. The six working groups of this Action are working respectively on standardization of neutron radiography techniques, on aerospace application, on civil engineering applications, on comparison and integration of neutron imaging techniques with other NDT, on neutron tomography, and on non radiographic techniques such as neutron scattering techniques. A specific effort is devoted to standardization issues, with respect to other non European standards. Results of work performed in the COST frame are published or will be published in the review INSIGHT, edited by the British Institute of Non Destructive Testing.

  20. Active Interrogation Observables for Enrichment Determination of DU Shielded HEU Metal Assemblies with Limited Geometrical Information

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, Kirsten E; McConchie, Seth M; Crye, Jason Michael; Mihalczo, John T

    2011-01-01

    Determining the enrichment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal assemblies shielded by depleted uranium (DU) proves a unique challenge to currently employed measurement techniques. Efforts to match time-correlated neutron distributions obtained through active interrogation to Monte Carlo simulations of the assemblies have shown promising results, given that the exact geometries of both the HEU metal assemblies and DU shields are known from imaging and fission site mapping. In certain situations, however, it is desirable to obtain enrichment with limited or no geometrical information of the assemblies being measured. This paper explores the possibility that the utilization of observables in the interrogation of assemblies by time-tagged D-T neutrons, including time-correlated distribution of neutrons and gammas using liquid scintillators operating on the fission chain time scale, can lead to enrichment determination without a complete set of geometrical information.

  1. Fissile Materials Detection via Neutron Differential Die-Away Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyaev, V. F.; Bochkarev, O. V.; Sklyarov, S. V.

    2014-02-01

    This work is devoted to the differential die-away technique that is widely used for active detection of fissile materials via pulsed neutron generators. The technique allows direct detection of milligram quantities of uranium-235 and plutonium-239 in objects with volumes up to several cubic meters. Our group has demonstrated this technique, creating a special installation based on the commercially produced ING-07T pulsed neutron generator. The installation includes eight proportional 3He-counters mounted inside a polyethylene moderator with a cadmium filter, as well as a polyethylene chamber into which a 70-liter container is loaded for inspection. Preliminary testing showed that the minimum detectable mass of unshielded uranium-235 is ˜3 mg, using a 5.108 n/s neutron yield and 8 min measurement time. When the container is filled with neutron absorbing materials, e.g., iron, the minimum detectable mass increases to ˜30 mg. Use of borated screens further increases the minimum mass that can be detected. The tested installation and/or its modifications can be used for control and detection of fissile materials in various applications from luggage inspection to control containers with nuclear fuel cycle radioactive wastes.

  2. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  3. Extrapolation techniques applied to matrix methods in neutron diffusion problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccready, Robert R

    1956-01-01

    A general matrix method is developed for the solution of characteristic-value problems of the type arising in many physical applications. The scheme employed is essentially that of Gauss and Seidel with appropriate modifications needed to make it applicable to characteristic-value problems. An iterative procedure produces a sequence of estimates to the answer; and extrapolation techniques, based upon previous behavior of iterants, are utilized in speeding convergence. Theoretically sound limits are placed on the magnitude of the extrapolation that may be tolerated. This matrix method is applied to the problem of finding criticality and neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor with control rods. The two-dimensional finite-difference approximation to the two-group neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor with control rods. The two-dimensional finite-difference approximation to the two-group neutron-diffusion equations is treated. Results for this example are indicated.

  4. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Schooneveld, E M; Pietropaolo, A; Andreani, C; Perelli Cippo, E; Rhodes, N J; Senesi, R; Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources. PMID:27502571

  5. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rhodes, N. J.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources.

  6. Characterization of European sword blades through neutron imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvemini, F.; Grazzi, F.; Peetermans, S.; Gener, M.; Lehmann, E. H.; Zoppi, M.

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, we have studied two European rapier blades, dating back to the period ranging from the Late Renaissance to the Early Modern Age (about 17th to 18th century). In order to determine variation in quality and differences in technology, a study was undertaken with the purpose to observe variations in the blade microstructure (and consequently in the construction processes). The samples, which in the present case were expendable, have been investigated, preliminarily, through standard metallography and then by means of white beam and energy-selective neutron imaging. The comparison of the results, using the two techniques, turned out to be satisfactory, with a substantial quantitative agreement of the results obtained with the two techniques, and show the complementarity of the two methods. Metallography has been considered up to now the method of choice for metal material characterization. The correspondence between the two methods, as well as the non-invasive character of the neutron-based techniques and its possibility to obtain 3D reconstruction, candidate neutron imaging as an important and quantitatively reliable technique for metal characterization.

  7. Active interrogation of highly enriched uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairrow, Nannette Lea

    Safeguarding special nuclear material (SNM) in the Department of Energy Complex is vital to the national security of the United States. Active and passive nondestructive assays are used to confirm the presence of SNM in various configurations ranging from waste to nuclear weapons. Confirmation measurements for nuclear weapons are more challenging because the design complicates the detection of a distinct signal for highly enriched uranium. The emphasis of this dissertation was to investigate a new nondestructive assay technique that provides an independent and distinct signal to confirm the presence of highly enriched uranium (HEU). Once completed and tested this assay method could be applied to confirmation measurements of nuclear weapons. The new system uses a 14-MeV neutron source for interrogation and records the arrival time of neutrons between the pulses with a high efficiency detection system. The data is then analyzed by the Feynman reduced variance method. The analysis determined the amount of correlation in the data and provided a unique signature of correlated fission neutrons. Measurements of HEU spheres were conducted at Los Alamos with the new system. Then, Monte Carlo calculations were performed to verify hypothesis made about the behavior of the neutrons in the experiment. Comparisons of calculated counting rates by the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) were made with the experimental data to confirm that the measured response reflected the desired behavior of neutron interactions in the highly enriched uranium. In addition, MCNP calculations of the delayed neutron build-up were compared with the measured data. Based on the results obtained from this dissertation, this measurement method has the potential to be expanded to include mass determinations of highly enriched uranium. Although many safeguards techniques exist for measuring special nuclear material, the number of assays that can be used to confirm HEU in shielded systems is

  8. Sensitivity Upgrades to the Idaho Accelerator Center Neutron Time of Flight Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S. J.; Kinlaw, M. T.; Harmon, J. F.; Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.

    2007-10-26

    Past experiments have shown that discrimination between between fissionable and non-fissionable materials is possible using an interrogation technique that monitors for high energy prompt fission neutrons. Several recent upgrades have been made to the neutron time of flight spectrometer at the Idaho Accelerator Center with the intent of increasing neutron detection sensitivity, allowing for system use in nonproliferation and security applications.

  9. Development of Measurement Methods for Detection of Special Nuclear Materials using D-D Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Kimura, Masaharu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    For detection of hidden special nuclear materials (SNMs), we have developed an active neutron-based interrogation system combined with a D-D fusion pulsed neutron source and a neutron detection system. In the detection scheme, we have adopted new measurement techniques simultaneously; neutron noise analysis and neutron energy spectrum analysis. The validity of neutron noise analysis method has been experimentally studied in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), and was applied to a cargo container inspection system by simulation.

  10. Radiation Detection for Active Interrogation of HEU

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    2004-12-09

    This report briefly describes the neutrons and gamma rays emitted by active interrogation of HEU, briefly discusses measurement methods, briefly discusses sources and detectors relevant to detection of shielded HEU in Sealand containers, and lists the measurement possibilities for the various sources. All but one of the measurement methods detect radiation emitted by induced fission in the HEU; the exception utilizes nuclear resonance fluorescence. The brief descriptions are supplemented by references. This report presents some active interrogation possibilities but the status of understanding is not advanced enough to select particular methods. Additional research is needed to evaluate these possibilities.

  11. Nondestructive determination of plutonium mass in spent fuel: prelliminary modeling results using the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Tobin, Stephen J; Schear, Melissa A; Menlove, Howard O; Lee, Sang Y; Swinhoe, Martyn T

    2009-01-01

    There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium (Pu) in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capability of the International Atomic Energy Agency (LAEA) to safeguard nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at pyrochemical processing facilities, providing quantitative input to burnup credit and final safeguards measurements at a long-term repository. In order to determine Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, thirteen NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key motivation of the present research is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of rods. It is therefore anticipated that a combination of techniques will be required. A 5 year effort funded by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE was recently started in pursuit of these goals. The first two years involves researching all thirteen techniques using Monte Carlo modeling while the final three years involves fabricating hardware and measuring spent fuel. Here, we present the work in two main parts: (1) an overview of this NGSI effort describing the motivations and approach being taken; (2) The preliminary results for one of the NDA techniques - Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR). The PNAR technique functions by using the intrinsic neutron emission of the fuel (primarily from the spontaneous fission of curium) to self-interrogate any fissile material present. Two separate measurements of the spent fuel are made, both with and without cadmium (Cd) present. The ratios of the Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates obtained in each case are analyzed; known as the Cd ratio. The primary differences between the two measurements are the neutron energy spectrum

  12. A Technique for Determining Neutron Beam Fluence to 0.01% Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, A. T.; Dewey, M. S.; Gilliam, D. M.; Nico, J. S.; Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Snow, W. M.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2014-01-01

    The achievable uncertainty in neutron lifetime measurements using the beam technique has been limited by the uncertainty in the determination of the neutron density in the decay volume. In the Sussex-ILL-NIST series of beam lifetime experiments, the density was determined with a neutron fluence mon itor that detected the charged particle products from neutron absorption in a thin layer of 6Li or lOB. In each of the experiments, the absolute detection efficiency of the neutron monitor was determined from the measured density of the neutron absorber, the thermal neutron cross section for the absorbing ma terial, and the solid angle of the charged particle detectors. The efficiency of the neutron monitor used in the most recent beam lifetime experiment has since been measured directly by operating it on a monochromatic neutron beam in which the total neutron rate is determined with a totally absorbing neutron detector. The absolute nature of this technique does not rely on any knowl edge of neutron absorption cross sections or a measurement of the density of the neutron absorbing deposit. This technique has been used to measure the neutron monitor efficiency to 0.06% uncertainty. VVe show that a new monitor and absolute neutron detector employing the same technique would be capable of achieving determining neutron fluence to an uncertainty of 0.01%.

  13. High signal-to-noise ratio acoustic sensor using phase-shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices

  14. Interrogating an insect society

    PubMed Central

    Gadagkar, Raghavendra

    2009-01-01

    Insect societies such as those of ants, bees, and wasps consist of 1 or a small number of fertile queens and a large number of sterile or nearly sterile workers. While the queens engage in laying eggs, workers perform all other tasks such as nest building, acquisition and processing of food, and brood care. How do such societies function in a coordinated and efficient manner? What are the rules that individuals follow? How are these rules made and enforced? These questions are of obvious interest to us as fellow social animals but how do we interrogate an insect society and seek answers to these questions? In this article I will describe my research that was designed to seek answers from an insect society to a series of questions of obvious interest to us. I have chosen the Indian paper wasp Ropalidia marginata for this purpose, a species that is abundantly distributed in peninsular India and serves as an excellent model system. An important feature of this species is that queens and workers are morphologically identical and physiologically nearly so. How then does an individual become a queen? How does the queen suppress worker reproduction? How does the queen regulate the nonreproductive activities of the workers? What is the function of aggression shown by different individuals? How and when is the queen's heir decided? I will show how such questions can indeed be investigated and will emphasize the need for a whole range of different techniques of observation and experimentation. PMID:19487678

  15. Active neutron methods for nuclear safeguards applications using Helium-4 gas scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jason M.

    Active neutron methods use a neutron source to interrogate fissionable material. In this work a 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detection system is used to measure neutrons created by the interrogation. Three new applications of this method are developed: spent nuclear fuel assay, fission rate measurement, and special nuclear material detection. Three active neutron methods are included in this thesis. First a non-destructive plutonium assay technique called Multispectral Active Neutron Interrogation Analysis is developed. It is based on interrogating fuel with neutrons at several different energies. The induced fission rates at each interrogation energy are compared with results from a neutron transport model of the irradiation geometry in a system of equations to iteratively solve the inverse problem for isotopic composition. The model is shown to converge on the correct composition for a material with 3 different fissionable components, a representative neutron absorber, and any neutron transparent material such as oxygen in a variety of geometries. Next an experimental fission rate measurement technique is developed using 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detector. Several unique features of this detector allow it to detect and provide energy information on fast neutrons with excellent gamma discrimination efficiency. The detector can measure induced fission rate by energetically differentiating between interrogation neutrons and higher energy fission neutrons. The detector response to a mono-energetic deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a 252Cf source are compared to examine the difference in detected energy range. Finally we demonstrate a special nuclear material detection technique by detecting an unambiguous fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium neutron generator and a high pressure 4He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. Energy histograms resulting from this

  16. Neutron capture strategy and technique developments for GNEP

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, Aaron Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The initial three years of neutron capture measurements have been very successful in providing data for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative/Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (AFCI/GNEP) program. Now that the most straightforward measurements have been completed, additional technical challenges face future measurements. In particular, techniques are needed to perform measurements that exhibit at least one of three major problems -- large fission:capture ratios, large capture:capture ratios, and high intrinsic activity samples. This paper will set forward a plan for attacking these technical challenges and moving forward with future measurements.

  17. Simultaneous and integrated neutron-based techniques for material analysis of a metallic ancient flute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Pietropaolo, A.; Grazzi, F.; Sutton, L. F.; Scherillo, A.; Bognetti, L.; Bini, A.; Barzagli, E.; Schooneveld, E.; Andreani, C.

    2013-09-01

    A metallic 19th century flute was studied by means of integrated and simultaneous neutron-based techniques: neutron diffraction, neutron radiative capture analysis and neutron radiography. This experiment follows benchmark measurements devoted to assessing the effectiveness of a multitask beamline concept for neutron-based investigation on materials. The aim of this study is to show the potential application of the approach using multiple and integrated neutron-based techniques for musical instruments. Such samples, in the broad scenario of cultural heritage, represent an exciting research field. They may represent an interesting link between different disciplines such as nuclear physics, metallurgy and acoustics.

  18. Neutron multiplicity equation and its application for (n,2n) multiplication measurements by statistical correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Srinivasan, M.

    1986-07-01

    A new equation, called the neutron multiplicity equation (NME), has been derived starting from basic physics principles. Neutron multiplicity v is defined as the integral number of neutrons leaking from a neutron multiplying system for a source neutron introduced into it. Probability distribution of neutron multiplicities (PDNMs) gives the probability of leakage of neutrons as a function of their multiplicity v. The PDNM is directly measurable through statistical correlation techniques. In a specific application, the NME has been solved for PDNM as a function of v for /sup 9/Be spheres of varying radii and driven by a centrally located 14-MeV deuterium-tritium neutron source. The potential of NME for sensitivity analysis is demonstrated through a particular modification of secondary neutron transfer cross sections of /sup 9/Be. It turns out that PDNM is very sensitive, even as the ''average'' neutron leakage is practically insensitive to it.

  19. Modeling and Interrogative Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denney, Douglas R.

    Three studies to determine the effects of adult models on interrogative strategies of children (ages 6-11) are reviewed. Two issues are analyzed: (1) the comparative effectiveness of various types of modeling procedures for changing rule-governed behaviors, and (2) the interaction between observational learning and the developmental level of the…

  20. Measurements of fusion neutron yields by neutron activation technique: Uncertainty due to the uncertainty on activation cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankunas, Gediminas; Batistoni, Paola; Sjöstrand, Henrik; Conroy, Sean

    2015-07-01

    The neutron activation technique is routinely used in fusion experiments to measure the neutron yields. This paper investigates the uncertainty on these measurements as due to the uncertainties on dosimetry and activation reactions. For this purpose, activation cross-sections were taken from the International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File (IRDFF-v1.05) in 640 groups ENDF-6 format for several reactions of interest for both 2.5 and 14 MeV neutrons. Activation coefficients (reaction rates) have been calculated using the neutron flux spectra at JET vacuum vessel, both for DD and DT plasmas, calculated by MCNP in the required 640-energy group format. The related uncertainties for the JET neutron spectra are evaluated as well using the covariance data available in the library. These uncertainties are in general small, but not negligible when high accuracy is required in the determination of the fusion neutron yields.

  1. Inspection of an artificial heart by the neutron radiography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Geraldo, L. P.; Andrade, M. L. G.; Menezes, M. O.,; Pereira, M. A. S.; Maizato, M. J. S.

    1999-11-01

    The neutron radiography technique was employed to inspect an artificial heart prototype which is being developed to provide blood circulation for patients expecting heart transplant surgery. The radiographs have been obtained by the direct method with a gadolinium converter screen along with the double coated Kodak-AA emulsion film. The artificial heart consists of a flexible plastic membrane located inside a welded metallic cavity, which is employed for blood pumping purposes. The main objective of the present inspection was to identify possible damages in this plastic membrane, produced during the welding process of the metallic cavity. The obtained radiographs were digitized as well as analysed in a PC and the improved images clearly identify several damages in the plastic membrane, suggesting changes in the welding process.

  2. Review of neutron calibration facilities and monitoring techniques: new needs for emerging fields.

    PubMed

    Gressier, V

    2014-10-01

    Neutron calibration facilities and monitoring techniques have been developed since the middle of the 20th century to support research and nuclear power energy development. The technical areas needing reference neutron fields and related instruments were mainly cross section measurements, radiation protection, dosimetry and fission reactors, with energy ranging from a few millielectronvolts to about 20 MeV. The reference neutron fields and calibration techniques developed for these purposes will be presented in this paper. However, in recent years, emerging fields have brought new needs for calibration facilities and monitoring techniques. These new challenges for neutron metrology will be exposed with their technical difficulties. PMID:24344349

  3. A neutron activation technique for manganese measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, C; Byun, S H; Chettle, D R; Inskip, M J; Prestwich, W V

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for humans, animals, and plants and is required for growth, development, and maintenance of health. Studies show that Mn metabolism is similar to that of iron, therefore, increased Mn levels in humans could interfere with the absorption of dietary iron leading to anemia. Also, excess exposure to Mn dust, leads to nervous system disorders similar to Parkinson's disease. Higher exposure to Mn is essentially related to industrial pollution. Thus, there is a benefit in developing a clean non-invasive technique for monitoring such increased levels of Mn in order to understand the risk of disease and development of appropriate treatments. To this end, the feasibility of Mn measurements with their minimum detection limits (MDL) has been reported earlier from the McMaster group. This work presents improvement to Mn assessment using an upgraded system and optimized times of irradiation and counting for induced gamma activity of Mn. The technique utilizes the high proton current Tandetron accelerator producing neutrons via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at McMaster University and an array of nine NaI (Tl) detectors in a 4 π geometry for delayed counting of gamma rays. The neutron irradiation of a set of phantoms was performed with protocols having different proton energy, current and time of irradiation. The improved MDLs estimated using the upgraded set up and constrained timings are reported as 0.67 μgMn/gCa for 2.3 MeV protons and 0.71 μgMn/gCa for 2.0 MeV protons. These are a factor of about 2.3 times better than previous measurements done at McMaster University using the in vivo set-up. Also, because of lower dose-equivalent and a relatively close MDL, the combination of: 2.0 MeV; 300 μA; 3 min protocol is recommended as compared to 2.3 MeV; 400 μA; 45 s protocol for further measurements of Mn in vivo. PMID:25169978

  4. Measurements of Separate Neutron and Gamma-Ray Coincidences with Liquid Scintillators and Digital PSD Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A

    2007-10-01

    A new technique is presented for the measurement of neutron and/or gamma-ray coincidences. Separate neutron neutron, neutron gamma-ray, gamma-ray neutron, and gamma-ray gamma-ray coincidences are acquired with liquid scintillation detectors and a digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique based on standard charge integration method. The measurement technique allows for the collection of fast coincidences in a time window of the order of a few tens of nanoseconds between the coincident particles. The PSD allows for the acquisition of the coincidences in all particle combinations. The measurements are compared to results obtained with the MCNP-PoliMi code, which simulates neutron and gamma-ray coincidences from from a source on an event-by-event basis. This comparison leads to good qualitative agreement.

  5. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  6. Pulsed-neutron techniques for condensed-matter research

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Price, D.L.; Kamitakahara, W.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed spallation sources are reviewed in a historical content as the latest generation of neutron sources in a line that started with the discovery of the neutron in 1932 and proceeded through research-reactor and accelerator-driven sources. The characteristics of the spallation sources are discussed in relation to their capabilities for structural and dynamical studies of condensed matter with slow neutrons and radiation effects research with fast neutrons. The new scientific opportunities opened up in these fields by the unique features of the sources are briefly reviewed, with some examples of completed work and experiments being planned.

  7. Capabilities of the INL ZPPR to Support Active Interrogation Research with SNM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.; Turnage, J. A.; Brush, B. A.; Perry, E. F.

    2009-03-01

    For over 40 years Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and its predecessor organizations have maintained and operated the Zero-Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) as a test bed for studying reactor physics and nuclear reactor design. Although ZPPR is no longer operated as an active research reactor, its infrastructure (radiation shielding, safety systems, physical safeguards) and special nuclear material (SNM) inventory (variably enriched uranium and plutonium fuels available in metallic, oxide, alloy, and other forms) still make the facility a unique national resource for research and development activities involving the use of SNM. Recently INL has utilized this resource to serve as a test and evaluation facility for active interrogation research and development. This facility is currently hosting scoping experiments using neutron and x-ray radiation sources to characterize SNM active interrogation signatures and to develop tools and techniques to detect and identify shielded SNM. This paper presents an overview of the facility's infrastructure and assets and describes recent active interrogation experiments that have taken place using high-energy x-ray sources and compact electronic neutron generators.

  8. Capabilities of the INL ZPPR to Support Active Interrogation Research with SNM

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury; Jennifer A. Turnage; Bevin A. Brush; Eugene F. Perry

    2008-08-01

    For over 40 years Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and its predecessor organizations have maintained and operated the Zero-Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) as a test bed for studying reactor physics and nuclear reactor design. Although the ZPPR is no longer operated as an active research reactor, it’s infrastructure (radiation shielding, safety systems, physical safeguards) and special nuclear material (SNM) inventory (variably enriched uranium and plutonium fuels available in metallic, oxide, alloy, and other forms) still makes the facility a unique national resource for research and development activities involving the use of SNM. Recently INL has utilized this facility to serve as a test and evaluation facility for active interrogation research and development. This facility is currently hosting scoping experiments using neutron and x-ray radiation sources to characterize SNM active interrogation signatures and to develop tools and techniques to detect and identify shielded SNM. This paper presents an overview of the facility’s infrastructure and assets and describes recent active interrogation experiments that have taken place using high-energy x-ray sources and compact electronic neutron generators.

  9. Application of the TLD albedo technique for monitoring and interpretation of neutron stray radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.

    1980-09-01

    A single sphere albedo technique with TLD 600/TLD 700 detectors has been applied in neutron monitoring to calibrate albedo dosimeters and to interpret neutron stray radiation fields in terms of neutron dose equivalent separated for the energy groups below 0.4 eV, 0.4-10 keV and 10 keV-10 MeV, and Eeff for fast neutrons. The paper describes the technique for field and personnel monitoring under the aspect of an on-line computer program for data recording and processing.

  10. A technique for determining the deuterium/hydrogen contrast map in neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    A difference in the neutron scattering length between hydrogen and deuterium leads to a high density contrast in neutron Fourier maps. In this study, a technique for determining the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) contrast map in neutron macromolecular crystallography is developed and evaluated using ribonuclease A. The contrast map between the D2O-solvent and H2O-solvent crystals is calculated in real space, rather than in reciprocal space as performed in previous neutron D/H contrast crystallography. The present technique can thus utilize all of the amplitudes of the neutron structure factors for both D2O-solvent and H2O-solvent crystals. The neutron D/H contrast maps clearly demonstrate the powerful detectability of H/D exchange in proteins. In fact, alternative protonation states and alternative conformations of hydroxyl groups are observed at medium resolution (1.8 Å). Moreover, water molecules can be categorized into three types according to their tendency towards rotational disorder. These results directly indicate improvement in the neutron crystal structure analysis. This technique is suitable for incorporation into the standard structure-determination process used in neutron protein crystallography; consequently, more precise and efficient determination of the D-atom positions is possible using a combination of this D/H contrast technique and standard neutron structure-determination protocols. PMID:26894536

  11. Neutron techniques. [for study of high-energy particles produced in large solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Glenn M., Jr.; Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.; Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Three experimental methods are described which hold the most promise for improved energy resolution, time resolution and sensitivity in the detection of solar neutrons on satellites and/or long duration balloon flights: the neutron calorimeter, the solar neutron track chamber, and the solar neutron decay proton detector. The characteristics of the three methods as to energy range, energy resolution, time resolution, detection efficiency, and physical properties are delineated. Earlier techniques to measure the intensity of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrons at the top of the atmosphere and to search for solar neutrons are described. The past three decades of detector development has now reached the point where it is possible to make comprehensive and detailed measurements of solar neutrons on future space missions.

  12. Application of nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques for the safeguarding of irradiated fuel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Lee, D.M.; Beach, S.E.; Bement, T.R.; Dermendjiev, E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Kaieda, K.; Medina, E.G.

    1980-05-01

    Nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques were used to characterize the irradiation exposures of irradiated fuel assemblies. Techniques for the rapid measurement of the axial-activity profiles of fuel assemblies have been developed using ion chambers and Be(..gamma..,n) detectors. Detailed measurements using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and passive neutron techniques were correlated with operator-declared values of cooling times and burnup.

  13. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  14. Fast Pulsing Neutron Generators for Security Application

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Q.; Regis, M.; Kwan, J. W.

    2009-04-24

    Active neutron interrogation has been demonstrated to be an effective method of detecting shielded fissile material. A fast fall-time/fast pulsing neutron generator is needed primarily for differential die-away technique (DDA) interrogation systems. A compact neutron generator, currently being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, employs an array of 0.6-mm-dia apertures (instead of one 6-mm-dia aperture) such that gating the beamlets can be done with low voltage and a small gap to achieve sub-microsecond ion beam fall time and low background neutrons. Arrays of 16 apertures (4x4) and 100 apertures (10x10) have been designed and fabricated for a beam extraction experiment. The preliminary results showed that, using a gating voltage of 1200 V and a gap distance of 1 mm, the fall time of extracted ion beam pulses is approximately 0.15 mu s at beam energies of 1000 eV.

  15. Modern Techniques for Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawari, A. I.

    2014-04-01

    A predictive approach based on ab initio quantum mechanics and/or classical molecular dynamics simulations has been formulated to calculate the scattering law, S(κ⇀,ω), and the thermal neutron scattering cross sections of materials. In principle, these atomistic methods make it possible to generate the inelastic thermal neutron scattering cross sections of any material and to accurately reflect the physical conditions of the medium (i.e, temperature, pressure, etc.). In addition, the generated cross sections are free from assumptions such as the incoherent approximation of scattering theory and, in the case of solids, crystalline perfection. As a result, new and improved thermal neutron scattering data libraries have been generated for a variety of materials. Among these are materials used for reactor moderators and reflectors such as reactor-grade graphite and beryllium (including the coherent inelastic scattering component), silicon carbide, cold neutron media such as solid methane, and neutron beam filters such as sapphire and bismuth. Consequently, it is anticipated that the above approach will play a major role in providing the nuclear science and engineering community with its needs of thermal neutron scattering data especially when considering new materials where experimental information may be scarce or nonexistent.

  16. Review of measurement techniques for the neutron radiative-capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The experimental techniques applied in measurements of the neutron capture process are reviewed. The emphasis is on measurement techniques used in neutron capture cross section measurements. The activation technique applied mainly in earlier work has still its use in some cases, specifically for measurements of technologically important cross sections (/sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th) with high accuracy. Three major prompt neutron radioactive capture detection techniques have evolved: the total gamma radiation energy detection technique (mainly with large liquid scintillation detectors), the gamma-energy proportional detectors (with proportional counters or Moxon-Rae detectors), and the pulse-height weighting technique. These measurement techniques are generally applicable, however, shortcomings limit the achievable accuracy to a approx. = 5 to 15% uncertainty level.

  17. Improvements in the Image Quality of Neutron Radiograms of NUR Neutron Radiography Facility by Using Several Exposure Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zergoug, T.; Nedjar, A.; Mokeddem, M. Y.; Mammou, L.

    2008-03-01

    Since the construction of NUR reactor neutron radiography facility in 1991, only transfer exposure method was used as a non destructive technique. The reason is the excess of gamma rays in the neutron beam. To improve radiation performances of the NR system, a stainless steal hollow conical cylinder is introduced at the bottom of the facility beam port, this filter reduce gamma infiltration through the edges of the NR structure without disturbing neutron beam arriving from the in pool divergent collimator. First results confirm our prediction; a gamma rays diminution and a relatively stable neutron flux at the point object are confirmed, consequently the n/γ ratio reaches a value of 2.104 n/cm2 mR. Radiograms obtained by using the direct exposure method reveal the feasibility of the technique in the new NR configuration facility, but a weak resolution and contrast of the image is observed. In this paper, we describe a procedure to improve the image quality obtained by direct exposure technique. The process consists of using digitized images obtained by several exposure techniques (NR, gamma radiography or X radiography) for a comparison study and then better image definition can be attained.

  18. Improvements in the Image Quality of Neutron Radiograms of NUR Neutron Radiography Facility by Using Several Exposure Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zergoug, T.; Nedjar, A.; Mokeddem, M. Y.; Mammou, L.

    2008-03-17

    Since the construction of NUR reactor neutron radiography facility in 1991, only transfer exposure method was used as a non destructive technique. The reason is the excess of gamma rays in the neutron beam. To improve radiation performances of the NR system, a stainless steal hollow conical cylinder is introduced at the bottom of the facility beam port, this filter reduce gamma infiltration through the edges of the NR structure without disturbing neutron beam arriving from the in pool divergent collimator. First results confirm our prediction; a gamma rays diminution and a relatively stable neutron flux at the point object are confirmed, consequently the n/{gamma} ratio reaches a value of 2.104 n/cm{sup 2} mR. Radiograms obtained by using the direct exposure method reveal the feasibility of the technique in the new NR configuration facility, but a weak resolution and contrast of the image is observed. In this paper, we describe a procedure to improve the image quality obtained by direct exposure technique. The process consists of using digitized images obtained by several exposure techniques (NR, gamma radiography or X radiography) for a comparison study and then better image definition can be attained.

  19. Development and prospects of Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuo, Tai-Sen; Cheng, He; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2016-07-01

    Very Small Angle Neutron Scattering (VSANS) is an upgrade of the traditional Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique which can cover three orders of magnitude of length scale from one nanometer to one micrometer. It is a powerful tool for structure calibration in polymer science, biology, material science and condensed matter physics. Since the first VSANS instrument, D11 in Grenoble, was built in 1972, new collimation techniques, focusing optics (multi-beam converging apertures, material or magnetic lenses, and focusing mirrors) and higher resolution detectors combined with the long flight paths and long incident neutron wavelengths have been developed. In this paper, a detailed review is given of the development, principles and application conditions of various VSANS techniques. Then, beam current gain factors are calculated to evaluate those techniques. A VSANS design for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is thereby presented. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474119, 11305191)

  20. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Yoshinori Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-11-15

    depth dose distributions of the neutron and gamma-ray components along the central axis was performed at Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility installed at Kyoto University Reactor using activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters, respectively. Results: Simulation results demonstrated that the absorbing effect for thermal neutrons occurred when the LiOH concentration was over 1%. The most effective Li-6 concentration was determined to be enriched {sup 6}LiOH with a solubility approaching its upper limit. Experiments confirmed that the thermal neutron flux and secondary gamma-ray dose rate decreased substantially; however, the fast neutron flux and primary gamma-ray dose rate were hardly affected in the 10%-{sup 6}LiOH phantom. It was confirmed that the dose contribution of fast neutrons is improved from approximately 10% in the pure water phantom to approximately 50% in the 10%-{sup 6}LiOH phantom. Conclusions: The dual phantom technique using the combination of a pure water phantom and a 10%-{sup 6}LiOH phantom developed in this work provides an effective method for dose estimation of the fast neutron component in BNCT. Improvement in the accuracy achieved with the proposed technique results in improved RBE estimation for biological experiments and clinical practice.

  1. Evaluation of spectral unfolding techniques for neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sunden, Erik Andersson; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Giacomelli, L.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ronchi, E.; Sjoestrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Kaellne, J.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.

    2008-03-12

    The precision of the JET installations of MAXED, GRAVEL and the L-curve version of MAXED has been evaluated by using synthetic neutron spectra. We have determined the number of counts needed for the detector systems NE213 and MPR to get an error below 10% of the MAXED unfolded neutron spectra is determined to be {approx}10{sup 6} and {approx}10{sup 4}, respectively. For GRAVEL the same number is {approx}10{sup 7} and {approx}3{center_dot}10{sup 4} for NE213 and MPR, respectively.

  2. The role of abusive states of being in interrogation.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Frank W

    2013-01-01

    Interrogation, the questioning of persons detained by police, military, or intelligence organizations, is designed to extract information that a subject may resist disclosing. Interrogation techniques are frequently predicated on inducing mental states of despair, dread, dependency, and debility that weaken an individual's resistance. Descriptions of techniques from 2 Central Intelligence Agency training manuals are illustrated by examples from interviews of and writings by Murat Kurnaz, who was held at Guantánamo Bay Detention Camp for 5 years. Interrogation techniques are designed to create a destabilizing sense of shock; undermine an individual's grasp on reality; and provoke internal psychological division, self-conflict, and confusion. The long-term effects of interrogation often include posttraumatic stress disorder as well as states of anxiety, depression, and depersonalization. PMID:23406220

  3. Dynamic neutron scattering on incoherent systems using efficient resonance spin flip techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Häussler, Wolfgang; Kredler, Lukas

    2014-05-15

    We have performed numerical ray-tracing Monte-Carlo-simulations of incoherent dynamic neutron scattering experiments. We intend to optimize the efficiency of incoherent measurements depending on the fraction of neutrons scattered without and with spin flip at the sample. In addition to conventional spin echo, we have numerically and experimentally studied oscillating intensity techniques. The results point out the advantages of these different spin echo variants and are an important prerequisite for neutron resonance spin echo instruments like RESEDA (FRM II, Munich), to choose the most efficient technique depending on the scattering vector range and the properties of the sample system under study.

  4. Comparison of neutron-based technologies for the detection of contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Siraj M.

    1994-03-01

    Results of a comparative study of the figure of merit (FOM) for various techniques for the detection of explosives and narcotics using neutrons as the interrogating radiation are presented. The calculations use the flux and energy of neutrons, the cross sections of nuclear reactions, the type and quantity of target material, the geometry of the detection system and the efficiency of the neutron and (gamma) ray detectors for arriving at the FOM of the detection systems based on neutron elastic scatter, associated particle imaging, pulsed fast neutron analysis, and pulsed fast-thermal neutron analysis.

  5. Neutron spectrum measurements in DT discharges using activation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, B.; Bertalot, L.; Loughlin, M.; Roquemore, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    The JET activation system has eight irradiation ends where samples may be irradiated in the neutron flux from the plasma. There is one end, re-entrant into the top of the vessel, for which there is little intervening material between it and the plasma; the other ends, including two beneath the divertor coils, have increasingly larger amounts of intervening structure. The local neutron spectrum at each irradiation end was measured by simultaneously activating several elemental foils (Al, Au, Co, Fe, In, Mg, Nb, Ni, Ti, Zr). There were 15 activation reactions in the energy range of 0.5-16 MeV which were used as input to the SNL-SAND-II code to determine the neutron energy spectrum. The results are compared with neutron transport calculations both from the MCNP and FURNACE codes: the average standard deviation between measured to SNL-SAND-II calculated activity ratios was as low as 5%. The results demonstrate the reliability of the neutronics calculations and have implications for the design of diagnostics and blankets for the next generation of large tokamaks such as ITER. The 377.9 keV line of the 54Fe(n,2n)53Fe reaction (threshold ˜13.9 MeV, not a dosimetric standard) has also been measured in different plasma conditions. The ratio of the saturated activity from this reaction to that from the 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reaction (threshold ˜4.5 MeV) provides information on the broadening of the 14 MeV fusion peak.

  6. Some Nuclear Techniques in Experimental Magnetism: Mössbauer Effect, Neutron Scattering and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piecuch, Michel

    The goal of this chapter is to present three traditional methods for the study of magnetic properties : Mössbauer effect, neutron diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance. It begins by recalling the basic properties of atomic nuclei and describing the hyperfine interactions between the nucleus and its surrounding. Then, the recoilless absorption of γ-rays by crystal, the Mössbauer effect is presented, we discuss the main parameters measured and show one example of application. Next we present neutron interactions with matter, the interaction of neutrons with the atomic nucleus and the interaction of the neutron magnetic moment with the magnetic moment of electrons. The use of polarized neutron and the inelastic scattering of neutrons are also discussed. The comparison between neutron experiments and synchrotron radiation techniques is briefly reviewed. One example of the use of neutron scattering in the domain of thin film magnetism is shown. Finally, we present the basic theory of nuclear magnetic resonance and one application of this technique to the study of Co/Cu multilayers.

  7. Interrogating personhood and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Paul; Gilleard, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To interrogate the concept of personhood and its application to care practices for people with dementia. Method: We outline the work of Tom Kitwood on personhood and relate this to conceptualisations of personhood in metaphysics and in moral philosophy. Results: The philosophical concept of personhood has a long history. The metaphysical tradition examines the necessary and sufficient qualities that make up personhood such as agency, consciousness, identity, rationality and second-order reflexivity. Alternative viewpoints treat personhood as a matter of degree rather than as a superordinate category. Within moral philosophy personhood is treated as a moral status applicable to some or to all human beings. Conclusion: In the light of the multiple meanings attached to the term in both metaphysics and moral philosophy, personhood is a relatively unhelpful concept to act as the foundation for developing models and standards of care for people with dementia. Care, we suggest, should concentrate less on ambiguous and somewhat abstract terms such as personhood and focus instead on supporting people's existing capabilities, while minimising the harmful consequences of their incapacities. PMID:26708149

  8. Interrogation of an object for dimensional and topographical information

    DOEpatents

    McMakin, Doug L [Richland, WA; Severtsen, Ronald H [Richland, WA; Hall, Thomas E [Richland, WA; Sheen, David M [Richland, WA

    2003-01-14

    Disclosed are systems, methods, devices, and apparatus to interrogate a clothed individual with electromagnetic radiation to determine one or more body measurements at least partially covered by the individual's clothing. The invention further includes techniques to interrogate an object with electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter and/or microwave range to provide a volumetric representation of the object. This representation can be used to display images and/or determine dimensional information concerning the object.

  9. Interrogation of an object for dimensional and topographical information

    DOEpatents

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Severtsen, Ronald H.; Hall, Thomas E.; Sheen, David M.; Kennedy, Mike O.

    2004-03-09

    Disclosed are systems, methods, devices, and apparatus to interrogate a clothed individual with electromagnetic radiation to determine one or more body measurements at least partially covered by the individual's clothing. The invention further includes techniques to interrogate an object with electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter and/or microwave range to provide a volumetric representation of the object. This representation can be used to display images and/or determine dimensional information concerning the object.

  10. 235U Determination using In-Beam Delayed Neutron Counting Technique at the NRU Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M. T.; Bentoumi, G.; Corcoran, E. C.; Dimayuga, I.; Kelly, D. G.; Li, L.; Sur, B.; Rogge, R. B.

