Science.gov

Sample records for neutron irradiated high

  1. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  2. Cation disorder in high-dose, neutron-irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Larson, A.C.; Yu, N.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine whether MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is a suitable ceramic for fusion applications. The crystal structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel single crystals irradiated to high neutron fluences [>5{times}10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E{sub n}>0.1 MeV)] were examined by neutron diffraction. Crystal structure refinement of the highese dose sample indicated that the average scattering strength of the tetrahedral crystal sites decreased by {approx}20% while increasing by {approx}8% on octahedral sites.

  3. Elastic stability of high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Chan, S.K.; Garner, F.A.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to identify ceramic materials that are suitable for fusion reactor applications. Elastic constants (C{sub 11}, C{sub 12}, and C{sub 44}) of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) single crystals irradiated to very high neutron fluences have geen measured by an ultrasonic technique. Although results of a neutron diffraction study show that cation occupation sites are significantly changed in the irradiated samples, no measurable differences occurred in their elastic properties. In order to understand such behavior, the elastic properties of a variety of materials with either normal or inverse spinel structures were studied. The cation valence and cation distribution appear to have little influence on the elastic properties of spinel materials.

  4. Neutron irradiation effects on high Nicalon silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.C.; Steiner, D.; Snead, L.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties and microstructure of SiC and SiC-based fibers is a current focal point for the development of radiation damage resistant SiC/SiC composites. This report discusses the radiation effects on the Nippon Carbon Hi-Nicalon{trademark} fiber system and also discusses an erratum on earlier results published by the authors on this material. The radiation matrix currently under study is also summarized.

  5. High-dose neutron irradiation performance of dielectric mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Nimishakavi Anantha Phani Kiran Kumar; Leonard, Keith J.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-05-01

    The study presents the high-dose behavior of dielectric mirrors specifically engineered for radiation-tolerance: alternating layers of Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 were grown on sapphire substrates and exposed to neutron doses of 1 and 4 dpa at 458 10K in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In comparison to previously reported results, these higher doses of 1 and 4 dpa results in a drastic drop in optical reflectance, caused by a failure of the multilayer coating. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors failed completely when exposed to 1 dpa, whereas the reflectance of Al2O3/SiO2 mirrors reduced to 44%, eventually failing at 4 dpa. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of the Al2O3/SiO2 specimens showed SiO2 layer defects which increases size with irradiation dose. The typical size of each defect was 8 nm in 1 dpa and 42 nm in 4 dpa specimens. Buckling type delamination of the interface between the substrate and first layer was typically observed in both 1 and 4 dpa HfO2/SiO2 specimens. Composition changes across the layers were measured in high resolution scanning-TEM mode using energy dispersive spectroscopy. A significant interdiffusion between the film layers was observed in Al2O3/SiO2 mirror, though less evident in HfO2/SiO2 system. Lastly, the ultimate goal of this work is the provide insight into the radiation-induced failure mechanisms of these mirrors.

  6. High-dose neutron irradiation performance of dielectric mirrors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nimishakavi Anantha Phani Kiran Kumar; Leonard, Keith J.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-05-01

    The study presents the high-dose behavior of dielectric mirrors specifically engineered for radiation-tolerance: alternating layers of Al2O3/SiO2 and HfO2/SiO2 were grown on sapphire substrates and exposed to neutron doses of 1 and 4 dpa at 458 10K in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In comparison to previously reported results, these higher doses of 1 and 4 dpa results in a drastic drop in optical reflectance, caused by a failure of the multilayer coating. HfO2/SiO2 mirrors failed completely when exposed to 1 dpa, whereas the reflectance of Al2O3/SiO2 mirrors reduced to 44%, eventually failing at 4 dpa. Transmission electron microscopymore » (TEM) observation of the Al2O3/SiO2 specimens showed SiO2 layer defects which increases size with irradiation dose. The typical size of each defect was 8 nm in 1 dpa and 42 nm in 4 dpa specimens. Buckling type delamination of the interface between the substrate and first layer was typically observed in both 1 and 4 dpa HfO2/SiO2 specimens. Composition changes across the layers were measured in high resolution scanning-TEM mode using energy dispersive spectroscopy. A significant interdiffusion between the film layers was observed in Al2O3/SiO2 mirror, though less evident in HfO2/SiO2 system. Lastly, the ultimate goal of this work is the provide insight into the radiation-induced failure mechanisms of these mirrors.« less

  7. Cation disorder determined by MAS {sup 27}Al NMR in high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, E.A.; Sickafus, K.E.; Hughes, C.D.; Earl, W.L.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Garner, F.A.; Bradt, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) single crystals which had been neutron irradiated to high doses (53-250 dpa) were examined using {sup 27}Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The sensitivity of this procedure to a specific cation (Al) residing in different crystallographic environments allowed one to determine the distribution of the Al between the two cation sites in the spinel structure. The samples were irradiated at two different temperatures (400 and 750{degrees}C) and various doses. These results indicate that the Al was nearly fully disordered over the two lattice sites after irradiation.

  8. Annealing studies of silicon microstrip detectors irradiated at high neutron fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñano, M.; Balbuena, J. P.; García, C.; González, S.; Lacasta, C.; Lacuesta, V.; Lozano, M.; Martí i Garcia, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Ullán, M.

    2008-06-01

    Silicon p-type detectors are being investigated for the development of radiation-tolerant detectors for the luminosity upgrade of the CERN large hadron collider (Super-LHC (sLHC)). Microstrip detectors have been fabricated by CNM-IMB with an n-side read-out on p-type high-resistivity float zone substrates. They have been irradiated with neutrons at the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor in Ljubljana. The irradiation fluxes match with the expected doses for the inner tracker at the sLHC (up to 10 16 equivalent 1 MeV neutrons cm -2). The macroscopic properties of the irradiated prototypes after irradiation were characterized at the IFIC-Valencia laboratory. The charge collection studies were carried out by means of a radioactive source setup as well as by an infrared laser illumination. The annealing behavior was studied in detail on a microstrip detector irradiated with a flux of 10 15 equivalent 1 MeV neutrons cm -2. Collected charge measurements were made after accelerated annealing times at 80 °C up to an equivalent annealing time of several years at room temperature. This note reports on the recorded results from the annealing of the irradiated p-type microstrip sensor.

  9. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 × 1021 m-2 s-1, ion fluence: 4 × 1025 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  10. Crack initiation behavior of neutron irradiated model and commercial stainless steels in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Kale J.; Was, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate key factors affecting the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) susceptibility of eleven neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steel alloys. Four commercial purity and seven high purity stainless steels were fabricated with specific changes in composition and microstructure, and irradiated in a fast reactor spectrum at 320 °C to doses between 4.4 and 47.5 dpa. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests were performed in normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or primary water (PW) environments to isolate the effects of environment, elemental solute addition, alloy purity, alloy heat, alloy type, cold work, and irradiation dose. The irradiated alloys showed a wide variation in IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the relative changes in mechanical properties and crack morphology. Cracking susceptibility measured by %IG was enhanced in oxidizing environments, although testing in the lowest potential environment caused an increase in surface crack density. Alloys containing solute addition of Ni or Ni + Cr exhibited no IASCC. Susceptibility was reduced in materials cold worked prior to irradiation, and increased with increasing irradiation dose. Irradiation-induced hardening was accounted for by the dislocation loop microstructure, however no relation between crack initiation and radiation hardening was found.

  11. High dose effects in neutron irradiated face-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    During neutron irradiation, most face-centered cubic metals and alloys develop saturation or quasi-steady state microstructures. This, in turn, leads to saturation levels in mechanical properties and quasi-steady state rates of swelling and creep deformation. Swelling initially plays only a small role in determining these saturation states, but as swelling rises to higher levels, it exerts strong feedback on the microstructure and its response to environmental variables. The influence of swelling, either directly or indirectly via second order mechanisms, such as elemental segregation to void surfaces, eventually causes major changes, not only in irradiation creep and mechanical properties, but also on swelling itself. The feedback effects of swelling on irradiation creep are particularly complex and lead to problems in applying creep data derived from highly pressurized creep tubes to low stress situations, such as fuel pins in liquid metal reactors.

  12. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitates that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.

  13. Structural characterization of nanoscale intermetallic precipitates in highly neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sprouster, D. J.; Sinsheimer, J.; Dooryhee, E.; Ghose, S.; Wells, P.; Stan, T.; Almirall, N.; Odette, G. R.; Ecker, L. E.

    2015-10-21

    Here, massive, thick-walled pressure vessels are permanent nuclear reactor structures that are exposed to a damaging flux of neutrons from the adjacent core. The neutrons cause embrittlement of the vessel steel that increases with dose (fluence or service time), as manifested by an increasing temperature transition from ductile-to-brittle fracture. Moreover, extending reactor life requires demonstrating that large safety margins against brittle fracture are maintained at the higher neutron fluence associated with 60 to 80 years of service. Here synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering measurements are used to characterize a new class of highly embrittling nm-scale Mn-Ni-Si precipitatesmore » that develop in the irradiated steels at high fluence. Furthermore, these precipitates can lead to severe embrittlement that is not accounted for in current regulatory models. Application of the complementarity techniques has, for the very first time, successfully characterized the crystal structures of the nanoprecipitates, while also yielding self-consistent compositions, volume fractions and size distributions.« less

  14. State of beryllium after irradiation at low temperature up to extremely high neutron doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakin, V. P.; Kupryanov, I. B.; Melder, R. R.

    2004-08-01

    A study was made for four beryllium grades manufactured in Russia by hot extrusion (HE) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) methods. Irradiation of specimens in the SM-3 reactor at a temperature of 70 °C up to a neutron fluence of (0.6-11.1) × 10 22 cm -2 ( E>0.1 eV) was performed and followed by post irradiation examination. The obtained results do not provide evidence of the advantage of one beryllium grade over another in terms of resistance to radiation damage in the fission reactor. In particular, neutron irradiation leads to absolutely brittle failure of all investigated beryllium specimens, according to the results of mechanical tensile and compression tests. Swelling of all grades at the maximum neutron dose does not exceed 1-2%. Some difference among the irradiated beryllium grades becomes apparent only in the brittle strength level.

  15. Radiation hardening of V C, V O, V N alloys neutron-irradiated to high fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuto, Toshinori; Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori

    1998-10-01

    Vanadium has a large affinity for interstitial impurities such as C, N and O. Mechanical properties and irradiation performance of vanadium alloys are affected by the impurities. Radiation hardening and defect microstructures of vanadium alloys doped with relatively large amounts of these interstitial elements were studied. Neutron irradiation was conducted in the Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF/MOTA-1F) to 47.9 dpa at temperatures of 679, 793 and 873 K. Irradiation hardening decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Increase in hardness for the V-C alloy was relatively greater after irradiation at the low temperatures. Decorated dislocations and voids were observed depending on the alloying elements. The factors for irradiation hardening were different for each interstitial element in the alloys irradiated at 873 K to 47.9 dpa.

  16. Response of dynamically compacted tungsten to high fluence neutron irradiation at 423?600$deg;C in FFTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megusar, J.; Garner, F. A.

    1998-10-01

    When pure tungsten produced by dynamic compaction at 95.3% theoretical density was irradiated in FFTF at temperatures of 423-600°C and neutron doses as high as 14.4 × 10 22 n cm -2 ( E > 0.1 MeV), it densified 2-3% and became very brittle. The brittle behavior resulted in failure at grain surfaces and appears not to be related to neutron-induced transmutation or segregation of transmutants. Based on density change measurements, it can be concluded that significant cavity formation did not occur at these high neutron exposures.

  17. High-dose neutron irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites. Part 2: Mechanical and physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao; Ozawa, Kazumi; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Porter, Wally; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear-grade silicon carbide (SiC) composite material was examined for mechanical and thermophysical properties following high-dose neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a temperature range of 573-1073 K. The material was chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC-matrix composite with a two-dimensional satin weave Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC fiber reinforcement and a multilayered pyrocarbon/SiC interphase. Moderate (1073 K) to very severe (573 K) degradation in mechanical properties was found after irradiation to >70 dpa, whereas no evidence was found for progressive evolution in swelling and thermal conductivity. The swelling was found to recover upon annealing beyond the irradiation temperature, indicating the irradiation temperature, but only to a limited extent. The observed strength degradation is attributed primarily to fiber damage for all irradiation temperatures, particularly a combination of severe fiber degradation and likely interphase damage at relatively low irradiation temperatures.

  18. High Dose Neutron Irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S Silicon Carbide Composites, Part 2. Mechanical and Physical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Ozawa, Kazumi; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Porter, Wallace D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-01-07

    Nuclear-grade silicon carbide (SiC) composite material was examined for mechanical and thermophysical properties following high-dose neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a temperature range of 573–1073 K. Likewise, the material was chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC-matrix composite with a two-dimensional satin weave Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC fiber reinforcement and a multilayered pyrocarbon/SiC interphase. Moderate (1073 K) to very severe (573 K) degradation in mechanical properties was found after irradiation to >70 dpa, whereas no evidence was found for progressive evolution in swelling and thermal conductivity. The swelling was found to recover upon annealing beyond the irradiation temperature, indicating the irradiation temperature, but only to a limited extent. Moreover, the observed strength degradation is attributed primarily to fiber damage for all irradiation temperatures, particularly a combination of severe fiber degradation and likely interphase damage at relatively low irradiation temperatures.

  19. Characterization of neutron-irradiated HT-UPS steel by high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Park, Jun-Sang; Almer, Jonathan; Li, Meimei

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the first measurement of neutron-irradiated microstructure using far-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy (FF-HEDM) in a high-temperature ultrafine-precipitate-strengthened (HT-UPS) austenitic stainless steel. Grain center of mass, grain size distribution, crystallographic orientation (texture), diffraction spot broadening and lattice constant distributions of individual grains were obtained for samples in three different conditions: non-irradiated, neutron-irradiated (3dpa/500 °C), and irradiated + annealed (3dpa/500 °C + 600 °C/1 h). It was found that irradiation caused significant increase in grain-level diffraction spot broadening, modified the texture, reduced the grain-averaged lattice constant, but had nearly no effect on the average grain size and grain size distribution, as well as the grain size-dependent lattice constant variations. Post-irradiation annealing largely reversed the irradiation effects on texture and average lattice constant, but inadequately restored the microstrain.

  20. Mechanical Behaviour of Cyanate Ester/epoxy Blends after Reactor Irradiation to High Neutron Fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4×1022 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  1. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF CYANATE ESTER/EPOXY BLENDS AFTER REACTOR IRRADIATION TO HIGH NEUTRON FLUENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, R.; Humer, K.; Fillunger, H.; Maix, R. K.; Weber, H. W.

    2008-03-03

    The mechanical strength of conventional epoxy resins drops dramatically after irradiation to a fast neutron fluence of 1x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). Recent results demonstrated that cyanate ester/epoxy blends were not affected at this fluence level. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance potential of these blends at higher fluence levels without significant degradation of their mechanical properties. Short-beam shear as well as static tensile tests were carried out at 77 K prior to and after irradiation to fast neutron fluences of up to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) in the TRIGA reactor at ambient temperature (340 K). In addition, load controlled tension-tension fatigue measurements were performed, in order to simulate the pulsed operation conditions of a tokamak. Initial results show that only a small reduction of the mechanical strength under static and dynamic load is observed at a fast neutron fluence of 2x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV). After exposure to 4x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} (E>0.1 MeV) the interlaminar shear strength of materials with a cyanate ester content of 40% or more is only reduced by 20% to 30%.