    2015-11-17

    This paper describes a collaborative effort that saw the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC)’s delayed neutron and gamma counting apparatus transported to Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) for use in the neutron beamline at the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor. Samples containing mg quantities of fissile material were re-interrogated, and their delayed neutron emissions measured. This collaboration offers significant advantages to previous delayed neutron research at both CNL and RMC. This paper details the determination of 235U content in enriched uranium via the assay of in-beam delayed neutron magnitudes and temporal behavior. 235U mass was determined with an average absolute error of ± 2.7 %. This error is lower than that obtained at RMCC for the assay of 235U content in aqueous solutions (3.6 %) using delayed neutron counting. Delayed neutron counting has been demonstrated to be a rapid, accurate, and precise method for special nuclear material detection and identification.

  11. Portable active interrogation system.

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C. E.; Brener, M. W.; Hollas, C. L.; Myers, W. L.

    2004-01-01

    The system consists of a pulsed DT neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 7} n/s) and a portable but high intrinsic efficiency, custom-designed, polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He neutron detector. A multichannel scaler card in a ruggedized laptop computer acquires the data. A user-friendly LabVIEW program analyzes and displays the data. The program displays a warning message when highly enriched uranium or any other fissionable materials is detected at a specified number of sigmas above background in the delayed region between pulses. This report describes the system and gives examples of the response of the system to highly enriched uranium and some other fissionable materials, at several distances and with various shielding materials.

  12. Determination of fission neutron transmission through waste matrix material using neutron signal correlation from active assay of {sup 239}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Hollas, C.L.; Arnone, G.; Brunson, G.; Coop, K.

    1996-09-01

    The accuracy of TRU (transuranic) waste assay using the differential die-away technique depends upon significant corrections to compensate for the effects of the matrix material in which the TRU waste is located. The authors have used a new instrument, the Combined Thermal/Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) instrument for the assay of TRU waste, to develop methods to improve the accuracy of these corrections. Neutrons from a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator are moderated in the walls of the CTEN cavity and induce fission in the TRU material. The prompt neutrons from these fission events are detected in cadmium-wrapped {sup 3}He neutron detectors. They report new methods of data acquisition and analysis to extract correlation in the neutron signals resulting form fission during active interrogation. They use the correlation information in conjunction with the total number of neutrons to determine the fraction of fission neutrons transmitted through the matrix material into the {sup 3}He detectors. This determination allows them to cleanly separate the matrix effects into two processes: matrix modification upon the neutron interrogating flux and matrix modification upon the fraction of fission neutrons transmitted to the neutron detectors. This transmission information is also directly applied in a neutron multiplicity analysis in the passive assay of {sup 240}Pu.

  13. Neutron scattering cross section measurements for thulium-169 via the time-of-flight technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimeti, Afrim

    This research provides the first direct neutron scattering cross section measurements for 169Tm via the time-of-flight technique. The neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross-section angular distributions for 169Tm were measured at 590-keV and 1000-keV incident neutron energies. Differential cross-section excitation functions were also measured in 0.1-MeV steps at 125° (scattering angle) from 495-keV to 1000-keV incident neutron energy. The measured neutron scattering cross sections for the elastic group at 0.5-MeV to 1.0-MeV incident neutron energy range are in reasonable agreement with the JENDL-4.0 evaluation, which is based on nuclear reaction model calculations, and with the earlier measurements made by Ko et al. via the (n, n' gamma) technique for states above 100 keV via the (n, n' gamma) reaction at incident energies in the 0.2-MeV to 1.0-MeV range. The 5.5-MeV Van de Graaff accelerator at Lowell was operated in the pulsed and bunched beam mode producing subnanosecond pulses at a 5-MHz repetition frequency to generate neutrons via the 7Li(p,n) 7Be reaction using a thin metallic elemental lithium target.

  14. Neutronic calculations for CANDU thorium systems using Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldideh, M.; Shayesteh, M.; Eshghi, M.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the prospects of exploiting the rich world thorium reserves using Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The analysis is performed using the Monte Carlo MCNP code in order to understand how much time the reactor is in criticality conduction. Four different fuel compositions have been selected for analysis. We have obtained the infinite multiplication factor, k∞, under full power operation of the reactor over 8 years. The neutronic flux distribution in the full core reactor has already been investigated.

  15. New techniques in neutron data measurements above 30 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.; Haight, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in experimental facilities have enabled new techniques for measurements of neutron interactions above 30 MeV. Foremost is the development of both monoenergetic and continuous neutron sources using accelerators in the medium energy region between 100 and 800 MeV. Measurements of the reaction products have been advanced by the continuous improvement in detector systems, electronics and computers. Corresponding developments in particle transport codes and in the theory of nuclear reactions at these energies have allowed more precise design of neutron sources, experimental shielding and detector response. As a result of these improvements, many new measurements are possible and the data base in this energy range is expanding quickly.

  16. Development Of A Digital Technique For The Determination Of Fission Fragments And Emitted Prompt Neutron Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varapai, N.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Serot, O.; Barreau, G.; Kornilov, N.; Zeinalov, Sh.

    2005-11-01

    The present work demonstrates the application of the digital technique for nuclear measurements. This method has been implemented for measurements of promptly emitted fission neutrons in coincidence with fission fragments from 252Cf(sf). A double Frisch-grid ionization chamber is used as fission fragment detector. The promptly emitted neutrons are detected by a NE213 liquid scintillation detector. The experimental set-up is installed at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements. Preliminary results are presented.

  17. The study of bronze statuettes with the help of neutron-imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Van Langh, R; Lehmann, E; Hartmann, S; Kaestner, A; Scholten, F

    2009-12-01

    Until recently fabrication techniques of Renaissance bronzes have been studied only with the naked eye, microscopically, videoscopically and with X-radiography. These techniques provide information on production techniques, yet much important detail remains unclear. As part of an interdisciplinary study of Renaissance bronzes undertaken by the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, neutron-imaging techniques have been applied with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of bronze workmanship during the Renaissance period. Therefore, an explanation of the fabrication techniques is given to better understand the data collected by these neutron-imaging techniques. The data was used for tomography studies, which reveal hidden aspects that could not at all or scarcely be seen using X-radiography. For this specific study, the representative bronze 'Hercules Pomarius' of Willem van Tetrode (ca 1520-1588) has been examined, along with 20 other Renaissance bronzes from the Rijksmuseum collection. PMID:19756545

  18. Neutron/gamma dose separation by the multiple-ion-chamber technique

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Many mixed n/..gamma.. dosimetry systems rely on two dosimeters, one composed of a tissue-equivalent material and the other made from a non-hydrogenous material. The paired chamber technique works well in fields of neutron radiation nearly identical in spectral composition to that in which the dosimeters were calibrated. However, this technique is drastically compromised in phantom due to the degradation of the neutron spectrum. The three-dosimeter technique allows for the fall-off in neutron sensitivity of the two non-hydrogenous dosimeters. Precise and physically meaningful results were obtained with this technique with a D-T source in air and in phantom and with simultaneous D-T neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray irradiation in air. The MORSE-CG coupled n/..gamma.. three-dimensional Monte Carlo code was employed to calculate neutron and gamma doses in a water phantom. Gamma doses calculated in phantom with this code were generally lower than corresponding ion chamber measurements. This can be explained by the departure of irradiation conditions from ideal narrow-beam geometry. 97 references.

  19. Studies on new neutron-sensitive dosimeters using an optically stimulated luminescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M. S.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Behrens, R.; Muthe, K. P.; Rawat, N. S.; Gupta, S. K.; Sharma, D. N.

    2011-07-01

    The neutron response of detectors prepared using α-Al 2O 3:C phosphor developed using a melt processing technique and mixed with neutron converters was studied in monoenergetic neutron fields. The detector pellets were arranged in two different pairs: α-Al 2O 3:C + 6LiF/α-Al 2O 3:C + 7LiF and α-Al 2O 3:C + high-density polyethylene/α-Al 2O 3:C + Teflon, for neutron dosimetry using albedo and recoil proton techniques. The optically stimulated luminescence response of the Al 2O 3:C + 6,7LiF dosimeter to radiation from a 252Cf source was 0.21, in terms of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and relative to radiation from a 137Cs source. This was comparable to results obtained with similar detectors prepared using commercially available α-Al 2O 3:C phosphor. The Hp(10) response of the α-Al 2O 3:C + 6,7LiF dosimeters was found to decrease by more than two orders of magnitude with increasing neutron energy, as expected for albedo dosimeters. The response of the α-Al 2O 3:C + high-density polyethylene/α-Al 2O 3:C + Teflon dosimeters was small, of the order of 1% to 2% in terms of Hp(10) and relative to radiation from a 137Cs source, for neutron energies greater than 1 MeV.

  20. Detection of drugs and explosives using neutron computerized tomography and artificial intelligence techniques.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, F J O; Crispim, V R; Silva, A X

    2010-06-01

    In this study the development of a methodology to detect illicit drugs and plastic explosives is described with the objective of being applied in the realm of public security. For this end, non-destructive assay with neutrons was used and the technique applied was the real time neutron radiography together with computerized tomography. The system is endowed with automatic responses based upon the application of an artificial intelligence technique. In previous tests using real samples, the system proved capable of identifying 97% of the inspected materials. PMID:20149671

  1. Integrated nuclear techniques to detect illicit materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper discusses the problem of detecting explosives in the context of an object being transported for illicit purposes. The author emphasizes that technologies developed for this particular application have payoffs in many related problem areas. The author discusses nuclear techniques which can be applied to this detection problem. These include: x-ray imaging; neutronic interrogation; inelastic neutron scattering; fieldable neutron generators. He discusses work which has been done on the applications of these technologies, including results for detection of narcotics. He also discusses efforts to integrate these techniques into complementary systems which offer improved performance.

  2. Efficiency of Moderated Neutron Lithium Glass Detectors Using Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Brian

    2011-10-01

    Due to national security concerns over the smuggling of special nuclear materials and the small supply of He-3 for use in neutron detectors, there is a great need for a new kind of neutron detector. Using Monte Carlo techniques I have been studying the use of lithium glass in varying configurations for neutron detectors. My research has included the effects of using a detector with two thin sheets of lithium at varying distances apart. I have also researched the effects of varying amounts of shielding a californium source with varying amounts of water. This is important since shielding would likely be used to make nuclear material more difficult to detect. The addition of one sheet of lithium-6 glass on the front surface of the detector significantly improves the efficiency for the detection of neutrons from a moderated fission source.

  3. Nuclear Material Detection by One-Short-Pulse-Laser-Driven Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Aymond, F.; Bridgewater, Jon S.; Croft, Stephen; Deppert, O.; Devlin, Matthew James; Falk, Katerina; Fernandez, Juan Carlos; Gautier, Donald Cort; Gonzales, Manuel A.; Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher Eric; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall Philip; Jung, Daniel; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Koehler, Katrina Elizabeth; Pomerantz, Ishay; Roth, Markus; Santi, Peter Angelo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas; Wurden, Glen Anthony; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; McCary, E.

    2015-01-28

    Covered in the PowerPoint presentation are the following areas: Motivation and requirements for active interrogation of nuclear material; laser-driven neutron source; neutron diagnostics; active interrogation of nuclear material; and, conclusions, remarks, and future works.

  4. Measurement of U-235 Fission Neutron Spectra Using a Multiple Gamma Coincidence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Chuncheng; Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.; DeSimone, D.J.; Alimeti, A.; Roldan, C.F.; McKittrick, T.M.; Kim, D.-S.; Chen, X.; Tremblay, S.E.

    2005-05-24

    The Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix predicts the shape of the fission neutron energy spectrum for incident primary neutrons of different energies. Verifications of the model normally are limited to measurements of the fission neutron spectra for energies higher than that of the primary neutrons because the low-energy spectrum is distorted by the admixture of elastically and inelastically scattered neutrons. This situation can be remedied by using a measuring technique that separates fission from scattering events. One solution consists of using a fissile sample so thin that fission fragments can be observed indicating the occurrence of a fission event. A different approach is considered in this paper. It has been established that a fission event is accompanied by the emission of between seven and eight gamma rays, while in a scattering interaction, between zero and two gammas are emitted, so that a gamma multiplicity detector should supply a datum to distinguish a fission event from a scattering event. We proceed as follows: A subnanosecond pulsed and bunched proton beam from the UML Van de Graaff generates nearly mono-energetic neutrons by irradiating a thin metallic lithium target. The neutrons irradiate a 235U sample. Emerging neutron energies are measured with a time-of-flight spectrometer. A set of four BaF2 detectors is located close to the 235U sample. These detectors together with their electronic components identify five different events for each neutron detected, i.e., whether four, three, two, one, or none of the BaF2 detectors received one (or more) gamma rays. We present work, preliminary to the final measurements, involving feasibility considerations based on gamma-ray coincidence measurements with four BaF2 detectors, and the design of a Fission-Scattering Discriminator under construction.

  5. Measurement of U-235 Fission Neutron Spectra Using a Multiple Gamma Coincidence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chuncheng; Kegel, G. H. R.; Egan, J. J.; DeSimone, D. J.; Alimeti, A.; Roldan, C. F.; McKittrick, T. M.; Kim, D.-S.; Chen, X.; Tremblay, S. E.

    2005-05-01

    The Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix predicts the shape of the fission neutron energy spectrum for incident primary neutrons of different energies. Verifications of the model normally are limited to measurements of the fission neutron spectra for energies higher than that of the primary neutrons because the low-energy spectrum is distorted by the admixture of elastically and inelastically scattered neutrons. This situation can be remedied by using a measuring technique that separates fission from scattering events. One solution consists of using a fissile sample so thin that fission fragments can be observed indicating the occurrence of a fission event. A different approach is considered in this paper. It has been established that a fission event is accompanied by the emission of between seven and eight gamma rays, while in a scattering interaction, between zero and two gammas are emitted, so that a gamma multiplicity detector should supply a datum to distinguish a fission event from a scattering event. We proceed as follows: A subnanosecond pulsed and bunched proton beam from the UML Van de Graaff generates nearly mono-energetic neutrons by irradiating a thin metallic lithium target. The neutrons irradiate a 235U sample. Emerging neutron energies are measured with a time-of-flight spectrometer. A set of four BaF2 detectors is located close to the 235U sample. These detectors together with their electronic components identify five different events for each neutron detected, i.e., whether four, three, two, one, or none of the BaF2 detectors received one (or more) gamma rays. We present work, preliminary to the final measurements, involving feasibility considerations based on gamma-ray coincidence measurements with four BaF2 detectors, and the design of a Fission-Scattering Discriminator under construction.

  6. A delayed neutron technique for measuring induced fission rates in fresh and burnt LWR fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K. A.; Perret, G.

    2011-04-01

    The LIFE@PROTEUS program at the Paul Scherrer Institut is being undertaken to characterize the interfaces between burnt and fresh fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. Techniques are being developed to measure fission rates in burnt fuel following re-irradiation in the zero-power PROTEUS research reactor. One such technique utilizes the measurement of delayed neutrons. To demonstrate the feasibility of the delayed neutron technique, fresh and burnt UO 2 fuel samples were irradiated in different positions in the PROTEUS reactor, and their neutron outputs were recorded shortly after irradiation. Fission rate ratios of the same sample irradiated in two different positions (inter-positional) and of two different samples irradiated in the same position (inter-sample) were derived from the measurements and compared with Monte Carlo predictions. Derivation of fission rate ratios from the delayed neutron measured signal requires correcting the signal for the delayed neutron source properties, the efficiency of the measurement setup, and the time dependency of the signal. In particular, delayed neutron source properties strongly depend on the fissile and fertile isotopes present in the irradiated sample and must be accounted for when deriving inter-sample fission rate ratios. Measured inter-positional fission rate ratios generally agree within 1σ uncertainty (on the order of 1.0%) with the calculation predictions. For a particular irradiation position, however, a bias of about 2% is observed and is currently under investigation. Calculated and measured inter-sample fission rate ratios have C/E values deviating from unity by less than 1% and within 2σ of the statistical uncertainties. Uncertainty arising from delayed neutron data is also assessed, and is found to give an additional 3% uncertainty factor. The measurement data indicate that uncertainty is overestimated.

  7. Interrogations, confessions, and guilty pleas among serious adolescent offenders.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Lindsay C; Shulman, Elizabeth P; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we examined (a) the prevalence and characteristics of youths' true and false admissions (confessions and guilty pleas), (b) youths' interrogation experiences with police and lawyers, and (c) whether youths' interrogation experiences serve as situational risk factors for true and false admissions. We interviewed 193 14- to 17-year-old males (M = 16.4) incarcerated for serious crimes. Over 1/3 of the sample (35.2%) claimed to have made a false admission to legal authorities (17.1% false confession; 18.1% false guilty plea), and 2/3 claimed to have made a true admission (28.5% true confession; 37.3% true guilty plea). The majority of youth said that they had experienced high-pressure interrogations (e.g., threats), especially with police officers. Youth who mentioned experiencing "police refusals" (e.g., of a break to rest) were more likely to report having made both true and false confessions to police, whereas only false confessions were associated with claims of long interrogations (>2 hr) and being questioned in the presence of a friend. The number of self-reported high-pressure lawyer tactics was associated with false, but not true, guilty pleas. Results suggest the importance of conducting specialized trainings for those who interrogate youth, recording interrogations, placing limits on lengthy and manipulative techniques, and exploring alternative procedures for questioning juvenile suspects. PMID:24127891

  8. Interrogation Methods and Terror Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccara, Mariagiovanna; Bar-Isaac, Heski

    We examine how the structure of terror networks varies with legal limits on interrogation and the ability of authorities to extract information from detainees. We assume that terrorist networks are designed to respond optimally to a tradeoff caused by information exchange: Diffusing information widely leads to greater internal efficiency, but it leaves the organization more vulnerable to law enforcement. The extent of this vulnerability depends on the law enforcement authority’s resources, strategy and interrogation methods. Recognizing that the structure of a terrorist network responds to the policies of law enforcement authorities allows us to begin to explore the most effective policies from the authorities’ point of view.

  9. Analysis of improved neutron activation technique using thick foils for application on medical LINAC environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagena, E.; Stoulos, S.; Manolopoulou, M.

    2016-01-01

    An improved neutron activation technique is analyzed that can be used for the characterization of the neutron field in low neutron flux environments, such as medical Linacs. Due to the much lower neutron fluence rates, thick materials instead of thin have been used. The study is focused on the calculations of basic components of the neutron activation analysis that are required for accurate results, such as the efficiency of the gamma detector used for γ-spectrometry as well as crucial correction factors that are required when dealing with thick samples in different geometries and forms. A Monte Carlo detector model, implemented by Geant4 MC Code was adjusted in accordance to results from various measurements performed. Moreover, regarding to estimate the self-shielding correction factors a new approach using both Monte Carlo and analytical approach was presented. This improvement gives more accurate results, which are important for both activation and shielding studies that take place in many facilities. A quite good agreement between the neutron fluxes is achieved; according to the data obtained a mean value of (2.13±0.34)×105 ncm-2 s-1 is representative for the isocenter of the specific Linac that corresponds to fluence of (5.53±0.94)×106 ncm-2 Gy-1. Comparable fluencies reported in the literature for similar Linacs operating with photon beams at 15 MeV.

  10. Time dependent measurements of induced fission for SNM interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Israelashvili, I.; Wengrowicz, U.; Caspi, E. N.; Yaar, I.; Osovizki, A.; Ocherashvili, A.; Rennhofer, H.; Pedersen, B.; Crochemore, J.-M.; Roesgen, E.

    2013-08-01

    Gammas from induced fissions were measured and separated into prompt and delayed particles. To this end, a dedicated detector was realized, based on a plastic scintillator, a wavelength shifter fiber and a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). Results are presented from the interrogation of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), employing a pulsed neutron generator in the PUNITA graphite moderator incorporating the above detector assembly. The detector response is presented, as well as the sensitivities for prompt and delayed processes within the same experimental setup.

  11. Feasibility study for the investigation of Nitinol self-expanding stents by neutron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogante, M.; Pasquini, U.; Rosta, L.; Lebedev, V.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, neutron techniques - in particular, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron diffraction (ND) - are considered for the non-destructive characterization of Nitinol artery stents. This roughly equiatomic (50Ni-50Ti at%) shape memory alloy (SMA) exhibits significant properties of superelasticity and biocompatibility that make it suitable to be typically used as smart material for medical implants and devices. Nitinol self-expanding artery stents, as permanent vascular support structures, supply an ideal option to bypass surgery, but they are submitted for the whole of patient's life to the dynamical stress of the artery pulsation and the aggression from the biological environment. These stents, consequently, can suffer from wear and fracture occurrence likely due to a variety of cyclic fatigue, overload conditions and residual stresses. Neutrons have recently become a progressively more important probe for various materials and components and they allow achieving information complementary to those obtained from the traditional microstructural analyses. The outputs from the preliminary works already carried out in this field consent to consider neutron techniques capable to contribute to the development of these crucial medical implants. The achievable results can yield trends adoptable in monitoring of the stent features.

  12. Lies and coercion: why psychiatrists should not participate in police and intelligence interrogations.

    PubMed

    Janofsky, Jeffrey S

    2006-01-01

    Police interrogators routinely use deceptive techniques to obtain confessions from criminal suspects. The United States Executive Branch has attempted to justify coercive interrogation techniques in which physical or mental pain and suffering may be used during intelligence interrogations of persons labeled unlawful combatants. It may be appropriate for law enforcement, military, or intelligence personnel who are not physicians to use such techniques. However, forensic psychiatry ethical practice requires honesty, striving for objectivity, and respect for persons. Deceptive and coercive interrogation techniques violate these moral values. When a psychiatrist directly uses, works with others who use, or trains others to use deceptive or coercive techniques to obtain information in police, military, or intelligence interrogations, the psychiatrist breaches basic principles of ethics. PMID:17185476

  13. Time of flight fast neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveman, R.; Bendahan, J.; Gozani, T.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-05-01

    Neutron radiography with fast or thermal neutrons is a standard technique for non-destructive testing (NDT). Here we report results for fast neutron radiography both as an adjunct to pulsed fast neutron analysis (PFNA) and as a stand-alone method for NDT. PFNA is a new technique for utilizing a collimated pulsed neutron beam to interrogate items and determine their elemental composition. By determining the time of flight for gamma-rays produced by (n,n' gamma X) reactions, a three dimensional image can be produced. Neutron radiography data taken with the same beam provides an important constraint for image reconstruction, and in particular is important in inferring the amount of hydrogen within the interrogated item. As a stand-alone device, the radiography measurement can be used to image items as large as cargo containers as long as their density is not too high. The use of a pulsed beam gives the further advantage of a time of flight measurement on the transmitted neutrons. By gating the radiography signal on the time of flight appropriate to the energy of the primary neutrons, most build-up from scattered neutrons can be eliminated. The pulsed beam also greatly improves the signal to background and extends the range of the neutron radiography. Simulation results will be presented which display the advantage of this constraint in particular for statistically limited data. Experimental results will be presented which show some of the limitations likely in a PFNA system utilizing neutron radiography data. Experimental and simulation results will demonstrate possible uses for this type of radiographic data in identifying contraband substances such as drugs.

  14. Recent advances in fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, B. D.; Tickner, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Fast neutron radiography techniques are attractive for screening cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine elemental composition. Compared to neutron interrogation techniques that measure secondary radiation (neutron or gamma-rays), neutron radiography systems are much more efficient and rapid and they are much more amenable to imaging. However, for neutron techniques to be successfully applied to cargo screening, they must demonstrate significant advantages over well-established X-ray techniques. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection. These developments include a fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography system that utilizes a 14 MeV neutron generator as well as fast neutron resonance radiography systems that use variable energy quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and pulsed broad energy neutron beams. These systems will be discussed and compared with particular emphasis on user requirements, sources, detector systems, imaging ability and performance.

  15. Proof-of-Concept Assessment of a Photofission-Based Interrogation System for the Detection of Shielded Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J. L.; Yoon, W. Y.; Harker, Y. D.; Hoggan, J. M.; Haskell, K. J.; VanAusdeln, L. A.

    2000-11-01

    A photonuclear interrogation method was experimentally assessed for the detection of shielded nuclear materials. Proof-of-Concept assessment was performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TA-18 facility and used the INEEL VARITRON electron accelerator. Experiments were performed to assess and characterize the delayed neutron emission responses for different nuclear materials with various shield configurations using three ''nominal'' electron beam energies; 8-, 10-, and 11-MeV. With the exception of highly enriched uranium (HEU), the nuclear materials assessed represent material types commonly encountered in commerce. The specific nuclear materials studied include a solid 4.8-kg HEU sphere, a 5-kg multiple-object, depleted uranium (DU) [uranium with about 0.2% enrichment with U-235] target, and two 11-kg thorium disks. The shield materials selected include polyethylene, borated-polyethylene, and lead. Experimental results, supported with numerical predictions, have shown that the photonuclear interrogation technique is quite capable of detecting shielded nuclear material via the direct measurement of the photofission-induced delayed neutron emissions. To identify or discriminate between nuclear material types (i.e., depleted uranium, HEU, and thorium), a ratio of delayed neutron counts at two different beam energies is utilized. This latter method, referred to as the dual-beam energy ratio Figure-of-Merit, allows one to differentiate among the three nuclear material types.

  16. Neutron Detection With Ultra-Fast Digitizer and Pulse Identification Techniques on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Piglowski, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    A prototype system for neutron detection with an ultra-fast digitizer and pulse identification techniques has been implemented on the DIII-D tokamak. The system consists of a cylindrical neutron fission chamber, a charge sensitive amplifier, and a GaGe Octopus 12-bit CompuScope digitizer card installed in a Linux computer. Digital pulse identification techniques have been successfully performed at maximum data acquisition rate of 50 MSPS with on-board memory of 2 GS. Compared to the traditional approach with fast nuclear electronics for pulse counting, this straightforward digital solution has many advantages, including reduced expense, improved accuracy, higher counting rate, and easier maintenance. The system also provides the capability of neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination and pulse height analysis. Plans for the upgrade of the old DIII-D neutron counting system with these techniques will be presented. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under SC-G903402, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. FY09 Advanced Instrumentation and Active Interrogation Research for Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; E. H. Seabury; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; J. T. Johnson; S. M. Watson; J. Wharton

    2009-08-01

    Multiple small-scale projects have been undertaken to investigate advanced instrumentation solutions for safeguard measurement challenges associated with advanced fuel cycle facilities and next-generation fuel reprocessing installations. These activities are in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and its Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) campaign. 1) Work was performed in a collaboration with the University of Michigan (Prof. Sara Pozzi, co-PI) to investigate the use of liquid-scintillator radiation detectors for assaying mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, to characterize its composition and to develop advanced digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithms for performing time-correlation measurements in the MOX fuel environment. This work included both simulations and experiments and has shown that these techniques may provide a valuable approach for use within advanced safeguard measurement scenarios. 2) Work was conducted in a collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Dr. Paul Hausladen, co-PI) to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the fast-neutron coded-aperture imaging technique for locating and characterizing fissile material, and as a tool for performing hold-up measurements in fissile material handling facilities. This work involved experiments at Idaho National Laboratory, using MOX fuel and uranium metal, in both passive and active interrogation configurations. A complete analysis has not yet been completed but preliminary results suggest several potential uses for the fast neutron imaging technique. 3) Work was carried out to identify measurement approaches for determining nitric acid concentration in the range of 1 – 4 M and beyond. This work included laboratory measurements to investigate the suitability of prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis for this measurement and product reviews of other commercial solutions. Ultrasonic density analysis appears to be

  18. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Morse, J; Meyer, G; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Kerr, P; Park, H G; Rusnak, B; Sampayan, S; Schmid, G; Spadaccini, C; Wang, L

    2008-08-08

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled [1-4]. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of {approx}100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  19. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, V.; Morse, J.; Meyer, G.; Falabella, S.; Guethlein, G.; Kerr, P.; Park, H. G.; Rusnak, B.; Sampayan, S.; Schmid, G.; Spadaccini, C.; Wang, L.

    2009-03-01

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled [1-4]. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of ˜100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  20. Fostering applications of neutron scattering techniques in developing countries: IAEA's role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjpe, Shriniwas K.; Mank, G.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2006-11-01

    Over the last 60 years research reactors have played an important role in technological and socio-economical development of mankind. Neutron scattering has been the workhorse for research and development in materials science. Developing countries with moderate flux research reactors have also been involved in using this technique. The reactors and the facilities around them have a large potential for applications, while their under-utilization has been a concern for many member states. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been supporting its member states in the enhancement of utilization of their research reactors. Technical meetings focussing on the area of current interests with potential applications are organized under the project on “effective utilization of research reactors,” e.g. on residual stress measurement, neutron reflectometry. Coordinated research projects (CRPs) bring together scientists from developed and developing countries, build collaborations, and exchange expertise and technology. The CRPs on research reactor utilization include topics like development of small-angle neutron scattering applications and development of sources and imaging systems for neutron radiography. New CRPs on the measurement of residual stress and accelerator-driven neutron sources will be initiated soon. The results from these meetings of CRPs are published as technical documents of the IAEA that would act as guidelines for capacity building for research reactor managers. This paper will present some of the salient features of IAEA activities in promoting research reactor utilization.

  1. Gravitational Waves from Rotating Neutron Stars and Evaluation of fast Chirp Transform Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    X-ray observations suggest that neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) are rotating with frequencies from 300 - 600 Hz. These spin rates are significantly less than the break-up rates for essentially all realistic neutron star equations of state, suggesting that some process may limit the spin frequencies of accreting neutron stars to this range. If the accretion induced spin up torque is in equilibrium with gravitational radiation losses, these objects could be interesting sources of gravitational waves. I present a brief summary of current measurements of neutron star spins in LMXBs based on the observations of high-Q oscillations during thermonuclear bursts (so called 'burst oscillations'). Further measurements of neutron star spins will be important in exploring the gravitational radiation hypothesis in more detail. To this end I also present a study of fast chirp transform (FCT) techniques as described by Jenet and Prince in the context of searching for the chirping signals observed during X-ray bursts.

  2. The role of neutron based inspection techniques in the post 9/11/01 era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    2004-01-01

    Non-intrusive inspection of objects of all sizes, from luggage to shipping containers and from postal parcels to trucks is a vital component of any national security from aviation to the control of all land and sea ports of entries. The paramount importance of these inspections is more obvious now, in the post 9/11 era, as the spectrum of threats is wider and the probability of occurrence more real. The urgent need for reliable inspection underscores the key attributes they must possess: High specificity High sensitivity Provide automatic decision The technologies being currently employed in the field, such as standard X-ray, X-ray based computed tomography, and trace detection (for luggage), and X-ray or γ-ray based radiography (for containers) are inherently deficient for lacking some or all of these attributes. The neutron based technologies, on the other hand, possess all three. They provide therefore accurate, rapid and automatic detection of a wide array of threats: explosives, chemical agents, nuclear materials and devices, other hazardous materials, drugs, etc. The nuclear based techniques achieve this feat through the production of characteristic elemental gamma rays by nuclear reactions, primarily (n,γ) with thermal neutrons and (n,n 'γ) with fast neutrons. The principles and status of neutron based inspection techniques are reviewed below.

  3. Low-level measuring techniques for neutrons: High accuracy neutron source strength determination and fluence rate measurement at an underground laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zimbal, Andreas; Reginatto, Marcel; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Degering, Detlev; Zuber, Kai

    2013-08-08

    We report on measuring techniques for neutrons that have been developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute. PTB has characterized radioactive sources used in the BOREXINO and XENON100 experiments. For the BOREXINO experiment, a {sup 228}Th gamma radiation source was required which would not emit more than 10 neutrons per second. The determination of the neutron emission rate of this specially designed {sup 228}Th source was challenging due to the low neutron emission rate and because the ratio of neutron to gamma radiation was expected to be extremely low, of the order of 10{sup −6}. For the XENON100 detector, PTB carried out a high accuracy measurement of the neutron emission rate of an AmBe source. PTB has also done measurements in underground laboratories. A two month measurement campaign with a set of {sup 3}He-filled proportional counters was carried out in PTB's former UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine. The aim of the campaign was to determine the intrinsic background of detectors, which is needed for the analysis of data taken in lowintensity neutron fields. At a later time, PTB did a preliminary measurement of the neutron fluence rate at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller operated by VKTA. By taking into account data from UDO, Felsenkeller, and detector calibrations made at the PTB facility, it was possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate at the Felsenkeller underground laboratory.

  4. Accessing Interior Vector Magnetic Field Components in Neutron EDM Experiments via Boundary Value Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaster, Brad

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new technique for the determination and monitoring of the interior vector magnetic field components during the operation of neutron EDM experiments. If a suitable three-dimensional volume surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined which contains no interior currents or magnetization, each of the interior vector field components will satisfy the Laplace Equation within this volume. Therefore, if the field components can be measured on the boundary, the interior vector field components can be determined uniquely via numerical solution of the Laplace Equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the magnetic field components and magnetic field gradients in the fiducial volumes of neutron EDM experiments.

  5. Manufacturing techniques studies of ceramics by neutron and γ-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Latini, R. M.; Bellido, A. V. B.; Souza, M. I. S.; Almeida, G. L.

    2014-11-11

    In this study, the aim was to evaluate capabilities and constraints of radiographic imagery using thermal neutrons and gamma-rays as tools to identify the type of technique employed in ceramics manufacturing especially that used in prehistoric Brazilian pottery from Acre state. For this purpose, radiographic images of test objects made with clay of this region using both techniques - palette and rollers - have been acquired with a system comprised of a source of gamma-rays or thermal neutrons and a corresponding X-ray or neutron-sensitive Imaging Plate as detector. For the neutrongraphy samples were exposed to a thermal neutron flux of order of 10{sup 5}n.cm{sup −2}.s{sup −1} for 3 minutes at main port of Argonauta research reactor of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - IEN/CNEN. The radiographic images using γ-rays from {sup 165}Dy (95 keV) and {sup 198}Au (412 keV) both produced at this reactor, have been acquired under an exposure time of a couple of hours. After acquisition, images have undergone a treatment to improve their quality through enhancement of their contrast, a procedure involving corrections of the beam divergence, sample shape and averaging of the attenuation map profile. Preliminary results show that difference between manufacturing techniques is better identified by radiography using low energy γ-rays from {sup 165}Dy rather than neutrongraphy or γ-rays from {sup 198}Au. Nevertheless, disregarding the kind of employed radiation, it should be stressed that feasibility to apply the technique is tightly tied to homogeneity of the clay itself and tempers due to their different attenuation.

  6. Manufacturing techniques studies of ceramics by neutron and γ-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latini, R. M.; Souza, M. I. S.; Almeida, G. L.; Bellido, A. V. B.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the aim was to evaluate capabilities and constraints of radiographic imagery using thermal neutrons and gamma-rays as tools to identify the type of technique employed in ceramics manufacturing especially that used in prehistoric Brazilian pottery from Acre state. For this purpose, radiographic images of test objects made with clay of this region using both techniques - palette and rollers - have been acquired with a system comprised of a source of gamma-rays or thermal neutrons and a corresponding X-ray or neutron-sensitive Imaging Plate as detector. For the neutrongraphy samples were exposed to a thermal neutron flux of order of 105n.cm-2.s-1 for 3 minutes at main port of Argonauta research reactor of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear - IEN/CNEN. The radiographic images using γ-rays from 165Dy (95 keV) and 198Au (412 keV) both produced at this reactor, have been acquired under an exposure time of a couple of hours. After acquisition, images have undergone a treatment to improve their quality through enhancement of their contrast, a procedure involving corrections of the beam divergence, sample shape and averaging of the attenuation map profile. Preliminary results show that difference between manufacturing techniques is better identified by radiography using low energy γ-rays from 165Dy rather than neutrongraphy or γ-rays from 198Au . Nevertheless, disregarding the kind of employed radiation, it should be stressed that feasibility to apply the technique is tightly tied to homogeneity of the clay itself and tempers due to their different attenuation.

  7. Interview and Interrogation Training using a Computer-Simulated Subject.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Dale E.

    Interactive, multimedia software involving a simulated subject has been created to help trainees develop interview and interrogation techniques using personal computers, because practice interviews are not always realistic and are too expensive. New and experienced law enforcement agents, among others, need such extensive training in techniques…

  8. Genetic algorithms - A new technique for solving the neutron spectrum unfolding problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, David W.; Ray Edwards, D.; Bolon, Albert E.

    1999-04-01

    A new technique utilizing genetic algorithms has been applied to the Bonner sphere neutron spectrum unfolding problem. Genetic algorithms are part of a relatively new field of "evolutionary" solution techniques that mimic living systems with computer-simulated "chromosome" solutions. Solutions mate and mutate to create better solutions. Several benchmark problems, considered representative of radiation protection environments, have been evaluated using the newly developed UMRGA code which implements the genetic algorithm unfolding technique. The results are compared with results from other well-established unfolding codes. The genetic algorithm technique works remarkably well and produces solutions with relatively high spectral qualities. UMRGA appears to be a superior technique in the absence of a priori data - it does not rely on "lucky" guesses of input spectra. Calculated personnel doses associated with the unfolded spectra match benchmark values within a few percent.

  9. Observational techniques for solar flare gamma-rays, hard X-rays, and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Robert P.

    1989-01-01

    The development of new instrumentation and techniques for solar hard X-ray, gamma ray and neutron observations from spacecraft and/or balloon-borne platforms is examined. The principal accomplishments are: (1) the development of a two segment germanium detector which is near ideal for solar hard X-ray and gamma ray spectroscopy; (2) the development of long duration balloon flight techniques and associated instrumentation; and (3) the development of innovative new position sensitive detectors for hard X-ray and gamma rays.

  10. Neutron imaging with coded sources: new challenges and the implementation of a simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Bingham, Philip R; Gregor, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The limitations in neutron flux and resolution (L/D) of current neutron imaging systems can be addressed with a Coded Source Imaging system with magnification (xCSI). More precisely, the multiple sources in an xCSI system can exceed the flux of a single pinhole system for several orders of magnitude, while maintaining a higher L/D with the small sources. Moreover, designing for an xCSI system reduces noise from neutron scattering, because the object is placed away from the detector to achieve magnification. However, xCSI systems are adversely affected by correlated noise such as non-uniform illumination of the neutron source, incorrect sampling of the coded radiograph, misalignment of the coded masks, mask transparency, and the imperfection of the system Point Spread Function (PSF). We argue that a model-based reconstruction algorithm can overcome these problems and describe the implementation of a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique algorithm for coded sources. Design pitfalls that preclude a satisfactory reconstruction are documented.

  11. Enhanced Analysis Techniques for an Imaging Neutron and Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Amanda C.

    The presence of gamma rays and neutrons is a strong indicator of the presence of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The imaging Neutron and gamma ray SPECTrometer (NSPECT) developed by the University of New Hampshire and Michigan Aerospace corporation detects the fast neutrons and prompt gamma rays from fissile material, and the gamma rays from radioactive material. The instrument operates as a double scatter device, requiring a neutron or a gamma ray to interact twice in the instrument. While this detection requirement decreases the efficiency of the instrument, it offers superior background rejection and the ability to measure the energy and momentum of the incident particle. These measurements create energy spectra and images of the emitting source for source identification and localization. The dual species instrument provides superior detection than a single species alone. In realistic detection scenarios, few particles are detected from a potential threat due to source shielding, detection at a distance, high background, and weak sources. This contributes to a small signal to noise ratio, and threat detection becomes difficult. To address these difficulties, several enhanced data analysis tools were developed. A Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC) helps set instrumental alarm thresholds as well as to identify the presence of a source. Analysis of a dual-species ROC curve provides superior detection capabilities. Bayesian analysis helps to detect and identify the presence of a source through model comparisons, and helps create a background corrected count spectra for enhanced spectroscopy. Development of an instrument response using simulations and numerical analyses will help perform spectra and image deconvolution. This thesis will outline the principles of operation of the NSPECT instrument using the double scatter technology, traditional analysis techniques, and enhanced analysis techniques as applied to data from the NSPECT instrument, and an

  12. A Second Look at Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis as a Spent Fuel NDA Technique

    SciTech Connect

    James W .Sterbentz; David L. Chichester

    2011-07-01

    Many different nondestructive analysis techniques are currently being investigated as a part of the United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) seeking methods to quantify plutonium in spent fuel. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) is one of these techniques. Having first been explored in the mid-1970s for the analysis of individual spent-fuel pins a second look, using advanced simulation and modeling methods, is now underway to investigate the suitability of the NRTA technique for assaying complete spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The technique is similar to neutron time-of-flight methods used for cross-section determinations but operates over only the narrow 0.1-20 eV range where strong, distinguishable resonances exist for both the plutonium (239, 240, 241,242Pu) and uranium (235,236,238U) isotopes of interest in spent fuel. Additionally, in this energy range resonances exists for six important fission products (99Tc, 103Rh, 131Xe, 133Cs, 145Nd, and 152Sm) which provide additional information to support spent fuel plutonium assay determinations. Initial modeling shows excellent agreement with previously published experimental data for measurements of individual spent-fuel pins where plutonium assays were demonstrated to have a precision of 2-4%. Within the simulation and modeling analyses of this project scoping studies have explored fourteen different aspects of the technique including the neutron source, drift tube configurations, and gross neutron transmission as well as the impacts of fuel burn up, cooling time, and fission-product interferences. These results show that NRTA may be a very capable experimental technique for spent-fuel assay measurements. The results suggest sufficient transmission strength and signal differentiability is possible for assays through up to 8 pins. For an 8-pin assay (looking at an assembly diagonally), 64% of the pins in a typical 17 ? 17 array of a pressurized water reactor fuel

  13. Radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis by a linear combination technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.; Bhargava, R.C.; Senftle, F.E.; Brinkerhoff, J.M.

    1972-01-01

    The linear combination technique, when applied to a gamma-ray spectrum, gives a single number indicative of the extent to which the spectral lines of a sought element are present in a complex spectrum. Spectra are taken of the sought element and of various other substances whose spectra interfere with that of the sought element. A weighting function is then computed for application to spectra of unknown materials. The technique was used to determine calcium by radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis in the presence of interfering elements, notably titanium, and the results were compared with those for two popular methods of peak area integration. Although linearity of response was similar for the methods, the linear combination technique was much better at rejecting interferences. For analyses involving mixtures of unknown composition the technique consequently offers improved sensitivity. ?? 1972.

  14. Key research issues in the pulsed fast-neutron analysis technique for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Yule, Thomas J.

    1994-10-01

    Non-invasive inspection systems based on the use of fast neutrons are being studied for the inspection of large cargo containers. A key advantage of fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are the primary constituents of explosives and narcotics. The high energy allows penetration of relatively large containers. The pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA) technique is currently the baseline system. A workshop on the PFNA technique involving industrial, government, and university participants was held at Argonne National Laboratory in January 1994. The purpose of this workshop was to review the status of research on the key technical issues involved in PFNA, and to develop a list of those areas where additional modeling and/or experimentation were needed. The workshop also focused on development of a near-term experimental assessment program using existing prototypes and on development of a long-term test program at the Tacoma Testbed, where a PFNA prototype will be installed in 1995. A summary of conclusions reached at this workshop is presented. Results from analytic and Monte Carlo modeling of simplified PFNA systems are also presented.

  15. Key research issues in the pulsed fast-neutron analysis technique for cargo inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1994-07-01

    Non-invasive inspection systems based on the use of fast neutrons are being studied for the inspection of large cargo containers. A key advantage of fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are the primary constituents of explosives and narcotics. The high energy allows penetration of relatively large containers. The pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA) technique is currently the baseline system. A workshop on the PFNA technique involving industrial, government, and university participants was held at Argonne National Lab. in January 1994. The purpose of this workshop was to review the status of research on the key technical issues involved in PFNA, and to develop a list of those areas where additional modeling and/or experimentation were needed. The workshop also focused on development of a near-term experimental assessment program using existing prototypes and on development of a long-term test program at the Tacoma Testbed, where a PFNA prototype will be installed in 1995. A summary of conclusions reached at this workshop is presented. Results from analytic and Monte Carlo modeling of simplified PFNA systems are also presented.

  16. AWG Filter for Wavelength Interrogator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J. (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Faridian, Fereydoun (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Sotoudeh, Vahid (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength interrogator is coupled to a circulator which couples optical energy from a broadband source to an optical fiber having a plurality of sensors, each sensor reflecting optical energy at a unique wavelength and directing the reflected optical energy to an AWG. The AWG has a detector coupled to each output, and the reflected optical energy from each grating is coupled to the skirt edge response of the AWG such that the adjacent channel responses form a complementary pair response. The complementary pair response is used to convert an AWG skirt response to a wavelength.

  17. Comparison of different MC techniques to evaluate BNCT dose profiles in phantom exposed tovarious neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Durisi, E; Koivunoro, H; Visca, L; Borla, O; Zanini, A

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose in BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) consists of several radiation components with different physical properties and biological effectiveness. In order to assess the clinical efficacy of the beams, determining the dose profiles in tissues, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used. This paper presents a comparison between dose profiles calculated in different phantoms using two techniques: MC radiation transport code, MCNP-4C2 and BNCT MC treatment planning program, SERA (simulation environment for radiotherapy application). In this study MCNP is used as a reference tool. A preliminary test of SERA is performed using six monodirectional and monoenergetic beams directed onto a simple water phantom. In order to deeply investigate the effect of the different cross-section libraries and of the dose calculation methodology, monoenergetic and monodirectional beams directed toward a standard Snyder phantom are simulated. Neutron attenuation curves and dose profiles are calculated with both codes and the results are compared. PMID:19939825

  18. Fundamental studies for the proton polarization technique in neutron protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ichiro; Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Niimura, Nobuo

    2013-11-01

    The isotope effect in conventional neutron protein crystallography (NPC) can be eliminated by the proton polarization technique (ppt). Furthermore, the ppt can improve detection sensitivity of hydrogen (relative neutron scattering length of hydrogen) by approximately eight times in comparison with conventional NPC. Several technical difficulties, however, should be overcome in order to perform the ppt. In this paper, two fundamental studies to realise ppt are presented: preliminary trials using high-pressure flash freezing has shown the advantage of making bulk water amorphous without destroying the single crystal; and X-ray diffraction and liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry analyses of standard proteins after introducing radical molecules into protein crystals have shown that radical molecules could be distributed non-specifically around proteins, which is essential for better proton polarization. PMID:24121348

  19. Fundamental studies for the proton polarization technique in neutron protein crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ichiro; Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Niimura, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    The isotope effect in conventional neutron protein crystallography (NPC) can be eliminated by the proton polarization technique (ppt). Furthermore, the ppt can improve detection sensitivity of hydrogen (relative neutron scattering length of hydrogen) by approximately eight times in comparison with conventional NPC. Several technical difficulties, however, should be overcome in order to perform the ppt. In this paper, two fundamental studies to realise ppt are presented: preliminary trials using high-pressure flash freezing has shown the advantage of making bulk water amorphous without destroying the single crystal; and X-ray diffraction and liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry analyses of standard proteins after introducing radical molecules into protein crystals have shown that radical molecules could be distributed non-specifically around proteins, which is essential for better proton polarization. PMID:24121348

  20. Investigating the Defect Structures in Transparent Conducting Oxides Using X-ray and Neutron Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    González, Gabriela B.

    2012-10-23

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) materials are implemented into a wide variety of commercial devices because they possess a unique combination of high optical transparency and high electrical conductivity. Created during the processing of the TCOs, defects within the atomic-scale structure are responsible for their desirable optical and electrical properties. Therefore, studying the defect structure is essential to a better understanding of the behavior of transparent conductors. X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are powerful tools to investigate the atomic lattice structural defects in these materials. This review paper presents some of the current developments in the study of structural defects in n-type TCOs using x-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), pair distribution functions (PDFs), and x-ray fluorescence (XRF).

  1. Integrating advanced materials simulation techniques into an automated data analysis workflow at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M; Campbell, Stuart I; Delaire, Olivier A; Doucet, Mathieu; Goswami, Monojoy; Hagen, Mark E; Lynch, Vickie E; Proffen, Thomas E; Ren, Shelly; Savici, Andrei T; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will review developments on the integration of advanced modeling and simulation techniques into the analysis step of experimental data obtained at the Spallation Neutron Source. A workflow framework for the purpose of refining molecular mechanics force-fields against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data is presented. The workflow combines software components to submit model simulations to remote high performance computers, a message broker interface for communications between the optimizer engine and the simulation production step, and tools to convolve the simulated data with the experimental resolution. A test application shows the correction to a popular fixed-charge water model in order to account polarization effects due to the presence of solvated ions. Future enhancements to the refinement workflow are discussed. This work is funded through the DOE Center for Accelerating Materials Modeling.

  2. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hälg, R A; Besserer, J; Boschung, M; Mayer, S; Lomax, A J; Schneider, U

    2014-05-21

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small. PMID:24778349

  3. Measurements of the neutron dose equivalent for various radiation qualities, treatment machines and delivery techniques in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hälg, R. A.; Besserer, J.; Boschung, M.; Mayer, S.; Lomax, A. J.; Schneider, U.

    2014-05-01

    In radiation therapy, high energy photon and proton beams cause the production of secondary neutrons. This leads to an unwanted dose contribution, which can be considerable for tissues outside of the target volume regarding the long term health of cancer patients. Due to the high biological effectiveness of neutrons in regards to cancer induction, small neutron doses can be important. This study quantified the neutron doses for different radiation therapy modalities. Most of the reports in the literature used neutron dose measurements free in air or on the surface of phantoms to estimate the amount of neutron dose to the patient. In this study, dose measurements were performed in terms of neutron dose equivalent inside an anthropomorphic phantom. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using track etch detectors as a function of the distance to the isocenter, as well as for radiation sensitive organs. The dose distributions were compared with respect to treatment techniques (3D-conformal, volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for photons; spot scanning and passive scattering for protons), therapy machines (Varian, Elekta and Siemens linear accelerators) and radiation quality (photons and protons). The neutron dose equivalent varied between 0.002 and 3 mSv per treatment gray over all measurements. Only small differences were found when comparing treatment techniques, but substantial differences were observed between the linear accelerator models. The neutron dose equivalent for proton therapy was higher than for photons in general and in particular for double-scattered protons. The overall neutron dose equivalent measured in this study was an order of magnitude lower than the stray dose of a treatment using 6 MV photons, suggesting that the contribution of the secondary neutron dose equivalent to the integral dose of a radiotherapy patient is small.

  4. In-situ vacuum deposition technique of lithium on neutron production target for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Baba, Y.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Imahori, Y.

    2012-10-01

    For the purpose of avoiding the radiation blistering of the lithium target for neutron production in BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) device, trilaminar Li target, of which palladium thin layer was inserted between cupper substrate and Li layer, was newly designed. In-situ vacuum deposition and electrolytic coating techniques were applied to validate the method of fabrication of the Li/Pd/Cu target, and the layered structures of the synthesized target were characterized. In-situ vacuum re-deposition technique was also established for repairing and maintenance for lithium target damaged. Following conclusions were derived; (1) Uniform lithium layers with the thickness from 1.6 nm to a few hundreds nanometer were formed on Pd/Cu multilayer surface by in situ vacuum deposition technique using metallic lithium as a source material. (2) Re-deposition of lithium layer on Li surface can be achieved by in situ vacuum deposition technique. (3) Small amount of water and carbonate was observed on the top surface of Li. But the thickness of the adsorbed layer was less than monolayer, which will not affect the quality of the Li target. (4) The formation of Pd-Li alloy layer was observed at the Pd and Li interface. The alloy layer would contribute to the stability of the Li layer.

  5. Further Evaluation of the Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) Technique for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2011-09-01

    This is an end-of-year report (Fiscal Year (FY) 2011) for the second year of effort on a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The second-year goals for this project included: (1) assessing the neutron source strength needed for the NRTA technique, (2) estimating count times, (3) assessing the effect of temperature on the transmitted signal, (4) estimating plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly, (5) providing a preliminary assessment of the neutron detectors, and (6) documenting this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes work performed over a nine month period from January-September 2011 and is to be considered a follow-on or add-on report to our previous published summary report from December 2010 (INL/EXT-10-20620).

  6. Laser interrogation of latent vehicle registration number

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, R.E. |; Pelkey, G.E.; Grant, P.; Whipple, R.E.; Andresen, B.D.

    1994-09-01

    A recent investigation involved automobile registration numbers as important evidentiary specimens. In California, as in most states, small, thin metallic decals are issued to owners of vehicles each year as the registration is renewed. The decals are applied directly to the license plate of the vehicle and typically on top of the previous year`s expired decal. To afford some degree of security, the individual registration decals have been designed to tear easily; they cannot be separated from each other, but can be carefully removed intact from the metal license plate by using a razor blade. In September 1993, the City of Livermore Police Department obtained a blue 1993 California decal that had been placed over an orange 1992 decal. The two decals were being investigated as possible evidence in a case involving vehicle registration fraud. To confirm the suspicion and implicate a suspect, the department needed to known the registration number on the bottom (completely covered) 1992 decal. The authors attempted to use intense and directed light to interrogate the colored stickers. Optical illumination using a filtered white-light source partially identified the latent number. However, the most successful technique used a tunable dye laser pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. By selectively tuning the wavelength and intensity of the dye laser, backlit illumination of the decals permitted visualization of the underlying registration number through the surface of the top sticker. With optimally-tuned wavelength and intensity, 100% accuracy was obtained in identifying the sequence of latent characters. The advantage of optical techniques is their completely nondestructive nature, thus preserving the evidence for further interrogation or courtroom presentation.

  7. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, D.; Börgardts, M.; Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E.; Müller, T. J. J.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied.

  8. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.; Börgardts, M.; Müller, T. J. J.; Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E.

    2015-09-15

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied.

  9. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Wagner, D; Börgardts, M; Grünzweig, C; Lehmann, E; Müller, T J J; Egelhaaf, S U; Hermes, H E

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied. PMID:26429447

  10. An investigation of mathematical tools for data reduction techniques in neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopal, R.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced mathematical tools have been developed for calculating corrections that are applied to neutron scattering data in order to account for the finite size of the scattering samples. The multiple scattering events (due to finite size) that occur in a neutron scattering experiment typically comprise 8 to 10% of the total measured scattering events. A Monte Carlo program was developed to simulate the disk geometry arrangement used in the Lowell neutron scattering experiments. A modern random number generator which passes all known randomness tests was implemented in the Monte Carlo program. A direction-biasing method was applied in order to improve the statistical results of the Monte Carlo simulation. The ratio of the probability of n + 1 scatterings to n scatterings was investigated for the disk geometry. The Monte Carlo calculation was also used to simulate the time-of-flight spectra and energy spectra. Corrections for multiple scattering were calculated for two sets of data; one at 128 keV and the other at 200 keV. The Monte Carlo results provided significant improvement over previous results. A parallel study was carried out to determine the feasibility of calculating the corrections analytically. Analytical techniques involving eigenfunction expansion, sparse matrix method and the Rayliegh-Ritz variational method were found to be inadequate to solve the problem.

  11. Tunable microring based on-chip interrogator for wavelength-modulated optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ao; Qiu, Chen; Yang, Longzhi; Dai, Tingge; Li, Yubo; Yu, Hui; Hao, Yinlei; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-04-01

    An interrogation system for wavelength-modulated optical sensors based on tunable microring filter has been proposed and demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The wavelength shift of the sensors can be readout from the shift of the peak optical output of the system by scanning the resonant wavelength of the microring filter. We fabricate the interrogator on the silicon-on-insulator platform and a fiber Bragg grating sensor (FBG) is precisely interrogated. The Lorentz spectrum of the microring filter can de-flatten the output spectrum of the FBG and improve the interrogating resolution efficiently. Such a technique potentially provides a compact (only 50×50 μm2), low-cost, and high-performance (1 pm resolution) approach for the interrogation of the wavelength-modulated sensor and distributed sensor arrays.

  12. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  13. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    PubMed

    Halpern, Abraham L; Halpern, John H; Doherty, Sean B

    2008-01-01

    After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946-1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter. PMID:18817568

  14. "Enhanced" interrogation of detainees: do psychologists and psychiatrists participate?

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Abraham L; Halpern, John H; Doherty, Sean B

    2008-01-01

    After revelations of participation by psychiatrists and psychologists in interrogation of prisoners at Guantánamo Bay and Central Intelligence Agency secret detention centers, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association adopted Position Statements absolutely prohibiting their members from participating in torture under any and all circumstances, and, to a limited degree, forbidding involvement in interrogations. Some interrogations utilize very aggressive techniques determined to be torture by many nations and organizations throughout the world. This paper explains why psychiatrists and psychologists involved in coercive interrogations violate the Geneva Conventions and the laws of the United States. Whether done with ignorance of professional ethical obligations or not, these psychiatrists and psychologists have crossed an ethical barrier that may best be averted from re-occurring by teaching medical students and residents in all medical specialties about the ethics principles stemming from the 1946–1947 Nuremberg trials and the Geneva Conventions, together with the Ethics Codes of the World Medical Association and the American Medical Association; and, with regard to psychiatric residents and psychological trainees, by the teaching about The Principles of Medical Ethics With Annotations Especially Applicable to Psychiatry and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, respectively. In this way, all physicians and psychologists will clearly understand that they have an absolute moral obligation to "First, do no harm" to the human beings they professionally encounter. PMID:18817568

  15. Development of a novel neutron detection technique by using a boron layer coating a Charge Coupled Device

    SciTech Connect

    Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Estrada, Juan; Tartaglione, Aureliano; Sofo haro, Miguel; Fernández Moroni, Guillermo; Cancelo, Gustavo

    2015-01-19

    This article describes the design features and the first test measurements obtained during the installation of a novel high resolution 2D neutron detection technique. The technique proposed in this work consists of a boron layer (enriched in ${^{10}}$B) placed on a scientific Charge Coupled Device (CCD). After the nuclear reaction ${^{10}}$B(n,$\\alpha$)${^{7}}$Li, the CCD detects the emitted charge particles thus obtaining information on the neutron absorption position. The above mentioned ionizing particles, with energies in the range 0.5-5.5 MeV, produce a plasma effect in the CCD which is recorded as a circular spot. This characteristic circular shape, as well as the relationship observed between the spot diameter and the charge collected, is used for the event recognition, allowing the discrimination of undesirable gamma events. We present the first results recently obtained with this technique, which has the potential to perform neutron tomography investigations with a spatial resolution better than that previously achieved. Numerical simulations indicate that the spatial resolution of this technique will be about 15 $\\mu$m, and the intrinsic detection efficiency for thermal neutrons will be about 3 %. We compare the proposed technique with other neutron detection techniques and analyze its advantages and disadvantages.

  16. TRU-ART: A cost-effective prototypical neutron imaging technique for transuranic waste certification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    The certification of defense radioactive waste as either transuranic or low-level waste requires very sensitive and accurate assay instrumentation to determine the specific radioactivity within an individual waste package. An assay instrument that employs a new technique (TRU-ART), which can identify the location of the radioactive material within a waste package, was designed, fabricated, and tested to potentially enhance the certification of problem defense waste drums. In addition, the assay instrumentation has potential application in radioactive waste reprocessing and neutron tomography. The assay instrumentation uses optimized electronic signal responses from an array of boral- and cadmium-shielded polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}H detector packages. Normally, thermal neutrons that are detected by {sup 3}H detectors have very poor spatial dependency that may be used to determine the location of the radioactive material. However, these shielded-detector packages of the TRU-ART system maintain the spatial dependency of the radioactive material in that the point of fast neutron thermalization is immediately adjacent to the {sup 3}H detector. The TRU-ART was used to determine the location of radioactive material within three mock-up drums (empty, peat moss, and concrete) and four actual waste drums. The TRU-ART technique is very analogous to emission tomography. The mock-up drum and actual waste drum data, which were collected by the TRU-ART, were directly input into a algebraic reconstruction code to produce three-dimensional isoplots. Finally, a comprehensive fabrication cost estimate of the fielded drum assay system and the TRU-ART system was determined, and, subsequently, these estimates were used in a cost-benefit analysis to compare the economic advantage of the respective systems.

  17. Variation in Miami Cuban Spanish Interrogative Intonation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvord, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    The interrogative intonation of Cubans and Cuban Americans living in Miami is investigated. Two different intonation patterns are used in this variety of Spanish to convey absolute interrogative meaning: one with a falling final contour, as has been observed in Cuban Spanish, and one with a rising final contour, as is used in American English and…

  18. 8 CFR 343b.3 - Interrogation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interrogation. 343b.3 Section 343b.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CERTIFICATE OF NATURALIZATION FOR RECOGNITION BY A FOREIGN STATE § 343b.3 Interrogation. When Form N-565 presents a prima...

  19. Comparison Between Digital and Analog Pulse Shape Discrimination Techniques For Neutron and Gamma Ray Separation

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejad; John K. Hartwell

    2005-11-01

    Recent advancement in digital signal processing (DSP) using fast processors and computer makes it possible to be used in pulse shape discrimination applications. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of using a DSP to distinguish between the neutrons and gamma rays by the shape of their pulses in a liquid scintillator detector (BC501), and have investigated pulse shape-based techniques to improve the resolution performance of room-temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. For the neutron/gamma discrimination, the advantage of using a DSP over the analog method is that in analog system two separate charge-sensitive ADC's are required. One ADC is used to integrate the beginning of the pulse risetime while the second ADC is for integrating the tail part. Using a DSP eliminates the need for separate ADCs as one can easily get the integration of two parts of the pulse from the digital waveforms. This work describes the performance of these DSP techniques and compares the results with the analog method.

  20. Comparison Between Digital and Analog Pulse Shape Discrimination Techniques for Neutron and Gamma Ray Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad

    2005-10-01

    Recent advancements in digital signal processing (DSP) using fast processors and a computer allows one to envision using it in pulse shape discrimination. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of using a DSP to distinguish between neutrons and gamma rays by the shape of their pulses in a liquid scintillator detector (BC501). For neutron/gamma discrimination, the advantage of using a DSP over the analog method is that in an analog system, two separate charge-sensitive ADCs are required. One ADC is used to integrate the beginning of the pulse rise time while the second ADC is for integrating the tail part. In DSP techniques the incoming pulses coming directly from the detector are immediately digitized and can be decomposed into individual pulses waveforms. This eliminates the need for separate ADCs as one can easily get the integration of two parts of the pulse from the digital waveforms. This work describes the performance of these DSP techniques and compares the results with the analog method.

  1. The soil moisture and its relevance to the landmine detection by neutron backscattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obhođaš, Jasmina; Sudac, Davorin; Nađ, Karlo; Valković, Vlado; Nebbia, Giancarlo; Viesti, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    The detection of landmines by using available technologies is a time consuming, expensive and extremely dangerous job, so that there is a need for a technological breakthrough in this field. Atomic and nuclear physics based sensors might offer new possibilities in de-mining. Among the available nuclear techniques, the neutron backscattering technique (NBT), based on the detection of the produced thermal neutrons, is thought to be the most promising for field applications. We discuss here two limitations of NBT, being related to the soil moisture. First, the critical value of the soil moisture, reached when the density of the hydrogen atoms in the landmine is equal to that in the background soil, defines a condition for which the detection is not possible. Critical values are small for some of the landmine types, thus suggesting the application of the method to arid countries, where the soil moisture is lower than 10%. Furthermore, small-scale variations of the soil moisture content, experimentally determined for different soil types, are found to be capable of generating false positive readings. To avoid this problem, the integration of the NBT with a second sensor, as the metal detector, is proposed.

  2. MCNPX--PoliMi Variance Reduction Techniques for Simulating Neutron Scintillation Detector Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Shikha

    Scintillation detectors have emerged as a viable He-3 replacement technology in the field of nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards. The scintillation light produced in the detectors is dependent on the energy deposited and the nucleus with which the interaction occurs. For neutrons interacting with hydrogen in organic liquid scintillation detectors, the energy-to-light conversion process is nonlinear. MCNPX-PoliMi is a Monte Carlo Code that has been used for simulating this detailed scintillation physics; however, until now, simulations have only been done in analog mode. Analog Monte Carlo simulations can take long times to run, especially in the presence of shielding and large source-detector distances, as in the case of typical nonproliferation problems. In this thesis, two nonanalog approaches to speed up MCNPX-PoliMi simulations of neutron scintillation detector response have been studied. In the first approach, a response matrix method (RMM) is used to efficiently calculate neutron pulse height distributions (PHDs). This method combines the neutron current incident on the detector face with an MCNPX-PoliMi-calculated response matrix to generate PHDs. The PHD calculations and their associated uncertainty are compared for a polyethylene-shielded and lead-shielded Cf-252 source for three different techniques: fully analog MCNPX-PoliMi, the RMM, and the RMM with source biasing. The RMM with source biasing reduces computation time or increases the figure-of-merit on an average by a factor of 600 for polyethylene and 300 for lead shielding (when compared to the fully analog calculation). The simulated neutron PHDs show good agreement with the laboratory measurements, thereby validating the RMM. In the second approach, MCNPX-PoliMi simulations are performed with the aid of variance reduction techniques. This is done by separating the analog and nonanalog components of the simulations. Inside the detector region, where scintillation light is produced, no variance

  3. Novel techniques for high precision refractive index measurements, and application to assessing neutron damage and dose in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.; Vaughan, E. I.; Arissian, L.; Hendrie, J. P.; Cole, J.; Diels, J.-C.; Hecht, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we present novel techniques for high precision index of refraction measurements for transparent crystals, and demonstrate a change from neutron irradiation. Radiation damage affects the structure of material, which can be read out nondestructively in transparent crystals. There is some difference in gamma-ray and neutron interactions which may be useful in characterization. Ionization from gamma rays produces color centers in the material, producing distinct spectral absorption, and some small shift in the index of refraction. Neutrons produce atomic recoils and, while the recoils do some ionization, they have a much greater efficiency for lattice displacement than do gamma rays, and these displacements can have a greater effect on the index of refraction. Using CaF2 crystals exposed to neutron radiation, together with a new high precision technique of detecting changes of index of refraction, we establish proof that this type of measurement can be used to monitor neutron exposure. This can provide a basic study of material changes with radiation and, with calibration of material in known neutron fields, this may even find application to neutron dosimetry.

  4. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

  5. Ion-induced gammas for photofission interrogation of HEU.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Antolak, Arlyn J.; Morse, Daniel H.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-03-01

    High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded special nuclear material (SNM), such as HEU (highly enriched uranium), by detecting prompt and/or delayed induced fission signatures. In this work, we explore the underlying physics for a new type of photon source that generates high fluxes of mono-energetic gamma-rays from low-energy (<500 keV) proton-induced nuclear reactions. The characteristic energies (4- to 18-MeV) of the gamma-rays coincide with the peak of the photonuclear cross section. The source could be designed to produce gamma-rays of certain selected energies, thereby improving the probability of detecting shielded HEU or providing a capability to determine enrichment inside sealed containers. The fundamental physics of such an interrogation source were studied in this LDRD through scaled ion accelerator experiments and radiation transport modeling. The data were used to assess gamma and neutron yields, background, and photofission-induced signal levels from several (p,{gamma}) target materials under consideration.

  6. Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) Preliminary Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    DR. Stephen Croft; Mr. David Martancik; Dr. Brian Young; Dr. Patrick MJ Chard; Dr. Robert J Estop; Sheila Melton; Gaetano J. Arnone

    2003-01-13

    Canberra Industries has won the tendered solicitation, INEEL/EST-99-00121 for boxed waste Nondestructive Assay Development and Demonstration. Canberra will provide the Integrated Box Interrogation System (IBIS) which is a suite of assay instrumentation and a data reduction system that addresses the measurement needs for Boxed Wastes identified in the solicitation and facilitates the associated experimental program and demonstration of system capability. The IBIS system will consist of the next generation CWAM system, i.e. CWAM II, which is a Scanning Passive/Active Neutron interrogation system which we will call a Box Segmented Neutron Scanner (BSNS), combined with a physically separate Box Segmented Gamma-ray Scanning (BSGS) system. These systems are based on existing hardware designs but will be tailored to the large sample size and enhanced to allow the program to evaluate the following measurement criteria:Characterization and correction for matrix heterogeneity Characterization of non-uniform radio-nuclide and isotopic compositions Assay of high density matrices (both high-Z and high moderator contents)Correction for radioactive material physical form - such as self shielding or multiplication effects due to large accumulations of radioactive materials.Calibration with a minimal set of reference standards and representative matrices.THis document summarizes the conceptual design parameters of the IBIS and indicates areas key to the success of the project where development is to be centered. The work presented here is a collaborative effort between scientific staff within Canberra and within the NIS-6 group at LANL.

  7. Personnel Dose Assessment during Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Akkurt, Hatice; Patton, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    A leading candidate in the detection of special nuclear material (SNM) is active interrogation (AI). Unlike passive interrogation, AI uses a source to enhance or create a detectable signal from SNM (usually fission), particularly in shielded scenarios or scenarios where the SNM has a low activity. The use of AI thus makes the detection of SNM easier or, in some scenarios, even enables previously impossible detection. During the development of AI sources, significant effort is put into determining the source strength required to detect SNM in specific scenarios. Usually during this process, but not always, an evaluation of personnel dose is also completed. In this instance personnel dose could involve any of the following: (1) personnel performing the AI; (2) unknown stowaways who are inside the object being interrogated; or (3) in clandestine interrogations, personnel who are known to be inside the object being interrogated but are unaware of the interrogation. In most instances, dose to anyone found smuggling SNM will be a secondary issue. However, for the organizations performing the AI, legal if not moral considerations should make dose to the personnel performing the AI, unknown stowaways, or innocent bystanders in clandestine interrogations a serious concern.

  8. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  9. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  10. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  11. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  12. 32 CFR 637.21 - Recording interviews and interrogations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.21 Recording interviews and interrogations. The recording of interviews and interrogations by military police personnel...

  13. Development of Techniques for a Precision Neutron EDM Measurement at RCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumiya, Ryohei; Masuda, Yasuhiro; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Jeong, Sun-Chan; Watanabe, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Pierre, Edgard; Shin, Yunchang; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu

    2014-09-01

    A non-zero neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) breaks the time-reversal symmetry. A precision measurement of the nEDM is expected to be a good probe to search for theories beyond the standard model. We have been developing techniques for a nEDM measurement, using a high intensity ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source developed by the collaboration between KEK and RCNP. We have succeeded to polarize UCNs by a super conducting polarizer, and stored them in a cell. This cell will be installed in static magnetic and electric fields for a nEDM observation by the Ramsey separated-oscillatory-field magnetic resonance method. The homogeneity of the magnetic field is being improved aiming to increase the transverse relaxation time T2. A multilayered magnetic shielding and a compensation coil system was developed to cancel the geomagnetic field. Some materials around the cell which were not completely non-magnetic were replaced. We are developing a 129Xe co-magnetometer for the high precision field monitoring, and a high voltage system including electrodes with minimum UCN losses. In this talk, the present status of these apparatuses will be discussed.

  14. A neutron-X-ray, NMR and calorimetric study of glassy Probucol synthesized using containerless techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. K. R.; Benmore, C. J.; Tailor, A. N.; Tumber, S. K.; Neuefeind, J.; Cherry, B.; Yarger, J. L.; Mou, Q.; Weber, W.; Byrn, S. R.

    2013-10-01

    Acoustic levitation was used to trap 1-3 mm diameter drops of Probucol and other pharmaceutical materials in containerless conditions. Samples were studied in situ using X-ray diffraction and ex situ using neutron diffraction, NMR and DSC techniques. The materials were brought into non-equilibrium states by supersaturating solutions or by supercooling melts. The glass transition and crystallization temperatures of glassy Probucol were 29 ± 1 and 71 ± 1 °C respectively. The glassy form was stable with a shelf life of at least 8 months. A neutron/X-ray difference function of the glass showed that while molecular sub-groups remain rigid, many of the hydrogen correlations observed in the crystal become smeared out in the disordered material. The glass is principally comprised of slightly distorted Form I Probucol molecules with disordered packing rather than large changes in the individual molecular structure. Avoiding surface contact-induced nucleation provided access to highly non-equilibrium phases and enabled synthesis of phase-pure glasses.

  15. Application of the coincidence counting technique to DD neutron spectrometry data at the NIF, OMEGA, and Z

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lahmann, B.; Milanese, L. M.; Han, W.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Hahn, K. D.; Jones, B.

    2016-07-20

    A compact neutron spectrometer, based on a CH foil for the production of recoil protons and CR-39 detection, is being developed for the measurements of the DD-neutron spectrum at the NIF, OMEGA, and Z facilities. As a CR-39 detector will be used in the spectrometer, the principal sources of background are neutron-induced tracks and intrinsic tracks (defects in the CR-39). To reject the background to the required level for measurements of the down-scattered and primary DD-neutron components in the spectrum, the Coincidence Counting Technique (CCT) must be applied to the data. Using a piece of CR-39 exposed to 2.5-MeV protonsmore » at the MIT HEDP accelerator facility and DD-neutrons at Z, a significant improvement of a DD-neutron signal-to-background level has been demonstrated for the first time using the CCT. In conclusion, these results are in excellent agreement with previous work applied to DT neutrons.« less

  16. Rattling Nucleons: New Developments in Active Interrogation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Runkle; David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Active interrogation is a vigorous area of research and development due to its promise of offering detection and characterization capabilities of special nuclear material in environments where passive detection fails. The primary value added by active methods is the capability to penetrate shielding - special nuclear material itself, incidental materials, or intentional shielding - and advocates hope that active interrogation will provide a solution to the problem of detecting shielded uranium, which is at present the greatest obstacle to interdiction efforts. The technique also provides a unique benefit for quantifying nuclear material in high background-radiation environments, an area important for nuclear material safeguards and material accountancy. Progress has been made in the field of active interrogation on several fronts, most notably in the arenas of source development, systems integration, and the integration and exploitation of multiple fission and non-fission signatures. But penetration of interrogating radiation often comes at a cost, not only in terms of finance and dose but also in terms of induced backgrounds, system complexity, and extended measurement times (including set up and acquisition). These costs make the calculus for deciding to implement active interrogation more subtle than may be apparent. The purpose of this review is thus to examine existing interrogation methods, compare and contrast their attributes and limitations, and identify missions where active interrogation may hold the most promise.

  17. Validation of computational methods for treatment planning of fast-neutron therapy using activation foil techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.; Hartwell, J.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Venhuizen, J.R.; Risler, R.

    1997-12-01

    A closed-form direct method for unfolding neutron spectra from foil activation data is presented. The method is applied to measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum produced by the proton-cyclotron-based fast-neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine. The results compare favorably with theoretical expectations based on an a-priori calculational model of the target and neutron beamline configuration of the UW facility.

  18. Integrated nanoscale tools for interrogating living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgolli, Marsela

    The development of next-generation, nanoscale technologies that interface biological systems will pave the way towards new understanding of such complex systems. Nanowires -- one-dimensional nanoscale structures -- have shown unique potential as an ideal physical interface to biological systems. Herein, we focus on the development of nanowire-based devices that can enable a wide variety of biological studies. First, we built upon standard nanofabrication techniques to optimize nanowire devices, resulting in perfectly ordered arrays of both opaque (Silicon) and transparent (Silicon dioxide) nanowires with user defined structural profile, densities, and overall patterns, as well as high sample consistency and large scale production. The high-precision and well-controlled fabrication method in conjunction with additional technologies laid the foundation for the generation of highly specialized platforms for imaging, electrochemical interrogation, and molecular biology. Next, we utilized nanowires as the fundamental structure in the development of integrated nanoelectronic platforms to directly interrogate the electrical activity of biological systems. Initially, we generated a scalable intracellular electrode platform based on vertical nanowires that allows for parallel electrical interfacing to multiple mammalian neurons. Our prototype device consisted of 16 individually addressable stimulation/recording sites, each containing an array of 9 electrically active silicon nanowires. We showed that these vertical nanowire electrode arrays could intracellularly record and stimulate neuronal activity in dissociated cultures of rat cortical neurons similar to patch clamp electrodes. In addition, we used our intracellular electrode platform to measure multiple individual synaptic connections, which enables the reconstruction of the functional connectivity maps of neuronal circuits. In order to expand and improve the capability of this functional prototype device we designed

  19. Monte Carlo Simulations Of The Response Of Shielded SNM To A Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.

    2011-06-01

    Active neutron interrogation has been used as a technique for the detection and identification of special nuclear material (SNM) for both proposed and field-tested systems. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been studying this technique for systems ranging from small systems employing portable electronic neutron generators to larger systems employing linear accelerators as high-energy photon sources for assessment of vehicles and cargo. In order to assess the feasibility of new systems, INL has undertaken a campaign of Monte Carlo simulations of the response of a variety of masses of SNM in multiple shielding configurations to a pulsed neutron source using the MCNPX code, with emphasis on the neutron and photon response of the system as a function of time after the initial neutron pulse. We present here some preliminary results from these calculations.

  20. COHN analysis: Body composition measurements based on the associated particle imaging and prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The measurement of the body's carbon (C), oxygen (O), hydrogen (H), and nitrogen (N) content can be used to calculate the relative amounts of fat, protein, and water. A system based on prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), coupled with the associated particle imaging (API) technique, is...

  1. Non destructive multi elemental analysis using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis techniques: Preliminary results for concrete sample

    SciTech Connect

    Dahing, Lahasen Normanshah; Yahya, Redzuan; Yahya, Roslan; Hassan, Hearie

    2014-09-03

    In this study, principle of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis has been used as a technique to determine the elements in the sample. The system consists of collimated isotopic neutron source, Cf-252 with HPGe detector and Multichannel Analysis (MCA). Concrete with size of 10×10×10 cm{sup 3} and 15×15×15 cm{sup 3} were analysed as sample. When neutrons enter and interact with elements in the concrete, the neutron capture reaction will occur and produce characteristic prompt gamma ray of the elements. The preliminary result of this study demonstrate the major element in the concrete was determined such as Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe and H as well as others element, such as Cl by analysis the gamma ray lines respectively. The results obtained were compared with NAA and XRF techniques as a part of reference and validation. The potential and the capability of neutron induced prompt gamma as tool for multi elemental analysis qualitatively to identify the elements present in the concrete sample discussed.