  2. Irradiation effects in 6H-SiC induced by neutron and heavy ions: Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Xiankun; Tang, Bin; Li, Jiangbo; Xue, Jianming; Peng, Shuming

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation effects of neutron and 3 MeV C+, Si+ in 6H-SiC were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD. The total disorder values of neutron irradiated SiC agree well with that of samples irradiated by ions at the same doses respectively. On the other hand, high-resolution XRD results shows that the lattice strain rate caused by neutron irradiation is 6.8%/dpa, while it is only 2.6%/dpa and 4.2%/dpa for Si+ and C+ irradiations respectively. Our results illustrate that the total disorder in neutron irradiated SiC can be accurately simulated by MeV Si+ or C+ irradiations at the same dose, but for the lattice strain and strain-related properties like surface hardness, the depth profile of irradiation damages induced by energetic ions must be considered. This research will contribute to a better understanding of the difference in irradiation effects between neutron and heavy ions.

  3. Radiation-induced strengthening in EB welds of Mo-Re alloys during high temperature neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morito, F.; Chakin, V. P.; Danylenko, M. I.; Krajnikov, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    Mo-Re alloys have been known as excellent construction materials with good thermal stability and resistivity for chemical corrosion. These alloys may be fabricated into equipments for various chemical plants and new energy facilities such as fusion reactor. Accordingly it is interesting to elucidate the weldability and radiation performance of Mo-Re alloys in the actual constructions. In this study Mo-Re welds with 16-50% Re exhibited a large radiation-induced strengthening and embrittlement by irradiation at ˜1073 K to ˜5 × 10 21 cm -2 ( E > 0.1 MeV). High temperature neutron irradiation leads to intensive homogeneous nucleation of Re-rich σ-phases in all studied Mo-Re alloys that equalizes the difference in mechanical properties between melting zone, heat-affected zone and base metal. As a result, all parts of as-irradiated welds displayed approximately same level of strength. Therefore, the application of EB welding in Mo-Re constructions operating under high temperature neutron irradiation does not limit lifetime of such constructions.

  4. High Dose Neutron Irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S Silicon Carbide Composites, Part 2. Mechanical and Physical Properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Katoh, Yutai; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Ozawa, Kazumi; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Porter, Wallace D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-01-07

    Nuclear-grade silicon carbide (SiC) composite material was examined for mechanical and thermophysical properties following high-dose neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a temperature range of 573–1073 K. Likewise, the material was chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC-matrix composite with a two-dimensional satin weave Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC fiber reinforcement and a multilayered pyrocarbon/SiC interphase. Moderate (1073 K) to very severe (573 K) degradation in mechanical properties was found after irradiation to >70 dpa, whereas no evidence was found for progressive evolution in swelling and thermal conductivity. The swelling was found to recover upon annealing beyond the irradiation temperature, indicating themore » irradiation temperature, but only to a limited extent. Moreover, the observed strength degradation is attributed primarily to fiber damage for all irradiation temperatures, particularly a combination of severe fiber degradation and likely interphase damage at relatively low irradiation temperatures.« less

  5. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  6. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  7. Development and high temperature testing by 14 MeV neutron irradiation of single crystal diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilotti, R.; Angelone, M.; Pagano, G.; Loreti, S.; Pillon, M.; Sarto, F.; Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, the performances of single crystal diamond detectors "ad hoc" designed to operate at high temperature are reported. The detectors were realized using commercial CVD single crystal diamond films, 500 micron thick with metal contacts deposited by sputtering method on each side. The new detector layout is based upon mechanical contacts between the diamond film and the electric ground. The detector was first characterized by measuring the leakage current as function of temperature and applied biasing voltage (I-V characteristics). The results obtained using two different metal contacts, Pt and Ag respectively, while irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons at the Frascati neutron generator (FNG) are reported and compared. It is shown that diamond detectors with Ag metal contacts can be properly operated in spectrometric mode up to 240oC with energy resolution (FWHM) of about 3.5%.

  8. The effect of high fluence neutron irradiation on the properties of a fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, S.; Burchell, T. D.; Strizak, J. P.; Eto, M.

    1996-05-01

    A fine-grained isotropic nuclear graphite (IG-110), manufactured from a petroleum coke, was irradiated to a total neutron dose of 3.8 × 10 26 n/m 2 or 25 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600°C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge: National Laboratory (ORNL). The effect of irradiation and the influence of post-irradiation thermal annealing on the properties of the graphite were evaluated. Volume change turnaround was clearly observed at 15—20 dpa and the return to original volume ( {ΔV}/{V 0} = 0 ) can be estimated to occur at ˜ 30 dpa. Strength and elastic moduli of the irradiated graphite increased by a factor of 2-3, and maximums in the {δ}/{δ 0}, and {E}/{E o} curves were at ˜20 dpa at 600°C. Recovery of volume, fracture strength and thermal conductivity by thermal annealing were found., and thermal conductivity returned to better than about 30% of the unirradiated value after 1200°C thermal annealing.

  9. Heat-to-heat variability of irradiation creep and swelling of HT9 irradiated to high neutron fluence at 400-600{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation creep data on ferritic/martensitic steels are difficult and expensive to obtain, and are not available for fusion-relevant neutron spectra and displacement rates. Therefore, an extensive creep data rescue and analysis effort is in progress to characterize irradiation creep of ferritic/martensitic alloys in other reactors and to develop a methodology for applying it to fusion applications. In the current study, four tube sets constructed from three nominally similar heats of HT9 subjected to one of two heat treatments were constructed as helium-pressurized creep tubes and irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at four temperatures between 400 and 600{degrees}C. Each of the four heats exhibited a different stress-free swelling behavior at 400{degrees}C, with the creep rate following the swelling according to the familiar B{sub o} + DS creep law. No stress-free swelling was observed at the other three irradiation temperatures. Using a stress exponent of n = 1.0 as the defining criterion, {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} irradiation creep was found at all temperatures, but, only over limited stress ranges that decreased with increasing temperature. The creep coefficient B{sub o} is a little lower ({approx}50%) than that observed for austenitic steel, but the swelling-creep coupling coefficient D is comparable to that of austenitic steels. Primary transient creep behavior was also observed at all temperatures except 400{degrees}C, and thermal creep behavior was found to dominate the deformation at high stress levels at 550 and 600{degrees}C.

  10. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities,more » the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.« less

  11. Neutron Radiography of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This paper describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities, the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.

  12. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities, the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.

  13. Neutron Flux Characterization of Irradiation Holes for Irradiation Test at HANARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Park, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    The High flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO) is a unique research reactor in the Republic of Korea, and has been used for irradiation testing since 1998. To conduct irradiation tests for nuclear materials, the irradiation holes of CT and OR5 have been used due to a high fast-neutron flux. Because the neutron flux must be accurately calculated to evaluate the neutron fluence of irradiated material, it was conducted using MCNP. The neutron flux was measured using fluence monitor wires to verify the calculated result. Some evaluations have been conducted, however, more than 20% errors have frequently occurred at the OR irradiation hole, while a good agreement between the calculated and measured data was shown at the CT irradiation hole.

  14. Low cycle fatigue properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels after high-dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaganidze, E.; Petersen, C.; Aktaa, J.; Povstyanko, A.; Prokhorov, V.; Diegele, E.; Lässer, R.

    2011-08-01

    This paper focuses on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated to a displacement damage dose of up to 70 dpa at 330-337 °C in the BOR 60 reactor within the ARBOR 2 irradiation programme. The influence of neutron irradiation on the fatigue behaviour was determined for the as-received EUROFER97, pre-irradiation heat-treated EUROFER97 HT and F82H-mod steels. Strain-controlled push-pull loading was performed using miniaturized cylindrical specimens at a constant temperature of 330 °C with total strain ranges between 0.8% and 1.1%. Comparison of the LCF behaviour of irradiated and reference unirradiated specimens was performed for both the adequate total and inelastic strains. Neutron irradiation-induced hardening may have various effects on the fatigue behaviour of the steels. The reduction of inelastic strain in the irradiated state compared with the reference unirradiated state at common total strain amplitudes may increase fatigue lifetime. The increase in the stress at the adequate inelastic strain, by contrast, may accelerate fatigue damage accumulation. Depending on which of the two effects mentioned dominates, neutron irradiation may either extend or reduce the fatigue lifetime compared with the reference unirradiated state. The results obtained for EUROFER97 and EUROFER97 HT confirm these considerations. Most of the irradiated specimens show fatigue lifetimes comparable to those of the reference unirradiated state at adequate inelastic strains. Some irradiated specimens, however, show lifetime reduction or increase in comparison with the reference state at adequate inelastic strains.

  15. Neutron Irradiation Resistance of RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Dafferner, Bernhard; Aktaa, Jarir

    2008-07-01

    The neutron irradiation resistance of the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel EUROFER97 and international reference steels (F82H-mod, OPTIFER-Ia, GA3X and MANET-I) have been investigated after irradiation in the Petten High Flux Reactor up to 16.3 dpa at different irradiation temperatures (250-450 deg. C). The embrittlement behavior and hardening are investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with sub-size specimens. Neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement and hardening of EUROFER97 was studied under different heat treatment conditions. Embrittlement and hardening of as-delivered EUROFER97 steel are comparable to those of reference steels. Heat treatment of EUROFER97 at a higher austenitizing temperature substantially improves the embrittlement behaviour at low irradiation temperatures. Analysis of embrittlement vs. hardening behavior of RAFM steels within a proper model in terms of the parameter C={delta}DBTT/{delta}{sigma} indicates hardening-dominated embrittlement at irradiation temperatures below 350 deg. C with 0.17 {<=} C {<=} 0.53 deg. C/MPa. Scattering of C at irradiation temperatures above 400 deg. C indicates non hardening embrittlement. A role of He in a process of embrittlement is investigated in EUROFER97 based steels, that are doped with different contents of natural B and the separated {sup 10}B-isotope (0.008-0.112 wt.%). Testing on small scale fracture mechanical specimens for determination of quasi-static fracture toughness will be also presented in a view of future irradiation campaigns. (authors)

  16. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  17. Water corrosion measurements on tungsten irradiated with high energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Scott Lillard, R.; Sommer, Walter F.; Butt, Darryl P.; Gac, Frank D.; Willcutt, Gordon J.; Louthan, McIntyre R.

    2012-12-01

    A detailed analysis was performed on the degradation of a tungsten target under water cooling while being exposed to a 761 MeV proton beam at an average current of 0.867 mA to a maximum fluence of 1.3 × 1021 protons/cm2. The target consisted of 3 mm diameter tungsten rods arranged in bundles and cooled with deionized water flowing over their length. Degradation of the tungsten was measured through analyzing water resistivity, tungsten concentration in water samples that were taken during irradiation and through dimensional measurements on the rods after irradiation. Chemical analysis of irradiated water samples showed W concentrations up to 35 μg/ml. Gamma analysis showed increases in concentrations of many isotopes including W-178, Lu-171, Tm-167, Tm-166, Yb-169 and Hf-175. Dimensional measurements performed after irradiation on the W rods revealed a decrease in diameter as a function of position that followed closely the Gaussian proton beam profile along the rod length and indicated a definite beam-effect. A general decrease in diameter, especially on the coolant-water entrance point where turbulent flow was likely, also suggests a chemically and mechanically-driven corrosion effect. A method to estimate the apparent corrosion rate based on proton fluence is presented and application of this method estimates the material loss rate at about 1.9 W atoms/incident proton. From this result, the corrosion rate of tungsten in a 761 MeV, 0.867 mA proton beam was calculated to be 0.073 cm/full power year. of irradiation.

  18. Total body calcium analysis. [neutron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, T. K.; Nelp, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    A technique to quantitate total body calcium in humans is developed. Total body neutron irradiation is utilized to produce argon 37. The radio argon, which diffuses into the blood stream and is excreted through the lungs, is recovered from the exhaled breath and counted inside a proportional detector. Emphasis is placed on: (1) measurement of the rate of excretion of radio argon following total body neutron irradiation; (2) the development of the radio argon collection, purification, and counting systems; and (3) development of a patient irradiation facility using a 14 MeV neutron generator. Results and applications are discussed in detail.

  19. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  20. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10/sup 23/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650/sup 0/C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys.

  1. Neutron irradiation effects in GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, J.U.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in electrical properties of n-GaAs as a result of irradiations with fast neutron have been studied, after epitaxial layers doped with Si at concentrations in the range 1.35 x 10[sup 15] to 1.60 x 10[sup 16] cm[sup [minus]3] were irradiated with reactor neutron fluences up to 1.31 x 10[sup 15] cm [sup [minus]2]. When the changes in carrier concentration, Hall mobility and resistivity were more than 25% of their initial values, nonlinear dependence on neutron fluence was apparent. New theory is proposed which explains the changes in electrical properties in terms of rates of trapping and release of charges. A theoretical relationship is derived for the change in carrier concentration as a function of neutron fluence and Fermi level shift was found to be consistent with the observed changes in carrier concentration. A correlation has been found between the changes in carrier concentration and mobility with neutron fluence using newly defined physically meaningful parameters in the case of two pairs of samples. The correlation has been explained in terms of the increased scattering of charge carriers from the defects created by neutrons that trap the free carriers. Mobility changes were measured at temperatures from 15 K to 305 K in n-GaAs van-der Pauw samples irradiated by fast reactor neutrons. The inverse mobility values obtain versus temperature, from the variable temperature Hall measurements, in the case of irradiated and in-irradiated samples were fitted using the relation [mu][sup [minus]1] = T[sup [minus]3/2] + B T[sup 3/2]. The inverse mobility increased as a result of neutron irradiations over the whole range of temperature, the increase being attributed to the increased scattering from neutron induced charged defects.

  2. High dose neutron irradiations of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites, Part 1: Microstructural evaluations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perez-Bergquist, Alex G.; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Leonard, Keith J.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in the development of silicon carbide (SiC) composites, composed of near-stoichiometric SiC fibers embedded in a crystalline SiC matrix, to the point that such materials can now be considered nuclear grade. Recent neutron irradiation studies of Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites showed excellent radiation response at damage levels of 30-40 dpa at temperatures of 300-800 °C. However, more recent studies of these same fiber composites irradiated to damage levels of >70 dpa at similar temperatures showed a marked decrease in ultimate flexural strength, particularly at 300 °C. Here, electron microscopy ismore » used to analyze the microstructural evolution of these irradiated composites in order to investigate the cause of the degradation. While minimal changes were observed in Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites irradiated at 800 °C, substantial microstructural evolution is observed in those irradiated at 300° C. Furthermore, carbonaceous particles in the fibers grew by 25% compared to the virgin case, and severe cracking occurred at interphase layers.« less

  3. High dose neutron irradiations of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites, Part 1: Microstructural evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Bergquist, Alex G.; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao Phillip; Leonard, Keith J.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2014-07-01

    Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in the development of silicon carbide (SiC) composites, composed of near-stoichiometric SiC fibers embedded in a crystalline SiC matrix, to the point that such materials can now be considered nuclear grade. Recent neutron irradiation studies of Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites showed excellent radiation response at damage levels of 30-40 dpa at temperatures of 300-800 °C. However, more recent studies of these same fiber composites irradiated to damage levels of >70 dpa at similar temperatures showed a marked decrease in ultimate flexural strength, particularly at 300 °C. Here, electron microscopy is used to analyze the microstructural evolution of these irradiated composites in order to investigate the cause of the degradation. While minimal changes were observed in Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites irradiated at 800 °C, substantial microstructural evolution is observed in those irradiated at 300° C. Furthermore, carbonaceous particles in the fibers grew by 25% compared to the virgin case, and severe cracking occurred at interphase layers.

  4. High dose neutron irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites, Part 1: Microstructural evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro G.; Nozawa, Takashi; Shih, Chunghao; Leonard, Keith J.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-07-01

    Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in the development of silicon carbide (SiC) composites, composed of near-stoichiometric SiC fibers embedded in a crystalline SiC matrix, to the point that such materials can now be considered nuclear grade. Recent neutron irradiation studies of Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites showed excellent radiation response at damage levels of 30-40 dpa at temperatures of 300-800 °C. However, more recent studies of these same fiber composites irradiated to damage levels of >70 dpa at similar temperatures showed a marked decrease in ultimate flexural strength, particularly at 300 °C. Here, electron microscopy is used to analyze the microstructural evolution of these irradiated composites in order to investigate the cause of the degradation. While minimal changes were observed in Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC composites irradiated at 800 °C, substantial microstructural evolution is observed in those irradiated at 300 °C. Specifically, carbonaceous particles in the fibers grew by 25% compared to the virgin case, and severe cracking occurred at interphase layers.