  2. Integrated FBG sensors interrogator in silicon photonic platform using active interferometer monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Y. E.; Nannipieri, T.; Di Pasquale, F.; Oton, C. J.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of Fiber Bragg Grating sensors interrogation using integrated unbalanced Mach-Zehnder Interferometers (MZI) and phase sensitive detection in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. The Phase- Generated Carrier (PGC) demodulation technique is used to detect phase changes, avoiding signal fading. Signal processing allows us to extract the wavelength shift from the signal patterns, allowing accurate dynamic FBG interrogation. High resolution and low cost chips with multiple interrogators and photodetectors on board can be realized by exploiting the advantages of large scale fabrication capabilities of well-established silicon based industrial infrastructures. Simultaneous dynamic reading of a large number of FBG sensors can lead to large volume market applications of the technology in several strategic industrial fields. The performance of the proposed integrated FBG interrogator is validated by comparing with a commercial FBG readout based on a spectrometer and used as a reference.

  3. Fast neutron scattering cross sections for terbium-159 via the (n,n'gamma) and (n,n') techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Pil-Neyo

    2001-08-01

    Scattering cross sections for fast neutrons were measured for low-lying levels of 159Tb, a deformed odd-A nucleus. Levels from 400 keV up to 1000 keV in excitation were studied by the (n,n'γ) technique, while elastic and inelastic scattering for the lower lying excited states were studied via the (n,n') technique. For the (n,n'γ) experiment, a Ge detector was used in conjunction with the pulsed beam time-of-flight technique to observe de-excitation gamma decays. A NaI(Tl) annulus was used to suppress signals caused by Compton scattered gamma rays. Gamma-ray production cross sections were measured in the 400- to 1000-keV incident neutron energy range in 50-keV intervals at a scattering angle of 125°. Thirty six gamma-ray transitions from 16 levels of 159.Tb were observed and placed in the decay scheme. Neutron level cross sections were inferred from the differential gamma- ray production cross sections. Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering angular distributions for this nuclide were measured via the time-of-flight technique at incident neutron energies of 575 keV and 995 keV. The neutron detector consisted of a plastic scintillator mounted on a fast photomultiplier tube. Measurements were made at 11 angles from 35° to 135° in 10-degree steps for 995 keV and at 5 angles for 575 keV. Neutrons were produced in a thin lithium target using the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction with protons generated by the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van de Graaff Accelerator. Level cross section results using the (n,n'γ) technique are compared with the those using the (n,n') technique for lower-lying levels, 241 keV(9/2+), a three-level cluster of 348 keV(5/2+), 363 keV(5/2-), and 388 keV(7/2-), and 428 keV(7/2+) states. The results are also compared with previous work and to the ENDF/B-VI, JEF-2, and JENDL-3 evaluations.

  4. L'Interrogation Indirecte (Indirect Interrogation). Montreal Working Papers in Linguistics, Vol. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieger, Monique; Paradis, Monique

    This study is divided into two sections: the first examines Standard French indirect interrogation, noting several distinct verb classes which are discussed in terms of permutations of WH-words, reduction, multiple WH-words, cleavage, semantic compatibility, and the "que-" completive; the second part focuses on indirect interrogation and relatives…

  5. Simulation Of A Photofission-Based Cargo Interrogation System

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael; Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; Shaw, Timothy

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive model has been developed to characterize and optimize the detection of Bremsstrahlung x-ray induced fission signatures from nuclear materials hidden in cargo containers. An effective active interrogation system should not only induce a large number of fission events but also efficiently detect their signatures. The proposed scanning system utilizes a 9-MV commercially available linear accelerator and the detection of strong fission signals i.e. delayed gamma rays and prompt neutrons. Because the scanning system is complex and the cargo containers are large and often highly attenuating, the simulation method segments the model into several physical steps, representing each change of radiation particle. Each approximation is carried-out separately, resulting in a major reduction in computational time and a significant improvement in tally statistics. The model investigates the effect on the fission rate and detection rate by various cargo types, densities and distributions. Hydrogenous and metallic cargos, homogeneous and heterogeneous, as well as various locations of the nuclear material inside the cargo container were studied. We will show that for the photofission-based interrogation system simulation, the final results are not only in good agreement with a full, single-step simulation but also with experimental results, further validating the full-system simulation.

  6. Pulsed Bremsstrahlung Interrogation with Photoneutron - Gamma-Ray Spectrometry for Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, James Litton

    A novel photoneutron-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique which does not require a radioactive neutron source is presented. Some unique features of this technique include: 1) pulsed interrogation neutron production within, or very near, an inspected object, 2) spectrum tailoring of the source neutrons, and 3) compatibility with many existing high-energy, commercial x-ray inspection devices. Basic concept feasibility was first established by numerical methods. The pulsed photoneutron inspection technique performs nondestructive elemental analysis using gamma-ray spectrometry. Highly penetrating bremsstrahlung photons are produced by a pulsed electron accelerator capable of producing up to 16-MeV electrons. The photoneutrons are generated by the bremsstrahlung photons interacting with an inspected object and near-by beryllium metal. The interactions of the neutrons within an inspected item result in the emission of elemental characteristic gamma-rays. Spectrometry is performed by analyzing the gamma -rays acquired between accelerator pulses. A unique fast detection and acquisition system, using two 5.08 x 5.08 -cm organic scintillators, acquires gamma-ray emissions within 100 ns of each accelerator pulse. The fast system is capable of processing individual gamma-ray signals at count rates up to 40 MHz between accelerator pulses with a repetition rate up to 1 kHz. The system incorporates a unique x-ray flash recovery method which allows individual gamma-ray detection as soon as 75 ns after the start of each x-ray flash occurring within the detector. Conventional detection and data acquisition systems are used to acquire gamma-ray spectra for the time period between 1000 ns and the next accelerator pulse. Operational tests using a 30-ps pulse width, electron accelerator demonstrated the x-ray flash recovery methodology, gamma-ray detection, and data acquisition. Although, gamma -ray spectrometry performance was limited by x-ray flash -induced gain shifts in

  7. On the combination of delayed neutron and delayed gamma techniques for fission rate measurement in nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Jordan, K. A.

    2011-07-01

    Novel techniques to measure newly induced fissions in spent fuel after re-irradiation at low power have been developed and tested at the Proteus zero-power research reactor. The two techniques are based on the detection of high energy gamma-rays emitted by short-lived fission products and delayed neutrons. The two techniques relate the measured signals to the total fission rate, the isotopic composition of the fuel, and nuclear data. They can be combined to derive better estimates on each of these parameters. This has potential for improvement in many areas. Spent fuel characterisation and safeguard applications can benefit from these techniques for non-destructive assay of plutonium content. Another application of choice is the reduction of uncertainties on nuclear data. As a first application of the combination of the delayed neutron and gamma measurement techniques, this paper shows how to reduce the uncertainties on the relative abundances of the longest delayed neutron group for thermal fissions in {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and fast fissions in {sup 238}U. The proposed experiments are easily achievable in zero-power research reactors using fresh UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel and do not require fast extraction systems. The relative uncertainties (1{sigma}) on the relative abundances are expected to be reduced from 13% to 4%, 16% to 5%, and 38% to 12% for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. (authors)

  8. Verification of threshold activation detection (TAD) technique in prompt fission neutron detection using scintillators containing 19F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibczynski, P.; Kownacki, J.; Moszyński, M.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Syntfeld-Każuch, A.; Gójska, A.; Gierlik, M.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Jakubowska, E.; Kędzierski, G.; Kujawiński, Ł.; Wojnarowicz, J.; Carrel, F.; Ledieu, M.; Lainé, F.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study ⌀ 5''× 3'' and ⌀ 2''× 2'' EJ-313 liquid fluorocarbon as well as ⌀ 2'' × 3'' BaF2 scintillators were exposed to neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source and a Sodern Genie 16GT deuterium-tritium (D+T) neutron generator. The scintillators responses to β- particles with maximum endpoint energy of 10.4 MeV from the n+19F reactions were studied. Response of a ⌀ 5'' × 3'' BC-408 plastic scintillator was also studied as a reference. The β- particles are the products of interaction of fast neutrons with 19F which is a component of the EJ-313 and BaF2 scintillators. The method of fast neutron detection via fluorine activation is already known as Threshold Activation Detection (TAD) and was proposed for photofission prompt neutron detection from fissionable and Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in the field of Homeland Security and Border Monitoring. Measurements of the number of counts between 6.0 and 10.5 MeV with a 252Cf source showed that the relative neutron detection efficiency ratio, defined as epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'', is 32.0% ± 2.3% and 44.6% ± 3.4% for front-on and side-on orientation of the BaF2, respectively. Moreover, the ⌀ 5'' EJ-313 and side-on oriented BaF2 were also exposed to neutrons from the D+T neutron generator, and the relative efficiency epsilonBaF2 / epsilonEJ-313-5'' was estimated to be 39.3%. Measurements of prompt photofission neutrons with the BaF2 detector by means of data acquisition after irradiation (out-of-beam) of nuclear material and between the beam pulses (beam-off) techniques were also conducted on the 9 MeV LINAC of the SAPHIR facility.

  9. The synchronous active neutron detection system for spent fuel assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-10-01

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit the unique operating features of a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. This generator and a novel detection system will be applied to the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed {open_quotes}lock-in{close_quotes} amplifiers. The authors have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. This approach is possible because the Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. The results to date are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be nonthermal and penetrating. Although a significant amount of work remains to fully explore the relevant physics and optimize the instrument design, the underlying concept appears sound.

  10. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  11. Nimbus 4/IRLS Balloon Interrogation Package (BIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The balloon interrogation package (BIP), an integral part of the overall interrogation, recording, and location subsystems (IRLS) for the Nimbus 4 program, is described. The BIP is a self-contained, integrated transponder designed to be carried aloft by a constant altitude, superpressure balloon to an altitude of 67,000 or 78,000 feet. After launch the BIP senses high-altitude balloon overpressure and temperature, and upon receipt of an interrogated command from the IRLS aboard the Nimbus 4 satellite, the BIP enodes the data on a real-time basis into a pulse-code modulation (PCM) format and transmits this data to the satellite. A summary of the program activity to produce 30 BIP systems and to support balloon launches from Ascension Island is presented.

  12. SNM detection by active muon interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, Andrew J; Miyadera, Haruo; Turchi, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Muons are charged particles with mass between the electron and proton and can be produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged-particle beam with a target. There are several distinct features of the muon interaction with matter attractive as a probe for detection of SNM at moderate ranges. These include muon penetration of virtually any amount of material without significant nuclear interaction until stopped by ionization loss in a short distance. When stopped, high-energy penetrating x-rays (in the range of 6 MeV for uranium,) unique to isotopic composition are emitted in the capture process. The subsequent interaction with the nucleus produces additional radiation useful in assessing SNM presence. A focused muon beam can be transported through the atmosphere, at a range limited mainly by beam-size growth through scattering. A muonbeam intensity of > 10{sup 9} /second is required for efficient interrogation and, as in any other technique, dose limits are to be respected. To produce sufficient muons a high-energy (threshold {approx}140 MeV) high-intensity (<1 mA) proton or electron beam is needed implying the use of a linear accelerator to bombard a refractory target. The muon yield is fractionally small, with large angle and energy dispersion, so that efficient collection is necessary in all dimensions of phase space. To accomplish this Los Alamos has proposed a magnetic collection system followed by a unique linear accelerator that provides the requisite phase-space bunching and allows an energy sweep to successively stop muons throughout a large structure such as a sea-going vessel. A possible maritime application would entail fitting the high-gradient accelerators on a large ship with a helicopter-borne detection system. We will describe our experimental results for muon effects and particle collection along with our current design and program for a muon detection system.

  13. Monte Carlo Modeling of Photon Interrogation Methods for Characterization of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara A; Downar, Thomas J; Padovani, Enrico; Clarke, Shaun D

    2006-01-01

    This work illustrates a methodology based on photon interrogation and coincidence counting for determining the characteristics of fissile material. The feasibility of the proposed methods was demonstrated using a Monte Carlo code system to simulate the full statistics of the neutron and photon field generated by the photon interrogation of fissile and non-fissile materials. Time correlation functions between detectors were simulated for photon beam-on and photon beam-off operation. In the latter case, the correlation signal is obtained via delayed neutrons from photofission, which induce further fission chains in the nuclear material. An analysis methodology was demonstrated based on features selected from the simulated correlation functions and on the use of artificial neural networks. We show that the methodology can reliably differentiate between highly enriched uranium and plutonium. Furthermore, the mass of the material can be determined with a relative error of about 12%. Keywords: MCNP, MCNP-PoliMi, Artificial neural network, Correlation measurement, Photofission

  14. Principles and status of neutron-based inspection technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi

    2011-06-01

    and energetically significantly different from the background, thus making them readily distinguishable. The penetrability of neutrons as probes and signatures as well as the gamma ray signatures make neutron interrogation applicable to the inspection of large conveyances such as cars, trucks, marine containers and also smaller objects like explosive mines concealed in the ground. The application of nuclear interrogation techniques greatly depends on operational requirements. For example explosive mines and IED detection clearly require one-sided inspection, which excludes transmission based inspection (e.g., transmission radiography) and greatly limits others. The technologies developed over the last decades are now being implemented with good results. Further advances have been made over the last several years that increase the sensitivity, applicability and robustness of these systems. The principle, applications and status of neutron-based inspection techniques will be reviewed.

  15. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui Hamilton, William A.; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Lee, Sung-Woo; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-14

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  16. Neutron intensity modulation and time-focusing with integrated Larmor and resonant frequency techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui; Hamilton, William A.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Robertson, J. L.; Crow, Lowell; Kang, Yoon W.

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of neutron diffraction experiments often assumes that neutrons are elastically scattered from the sample. However, there is growing evidence that a significant fraction of the detected neutrons is in fact inelastically scattered, especially from soft materials and aqueous samples. Ignoring these inelastic contributions gives rise to inaccurate experimental results. To date, there has been no simple method with broad applicability for inelastic signal separation in neutron diffraction experiments. Here, we present a simple and robust method that we believe could be suited for this purpose. We use two radio frequency resonant spin flippers integrated with a Larmor precession field to modulate the neutron intensity and to encode the inelastic scattering information into the neutron data. All three components contribute to the spin encoding. The Larmor field serves several additional purposes. Its usage facilitates neutron time-focusing, eliminates the need for stringent magnetic shielding, and allows for compact setups. The scheme is robust, simple, and flexible. We believe that, with further improvements, it has the potential of adding inelastic signal discrimination capabilities to many existing diffraction instruments in the future.

  17. The Use of Neutron Analysis Techniques for Detecting The Concentration And Distribution of Chloride Ions in Archaeological Iron

    PubMed Central

    Watkinson, D; Rimmer, M; Kasztovszky, Z; Kis, Z; Maróti, B; Szentmiklósi, L

    2014-01-01

    Chloride (Cl) ions diffuse into iron objects during burial and drive corrosion after excavation. Located under corrosion layers, Cl is inaccessible to many analytical techniques. Neutron analysis offers non-destructive avenues for determining Cl content and distribution in objects. A pilot study used prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and prompt gamma activation imaging (PGAI) to analyse the bulk concentration and longitudinal distribution of Cl in archaeological iron objects. This correlated with the object corrosion rate measured by oxygen consumption, and compared well with Cl measurement using a specific ion meter. High-Cl areas were linked with visible damage to the corrosion layers and attack of the iron core. Neutron techniques have significant advantages in the analysis of archaeological metals, including penetration depth and low detection limits. PMID:26028670

  18. New technique to improve the accuracy of albedo neutron dosimeter evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, D. E.

    The calibration factor for albedo neutron dosimeters varies greatly depending upon the energy of the neutrons in the exposure. Calibration results obtained over an eight-year period at each Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory facility where neutron exposure may occur were reviewed. A stronger relationship than expected was found between the ratio of the readings of the 9-in. to 3-in. spheres and the percent thermal. Readings from personnel and albedo badges were reviewed. The readings were consistent with the use of a calibration factor for the albedo dosimeter which varies with changes in the ratio of the personnel and albedo dosimeter TLD readings.

  19. Techniques for obtaining high vertical resolution formation capture cross sections from pulsed neutron logs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Wyatt, D.F. Jr.; Smith, M.P.

    1991-02-05

    This patent describes a method for measuring high vertical resolution earth formation thermal neutron capture cross sections of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole. It comprises repetitively emitting in a well borehole relatively short duration bursts of fast neutrons; detecting, as a function of depth, in the borehole during time intervals between the repetitive bursts of fast neutrons; filtering count rate signals to reduce statistical fluctuations in subsequent computations; combining at least two filtered count rate signals; selecting at least one of the at least two filtered gate count rate signals.

  20. New technique to improve the accuracy of albedo neutron dosimeter evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The calibration factor for albedo neutron dosimeters varies greatly depending upon the energy of the neutrons in the exposure. Calibration results obtained over an eight-year period at each Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory facility where neutron exposure may occur were reviewed. A stronger relationship than expected was found between the ratio of the readings of the 9-in. to 3-in. spheres and the percent thermal. Readings from personnel and albedo badges were reviewed. The readings were consistent with the use of a calibration factor for the albedo dosimeter which varies with changes in the ratio of the personnel and albedo dosimeter TLD readings. 2 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  1. High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-07-01

    Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations and

  2. Development of an instrument for non-destructive identification of Unexploded Ordnance using tagged neutrons - a proof of concept study

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.; Dioszegi, I.

    2011-10-23

    Range clearance operations at munitions testing grounds must discriminate Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) from clutter items and distinguish UXO filled with High Explosives (HE) from those with inert fillers. Non-destructive technologies are thus necessary for the cost-effective disposal of UXO during remediation of such sites. The only technique showing promise so far for the non-destructive elemental characterization of UXO fillers utilizes neutron interactions with the material to detect carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) which have unique ratios in HE. However, several unresolved issues hinder the wide application of this potentially very suitable technique. The most important one is that neutrons interact with all surrounding matter in addition to the interrogated material, leading to a very high gamma-ray background in the detector. Systems requiring bulky shielding and having poor signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for measuring elements are unsuitable for field deployment. The inadequacies of conventional neutron interrogation methods are overcome by using the tagged-neutron approach, and the availability of compact sealed neutron generators exploiting this technique offers field deployment of non-intrusive measurement systems for detecting threat materials, like explosives and drugs. By accelerating deuterium ions into a tritium target, the subsequent fusion reaction generates nearly back-to-back emissions of neutrons and alpha particles of energy 14.1 and 3.5 MeV respectively. A position-sensitive detector recognizes the associated alpha particle, thus furnishing the direction of the neutron. The tagged neutrons interact with the nuclei of the interrogated object, producing element-specific prompt gamma-rays that the gamma detectors recognize. Measuring the delay between the detections of the alpha particle and the gamma-ray determines where the reaction occurred along the axis of the neutron beam (14.1 MeV neutrons travel at 5 cm/nanosecond, while gamma rays

  3. Interrogating Racism in Qualitative Research Methodology. Counterpoints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Gerardo R., Ed.; Parker, Laurence, Ed.

    This book explores the link between critical race theory and qualitative research methodology, interrogating how race connects and conflicts with other areas of difference and is never entirely absent from the research process. After an introduction, "Critical Race Theory in Education: Theory, Praxis, and Recommendations" (Sylvia R. Lazos Vargas),…

  4. Investigation on using neutron counting techniques for online burnup monitoring of pebble bed reactor fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor. This project investigated the feasibility of using the passive neutron counting and active neutron/gamma counting for the on line fuel burnup measurement for MPBR. To investigate whether there is a correlation between neutron emission and fuel burnup, the MPBR fuel depletion was simulated under different irradiation conditions by ORIGEN2. It was found that the neutron emission from an irradiated pebble increases with burnup super-linearly and reaches to 104 neutron/sec/pebble at the discharge burnup. The photon emission from an irradiated pebble was found to be in the order of 1013 photon/sec/pebble at all burnup levels. Analysis shows that the neutron emission rate of an irradiated pebble is sensitive to its burnup history and the spectral-averaged one-group cross sections used in the depletion calculations, which consequently leads to large uncertainty in the correlation between neutron emission and burnup. At low burnup levels, the uncertainty in the neutron emission/burnup correlation is too high and the neutron emission rate is too low so that it is impossible to determine a pebble's burnup by on-line neutron counting at low burnup levels. At high burnup levels, the uncertainty in the neutron emission rate becomes less but is still large in quantity. However, considering the super-linear feature of the correlation, the uncertainty in burnup determination was found to be ˜7% at the discharge burnup, which is acceptable. Therefore, total neutron emission rate of a pebble can be used as a burnup indicator to determine whether a pebble should be discharged or not. The feasibility of using passive neutron counting methods for the on-line burnup measurement was investigated by using a general Monte Carlo code, MCNP, to assess the detectability of the neutron emission and the capability to discriminate gamma noise by commonly used neutron detectors. It was found that both He-3

  5. PREFACE: Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques Exploring surfaces and buried interfaces of functional materials by advanced x-ray and neutron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    This special issue is devoted to describing recent applications of x-ray and neutron scattering techniques to the exploration of surfaces and buried interfaces of various functional materials. Unlike many other surface-sensitive methods, these techniques do not require ultra high vacuum, and therefore, a variety of real and complicated surfaces fall within the scope of analysis. It must be particularly emphasized that the techniques are capable of seeing even buried function interfaces as well as the surface. Furthermore, the information, which ranges from the atomic to mesoscopic scale, is highly quantitative and reproducible. The non-destructive nature of the techniques is another important advantage of using x-rays and neutrons, when compared with other atomic-scale analyses. This ensures that the same specimen can be measured by other techniques. Such features are fairly attractive when exploring multilayered materials with nanostructures (dots, tubes, wires, etc), which are finding applications in electronic, magnetic, optical and other devices. The Japan Applied Physics Society has established a group to develop the research field of studying buried function interfaces with x-rays and neutrons. As the methods can be applied to almost all types of materials, from semiconductor and electronic devices to soft materials, participants have fairly different backgrounds but share a common interest in state-of-the-art x-ray and neutron techniques and sophisticated applications. A series of workshops has been organized almost every year since 2001. Some international interactions have been continued intensively, although the community is part of a Japanese society. This special issue does not report the proceedings of the recent workshop, although all the authors are in some way involved in the activities of the above society. Initially, we intended to collect quite long overview papers, including the authors' latest and most important original results, as well as

  6. Applicability of a Bonner Shere technique for pulsed neutron in 120 GeV proton facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sanami, T.; Hagiwara, M.; Iwase, H.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Arakawa, H.; Shigyo, N.; Leveling, A.F.; Boehnlein, D.J.; Vaziri, K.; /Fermilab

    2008-02-01

    The data on neutron spectra and intensity behind shielding are important for radiation safety design of high-energy accelerators since neutrons are capable of penetrating thick shielding and activating materials. Corresponding particle transport codes--that involve physics models of neutron and other particle production, transportation, and interaction--have been developed and used world-wide [1-8]. The results of these codes have been ensured through plenty of comparisons with experimental results taken in simple geometries. For neutron generation and transport, several related experiments have been performed to measure neutron spectra, attenuation length and reaction rates behind shielding walls of various thicknesses and materials in energy range up to several hundred of MeV [9-11]. The data have been used to benchmark--and modify if needed--the simulation modes and parameters in the codes, as well as the reference data for radiation safety design. To obtain such kind of data above several hundred of MeV, Japan-Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) collaboration for shielding experiments has been started in 2007, based on suggestion from the specialist meeting of shielding, Shielding Aspects of Target, Irradiation Facilities (SATIF), because of very limited data available in high-energy region (see, for example, [12]). As a part of this shielding experiment, a set of Bonner sphere (BS) was tested at the antiproton production target facility (pbar target station) at FNAL to obtain neutron spectra induced by a 120-GeV proton beam in concrete and iron shielding. Generally, utilization of an active detector around high-energy accelerators requires an improvement on its readout to overcome burst of secondary radiation since the accelerator delivers an intense beam to a target in a short period after relatively long acceleration period. In this paper, we employ BS for a spectrum measurement of neutrons that penetrate the shielding wall of the pbar target

  7. The multianalyser system of the three axes neutron spectrometer PUMA: Pilot experiments with the innovative multiplex technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Oleg; Hoffmann, Ron; Gibhardt, Holger; Jünke, Norbert; Knorr, Andreas; Meyer, Volker; Eckold, Götz

    2015-02-01

    A new type of multiplex technique for three axes neutron spectrometers has been realized and successfully commissioned at the PUMA spectrometer at FRM II. Consisting of eleven analyser-detector channels which can be configured individually, this technique is especially suitable for kinetic experiments where a single excitation spectrum is recorded as a function of time without the need to move the spectrometer. On a time-scale of seconds an entire spectrum can be recorded thus allowing users to monitor changes during fast kinetic processes in single shot experiments without the need for stroboscopic techniques. Moreover, the multianalyser system provides an efficient and rapid tool for mapping excitations in (Q,ω)-space. The results of pilot experiments demonstrate the performance of this new technique and a user-friendly software is presented which assists users during their experiments.

  8. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures From Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Norman; J. L. Jones; B. W. Blackburn; S. M. Watson; K. J. Haskell

    2006-08-01

    A pulsed photonuclear interrogation environment is rich with time-dependent, material specific, radiation signatures. Exploitation of these signatures in the delayed time regime (>1us after the photon flash) has been explored through various detection schemes to identify both shielded nuclear material and nitrogen-based explosives. Prompt emission may also be invaluable for these detection methods. Numerical and experimental results, which utilize specially modified neutron and HpGe detectors, are presented which illustrate the efficacy of utilizing these time-dependent signatures. Optimal selection of the appropriate delayed time window is essential to these pulsed inspection systems. For explosive (ANFO surrogate) detection, both numerical models and experimental results illustrate that nearly all 14N(n,y) reactions have occurred within l00 us after the flash. In contrast, however, gamma-ray and neutron signals for nuclear material detection require a delay of several milliseconds after the photon pulse. In this case, any data collected too close to the photon flash results in a spectrum dominated by high energy signals which make it difficult to discern signatures from nuclear material. Specifically, two short-lived, high-energy fission fragments (97Ag(T1/2=5.1 s) and 94Sr(T1/2=75.2 s)) were measured and identified as indicators of the presence of fissionable material. These developments demonstrate that a photon inspection environment can be exploited for time-dependent, material specific signatures through the proper operation of specially modified detectors.

  9. Neutron Compton scattering as a molecular characterization technique: A study on NaHF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Colognesi, D.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.

    2007-11-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments were performed at intermediate and high momentum transfers, up to 85-90 A ring {sup -1}, to study the proton momentum distribution in polycrystalline sodium hydrogen fluoride (NaHF{sub 2}) at low temperature (below 5 K). The H mean kinetic energy was extracted and compared to the results from hydrogen-projected density of phonon states derived from intermediate momentum transfer inelastic neutron scattering and lattice dynamics simulations. A reasonable agreement between the two figures was found. In addition, relevant aspects of high momentum transfer neutron scattering from NaHF{sub 2} were explored in detail, ranging from an alternative evaluation of final state effects to the role played by the instrumental resolution and to the possibility to reconstruct the potential felt by a proton from its momentum distribution.

  10. Techniques for the separation of neutron and gamma irradiations in thermoluminescent LiF

    SciTech Connect

    Abhold, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The light emission spectra from thermoluminescent LiF in the form of TLD-100 is investigated for irradiations from Cs-137 gammas, thermal neutrons, and Am-241 alphas. The light emission spectra for thermal neutron and Cs-137 gamma irradiations is observed to be identical over the spectral range from 300 nm to 660 nm. The spectral observed for Am-241 alpha irradiations exhibit an enhancement in the spectral region from 520 nm to 600 nm with respect to the gamma and thermal neutron irradiations. This enhancement is shown to be due to contaminants on the surface of the TLD most likely introduced by the standard cleansing rinse in Methanol. The design of a carbon dioxide laser heated TLD reader developed to observe the light emission spectrum of LiF is presented. The TLD reader is shown to exhibit excellent reproducibility in the heating rate, which allows for a repeatability in radiation dose measurements of less than two percent.

  11. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Response of Shielded SNM to a Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester

    2010-08-01

    Active interrogation (AI) has been used as a technique for the detection and identification of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) for both proposed and field-tested systems. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been studying this technique for systems ranging from small systems employing portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) 1 to larger systems employing linear accelerators as high-energy photon sources for assessment of vehicles and cargo2. In order to assess the feasibility of new systems, INL has undertaken a campaign of Monte Carlo simulations of the response of a variety of masses of SNM in multiple shielding configurations to a pulsed neutron source using the MCNPX3 code, with emphasis on the neutron and photon response of the system as a function of time after the initial neutron pulse. We present here some preliminary results from these calculations. 1. D.L. Chichester and E.H. Seabury, “ Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Nuclear Material,” IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science 56 (2009) pp 441-447. 2. J.L. Jones et al., “Photonuclear-based, nuclear material detection system for cargo containers,” Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 241 (2005) pp 770-776. 3. D.B. Pelowitz, “MCNPXTM User’s Manual version 2.6.0,” Los Alamos National Laboratory Report LA-CP-07-1473 (2008).

  12. A New Signal Processing Technique for Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement Based on Pulse Width Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katabuchi, T.; Matsuhashi, T.; Terada, K.; Mizumoto, M.; Hirose, K.; Kimura, A.; Furutaka, K.; Hara, K. Y.; Harada, H.; Hori, J.; Igashira, M.; Kamiyama, T.; Kitatani, F.; Kino, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Koizumi, M.; Nakamura, S.; Oshima, M.; Toh, Y.

    2014-05-01

    A fast data acquisition method based on pulse width analysis was developed for γ-ray spectroscopy with an NaI(Tl) detector. The new method was tested in experiments with standard γ-ray sources and pulsed neutron beam from a spallation neutron source. Pulse height spectra were successfully reconstructed from pulse width distribution by use of an energy calibration curve. The 197Au(n, γ)198Au cross section was measured by this method to test the viability. The obtained experimental cross section showed a good agreement with a calculation using the resonance parameters of JENDL-4.0.

  13. Programmable DNA Nanosystem for Molecular Interrogation

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Divita; Henderson, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a self-assembling DNA-based nanosystem for interrogating molecular interactions. The nanosystem contains a rigid supporting dumbbell-shaped frame, a cylindrical central core, and a mobile ring that is coaxial with the core. Motion of the ring is influenced by several control elements whose force-generating capability is based on the transition of single-stranded DNA to double-stranded DNA. These forces can be directed to act in opposition to adhesive forces between the ring and the frame thereby providing a mechanism for molecular detection and interrogation at the ring-frame interface. As proof of principle we use this system to evaluate base stacking adhesion and demonstrate detection of a soluble nucleic acid viral genome mimic. PMID:27270162

  14. Wirelessly Interrogated Position or Displacement Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2007-01-01

    Two simple position or displacement sensors based on inductance-capacitance resonant circuits have been conceived. These sensors are both powered and interrogated without use of wires and without making contact with other objects. Instead, excitation and interrogation are accomplished by means of a magnetic-field-response recorder. Both of the present position or displacement sensors consist essentially of variable rectangular parallel-plate capacitors electrically connected in series with fixed inductors. Simple inductance-capacitance circuits of the type used in these sensors are inherently robust; their basic mode of operation does not depend on maintenance of specific environmental conditions. Hence, these sensors can be used under such harsh conditions as cryogenic temperatures, high pressures, and radioactivity.

  15. Programmable DNA Nanosystem for Molecular Interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Divita; Henderson, Eric R.

    2016-06-01

    We describe a self-assembling DNA-based nanosystem for interrogating molecular interactions. The nanosystem contains a rigid supporting dumbbell-shaped frame, a cylindrical central core, and a mobile ring that is coaxial with the core. Motion of the ring is influenced by several control elements whose force-generating capability is based on the transition of single-stranded DNA to double-stranded DNA. These forces can be directed to act in opposition to adhesive forces between the ring and the frame thereby providing a mechanism for molecular detection and interrogation at the ring-frame interface. As proof of principle we use this system to evaluate base stacking adhesion and demonstrate detection of a soluble nucleic acid viral genome mimic.

  16. Wirelessly Interrogated Wear or Temperature Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2010-01-01

    Sensors for monitoring surface wear and/or temperature without need for wire connections have been developed. Excitation and interrogation of these sensors are accomplished by means of a magnetic-field-response recorder. In a sensor of the present type as in the previously reported ones, the capacitance and, thus, the resonance frequency, varies as a known function of the quantity of interest that one seeks to determine. Hence, the resonance frequency is measured and used to calculate the quantity of interest.

  17. Neutron Scattering Cross Section Measurements for 169Tm via the (n,n') Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Alimeti, Afrim; Kegel, Gunter H.R.; Egan, James J.; DeSimone, David J.; McKittrick, Thomas M.; Ji, Chuncheng; Tremblay, Steven E.; Roldan, Carlos; Chen Xudong; Kim, Don S.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron physics group at the University of Massachusetts Lowell (UML) has been involved in a program of scattering cross-section measurements for highly deformed nuclei such as 159Tb, 169Tm, 232Th, 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. Ko et al. have reported neutron inelastic scattering data from 169Tm for states above 100 keV via the (n,n'{gamma}) reaction at incident energies in the 0.2 MeV to 1.0 MeV range. In the present research, in which the time-of-flight method was employed, direct (n,n') measurements of neutrons scattered from 169Tm in the 0.2 to 1.0 MeV range were taken. It requires that our 5.5-MeV Van de Graaff accelerator be operated in the pulsed and bunched beam mode producing subnanosecond pulses at a 5-MHz repetition frequency. Neutrons are produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction using a thin metallic elemental lithium target.

  18. Laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) for chemical agent reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Richter, Dale A.; Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Lobb, C. T.; Kelly, Brian T.; Babnick, Robert D.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III

    2002-06-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a new technique which exploits Raman scattering to provide standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division is developing the LISA technology under a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command for incorporation on the Army's future reconnaissance vehicles. A field-engineered prototype LISA-Recon system is being designed to demonstrate on-the- move measurements of chemical contaminants. In this article, we will describe the LISA technique, data form proof-of- concept measurements, the LISA-Recon design, and some of the future realizations envisioned for military sensing applications.

  19. An Evaluation of "Miranda" Rights and Interrogation in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salseda, Lindsay M.; Dixon, Dennis R.; Fass, Tracy; Miora, Deborah; Leark, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The primary deficits present in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may lead to increased susceptibility to involvement in the criminal justice system. The same deficits may also cause individuals with ASD to be more vulnerable to interrogation techniques and other aspects of the legal system. Due to the increased level of vulnerability as well as…

  20. Interrogations, confessions, and adolescent offenders' perceptions of the legal system.

    PubMed

    Arndorfer, Andrea; Malloy, Lindsay C; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    The potential consequences of interrogations and false confessions have been discussed primarily in terms of the risk for wrongful conviction, especially among adolescents and other vulnerable populations. However, it is possible that such experiences influence adolescents' perceptions of the legal system more generally. In the present study, we examined whether incarcerated male juvenile offenders' (n = 193) perceptions of police and the courts were related to their confession and interrogation experiences. High-pressure interrogation experiences and self-reported false confessions to police were associated with more negative perceptions of police. However, self-reported true confessions were not significantly associated with youths' perceptions of the police. Neither interrogation nor confession experiences (true or false) were related to youths' perceptions of the courts. Results provide additional support for policy reform of interrogation practices with young suspects. A more developmentally appropriate approach to criminal interrogations with youth may simultaneously improve police-youth relations and protect vulnerable suspects in the interrogation room. PMID:26011040

  1. Split Hopkinson bar measurement using high-speed full-spectrum fiber Bragg grating interrogation.

    PubMed

    Seng, Frederick; Hackney, Drew; Goode, Tyler; Shumway, LeGrand; Hammond, Alec; Shoemaker, George; Pankow, Mark; Peters, Kara; Schultz, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The development and validation of a high-speed, full-spectrum measurement technique is described for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. A FBG is surface-mounted to a split-Hopkinson tensile bar specimen to induce high strain rates. The high strain gradients and large strains that indicate material failure are analyzed under high strain rates up to 500  s-1. The FBG is interrogated using a high-speed full-spectrum solid-state interrogator with a repetition rate of 100 kHz. The captured deformed spectra are analyzed for strain gradients using a default interior point algorithm in combination with the modified transfer matrix approach. This paper shows that by using high-speed full-spectrum interrogation of an FBG and the modified transfer matrix method, highly localized strain gradients and discontinuities can be measured without a direct line of sight. PMID:27607299

  2. An implantable pressure sensing system with electromechanical interrogation scheme.

    PubMed

    Kim, Albert; Powell, C R; Ziaie, Babak

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of an implantable pressure sensing system that is powered by mechanical vibrations in the audible acoustic frequency range. This technique significantly enhances interrogation range, alleviates the misalignment issues commonly encountered with inductive powering, and simplifies the external receiver circuitry. The interrogation scheme consists of two phases: a mechanical vibration phase and an electrical radiation phase. During the first phase, a piezoelectric cantilever acts as an acoustic receiver and charges a capacitor by converting sound vibration harmonics occurring at its resonant frequency into electrical power. In the subsequent electrical phase, when the cantilever is not vibrating, the stored electric charge is discharged across an LC tank whose inductor is pressure sensitive; hence, when the LC tank oscillates at its natural resonant frequency, it radiates a high-frequency signal that is detectable using an external receiver and its frequency corresponds to the measured pressure. The pressure sensitive inductor consists of a planar coil (single loop of wire) with a ferrite core whose distance to the coil varies with applied pressure. A prototype of the implantable pressure sensor is fabricated and tested, both in vitro and in vivo (swine bladder). A pressure sensitivity of 1 kHz/cm H2O is achieved with minimal misalignment sensitivity (26% drop at 90° misalignment between the implanted device and acoustic source; 60% drop at 90° misalignment between the implanted device and RF receiver coil). PMID:24800754

  3. FBG interrogation method based on wavelength-swept laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chuan; Zhao, Jianlin; Jiang, Biqiang; Rauf, Abdul; Wang, Donghui; Yang, Dexing

    2013-06-01

    Wavelength-swept laser technique is an active demodulation method which integrates laser source and detecting circuit together to achieve compact size. The method also has the advantages such as large demodulation range, high accuracy, and comparatively high speed. In this paper, we present a FBG interrogation method based on wavelength-swept Laser, in which an erbium-doped fiber is used as gain medium and connected by a WDM to form a ring cavity, a fiber FP tunable filter is inserted in the loop for choosing the laser frequency and a gas absorption cell is adopted as a frequency reference. The laser wavelength is swept by driving the FP filter. If the laser wavelength matches with that of FBG sensors, there will be some strong reflection peak signals. Detecting such signals with the transmittance signal after the gas absorption cell synchronously and analyzing them, the center wavelengths of the FBG sensors are calculated out at last. Here, we discuss the data processing method based on the frequency reference, and experimentally study the swept laser characteristics. Finally, we adopt this interrogator to demodulate FBG stress sensors. The results show that, the demodulation range almost covers C+L band, the resolution and accuracy can reach about 1pm or less and 5pm respectively. So it is very suitable for most FBG measurements.

  4. Vapor fraction measurements in a steam-water tube at up to 15 bar using neutron radiography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickstein, S. S.; Murphy, J. H.; Joo, H.