  5. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, G.E.; Frasca, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    The performance characteristics of high power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  6. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance characteristics of high power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  7. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance characteristics of high-power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  8. Evaluation of Neutron Irradiated Silicon Carbide and Silicon Carbide Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome G, Snead L, Hinoki T, Katoh Y, Peters D

    2007-03-26

    The effects of fast neutron irradiation on SiC and SiC composites have been studied. The materials used were chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC and SiC/SiC composites reinforced with either Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, Hi-Nicalon{trademark} or Sylramic{trademark} fibers fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration. Statistically significant numbers of flexural samples were irradiated up to 4.6 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) at 300, 500 and 800 C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dimensions and weights of the flexural bars were measured before and after the neutron irradiation. Mechanical properties were evaluated by four point flexural testing. Volume increase was seen for all bend bars following neutron irradiation. Magnitude of swelling depended on irradiation temperature and material, while it was nearly independent of irradiation fluence over the fluence range studied. Flexural strength of CVD SiC increased following irradiation depending on irradiation temperature. Over the temperature range studied, no significant degradation in mechanical properties was seen for composites fabricated with Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, while composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon{trademark} or Sylramic fibers showed significant degradation. The effects of irradiation on the Weibull failure statistics are also presented suggesting a reduction in the Weibull modulus upon irradiation. The cause of this potential reduction is not known.

  9. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook, B.C.; Casarett, G.W.; Deye, J.A.; Adoff, L.M.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues--spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), or 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed any neoplasms. Seven dogs receiving fast neutrons have developed 9 neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  10. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy Study of Neutron Irradiated High Temperature Superconductors YBa2Cu3O7-δ for Application in Fusion Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veterníková, J.; Chudý, M.; Slugeň, V.; Eisterer, M.; Weber, H. W.; Sojak, S.; Petriska, M.; Hinca, R.; Degmová, J.; Sabelová, V.

    2012-02-01

    This study focuses on the crystallographic defects introduced by neutron irradiation and the resulting changes of the superconducting properties in the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. This material is considered to be most promising for magnet systems in future fusion reactors. Two different bulk samples, pure non-doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) and multi-seed YBa2Cu3O7-δ doped by platinum (MS2F) were studied prior to and after irradiation in the TRIGA MARK II reactor in Vienna. Neutron irradiation is responsible for a significant enhancement of the critical current densities as well as for a reduction in critical temperature. The accumulation of small open volume defects (<0.5 nm) partially causes those changes. These defects were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at room temperature. A high concentration of Cu-O di-vacancies was found in both samples, which increased with neutron fluence. The defect concentration was significantly reduced after a heat treatment.

  11. Temperature effect on characteristics of void population formed in the austenitic steel under neutron irradiation up to high damage dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.; Skryabin, L. A.; Kinev, E. A.

    2002-12-01

    Radiation-induced porosity in fuel pin cladding of the BN-600 reactor fabricated of cold-worked austenitic steel 16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn irradiated to different damage dose 20-90 dpa at 410-600 °C has been examined by transmission electron microscopy. Formation and growth of various types of voids were shown to occur according to their both duration and mechanism of nucleation. Dependencies of average diameters and concentration of all void types on neutron irradiation damage dose were plotted for various temperature ranges. The change of void population with increasing dose at various temperature ranges was analyzed based on point defect kinetic. The contribution of different types of voids to swelling was examined.

  12. Characteristics of high-energy neutrons estimated using the radioactive spallation products of Au at the 500-MeV neutron irradiation facility of KENS.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakao, Noriaki; Wang, Qingbin; Toyoda, Akihiro; Kawai, Masayoshi; Aze, Takahiro; Fujimura, Masatsugu

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a shielding experiment of high-energy neutrons, generated from a tungsten target bombarded with primary 500-MeV protons at KENS, which penetrated through a concrete shield in the zero-degree direction. We propose a new method to evaluate the spectra of high-energy neutrons ranging from 8 to 500 MeV. Au foils were set in a concrete shield, and the reaction rates for 13 radionuclides produced by the spallation reactions on the Au targets were measured by radiochemical techniques. The experimental results were compared with those obtained by the MARS14 Monte-Carlo code. A good agreement (between them) was found for energies beyond 100 MeV. The profile of the neutron spectrum, ranging from 8 to 500 MeV, does not depend on the thickness of the concrete shield. PMID:16604584

  13. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook; B.C.; Casarett, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues - spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  14. Comparison of Deuterium Retention for Ion-irradiated and Neutron-irradiated Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuhisa Oya; Masashi Shimada; Makoto Kobayashi; Takuji Oda; Masanori Hara; Hideo Watanabe; Yuji Hatano; Pattrick Calderoni; Kenji Okuno

    2011-12-01

    The behavior of D retention for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten with a damage of 0.025-3 dpa was compared with that for neutron-irradiated tungsten with 0.025 dpa. The D{sub 2} thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten consisted of two desorption stages at 450 and 550 K, while that for neutron-irradiated tungsten was composed of three stages and an addition desorption stage was found at 750 K. The desorption rate of the major desorption stage at 550K increased as the displacement damage increased due to Fe{sup 2+} irradiation increasing. In addition, the first desorption stage at 450K was found only for damaged samples. Therefore, the second stage would be based on intrinsic defects or vacancy produced by Fe{sup 2+} irradiation, and the first stage should be the accumulation of D in mono-vacancy and the activation energy would be relatively reduced, where the dislocation loop and vacancy is produced. The third one was found only for neutron irradiation, showing the D trapping by a void or vacancy cluster, and the diffusion effect is also contributed to by the high full-width at half-maximum of the TDS spectrum. Therefore, it can be said that the D{sub 2} TDS spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten cannot represent that for the neutron-irradiated one, indicating that the deuterium trapping and desorption mechanism for neutron-irradiated tungsten is different from that for the ion-irradiated one.

  15. High dose neutron irradiation of MgAl2O4 spinel: effects of post-irradiation thermal annealing on EPR and optical absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, A.; Bravo, D.; Lopez, F J.; Garner, Francis A.

    2005-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption spectra were measured during thermal annealing for stoichiometric MgAl2O4 spinel that was previously irradiated in FFTF-MOTA at {approx}405 C to {approx}50 dpa. Both F and F+ centres are to persist up to very high temperatures (over 700C), suggesting the operation of an annealing mechanism based on evaporation from extended defects Using x-ray irradiation following the different annealing steps it was shown that the optical absorption band is related to a sharp EPR band at g=2.0005 and that the defect causing these effects is the F+ centre.

  16. Microstructural development of neutron irradiated W?Re alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Hasegawa, Akira; Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori

    2000-12-01

    Tungsten (W) alloys are candidate materials to be used as high-heat-flux materials in fusion reactors. In our previous work, W-26 wt% Re showed drastic hardening and embrittlement after the neutron irradiation. In this study, to clarify the irradiation hardening and embrittlement behavior of W-26 wt% Re, from the viewpoint of microstructural development, the microstructure observation of the neutron irradiated W-26 wt% Re was carried out using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The specimens were irradiated at the materials open test assembly of the fast flux test facility (FFTF/MOTA-2A cycle 11) up to ˜1×10 27 n/m2, ( En>0.1 MeV). The irradiation temperatures were 646, 679, 792, 873 and 1073 K. In all neutron irradiated W-26 wt% Re samples, sigma-phase precipitates and chi-phase precipitates were observed, while in the thermally aged specimen, only sigma-phase precipitates were observed. Irradiation effects on microstructural development are discussed.

  17. Properties of polymers after cryogenic neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, D. S.; Clinard, F. W.; Hurley, G. F.; Fowler, J. D.

    1985-08-01

    Organic matrix insulation has been specified for use in fusion reactor superconducting coils due to lower material and fabrication costs compared to other forms of insulation. Glass fabric filled resins are prime candidates since they provide not only electrical insulation, but also the mechanical strength necessary to withstand the high magnetic forces present during coil operation. Two epoxy- and two polyimide-based fiber reinforced materials were irradiated to neutron fluences of 4.1 × 10 21n/m 2, E > 0.1 MeV at 4.2 K. Post-irradiation testing included flexural (3 pt. bend), as well as DC conductivity and dielectric breakdown strength. Measurements were made at 77 K and 300 K. Flexural strength was observed to decrease for the epoxy-based materials while the polyimide-based materials exhibited essentially no change in strength. Both DC conductivity and dielectric breakdown strength revealed little or no pattern of degradation at all levels of radiation exposure.

  18. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M.; Tsai, H.

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  19. The physics experimental study for in-hospital neutron irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yiguo; Xia Pu; Zou Shuyun; Zhang Yongbao; Zheng Iv; Zheng Wuqing; Shi Yongqian; Gao Jijin; Zhou Yongmao

    2008-07-15

    MNSRs (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor) are low power research reactors designed and manufactured by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). MNSRs are mainly used for NAA, training and teaching, testing of nuclear instrumentation. The first MNSR, the prototype MNSR, was put into operation in 1984, later, eight other MNSRs had been built both at home and abroad. For MNSRs, highly enriched uranium (90%) is used as the fuel material. The In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator (IHNI) is designed for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on Miniature Neutron Source Reactor(MNSR). On both sides of the reactor core, there are two neutron beams, one is thermal neutron beam, and the other opposite to the thermal beam, is epithermal neutron beam. A small thermal neutron beam is specially designed for the measurement of blood boron concentration by the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA). In this paper, the experimental results of critical mass worth of the top Be reflectors worth of the control rod, neutron flux distribution and other components worth were measured, the experiment was done on the Zero Power Experiment equipment of MNSR. (author)

  20. Test of radiation hardness of CMOS transistors under neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Rowe, W.A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Hoffman, C.M.; Holtkamp, D.; Kinnison, W.W.; Sommer, W.F. Jr.; Ziock, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    We have tested 2 micron CMOS test structures from various foundries in the LAMPF Beam stop for radiation damage under prolongued neutron irradiation. The fluxes employed covered the region expected to be encountered at the SSC and led to fluences of up to 10/sup 14/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ in about 500 hrs of running. We show that test structures which have been measured to survive ionizing radiation of the order MRad also survive these high neutron fluences. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  1. High-energy neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Michele Rhea

    2001-12-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for the radiation protection quantity effective dose were calculated for neutrons, photons and protons with energies up to 2 GeV using the MCNPX code. The calculations were performed using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory versions of the MIRD-V male and female anthropomorphic phantoms modified to include the skin and esophagus. The latest high-energy neutron evaluated cross-section libraries and the recommendations given in ICRP Publication 60 and ICRP Publication 74 were utilized to perform the calculations. Sets of fluence-to- effective dose conversion coefficients are given for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral, right-lateral and rotational irradiation geometries. This is the first set of dose conversion coefficients over this energy range calculated for the L-LAT irradiation geometry. A unique set of high-energy neutron depth-dose benchmark experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center/Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE/WNR) complex. The experiments consisted of filtered neutron beams with energies up to 800 MeV impinging on a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 tissue-equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose was measured in the phantom at various depths with tissue-equivalent ion chambers. The phantom and the experimental set-up were modeled using MCNPX. Comparisons of the experimental and computational depth- dose distributions indicate that the absorbed dose calculated by MCNPX is within 13% for neutrons with energies up to 750 MeV. This experiment will serve as a benchmark experiment for the testing of high-energy radiation transport codes for the international radiation protection community.

  2. Correlation of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties and microstructural development of Alloy 718 irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Garner, F. A.; Hamilton, M. L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    Alloy 718 is a γ '(Ni 3(Al,Ti))-γ″(Ni 3Nb) hardenable superalloy with attractive strength, and corrosion resistance. This alloy is a candidate material for use in accelerator production of tritium (APT) target and blanket applications, where it would have to withstand low-temperature irradiation by high-energy protons and spallation neutrons. The existing data base, relevant to such irradiation conditions, is very limited. Alloy 718 has therefore been exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), closely matching those expected in the APT target and blanket applications. The yield stress of Alloy 718 increases with increasing dose up to ˜0.5 dpa, and then decreases with further increase in dose. The uniform elongation, however, drastically decreases with increasing dose at very low doses (<0.5 dpa), and does not recover when the alloy later softens somewhat. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of Alloy 718 shows that superlattice spots corresponding to the age-hardening precipitate phases γ ' and γ″ are lost from the diffraction patterns for Alloy 718 by only 0.6 dpa, the lowest proton-induced dose level achieved in this experiment. Examination of samples that were neutron irradiated to doses of only ˜0.1 dpa showed that precipitates are faintly visible in diffraction patterns but are rapidly becoming invisible. It is proposed that the γ ' and γ″ first become disordered (by <0.6 dpa), but remain as solute-rich aggregates that still contribute to the hardness at relatively low dpa levels, and then are gradually dispersed at higher doses.

  3. Vanadium irradiation at ATR - neutronics aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate damage and transmutation rates in vanadium irradiated in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) located in Idaho. The main focuses of the study are to evaluate the transmutation of vanadium to chromium and to explore ways to design the irradiation experiment to avoid excessive transmutation. It was found that the A-hole of ATR produces damage rate of {approximately} 0.2%/dpa of vanadium to chromium. A thermal neutron filter can be incorporated into the design to reduce the vanadium-to-chromium transmutation rate to low levels. A filter 1-2 mm thick of gadolinium or hafnium can be used.

  4. Neutron Spectrum Measurements from Irradiations at NCERC

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, Kevin Richard; Mosby, Michelle A.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Hutchens, Gregory Joe; White, Morgan Curtis

    2015-04-15

    Several irradiations have been conducted on assemblies (COMET/ZEUS and Flattop) at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Configurations of the assemblies and irradiated materials changed between experiments. Different metallic foils were analyzed using the radioactivation method by gamma-ray spectrometry to understand/characterize the neutron spectra. Results of MCNP calculations are shown. It was concluded that MCNP simulated spectra agree with experimental measurements, with the caveats that some data are limited by statistics at low-energies and some activation foils have low activities.

  5. High-dose neutron irradiation of MgAl 2O 4 spinel: effects of post-irradiation thermal annealing on EPR and optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, A.; Bravo, D.; Lopez, F. J.; Garner, F. A.

    2005-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption spectra were measured during thermal annealing of stoichiometric MgAl 2O 4 spinel that was previously irradiated in the Materials Open Test Assembly in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF/MOTA) at ≈680 K to ≈50 dpa. Both F and F + centres are to persist up to very high temperatures (over 1000 K) suggesting the operation of an annealing mechanism controlled by the thermal stability of extended defects. Using X-ray irradiation following the different annealing steps it was shown that an optical absorption band at 37 000 cm -1 is related to a sharp EPR band at g = 2.0005 and that the defect causing these effects is the F + centre.

  6. Progress on performance assessment of ITER enhanced heat flux first wall technology after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, T.; Bao, L.; Barabash, V.; Chappuis, Ph; Eaton, R.; Escourbiac, F.; Giqcuel, S.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Raffray, R.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Wirtz, M.; Boomstra, D.; Magielsen, A.; Chen, J.; Wang, P.; Gervash, A.; Safronov, V.

    2016-02-01

    ITER first wall (FW) panels are irradiated by energetic neutrons during the nuclear phase. Thus, an irradiation and high heat flux testing programme is undertaken by the ITER organization in order to evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation on the performance of enhanced heat flux (EHF) FW components. The test campaign includes neutron irradiation (up to 0.6-0.8 dpa at 200 °C-250 °C) of mock-ups that are representative of the final EHF FW panel design, followed by thermal fatigue tests (up to 4.7 MW m-2). Mock-ups were manufactured by the same manufacturing process as proposed for the series production. After a pre-irradiation thermal screening, eight mock-ups will be selected for the irradiation campaigns. This paper reports the preparatory work of HHF tests and neutron irradiation, assessment results as well as a brief description of mock-up manufacturing and inspection routes.

  7. Experiments on the high-temperature behaviour of neutron-irradiated uranium dioxide and fission products, volume 8, number 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanke, R. H. J.

    The release rate of fission products from overheated UO2, the chemical form of these fission products, and the transport mechanism inside the nuclear fuel are determined. UO spheres of approximately 1 mm diameter, irradiated in a high-flux reactor were used for the experiments. The chemical forms of the particles released from the spheres during evaporation were determined by mass spectrometry and the release rate of the mission products was determined by gamma spectrometry. A gamma topographer was developed to determine the change with temperature in the three dimensional distribution of radioactive fission products in the spheres. No clear relationship between the stoichiometry of the spheres and uranium consumption were shown. A diffusion model was used to determine the activation energy for the diffusion of fission products. It is concluded that the microstructure of the nuclear fuel greatly affects the number of free oxygen atoms, the release rate and the chemical form of the fission products. The evaporation of the UO2 matrix is the main mechanism for the release of all fission products at temperatures above 2300 K. Barium can be as volatile as iodine. Niobium and lanthenum can be volatile. Molecular combinations of the fission products, iodine, cesium and tellurium, are highly unlikely to be present inside the fuel. Barium and nobium may form compounds with oxygen and are then released as simple oxides. Fission products are released from overheated UO2 or as oxides. A new model is proposed for describing the behavior of oxygen in irradiated nuclear fuel.

  8. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  9. Retention of Hydrogen Isotopes in Neutron Irradiated Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Yuji Hatano; Masashi Shimada; Yasuhisa Oya; Guoping Cao; Makoto Kobayashi; Masanori Hara; Brad J. Merrill; Kenji Okuno; Mikhail A. Sokolov; Yutai Katoh

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effects of neutron irradiation on hydrogen isotope retention in tungsten, disk-type specimens of pure tungsten were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor in Oak Ridge National Laboratory followed by exposure to high flux deuterium (D) plasma in Idaho National Laboratory. The results obtained for low dose n-irradiated specimens (0.025 dpa for tungsten) are reviewed in this paper. Irradiation at coolant temperature of the reactor (around 50 degrees C) resulted in the formation of strong trapping sites for D atoms. The concentrations of D in n-irradiated specimens were ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 mol% after exposure to D plasma at 200 and 500 degrees C and significantly higher than those in non-irradiated specimens because of D-trapping by radiation defects. Deep penetration of D up to a depth of 50-100 µm was observed at 500 degrees C. Release of D in subsequent thermal desorption measurements continued up to 900 degrees C. These results were compared with the behaviour of D in ion-irradiated tungsten, and distinctive features of n-irradiation were discussed.

  10. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  11. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  12. Separation of radiation defects in Ni and Ni-C alloys under electron and neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, S. E.; Danilov, V. L.; Goshchitskii, B. N.; Kar'kin, A. E.; Parkhomenko, V. D.

    2016-02-01

    Complex investigations of radiation damage of Ni and Ni- 880 at. ppm C alloy under electron and neutron irradiation in the region of room temperature hardened and deformed state. In pure nickel, with the deformation microstructure, both in electron and in the neutron irradiation is observed separation of radiation-induced defects. When electron irradiation in the alloy Ni-C separation effect is observed, and when neutron irradiation there is no. This is due to the interaction of carbon atoms with radiation defects. The main sinks for radiation-induced defects are the areas with a high concentration of defects in cascades of atomic displacements.

  13. Persistent photoconductivity in neutron irradiated GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minglan, Zhang; Ruixia, Yang; Naixin, Liu; Xiaoliang, Wang

    2013-09-01

    Unintentionally doped GaN films grown by MOCVD were irradiated with neutrons at room temperature. In order to investigate the influence of neutron irradiation on the optical properties of GaN films, persistent photoconductivity (PPC) and low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out. Pronounced PPC was observed in the samples before and after neutron irradiation without the appearance of a yellow luminescence (YL) band in the PL spectrum, suggesting that the origin of PPC and YL are not related. Moreover, PPC phenomenon was enhanced by neutron irradiation and quenched by the followed annealing process at 900 °C. The possible origin of PPC is discussed.

  14. Neutron irradiation of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Mountford, M H; Allen, B J; Mishima, Y; Ichihashi, M; Parsons, P

    1989-01-01

    The biological characteristics and in vitro radiosensitivity of melanoma cells to thermal neutrons were investigated as a guide to the effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy. Plateau phase cultures of three human malignant melanoma-established cell lines were examined for cell density at confluence, doubling time, cell cycle parameters, chromosome constitution, and melanin content. Cell survival dose-response curves, for cells preincubated in the presence or absence of p-boronophenylalanine. HCl (10B1-BPA), were measured over the dose range 0.6-8.0 Gy (N + gamma). The neutron fluence rate was 2.6 x 10(9) n/cm2/s and the total dose rate 3.7 Gy/h (31% gamma). Considerable differences were observed in the morphology and cellular properties of the cell lines. Two cell lines (96E and 96L) were amelanotic, and one was melanotic (418). An enhanced killing for neutron irradiation was found only for the melanotic cells after 20 h preincubation with 10 micrograms/ml 10B1-BPA. In view of the doubling times of the cell lines of about 23 h (96E and 96L) or of 36 h (418), it seems likely that an increased boron uptake, and hence increased radiosensitivity, might result if the preincubation period with 10B1-BPA is extended to several hours longer than the respective cell cycle times. PMID:2798324

  15. DECONTAMINATION OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED REACTOR FUEL

    DOEpatents

    Buyers, A.G.; Rosen, F.D.; Motta, E.E.

    1959-12-22

    A pyrometallurgical method of decontaminating neutronirradiated reactor fuel is presented. In accordance with the invention, neutron-irradiated reactor fuel may be decontaminated by countercurrently contacting the fuel with a bed of alkali and alkaine fluorides under an inert gas atmosphere and inductively melting the fuel and tracking the resulting descending molten fuel with induction heating as it passes through the bed. By this method, a large, continually fresh surface of salt is exposed to the descending molten fuel which enhances the efficiency of the scrubbing operation.

  16. TEM study of neutron-irradiated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, L.L.; Bentley, J.; Farrell, K.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a transmission electron microscopy study of the defect structure in iron neutron-irradiated to low fluences (less than or equal to 1 dpa) at temperatures of 455 to 1013/sup 0/K are presented. The dislocation microstructures coarsen with increasing irradiation temperature from decorated dislocations, through clusters of dislocation loops, to near-edge, interstitial dislocation loops with b = a<100>, and network segments. Significant cavity formation occurred only at 548 to 723/sup 0/K, with homogeneous distributions found only at 623 and 673/sup 0/K. The maximum swelling of 0.07% occurred at 673/sup 0/K. Large cavities had a truncated octahedral shape with (111) facets and (100) truncations. Damage halos were observed around boron-containing precipitates. The effects of interstitial impurities on microstructural development and the differences in the observed microstructures compared to those in refractory bcc metals are discussed. 8 figures, 6 tables.

  17. Laser annealing of neutron irradiated boron-10 isotope doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannadham, K.; Butler, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    10B isotope doped p-type diamond epilayer grown by chemical vapor deposition on (110) oriented type IIa diamond single crystal substrate was subjected to neutron transmutation at a fluence of 2.4 9 1020 thermal and 2.4 9 1020 fast neutrons. After neutron irradiation, the epilayer and the diamond substrate were laser annealed using Nd YAG laser irradiation with wave length, 266 nm and energy, 150 mJ per pulse. The neutron irradiated diamond epilayer and the substrate were characterized before and after laser annealing using different techniques. The characterization techniques include optical microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, Raman, photoluminescence and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and electrical sheet conductance measurement. The results indicate that the structure of the irradiation induced amorphous epilayer changes to disordered graphite upon laser annealing. The irradiated substrate retains the (110) crystalline structure with neutron irradiation induced defects.

  18. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for characterizing neutron irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    C.N. Taylor; M. Shimada; D.W. Akers; M.W. Drigert; B.J. Merrill; Y. Hatano

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten samples (6 mm diameter, 0.2 mm thick) were irradiated to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa with neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma in the tritium plasma experiment (TPE) at 100, 200 and 500ºC to a total fluence of 1 x 1026 m-2. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation spectroscopy (DB-PAS) were performed at various stages to characterize damage and retention. We present the first known results of neutron damaged tungsten characterized by DB-PAS in order to study defect concentration. Two positron sources, 22Na and 68Ge, probe ~58 µm and through the entire 200 µm thick samples, respectively. DB-PAS results reveal clear differences between the various irradiated samples. These results, and the calibration of DB-PAS to NRA data are presented.

  19. Radiation tolerance of a high quality synthetic single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detector irradiated by 14.8 MeV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Aielli, G.; Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2008-09-01

    Diamond exhibits many properties such as an outstanding radiation hardness and fast response time both important to design detectors working in extremely radioactive environments. Among the many applications these devices can be used for, there is the development of a fast and radiation hard neutron detector for the next generation of fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, under construction at Cadarache in France. A technology to routinely produce electronic grade synthetic single crystal diamond detectors was recently developed by our group. One of such detectors, with an energy resolution of 0.9% as measured using an {sup 241}Am{alpha} particle source, has been heavily irradiated with 14.8 MeV neutrons produced by the Frascati Neutron Generator. The modifications of its spectroscopic properties have been studied as a function of the neutron fluence up to 2.0x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}. In the early stage of the irradiation procedure an improvement in the spectroscopic performance of the detector was observed. Subsequently the detection performance remains stable for all the given neutron fluence up to the final one thus assessing a remarkable radiation hardness of the device. The neutron damage in materials has been calculated and compared with the experimental results. This comparison is discussed within the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) hypothesis, which states that performance degradation is proportional to NIEL.

  20. Radiation tolerance of a high quality synthetic single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond detector irradiated by 14.8 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Aielli, G.; Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2008-09-01

    Diamond exhibits many properties such as an outstanding radiation hardness and fast response time both important to design detectors working in extremely radioactive environments. Among the many applications these devices can be used for, there is the development of a fast and radiation hard neutron detector for the next generation of fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project, under construction at Cadarache in France. A technology to routinely produce electronic grade synthetic single crystal diamond detectors was recently developed by our group. One of such detectors, with an energy resolution of 0.9% as measured using an A241m α particle source, has been heavily irradiated with 14.8 MeV neutrons produced by the Frascati Neutron Generator. The modifications of its spectroscopic properties have been studied as a function of the neutron fluence up to 2.0×1014 n/cm2. In the early stage of the irradiation procedure an improvement in the spectroscopic performance of the detector was observed. Subsequently the detection performance remains stable for all the given neutron fluence up to the final one thus assessing a remarkable radiation hardness of the device. The neutron damage in materials has been calculated and compared with the experimental results. This comparison is discussed within the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) hypothesis, which states that performance degradation is proportional to NIEL.

  1. Phase transformations in neutron-irradiated Zircaloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.

    1986-04-01

    Microstructural evolution in Zircaloy-2 and -4 spent-fuel cladding specimens after approx.3 years of irradiation in commercial power reactors has been investigated by TEM and HVEM. Two kinds of precipitates induced by the fast-neutron irradiation in the reactors have been identified, i.e., Zr/sub 3/O and cubic-ZrO/sub 2/ particles approximately 2 to 10 nm in size. By means of a weak-beam dark-field ''2-1/2D-microscopy'' technique, the bulk nature of the precipitates and the surficial nature of artifact oxide and hydride phases could be discerned. The Zr(Fe/sub x/,Cr/sub 1-x/)/sub 2/ and Zr/sub 2/(Fe/sub x/,Ni/sub 1-x/) intermetallic precipitates normally present in the as-fabricated material virtually dissolved in the spent-fuel cladding specimens after a fast-neutron fluence of approx.4 x 10/sup 21/ ncm/sup -2/ in the power reactors. The observed radiation-induced phase transformations are compared with predictions based on the currently available understanding of the alloy characteristics. 29 refs.

  2. Automated pneumatic transfer irradiation system for delayed neutron counting

    SciTech Connect

    Heifer, Paul G.; Millard, Hugh T. Jr.; Zermane, Albert J

    1982-07-01

    The Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor has been used for uranium and thorium neutron activation analysis by delayed neutron counting for the past eleven years. As the requirements for analysis increased the original General Atomic pneumatic system was upgraded in several stages. By 1979 we had reached the practical limits of safe through-put for that system and a new pneumatic transfer system was built. A single large Roots type blower is used to drive four individual transfer tubes simultaneously (two termini in the core and two outside the reflector). A microprocessor controls the operation and is paced by a minicomputer, which is also used to collect and reduce the counting data. Two irradiations and counting cycles are performed on each sample, one in the core, a Cd-lined terminus for thorium, and one in the reflector mounted terminus for uranium. Video displays at both the reactor console and the pneumatic system operating station indicate the status of the system and the locations of the samples at all times. This highly automated system is capable of 1,200 irradiations for delayed neutron counting in a 10 hour day, and, in addition, incorporates programmable versatility for other irradiation-counting experiments, and provides a high degree of reactor and radiological safety with only remote operator attention. (author)

  3. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-07-02

    We performed a neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). In order to investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ~90–~800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the hardness and microstructure changes exhibitedmore » a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Finally, irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.« less

  4. Effect of neutron energy and fluence on deuterium retention behaviour in neutron irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroe; Yuyama, Kenta; Li, Xiaochun; Hatano, Yuji; Toyama, Takeshi; Ohta, Masayuki; Ochiai, Kentaro; Yoshida, Naoaki; Chikada, Takumi; Oya, Yasuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium (D) retention behaviours for 14 MeV neutron irradiated tungsten (W) and fission neutron irradiated W were evaluated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) to elucidate the correlation between D retention and defect formation by different energy distributions of neutrons in W at the initial stage of fusion reactor operation. These results were compared with that for Fe2+ irradiated W with various damage concentrations. Although dense vacancies and voids within the shallow region near the surface were introduced by Fe2+ irradiation, single vacancies with low concentration were distributed throughout the sample for 14 MeV neutron irradiated W. Only the dislocation loops were introduced by fission neutron irradiation at low neutron fluence. The desorption peak of D for fission neutron irradiated W was concentrated at low temperature region less than 550 K, but that for 14 MeV neutron irradiated W was extended toward the higher temperature side due to D trapping by vacancies. It can be said that the neutron energy distribution could have a large impact on irradiation defect formation and the D retention behaviour.

  5. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for characterizing neutron irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. N.; Shimada, M.; Merrill, B. J.; Drigert, M. W.; Akers, D. W.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten samples (6 mm diameter and 0.2 mm thick) were irradiated to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa with neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the US/Japan Tritium, Irradiation and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN) collaboration. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma in Idaho National Laboratory's Tritium Plasma Experiment at 100, 200 and 500 °C to a total fluence of 1 × 1026 m-2. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation spectroscopy (DB-PAS) were performed at various stages to characterize radiation damage and retention. We present the first results of neutron irradiated tungsten characterized by DB-PAS in order to study defect concentration. Two positron sources, 22Na and 68Ge, probe ˜58 μm and through the entire 200 μm thick samples, respectively. DB-PAS results reveal clear differences between the various irradiated samples. These results, and a correlation between DB-PAS and NRA data, are presented.

  6. Irradiation embrittlement of neutron-irradiated low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayano, H.; Kimura, A.; Narui, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ohta, S.