    1999-11-01

    Real-time neutron radiography has been used to study the dynamic behavior of two-phase flow and measure the time averaged vapor fraction in a heated metal tube containing boiling steam-water operating at up to 15 bar pressure. The neutron radiographic technique is non-intrusive and requires no special transparent window region. This is the first time this technique has been used in an electrically heated pressurized flow loop. This unique experimental method offers the opportunity to observe and record on videotape, flow patterns and transient behavior of two-phase flow inside opaque containers without disturbing the environment. In this study the test sections consisted of stainless steel tubes with a 1.27 cm outer diameter and wall thicknesses of 0.084 and 0.124 cm. The experiments were carried out at the Pennsylvania State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor facility utilizing a Precise Optics neutron radiography camera. The inlet water temperature to the test section was varied between 120°C and 170°C and the flow rate set to 2.3 l/min. Tsat is 200°C at these conditions. The tube was resistively heated by passing high currents (˜1000 A) through the stainless steel wall. Scattering due to water in the ˜1 cm tube is significant and Monte Carlo calculations simulating the experiment were made to correct for this effect on the vapor fraction measurement. Details of the experimental technique, methods for analyzing the data and the results of the experiments are discussed.

  5. Development and application of a hybrid transport methodology for active interrogation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Royston, K.; Walters, W.; Haghighat, A.; Yi, C.; Sjoden, G.

    2013-07-01

    A hybrid Monte Carlo and deterministic methodology has been developed for application to active interrogation systems. The methodology consists of four steps: i) neutron flux distribution due to neutron source transport and subcritical multiplication; ii) generation of gamma source distribution from (n, 7) interactions; iii) determination of gamma current at a detector window; iv) detection of gammas by the detector. This paper discusses the theory and results of the first three steps for the case of a cargo container with a sphere of HEU in third-density water cargo. To complete the first step, a response-function formulation has been developed to calculate the subcritical multiplication and neutron flux distribution. Response coefficients are pre-calculated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code. The second step uses the calculated neutron flux distribution and Bugle-96 (n, 7) cross sections to find the resulting gamma source distribution. In the third step the gamma source distribution is coupled with a pre-calculated adjoint function to determine the gamma current at a detector window. The AIMS (Active Interrogation for Monitoring Special-Nuclear-Materials) software has been written to output the gamma current for a source-detector assembly scanning across a cargo container using the pre-calculated values and taking significantly less time than a reference MCNP5 calculation. (authors)

  6. Development of techniques for the neutron radiography of CF188 flight control surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, L. G. I.; Bickerton, M. L.; Lewis, W. J.

    1999-11-01

    A neutron radiography facility previously installed on the SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada has been used to gain experience with the inspection of flight control surfaces from the CF188 fighter aircraft. Through operating the facility in a temporary manner in terms of handling and shielding for this application, over 500 radiographs were made for more than three aircraft. Moisture and corrosion were discovered in the honeycomb structure and hydration was found in the composite and adhesive layers. The experience also indicated a need to characterize the neutron beam, to decrease the exposure time by finding a faster film and conversion screen combination, and to develop a gauge to evaluate the moisture trapped in the honeycomb cells of flight control surfaces.

  7. Optimization of combined delayed neutron and differential die-away prompt neutron signal detection for characterization of spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Pauline; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen; Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, M; Lee, T

    2010-12-02

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded multiple laboratories and universities to develop a means to accurately quantify the Plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and ways to also detect potential diversion of fuel pins. Delayed Neutron (DN) counting provides a signature somewhat more sensitive to {sup 235}U than Pu while Differential Die-Away (DDA) is complementary in that it has greater sensitivity to Pu. The two methods can, with care, be combined into a single instrument which also provides passive neutron information. Individually the techniques cannot robustly quantify the Pu content but coupled together the information content in the signatures enables Pu quantification separate to the total fissile content. The challenge of merging DN and DDA, prompt neutron (PN) signal, capabilities in the same design is the focus of this paper. Other possibilities also suggest themselves, such as a direct measurement of the reactivity (multiplication) by either the boost in signal obtained during the active interrogation itself or by the extension of the die-away profile. In an early study, conceptual designs have been modeled using a neutron detector comprising fission chambers or 3He proportional counters and a {approx}14 MeV neutron Deuterium-Tritium (DT) generator as the interrogation source. Modeling was performed using the radiation transport code Monte Carlo N-Particles eXtended (MCNPX). Building on this foundation, the present paper quantifies the capability of a new design using an array of {sup 3}He detectors together with fission chambers to optimize both DN and PN detections and active characterization, respectively. This new design was created in order to minimize fission in {sup 238}U (a nuisance DN emitter), to use a realistic neutron generator, to reduce the cost and to achieve near spatial interrogation and detection of the DN and PN, important for detection of diversion, all within

  8. RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Pogge, James R; Zhukov, Alexander P

    2010-01-01

    Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

  9. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Bingham, Philip R; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Carmichael, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  10. A replica technique for extracting precipitates from neutron-irradiated or thermal-aged vanadium alloys for TEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, K.; Iwasaki, M.

    2014-06-01

    A carbon replica technique has been developed to extract precipitates from vanadium alloys. Using this technique, precipitation phases can be extracted from neutron-irradiated or thermal-aged V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. Precipitate identification using EDS X-ray analysis and electron diffraction was facilitated. Only NaCl type of Ti(OCN) precipitate was formed in the thermal-aged V-4Cr-4Ti alloys at 600 °C for 20 h and cation sub-lattice was only occupied by Ti atoms. However, the thin plate of precipitates with NaCl type of crystallographic structure could be seen in the V-4Cr-4Ti alloys irradiated at 593 °C in the JOYO fast reactor. The precipitate contained chromium and vanadium atoms on the cation sub-lattice as well as titanium atoms. It is considered that the phase of MX type (M = Ti, V, Cr and X = O, N, C) is a metastable phase under neutron irradiation.

  11. Photoneutron interrogation of low-enriched uranium induced by bremsstrahlung from a 4 MeV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakosi, L.; Tam Nguyen, C.; Bagi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Revealing smuggled nuclear material by passive γ-detection is hindered, because the weak radiation can easily be shielded. Neutrons, as penetrate shielding, represent a detection potential, by inducing fission in the nuclear material. A 4 MeV linear accelerator was used as a pulsed neutron source for active interrogation of U-bearing material. Produced in heavy water by bremsstrahlung, neutrons subsequently induced fissions in UO2 samples. Delayed fission neutrons were detected in a neutron collar built up by 3He counters in a polyamide container. The counters were gated to be detached from high voltage during the electron pulse. Irradiation-measurement cycles were carried out with a 25 Hz pulse repetition rate as optimum setting. The time analyser start-up was externally triggered and synchronised by the electron beam pulse. The response of the system was studied as a function of the intensity of the electron current, the amount of heavy water, U enrichment, and total U content. Sensitivity limit was achieved as 0.5 g 235U and/or 30 g 238U in a 20 s measurement time (500 cycles) with the amount of heavy water of 100 g and a mean electron current of 2 μA. Because of the long decay time of the prompt (interrogating and fission) neutron pulse, about a half of the time interval (40 ms) between pulses is only available for counting delayed neutrons.

  12. Predicting fissile content of spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique and Monte Carlo code emulation

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-10-13

    There is a great need in the safeguards community to be able to nondestructively quantify the mass of plutonium of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. As part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative, we are investigating several techniques, or detector systems, which, when integrated, will be capable of quantifying the plutonium mass of a spent fuel assembly without dismantling the assembly. This paper reports on the simulation of one of these techniques, the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity with Fission Chambers (PNAR-FC) system. The response of this system over a wide range of spent fuel assemblies with different burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time characteristics is shown. A Monte Carlo method of using these modeled results to estimate the fissile content of a spent fuel assembly has been developed. A few numerical simulations of using this method are shown. Finally, additional developments still needed and being worked on are discussed.

  13. Linear Accelerator-Based Active Interrogation For Detection of Highly Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Goulding, C.A.; Hollas, C.L.; Myers, W.L.

    2003-08-26

    Photofissions were induced in samples of highly enriched uranium (HEU) with masses up to 22 kg using bremsstrahlung photons from a pulsed 10-MeV electron linear accelerator (linac). Neutrons were detected between pulses by large 3He detectors, and the data were analyzed with the Feynman variance-to-mean method. The effects of shielding materials, such as lead and polyethylene, and the variation of the counting rate with distance for several configurations were measured. For comparison, a beryllium block was inserted in the beam to produce neutrons that were also used for interrogation. Because both high-energy photons and neutrons are very penetrating, both approaches can be used to detect shielded HEU; the choice of approach depends on the details of the configuration and the shielding.

  14. Detection of illicit HEU production in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants using neutron counting techniques on product cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Corey R; Geist, William H

    2010-01-01

    Innovative and novel safeguards approaches are needed for nuclear energy to meet global energy needs without the threat of nuclear weapons proliferation. Part of these efforts will include creating verification techniques that can monitor uranium enrichment facilities for illicit production of highly-enriched uranium (HEU). Passive nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques will be critical in preventing illicit HEU production because NDA offers the possibility of continuous and unattended monitoring capabilities with limited impact on facility operations. Gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) are commonly used to produce low-enriched uranium (LEU) for reactor fuel. In a GCEP, gaseous UF{sub 6} spins at high velocities in centrifuges to separate the molecules containing {sup 238}U from those containing the lighter {sup 235}U. Unfortunately, the process for creating LEU is inherently the same as HEU, creating a proliferation concern. Insuring that GCEPs are producing declared enrichments poses many difficult challenges. In a GCEP, large cascade halls operating thousands of centrifuges work together to enrich the uranium which makes effective monitoring of the cascade hall economically prohibitive and invasive to plant operations. However, the enriched uranium exiting the cascade hall fills product cylinders where the UF{sub 6} gas sublimes and condenses for easier storage and transportation. These product cylinders hold large quantities of enriched uranium, offering a strong signal for NDA measurement. Neutrons have a large penetrability through materials making their use advantageous compared to gamma techniques where the signal is easily attenuated. One proposed technique for detecting HEU production in a GCEP is using neutron coincidence counting at the product cylinder take off stations. This paper discusses findings from Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code simulations that examine the feasibility of such a detector.

  15. Biopolymer deuteration for neutron scattering and other isotope-sensitive techniques.

    PubMed

    Russell, Robert A; Garvey, Christopher J; Darwish, Tamim A; Foster, L John R; Holden, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The use of microbial biosynthesis to produced deuterated recombinant proteins is a well-established practice in investigations of the relationship between molecular structure and function using neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. However, there have been few reports of using microbial synthetic capacity to produce labeled native biopolymers. Here, we describe methods for the production of deuterated polyhydroxyalkanoate biopolyesters in bacteria, the polysaccharide chitosan in the yeast Pichia pastoris, and cellulose in the bacterium Gluconacetobacter xylinus. The resulting molecules offer not only multiple options in creating structural contrast in polymer blends and composites in structural studies but also insight into the biosynthetic pathways themselves. PMID:26577729

  16. Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA): A Nondestructive Assay Technique for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative’s Plutonium Assay Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

    2010-12-01

    This is an end-of-year report for a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The first-year goals for this project were modest and included: 1) developing a zero-order MCNP model for the NRTA technique, simulating data results presented in the literature, 2) completing a preliminary set of studies investigating important design and performance characteristics for the NRTA measurement technique, and 3) documentation of this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes a nine month period of work.

  17. Adaptive dynamic FBG interrogation utilising erbium-doped fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, R. N.; Read, I.; MacPherson, W. N.

    2013-04-01

    A dynamic fibre Bragg grating interrogation scheme is investigated using two-wave mixing in erbium-doped fibre, capable of adapting to quasistatic strain and temperature drifts. An interference pattern set up in the erbium-doped fibre creates, due to the photorefractive effect, a dynamic grating capable of wavelength demodulating the FBG signal. The presence of a dynamic grating was verified and then dynamic strain signals from a fibre stretcher were measured. The adaptive nature of the technique was successfully demonstrated by heating the FBG while it underwent dynamic straining leading to detection unlike an alternative arrayed waveguide grating system which simultaneously failed detection. Two gratings were then wavelength division multiplexed with the signal grating receiving approximately 30dB greater signal showing that there was little cross talk in the system.

  18. Simultaneous interrogation of interferometric and Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, G.; Kalli, K.; Webb, D. J.; Jackson, D. A.; Reekie, L.; Archambault, J. L.

    1995-06-01

    We propose a new method for the simultaneous interrogation of conventional two-beam interferometers and Bragg grating sensors. The technique employs an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer illuminated by a single low-coherence source, which acts as a wavelength-tunable source for the grating and as a path-matched filter for the Fizeau interferometer, thus providing a high phase resolution output for each sensor. The grating sensor demonstrates a dynamic strain resolution of \\similar 0.05 mu 3 / \\radical Hz \\end-radical at 20 Hz, while the interferometric phase resolution is better than 1mrad/ \\radical Hz \\end-radical at 20 Hz, corresponding to an rms mirror displacement of 0.08 nm.

  19. The hydration structure of a Z-DNA hexameric duplex determined by a neutron diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Umino, Hisao; Arai, Shigeki; Niimura, Nobuo

    2005-08-01

    In order to reveal the hydration structure of Z-DNA, a neutron diffraction study has been carried out at 1.8 A resolution on a Z-DNA hexamer d(CGCGCG). Neutron diffraction data were collected with the BIX-3 single-crystal diffractometer at the JRR-3 reactor in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using a large crystal (1.6 mm3) obtained from D2O solution. It has been found that almost all the guanine bases have participated in H/D exchange at the C8-H8 group, consistent with the acidic nature of this bond. 44 water molecules were found in the nuclear density maps, of which 29 showed the entire contour of all three atoms (D-O-D). The remaining 15 water molecules had a simple spherical shape, indicating that they were rotationally disordered. An interesting relationship was found between the orientational disorder of the water molecules and their locations. Almost all water molecules in the minor groove were well ordered in the crystal, while 40% of the water molecules in the major groove were rotationally disordered. The hydrogen-bonding networks in the hydration shells have two structural aspects: flexibility and regularity. PMID:16041074

  20. Phase Concentration Determination of Fe16N2 Using State of the Art Neutron Scattering Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. P.; Feygenson, M.; Jiang, Y.; Zande, B. J.; Zhang, X.; Sankar, S. G.; Wang, J. P.; Lauter, V.

    2016-03-01

    Due to limitations on the availability of rare earth elements it is imperative that new high energy product rare earth free permanent magnet materials are developed for the next generation of energy systems. One promising low cost permanent magnet candidate for a high energy magnet is α″-Fe16N2, whose giant magnetic moment has been predicted to be well above any other from conventional first principles calculations. Despite its great promise, the α″ phase is metastable; making synthesis of the pure phase difficult, resulting in less than ideal magnetic characteristics. This instability gives way to a slew of possible secondary phases (i.e. α-Fe, Fe2O3, Fe8N, Fe4N, etc.) whose concentrations are difficult to detect by conventional x-ray diffraction. Here we show how high resolution neutron diffraction and polarized neutron reflectometry can be used to extract the phase concentration ratio of the giant magnetic phase from ultra-small powder sample sizes (~0.1 g) and thin films. These studies have led to the discovery of promising fabrication methods for both homogeneous thin films, and nanopowders containing the highest reported to date (>95%) phase concentrations of room temperature stable α″-Fe16N2.

  1. Phase Concentration Determination of Fe16N2 Using State of the Art Neutron Scattering Techniques

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bennett, S. P.; Feygenson, M.; Jiang, Y.; Zande, B. J.; Zhang, X.; Sankar, S. G.; Wang, J. P.; Lauter, V.

    2016-03-25

    Limitation on the availability of rare earth elements have made it imperative that new high energy product rare earth free permanent magnet materials are developed for the next generation of energy systems. One promising low cost permanent magnet candidate for a high energy magnet is -Fe16N2, whose giant magnetic moment has been predicted to be well above any other from conventional first principles calculations. Despite its great promise, the phase is metastable; making synthesis of the pure phase difficult, resulting in less than ideal magnetic characteristics. This instability gives way to a slew of possible secondary phases (i.e. -Fe, Fe2O3,more » Fe8N, Fe4N ) whose concentrations are difficult to detect by conventional x-ray diffraction. Moreover, we show how high resolution neutron diffraction and polarized neutron reflectometry can be used to extract the phase concentration ratio of the giant magnetic phase from ultra-small powder sample sizes (~0.1g) and thin films. These studies have led to the discovery of promising fabrication methods for both homogeneous thin films, and nanopowders containing the highest reported to date (>95%) phase concentrations of room temperature stable -Fe16N2.« less

  2. Phase Concentration Determination of Fe16N2 Using State of the Art Neutron Scattering Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. P.; Feygenson, M.; Jiang, Y.; Zande, B. J.; Zhang, X.; Sankar, S. G.; Wang, J. P.; Lauter, V.

    2016-06-01

    Due to limitations on the availability of rare earth elements it is imperative that new high energy product rare earth free permanent magnet materials are developed for the next generation of energy systems. One promising low cost permanent magnet candidate for a high energy magnet is α″-Fe16N2, whose giant magnetic moment has been predicted to be well above any other from conventional first principles calculations. Despite its great promise, the α″ phase is metastable; making synthesis of the pure phase difficult, resulting in less than ideal magnetic characteristics. This instability gives way to a slew of possible secondary phases (i.e. α-Fe, Fe2O3, Fe8N, Fe4N, etc.) whose concentrations are difficult to detect by conventional x-ray diffraction. Here we show how high resolution neutron diffraction and polarized neutron reflectometry can be used to extract the phase concentration ratio of the giant magnetic phase from ultra-small powder sample sizes (~0.1 g) and thin films. These studies have led to the discovery of promising fabrication methods for both homogeneous thin films, and nanopowders containing the highest reported to date (>95%) phase concentrations of room temperature stable α″-Fe16N2.

  3. In vivo monitoring of toxic metals: assessment of neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    To date, cadmium, lead, aluminum, and mercury have been measured in vivo in humans. The possibilities of monitoring other toxic metals have also been demonstrated, but no human studies have been performed. Neutron activation analysis appears to be most suitable for Cd and Al measurements, while x-ray fluorescence is ideally suited for measurement of lead in superficial bone. Filtered neutron beams and polarized x-ray sources are being developed which will improve in vivo detection limits. Even so, several of the current facilities are already suitable for use in epidemiological studies of selected populations with suspected long-term low-level ''environmental'' exposures. Evaluation and diagnosis of patients presenting with general clinical symptoms attributable to possible toxic metal exposure may be assisted by in vivo examination. Continued in vivo monitoring of industrial workers, especially follow-up measurements, will provide the first direct assessment of changes in body burden and a direct measure of the biological life-times of these metals in humans. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Resolution-improved in situ DNA hybridization detection based on microwave photonic interrogation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Guo, Tuan; Wang, Xudong; Sun, Dandan; Ran, Yang; Feng, Xinhuan; Guan, Bai-ou

    2015-10-19

    In situ bio-sensing system based on microwave photonics filter (MPF) interrogation method with improved resolution is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A microfiber Bragg grating (mFBG) is used as sensing probe for DNA hybridization detection. Different from the traditional wavelength monitoring technique, we use the frequency interrogation scheme for resolution-improved bio-sensing detection. Experimental results show that the frequency shift of MPF notch presents a linear response to the surrounding refractive index (SRI) change over the range of 1.33 to 1.38, with a SRI resolution up to 2.6 × 10(-5) RIU, which has been increased for almost two orders of magnitude compared with the traditional fundamental mode monitoring technique (~3.6 × 10(-3) RIU). Due to the high Q value (about 27), the whole process of DNA hybridization can be in situ monitored. The proposed MPF-based bio-sensing system provides a new interrogation method over the frequency domain with improved sensing resolution and rapid interrogation rate for biochemical and environmental measurement. PMID:26480367

  5. Determining fissile content in PWR spent fuel assemblies using a passive neutron Albedo reactivity with fission chambers technique

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    State regulatory bodies and organizations such as the IAEA that are concerned with preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons are interested in a means of quantifying the amount of plutonium in a given spent fuel assembly. The complexity of spent nuclear fuel makes the measurement of plutonium content challenging. There are a variety of techniques that can measure various properties of spent nuclear fuel including burnup, and mass of fissile content. No single technique can provide all desired information, necessitating an approach using multiple detector systems and types. This paper presents our analysis of the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity Fission Chamber (PNAR-FC) detector system. PNAR-FC is a simplified version of the PNAR technique originally developed in 1997. This earlier research was performed with a high efficiency, {sup 3}He-based system (PNAR-3He) with which multiplicty analysis was performed. With the PNAR technique a portion of the spent fuel assembly is wrapped in a 1 mm thick cadmium liner. Neutron count rates are measured both with and without the cadmium liner present. The ratio of the count rate with the cadmium liner to the count rate without the cadmium liner is calculated and called the cadmium ratio. In the PNAR-3He technique, multiplicity measurements were made and the cadmium ratio was shown to scale with the fissile content of the material being measured. PNAR-FC simplifies the PNAR technique by using only a few fission chambers instead of many {sup 3}He tubes. Using a simplified PNAR-FC technique provides for a cheaper, lighter, and thus more portable detector system than was possible with the PNAR-3He system. The challenge with the PNAR-FC system are two-fold: (1) the change in the cadmium ratio is weaker as a afunction of the changing fissile content relative to multiplicity count rates, and (2) the efficiency for the fission chamber based system are poorer than for the {sup 3}He based detectors. In this paper, we present our

  6. Performance of a Compact Gamma Tube Interrogation Source

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael J.; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Morse, Dan H.; Raber, Thomas N.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Doyle, Barney L.

    2009-03-10

    Active interrogation with high-energy monoenergetic gammas can induce photofission signals in fissile materials while minimizing absorbed radiation dose and background from surrounding materials. A first-generation axial-type gamma generator has been developed that utilizes the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction at a 163 keV resonance to produce monoenergetic 12-MeV gamma-rays. The gamma tube employs a water-cooled cylindrical radio frequency (if) induction ion source capable of producing a proton current density of up to 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. The extracted proton beam bombards a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) target at energies up to 200 keV. The 12-MeV gamma intensity was measured as a function of proton energy, beam current, and angle. Photofission-induced neutrons from depleted uranium (DU) were measured and compared to MCNPX calculations. After extended operation, the high power density of the proton beam was observed to cause damage to the LaB{sub 6} target and the gamma tube improvements currently being made to mitigate this damage are discussed.

  7. Combined Photoneutron And X Ray Interrogation Of Containers For Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, Tsahi; Shaw, Timothy; King, Michael J.; Stevenson, John; Elsalim, Mashal; Brown, Craig; Condron, Cathie

    2011-06-01

    Effective cargo inspection systems for nuclear material detection require good penetration by the interrogating radiation, generation of a sufficient number of fissions, and strong and penetrating detection signatures. Inspection systems need also to be sensitive over a wide range of cargo types and densities encountered in daily commerce. Thus they need to be effective with highly hydrogenous cargo, where neutron attenuation is a major limitation, as well as with dense metallic cargo, where x-ray penetration is low. A system that interrogates cargo with both neutrons and x-rays can, in principle, achieve high performance over the widest range of cargos. Moreover, utilizing strong prompt-neutron ({approx}3 per fission) and delayed-gamma ray ({approx}7 per fission) signatures further strengthens the detection sensitivity across all cargo types. The complementary nature of x-rays and neutrons, used as both probing radiation and detection signatures, alleviates the need to employ exceedingly strong sources, which would otherwise be required to achieve adequate performance across all cargo types, if only one type of radiation probe were employed. A system based on the above principles, employing a commercially-available 9 MV linac was developed and designed. Neutrons are produced simultaneously with x-rays by the photonuclear interaction of the x-ray beam with a suitable converter. A total neutron yield on the order of 10{sup 11} n/s is achieved with an average electron beam current of 100 {mu}A. If fissionable material is present, fissions are produced both by the high-energy x-ray beam and by the photoneutrons. Photofission and neutron fission dominate in hydrogenous and metallic cargos, respectively. Neutron-capture gamma rays provide information on the cargo composition. The prompt neutrons resulting from fission are detected by two independent detector systems: by very efficient Differential Die Away Analysis (DDAA) detectors, and by direct detection of neutrons

  8. Measurement of θ 13 in Double Chooz using neutron captures on hydrogen with novel background rejection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Y.; Appel, S.; Abrahão, T.; Almazan, H.; Alt, C.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Barriere, J. C.; Baussan, E.; Bekman, I.; Bergevin, M.; Bezerra, T. J. C.; Bezrukov, L.; Blucher, E.; Brugière, T.; Buck, C.; Busenitz, J.; Cabrera, A.; Camilleri, L.; Carr, R.; Cerrada, M.; Chauveau, E.; Chimenti, P.; Collin, A. P.; Conrad, J. M.; Crespo-Anadón, J. I.; Crum, K.; Cucoanes, A. S.; Damon, E.; Dawson, J. V.; Dhooghe, J.; Dietrich, D.; Djurcic, Z.; Dracos, M.; Etenko, A.; Fallot, M.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Felde, J.; Fernandes, S. M.; Fischer, V.; Franco, D.; Franke, M.; Furuta, H.; Gil-Botella, I.; Giot, L.; Göger-Neff, M.; Gomez, H.; Gonzalez, L. F. G.; Goodenough, L.; Goodman, M. C.; Haag, N.; Hara, T.; Haser, J.; Hellwig, D.; Hofmann, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Hourlier, A.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jochum, J.; Jollet, C.; Kaether, F.; Kalousis, L. N.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaneda, M.; Kaplan, D. M.; Kawasaki, T.; Kemp, E.; de Kerret, H.; Kryn, D.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lane, C. E.; Lasserre, T.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Lima, H. P.; Lindner, M.; López-Castaño, J. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lucht, S.; Maeda, J.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Martino, J.; Matsubara, T.; Mention, G.; Meregaglia, A.; Miletic, T.; Milincic, R.; Minotti, A.; Nagasaka, Y.; Navas-Nicolás, D.; Novella, P.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Onillon, A.; Osborn, A.; Palomares, C.; Pepe, I. M.; Perasso, S.; Porta, A.; Pronost, G.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reinhold, B.; Röhling, M.; Roncin, R.; Rybolt, B.; Sakamoto, Y.; Santorelli, R.; Schilithz, A. C.; Schönert, S.; Schoppmann, S.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Sharankova, R.; Shrestha, D.; Sibille, V.; Sinev, V.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smith, E.; Soiron, M.; Spitz, J.; Stahl, A.; Stancu, I.; Stokes, L. F. F.; Strait, M.; Suekane, F.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sun, Y.; Svoboda, R.; Terao, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Thi, H. H. Trinh; Valdiviesso, G.; Vassilopoulos, N.; Veyssiere, C.; Vivier, M.; Wagner, S.; Walsh, N.; Watanabe, H.; Wiebusch, C.; Wurm, M.; Yang, G.; Yermia, F.; Zimmer, V.

    2016-01-01

    The Double Chooz collaboration presents a measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ 13 using reactor overline{νe} observed via the inverse beta decay reaction in which the neutron is captured on hydrogen. This measurement is based on 462.72 live days data, approximately twice as much data as in the previous such analysis, collected with a detector positioned at an average distance of 1050 m from two reactor cores. Several novel techniques have been developed to achieve significant reductions of the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties. Accidental coincidences, the dominant background in this analysis, are suppressed by more than an order of magnitude with respect to our previous publication by a multi-variate analysis. These improvements demonstrate the capability of precise measurement of reactor overline{νe} without gadolinium loading. Spectral distortions from the overline{νe} reactor flux predictions previously reported with the neutron capture on gadolinium events are confirmed in the independent data sample presented here. A value of sin2 2 θ 13 = 0.095 - 0.039 + 0.038 (stat+syst) is obtained from a fit to the observed event rate as a function of the reactor power, a method insensitive to the energy spectrum shape. A simultaneous fit of the hydrogen capture events and of the gadolinium capture events yields a measurement of sin2 2 θ 13 = 0 .088 ± 0 .033(stat+syst). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  10. Study of deep level characteristics in the neutrons irradiated Si structures by combining pulsed and steady-state spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Kalendra, V.; Ceponis, T.; Uleckas, A.; Tekorius, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Velicka, A.

    2012-11-01

    The standard methods, such as capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (C-DLTS) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques are unsuitable for the analysis of heavily irradiated devices. In this work, therefore, several steady-state and pulsed techniques have been combined to comprehensively evaluate parameters of radiation defects and functional characteristics of the irradiated Si pin detectors. In order to understand defects created by radiation and evaluate their evolution with fluence, C-DLTS and TSC techniques have been employed to make a baseline identification of the radiation induced traps after irradiation with a rather small neutron fluence of 1012 cm-2. The steady-state photo-ionization spectroscopy (PIS) technique has been involved to correlate thermal- and photo- activation energies for definite radiation defects. A contactless technique for simultaneous measurements of the carrier lifetime and the parameters of deep levels based on microwave probed pulsed photo-conductivity (MW-PC) spectroscopy has been applied to correlate carrier capture cross-sections and densities of the identified different radiation defects. A technique for spectroscopy of deep levels in junction structures (BELIV) based on measurements of barrier capacitance charging current transient changes due to additional spectrally resolved pulsed illumination has been applied to evaluate the functional characteristics of the irradiated diodes. Pulsed spectroscopic measurements were implemented by combining the analysis of generation current and of barrier capacitance charging transients modified by a single fs pulse of illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator of varied wavelength in the range from 0.5 to 10 μm. Several deep levels with activation energy in the range of 0.18-0.8 eV have been resolved from spectral analysis in the samples of Si grown by magnetic field applied Czochralski (MCz) technology.

  11. Fissile interrogation using gamma rays from oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Donald; Micklich, Bradley J.; Fessler, Andreas

    2004-04-20

    The subject apparatus provides a means to identify the presence of fissionable material or other nuclear material contained within an item to be tested. The system employs a portable accelerator to accelerate and direct protons to a fluorine-compound target. The interaction of the protons with the fluorine-compound target produces gamma rays which are directed at the item to be tested. If the item to be tested contains either a fissionable material or other nuclear material the interaction of the gamma rays with the material contained within the test item with result in the production of neutrons. A system of neutron detectors is positioned to intercept any neutrons generated by the test item. The results from the neutron detectors are analyzed to determine the presence of a fissionable material or other nuclear material.

  12. Direct Mass Measurements in the Light Neutron-Rich Region Using a Combined Energy and Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, C.; Swenson, L. W.; Vieira, D. J.; Butler, G. W.; Wouters, J. M.; Rokni, S. H.; Vaziri, K.; Remsberg, L. P.

    This experiment has demonstrated that direct mass measurements can be performed (albeit of low precision in this first attempt) using the M proportional to ET(2) method. This technique has the advantage that many particle-bound nuclei, produced in fragmentation reactions can be measured simultaneously, independent of their N or Z. The main disadvantage of this approach is that both energy and time-of-flight must be measured precisely on an absolute scale. Although some mass walk with N and Z was observed in this experiment, these uncertainties were largely removed by extrapolating the smooth dependence observed for known nuclei which lie closer to the valley of (BETA)-stability. Mass measurements for several neutron-rich light nuclei ranging from C-17 to NE-26 have been performed. In all cases these measurements agree with the latest mass compilation of Wapstra and Audi. The masses of N-20 N and F-24 have been determined for the first time.

  13. Direct assignment of molecular vibrations via normal mode analysis of the neutron dynamic pair distribution function technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fry-Petit, A. M. E-mail: afry@fullerton.edu; Sheckelton, J. P.; McQueen, T. M. E-mail: afry@fullerton.edu; Rebola, A. F.; Fennie, C. J.; Mourigal, M.; Valentine, M.; Drichko, N.

    2015-09-28

    For over a century, vibrational spectroscopy has enhanced the study of materials. Yet, assignment of particular molecular motions to vibrational excitations has relied on indirect methods. Here, we demonstrate that applying group theoretical methods to the dynamic pair distribution function analysis of neutron scattering data provides direct access to the individual atomic displacements responsible for these excitations. Applied to the molecule-based frustrated magnet with a potential magnetic valence-bond state, LiZn{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 8}, this approach allows direct assignment of the constrained rotational mode of Mo{sub 3}O{sub 13} clusters and internal modes of MoO{sub 6} polyhedra. We anticipate that coupling this well known data analysis technique with dynamic pair distribution function analysis will have broad application in connecting structural dynamics to physical properties in a wide range of molecular and solid state systems.

  14. Direct assignment of molecular vibrations via normal mode analysis of the neutron dynamic pair distribution function technique.

    PubMed

    Fry-Petit, A M; Rebola, A F; Mourigal, M; Valentine, M; Drichko, N; Sheckelton, J P; Fennie, C J; McQueen, T M

    2015-09-28

    For over a century, vibrational spectroscopy has enhanced the study of materials. Yet, assignment of particular molecular motions to vibrational excitations has relied on indirect methods. Here, we demonstrate that applying group theoretical methods to the dynamic pair distribution function analysis of neutron scattering data provides direct access to the individual atomic displacements responsible for these excitations. Applied to the molecule-based frustrated magnet with a potential magnetic valence-bond state, LiZn2Mo3O8, this approach allows direct assignment of the constrained rotational mode of Mo3O13 clusters and internal modes of MoO6 polyhedra. We anticipate that coupling this well known data analysis technique with dynamic pair distribution function analysis will have broad application in connecting structural dynamics to physical properties in a wide range of molecular and solid state systems. PMID:26429001

  15. Thermal neutron imaging support with other laboratories BL06-IM-TNI

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.

    2008-06-17

    The goals of this project are: (1) detect and locate a source of thermal neutrons; (2) distinguish a localized source from uniform background; (3) show shape and size of thermalizing material; (4) test thermal neutron imager in active interrogation environment; and (5) distinguish delayed neutrons from prompt neutrons.

  16. Spectrum tailoring of the neutron energy spectrum in the context of delayed neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, William E; Tobin, Steve J; Sandoval, Nathan P; Fensin, Mike L

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of measuring plutonium mass in spent fuel, a delayed neutron instrument is of particular interest since, if properly designed, the delayed neutron signal from {sup 235}U is significantly stronger than the signature from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Pu. A key factor in properly designing a delayed neutron instrument is to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U. This minimization is achieved by keeping the interrogating neutron spectrum below {approx} 1 MeV. In the context of spent fuel measurements it is desirable to use a 14 MeV (deuterium and tritium) neutron generator for economic reasons. Spectrum tailoring is the term used to describe the inclusion of material between the 14 MeV neutrons and the interrogated object that lower the neutron energy through nuclear reactions and moderation. This report quantifies the utility of different material combination for spectrum tailoring.

  17. Choppers to optimise the repetition rate multiplication technique on a direct geometry neutron chopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vickery, A.; Deen, P. P.

    2014-11-15

    In recent years the use of repetition rate multiplication (RRM) on direct geometry neutron spectrometers has been established and is the common mode of operation on a growing number of instruments. However, the chopper configurations are not ideally optimised for RRM with a resultant 100 fold flux difference across a broad wavelength band. This paper presents chopper configurations that will produce a relative constant (RC) energy resolution and a relative variable (RV) energy resolution for optimised use of RRM. The RC configuration provides an almost uniform ΔE/E for all incident wavelengths and enables an efficient use of time as the entire dynamic range is probed with equivalent statistics, ideal for single shot measurements of transient phenomena. The RV energy configuration provides an almost uniform opening time at the sample for all incident wavelengths with three orders of magnitude in time resolution probed for a single European Spallation Source (ESS) period, which is ideal to probe complex relaxational behaviour. These two chopper configurations have been simulated for the Versatile Optimal Resolution direct geometry spectrometer, VOR, that will be built at ESS.

  18. Choppers to optimise the repetition rate multiplication technique on a direct geometry neutron chopper spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickery, A.; Deen, P. P.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years the use of repetition rate multiplication (RRM) on direct geometry neutron spectrometers has been established and is the common mode of operation on a growing number of instruments. However, the chopper configurations are not ideally optimised for RRM with a resultant 100 fold flux difference across a broad wavelength band. This paper presents chopper configurations that will produce a relative constant (RC) energy resolution and a relative variable (RV) energy resolution for optimised use of RRM. The RC configuration provides an almost uniform ΔE/E for all incident wavelengths and enables an efficient use of time as the entire dynamic range is probed with equivalent statistics, ideal for single shot measurements of transient phenomena. The RV energy configuration provides an almost uniform opening time at the sample for all incident wavelengths with three orders of magnitude in time resolution probed for a single European Spallation Source (ESS) period, which is ideal to probe complex relaxational behaviour. These two chopper configurations have been simulated for the Versatile Optimal Resolution direct geometry spectrometer, VOR, that will be built at ESS.

  19. Monte Carlo Evaluation of the Improvements in Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) Resulting From a DT Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, S. A.; Mihalczo, J. T.

    2002-05-16

    Nuclear safeguards active measurements that rely on the time correlation between fast neutrons and gamma rays from the same fission are a promising technique. Previous studies have shown the feasibility of this method, in conjunction with the use of artificial neural networks, to estimate the mass and enrichment of fissile samples enclosed in special, sealed containers. This paper evaluates the use of the associated particle sealed tube neutron generator (APSTNG) as the interrogation source in correlation measurements. The results show that its use is of particular importance when floor reflections are present. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) presently uses {sup 252}Cf ionization chambers as interrogation sources for the time-dependent coincidence measurements. Because triggers from this source are associated with neutrons emitted in any direction, adjacent materials such as the floor and nearby containers could affect the measurements and should be accounted for. Conversely, the APSTNG, together with an alpha particle detector, defines a cone of neutrons that can be aimed at the item under verification, thus removing the effects of nearby materials from the time-dependent coincidence distributions. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using MCNP-POLIMI, a modified version of the standard MCNP code. The code attempts to calculate more correctly quantities that depend on the second moment of the neutron and gamma distributions. The simulations quantified the sensitivity enhancements and removal of the effects of nearby materials by substituting the traditional {sup 252}Cf source with the APSTNG.

  20. Single transmission line interrogated multiple channel data acquisition system

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Keech, Jr., Thomas W.

    1980-01-01

    A single transmission line interrogated multiple channel data acquisition system is provided in which a plurality of remote station/sensor circuits each monitors a specific process variable and each transmits measurement values over a single transmission line to a master interrogating station when addressed by said master interrogating station. Typically, as many as 330 remote stations may be parallel connected to the transmission line which may exceed 7,000 feet. The interrogation rate is typically 330 stations/second. The master interrogating station samples each station according to a shared, charging transmit-receive cycle. All remote station address signals, all data signals from the remote stations/sensors and all power for all of the remote station/sensors are transmitted via a single continuous terminated coaxial cable. A means is provided for periodically and remotely calibrating all remote sensors for zero and span. A provision is available to remotely disconnect any selected sensor station from the main transmission line.

  1. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid

    1995-09-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutron is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS) and pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ration is greater than about 0.01. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projections angles and modest (2 cm) reolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and the reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA technqiues are presented.