    1988-07-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation and additions of small amounts of alloying elements on the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of three different groups of ferritic steels were investigated by means of the Charpy impact test in order to gain an insight into the development of low-activation ferritic steels suitable for the nuclear fusion reactor. The groups of ferritic steels used in this study were (1) basic 0-5% Cr ferritic steels, (2) low-activation ferritic steels which are FeCrW steels with additions of small amounts of V, Mn, Ta, Ti, Zr, etc. and (3) FeCrMo, Nb or V ferritic steels for comparison. In Fe-0-15% Cr and FeCrMo steels, Fe-3-9% Cr steels showed minimum brittleness and provided good resistance against irradiation embrittlement. Investigations on the effects of additions of trace amounts of alloying elements on the fracture toughness of low-activation ferritic steels made clear the optimum amounts of each alloying element to obtain higher toughness and revealed that the 9Cr-2W-Ta-Ti-B ferritic steel showed the highest toughness. This may result from the refinement of crystal grains and improvement of quenching characteristics caused by the complex effect of Ti and B.

  7. Swelling and microstructure of austenitic stainless steel ChS-68 CW after high dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porollo, S. I.; Konobeev, Yu. V.; Garner, F. А.

    2009-08-01

    Austenitic stainless steel ChS-68 serving as fuel pin cladding was irradiated in the 20% cold-worked condition in the BN-600 fast reactor in the range 56-84 dpa. This steel was developed to replace EI-847 which was limited by its insufficient resistance to void swelling. Comparison of swelling between EI-847 and ChS-68 under similar irradiation conditions showed improvement of the latter steel by an extended transient regime of an additional ˜10 dpa. Concurrent with swelling was the development of a variety of phases. In the temperature range 430-460 °С where the temperature peak of swelling was located, the principal type of phase generated during irradiation was G-phase, with volume fraction increasing linearly with dose to ˜0.5% at 84 dpa. While the onset of swelling is concurrent with formation of G-phase, the action of G-phase cannot be confidently ascribed to significant removal from solution of swelling-suppressive elements such as silicon. A plausible mechanism for the higher resistance to void swelling of ChS-68 as compared with EI-847 may be related to an observed higher stability of faulted dislocation loops in ChS-68 that impedes the formation of a glissile dislocation network. The higher level of boron in ChS-68 is thought to be one contributor that might play this role.

  8. Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Zhang, J.; Yang, J.

    1999-07-01

    Various effects of proton and neutron irradiated Ti: sapphires were studied. Proton irradiation induced F, F{sup +} and V center in Ti: sapphires and 3310 cm{sup -1} infrared absorption, and made ultraviolet absorption edge shift to short wave. Neutron irradiation produced a number of F, F{sup +} and F{sub 2} centers and larger defects in Ti: sapphires, and changed Ti{sup 4+}into Ti{sup 3+} ions. Such valence state variation enhanced characteristic luminescence of Ti: sapphires, and no singular variances of intrinsic fluorescence spectra of Ti: sapphires took place with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 17}n/cm{sup 2}, but the fluorescence vanished with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 18}n/cm{sup 2} which means the threshold for the concentration of improving Ti{sup 3+} ions by neutron irradiation.

  9. Microstructures of deformed VTiCrSi type alloys after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori; Kayano, Hideo

    1996-10-01

    The alloy of V5Ti5Cr1SiAl,Y (nominal composition, weight percentage) was developed to improve oxidation properties and high temperature strength, and has been studied as one of the candidates for fusion applications. This alloy showed low swelling properties and enough tensile ductility after neutron irradiation to high fluence levels. The dislocation microstructures after tensile deformation and defect microstructures in the neutron-irradiated alloy to high fluences were studied. Irradiation was conducted in the Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF/MOTA-2A) at 406°C to 46 dpa and the deformation microstructures were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Slip dislocations were developed inhomogeneously in the specimen deformed at ambient temperature after neutron irradiation. Dislocation loops contributed mainly to hardening of the alloy after irradiation; however, cavities and radiation-induced precipitates did not so much.

  10. Weldability of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kyoichi; Nishimura, Seiji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuji; Kato, Takahiko; Hashimoto, Tsuneyuki

    1999-01-01

    Degradation of weldability in neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steel is an important issue to be addressed in the planning of proactive maintenance of light water reactor core internals. In this work, samples selected from reactor internal components which had been irradiated to fluence from 8.5 × 10 22 to 1.4 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) corresponding to helium content from 0.11 to 103 appm, respectively, were subjected to tungsten inert gas arc (TIG) welding with heat input ranged 0.6-16 kJ/cm. The weld defects were characterized by penetrant test and cross-sectional metallography. The integrity of the weld was better when there were less helium and at lower heat input. Tensile properties of weld joint containing 0.6 appm of helium fulfilled the requirement for unirradiated base metal. Repeated thermal cycles were found to be very hazardous. The results showed the combination of material helium content and weld heat input where materials can be welded with little concern to invite cracking. Also, the importance of using properly selected welding procedures to minimize thermal cycling was recognized.

  11. Influence of neutron irradiation on conduction cooling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Ogitsu, T.; Makida, Y.; Nakamoto, T.; Okamura, T.; Sasaki, K.; Sugano, M.

    2015-12-01

    The conduction-cooled superconducting magnets are now widely used in various applications due to their minimum usage of helium. In the accelerator science, they also play an increasingly important role in particle detector solenoids because they can minimize the materials needed for the magnet such that they can be more transparent against irradiated particles. For the same reason they are currently used in high radiation environments because they can reduce the heat load from the irradiation. However, the hadronic reactions, such as neutron or proton irradiation, can create degradation on the thermal conductivity of pure aluminum which is used as a cooling path. It leads to a poor cooling condition of the magnets. In Japan, there are two conduction-cooled superconducting magnets for muon production; one is already constructed and under operation, the other is now under construction. This paper briefly reports the influence of the irradiation on those magnets and discusses the possibilities of HTS based conduction-cooled magnets under high irradiation environments.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR HAVING LOCALIZED AREAS OF HIGH THERMAL NEUTRON DENSITIES

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1958-06-01

    A nuclear reactor for the irradiation of materials designed to provide a localized area of high thermal neutron flux density in which the materials to be irradiated are inserted is described. The active portion of the reactor is comprised of a cubicle graphite moderator of about 25 feet in length along each axis which has a plurality of cylindrical channels for accommodatirg elongated tubular-shaped fuel elements. The fuel elements have radial fins for spacing the fuel elements from the channel walls, thereby providing spaces through which a coolant may be passed, and also to serve as a heatconductirg means. Ducts for accommnodating the sample material to be irradiated extend through the moderator material perpendicular to and between parallel rows of fuel channels. The improvement is in the provision of additional fuel element channels spaced midway between 2 rows of the regular fuel channels in the localized area surrounding the duct where the high thermal neutron flux density is desired. The fuel elements normally disposed in the channels directly adjacent the duct are placed in the additional channels, and the channels directly adjacent the duct are plugged with moderator material. This design provides localized areas of high thermal neutron flux density without the necessity of providing additional fuel material.

  13. Characterization of neutron calibration fields at the TINT's 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liamsuwan, T.; Channuie, J.; Ratanatongchai, W.

    2015-05-01

    Reliable measurement of neutron radiation is important for monitoring and protection in workplace where neutrons are present. Although Thailand has been familiar with applications of neutron sources and neutron beams for many decades, there is no calibration facility dedicated to neutron measuring devices available in the country. Recently, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) has set up a multi-purpose irradiation facility equipped with a 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator. The facility is planned to be used for research, nuclear analytical techniques and, among other applications, calibration of neutron measuring devices. In this work, the neutron calibration fields were investigated in terms of neutron energy spectra and dose equivalent rates using Monte Carlo simulations, an in-house developed neutron spectrometer and commercial survey meters. The characterized neutron fields can generate neutron dose equivalent rates ranging from 156 μSv/h to 3.5 mSv/h with nearly 100% of dose contributed by neutrons of energies larger than 0.01 MeV. The gamma contamination was less than 4.2-7.5% depending on the irradiation configuration. It is possible to use the described neutron fields for calibration test and routine quality assurance of neutron dose rate meters and passive dosemeters commonly used in radiation protection dosimetry.

  14. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A; Ferguson, Phillip D; Mansur, Louis K

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  15. Application of nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques for the safeguarding of irradiated fuel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Lee, D.M.; Beach, S.E.; Bement, T.R.; Dermendjiev, E.; Hatcher, C.R.; Kaieda, K.; Medina, E.G.

    1980-05-01

    Nondestructive gamma-ray and neutron techniques were used to characterize the irradiation exposures of irradiated fuel assemblies. Techniques for the rapid measurement of the axial-activity profiles of fuel assemblies have been developed using ion chambers and Be(..gamma..,n) detectors. Detailed measurements using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and passive neutron techniques were correlated with operator-declared values of cooling times and burnup.

  16. Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

    2011-05-01

    The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

  17. Effect of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of weld overlay cladding for reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobita, Tohru; Udagawa, Makoto; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Nishiyama, Yutaka; Onizawa, Kunio

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of high fluence neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of two types of cladding materials fabricated using the submerged-arc welding and electroslag welding methods. The tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and fracture toughness tests were conducted before and after the neutron irradiation with a fluence of 1 × 1024 n/m2 at 290 °C. With neutron irradiation, we could observe an increase in the yield strength and ultimate strength, and a decrease in the total elongation. All cladding materials exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during the Charpy impact tests. A reduction in the Charpy upper-shelf energy and an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was observed with neutron irradiation. There was no obvious decrease in the elastic-plastic fracture toughness (JIc) of the cladding materials upon irradiation with high neutron fluence. The tearing modulus was found to decrease with neutron irradiation; the submerged-arc-welded cladding materials exhibited low JIc values at high temperatures.

  18. Properties of a Cold-Neutron Irradiation Facility for In Vitro Research on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Luedemann, L.; Kampmann, R.; Sosaat, W.; Staron, P.; Wille, P.

    2000-05-15

    A new irradiation facility, GBET (basic research on boron neutron capture therapy), especially designed for in vitro experiments on boron neutron capture therapy was put into operation at the Geesthacht Neutron Facility of the GKSS Research Center. Its location at a cold-neutron guide without direct view of the reactor core has two advantages: First, contamination of the primary beam with fast neutrons or photons is negligible. Second, GBET yields a high cold-neutron flux of 1.4 x 10{sup 8}/(cm{sup 2}.s) over an area of 3 x 4 cm. As a result of the energy dependence of the neutron absorption cross section of boron, this corresponds to a higher effective thermal flux of 4.7 x 10{sup 8}/(cm{sup 2}.s). This effect is used to reduce the irradiation times by a factor of 3.32.The effective flux is sufficient for irradiation of thin samples like cell monolayers in conventional culture flasks. For such in vitro irradiations, a survival fraction of 1% is achieved at a homogeneous boron concentration of 100 ppm {sup 10}B within {approx}20 min. Furthermore, the beam can be used for boron radiography. The respective experimental conditions are discussed, especially the neutron flux distribution, available for these different types of samples.

  19. Defect clusters formed from large collision cascades in fcc metals irradiated with spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Yoshiie, T.; Kawai, M.; Matsumura, H.; Iwase, H.; Abe, H.; Kim, S. W.; Matsunaga, T.

    2013-11-01

    Fcc pure metals were irradiated with spallation neutrons (energies up to 500 MeV) at room temperature to a neutron fluence of 1 × 1018 n m-2 at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Defect clusters induced by large collision cascades were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In Au, large groups of defects included more than 10 clusters, and the damage zone extended over 50 nm, which was larger than that induced by fusion neutron irradiation (<20 nm). Although small stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) are formed in subcascades by fission and fusion neutron irradiation, dislocation loops were also observed in the present experiments. Large dislocation loops (>10 nm) were identified as vacancy type by the conventional inside-outside contrast method. Because of the low neutron fluence, spatial overlapping of collision cascades was ignored. Large vacancy loops are formed through cooperative reactions among subcascades in a single collision cascade with large recoil energy.

  20. Age-dependent protection quantities for external neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chou, D P; Wang, J N; Chen, I J; Chang, B J

    2003-01-01

    Based on the recommendations issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), equivalent doses and effective doses for different ages are obtained for external neutron sources. The calculations at 28 neutron energies from 1 x 10(-9) MeV to 20 MeV are carried out for six irradiation geometries: AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO. An age-dependent anthropomorphic mathematical phantom series of six age groups: newborn, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old and adult is used with the Monte Carlo computer code MCNP for the dose evaluations. The results for adults are compared with those in ICRP Publication 74 and are in good agreement. At low energies the effective doses increase as the phantom age increases, but at high energics they decrease with increasing age for the AP, PA, ROT and ISO irradiation geometries. In the whole energy region the effective doses decrease as the phantom age increases for the RLAT and LLAT irradiation geometries. The age-dependent equivalent doses behave similarly to the effective doses, with some exceptions caused by the influence of the organ position. PMID:12862238

  1. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. Lastly, the results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structuremore » may be investigated.« less

  2. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. Lastly, the results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  3. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-15

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr{sub 0.5}Ti{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 10{sup 15} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  4. Tritium release properties of neutron-irradiated Be 12Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, M.; Ishitsuka, E.; Kawamura, H.

    2002-12-01

    Be 12Ti has a high melting point and good chemical stability and is a promising advanced material for the neutron multiplier of the DEMO reactor that requires temperatures higher than 600 °C in a blanket. To evaluate the tritium inventory in the breeding blanket, a tritium release experiment of neutron-irradiated Be 12Ti with a total fast fluence of about 4×10 20 n/cm 2 ( E>1 MeV) was carried out at 330, 400 and 500 °C. It was clear that tritium could be released easier than from beryllium, and the apparent diffusion coefficient in Be 12Ti was about two orders larger than that in beryllium at 600-100 °C. In addition to the good tritium release property, the swelling calculated from the density change of the specimens up to 1100 °C in this test was smaller than that of beryllium.

  5. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure maymore » be investigated.« less

  6. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, Alexandra; Graham, Joseph T.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brennecka, Geoff L.; Brown, Donald W.; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-11-17

    Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method) is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  7. A separation of protactinium from neutron-irradiated thorium.

    PubMed

    Lyle, S J; Shendrikar, A D

    1966-01-01

    A convenient-method, based on liquid-liquid extraction with N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine in chloroform, is given for the separation of protactinium-233 from neutron-irradiated thorium. PMID:18959855

  8. Spectroscopic study of lithium oxide irradiated by fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, N. M.; Noda, K.; Watanabe, H.; Clemmer, R. G.; Hollenberg, G. W.

    1994-09-01

    Lithium oxide (Li 2O) is a candidate material for solid breeder blankets in d-t fusion reactors. Radiation damage in Li 2O was investigated in IEA BEATRIX-II phase 1 irradiation tests using the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Li 2O single crystal specimens with various 6Li concentrations, 6Li/( 6Li + 7Li), were irradiated at about 650 K for 300 effective full power days in FFTF by fast neutrons (the fast neutron fluence) ( > 0.1 MeV): 3.9 × 10 26 n/m 2). After the neutron-irradiation, measurements of electron-spin resonance (ESR) and optical absorption were carried out for the specimens at room temperature. From the measurements, colloidal lithium metal was found to be formed in Li 2O irradiated with fast neutrons.

  9. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - neutron embrittlement.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods not only changes the microstructure and microchemistry of these steels, but also degrades their fracture properties. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs are reviewed to determine the effects of key parameters such as material type and condition and irradiation temperature, dose, and dose rate on neutron embrittlement. Differences in the radiation-induced degradation of fracture properties between LWR and fast-reactor irradiations are also discussed. The results are used to (a) define a threshold fluence above which irradiation effects on fracture toughness of the material are significant, (b) evaluate the potential of neutron embrittlement under LWR operating conditions, and (c) assess the potential effects of voids on fracture toughness.

  10. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - Neutron embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods not only changes the microstructure and microchemistry of these steels, but also degrades their fracture properties. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs are reviewed to determine the effects of key parameters such as material type and condition and irradiation temperature, dose, and dose rate on neutron embrittlement. Differences in the radiation-induced degradation of fracture properties between LWR and fast-reactor irradiations are also discussed. The results are used to (a) define a threshold fluence above which irradiation effects on fracture toughness of the material are significant, (b) evaluate the potential of neutron embrittlement under LWR operating conditions, and (c) assess the potential effects of voids on fracture toughness.