  2. Delayed neutron detection with an integrated differential die-away and delayed neutron instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Pauline; Tobin, Stephen J; Lee, Taehoon; Hu, Jianwei S; Hendricks, John; Croft, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded a multilab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass and detect the diversion of pins from spent nuclear fuel. The first two years of this NGSI effort was focused on quantifying the capability of a range of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques with Monte Carlo (MCNPX) modeling and the second current phase involves measuring Spent Fuel. One of the techniques of interest in this paper involves measuring delayed neutrons. A delayed neutron instrument using 36 fission chambers and a 14 MeV neutron generator so called DT generator (Deuterium + Tritium) surrounding the fuel was previously studied as part of the NGSI effort. This paper will quantify the capability of a standalone delayed neutron instrument using 4 {sup 3}He gas filled tubes and a DT generator with significant spectrum tailoring, located far from the fuel. So that future research can assess how well a delayed neutron instrument will function as part of an integrated NDA system. A new design is going to be used to respond to the need of the techniques. This design has been modeled for a water media and is currently being optimized for borated water and air media as part of ongoing research. This new design was selected in order to minimize the fission of {sup 238}U, to use a more realistic neutron generator design in the model, to reduce cost and facilitate the integration of a delayed neutron (DN) with a differential die-away (DDA) instrument. Since this paper will focus on delayed neutron detection, the goal is to quantify the signal from {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu, which are the isotopes present in Spent Fuel that respond significantly to a neutron interrogation. This report will quantify the capability of this new delayed neutron design to measure the combined mass of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu for 16 of the 64 assemblies of the NGSI Spent Fuel library in one

  3. Measurement/Evaluation Techniques and Nuclear Data Associated with Fission of 239Pu by Fission Spectrum Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, P; Bauge, E; Ferguson, J; Gilliam, D; Granier, T; Jeanloz, R; McMillan, C; Robertson, D; Thompson, P; Verdon, C; Wilkerson, C; Young, P

    2010-03-16

    This Panel was chartered to review and assess new evaluations of work on fission product data, as well as the evaluation process used by the two U.S. nuclear weapons physics laboratories. The work focuses on fission product yields resulting from fission spectrum neutrons incident on plutonium, and includes data from measurements that had not been previously published as well as new or revised fission product cumulative yield data, and related quantities such as Q values and R values. This report documents the Panel's assessment of the work presented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Based on the work presented we have seven key observations: (1) Experiments conducted in the 1970s at LANL, some of which were performed in association with a larger, NIST-led, program, have recently been documented. A preliminary assessment of this work, which will be referred to in this document as ILRR-LANL, shows it to be technically sound. (2) LLNL has done a thorough, unbiased review and evaluation of the available literature and is in the process of incorporating the previously unavailable LANL data into its evaluation of key fission product yields. The results of the LLNL effort, which includes a preliminary evaluation of the ILRR-LANL data, have been documented. (3) LANL has also conducted an evaluation of fission product yields for fission spectrum neutrons on plutonium including a meta-analysis of benchmark data as part of a planned upgrade to the ENDF/B compilation. We found that the approach of using meta-analysis provides valuable additional insight for evaluating the sparse data sets involved in this assessment. (4) Both laboratories have provided convincing evidence for energy dependence in the fission product yield of {sup 147}Nd produced from the bombardment of {sup 239}Pu with fission spectrum neutrons over an incident neutron energy range of 0.2 to 1.9 MeV. (5) Consistent, complete, and explicit treatment of

  4. Velocity field measurement in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with use of PIV and neutron radiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Mishima, K; Tobita, Y; Suzuki, T; Matsubayashi, M

    2004-10-01

    To establish reasonable safety concepts for the realization of commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactors, it is indispensable to demonstrate that the release of excessive energy due to re-criticality of molten core could be prevented even if a severe core damage accident took place. Two-phase flow due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture in the molten core pool has a larger liquid-to-gas density ratio and higher surface tension in comparison with those of ordinary two-phase flows such as air-water flow. In this study, to investigate the effect of the recirculation flow on the bubble behavior, visualization and measurement of nitrogen gas-molten lead bismuth in a rectangular tank was performed by using neutron radiography and particle image velocimetry techniques. Measured flow parameters include flow regime, two-dimensional void distribution, and liquid velocity field in the tank. The present technique is applicable to the measurement of velocity fields and void fraction, and the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. PMID:15246418

  5. Production of beams of neutron-rich nuclei between Ca and Ni using the ion-guide technique

    SciTech Connect

    Perajarvi, K.; Cerny, J.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Kurpeta, J.; Lee, D.; Moore, I.; Penttila, H.; Popov, A.; Aysto, J.

    2004-09-28

    Since several elements between Z = 20-28 are refractory in their nature, their neutron-rich isotopes are rarely available as low energy Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) in ordinary Isotope Separator On-Line facilities [1-4]. These low energy RIBs would be especially interesting to have available under conditions which allow high-resolution beta-decay spectroscopy, ion-trapping and laser-spectroscopy. As an example, availability of these beams would open a way for research which could produce interesting and important data on neutron-rich nuclei around the doubly magic {sup 78}Ni. One way to overcome the intrinsic difficulty of producing these beams is to rely on the chemically unselective Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique [5]. Quasi- and deep-inelastic reactions, such as {sup 197}Au({sup 65}Cu,X)Y, could be used to produce these nuclei in existing IGISOL facilities, but before they can be successfully incorporated into the IGISOL concept their kinematics must be well understood. Therefore the reaction kinematics part of this study was first performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using its 88'' cyclotron and, based on those results, a specialized target chamber was built[6]. The target chamber shown in Fig. 1 was recently tested on-line at the Jyvaaskylaa IGISOL facility. Yields of mass-separated radioactive projectile-like species such as {sup 62,63}Co are about 0.8 ions/s/pnA, corresponding to about 0.06 % of the total IGISOL efficiency for the products that hit the Ni-degrader. (The current maximum 443 MeV {sup 65}Cu beam intensity at Jyvaaskylaa is about 20 pnA.) This total IGISOL efficiency is a product of two coupled loss factors, namely inadequate thermalization and the intrinsic IGISOL efficiency. In our now tested chamber, about 9 % of the Co recoils are thermalized in the owing He gas (p{sub He}=300 mbar) and about 0.7 % of them are converted into the mass-separated ion beams. In the future, both of these physical

  6. Determining plutonium mass in spent fuel with non-destructive assay techniques - NGSU research overview and update on 6 NDA techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J; Conlin, Jeremy L; Evans, Louise G; Hu, Jianwei; Blanc, Pauline C; Lafleur, Adrienne M; Menlove, Howard O; Schear, Melissa A; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Croft, Stephen; Fensin, Michael L; Freeman, Corey R; Koehler, William E; Mozin, V; Sandoval, N P; Lee, T H; Cambell, L W; Cheatham, J R; Gesh, C J; Hunt, A; Ludewigt, B A; Smith, L E; Sterbentz, J

    2010-09-15

    This poster is one of two complementary posters. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). This research effort has the goal of quantifying the capability of 14 NDA techniques as well as training a future generation of safeguards practitioners. By November of 2010, we will be 1.5 years into the first phase (2.5 years) of work. This first phase involves primarily Monte Carlo modelling while the second phase (also 2.5 years) will focus on experimental work. The goal of phase one is to quantify the detection capability of the various techniques for the benefit of safeguard technology developers, regulators, and policy makers as well as to determine what integrated techniques merit experimental work, We are considering a wide range of possible technologies since our research horizon is longer term than the focus of most regulator bodies. The capability of all of the NDA techniques will be determined for a library of 64 17 x 17 PWR assemblies [burnups (15, 30, 45, 60 GWd/tU), initial enrichments (2, 3, 4, 5%) and cooling times (1, 5, 20, 80 years)]. The burnup and cooling time were simulated with each fuel pin being comprised of four radial regions. In this paper an overview of the purpose will be given as well as a technical update on the following 6 neutron techniques: {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Self-Integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry. The technical update will quantify the anticipated performance of each technique for the 64 assemblies of the spent fuel library.

  7. High-energy photon interrogation for nonproliferation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. L.; Blackburn, B. W.; Watson, S. M.; Norman, D. R.; Hunt, A. W.

    2007-08-01

    There is an immediate need for technologies that can successfully address homeland security challenges related to the inspection of commercial rail, air and maritime-cargo container inspections for nuclear and radiological devices. The pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technology, developed through collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC) has demonstrated the ability to detect shielded/unshielded nuclear material primarily through the analysis of delayed neutrons and gamma-rays produced via photonuclear reactions. Because of current food irradiation limitations, however, most active photon (i.e. bremsstrahlung) interrogation studies have been performed with electron beam energies at or below 10 MeV. While this energy limit currently applies to cargo inspections, the World Health Organization has indicated that higher energy electron beam operations could be considered for future operations. Clinical applications using photon energies well in excess of 10 MeV are already well established. Notwithstanding the current limitation of 10 MeV, there is a definite advantage in using higher photon energies for cargo inspections. At higher energies, several phenomena contribute to increased sensitivity in regards to detecting shielded nuclear material. Two of the most important are: (1) increased ability for source photons to penetrate shielding; and (2) enhanced signature production via increased (γ,n) and (γ,f) cross-sections in materials such as 235U and 239Pu directly leading to faster inspection throughput. Experimental assessments have been conducted for various electron beam energies from 8 to 25 MeV. Increases of up to three orders of magnitude in delayed signatures have been measured over these energy ranges. Through the continued investigation into PPA-based inspection applications using photon energies greater than 10 MeV, higher detection sensitivities with potentially

  8. Theoretical and experimental investigations in characterizing and developing multiplexed diamond-based neutron spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukosi, Eric

    In this work a novel technique of multiplexing diamond is presented where electronic grade diamond plates are connected electrically in series and in parallel to increase the overall detection efficiency of diamond-based neutron detection systems. Theoretical results utilizing MCNPX indicate that further development in this simulation software is required to accurately predict the response of diamond to various interrogating neutron energies. However, the results were accurate enough to indicate that an equivalent diamond plate 1cm thick only lowers the energy resolution of the 12 C(n,αo)9Be peak from a 14.1 MeV interrogating neutron reference field by a factor of two compared to a single diamond plate 0.5mm thick while increasing the detection efficiency from 1.34 percent for a single diamond plate to 25.4 percent for the 1cm thick diamond plate. Further, the number of secondary neutron interactions is minimal, approximately 5.3 percent, with a detection medium this size. It is also shown that photons can interfere with lower energy neutron signals when multiplexing is used, especially at lower impinging photon energies, although the full energy peak still does not dominantly present itself in the pulse height spectrum for multiplexed arrays approaching 1cm with respect to the interrogating neutron reference field vector. Experimental results indicate that series multiplexing is not capable for use as a means of increasing the active detection volume of a diamond-based neutron spectrometer because of the interaction of diamond detection mediums in series with each other and the input capacitor of a charge sensitive preamplifier, where severe signal degradation is seen due to the equal impedances of the single crystal diamond plates. However, parallel multiplexing is shown to have great promise, although there are limitations to this technique due to the large capacitance at the preamplifier input for a large parallel multiplexed array. Still, the latter

  9. Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.

    1988-04-12

    A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads is disclosed. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples. 6 figs.

  10. Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits

    DOEpatents

    Jatko, William B.; McNeilly, David R.

    1988-01-01

    A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples.

  11. Repetitive Interrogation of 2-Level Quantum Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.

    2010-01-01

    Trapped ion clocks derive information from a reference atomic transition by repetitive interrogations of the same quantum system, either a single ion or ionized gas of many millions of ions. Atomic beam frequency standards, by contrast, measure reference atomic transitions in a continuously replenished "flow through" configuration where initial ensemble atomic coherence is zero. We will describe some issues and problems that can arise when atomic state selection and preparation of the quantum atomic system is not completed, that is, optical pumping has not fully relaxed the coherence and also not fully transferred atoms to the initial state. We present a simple two-level density matrix analysis showing how frequency shifts during the state-selection process can cause frequency shifts of the measured clock transition. Such considerations are very important when a low intensity lamp light source is used for state selection, where there is relatively weak relaxation and re-pumping of ions to an initial state and much weaker 'environmental' relaxation of the atomic coherence set-up in the atomic sample.

  12. Development of Fast Measurement System of Neutron Emission Profile Using a Digital Signal Processing Technique in JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, M.; Shinohara, K.; Itoga, T.; Okuji, T.; Nakhostin, M.; Baba, M.; Nishitani, T.

    2008-03-12

    Neutron emission profiles are routinely measured in JT-60U Tokamak. Stinbene neuron detectors (SNDs), which combine a Stilbene organic crystal scintillation detector (Stilbene detector) with an analog neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination (PSD) circuit, have been used to measure neutron flux efficiently. Although the SND has many advantages as a neutron detector, the maximum count rate is limited up to {approx}1x 10{sup 5} counts/s due to the dead time of the analog PSD circuit. To overcome this issue, a digital signal processing (DSP) system using a Flash-ADC has been developed. In this system, anode signals from the photomultiplier of the Stilbene detector are fed to the Flash ADC and digitized. Then, the PSD between neutrons and gamma-rays are performed using software. The photomultiplier tube is also modified to suppress and correct gain fluctuation of the photomultiplier. The DSP system has been installed in the center channel of the vertical neutron collimator system in JT-60U and applied to measurements of neutron flux in JT-60U experiments. Neutron flux are successfully measured with count rate up to {approx}1x 10{sup 6} counts/s without the effect of pile up of detected pulses. The performance of the DSP system as a neutron detector is demonstrated.

  13. Investigating Early/Middle Bronze Age copper and bronze axes by micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and neutron imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Elin; Pereira, Marco A. Stanojev; Lopes, Filipa; Marques, José G.; Santos, Joana P.; Araújo, M. Fátima; Silva, Rui J. C.; Senna-Martinez, João C.

    2016-08-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) analysis and neutron imaging techniques, namely 2D radiography and 3D tomography, have been applied for the study of four metal axes from the Early/Middle Bronze Age in Western Iberia, a period characterized by a metallurgical change in the use of copper to bronze. Micro-XRF analysis has shown that one of the axes was produced in copper with some arsenic while the other three were produced in a copper-tin alloy (bronze) with variable tin contents and some arsenic and lead. Neutron radiography and tomography were applied to study internal heterogeneities of the axes in a non-invasive way since the specificities of neutron interaction with matter allow a suitable penetration of these relatively thick copper-based objects when compared to the use of a conventional X-ray radiography. Neutron imaging allowed the visualization of internal fissures and pores and the evaluation of their distribution, size and shape. Relevant information for the reconstruction of ancient manufacturing techniques was gathered, revealing that one ax was produced with the mold in an angle of ≈ 25°, probably to facilitate gas escape during metal pouring. Also, information regarding physical weaknesses of the axes was collected, providing relevant data for their conservation. The combination of these non-destructive techniques allowed the evaluation of the metal composition and the internal structure of the axes. Micro-XRF allowed the distinction among copper and bronze axes, and provided data about the composition of early bronzes for which data is scarce. The neutron imaging study allowed for the first time the visualization of internal heterogeneities in early bronze axes, namely pores and large voids, providing relevant information for the reconstruction of ancient manufacturing techniques and raising pertinent information regarding physical weaknesses of these types of objects.

  14. Detection of uranium-based nuclear weapons using neutron-induced fission

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Byrd, R.C.; Feldman, W.C.; Auchampaugh, G.F.; Estes, G.P.; Ewing, R.I.; Marlow, K.W.

    1991-12-01

    Although plutonium-based nuclear weapons can usually be detected by their spontaneous emission of neutrons and gammas, the radiation emitted by weapons based entirely on highly-enriched uranium can often be easily shielded. Verification of a treaty that limits the number of such weapons may require an active technique, such as interrogating the suspect assembly with an external neutron source and measuring the number of fission neutrons produced. Difficulties include distinguishing between source and fission neutrons, the variations in yield for different materials and geometries, and the possibility of non-nuclear weapons that may contain significant amounts of fissionable depleted uranium. We describe simple measurements that test the induced-fission technique using an isotopic Am-Li source, an novel energy-sensitive neutron detector, and several small assemblies containing {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, lead, and polyethylene. In all cases studied, the neutron yields above the source energy are larger for the {sup 235}U assemblies than for assemblies containing only lead or depleted uranium. For more complex geometries, corrections for source transmission may be necessary. The results are promising enough to recommend further experiments and calculations using examples of realistic nuclear and non-nuclear weapons. 5 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Design concept for the microwave interrogation structure in PARCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Heavner, T. P.; Jefferts, S. R.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we will describe key aspects of the conceptual design of the microwave interrogation structure in the laser-cooled cesium frequency standard that is part of the Primary Atomic Reference Clock in Space (PARCS) experiment.

  16. High performance FBG interrogation technology with scan fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Ma, Youchun; Yang, Minwei

    2010-11-01

    A Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) Interrogation scheme with scan fiber laser was demonstrated. The ring cavity scan fiber laser was investigated and the scan fiber laser module was made and test, the 200Hz scan frequency, ~0.02nm line width, more than 40nm scan range and more than 1 mW output power were obtained. A 12 channels, 20 FBGs per channel FBG interrogator was made with this laser module and the high speed signal process circuit base on FPGA. The centroid finding method which has advantage on interrogation speed and accurate was taken for finding the peak of the return FBG spectrum. The FBG interrogator was test and less than 3pm standard deviation with 200Hz scan frequency were obtained.

  17. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  18. Laminography using resonant neutron attenuation for detection of drugs and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveman, R. A.; Feinstein, R. L.; Bendahan, J.; Gozani, T.; Shea, P.

    1997-02-01

    Resonant neutron attenuation has been shown to be usable for assaying elements which constitute explosives, cocaine, and heroin. By careful analysis of attenuation measurements, the determination of the presence or absence of explosives can be determined. Simple two dimensional radiographic techniques only give results for areal density and consequently will be limited in their effectiveness. Classical tomographic techniques are both computationally very intensive and place strict requirements on the quality and amount of data acquired. These requirements and computations take time and are likely to be very difficult to perform in real time. Simulation studies described in this article have shown that laminographic image reconstruction can be used effectively with resonant neutron attenuation measurements to interrogate luggage for explosives or drugs. The design of the system described in this article is capable of pseudo-three dimensional image reconstruction of all of the elemental densities pertinent to explosive and drug detection.

  19. Implementation of interrogation systems for fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese P, Benjamin; Kumar R, Dinesh; Raju, Mittu; Madhusoodanan, K. N.

    2013-09-01

    The development of two simple methods for wavelength-optical intensity modulation techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors is presented. The performance is evaluated by measuring the strain and temperature. The first method consists of a narrow band source, an optical circulator, an FBG, and a power meter. The source and Bragg reflected signal from the FBG need to be matched to get linear results with good power levels. The source spectral power levels are very critical in this study. The power reflected from a matched reference FBG is fed into the measuring FBG in the second method. Since the FBGs are matched, the entire power is reflected back initially. During the measurement, the change in the measurand causes the reflected power from the sensing FBG to vary. A costly high resolution spectrum analyzer is required only during the characterization of the FBG and source. The performances of two interrogators are compared by measuring the strain and temperature. In the second method, the strain measurements can be made insensitive to the temperature variation by selecting a source with a flat spectrum at the measurement range. Highlights of these methods are the portability, cost effectiveness and better resolution.

  20. A utilitarian argument against torture interrogation of terrorists.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Jean Maria

    2004-07-01

    Following the September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, much support for torture interrogation of terrorists has emerged in the public forum, largely based on the "ticking bomb" scenario. Although deontological and virtue ethics provide incisive arguments against torture, they do not speak directly to scientists and government officials responsible for national security in a utilitarian framework. Drawing from criminology, organizational theory, social psychology, the historical record, and my interviews with military professionals, I assess the potential of an official U.S. program of torture interrogation from a practical perspective. The central element of program design is a sound causal model relating input to output. I explore three principal models of how torture interrogation leads to truth: the animal instinct model, the cognitive failure model, and the data processing model. These models show why torture interrogation fails overall as a counterterrorist tactic. They also expose the processes that lead from a precision torture interrogation program to breakdowns in key institutions-health care, biomedical research, police, judiciary, and military. The breakdowns evolve from institutional dynamics that are independent of the original moral rationale. The counterargument, of course, is that in a society destroyed by terrorism there will be nothing to repair. That is why the actual causal mechanism of torture interrogation in curtailing terrorism must be elucidated by utilitarians rather than presumed PMID:15362710

  1. Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: a Monte Carlo simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A C; Harrawood, B P; Bender, J E; Tourassi, G D; Kapadia, A J

    2007-10-21

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been developed for neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) using the GEANT4 toolkit. NSECT is a new approach to biomedical imaging that allows spectral analysis of the elements present within the sample. In NSECT, a beam of high-energy neutrons interrogates a sample and the nuclei in the sample are stimulated to an excited state by inelastic scattering of the neutrons. The characteristic gammas emitted by the excited nuclei are captured in a spectrometer to form multi-energy spectra. Currently, a tomographic image is formed using a collimated neutron beam to define the line integral paths for the tomographic projections. These projection data are reconstructed to form a representation of the distribution of individual elements in the sample. To facilitate the development of this technique, a Monte Carlo simulation model has been constructed from the GEANT4 toolkit. This simulation includes modeling of the neutron beam source and collimation, the samples, the neutron interactions within the samples, the emission of characteristic gammas, and the detection of these gammas in a Germanium crystal. In addition, the model allows the absorbed radiation dose to be calculated for internal components of the sample. NSECT presents challenges not typically addressed in Monte Carlo modeling of high-energy physics applications. In order to address issues critical to the clinical development of NSECT, this paper will describe the GEANT4 simulation environment and three separate simulations performed to accomplish three specific aims. First, comparison of a simulation to a tomographic experiment will verify the accuracy of both the gamma energy spectra produced and the positioning of the beam relative to the sample. Second, parametric analysis of simulations performed with different user-defined variables will determine the best way to effectively model low energy neutrons in tissue, which is a concern with the high hydrogen content in

  2. Compact D-D/D-T neutron generators and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Tak Pui

    2003-05-01

    Neutron generators based on the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He and {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He fusion reactions are the most commonly available neutron sources. The applications of current commercial neutron generators are often limited by their low neutron yield and their short operational lifetime. A new generation of D-D/D-T fusion-based neutron generators has been designed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) by using high current ion beams hitting on a self-loading target that has a large surface area to dissipate the heat load. This thesis describes the rationale behind the new designs and their potential applications. A survey of other neutron sources is presented to show their advantages and disadvantages compared to the fusion-based neutron generator. A prototype neutron facility was built at LBNL to test these neutron generators. High current ion beams were extracted from an RF-driven ion source to produce neutrons. With an average deuteron beam current of 24 mA and an energy of 100 keV, a neutron yield of >10{sup 9} n/s has been obtained with a D-D coaxial neutron source. Several potential applications were investigated by using computer simulations. The computer code used for simulations and the variance reduction techniques employed were discussed. A study was carried out to determine the neutron flux and resolution of a D-T neutron source in thermal neutron scattering applications for condensed matter experiments. An error analysis was performed to validate the scheme used to predict the resolution. With a D-T neutron yield of 10{sup 14} n/s, the thermal neutron flux at the sample was predicted to be 7.3 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}s. It was found that the resolution of cold neutrons was better than that of thermal neutrons when the duty factor is high. This neutron generator could be efficiently used for research and educational purposes at universities. Additional applications studied were positron production and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The

  3. Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, Ann M.; Arens, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Th ere is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time, com promising the thermal performance and possibly also structural integr ity of the tanks. Therefore an Non-destructive Testing (NDT) method for measuring the perlite density or void fraction is urgently needed. Methods based on neutrons are good candidates because they can readil y penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the ent ire 120 cm thickness of the perlite zone. Neutrons interact with the nuclei of materials to produce characteristic gamma rays which are the n detected. The gamma ray signal strength is proportional to the atom ic number density. Consequently, if the perlite is compacted then the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will i ncrease. Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simul taneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scatt ering which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, AI, Na, Kand H. Thus the two energy ranges produce complementary information. The R&D program has three phases: numerical simulations of neutron and gamma ray transport with MCNP s oftware, evaluation of the system in the laboratory on test articles and finally mapping of the perlite density in the cryogenic tanks at KSC. The preliminary MCNP calculations have shown that the fast/therma l neutron NDT method is capable of distinguishing between expanded an d compacted perlite with excellent statistics.

  4. Tungsten thermal neutron dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, L. L.; Richardson, P. J.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1969-01-01

    Tungsten-185 activity, which is produced by neutron activation of tungsten-184, determines thermal neutron flux. Radiochemical separation methods and counting techniques for irradiated tungsten provide accurate determination of the radiation exposure.

  5. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J. M. Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A.; Murer, D.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  6. Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  7. Time-resolved neutron/gamma-ray data acquisition for in situ subsurface planetary geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarik, J. G.; Burger, D. M.; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr, R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-04-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  8. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  9. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklyn, C. B.

    2011-12-01

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >1011 nṡs-1. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  10. The response of a 300 micron silicon detector to monoenergetic neutrons determined by the use of the Monte Carlo technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahezadeh, M.; Anno, G.

    1972-01-01

    The response of a 300 micron thick silicon detector to an incident monoenergetic neutron beam is evaluated by the Monte Carlo method for the cases of both a shielded and a bare detector. The result of Monte Carlo calculation, using elastic, inelastic, and absorption reactions indicates that the response of the silicon detector to neutrons is basically due to the elastic scattering. In addition, the gamma rays generated in the shield of the detector will result in a response which is 3 or 4 orders of magnitude smaller than response to incident photons. The response of a bare silicon detector is calculated for neutron energies up to 6 MeV and bias energies from 50 to 250 KeV. It is found that the maximum response for a 300 micron thick silicon detector is less than .004 c/n within this selected neutron and bias energy range. When the pulse height defect is introduced in the calculation the results at low energy neutrons were reduced.

  11. Development of fast FBG interrogator with wavelength-swept laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tatsuya; Shinoda, Yukitaka

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this research is the construction of a structural health monitoring system that uses fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to determine the health of structures. We develop fast FBG interrogator for real-time measurement of the reflected wavelength of a multipoint FBG to monitor the broadband vibration of a structure. This FBG interrogator, which combines a wavelength-swept laser and a real-time measurement system is capable of measuring wavelength within a standard deviation of 2×10-3 nm or less. We have demonstrated that the FBG interrogator is able to measure vibration that has a resonance frequency of 440 Hz at intervals of 0.1 ms with a multipoint FBG.

  12. Micro-size optical fibre strain interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih; Xiao, Gaozhi; Guo, Honglei

    2008-03-01

    Within several countries, the military is undergoing significant economic pressure to extend the use of its air fleet beyond its established design life. The availability of low weight, small size, reliable and cost-effective technologies to detect and monitor incipient damage and to alert prior to catastrophic failures is critical to sustain operational effectiveness. To enable the implementation of distributed and highly multiplexed optical fiber sensors networks to aerospace platforms, the data acquisition (interrogation) system has to meet small size and low weight requirements. This paper reports on our current development of micro-sized Echelle Diffractive Gratings (EDG) based interrogation system for strain monitoring of serially multiplexed fibre Bragg grating sensors. The operation principle of the interrogator and its suitability for strain measurements is demonstrated. Static load measurements obtained using this system are compared to those acquired using a optical multi-wavelength meter and are found to have strong correlation.

  13. Caged compounds for multichromic optical interrogation of neural systems

    PubMed Central

    Amatrudo, Joseph M.; Olson, Jeremy P.; Agarwal, Hitesh K.; Ellis-Davies, Graham C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Caged compounds have widely used by neurophysiologists to study many aspects of cellular signaling in glia and neurons. Biologically inert before irradiation, they can be loaded into cells via patch pipette or topically applied in situ to a defined concentration, photolysis releases the caged compound in a very rapid and spatially defined way. Since caged compounds are exogenous optical probes, they include not only natural products such neurotransmitters, calcium and IP3, but non-natural products such as fluorophores, drugs and antibodies. In this Technical Spotlight we provide a short introduction to the uncaging technique by discussing the nitroaromatic caging chromophores most widely used in such experiments (e.g. CNB1, DMNB, MNI and CDNI). We show that recently developed caging chromophores (RuBi and DEAC450) that are photolyzed with blue light (ca. 430–480 nm range) can be combined with traditional nitroaromatic caged compounds to enable two-color optical probing of neuronal function. For example, one-photon uncaging of either RuBi-GABA or DEAC450-GABA with a 473-nm laser is facile, and can block non-linear currents (dendritic spikes or action potentials) evoked by two-photon uncaging of CDNI-Glu at 720 nm. We also show that two-photon uncaging of DEAC450-Glu and CDNI-GABA at 900 and 720 nm, respectively, can be used to fire and block action potentials. Our experiments illustrate that recently developed chromophores have taken uncaging out of the “monochrome era”, in which it has existed since 1978, so as to enable multichromic interrogation of neuronal function with single synapse precision. PMID:25471355

  14. Identifying Robust and Sensitive Frequency Bands for Interrogating Neural Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Shackman, Alexander J.; McMenamin, Brenton W.; Maxwell, Jeffrey S.; Greischar, Lawrence L.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in using neural oscillations to characterize the mechanisms supporting cognition and emotion. Oftentimes, oscillatory activity is indexed by mean power density in predefined frequency bands. Some investigators use broad bands originally defined by prominent surface features of the spectrum. Others rely on narrower bands originally defined by spectral factor analysis (SFA). Presently, the robustness and sensitivity of these competing band definitions remains unclear. Here, a Monte Carlo-based SFA strategy was used to decompose the tonic (“resting” or “spontaneous”) electroencephalogram (EEG) into five bands: delta (1–5Hz), alpha-low (6–9Hz), alpha-high (10–11Hz), beta (12–19Hz), and gamma (>21Hz). This pattern was consistent across SFA methods, artifact correction/rejection procedures, scalp regions, and samples. Subsequent analyses revealed that SFA failed to deliver enhanced sensitivity; narrow alpha sub-bands proved no more sensitive than the classical broadband to individual differences in temperament or mean differences in task-induced activation. Other analyses suggested that residual ocular and muscular artifact was the dominant source of activity during quiescence in the delta and gamma bands. This was observed following threshold-based artifact rejection or independent component analysis (ICA)-based artifact correction, indicating that such procedures do not necessarily confer adequate protection. Collectively, these findings highlight the limitations of several commonly used EEG procedures and underscore the necessity of routinely performing exploratory data analyses, particularly data visualization, prior to hypothesis testing. They also suggest the potential benefits of using techniques other than SFA for interrogating high-dimensional EEG datasets in the frequency or time-frequency (event-related spectral perturbation, event-related synchronization / desynchronization) domains. PMID

  15. Development of a liquid scintillator neutron multiplicity counter (LSMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, Katherine; Clay, Willam; Elmont, Tim; Esch, Ernst; Karpius, Peter; MacArthur, Duncan; McKigney, Edward; Santi, Peter; Smith, Morag; Thron, Jonathan; Williams, Richard

    2007-08-01

    A new neutron multiplicity counter is being developed that utilizes the fast response of liquid scintillator detectors. The ability to detect fast (vs. moderated) fission neutrons makes possible a coincidence gate of the order of tens of nanoseconds (vs. tens of microseconds). A neutron counter with such a narrow gate will be virtually insensitive to accidental coincidences, making it possible to measure items with a high single neutron background to greater accuracy in less time. This includes impure Pu items with high (α, n) rates as well as items of low-mass HEU where a strong active interrogation source is needed. Liquid scintillator detectors also allow for energy discrimination between interrogation source neutrons and fission neutrons, allowing for even greater assay sensitivity. Designing and building a liquid scintillator multiplicity counter (LSMC) requires a symbiotic effort of simulation and experiment to optimize performance and mitigate hardware costs in the final product. We present preliminary Monte-Carlo studies using the GEANT toolkit.

  16. A MHz speed wavelength sweeping for ultra-high speed FBG interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gyeong Hun; Lee, Hwi Don; Eom, Tae Joong; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrated a MHz speed wavelength-swept fiber laser based on the active mode locking (AML) technique and applied to interrogation system of an array of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. MHz speed wavelength sweeping of wavelength-swept fiber laser can be obtained by programmable frequency modulation of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) without any wavelength tunable filter. Both static and dynamic strain measurement of FBG sensors were successfully characterized with high linearity of an R-square value of 0.9999 at sweeping speed of 50 kHz.

  17. The use of a neutron backscatter technique for in-situ water measurement in paper-recycling industry.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Norpaiza Mohamad; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Fitri; Mustapha, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    A bulk of used paper supplied to recycling industry may contain water in their internal voids. This is because the price of the used paper is currently based on their weight and it has a huge potential of suppliers to add with water in order to increase the price. Currently used methods for detecting moisture content in a paper are restricted to a sheet of paper only. This paper presents a non-intrusive method for quick and in-situ measurement of water content in a bulk of used paper. The proposed method extends the capability of common paper moisture gauge, by using a neutron device. A fast neutron source (Am-Be 241) and a portable backscattering neutron detector are used for water measurement. It theoretically indicates that the slow neutron counts can be correlated to the hydrogen or water level in a paper. The method has the potential of being used by the paper-recycling industry for rapid and non-destructive measurement of water in a bulk of used paper. PMID:19303310

  18. Interrogative suggestibility, confabulation, and acquiescence in people with mild learning disabilities (mental handicap): implications for reliability during police interrogations.

    PubMed

    Clare, I C; Gudjonsson, G H

    1993-09-01

    In order to assess a criminal suspect's ability to make a reliable statement, performance on three measures--interrogative suggestibility, confabulation and acquiescence--may be used. This paper presents preliminary data on these measures for people with mild learning disabilities (Full Scale IQ [FSIQ]: 57-75). It was found that they were more suggestible than their average ability counterparts (FSIQ: 83-111) because they were much more susceptible to 'leading questions'. They also confabulated more and were more acquiescent. Overall, the data emphasized their potential vulnerability to giving erroneous testimony during interrogations. PMID:8251959

  19. Modern Methods for Interrogating the Human Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Mark J.; Sakaie, Ken E.; Beall, Erik B.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Bridwell, David A.; Rubinov, Mikail; Rao, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Connectionist theories of brain function took hold with the seminal contributions of Norman Geschwind a half century ago. Modern neuroimaging techniques have expanded the scientific interest in the study of brain connectivity to include the intact as well as disordered brain. Method In this review, we describe the most common techniques used to measure functional and structural connectivity, including resting state functional MRI, diffusion MRI, and electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography coherence. We also review the most common analytical approaches used for examining brain interconnectivity associated with these various imaging methods. Results This review presents a critical analysis of the assumptions, as well as methodological limitations, of each imaging and analysis approach. Conclusions The overall goal of this review is to provide the reader with an introduction to evaluating the scientific methods underlying investigations that probe the human connectome. PMID:26888611

  20. Grazing incidence neutron optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20 .ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  1. Grazing Incidence Neutron Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor); Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Neutron optics based on the two-reflection geometries are capable of controlling beams of long wavelength neutrons with low angular divergence. The preferred mirror fabrication technique is a replication process with electroform nickel replication process being preferable. In the preliminary demonstration test an electroform nickel optics gave the neutron current density gain at the focal spot of the mirror at least 8 for neutron wavelengths in the range from 6 to 20.ANG.. The replication techniques can be also be used to fabricate neutron beam controlling guides.

  2. Visual interrogation of gyrokinetic particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chad; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Sanderson, Allen; Myers, Lee Roy, Jr.

    2007-07-01

    Gyrokinetic particle simulations are critical to the study of anomalous energy transport associated with plasma microturbulence in magnetic confinement fusion experiments. The simulations are conducted on massively parallel computers and produce large quantities of particles, variables, and time steps, thus presenting a formidable challenge to data analysis tasks. We present two new visualization techniques for scientists to improve their understanding of the time-varying, multivariate particle data. One technique allows scientists to examine correlations in multivariate particle data with tightly coupled views of the data in both physical space and variable space, and to visually identify and track features of interest. The second technique, built into SCIRun, allows scientists to perform range-based queries over a series of time slices and visualize the resulting particles using glyphs. The ability to navigate the multiple dimensions of the particle data, as well as query individual or a collection of particles, enables scientists to not only validate their simulations but also discover new phenomena in their data.

  3. Teacher Epistemology and Collective Narratives: Interrogating Teaching and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Susan Matoba

    2011-01-01

    This action research study interrogates how one teacher educator analyzed her pedagogy and engaged her students in writing narratives about working with children, families, and co-workers who are racially and ethnically different from themselves. Data were collected from a special topic graduate course entitled, Epistemology, Diversity and…

  4. Microwave interrogation cavity for the rubidium space cold atom clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ren; Yuan-Ci, Gao; Tang, Li; De-Sheng, Lü; Liang, Liu

    2016-06-01

    The performance of space cold atom clocks (SCACs) should be improved thanks to the microgravity environment in space. The microwave interrogation cavity is a key element in a SCAC. In this paper, we develop a microwave interrogation cavity especially for the rubidium SCAC. The interrogation cavity has two microwave interaction zones with a single feed-in source, which is located at the center of the cavity for symmetric coupling excitation and to ensure that the two interaction zones are in phase. The interrogation cavity has a measured resonance frequency of 6.835056471 GHz with a loaded quality factor of nearly 4200, which shows good agreement with simulation results. We measure the Rabi frequency of the clock transition of the rubidium atom in each microwave interaction zone, and subsequently demonstrate that the distributions of the magnetic field in the two interaction zones are the same and meet all requirements of the rubidium SCAC. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11034008), the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ09094304), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Monolithic integrated optic fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Esterkin, Yan; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Songjian

    2010-04-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are a mature sensing technology that has gained rapid acceptance in civil, aerospace, chemical and petrochemical, medicine, aviation and automotive industries. Fiber Bragg grating sensors can be use for a variety of measurements including strain, stress, vibration, acoustics, acceleration, pressure, temperature, moisture, and corrosion distributed at multiple locations within the structure using a single fiber element. The most prominent advantages of FBGs are: small size and light weight, multiple FBG transducers on a single fiber, and immunity to radio frequency interference. A major disadvantage of FBG technology is that conventional state-of-the-art fiber Bragg grating interrogation systems are typically bulky, heavy, and costly bench top instruments that are assembled from off-the-shelf fiber optic and optical components integrated with a signal electronics board into an instrument console. Based on the need for a compact FBG interrogation system, this paper describes recent progress towards the development of a miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-TransceiverTM) system based on multi-channel monolithic integrated optic sensor microchip technology. The integrated optic microchip technology enables the monolithic integration of all of the functionalities, both passive and active, of conventional bench top FBG sensor interrogators systems, packaged in a miniaturized, low power operation, 2-cm x 5-cm small form factor (SFF) package suitable for the long-term structural health monitoring in applications where size, weight, and power are critical for operation.

  6. Learning about Posterior Probability: Do Diagrams and Elaborative Interrogation Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Virginia; Alibali, Martha W.; Nathan, Mitchell J.

    2016-01-01

    To learn from a text, students must make meaningful connections among related ideas in that text. This study examined the effectiveness of two methods of improving connections--elaborative interrogation and diagrams--in written lessons about posterior probability. Undergraduate students (N = 198) read a lesson in one of three questioning…

  7. Interrogating Our Practices of Integrating Spirituality into Workplace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Leona M.; Fenwick, Tara J.; Parsons, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Workplace education's interest in spirituality is examined, with an emphasis placed on why this interest might be increasing and what challenges it presents. This article interrogates commonplace strategies to integrate spirituality in workplace education,--providing holistic education, creating sacred spaces and mentoring--questions each approach…

  8. Absolute Interrogative Intonation Patterns in Buenos Aires Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Su Ar

    2010-01-01

    In Spanish, each uttered phrase, depending on its use, has one of a variety of intonation patterns. For example, a phrase such as "Maria viene manana" "Mary is coming tomorrow" can be used as a declarative or as an absolute interrogative (a yes/no question) depending on the intonation pattern that a speaker produces. Patterns of usage also…

  9. Some Remarks on Interrogative and Relative Pronouns in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowska, Barbara

    1973-01-01

    An analysis is made of three "wh" words -- what, which, and who -- which are most frequently used as interrogative and relative pronouns in English. An attempt is made to find some formal syntactic markers distinguishing these two uses and consequently to postulate distinct feature matrices for them. (Available from: See FL 508 214.) (Author/RM)

  10. Ask Systems: Interrogative Access to Multiple Ways of Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to familiarize instructional designers and researchers with a useful design and research paradigm known as "Ask Systems." Ask Systems are interrogative interfaces to information and learning environments that model conversations with a skilled, reflective practitioner (Schon, The reflective practitioner, "1983") or…

  11. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems: the feasibility of computer interrogation of experts for WISAP

    SciTech Connect

    Wight, L.H.