  11. PROCESSING OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, H.H. Jr.

    1960-09-01

    An improved "Purex" process for separating uranium, plutonium, and fission products from nitric acid solutions of neutron-irradiated uranium is offered. Uranium is first extracted into tributyl phosphate (TBP) away from plutonium and fission products after adjustment of the acidity from 0.3 to 0.5 M and heating from 60 to 70 deg C. Coextracted plutonium, ruthenium, and fission products are fractionally removed from the TBP by three scrubbing steps with a 0.5 M nitric acid solution of ferrous sulfamate (FSA), from 3.5 to 5 M nitric acid, and water, respectively, and the purified uranium is finally recovered from the TBP by precipitation with an aqueous solution of oxalic acid. The plutonium in the 0.3 to 0.5 M acid solution is oxidized to the tetravalent state with sodium nitrite and extracted into TBP containing a small amount of dibutyl phosphate (DBP). Plutonium is then back-extracted from the TBP-DBP mixture with a nitric acid solution of FSA, reoxidized with sodium nitrite in the aqueous strip solution obtained, and once more extracted with TBP alone. Finally the plutonium is stripped from the TBP with dilute acid, and a portion of the strip solution thus obtained is recycled into the TBPDBP for further purification.

  12. Development of microstructure and irradiation hardening of Zircaloy during low dose neutron irradiation at nominally 358 C

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, Brian V; Smith, Richard W; Leonard, Keith J; Byun, Thak Sang; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2011-01-01

    Wrought Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 were neutron irradiated at nominally 358 C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at relatively low neutron fluences between 5.8 1022 and 2.9 1025 n/m2 (E > 1 MeV). The irradiation hardening and change in microstructure were characterized following irradiation using tensile testing and examinations of microstructure using Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM). Small increments of dose (0.0058, 0.11, 0.55, 1.08, and 2.93 1025 n/m2) were used in the range where the saturation of irradiation hardening is typically observed so that the role of microstructure evolution and hai loop formation on irradiation hardening could be correlated. An incubation dose between 5.8 1023 and 1.1 1024 n/m2 was needed for loop nucleation to occur that resulted in irradiation hardening. Increases in yield strength were consistent with previous results in this temperature regime, and as expected less irradiation hardening and lower hai loop number density values than those generally reported in literature for irradiations at 260 326 C were observed. Unlike previous lower temperature data, there is evidence in this study that the irradiation hardening can decrease with dose over certain ranges of fluence. Irradiation induced voids were observed in very low numbers in the Zircaloy-2 materials at the highest fluence.

  13. Antiradiation Vaccine: Technology Development Of Prophylaxis, Prevention And Treatment Of Biological Consequences And Complications After Neutron Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    Introduction: Neutrons irradiation produce a unique biological effectiveness compare to different types of radiation because their ability to create a denser trail of ionized atoms in biological living tissues[Straume 1982; Latif et al.2010; Katz 1978; Bogatyrev 1982]. The efficacy of an Anti-Radiation Vaccine for the prophylaxis, prevention and therapy of acute radiation pathology was studied in a neutron exposure facility. The biological effects of fast neutrons include damage of central nervous system and cardiovascular system with development of Acute Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of acute radiation pathology. After irradiation by high doses of fast neutron, formation of neurotoxins, hematotoxins,cytotoxins forming from cell's or tissue structures. High doses of Neutron Irradiation generate general and specific toxicity, inflammation reactions. Current Acute Medical Management and Methods of Radiation Protection are not effective against moderate and high doses of neutron irradiation. Our experiments demonstrate that Antiradiation Vaccine is the most effective radioprotectant against high doses of neutron-radiation. Radiation Toxins(biological substances with radio-mimetic properties) isolated from central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals could be working substance with specific antigenic properties for vaccination against neutron irradiation. Methods: Antiradiation Vaccine preparation standard - mixture of a toxoid form of Radiation Toxins - include Cerebrovascular RT Neurotoxin, Cardiovascular RT Neurotoxin, Gastrointestinal RT Neurotoxin, Hematopoietic RT Hematotoxin. Radiation Toxins were isolated from the central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals with different forms of Acute Radiation Syndromes - Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, Hematopoietic forms. Devices for Y-radiation were "Panorama","Puma". Neutron exposure was accomplished at the Department of Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. The neutrons

  14. Characterization of the neutron irradiation system for use in the Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Manuel,

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron irradiation system consisting of americium-241 beryllium (241AmBe) neutron sources placed in a polyethylene shielding for use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF). With a total activity of 0.3 TBq (9 Ci), the source consisted of three recycled 241AmBe sources of different activities that had been combined into a single source. The source in its polyethylene shielding will be used in neutron irradiation testing of components. The characterization of the source-shielding system was necessary to evaluate the radiation environment for future experiments. Characterization of the source was also necessary because the documentation for the three component sources and their relative alignment within the Special Form Capsule (SFC) was inadequate. The system consisting of the source and shielding was modeled using Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP). The model was validated by benchmarking it against measurements using multiple techniques. To characterize the radiation fields over the full spatial geometry of the irradiation system, it was necessary to use a number of instruments of varying sensitivities. First, the computed photon radiography assisted in determining orientation of the component sources. With the capsule properly oriented inside the shielding, the neutron spectra were measured using a variety of techniques. A N-probe Microspec and a neutron Bubble Dosimeter Spectrometer (BDS) set were used to characterize the neutron spectra/field in several locations. In the third technique, neutron foil activation was used to ascertain the neutron spectra. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to characterize the photon spectrum. The experimentally measured spectra and the MCNP results compared well. Once the MCNP model was validated to an adequate level of confidence, parametric analyses was performed on the model to optimize for potential

  15. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-11

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures.

  16. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  17. Mechanical properties of high-nickel alloys EP-753 and РЕ-16 after neutron irradiation to 54 dpa at 400-650 °С

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konobeev, Yu. V.; Porollo, S. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Shulepin, S. V.; Budylkin, N. I.; Mironova, E. G.; Garner, F. A.

    2011-05-01

    Short-term mechanical properties and void swelling were investigated for high-nickel alloys РЕ-16 and three compositional variants of Russian alloy EP-753 and in various starting conditions after side-by-side irradiation in the BN-350 fast reactor at 400, 500, 600 and 650 °С to 54 dpa. For both alloys irradiation resulted in significant hardening and ductility reduction dependent on their chemical composition and initial heat treatment. At test temperatures equal to the irradiation values both alloys exhibited a high level of strength and satisfactory ductility. In the test temperature range of 550-650 °С the phenomenon of high-temperature irradiation embrittlement was observed.

  18. Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

    2012-04-01

    This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

  19. Neutron flux assessment of a neutron irradiation facility based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, M L; Miller, M E

    2015-12-01

    Neutron generators based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion were considered for the design of a neutron irradiation facility for explanted organ Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) that could be installed in a health care center as well as in research areas. The chosen facility configuration is "irradiation chamber", a ~20×20×40 cm(3) cavity near or in the center of the facility geometry where samples to be irradiated can be placed. Neutron flux calculations were performed to study different manners for improving scattering processes and, consequently, optimize neutron flux in the irradiation position. Flux distributions were assessed through numerical simulations of several models implemented in MCNP5 particle transport code. Simulation results provided a wide spectrum of combinations of net fluxes and energy spectrum distributions. Among them one can find a group that can provide thermal neutron fluxes per unit of production rate in a range from 4.1·10(-4) cm(-2) to 1.6·10(-3) cm(-2) with epithermal-to-thermal ratios between 0.3% and 13% and fast-to-thermal ratios between 0.01% to 8%. Neutron generators could be built to provide more than 10(10) n s(-1) and, consequently, with an arrangement of several generators appropriate enough neutron fluxes could be obtained that would be useful for several BNCT-related irradiations and, eventually, for clinical practice. PMID:26122974

  20. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70 °C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa. After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5 × 1025 m-2 to reach the total ion fluence of 1 × 1026 m-2 in order to investigate the near-surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Final thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate the irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near-surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at% D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at% D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near-surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.3 dpa) at 500 °C cases even in the relatively low ion fluence of 1026 m-2.

  1. Point defect production and annihilation in neutron-irradiated zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    MacEwen, S.R.; Zee, R.H.; Birtcher, R.C.; Abromeit, C.

    1984-05-01

    High-purity Zr has been irradiated to a dose of 2.2 x 10/sup 21/ n/m/sup 2/ (E < 0.1 MeV) using the pulsed spallation source at IPNS. Electrical resistivity was monitored continuously during irradiation. The saturation resistivity, found from a linear extrapolation of the damage-rate curve between four and five n..cap omega...m. However, comparison with data from the literature shows that the normalized damage-rate curves from five experiments at different temperatures (less than or equal to 77 K) and with different neutron spectra, all fall on the same common curve. A saturation resistivity of 100 n..cap omega...m is found from the high-dose, linear part of this curve. A spontaneous recombination volume in the range 280 to 400 atomic volumes is found using the theory of Dettmann, Leibfried and Schroeder and the saturation resistivity of 100 n..cap omega...m. Post-irradiation annealing has been done up to 300 K using stepped, isochronal anneals. The recovery spectrum is in reasonable agreement with previous work, showing a large peak near 100 K, and two smaller peaks at 160 K and 250 K.

  2. Correlating radiation exposure with embrittlement: Comparative studies of electron- and neutron-irradiated pressure vessel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.; Klingensmith, D.; Gragg, D.

    1999-12-22

    Comparative experiments using high energy (10 MeV) electrons and test reactor neutrons have been undertaken to understand the role that primary damage state has on hardening (embrittlement) induced by irradiation at 300 C. Electrons produce displacement damage primarily by low energy atomic recoils, while fast neutrons produce displacements from considerably higher energy recoils. Comparison of changes resulting from neutron irradiation, in which nascent point defect clusters can form in dense cascades, with electron irradiation, where cascade formation is minimized, can provide insight into the role that the in-cascade point defect clusters have on the mechanisms of embrittlement. Tensile property changes induced by 10 MeV electrons or test reactor neutron irradiations of unalloyed iron and an Fe-O.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy were examined in the damage range of 9.0 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa to 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results show the ternary alloy experienced substantially greater embrittlement in both the electron and neutron irradiate samples relative to unalloyed iron. Despite their disparate nature of defect production similar embrittlement trends with increasing radiation damage were observed for electrons and neutrons in both the ternary and unalloyed iron.

  3. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  4. Influence of high dose neutron irradiation at 385 and 750°C on the microhardness of MgAl 2O 4 spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C. A.; Garner, F. A.; Bradt, R. C.

    1994-09-01

    High-purity specimens of stoichiometric MgAl 2O 4 single crystal spinel and a hot-pressed polycrystalline ceramic spinel were irradiated to exposures as large as 24.9 × 10 22 n cm -2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) in FFTF at 385 and 750°C. The specimens did not develop any brittleness or fragility, and maintained their physical integrity. Microhardness measurements revealed that initially all specimens hardened a small amount and then recovered slightly. At the lower irradiation temperature, the dependence of microhardness on orientation observed prior to irradiation tended to disappear. There was also some evidence that a secondary slip system was being activated. Following 750°C irradiation, the orientation dependence was not lost, and the evidence for activation of a secondary slip system was stronger.

  5. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Karim, Julia Abdul

    2011-03-01

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO4) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1×1013 ncm-2s-1. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

  6. Neutron irradiation influence on magnesium aluminium spinel inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skvortsova, V.; Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Ulmanis, U.

    2002-05-01

    Grown by the Verneuil method MgO · nAl 2O 3 single crystals and natural spinel crystal have been studied using X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectra. The fast neutron irradiation of magnesium aluminium spinel leads to the lattice parameter decrease. The bond lengths of Mg-O and Al-O vary with the u-parameter and the lattice parameter. On the other hand, the bond lengths are related with the inversion parameter. Using changes of the lattice parameter during irradiation we have calculated the inversion parameter, which is 15-20%. In the luminescence spectra, the fast neutron radiation (fluence 10 16 cm -2) produces an increase in the intensity ratio of the N- to R-lines by 5-20%. Taking into account that intensity of the N-lines is closely associated with the inversion parameter, it is possible to state that the neutron irradiation causes the increasing of the spinel inversion.

  7. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Karim, Julia Abdul

    2011-03-30

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

  8. Defect microstructures in neutron-irradiated copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The defect microstructures of copper and type 304L austenitic stainless steel have been examined following neutron irradiation under widely different conditions. Less than 0.2% of the defect clusters in steel irradiated at 120/sup 0/C with moderated fission neutrons were resolvable as stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). The fraction of defect clusters identified as SFT in copper varied from approx.10% for a low-dose 14-MeV neutron irradiation at 25/sup 0/C to approx.50% for copper irradiated to 1.3 dpa in a moderated fission spectrum at 182/sup 0/C. The mean cluster size in copper was about 2.6 nm for both cases, despite the large differences in irradiation conditions. The mean defect cluster size in the irradiated steel was about 1.8 nm. The absence of SFT in stainless steel may be due to the generation of 35 appm He during the irradiation, which caused the vacancies to form helium-filled cavities instead of SFT. 20 refs.

  9. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kitsunai, Yuji; Kasahara, Shigeki; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%-2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps.

  10. Determination of proton and neutron spectra in the LANSCE spallation irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Fowler, M.M.; Dry, D.; Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.; Corzine, R.K.

    1999-06-01

    Materials samples were recently irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical and physical properties of materials. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including, high-energy protons, mixed protons and high-energy neutrons, and low-energy neutrons. The samples were irradiated for approximately six months during a ten month period using an 800 MeV proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.0 cm. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils were also extracted that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples. These were used to quantify the fluences in various locations.

  11. Effects of silicon, carbon and molybdenum additions on IASCC of neutron irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, J.; Miwa, Y.; Kohya, T.; Tsukada, T.

    2004-08-01

    To study the effects of minor elements on irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), high purity type 304 and 316 stainless steels (SSs) were fabricated and minor elements, Si or C were added. After neutron irradiation to 3.5 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E>1 MeV), slow strain rate tests (SSRTs) of irradiated specimens were conducted in oxygenated high purity water at 561 K. Specimen fractured surfaces were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) after the SSRTs. The fraction of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) on the fractured surface after the SSRTs increased with neutron fluence. In high purity SS with added C, the fraction of IGSCC was the smallest in the all SSs, although irradiation hardening level was the largest of all the SSs. Addition of C suppressed the susceptibility to IGSCC.

  12. Significant disparity in base and sugar damage in DNA resulting from neutron and electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Dalong; Nico, Jeffrey S; Karam, Lisa; Timofeeva, Olga; Blakely, William F; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2014-11-01

    In this study, a comparison of the effects of neutron and electron irradiation of aqueous DNA solutions was investigated to characterize potential neutron signatures in DNA damage induction. Ionizing radiation generates numerous lesions in DNA, including base and sugar lesions, lesions involving base-sugar combinations (e.g. 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides) and DNA-protein cross-links, as well as single- and double-strand breaks and clustered damage. The characteristics of damage depend on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the incident radiation. Here we investigated DNA damage using aqueous DNA solutions in 10 mmol/l phosphate buffer from 0-80 Gy by low-LET electrons (10 Gy/min) and the specific high-LET (∼0.16 Gy/h) neutrons formed by spontaneous (252)Cf decay fissions. 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), (5'R)-8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (R-cdA) and (5'S)-8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine (S-cdA) were quantified using liquid chromatography-isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry to demonstrate a linear dose dependence for induction of 8-OH-dG by both types of radiation, although neutron irradiation was ∼50% less effective at a given dose compared with electron irradiation. Electron irradiation resulted in an exponential increase in S-cdA and R-cdA with dose, whereas neutron irradiation induced substantially less damage and the amount of damage increased only gradually with dose. Addition of 30 mmol/l 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (TRIS), a free radical scavenger, to the DNA solution before irradiation reduced lesion induction to background levels for both types of radiation. These results provide insight into the mechanisms of DNA damage by high-LET (252)Cf decay neutrons and low-LET electrons, leading to enhanced understanding of the potential biological effects of these types of irradiation. PMID:25034731

  13. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  14. Tensile behavior and microstructure of neutron-irradiated Mo-5% Re alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Abe, Katsunori; Satou, Manabu; Namba, Chusei

    1995-08-01

    This work reports the effect of heat treatment on the tensile behavior and and microstructure of neutron-irradiated Mo-5% Re alloy. Stress-relived and recrystallized specimens conditions were irradiated at five temperatures between 646 and 1073 K in FFTF/MOTA. The exposure levels were in the range of 6.8 to 34 dpa depending on the irradiation temperatures. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature and 673 K and microstructures of the irradiated specimens were observed by TEM. The Mo-5% Re alloy irradiated at high temperatures shows ductile behavior even at room temperature. The total elongation of stress-relived specimens irradiated at 873 and 1073 K ranged from 5 to 10%, and that of recrystallized specimens irradiated at 1073 K was 5%. The fracture modes of these specimens were transgranular type. Voids were observed in all of the irradiated specimens, but precipitates were found only in specimens irradiated above 792 K. It is important for the Mo sbnd Re alloy to be used in high-heat flux components of fusion reactors that the alloy showed the ductility after neutron exposures of relatively high fluences.

  15. The Effect of Neutron Irradiation on the Fracture Toughness of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Strizak, Joe P

    2012-01-01

    As part of our irradiated graphite recycle program a small quantity of PCEA grade graphite was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL. The graphite will provide the raw material for future recycle experiments. The geometry of the irradiated graphite allowed us to study the effects of neutron irradiation on the Critical Stress Intensity Factor, KIc, of graphite. The specimens where irradiated in two groups of 6 at an irradiation temperature of 900 C in rabbit capsules to doses of 6.6 and 10.2 DPA, respectively. Following a full suite of pre-and post-irradiation examination, which included dimensions, mass, electrical resistivity, elastic constants, and thermal expansion (to 800 C) the samples were notched and tested to determine their KIc using the newly approved ATSM test method for SENB fracture toughness of graphite. Here we report the irradiation induced changes in the dimensions, elastic constants, resistivity, and coefficient of thermal expansion of PCEA graphite. Moreover, irradiation induced changes in the Critical Stress Intensity Factor, KIc, or fracture toughness, are reported and discussed. Very little work on the effect of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of graphite has previously be performed or reported.

  16. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüle, Wolfgang; Hausen, Hermann

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300°C and 500°C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of "primary" creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the "secondary" creep stage begins. The "primary" creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These "primary" creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of α-ferrite below about 400°C and of carbides below about 700°C, and not to irradiation creep. The "secondary" creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature ( Qirr = 0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels.

  17. Microstructure evolution in austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated with rotons: comparison with neutron-irradiated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructures of high purity and commercial purity austenitic stainless steels were investigated using proton-irradiation. For high purity alloys, Fe-20Cr-9Ni (HP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons between 300°C and 600°C at a dose rate of 7×10 -6 dpa/ s to doses up to 3.0 dpa. The commercial purity alloys, CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 5.0 dpa. The dose, temperature and composition dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were characterized. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier-hardening (DBH) model. The dose and temperature dependence of proton-irradiated microstructure (loops, voids) and the irradiation hardening are consistent with the neutron-data trend. Results indicate that proton-irradiation can accurately reproduce the microstructure of austenitic alloys irradiated in LWR cores.

  18. Neutron irradiated uranium silicides studied by neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Mueller, M.H.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The irradiation behavior of high-density uranium silicides has been a matter of interest to the nuclear industry for use in high power or low enrichment applications. Transmission electron microscopy studies have found that heavy ion bombardment renders U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} amorphous at temperatures below about 250 C and that U{sub 3}Si becomes mechanically unstable suffering rapid growth by plastic flow. In this present work, crystallographic changes preceding amorphization by fission fragment damage have been studied by high-resolution neutron diffraction as a function of damage produced by uranium fission at room temperature. Initially, both silicides had tetragonal crystal structures. Crystallographic and amorphous phases were studied simultaneously by combining conventional Rietveld refinement of the crystallographic phases with Fourier-filtering analysis of the non-crystalline scattering component. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2014-05-23

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4 - 7

  20. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.-P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4-7% lower than

  1. Determination of mixed proton/neutron fluences in the LANSCE irradiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.; Fowler, M.M.; Corzine, K.

    1998-12-31

    In support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program, several materials were exposed to a high-energy proton and spallation neutron environments. Large differences in mechanical property changes in this environment are expected compared to the typical fusion or fission systems. To make proper dose correlations, it is important to accurately quantify the fluences. Activation foils consisting of a stack of disks of Co, Ni, Fe, Al, Nb and Cu were irradiated concurrent with mechanical testing samples in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility. The irradiation consisted of an 800 MeV, 1 mA proton beam and a W target in the beam provided a source of spallation neutrons. The maximum proton fluence was around 3 {times} 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2} and the maximum neutron fluence approximately 3 {times} 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. After irradiation, the foils were withdrawn and the radioactive isotopes analyzed using gamma spectroscopy. From initial estimates for the fluences and spectra derived from the Los Alamos High-Energy Transport (LAHET) Code System (LCS), comparisons to the measured levels of activation products were made. The Na-22 activation products in the Al foils were measured from different regions of the target in order to profile the spatial levels of the fluences. These tests gave empirical confirmation of the proton and neutron fluences of the irradiated samples throughout the target region.

  2. Radiation resistance of endohedral metallofullerenols under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szhogina, A. A.; Shilin, V. A.; Sedov, V. P.; Lebedev, V. T.

    2016-07-01

    The endohedral metallofullerenols Me@C2 n (OH)38-40 + C2 n (OH)38-40 ( Me = Tb, Sc, Gd, Fe, Pr, Mo) have been obtained and their radiation resistance under irradiation by a neutron flux of 8 × 1013 cm-2 s-1 has been studied. The factors affecting the radiation resistance of endohedral metallofullerenols are discussed.

  3. Radiation Damages in Aluminum Alloy SAV-1 under Neutron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikhbaev, Umar; Akhmedzhanov, Farkhad; Alikulov, Sherali; Baytelesov, Sapar; Boltabaev, Azizbek

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of neutron irradiation on the kinetics of radiation damages in the SAV-1 alloy, which belongs to the group of aluminum alloys of the ternary system Al-Mg-Si. For fast-neutron irradiation by different doses up to fluence 1019 cm-2 the SAV-1 samples were placed in one of the vertical channels of the research WWR type reactor (Tashkent). The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of the alloy samples was investigated in the range 290 - 490 K by the four-compensation method with an error about 0.1%. The experimental results were shown that at all the temperatures the dependence of the SAV-1 alloy resistivity on neutron fluence was nonlinear. With increasing neutron fluence the deviation from linearity and the growth rate of resistivity with temperature becomes more appreciable. The observed dependences are explained by means of martensitic transformations and the radiation damages in the studied alloy under neutron irradiation. The mechanisms of radiation modification of the SAV-1 alloy structure are discussed.

  4. Simulation of neutron-induced damage in tungsten by irradiation with energetic self-ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Gann, V.

    2015-05-01

    A direct comparison of the deuterium (D) decoration of radiation-induced damage in polycrystalline tungsten irradiated with self-ions [present work] and neutrons in the high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) (Hatano et al., 2013) shows a reasonably good agreement at least up to 0.3 displacement per atom indicating that MeV heavy ions can be a good proxy to simulate neutron-produced damage at room temperature and low dpa. The coefficient of similarity between two kinds of irradiation was obtained experimentally to be Kexp ∼ 0.65 ± 0.1 in the case of the deuterium decoration of both kinds of radiation-induced defects with low and high de-trapping energies for deuterium. We introduced the theoretical estimation for coefficient of similarity between neutron- and self-ion-irradiations, which is a fraction of common area under the curves of two overlapping damage energy spectra of primary knock-on atom (PKA) produced in tungsten by these two types of irradiation. In other words, Ksim is a part of displaced atoms produced in the similar conditions under two different types of irradiation. The theoretical values of Ksim = 0.34 and Ksim = 0.29 were obtained for tungsten target irradiated with 20 MeV self-ions in comparison to irradiation with neutrons in HFIR reactor (>0.1 MeV) and 14 MeV neutrons, respectively. The theoretical value of Ksim = 0.34 is about two times less than the experimental value of Kexp = 0.65. It means that high energy PKAs can play more important role in the production of similar damage structure by irradiation with self-ions and neutrons which is responsible for deuterium retention. The model assuming that all cascades with an energy higher than Tc = 150 keV split into identical sub-cascades gives the value of Ksim = 0.64 ± 0.01 for the coefficient of similarity between HFIR-neutron and 20 MeV self-ion irradiations that is in an agreement with experimental value of Kexp = 0.65 ± 0.1. Consequently, splitting of high-energy part of cascades might take

  5. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-10-09

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of themore » samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility.« less

  6. Neutron-Irradiated Samples as Test Materials for MPEX

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-10-09

    Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by fast neutron irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. This paper presents assessments of the calculated induced radioactivity and resulting radiation dose rates of a variety of potential fusion reactor plasma-facing materials (such as tungsten). The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR including the generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. A challenge of the MPEX project is to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples and the sample dose rates for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  7. Neutron irradiation of Am-241 effectively produces curium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. W.; Milstead, J.; Stewart, D. C.

    1967-01-01

    Computer study was made on the production of multicurie amounts of highly alpha-active curium 242 from americium 241 irradiation. The information available includes curium 242 yields, curium composition, irradiation data, and production techniques and safeguards.

  8. Neutron irradiation embrittlement of molybdenum rhenium alloys and their improvement by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Ueda, Kazukiyo; Satou, Manabu; Abe, Katsunori

    1998-10-01

    Irradiation-induced embrittlement is one of the major problems with molybdenum alloys, which have been considered as one of the candidates for divertor structural materials. The effects of rhenium content, heat-treatment and irradiation condition on mechanical properties and microstructural development of molybdenum rhenium alloys were studied after neutron exposure by FFTF/MOTA up to high fluence (˜1 × 10 27 n/m 2, En>0.1 MeV). Appreciable plastic deformation was observed in a bending test on stress-relieved Mo-5 wt% Re irradiated at high temperatures. Fine, dense precipitates were observed in Mo-41 wt% Re, resulting in large hardening and embrittlement.

  9. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10²⁵ m⁻² to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10²⁶ m⁻² in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Finalmore » thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at % D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at. % D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was migrated and trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.025 dpa) at 500 °C case even in the relatively low ion fluence of 10²⁶ m⁻².« less

  10. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10²⁵ m⁻² to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10²⁶ m⁻² in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Final thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at % D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at. % D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was migrated and trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.025 dpa) at 500 °C case even in the relatively low ion fluence of 10²⁶ m⁻².

  11. ac susceptibility of thermally annealed and neutron irradiated Cu-Ni alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catchings, R. M., III; Borg, R. J.; Violet, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal annealing and high-flux neutron irradiation are used to vary the degree of short-range atomic order in Cu-Ni alloys of composition 40, 50, and 60 at. pct Ni. The magnetic state is measured by ac magnetic susceptibility measurements. It is shown that annealing at 350 C causes significant changes in the susceptibility of all the samples. In the 50 and 60 at. pct Ni samples, the transition is broadened and extended to higher temperatures, while the 40 at. pct Ni sample changes from a paramagnetic system to a weakly ferromagnetic system. The neutron irradiation, in contrast to the thermal treatment, causes the development of smaller size cluster formations. The irradiated 60 at. pct Ni sample exhibits no change in the shape of its susceptibility curve from that of the quenched sample, whereas, the 40 pct alloy is changed, by irradiation, from a paramagnetic system to a spin-glass system.

  12. Effect of electron- and neutron-irradiation on Fe-Cu model alloys studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Y.; Takadate, K.; Tang, Z.; Ohkubo, H.; Sunaga, H.; Takizawa, H.; Hasegawa, M.

    2011-01-01

    Electron- and neutron-irradiation effects on dilute Fe-Cu model alloys of nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels are studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. We have found that, not only by high-dose neutron-irradiation but also by low-dose electron-irradiation, the aggregation of Cu atoms and vacancies takes place and the ultrafine Cu precipitates are formed after post-irradiation annealing at 400°C. In spite of large difference in the irradiation doses between the electron- and the neutron-irradiated samples, no significant difference is observed in the isochronal annealing behaviour above 400°C of positron annihilation and micro-hardness, indicating that small amount of extra vacancies enhance the aggregation of Cu atoms in Fe during the annealing-out process of the vacancies.

  13. Radioisotopes produced by neutron irradiation of food.

    PubMed

    Albright, S; Seviour, R

    2016-04-01

    The use of neutrons for cargo interrogation has the potential to drastically improve threat detection. Previous research has focussed on the production of (24)Na, based on the isotopes produced in pharmaceuticals and medical devices. For both the total activity and the ingestion dose we show that a variety of isotopes contribute and that (24)Na is only dominant under certain conditions. The composition of the foods has a strong influence on the resulting activity and ingestion dose suggesting that the pharmaceuticals and medical devices considered initially are not a viable analogue for foodstuffs. There is an energy dependence to the isotopes produced due to the cross-sections of different reactions varying with neutron energy. We show that this results in different isotopes dominating the ingestion dose at different energies, which has not been considered in the previous literature. PMID:26749562

  14. Perspectives for online analysis of raw material by pulsed neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Pierre; Le Tourneur, P.; Poumarede, B.

    1997-02-01

    On-line analysis by pulsed neutron irradiation is an example of an advanced technology application of nuclear techniques, concerning real problems in the cement, mineral and coal industries. The most significant of these nuclear techniques is their capability of continuous measurement without contact and without sampling, which can lead to improved control of processes and resultant large financial savings. Compared to Californium neutron sources, the use of electrical pulsed neutron generators allows to obtain a higher signal/noise ratio for a more sensitive measurement, and allows to overcome a number of safety problems concerning transportation, installation and maintenance. An experiment related to a possible new on-line raw material analyzer is described, using a pulsed neutron generator. The key factors contributing to an accurate measurement are related to a suitable generator, to a high count rate gamma ray spectroscopy electronics, and to computational tools. Calculation and results for the optimization of the neutron irradiation time diagram are reported. One of the operational characteristics of such an equipment is related to neutron flux available: it is possible to adjust it to the requested accuracy, i.e. for a high accuracy during a few hours/day and for a lower accuracy the rest of the time. This feature allows to operate the neutron tube during a longer time, and then to reduce the cost of analysis.

  15. SPECTER: neutron damage calculations for materials irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Smither, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron displacement damage-energy cross sections have been calculated for 41 isotopes in the energy range from 10/sup -10/ to 20 MeV. Calculations were performed on a 100-point energy grid using nuclear cross sections from ENDF/B-V and the DISCS computer code. Elastic scattering is treated exactly including angular distributions from ENDF/B-V. Inelastic scattering calculations consider both discrete and continuous nuclear level distributions. Multiple (n,xn) reactions use a Monte Carlo technique to derive the recoil distributions. The (n,d) and (n,t) reactions are treated as (n,p) and (n,/sup 3/He) as (n,/sup 4/He). The (n,..gamma..) reaction and subsequent ..beta..-decay are also included, using a new treatment of ..gamma..-..gamma.. coincidences, angular correlations, ..beta..-neutrino correlations, and the incident neutron energy. The Lindhard model was used to compute the energy available for nuclear displacement at each recoil energy. The SPECTER computer code has been developed to simplify damage calculations. The user need only specify a neutron energy spectrum. SPECTER will then calculate spectral-averaged displacements, recoil spectra, gas production, and total damage energy (Kerma). The SPECTER computer code package is readily accessible to the fusion community via the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory.