    1980-05-01

    Simulation of the response of a waste repository to events that could initiate a fault tree to breach and failure is currently a keystone to the Battelle Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). The repository simulation, which is part of the Disruptive Event Analysis Task, models the repository for its entire design life, one million years. This is clearly a challenging calculation, requiring input unlike any other response analysis by virtue of the long design life of the facility. What technology will provide design criteria for a million year design life. Answers to questions like this can, to some extent, be based on data, but always require some subjective judgments. The subjectivity, which is sometimes driven by inadequate or incomplete data or by a lack of understanding of the physical process, is therefore a crucial ingredient in an analysis of initiating events. Because of the variety of possible initiating events (glaciation, man-caused disruption, volcanism, etc.), many expert opinions will be solicited as input. The complexity of the simulation, the variety of experts involved, and the volume of applicable data all suggest that there may be a more direct, economical method to solicit the expert opinion. This report addresses the feasibility of such a system. Background information is presented that demonstrates the advantages of a computer interrogation system over conventional interrogation and assessment techniques. In the subsequent three sections the three elements - structure and decomposition, scaling, and synthesis - that are basic to any interrogation and assessment technique are reviewed. The interrelationship are schematically illustrated between these three fundamental elements and, therefore, serves as a useful guide to these three sections. Each of these three sections begins with a recommended approach to the particular element and ends with an illustration of representative dialogue.

  12. Non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel using passive neutron Albedo reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L G; Schear, M A; Croft, S; Tobin, S J; Swinhoe, M T; Menlove, H O

    2010-01-01

    Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (PNAR) is one of fourteen techniques that has been researched and evaluated to form part of a comprehensive and integrated detection system for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. PNAR implemented with {sup 3}He tubes for neutron detection (PNAR-{sup 3}He) is the measurement of time correlated neutrons from a spent fuel assembly with and without a Cadmium (Cd) layer surrounding the assembly. PNAR utilizes the self-interrogation of the fuel via reflection of neutrons born in the fuel assembly back in to the fuel assembly. The neutrons originate primarily from spontaneous fission events within the fuel itself (Curium-244) but are amplified by multiplication. The presence and removal of the Cd provides two measurement conditions with different neutron energy spectra and therefore different interrogating neutron characteristics. Cd has a high cross-section of absorption for slow neutrons and therefore greatly reduces the low energy (thermal) neutron fluence rate returning. The ratios of the Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates obtained in each case are known as the Cd ratios, which are related to fissile content. A potential safeguards application for which PNAR-{sup 3}He is particularly suited is 'fingerprinting'. Fingerprinting could function as an alternative to plutonium (Pu) mass determination; providing confidence that material was not diverted during transport between sites. PNAR-{sup 3}He has six primary NDA signatures: Singles, Doubles and Triples count rates measured with two energy spectra at both shipping and receiving sites. This is to uniquely identify the fuel assembly, and confirm no changes have taken place during transport. Changes may indicate all attempt to divert material for example. Here, the physics of the PNAR-{sup 3}He concept will be explained, alongside a discussion on the development of a prototypical PNAR-{sup 3}He instrument using simulation. The capabilities and performance of the

  13. Neutrons and Photons in Nondestructive Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, J. F.; Wells, D. P.; Hunt, A. W.

    2011-02-01

    Active, nondestructive interrogation with neutrons and photons has seen a renaissance in recent years, owing to a broad spectrum of important applications in security, nuclear nonproliferation, contraband detection and materials analysis. Active methods are of high interest for such applications because they provide at least an order of magnitude greater sensitivity than passive methods. Accelerator-based neutron and photon active methods exploit two important factors to attain greater sensitivity: these are (i) the control of interrogating beam properties such as directionality, energy, intensity, polarization and the temporal distribution of radiation; (ii) well-founded, low energy nuclear physics that yields distinct "signatures" for elemental and isotopic content. This review addresses accelerator-based neutron and photon nondestructive testing methods and issues when applied to modern and emerging wide-ranging challenges in nondestructive detection.

  14. Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2014-11-04

    An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

  15. Calculations of neutron spectra after neutron neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Mitchell, G. E.; Tornow, W.; Furman, W. I.; Lychagin, E. V.; Muzichka, A. Yu; Nekhaev, G. V.; Strelkov, A. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2004-09-01

    A direct neutron-neutron scattering length, ann, measurement with the goal of 3% accuracy (0.5 fm) is under preparation at the aperiodic pulsed reactor YAGUAR. A direct measurement of ann will not only help resolve conflicting results of ann by indirect means, but also in comparison to the proton-proton scattering length, app, shed light on the charge-symmetry of the nuclear force. We discuss in detail the analysis of the nn-scattering data in terms of a simple analytical expression. We also discuss calibration measurements using the time-of-flight spectra of neutrons scattered on He and Ar gases and the neutron activation technique. In particular, we calculate the neutron velocity and time-of-flight spectra after scattering neutrons on neutrons and after scattering neutrons on He and Ar atoms for the proposed experimental geometry, using a realistic neutron flux spectrum—Maxwellian plus epithermal tail. The shape of the neutron spectrum after scattering is appreciably different from the initial spectrum, due to collisions between thermal-thermal and thermal-epithermal neutrons. At the same time, the integral over the Maxwellian part of the realistic scattering spectrum differs by only about 6 per cent from that of a pure Maxwellian nn-scattering spectrum.

  16. Scanning electrochemical microscopy: surface interrogation of adsorbed hydrogen and the open circuit catalytic decomposition of formic acid at platinum.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Bard, Allen J

    2010-04-14

    The surface interrogation mode of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is extended to the in situ quantification of adsorbed hydrogen, H(ads), at polycrystalline platinum. The methodology consists of the production, at an interrogator electrode, of an oxidized species that is able to react with H(ads) on the Pt surface and report the amounts of this adsorbate through the SECM feedback response. The technique is validated by comparison to the electrochemical underpotential deposition (UPD) of hydrogen on Pt. We include an evaluation of electrochemical mediators for their use as oxidizing reporters for adsorbed species at platinum; a notable finding is the ability of tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) to oxidize (interrogate) H(ads) on Pt at low pH (0.5 M H(2)SO(4) or 1 M HClO(4)) and with minimal background effects. As a case study, the decomposition of formic acid (HCOOH) in acidic media at open circuit on Pt was investigated. Our results suggest that formic acid decomposes at the surface of unbiased Pt through a dehydrogenation route to yield H(ads) at the Pt surface. The amount of H(ads) depended on the open circuit potential (OCP) of the Pt electrode at the time of interrogation; at a fixed concentration of HCOOH, a more negative OCP yielded larger amounts of H(ads) until reaching a coulomb limiting coverage close to 1 UPD monolayer of H(ads). The introduction of oxygen into the cell shifted the OCP to more positive potentials and reduced the quantified H(ads); furthermore, the system was shown to be chemically reversible, as several interrogations could be run consecutively and reproducibly regardless of the path taken to reach a given OCP. PMID:20225806

  17. Interrogation and mitigation of polarization effects for standard and birefringent FBGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Selwan K.; Van Roosbroeck, Jan; O'Dowd, John A.; Van Hoe, Bram; Lindner, Eric; Vlekken, Johan; Farnan, Martin; Karabacak, Devrez M.; Singer, Johannes M.

    2016-05-01

    Optical sensors based on Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) are used in several applications and industries. Several inscription techniques and type of fibers can be used. However, depending on the writing process, type of fiber used and the packaging of the sensor a Polarization Dependent Frequency Shift (PDFS) can often be observed with polarized tunable laser based optical interrogators. Here we study the PDFS of the FBG peak for the different FBG types. A PDFS of <1pm up to >20pm was observed across the FBGs. To mitigate and reduce this effect we propose a polarization mitigation technique which relies on a synchronous polarization switch to reduce the effect typically by a factor greater than 4. In other scenarios the sensor itself is designed to be birefringent (Bi-FBG) to allow pressure and/or simultaneous temperature and strain measurements. Using the same polarization switch we demonstrate how we can interrogate the Bi-FBGs with high accuracy to enable high performance of such sensors to be achievable.

  18. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  19. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  20. 29 CFR 18.611 - Mode and order of interrogation and presentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Mode and order of interrogation and presentation. 18.611... of interrogation and presentation. (a) Control by judge. The judge shall exercise reasonable control... interrogation and presentation effective for the ascertainment of the truth, (2) Avoid needless consumption...

  1. Method for improving the angular resolution of a neutron scatter camera

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Gerling, Mark; Cooper, Robert Lee; Mrowka, Stanley; Brennan, James S.

    2012-12-25

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source wherein the neutron detection efficiency is increased has been described. Instead of the previous technique that uses a time-of-flight (TOF) between 2 widely spaced fixed planes of neutron detectors to measure scatter neutron kinetic energy, we now use the recoil proton energy deposited in the second of the 2 scatter planes which can now be repositioned either much closer together or further apart. However, by doubling the separation distance between the 2 planes from 20 cm to a distance of 40 cm we improved the angular resolution of the detector from about 12.degree. to about 10.degree.. A further doubling of the separation distance to 80 cm provided an addition improvement in angular resolution of the detector to about 6.degree. without adding additional detectors or ancillary electronics. The distance between planes also may be dynamically changed using a suitable common technique such as a gear- or motor-drive to toggle between the various positions. The angular resolution of this new configuration, therefore, is increased at the expanse of detection sensitivity. However, the diminished sensitivity may be acceptable for those applications where the detector is able to interrogate a particular site for an extended period.

  2. Active interrogation of helicopter main rotor faults using trailing edge flap actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Patricia Lynn

    Over the past decade, the helicopter community has become increasingly interested in health monitoring. The rotor system, however, is not sufficiently covered in the current Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS). This dissertation describes the development and evaluation of a new approach for detecting helicopter rotor faults in which active trailing edge flaps are used to interrogate the system. This work is based on the presumption that trailing edge flaps would be installed for the primary purpose of vibration and/or noise control; health monitoring is a secondary use. Using this approach, the blade is excited by an interrogation signal, which is a low amplitude oscillation at a few discrete frequencies. The blade response is measured and the health of the system is determined using a frequency domain damage identification algorithm. Damage detection and location are achieved via the residual force vector. The residual force vector, coupled with an understanding of the system physics, also provides nature characterization. Quantification of damage extent is achieved via a frequency domain adaptation of the Asymmetric Minimum Rank Perturbation Theory. The active interrogation system is evaluated using an aeroelastic finite element model of the rotor system in hover, including an advanced unsteady aerodynamic model to predict the trailing edge flap loads. Realistic damage models, including distributed bending stiffness damage, torsional stiffness damage, control system stiffness damage, cracks and ballistic damage, are seeded in the rotor system model. Results demonstrate detection, location and quantification of extent of all of the faults tested. The effects of noise and modeling errors are discussed and mitigation techniques are developed. Additionally, a measurability study is included. Benefits of this work include both improved health monitoring for rotorcraft as well as insights into the application of structural damage detection algorithms to a

  3. Development of neutron/gamma generators and a polymer semiconductor detector for homeland security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Michael Joseph

    Instrumentation development is essential to the advancement and success of homeland security systems. Active interrogation techniques that scan luggage and cargo containers for shielded special nuclear materials or explosives hold great potential in halting further terrorist attacks. The development of more economical, compact and efficient source and radiation detection devices will facilitate scanning of all containers and luggage while maintaining high-throughput and low-false alarms Innovative ion sources were developed for two novel, specialized neutron generating devices and initial generator tests were performed. In addition, a low-energy acceleration gamma generator was developed and its performance characterized. Finally, an organic semiconductor was investigated for direct fast neutron detection. A main part of the thesis work was the development of ion sources, crucial components of the neutron/gamma generator development. The use of an externally-driven radio-frequency antenna allows the ion source to generate high beam currents with high, mono-atomic species fractions while maintaining low operating pressures, advantageous parameters for neutron generators. A dual "S" shaped induction antenna was developed to satisfy the high current and large extraction area requirements of the high-intensity neutron generator. The dual antenna arrangement generated a suitable current density of 28 mA/cm2 at practical RF power levels. The stringent requirements of the Pulsed Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy neutron generator necessitated the development of a specialized ten window ion source of toroidal shape with a narrow neutron production target at its center. An innovative ten antenna arrangement with parallel capacitors was developed for driving the multi-antenna arrangement and uniform coupling of RF power to all ten antennas was achieved. To address the desire for low-impact, low-radiation dose active interrogation systems, research was performed on mono

  4. Neutron tomography of axially symmetric objects using 14 MeV neutrons from a portable neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, P. Andersson-Sunden, E.; Sjöstrand, H.; Jacobsson-Svärd, S.

    2014-08-01

    In nuclear boiling water reactor cores, the distribution of water and steam (void) is essential for both safety and efficiency reasons. In order to enhance predictive capabilities, void distribution assessment is performed in two-phase test-loops under reactor-relevant conditions. This article proposes the novel technique of fast-neutron tomography using a portable deuterium-tritium neutron generator to determine the time-averaged void distribution in these loops. Fast neutrons have the advantage of high transmission through the metallic structures and pipes typically concealing a thermal-hydraulic test loop, while still being fairly sensitive to the water/void content. However, commercially available fast-neutron generators also have the disadvantage of a relatively low yield and fast-neutron detection also suffers from relatively low detection efficiency. Fortunately, some loops are axially symmetric, a property which can be exploited to reduce the amount of data needed for tomographic measurement, thus limiting the interrogation time needed. In this article, three axially symmetric test objects depicting a thermal-hydraulic test loop have been examined; steel pipes with outer diameter 24 mm, thickness 1.5 mm, and with three different distributions of the plastic material POM inside the pipes. Data recorded with the FANTOM fast-neutron tomography instrument have been used to perform tomographic reconstructions to assess their radial material distribution. Here, a dedicated tomographic algorithm that exploits the symmetry of these objects has been applied, which is described in the paper. Results are demonstrated in 20 rixel (radial pixel) reconstructions of the interior constitution and 2D visualization of the pipe interior is demonstrated. The local POM attenuation coefficients in the rixels were measured with errors (RMS) of 0.025, 0.020, and 0.022 cm{sup −1}, solid POM attenuation coefficient. The accuracy and precision is high enough to provide a useful

  5. Neutron tomography of axially symmetric objects using 14 MeV neutrons from a portable neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, P.; Andersson-Sunden, E.; Sjöstrand, H.; Jacobsson-Svärd, S.

    2014-08-01

    In nuclear boiling water reactor cores, the distribution of water and steam (void) is essential for both safety and efficiency reasons. In order to enhance predictive capabilities, void distribution assessment is performed in two-phase test-loops under reactor-relevant conditions. This article proposes the novel technique of fast-neutron tomography using a portable deuterium-tritium neutron generator to determine the time-averaged void distribution in these loops. Fast neutrons have the advantage of high transmission through the metallic structures and pipes typically concealing a thermal-hydraulic test loop, while still being fairly sensitive to the water/void content. However, commercially available fast-neutron generators also have the disadvantage of a relatively low yield and fast-neutron detection also suffers from relatively low detection efficiency. Fortunately, some loops are axially symmetric, a property which can be exploited to reduce the amount of data needed for tomographic measurement, thus limiting the interrogation time needed. In this article, three axially symmetric test objects depicting a thermal-hydraulic test loop have been examined; steel pipes with outer diameter 24 mm, thickness 1.5 mm, and with three different distributions of the plastic material POM inside the pipes. Data recorded with the FANTOM fast-neutron tomography instrument have been used to perform tomographic reconstructions to assess their radial material distribution. Here, a dedicated tomographic algorithm that exploits the symmetry of these objects has been applied, which is described in the paper. Results are demonstrated in 20 rixel (radial pixel) reconstructions of the interior constitution and 2D visualization of the pipe interior is demonstrated. The local POM attenuation coefficients in the rixels were measured with errors (RMS) of 0.025, 0.020, and 0.022 cm-1, solid POM attenuation coefficient. The accuracy and precision is high enough to provide a useful indication

  6. Neutron tomography of axially symmetric objects using 14 MeV neutrons from a portable neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Andersson, P; Andersson-Sunden, E; Sjöstrand, H; Jacobsson-Svärd, S

    2014-08-01

    In nuclear boiling water reactor cores, the distribution of water and steam (void) is essential for both safety and efficiency reasons. In order to enhance predictive capabilities, void distribution assessment is performed in two-phase test-loops under reactor-relevant conditions. This article proposes the novel technique of fast-neutron tomography using a portable deuterium-tritium neutron generator to determine the time-averaged void distribution in these loops. Fast neutrons have the advantage of high transmission through the metallic structures and pipes typically concealing a thermal-hydraulic test loop, while still being fairly sensitive to the water/void content. However, commercially available fast-neutron generators also have the disadvantage of a relatively low yield and fast-neutron detection also suffers from relatively low detection efficiency. Fortunately, some loops are axially symmetric, a property which can be exploited to reduce the amount of data needed for tomographic measurement, thus limiting the interrogation time needed. In this article, three axially symmetric test objects depicting a thermal-hydraulic test loop have been examined; steel pipes with outer diameter 24 mm, thickness 1.5 mm, and with three different distributions of the plastic material POM inside the pipes. Data recorded with the FANTOM fast-neutron tomography instrument have been used to perform tomographic reconstructions to assess their radial material distribution. Here, a dedicated tomographic algorithm that exploits the symmetry of these objects has been applied, which is described in the paper. Results are demonstrated in 20 rixel (radial pixel) reconstructions of the interior constitution and 2D visualization of the pipe interior is demonstrated. The local POM attenuation coefficients in the rixels were measured with errors (RMS) of 0.025, 0.020, and 0.022 cm(-1), solid POM attenuation coefficient. The accuracy and precision is high enough to provide a useful

  7. Characterization of a Pulse Neutron Source Yield under Field Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip C.; Hopper, Lindsay

    2009-03-10

    Technique of rapid evaluation of a pulse neutron sources such as neutron generators under field conditions has been developed. The phoswich sensor and pulse-shape discrimination techniques have been used for the simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons. The sensor has been calibrated using activation neutron detectors and a pulse deuterium-tritium fusion neutron source.

  8. Assessment of organ doses from exposure to neutrons using the Monte Carlo technique and an image-based anatomical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Ahmet

    The distribution of absorbed doses in the body can be computationally determined using mathematical or tomographic representations of human anatomy. A whole- body model was developed from the color images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project® for simulating the transport of radiation in the human body. The model, called Visible Photographic Man (VIP-Man), has sixty-one organs and tissues represented in the Monte Carlo code MCNPX at 4-mm voxel resolution. Organ dose calculations from external neutron sources were carried out using VIP-man and MCNPX to determine a new set of dose conversion coefficients to be used in radiation protection. Monoenergetic neutron beams between 10-9 MeV and 10 GeV were studied under six different irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic. The results for absorbed doses in twenty-four organs and the effective doses based on twelve critical organs are presented in tabular form. A comprehensive comparison of the results with those from the mathematical models show discrepancies that can be attributed to the variations in body modeling (size, location and shape of the individual organs) and the use of different nuclear datasets or models to derive the reaction cross sections, as well as the use of different transport packages for simulation radiation effects. The organ dose results based on the realistic VIP-Man body model allow the existing radiation protection dosimetry on neutrons to be re-evaluated and improved.

  9. Application of Neutron Correlation Techniques to Warhead Authentication: Feasibility and Conceptual Requirements?Monte Carlo Simulations and Statistical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M I; Wolford, J K

    2004-08-05

    We explore the feasibility of using Feynman moments as attributes of fissile material in warhead authentication measurements. We present results of computer simulations of neutron correlation measurements to validate and inform the application of the method to measurements in an arms control scenario. We establish the robustness of the method for use in automated measuring equipment that protects classified or sensitive data using an information barrier. Drawing from our results, we define high-level requirements to govern the design process, and guide the construction of a prototype.

  10. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise and Neutron Diffraction Techniques for the Study of Intergranular Residual Strains in Mild Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hutanu, Roxana; Clapham, Lynann; Rogge, Ronald

    2004-02-26

    Intergranular residual stresses (IS) are microscopic residual stresses which have been found to accumulate along the <100> direction in steels. The <100> direction is also the magnetic easy axis direction in steel. This work involved Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) studies on steel samples, deformed uniaxially to increasing levels of strain. The MBN results indicated that a bulk magnetic easy axis was produced by the deformation process, and neutron diffraction experiments showed that this easy axis was correlated with the tensile strain in grains oriented in the <100> direction.

  11. OFDR with double interrogation for dynamic quasi-distributed sensing.

    PubMed

    Am, Adva Bar; Arbel, Dror; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-02-10

    A method for phase sensitive quasi-distributed vibration and acoustical sensing is presented. The method is based on double optical frequency domain reflectometry interrogation of a sensing fiber with an array of discrete weak reflectors. Two replicas of the interrogation signal are launched into the sensing fiber. The time delay between the replicas is equal to the roundtrip time between two consecutive reflectors. Each peak in the spectrum of the returning signal is made from a coherent addition of the reflections of two consecutive reflectors. Its magnitude is highly sensitive to the optical phase in the fiber segment between the reflectors. The system was used to detect and locate the fall of a paperclip from height of 40 cm onto a sandbox where a 15 cm segment of the fiber was buried. In a different experiment the system successfully detected and located minute vibrations at 440 Hz that were induced by touching the fiber with a tuning fork. PMID:24663522

  12. Time of flight grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering. A novel scattering technique for the investigation of nanostructured polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Buschbaum, P.; Metwalli, E.; Moulin, J.-F.; Kudryashov, V.; Haese-Seiller, M.; Kampmann, R.

    2009-02-01

    Grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS) overcomes the limitations of conventional small angle scattering with respect to extremely small sample volumes in the thin film geometry. In time of flight (TOF) mode neutrons with a broad range of wavelengths are used simultaneously and recorded as a function of their respective times of flight. The combination of both, TOF-GISANS, enables the simultaneous performance of several GISANS measurements, which differ in wavelength. As a consequence, within one measurement a full set of GISANS pattern related to different scattering vectors, different scattering depths and resolutions result. This allows the detection of nanostructures with a chemical sensitivity. The possibilities of TOF-GISANS are demonstrated by the simple example of polymer nano-dots located on top of a silicon surface. As probed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) the nano-dots exhibit a large characteristic nearest neighbour distance of 545 nm and a surface coverage of 28%. From the analysis of the wavelength dependent data in combination with AFM the mass density of the polymer nano-dots is determined to be equal to the bulk value. A comparison to common single wavelength GISANS experiments is shown.

  13. Implementation of neutron counting techniques at US facilities for IAEA verification of excess materials from nuclear weapons production

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.E.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Reilly, T.D.; Theis, W.; Lemaire, R.J.; Xiao, J.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Nonproliferation and Export Control Policy, announced by President Clinton before the United Nations General Assembly on September 27, 1993, commits the U.S. to placing under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards excess nuclear materials no longer needed for the U.S. nuclear deterrent. As of July 1, 1995, the IAEA had completed Initial Physical Inventory Verification (IPIV) at two facilities: a storage vault in the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant containing highly enriched uranium (HOW) metal and another storage vault in the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) containing plutonium oxide and plutonium-bearing residues. Another plutonium- storage vault, located at Rocky Flats, is scheduled for the IPIV in the fall of 1995. Conventional neutron coincidence counting is one of the routinely applied IAEA nondestructive assay (ND) methods for verification of uranium and plutonium. However, at all three facilities mentioned above, neutron ND equipment had to be modified or developed for specific facility needs such as the type and configuration of material placed under safeguards. This document describes those modifications and developments.

  14. Distributed audio recording using OFDR with double interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabai, Haniel; Eyal, Avishay

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a phase sensitive, dynamic and long range fiber-optic sensing system with fully distributed audio recording capabilities. The proposed system implements a recently developed OFDR design, which is based on double interrogation of a sensing fiber with equally-spaced discrete reflectors. In this paper, the ability of each sensing segment to operate as an independent, purely optical audio recorder with little cross-talk artifacts is demonstrated.

  15. Neutron scatter camera

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  16. A Study of 3He detectors for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester

    2009-10-01

    3He proportional counters have long been used as neutron detectors for both passive and active detection of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The optimal configuration of these detectors as far as gas pressure, amount of moderating material, and size are concerned is highly dependent on what neutron signatures are being used to detect and identify SNM. We present here a parametric study of the neutron capture response of 3He detectors, based on Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNPX radiation transport code. The neutron capture response of the detectors has been modeled as a function of time after an incident neutron pulse.

  17. Determination of the plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly by passive and active interrogation using a differential die-away instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzl, V.; Croft, S.; Richard, J.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Tobin, S. J.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to estimating the total plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly (SFA) that is based on combining information from a passive measurement of the total neutron count rate (PN) of the assayed SFA and a measure of its multiplication. While PN can be measured essentially with any non-destructive assay (NDA) technique capable of neutron detection, the measure of multiplication is, in our approach, determined by means of active interrogation using an instrument based on the Differential Die-Away technique (DDA). The DDA is a NDA technique developed within the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) project focused on the utilization of NDA techniques to determine the elemental plutonium content in commercial nuclear SFA's [1]. This approach was adopted since DDA also allows determination of other SFA characteristics, such as burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time, and also allows for detection of certain types of diversion of nuclear material. The quantification of total plutonium is obtained using an analytical correlation function in terms of the observed PN and active multiplication. Although somewhat similar approaches relating Pu content with PN have been adopted in the past, we demonstrate by extensive simulation of the fuel irradiation and NDA process that our analytical method is independent of explicit knowledge of the initial enrichment, burnup, and an absolute value of the SFA's reactivity (i.e. multiplication factor). We show that when tested with MCNPX™ simulations comprising the 64 SFA NGSI Spent Fuel Library-1 we were able to determine elemental plutonium content, using just a few calibration parameters, with an average variation in the prediction of around 1-2% across the wide dynamic range of irradiation history parameters used, namely initial enrichment (IE=2-5%), burnup (BU=15-60 GWd/tU) and cooling time (CT=1-80 y). In this paper we describe the basic approach and the

  18. Polarization-independent high-resolution spectral interrogation of FBGs using a BFBG-CCD array for optical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Alexander G.; Zhou, Kaiming; Foote, Peter; Zhang, Lin; Bennion, Ian

    2004-03-01

    Optical fibre strain sensors using Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBGs) are poised to play a major role in structural health monitoring in a variety of application from aerospace to civil engineering. At the heart of technology is the optoelectronic instrumentation required to convert optical signals into measurands. Users are demanding compact, lightweight, rugged and low cost solutions. This paper describes development of a new device based on a blazed FBG and CCD array that can potentially meet the above demands. We have shown that this very low cost technique may be used to interrogate a WDM array of sensor gratings with highly accurate and highly repeatable results unaffected by the polarisation state of the radiation. In this paper, we present results showing that sensors may be interrogated with an RMS error of 1.7pm, drift below 0.12pm and dynamic range of up to 65nm.

  19. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress. Progress report, June 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

  20. NeuroArray: a universal interface for patterning and interrogating neural circuitry with single cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices. PMID:24759264

  1. NeuroArray: A Universal Interface for Patterning and Interrogating Neural Circuitry with Single Cell Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Junzhe; Lin, Xudong; Luo, Rongcong; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2014-04-01

    Recreation of neural network in vitro with designed topology is a valuable tool to decipher how neurons behave when interacting in hierarchical networks. In this study, we developed a simple and effective platform to pattern primary neurons in array formats for interrogation of neural circuitry with single cell resolution. Unlike many surface-chemistry-based patterning methods, our NeuroArray technique is specially designed to accommodate neuron's polarized morphologies to make regular arrays of cells without restricting their neurite outgrowth, and thus allows formation of freely designed, well-connected, and spontaneously active neural network. The NeuroArray device was based on a stencil design fabricated using a novel sacrificial-layer-protected PDMS molding method that enables production of through-structures in a thin layer of PDMS with feature sizes as small as 3 µm. Using the NeuroArray along with calcium imaging, we have successfully demonstrated large-scale tracking and recording of neuronal activities, and used such data to characterize the spiking dynamics and transmission within a diode-like neural network. Essentially, the NeuroArray is a universal patterning platform designed for, but not limited to neuron cells. With little adaption, it can be readily interfaced with other interrogation modalities for high-throughput drug testing, and for building neuron culture based live computational devices.

  2. Identifying work related injuries: comparison of methods for interrogating text fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Work-related injuries in Australia are estimated to cost around $57.5 billion annually, however there are currently insufficient surveillance data available to support an evidence-based public health response. Emergency departments (ED) in Australia are a potential source of information on work-related injuries though most ED's do not have an 'Activity Code' to identify work-related cases with information about the presenting problem recorded in a short free text field. This study compared methods for interrogating text fields for identifying work-related injuries presenting at emergency departments to inform approaches to surveillance of work-related injury. Methods Three approaches were used to interrogate an injury description text field to classify cases as work-related: keyword search, index search, and content analytic text mining. Sensitivity and specificity were examined by comparing cases flagged by each approach to cases coded with an Activity code during triage. Methods to improve the sensitivity and/or specificity of each approach were explored by adjusting the classification techniques within each broad approach. Results The basic keyword search detected 58% of cases (Specificity 0.99), an index search detected 62% of cases (Specificity 0.87), and the content analytic text mining (using adjusted probabilities) approach detected 77% of cases (Specificity 0.95). Conclusions The findings of this study provide strong support for continued development of text searching methods to obtain information from routine emergency department data, to improve the capacity for comprehensive injury surveillance. PMID:20374657

  3. A novel method for active fissile mass estimation with a pulsed neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubi, C.; Ridnik, T.; Israelashvili, I.; Pedersen, B.

    2013-07-01

    Neutron interrogation facilities for mass evaluation of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) samples are divided into two main categories: passive interrogation, where all neutron detections are due to spontaneous events, and active interrogation, where fissions are induced on the tested material by an external neutron source. While active methods are, in general, faster and more effective, their analysis is much harder to carry out. In the paper, we will introduce a new formalism for analyzing the detection signal generated by a pulsed source active interrogation facility. The analysis is aimed to distinct between fission neutrons from the main neutron source in the system, and the surrounding "neutron noise". In particular, we derive analytic expressions for the first three central moments of the number of detections in a given time interval, in terms of the different neutron sources. While the method depends on exactly the same physical assumptions as known models, the simplicity of the suggested formalism allows us to take into account the variance of the external neutron source—an effect that was so far neglected.

  4. Evaluation of gratings for X-ray and neutron phase imaging techniques by using x-ray projection microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Katsunori; Yashiro, Wataru; Olbinado, Margie; Momose, Atsushi

    2012-07-31

    In the X-ray and neutron Talbot (-Lau) interferometry, fabrication of phase or amplitude grating with a high-aspect ratio is a key factor to obtain high quality images. To improve the ability of the grating, evaluation of shape and thickness variation and feed-back to the fabrication process are essential. Here, it is shown that X-ray projection microscope with a spatial resolution of sub-micrometer is a powerful tool for the purpose. Three kinds of gratings have been evaluated by using a projection X-ray microscope with X-ray source size of 0.6 micrometer. Uniformity of thickness of the grating has been visualized nondestructively.

  5. Characterization of ancient glass excavated in Enez (Ancient Ainos) Turkey by combined Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyuz, Sevim; Akyuz, Tanil; Mukhamedshina, Nuranya M.; Mirsagatova, A. Adiba; Basaran, Sait; Cakan, Banu

    2012-05-01

    Ancient glass fragments excavated in the archaeological district Enez (Ancient Ainos)-Turkey were investigated by combined Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry techniques. Multi-elemental contents of 15 glass fragments that belong to Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman Periods, were determined by INAA. The concentrations of twenty six elements (Na, K, Ca, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Sb, Cs, Ba, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, Au and Th), which might be present in the samples as flux, stabilizers, colorants or opacifiers, and impurities, were examined. Chemometric treatment of the INAA data was performed and principle component analysis revealed presence of 3 distinct groups. The thermal history of the glass samples was determined by FTIR spectrometry.

  6. Monte-Carlo simulations of neutron-induced activation in a Fast-Neutron and Gamma-Based Cargo Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Brandis, M.; Dangendorf, V.; Goldberg, M. B.; Kaufmann, F.; Mor, I.; Nolte, R.; Schmiedel, M.; Tittelmeier, K.; Vartsky, D.; Wershofen, H.

    2012-03-01

    An air cargo inspection system combining two nuclear reaction based techniques, namely Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography and Dual-Discrete-Energy Gamma Radiography is currently being developed. This system is expected to allow detection of standard and improvised explosives as well as special nuclear materials. An important aspect for the applicability of nuclear techniques in an airport inspection facility is the inventory and lifetimes of radioactive isotopes produced by the neutron radiation inside the cargo, as well as the dose delivered by these isotopes to people in contact with the cargo during and following the interrogation procedure. Using MCNPX and CINDER90 we have calculated the activation levels for several typical inspection scenarios. One example is the activation of various metal samples embedded in a cotton-filled container. To validate the simulation results, a benchmark experiment was performed, in which metal samples were activated by fast-neutrons in a water-filled glass jar. The induced activity was determined by analyzing the gamma spectra. Based on the calculated radioactive inventory in the container, the dose levels due to the induced gamma radiation were calculated at several distances from the container and in relevant time windows after the irradiation, in order to evaluate the radiation exposure of the cargo handling staff, air crew and passengers during flight. The possibility of remanent long-lived radioactive inventory after cargo is delivered to the client is also of concern and was evaluated.

  7. Fast neutron transmission spectroscopy for illicit substance detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, T.J.; Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1996-05-01

    Fast Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detecting explosives in luggage and other small containers. It uses an accelerator to generate nanosecond-pulsed neutron beams that strike a target, producing a white source of neutrons. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing neutron transmission data. Tomographic reconstruction is used to determine the spatial variations of individual elemental densities. Elemental densities are combined in a detection algorithm that indicates presence or absence of explosives. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms have been validated by application to experimental data. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as flight path length and position of the interrogated object.

  8. Assessing the feasibility of interrogating nuclear waste storage silos using cosmic-ray muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Bonechi, L.; Cimmino, L.; D'Alessandro, R.; Ireland, D. G.; Kaiser, R.; Mahon, D. F.; Mori, N.; Noli, P.; Saracino, G.; Shearer, C.; Viliani, L.; Yang, G.

    2015-06-01

    Muon radiography is a fast growing field in applied scientific research. In recent years, many detector technologies and imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering and absorption properties of cosmic-ray muons have been developed for the non-destructive assay of various structures across a wide range of applications. This work presents the first results that assess the feasibility of using muon radiography to interrogate waste silos within the U.K. Nuclear Industry. Two such approaches, using different techniques that exploit each of these properties, have previously been published, and show promising results from both simulation and experimental data for the detection of shielded high-Z materials and density variations from volcanic assay. Both detection systems used are based on scintillator and photomultiplier technologies. Results from dedicated simulation studies using both these proven technologies and image reconstruction techniques are presented for an intermediate-sized legacy nuclear waste storage facility filled with concrete and an array of uranium samples. Both results highlight the potential to identify uranium objects of varying thicknesses greater than 5 cm within real-time durations of several weeks. Increased contributions from Coulomb scattering within the concrete matrix of the structure hinder the ability of both approaches to resolve similar objects of 2 cm dimensions even with increased statistics. These results are all dependent on both the position of the objects within the facility and the locations of the detectors. Results for differing thicknesses of concrete, which reflect the non-standard composition of these complex, legacy structures under interrogation, are also presented alongside studies performed for a series of data collection durations. It is anticipated that with further research and optimisation of detector technologies and geometries, muon radiography in one, or both of these forms, will play a key role in future

  9. Neutron Imaging and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Ian S; McGreevy, Robert L; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2009-04-01

    Neutron Imaging and Applications offers an introduction to the basics of neutron beam production and instrumentation in addition to the wide scope of techniques that provide unique imaging capabilities over a broad and diverse range of applications. An instructional overview of neutron sources, optics and detectors, allows readers to delve more deeply into the discussions of radiography, tomography, phase contrast imaging and prospective applications using advanced neutron holography techniques and polarized beams. A section devoted to overviews in a growing range of applications describes imaging of fuel cells and hydrogen storage devices for a robust hydrogen economy; new directions in material science and engineering; the investigation of precious artifacts of cultural heritage importance; determination of plant physiology and growth processes; imaging of biological tissues and macromolecules, and the practical elements of neutron imaging for homeland security and contraband detection. Written by key experts in the field, researchers and engineers involved with imaging technologies will find Neutron Imaging and Applications a valuable reference.

  10. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Bonura, M A; Ruiz, C L; Fehl, D L; Cooper, G W; Chandler, G; Hahn, K D; Nelson, A J; Styron, J D; Torres, J A

    2014-11-01

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF's) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement. PMID:25430209

  11. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bonura, M. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Ruiz, C. L. Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G.; Hahn, K. D.; Torres, J. A.

    2014-11-15

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF’s) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  12. Atmospheric deposition of rare earth elements in Albania studied by the moss biomonitoring technique, neutron activation analysis and GIS technology.

    PubMed

    Allajbeu, Sh; Yushin, N S; Qarri, F; Duliu, O G; Lazo, P; Frontasyeva, M V

    2016-07-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are typically conservative elements that are scarcely derived from anthropogenic sources. The mobilization of REEs in the environment requires the monitoring of these elements in environmental matrices, in which they are present at trace level. The determination of 11 REEs in carpet-forming moss species (Hypnum cupressiforme) collected from 44 sampling sites over the whole territory of the country were done by using epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) at IBR-2 fast pulsed reactor in Dubna. This paper is focused on REEs (lanthanides) and Sc. Fe as typical consistent element and Th that appeared good correlations between the elements of lanthanides are included in this paper. Th, Sc, and REEs were never previously determined in the air deposition of Albania. Descriptive statistics were used for data treatment using MINITAB 17 software package. The median values of the elements under investigation were compared with those of the neighboring countries such as Bulgaria, Macedonia, Romania, and Serbia, as well as Norway which is selected as a clean area. Geographical distribution maps of the elements over the sampled territory were constructed using geographic information system (GIS) technology. Geochemical behavior of REEs in moss samples has been studied by using the ternary diagram of Sc-La-Th, Spider diagrams and multivariate analysis. It was revealed that the accumulation of REEs in current mosses is associated with the wind-blowing metal-enriched soils that is pointed out as the main emitting factor of the elements under investigation. PMID:27044293

  13. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic raysa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonura, M. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Chandler, G.; Hahn, K. D.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Torres, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF's) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  14. Microwave interrogated large core fused silica fiber Michelson interferometer for strain sensing.

    PubMed

    Hua, Liwei; Song, Yang; Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Li, Yanjun; Xiao, Hai

    2015-08-20

    A Michelson-type large core optical fiber sensor has been developed, which is designed based on the optical carrier-based microwave interferometry technique, and fabricated by using two pieces of 200-μm diameter fused silica core fiber as two arms of the Michelson interferometer. The interference fringe pattern caused by the optical path difference of the two arms is interrogated in the microwave domain, where the fringe visibility of 40 dB has easily been obtained. The strain sensing at both room temperature and high temperatures has been demonstrated by using such a sensor. Experimental results show that this sensor has a linear response to the applied strain, and also has relatively low temperature-strain cross talk. The dopant-free quality of the fused silica fiber provides high possibility for the sensor to have promising strain sensing performance in a high temperature environment. PMID:26368751

  15. Elemental characterization of LL-MA radioactive waste packages with the associated particle technique

    SciTech Connect

    Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Toure, M.; El Kanawati, W.; Eleon, C.

    2011-07-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R and D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages with analytical methods and with non-destructive nuclear measurements. This paper concerns fast neutron interrogation with the associated particle technique (APT), which brings 3D information about the waste material composition. The characterization of volume elements filled with iron, water, aluminium, and PVC in bituminized and fibre concrete LL-MA waste packages has been investigated with MCNP [1] and MODAR data analysis software [2]. APT provides usable information about major elements presents in the volumes of interest. However, neutron scattering on hydrogen nuclei spreads the tagged neutron beam out of the targeted volume towards surrounding materials, reducing spatial selectivity. Simulation shows that small less than 1 L targets can be characterised up to the half-radius of a 225 L bituminized drum, the matrix of which is very rich in hydrogen. Deeper characterization in concrete is possible but limited by counting statistics due to photon attenuation in this dense matrix and, unless large inspection volumes are considered, by the lack of spatial selectivity of the tagged neutron beam due to neutron scattering. (authors)

  16. Advanced ultrasonic measurement methodology for non-invasive interrogation and identification of fluids in sealed containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-03-01

    Government agencies and homeland security related organizations have identified the need to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a prototype portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection prototype that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials encountered in various law enforcement inspection activities, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with an advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios and 2) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of work conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated that the prototype experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  17. Advanced ultrasonic measurement methodology for non-invasive interrogation and identification of fluids in sealed containers

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-05-01

    Government agencies and homeland security related organizations have identified the need to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a prototype portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection prototype that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials encountered in various law enforcement inspection activities, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with an advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios and 2) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of work conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated that the prototype experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  18. Advanced Ultrasonic Measurement Methodology for Non-Invasive Interrogation and Identification of Fluids in Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Brian J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Eckenrode, Brian A.

    2006-03-16

    The Hazardous Materials Response Unit (HMRU) and the Counterterrorism and Forensic Science Research Unit (CTFSRU), Laboratory Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) have been mandated to develop and establish a wide range of unprecedented capabilities for providing scientific and technical forensic services to investigations involving hazardous chemical, biological, and radiological materials, including extremely dangerous chemical and biological warfare agents. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a portable, hand-held, hazardous materials acoustic inspection device (HAZAID) that provides noninvasive container interrogation and material identification capabilities using nondestructive ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements. Due to the wide variety of fluids as well as container sizes and materials, the need for high measurement sensitivity and advanced ultrasonic measurement techniques were identified. The HAZAID prototype was developed using a versatile electronics platform, advanced ultrasonic wave propagation methods, and advanced signal processing techniques. This paper primarily focuses on the ultrasonic measurement methods and signal processing techniques incorporated into the HAZAID prototype. High bandwidth ultrasonic transducers combined with the advanced pulse compression technique allowed researchers to 1) impart large amounts of energy, 2) obtain high signal-to-noise ratios, and 3) obtain accurate and consistent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements through a variety of highly attenuative containers and fluid media. Results of this feasibility study demonstrated that the HAZAID experimental measurement technique also provided information regarding container properties, which will be utilized in future container-independent measurements of hidden liquids.

  19. Interrogating scarcity: how to think about 'resource-scarce settings'.

    PubMed

    Schrecker, Ted

    2013-07-01

    The idea of resource scarcity permeates health ethics and health policy analysis in various contexts. However, health ethics inquiry seldom asks-as it should-why some settings are 'resource-scarce' and others not. In this article I describe interrogating scarcity as a strategy for inquiry into questions of resource allocation within a single political jurisdiction and, in particular, as an approach to the issue of global health justice in an interconnected world. I demonstrate its relevance to the situation of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with brief descriptions of four elements of contemporary globalization: trade agreements; the worldwide financial marketplace and capital flight; structural adjustment; imperial geopolitics and foreign policy. This demonstration involves not only health care, but also social determinants of health. Finally, I argue that interrogating scarcity provides the basis for a new, critical approach to health policy at the interface of ethics and the social sciences, with specific reference to market fundamentalism as the value system underlying contemporary globalization. PMID:22899597

  20. Remotely Interrogated Passive Polarizing Dosimeter (RIPPeD).

    SciTech Connect

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Buller, Daniel L.; Dirk, Shawn M.; Boye, Robert R.; Samora, Sally; Washburn, Cody M.; Wheeler, David Roger

    2008-09-01

    Conductive polymers have become an extremely useful class of materials for many optical applications. We have developed an electrochemical growth method for depositing highly conductive ({approx}100 S/cm) polypyrrole. Additionally, we have adapted advanced fabrication methods for use with the polypyrrole resulting in gratings with submicron features. This conductive polymer micro-wire grid provides an optical polarizer with unique properties. When the polymer is exposed to ionizing radiation, its conductivity is affected and the polarization properties of the device, specifically the extinction ratio, change in a corresponding manner. This change in polarization properties can be determined by optically interrogating the device, possibly from a remote location. The result is a passive radiation-sensitive sensor with very low optical visibility. The ability to interrogate the device from a safe standoff distance provides a device useful in potentially dangerous environments. Also, the passive nature of the device make it applicable in applications where external power is not available. We will review the polymer deposition, fabrication methods and device design and modeling. The characterization of the polymer's sensitivity to ionizing radiation and optical testing of infrared polarizers before and after irradiation will also be presented. These experimental results will highlight the usefulness of the conductive infrared polarizer to many security and monitoring applications.

  1. Shrink tape technique for heat-forming aluminum substrates for thin foil x-ray mirrors and the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer x-ray concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsamo, Erin; Gendreau, Keith; Okajima, Takashi; Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos, Peter; Jalota, Lalit; Kenyon, Steven; Spartana, Nicholas; Fickau, David; Koenecke, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Consistent improvements in the design and fabrication of thin-foil, epoxy-replicated x-ray mirrors for astronomical telescopes have yielded increasingly higher quality and more precise astrophysical data. The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) x-ray timing mission optics continues this tradition and introduces design elements that promise even more accurate measurements and precise astrophysical parameters. The singly reflecting concentrators have a curved axial profile to improve photon concentration and a sturdy full shell structure for enhanced module stability. These design elements introduced the challenge of reliably forming mirror substrates at an acceptable production rate. By developing a technique using heat shrink tape to compress and conform thin aluminum mirror substrates to shaping mandrels, production rate improved with successful fabrication. The technique's efficiency was analyzed by measuring hundreds of substrate profiles postforming, performance testing completely assembled concentrators composed of every size substrate, and comparing the results to simulated fabrication scenarios. On average, the profiles were copied within 4.6±3.7%. These measurements and the overall success of NICER's optics, via ground calibration, have shown that the heat-shrink tape method is reliable, repeatable, and could be used in future missions to increase production rate and improve performance.

  2. Study of the effect of nano-sized precipitates on the mechanical properties of boron-added low-carbon steels by neutron scattering techniques

    PubMed Central

    Seong, B. S.; Cho, Y. R.; Shin, E. J.; Kim, S. I.; Choi, S.-H.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, Y. J.

    2008-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron powder diffraction (ND) techniques were used to study quantitatively the effect of nano-sized precipitates and boron addition on the mechanical properties of low-carbon steels. SANS was used to evaluate nano-sized precipitates, smaller than about 600 Å in diameter, and ND was used to determine the weight fraction of the cementite precipitates. Fine core–shell structured spherical precipitates with an average radius of ~50 Å, such as MnS and/or CuS, surrounded by BN layers were observed in the boron-added (BA) low-carbon steels; fine spherical precipitates with an average radius of ~48 Å were mainly observed in the boron-free (BF) low-carbon steels. In the BA steels, the number of boron precipitates, such as BN, Fe3(C,B) and MnS, surrounded by BN layers increased drastically at higher hot-rolling temperatures. The volume fraction of the fine precipitates of the BA steels was higher than that of the BF steels; this difference is related to the rapid growth of the BN layers on the MnS and CuS precipitates. Boron addition to low-carbon steels resulted in a reduction in strength and an improvement in elongation; this behaviour is related to the reduction of the solute carbon and the nitrogen contents in the ferrite matrix caused by the precipitation of BN, as well by the increase in the volume fraction of the cementites. PMID:19461851

  3. Study of the effect of nano-sized precipitates on the mechanical properties of boron-added low-carbon steels by neutron scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Seong, B S; Cho, Y R; Shin, E J; Kim, S I; Choi, S-H; Kim, H R; Kim, Y J

    2008-10-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron powder diffraction (ND) techniques were used to study quantitatively the effect of nano-sized precipitates and boron addition on the mechanical properties of low-carbon steels. SANS was used to evaluate nano-sized precipitates, smaller than about 600 A in diameter, and ND was used to determine the weight fraction of the cementite precipitates. Fine core-shell structured spherical precipitates with an average radius of ~50 A, such as MnS and/or CuS, surrounded by BN layers were observed in the boron-added (BA) low-carbon steels; fine spherical precipitates with an average radius of ~48 A were mainly observed in the boron-free (BF) low-carbon steels. In the BA steels, the number of boron precipitates, such as BN, Fe(3)(C,B) and MnS, surrounded by BN layers increased drastically at higher hot-rolling temperatures. The volume fraction of the fine precipitates of the BA steels was higher than that of the BF steels; this difference is related to the rapid growth of the BN layers on the MnS and CuS precipitates. Boron addition to low-carbon steels resulted in a reduction in strength and an improvement in elongation; this behaviour is related to the reduction of the solute carbon and the nitrogen contents in the ferrite matrix caused by the precipitation of BN, as well by the increase in the volume fraction of the cementites. PMID:19461851

  4. Police interviewing and interrogation of juvenile suspects: a descriptive examination of actual cases.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Hayley M D

    2014-06-01

    Although empirical attention to police interrogation has gained traction in recent years, comparatively few studies have examined interrogation of juvenile suspects, and virtually none have examined actual interrogations. Despite a growing literature on youths' interrogation-related capacities, we still know very little about what actually transpires when police question youth. The present study examines electronically recorded police interviews with juveniles to describe the characteristics, processes, and outcomes that occur in actual juvenile interrogations, including interview duration, individuals present, and confessions. Fifty-seven electronic recordings from 17 police departments were analyzed using observational research software. The median juvenile interrogation lasted 46 min, though the range was extensive (6 min to nearly 5 hr). Youth frequently submitted to questioning without a parent or advocate present, and disruptions to the interview process were common. Interrogation outcomes varied and included full confessions, partially incriminating admissions, and denials of guilt. Results from this study provide context for interrogation research using other methods and suggest that youth may frequently consent to interrogation in the absence of important legal protections. PMID:24377911

  5. 48 CFR 252.237-7010 - Prohibition on interrogation of detainees by contractor personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... personnel or DoD contractor personnel being held for law enforcement purposes. Interrogation of detainees... obtaining reliable information to satisfy foreign intelligence collection requirements. (b)...

  6. Laser generated neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higginson, D. P.; Bartal, T.; McNaney, J. M.; Swift, D. C.; Hey, D. S.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Kodama, R.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mariscal, D.; Beg, F. N.; Nakamura, H.; Nakanii, N.

    2010-10-15

    A neutron source for neutron resonance spectroscopy has been developed using high-intensity, short-pulse lasers. This technique will allow robust measurement of interior ion temperature of laser-shocked materials and provide insight into material equation of state. The neutron generation technique uses laser-accelerated protons to create neutrons in LiF through (p,n) reactions. The incident proton beam has been diagnosed using radiochromic film. This distribution is used as the input for a (p,n) neutron prediction code which is validated with experimentally measured neutron yields. The calculation infers a total fluence of 1.8x10{sup 9} neutrons, which are expected to be sufficient for neutron resonance spectroscopy temperature measurements.

  7. A multitask neutron beam line for spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Festa, G.; Grazzi, F.; Barzagli, E.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Civita, F.

    2011-08-01

    Here we present a new concept for a time-of-flight neutron scattering instrument allowing for simultaneous application of three different techniques: time-of-flight neutron diffraction, neutron resonance capture analysis and Bragg edge transmission analysis. The instrument can provide average resolution neutron radiography too. The potential of the proposed concept was explored by implementing the necessary equipment on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). The results obtained show the effectiveness of the proposed instrument to acquire relevant quantitative information in a non-invasive way on a historical metallurgical sample, namely a Japanese hand guard (tsuba). The aforementioned neutron techniques simultaneously exploited the extended neutron energy range available from 10 meV to 1 keV. This allowed a fully satisfactory characterization of the sample in terms of metal components and their combination in different phases, and forging and assembling methods.

  8. Accelerator based techniques for contraband detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourvopoulos, George

    1994-05-01

    It has been shown that narcotics, explosives, and other contraband materials, contain various chemical elements such as H, C, N, O, P, S, and Cl in quantities and ratios that differentiate them from each other and from other innocuous substances. Neutrons and γ-rays have the ability to penetrate through various materials at large depths. They are thus able, in a non-intrusive way, to interrogate volumes ranging from suitcases to Sea-Land containers, and have the ability to image the object with an appreciable degree of reliability. Neutron induced reactions such as (n, γ), (n, n') (n, p) or proton induced γ-resonance absorption are some of the reactions currently investigated for the identification of the chemical elements mentioned above. Various DC and pulsed techniques are discussed and their advantages, characteristics, and current progress are shown. Areas where use of these methods is currently under evaluation are detection of hidden explosives, illicit drug interdiction, chemical war agents identification, nuclear waste assay, nuclear weapons destruction and others.

  9. Determination of spent nuclear fuel assembly multiplication with the differential die-away self-interrogation instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alexis C.; Henzl, Vladimir; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Belian, Anthony P.; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-09-01

    We present a novel method for determining the multiplication of a spent nuclear fuel assembly with a Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation (DDSI) instrument. The signal, which is primarily created by thermal neutrons, is measured with four 3He detector banks surrounding a spent fuel assembly. The Rossi-alpha distribution (RAD) at early times reflects coincident events from single fissions as well as fission chains. Because of this fact, the early time domain contains information about both the fissile material and spontaneous fission material in the assembly being measured. A single exponential function fit to the early time domain of the RAD has a die-away time proportional to the spent fuel assembly (SFA) multiplication. This correlation was tested by simulating assay of 44 different SFAs with the DDSI instrument. The SFA multiplication was determined with a variance of 0.7%.

  10. Determination of total plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the differential die-away self-interrogation instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alexis C.; Henzl, Vladimir; Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Belian, Anthony P.; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-11-01

    As a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel project, we simulate the response of the Differential Die-away Self-Interrogation (DDSI) instrument to determine total elemental plutonium content in an assayed spent nuclear fuel assembly (SFA). We apply recently developed concepts that relate total plutonium mass with SFA multiplication and passive neutron count rate. In this work, the multiplication of the SFA is determined from the die-away time in the early time domain of the Rossi-Alpha distributions measured directly by the DDSI instrument. We utilize MCNP to test the method against 44 pressurized water reactor SFAs from a simulated spent fuel library with a wide dynamic range of characteristic parameters such as initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Under ideal conditions, discounting possible errors of a real world measurement, a root mean square agreement between true and determined total Pu mass of 2.1% is achieved.

  11. Neutron analysis of spent fuel storage installation using parallel computing and advance discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Daniel; Haghighat, Alireza

    2005-01-01

    In the United States, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 mandated centralised storage of spent nuclear fuel by 1988. However, the Yucca Mountain project is currently scheduled to start accepting spent nuclear fuel in 2010. Since many nuclear power plants were only designed for -10 y of spent fuel pool storage, > 35 plants have been forced into alternate means of spent fuel storage. In order to continue operation and make room in spent fuel pools, nuclear generators are turning towards independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). Typical vertical concrete ISFSIs are -6.1 m high and 3.3 m in diameter. The inherently large system, and the presence of thick concrete shields result in difficulties for both Monte Carlo (MC) and discrete ordinates (SN) calculations. MC calculations require significant variance reduction and multiple runs to obtain a detailed dose distribution. SN models need a large number of spatial meshes to accurately model the geometry and high quadrature orders to reduce ray effects, therefore, requiring significant amounts of computer memory and time. The use of various differencing schemes is needed to account for radial heterogeneity in material cross sections and densities. Two P3, S12, discrete ordinate, PENTRAN (parallel environment neutral-particle TRANsport) models were analysed and different MC models compared. A multigroup MCNP model was developed for direct comparison to the SN models. The biased A3MCNP (automated adjoint accelerated MCNP) and unbiased (MCNP) continuous energy MC models were developed to assess the adequacy of the CASK multigroup (22 neutron, 18 gamma) cross sections. The PENTRAN SN results are in close agreement (5%) with the multigroup MC results; however, they differ by -20-30% from the continuous-energy MC predictions. This large difference can be attributed to the expected difference between multigroup and continuous energy cross sections, and the fact that the CASK library is based on the old ENDF

  12. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Material and High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Wharton, C. J.; Caffrey, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory's PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source, but recently a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  13. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Materiel and High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey

    2008-08-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a Cf-252 isotopic neutron source, but recently a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Electronic Neutron Generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  14. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Materiel and High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Wharton, C. J.; Caffrey, A. J.

    2009-03-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory's PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a 252Cf isotopic neutron source, but recently a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  15. New developments in APSTNG neutron probe diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) show potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and can yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. The gamma-ray dector and neutron generator can be located on the same side of the interrogated object, so spaces behind walls and other confirmed areas can be inspected. No collimators or radiation shielding are needed, the neutron generator is relatively simple and small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. A complete system could be transported in an automotive van. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Inspection applications have been investigated for presence of cocaine in propane tanks, uranium and plutonium smuggling, and radioactive and toxic waste characterization. An advanced APSTNG tube is being designed and constructed that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  16. Simulation of a tagged neutron inspection system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzella, A.; Boghen, G.; Bonomi, G.; Fontana, A.; Formisano, P.; Pesente, S.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.; Zenoni, A.

    2006-05-01

    The illicit trafficking of explosive materials in cargo containers has become, in recent years, a serious problem. Currently used X-ray or γ-ray based systems provide only limited information about the elemental composition of the inspected cargo items. During the last years, a new neutron interrogation technique, named TNIS (Tagged Neutron Inspection System), has been developed, which should permit to determine the chemical composition of the suspect item by coincidence measurements between alpha particles and photons produced. A prototype of such a system for container inspection has been built, at the Institute Ruder Boskovic (IRB) in Zagreb, Croatia, for the European Union 6FP EURITRACK project. We present the results of a detailed simulation of the IRB prototype performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo program and a comparison with beam attenuation calculations performed with GEANT3/MICAP. Detector signals, rates and signal over background ratios have been calculated for 100 kg of TNT explosive located inside a cargo container filled with a metallic matrix of density 0.2 g/cm3. The case of an organic filling material is discussed too.

  17. Spectroscopy of the neutron-deficient isobars {sup 163}Re and {sup 163}W using tagging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Joss, D. T.; Thomson, J.; Page, R. D.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Grahn, T.; Pakarinen, J.; Paul, E. S.; Scholey, C.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaennen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Rahkila, P.; Sorri, J.

    2008-11-11

    Selective tagging techniques have been used to establish new band structures in the transitional isobars {sup 163}Re and {sup 163}W. These nuclei were produced in the {sup 106}Cd({sup 60}Ni, xp yn {gamma}) reaction at a bombarding energy of 270 MeV. Prompt {gamma} rays were detected at the target position using the JUROGAM spectrometer while recoiling ions were separated by the RITU separator and implanted into the GREAT spectrometer. At low spin, the yrast band of {sup 163}Re is shown to be a strongly coupled collective band based on a proton h{sub 11/2} configuration. In {sup 163}W, the decay path of the 13/2{sup +} isomeric state to the ground state has been identified and negative parity structures based on the ground state established.

  18. Gamma-ray and neutron radiography as part of a pulsed fast neutron analysis inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynes, J.; Bendahan, J.; Gozani, T.; Loveman, R.; Stevenson, J.; Bell, C.

    1999-02-01

    A gamma-ray and neutron radiography system has been developed to provide useful supplemental information for a Pulsed Fast Neutron Analysis (PFNA) cargo inspection system. PFNA uses a collimated beam of pulsed neutrons to interrogate cargoes using (n, γx) reactions. The PFNA source produces both gamma rays as well as neutrons. The transmission of both species through the cargo is measured with an array of plastic scintillators. Since the neutron and gamma-ray signals are easily separated by arrival time a separate image can be made for both species. The radiography measurement is taken simultaneously with the PFNA measurement turning PFNA into an emission and transmission imaging system, thus enhancing the PFNA radiography system.

  19. Development of a 3He nuclear spin flip system on an in-situ SEOP 3He spin filter and demonstration for a neutron reflectometer and magnetic imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, H.; Oku, T.; Kira, H.; Sakai, K.; Hiroi, K.; Ino, T.; Shinohara, T.; Imagawa, T.; Ohkawara, M.; Ohoyama, K.; Kakurai, K.; Takeda, M.; Yamazaki, D.; Oikawa, K.; Harada, M.; Miyata, N.; Akutsu, K.; Mizusawa, M.; Parker, J. D.; Matsumoto, Y.; Zhang, S.; Suzuki, J.; Soyama, K.; Aizawa, K.; Arai, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have been developing a 3He neutron spin filter (NSF) using the spin exchange optical pumping (SEOP) technique. The 3He NSF provides a high-energy polarized neutron beam with large beam size. Moreover the 3He NSF can work as a π-flipper for a polarized neutron beam by flipping the 3He nuclear spin using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique. For NMR with the in-situ SEOP technique, the polarization of the laser must be reversed simultaneously because a non-reversed laser reduces the polarization of the spin-flipped 3He. To change the polarity of the laser, a half-wavelength plate was installed. The rotation angle of the half-wavelength plate was optimized, and a polarization of 97% was obtained for the circularly polarized laser. The 3He polarization reached 70% and was stable over one week. A demonstration of the 3He nuclear spin flip system was performed at the polarized neutron reflectometer SHARAKU (BL17) and NOBORU (BL10) at J-PARC. Off-specular measurement from a magnetic Fe/Cr thin film and magnetic imaging of a magnetic steel sheet were performed at BL17 and BL10, respectively.

  20. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  1. Optimization of coil design for near uniform interrogating field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Efremov, A.; Safdarnejad, M.; Tamburrino, A.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. S.

    2015-03-01

    The detection of a crack under fastener heads (CUF) in a multi-layered aircraft structure remains a challenge in non-destructive evaluation (NDE). An EC-GMR system using a linear eddy current (EC) coil with giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors located on the axis of symmetry is proposed for detecting discontinuities in conducting materials. The signal received from sensors is greatly influenced by the interrogating field. This paper describes a detailed parametric study, using a finite element model predicted signals in conjunction with a multi-parameter optimization problem for coil design. The sensor performance is assessed using quantitative measures based on Probability of detection (POD) with respect to different crack geometries.

  2. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures from Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    Daren R. Norman; James L. Jones; Brandon W. Blackburn; Kevin J. Haskell; James T. Johnson; Scott M. Watson; Alan W. Hunt; Randy Spaulding; Frank Harmon

    2007-08-01

    Pulsed photonuclear interrogation environments generated by 8–24 MeV electron linac are rich with time-dependent, material-specific, radiation signatures. Nitrogen-based explosives and nuclear materials can be detected by exploiting these signatures in different delayed-time regions. Numerical and experimental results presented in this paper show the unique time and energy dependence of these signatures. It is shown that appropriate delayed-time windows are essential to acquire material-specific signatures in pulsed photonuclear assessment environments. These developments demonstrate that pulsed, high-energy, photon-inspection environments can be exploited for time-dependent, material-specific signatures through the proper operation of specialized detectors and detection methods.

  3. Time-Dependent Delayed Signatures from Energetic Photon Interrogations

    SciTech Connect

    Daren R. Norman; James L. Jones; Brandon W. Blackburn; Kevin J. Haskell; James T. Johnson; Scott M. Watson; Alan W. Hunt; Randy Spaulding; Frank Harmon

    2007-08-01

    Pulsed photonuclear interrogation environments generated by 8–24 MeV electron linac are rich with time-dependent, material-specific, radiation signatures. Nitrogen-based explosives and nuclear materials can be detected by exploiting these signatures in different delayed-time regions. Numerical and experimental results presented in this paper show the unique time and energy dependence of these signatures. It is shown that appropriate delayed-time windows are essential to acquire material-specific signatures in the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) environments. These developments demonstrate that pulsed, high-energy, photon- inspection environments can be exploited for time-dependent, material-specific signatures through the proper operation of specialized detectors and detection methods.

  4. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  5. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, B. A.; Antolak, A. J.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.

    2009-03-01

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the 11B(p,γ)12C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the 11B(p,γ)12C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB6 tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 μs long pulses, and a 1% duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  6. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Antolak, A.J.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Kwan, J.W.

    2008-08-01

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the 11B(p,gamma)12C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the 11B(p,gamma)12C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB6 tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 mu s long pulses, and a 1percent duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  7. Coaxial Mono-Energetic Gamma Generator for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B. A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Leitner, M.; Leung, K.-N.; Waldron, W.; Wilde, S.; Antolak, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Compact mono-energetic photon sources are sought for active interrogation systems to detect shielded special nuclear materials in, for example, cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. A prototype gamma interrogation source has been designed and built that utilizes the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C reaction to produce 12 MeV gamma-rays which are near the peak of the photofission cross section. In particular, the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C resonance at 163 kV allows the production of gammas at low proton acceleration voltages, thus keeping the design of a gamma generator comparatively small and simple. A coaxial design has been adopted with a toroidal-shaped plasma chamber surrounding a cylindrical gamma production target. The plasma discharge is driven by a 2 MHz rf-power supply (capable up to 50 kW) using a circular rf-antenna. Permanent magnets embedded in the walls of the plasma chamber generate a multi-cusp field that confines the plasma and allows higher plasma densities and lower gas pressures. About 100 proton beamlets are extracted through a slotted plasma electrode towards the target at the center of the device that is at a negative 180 kV. The target consists of LaB{sub 6} tiles that are brazed to a water-cooled cylindrical structure. The generator is designed to operate at 500 Hz with 20 {mu}s long pulses, and a 1% duty factor by pulsing the ion source rf-power. A first-generation coaxial gamma source has been built for low duty factor experiments and testing.

  8. Interrogating Transcriptional Regulatory Sequences in Tol2-Mediated Xenopus Transgenics

    PubMed Central

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Bergmann, Anne; Hum, Nicholas R.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Wills, Andrea E.; Hu, Na; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Harland, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying gene regulatory elements and their target genes in vertebrates remains a significant challenge. It is now recognized that transcriptional regulatory sequences are critical in orchestrating dynamic controls of tissue-specific gene expression during vertebrate development and in adult tissues, and that these elements can be positioned at great distances in relation to the promoters of the genes they control. While significant progress has been made in mapping DNA binding regions by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and next generation sequencing, functional validation remains a limiting step in improving our ability to correlate in silico predictions with biological function. We recently developed a computational method that synergistically combines genome-wide gene-expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding-site analysis to predict tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this method to 270 genes highly expressed in skeletal muscle and predicted 190 putative cis-regulatory modules. Furthermore, we optimized Tol2 transgenic constructs in Xenopus laevis to interrogate 20 of these elements for their ability to function as skeletal muscle-specific transcriptional enhancers during embryonic development. We found 45% of these elements expressed only in the fast muscle fibers that are oriented in highly organized chevrons in the Xenopus laevis tadpole. Transcription factor binding site analysis identified >2 Mef2/MyoD sites within ∼200 bp regions in 6 of the validated enhancers, and systematic mutagenesis of these sites revealed that they are critical for the enhancer function. The data described herein introduces a new reporter system suitable for interrogating tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements which allows monitoring of enhancer activity in real time, throughout early stages of embryonic development, in Xenopus. PMID:23874664

  9. Miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-Transceiver) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Lopatin, Craig

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes recent progress conducted towards the development of a miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-Transceiver TM) system based on multi-channel integrated optic sensor (InOSense TM) microchip technology. The hybrid InOSense TM microchip technology enables the integration of all of the functionalities, both passive and active, of conventional bench top FBG sensor interrogator systems, packaged in a miniaturized, low power operation, 2-cm x 5-cm package suitable for the long-term structural health monitoring in applications where size, weight, and power are critical for operation. The FBG-Transceiver system uses active optoelectronic components monolithically integrated to the InOSense TM microchip, a microprocessor controlled signal processing electronics board capable of processing the FBG sensors signals related to stress-strain and temperature as well as vibration and acoustics. The FBG-Transceiver TM system represents a new, reliable, highly robust technology that can be used to accurately monitor the status of an array of distributed fiber optic Bragg grating sensors installed in critical infrastructures. Its miniature package, low power operation, and state-of-the-art data communications architecture, all at a very affordable price makes it a very attractive solution for a large number of SHM/NDI applications in aerospace, naval and maritime industry, civil structures like bridges, buildings and dams, the oil and chemical industry, and for homeland security applications. The miniature, cost-efficient FBG-Transceiver TM system is poised to revolutionize the field of structural health monitoring and nondestructive inspection market. The sponsor of this program is NAVAIR under a DOD SBIR contract.

  10. And I Want to Thank You Barbie: Barbie as a Site for Cultural Interrogation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Claudia; Reid-Walsh, Jacqueline

    1995-01-01

    Barbie is presented as the perfect cultural site for interrogating margins, borders, and contradictions in females' lives. This article illuminates such issues by interrogating the "cumulative cultural text of Barbie." Texts criticized are: Barbie collector cards; "Barbie" and "Barbie Fashion" comic books; "Barbie, The Magazine for Girls"; and the…

  11. 29 CFR 18.614 - Calling and interrogation of witnesses by judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Calling and interrogation of witnesses by judge. 18.614... HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.614 Calling and interrogation of witnesses by judge. (a) Calling by the judge. The judge may, on the judge's own motion or...

  12. Using Elaborative Interrogation Enhanced Worked Examples to Improve Chemistry Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pease, Rebecca Simpson

    2012-01-01

    Elaborative interrogation, which prompts students to answer why-questions placed strategically within informational text, has been shown to increase learning comprehension through reading. In this study, elaborative interrogation why-questions requested readers to explain why paraphrased statements taken from a reading were "true."…

  13. A flexible state-space approach for the modeling of metabolic networks II: advanced interrogation of hybridoma metabolism.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Adam C; Sharfstein, Susan T; Martin, Lealon L

    2011-03-01

    Having previously introduced the mathematical framework of topological metabolic analysis (TMA) - a novel optimization-based technique for modeling metabolic networks of arbitrary size and complexity - we demonstrate how TMA facilitates unique methods of metabolic interrogation. With the aid of several hybridoma metabolic investigations as case-studies (Bonarius et al., 1995, 1996, 2001), we first establish that the TMA framework identifies biologically important aspects of the metabolic network under investigation. We also show that the use of a structured weighting approach within our objective provides a substantial modeling benefit over an unstructured, uniform, weighting approach. We then illustrate the strength of TAM as an advanced interrogation technique, first by using TMA to prove the existence of (and to quantitatively describe) multiple topologically distinct configurations of a metabolic network that each optimally model a given set of experimental observations. We further show that such alternate topologies are indistinguishable using existing stoichiometric modeling techniques, and we explain the biological significance of the topological variables appearing within our model. By leveraging the manner in which TMA implements metabolite inputs and outputs, we also show that metabolites whose possible metabolic fates are inadequately described by a given network reconstruction can be quickly identified. Lastly, we show how the use of the TMA aggregate objective function (AOF) permits the identification of modeling solutions that can simultaneously consider experimental observations, underlying biological motivations, or even purely engineering- or design-based goals. PMID:21163360

  14. Are the American Psychological Association’s Detainee Interrogation Policies Ethical and Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    After 9–11, the United States began interrogating detainees at settings such as Abu Ghraib, Bagram, and Guantanamo. The American Psychological Association (APA) supported psychologists’ involvement in interrogations, adopted formal policies, and made an array of public assurances. This article’s purpose is to highlight key APA decisions, policies, procedures, documents, and public statements in urgent need of rethinking and to suggest questions that may be useful in a serious assessment, such as, “However well intended, were APA’s interrogation policies ethically sound?”; “Were they valid, realistic, and able to achieve their purpose?”; “Were other approaches available that would address interrogation issues more directly, comprehensively, and actively, that were more ethically and scientifically based, and that would have had a greater likelihood of success?”; and “Should APA continue to endorse its post-9–11 detainee interrogation policies?” PMID:22096660

  15. Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

    2014-02-18

    The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

  16. Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

    2014-02-01

    The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

  17. Neutron flux from a 14-MeV neutron generator with tungsten filter for research in NDA methods for nuclear safeguards and security

    SciTech Connect

    Rennhofer, H.; Pedersen, B.; Crochemore, J.-M.

    2009-12-02

    The Joint Research Centre has taken into operation a new experimental device designed for research in the fields of nuclear safeguards and security applications. The research projects currently undertaken include detection of shielded contraband materials, detection of fissile materials, and mass determination of small fissile materials in shielded containers. The device, called the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly (PUNITA), incorporates a pulsed 14-MeV (D-T) neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator with a frequency in the range of 10 to 150 Hz, a sample may be interrogated first by fast neutrons and a few hundred micro-seconds later by a pure thermal neutron flux. The permanent detection systems incorporated in PUNITA include {sup 3}He neutrons detectors, HPGe gamma detectors, and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors.We have studied the effects of placing a tungsten liner around the neutron generator target. The 14-MeV neutrons induce (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) reactions. In addition the mean neutron energy emitted from generator/tungsten assembly is reduced to about 1 MeV. Both of these effects increase the thermal neutron flux in the sample cavity. The paper describes the observed advantages of the tungsten liner with respect to increase in thermal flux, and better shielding capabilities of the nearby gamma and neutron detectors.

  18. Characterization of the CO2 fluid adsorption in coal as a function of pressure using neutron scattering techniques (SANS and USANS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melnichenko, Y.B.; Radlinski, A.P.; Mastalerz, Maria; Cheng, G.; Rupp, J.

    2009-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering techniques have been applied to investigate the phase behavior of CO2 injected into coal and possible changes in the coal pore structure that may result from this injection. Three coals were selected for this study: the Seelyville coal from the Illinois Basin (Ro = 0.53%), Baralaba coal from the Bowen Basin (Ro = 0.67%), and Bulli 4 coal from the Sydney Basin (Ro = 1.42%). The coals were selected from different depths to represent the range of the underground CO2 conditions (from subcritical to supercritical) which may be realized in the deep subsurface environment. The experiments were conducted in a high pressure cell and CO2 was injected under a range of pressure conditions, including those corresponding to in-situ hydrostatic subsurface conditions for each coal. Our experiments indicate that the porous matrix of all coals remains essentially unchanged after exposure to CO2 at pressures up to 200??bar (1??bar = 105??Pa). Each coal responds differently to the CO2 exposure and this response appears to be different in pores of various sizes within the same coal. For the Seelyville coal at reservoir conditions (16????C, 50??bar), CO2 condenses from a gas into liquid, which leads to increased average fluid density in the pores (??pore) with sizes (r) 1 ?? 105 ??? r ??? 1 ?? 104???? (??pore ??? 0.489??g/cm3) as well as in small pores with size between 30 and 300???? (??pore ??? 0.671??g/cm3). These values are by a factor of three to four higher than the density of bulk CO2 (??CO2) under similar thermodynamic conditions (??CO2 ??? 0.15??g/cm3). At the same time, in the intermediate size pores with r ??? 1000???? the average fluid density is similar to the density of bulk fluid, which indicates that adsorption does not occur in these pores. At in situ conditions for the Baralaba coal (35 OC, 100??bar), the average fluid density of CO2 in all pores is lower than that of the bulk fluid (??pore / ??CO2 ??? 0.6). Neutron scattering from the

  19. Enabling Explosives and Contraband Detection with Neutron Resonant Attenuation. Year 1 of 3 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, Melinda

    2015-10-01

    Material Identification by Resonant Attenuation is a technique that measures the energy-dependent attenuation of 1-10 MeV neutrons as they pass through a sample. Elemental information is determined from the neutron absorption resonances unique to each element. With sufficient energy resolution, these resonances can be used to categorize a wide range of materials, serving as a powerful discrimination technique between explosives, contraband, and other materials. Our proposed system is unique in that it simultaneously down-scatters and time tags neutrons in scintillator detectors oriented between a d-T generator and sample. This allows not only for energy measurements without pulsed neutron beams, but for sample interrogation over a large range of relevant energies, vastly improving scan times. Our system’s core advantage is a potential breakthrough ability to provide detection discrimination of threat materials by their elemental composition (e.g. water vs. hydrogen peroxide) without opening the container. However, several technical and computational challenges associated with this technique have yet to be addressed. There are several open questions: what is the sensitivity to different materials, what scan times are necessary, what are the sources of background, how do each of these scale as the detector system is made larger, and how can the system be integrated into existing scanning technology to close current detection gaps? In order to prove the applicability of this technology, we will develop a validated model to optimize the design and characterize the uncertainties in the measurement, and then test the system in a real-world scenario. This project seeks to perform R&D and laboratory tests that demonstrate proof of concept (TRL 3) to establishing an integrated system and evaluating its performance (TRL 4) through both laboratory tests and a validated detector model. The validated model will allow us to explore our technology’s benefits to explosive

  20. Detection of special nuclear material by observation of delayed neutrons with a novel fast neutron composite detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Michael; Nattress, Jason; Barhoumi Meddeb, Amira; Foster, Albert; Trivelpiece, Cory; Rose, Paul; Erickson, Anna; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-10-01

    Detection of shielded special nuclear material is crucial to countering nuclear terrorism and proliferation, but its detection is challenging. By observing the emission of delayed neutrons, which is a unique signature of nuclear fission, the presence of nuclear material can be inferred. We report on the observation of delayed neutrons from natural uranium by using monoenergetic photons and neutrons to induce fission. An interrogating beam of 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV gamma-rays and neutrons was produced using the 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction and used to probe different targets. Neutron detectors with complementary Cherenkov detectors then discriminate material undergoing fission. A Li-doped glass-polymer composite neutron detector was used, which displays excellent n/ γ discrimination even at low energies, to observe delayed neutrons from uranium fission. Delayed neutrons have relatively low energies (~0.5 MeV) compared to prompt neutrons, which makes them difficult to detect using recoil-based detectors. Neutrons were counted and timed after the beam was turned off to observe the characteristic decaying time profile of delayed neutrons. The expected decay of neutron emission rate is in agreement with the common parametrization into six delayed neutron groups.