  16. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  17. Investigation of the oxygen-vacancy (A-center) defect complex profile in neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon junction particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng; Kraner, H.W.; Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Ivanov, A.; Rattaggi, M.; Rancoita, P.G.; Rubinelli, F.A.; Fonash, S.J.; Dale, C.; Marshall, P.

    1992-02-01

    Distributions of the A-center (oxygen-vacancy) in neutron silicon detectors have been studied using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy. A-centers have been found to be nearly uniformly distributed in the silicon water depth for medium resistivity (0.1 {minus} 0.2 k{Omega}-cm) silicon detectors. A positive filling pulse was needed to detect the A-centers in high resistivity (>4 k{Omega}-cm) silicon detectors, and this effect was found to be dependent on the oxidation temperature. A discussion of this effect is presented. 16 refs.

  18. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  19. Positron annihilation in neutron irradiated iron-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, M.; Almazouzi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The hardening and embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels is of great concern in the actual nuclear power plant life assessment. This embrittlement is caused by irradiation-induced damage, like vacancies, interstitials, solutes and their clusters. But the reason for the embrittlement of the material is not yet totally known. The real nature of the irradiation damage should thus be examined as well as its evolution in time. Positron annihilation spectroscopy has been shown to be a powerful method for analyzing some of these defects. In fact, both vacancy type clusters and precipitates can be visualized by positrons. Recently, at SCK·CEN, a new setup has been constructed, calibrated and optimized to measure the coincidence Doppler broadening and lifetime of neutron irradiated materials. To be able to compare the results obtained by the positron studies, with those of other techniques (such as transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography and small angle neutron scattering), quantitative estimations of the size and density of the annihilation sites are needed. Using the approach proposed by Vehanen et al., an attempt is made to calculate the needed quantities in Fe and Fe-Cu binary alloys that were neutron irradiated to different doses. The results obtained are discussed highlighting the difficulties in defining the annihilation centres even in these simple model alloys, in spite of using both lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements in the same samples.

  20. Microstructural origins of radiation-induced changes in mechanical properties of 316 L and 304 L austenitic stainless steels irradiated with mixed spectra of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sencer, B. H.; Bond, G. M.; Hamilton, M. L.; Garner, F. A.; Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.

    2001-07-01

    A number of candidate alloys were exposed to a particle flux and spectrum at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) that closely match the mixed high-energy proton/neutron spectra expected in accelerator production of tritium (APT) window and blanket applications. Austenitic stainless steels 316 L and 304 L are two of these candidate alloys possessing attractive strength and corrosion resistance for APT applications. This paper describes the dose dependence of the irradiation-induced microstructural evolution of SS 316 L and 304 L in the temperature range 30-60°C and consequent changes in mechanical properties. It was observed that the microstructural evolution during irradiation was essentially identical in the two alloys, a behavior mirrored in their changes in mechanical properties. With one expection, it was possible to correlate all changes in mechanical properties with visible microstructural features. A late-term second abrupt decrease in uniform elongation was not associated with visible microstructure, but is postulated to be a consequence of large levels of retained hydrogen measured in the specimens. In spite of large amounts of both helium and hydrogen retained, approaching 1 at.% at the highest exposures, no visible cavities were formed, indicating that the gas atoms were either in solution or in subresolvable clusters.

  1. High intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1973-12-11

    This invention relates to a high intensity, pulsed thermal neutron source comprising a neutron-producing source which emits pulses of fast neutrons, a moderator block adjacent to the last neutron source, a reflector block which encases the fast neutron source and the moderator block and has a thermal neutron exit port extending therethrough from the moderator block, and a neutron energy- dependent decoupling reflector liner covering the interior surfaces of the thermal neutron exit port and surrounding all surfaces of the moderator block except the surface viewed by the thermal neutron exit port. (Official Gazette)

  2. Neutron irradiation induced microstructural changes in NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, Chinnathambi; Kane, Joshua; Butt, Darryl P.; Windes, William E.; Ubic, Rick

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports the neutron-irradiation-induced effects on the microstructure of NBG-18 and IG-110 nuclear graphites. The high-temperature neutron irradiation at two different irradiation conditions was carried out at the Advanced Test Reactor National User Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. NBG-18 samples were irradiated to 1.54 dpa and 6.78 dpa at 430 °C and 678 °C respectively. IG-110 samples were irradiated to 1.91 dpa and 6.70 dpa at 451 °C and 674 °C respectively. Bright-field transmission electron microscopy imaging was used to study the changes in different microstructural components such as filler particles, microcracks, binder and quinoline-insoluble (QI) particles. Significant changes have been observed in samples irradiated to about 6.7 dpa. The closing of pre-existing microcracks was observed in both the filler and the binder phases. The binder phase exhibited substantial densification with near complete elimination of the microcracks. The QI particles embedded in the binder phase exhibited a complete microstructural transformation from rosettes to highly crystalline solid spheres. The lattice images indicate the formation of edge dislocations as well as extended line defects bridging the adjacent basal planes. The positive climb of these dislocations has been identified as the main contributor to the irradiation-induced swelling of the graphite lattice.

  3. Precipitate stability in neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. J. S.

    1988-09-01

    Zircaloy-4, a zirconium-base alloy used extensively as cladding and core structural materials in water-cooled nuclear reactors, was examined by transmission electron microscopy, after neutron irradiation and postirradiation annealing. Phase instabilities found during irradiation at 561 K include the amorphous transformation and the dissolution of the intermetallic Zr(Fe,Cr) 2. The α-matrix is driven toward a single phase solid solution as the neutron fluence increases. This is evidenced by the continuous dissolution of the precipitate without precipitation of any new phase during irradiation. During postirradiation annealing at 833 K, solute Fe precipitates out particularly at the grain boundaries as Zr-Fe zeta-phase. Recrystallization of the amorphous precipitates occurs at a postirradiation annealing temperature of 1023 K. In general, the observed phenomena of amorphous transformation, precipitate dissolution, reprecipitation and recrystallization reflect the complex solute-point defect interactions in the α-matrix. The continuous solute dissolution during irradiation is expected to have a potential effect on irradiation growth, creep and corrosion properties of the alloy.

  4. Dose-Dependent Onset of Regenerative Program in Neutron Irradiated Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Artibani, Mara; Kobos, Katarzyna; Colautti, Paolo; Negri, Rodolfo; Amendola, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Tissue response to irradiation is not easily recapitulated by cell culture studies. The objective of this investigation was to characterize, the transcriptional response and the onset of regenerative processes in mouse skin irradiated with different doses of fast neutrons. Methodology/Principal Findings To monitor general response to irradiation and individual animal to animal variation, we performed gene and protein expression analysis with both pooled and individual mouse samples. A high-throughput gene expression analysis, by DNA oligonucleotide microarray was done with three months old C57Bl/6 mice irradiated with 0.2 and 1 Gy of mono-energetic 14 MeV neutron compared to sham irradiated controls. The results on 440 irradiation modulated genes, partially validated by quantitative real time RT-PCR, showed a dose-dependent up-regulation of a sub-class of keratin and keratin associated proteins, and members of the S100 family of Ca2+-binding proteins. Immunohistochemistry confirmed mRNA expression data enabled mapping of protein expression. Interestingly, proteins up-regulated in thickening epidermis: keratin 6 and S100A8 showed the most significant up-regulation and the least mouse-to-mouse variation following 0.2 Gy irradiation, in a concerted effort toward skin tissue regeneration. Conversely, mice irradiated at 1 Gy showed most evidence of apoptosis (Caspase-3 and TUNEL staining) and most 8-oxo-G accumulation at 24 h post-irradiation. Moreover, no cell proliferation accompanied 1 Gy exposure as shown by Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Conclusions/Significance The dose-dependent differential gene expression at the tissue level following in vivo exposure to neutron radiation is reminiscent of the onset of re-epithelialization and wound healing and depends on the proportion of cells carrying multiple chromosomal lesions in the entire tissue. Thus, this study presents in vivo evidence of a skin regenerative program exerted independently from DNA repair

  5. Evaluation of weld crack susceptibility for neutron irradiated stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Kohyama, A.; Hirose, T.; Narui, M.

    In order to clarify the mechanisms of weld cracking, especially for heat affected zone cracking in heavily neutron irradiated stainless steels and to establish a measure to evaluate crack susceptibility, a mini-sized Varestraint (variable restraint) test machine for hot laboratory operation was designed and fabricated. This unique PIE facility was successfully applied in the hot laboratory of IMR Oarai Branch of Tohoku University. The maximum restraint applied was 4% at the surface of the specimen. Specimen surface morphology and specimen microstructures were inspected by video microscope, SEM and TEM. Under the 2% surface restraint condition, clear formation of heat affected zone (HAZ) crack was observed for the case of neutron irradiation to produce 0.5 appm He and of 2.4 kJ heat input by TIG.

  6. Neutron irradiation and compatibility testing of Li 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Krsul, J. R.; Laug, M. T.; Walters, L. C.; Tetenbaum, M.

    1984-05-01

    A study was made of the neutron irradiation behavior of 6Li-enriched Li 2O in EBR-II. In addition, a stress corrosion study was performed ex-reactor to test the compatibility of Li 2O with a variety of stainless steels. The irradiation tests showed that tritium and helium retention in the Li 2O (˜ 89% dense) lessened with neutron exposure, and the retentions appear to approach a steady-state after ˜ 1% 6Li burnup. The stress corrosion studies, using 316 stainless steel (Ti-modified) and a 35% Ni alloy, showed that stress does not enhance the corrosion, and that dry Li 2O is not significantly corrosive, the LiOH content producing the corrosive effects. Corrosion, in general, was not severe because a passivation in sealed capsules seemed to occur after a time which greatly reduced corrosion rates.

  7. Fast neutron irradiation for advanced tumors in the pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.; Breur, K.

    1981-08-01

    Since the end of 1975, fast neutron irradiation has been used in the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital for the treatment of advanced tumors, which had no prospect of cure by other treatment modalities. Fifty-nine patients were irradiated in the pelvic area, 22 for inoperable bladder cancer, 25 for rectal and 12 for gynecological cancer. Treatments were given 5 times per week with a 14 MeV d + T neutron generator. Persisting complete tumor regression was achieved in 11 of 22 bladded patients, 14 of 25 rectum patients and 6 of 12 gynecological patients. Because of unfavorable beam characteristics, 15 of 59 (25%) treated patients had severe radiation-induced intestinal and skin complications.

  8. Radioxenon production through neutron irradiation of stable xenon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Derek A.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Foltz Biegalski, Kendra M.

    2009-12-01

    The Spectral Deconvolution Analysis Tool (SDAT) software was developed to improve counting statistics and detection limits for nuclear explosion radionuclide measurements. SDAT utilizes spectral deconvolution spectroscopy techniques and can analyze both β-γ coincidence spectra for radioxenon isotopes and high-resolution HPGe spectra from aerosol monitors. The deconvolution algorithm of the SDAT requires a library of β-γ coincidence spectra of individual radioxenon isotopes to determine isotopic ratios in a sample. In order to get experimentally produced spectra of the individual isotopes we have irradiated enriched samples of 130Xe, 132Xe, and 134Xe gas with a neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor at The University of Texas. The samples produced were counted in an Automated Radioxenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) style β-γ coincidence detector. The spectra produced show that this method of radioxenon production yields samples with very high purity of the individual isotopes for 131mXe and 135Xe and a sample with a substantial 133mXe to 133Xe ratio.

  9. Interpretation of infrared data in neutron-irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Londos, C.A.; Georgiou, G.I.; Fytros, L.G. ); Papastergiou, K. )

    1994-10-15

    Czochralski-grown Si samples were irradiated by fast neutrons, at room temperature, with the aim of studying the identity of the defects produced, using infrared spectroscopy. Two localized vibrational modes at 914 and 1000 cm[sup [minus]1] were considered as intermediate defect stages between VO and VO[sub 2] complexes. We express the view that they may arise from a [VO+O[sub [ital i

  10. Neutron irradiation of polycrystalline yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and α-alumina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeft, E. A. C.; Konings, R. J. M.; Bakker, K.; Boshoven, J. G.; Hein, H.; Schram, R. P. C.; van Veen, A.; Conrad, R.

    1999-08-01

    Polycrystalline pellets of yttrium aluminate garnet (Y 3Al 5O 12), magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl 2O 4) and α-alumina (α-Al 2O 3) have been irradiated in the high flux reactor (HFR) at Petten to a neutron fluence of 1.7 × 10 26 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) at a temperature of about 815 K. Volume changes smaller than 1% have been measured for Y 3Al 5O 12 and MgAl 2O 4. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results of Y 3Al 5O 12 show no difference between the unirradiated TEM samples and neutron-irradiated samples. For MgAl 2O 4, dislocation loops in some grains are found in the irradiated samples. TEM results of Al 2O 3 show a dense network of dislocation loops after neutron irradiation. The increase in volume is 4.2% for a neutron fluence of 1.7 × 10 26 m -2.

  11. Filtered fast neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S. Y.; Kim, C. H.; Reece, W. D.; Braby, L. A.

    2004-09-01

    A heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS) was developed for a variety of applications, including the study of long-term health effects of fast neutrons by evaluating the biological mechanisms of damage in cultured cells and living animals such as rats or mice. This irradiation system includes an exposure cave made with a lead-bismuth alloy, a cave positioning system, a gamma and neutron monitoring system, a sample transfer system, and interchangeable filters. This system was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). For a realistic modeling of the NSCR, the irradiation cell, and the FNIS, this study used the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code and a set of high-temperature ENDF/B-VI continuous neutron cross-section data. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find the characteristics of the FNIS as a function of the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy. A paired ion chamber system was constructed with a tissue-equivalent plastic (A-150) and propane gas for total dose monitoring and with graphite and argon for gamma dose monitoring. This study, in addition, tested the Monte Carlo modeling of the FNIS system, as well as the performance of the system by comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements using activation foils and paired ion chambers.

  12. [CYTOGENETIC EFFECTS IN MICE BONE MARROW AFTER IRRADIATION BY FAST NEUTRONS].

    PubMed

    Vorozhtsova, S V; Bulynina, T M; Ivanov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of damaging mice bone marrow cells by 1.5 MeV neutrons at the dose of 25-250 cGy, dose rate of 23.9 cGy/s and γ-quants ⁶⁰Co as a standard radiation were studied. The mitotic index and aberrant mitoses in marrow preparations were counted in 24 and 72 hours after irradiation. Coefficients of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of fast neutrons 24 and 72 hours post irradiation calculated from mitotic index reduction and aberrant mitoses formation were within the range from 4.1 ± 0.1 to 7.3 ± 0.1. Mean time of the existence of chromosomal aberrations in marrow cells was determined. For the specified doses from γ-rays, the period of aberrations existence was 1.4-1.1 cycles and for neutrons, 1.0-0.6 cycles. Morphologic analysis of neutron-induced damages and ratio of the most common breaks demonstrated a high production of bridges, which outnumbered cells with fragments in 3 to 4 times suggesting a more destructive effect on the genetic structures of cells. RBE of fast neutrons is a variable that grows with a radiation dose. Moreover, RBE estimated after 72 hours exceeded values it had 24 hours after irradiation. PMID:27347593

  13. Results of d+T fast neutron irradiation on advanced tumors of bladder and rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.

    1982-12-01

    From November, 1975 to November, 1981, around 400 patients were irradiated with 14 MeV d+T fast neutrons at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Special interest was focused on inoperable tumors of bladder and rectum. During the pilot phase of the study 47 patients were treated, mostly via two parallel opposed ports with dosages that ranged from 18 to more than 22 Gy. Although persistent local control was achieved in 23 patients (48%), 14 patients (29%) died of severe complications. By the introduction of a six field technique, the fatal complication rate could be reduced significantly. Since May 1978 patients were randomized in a three arm trial, using two dose levels on the neutron site. The preliminary results of a group of 91 patients show a similar survival in the three treatment arms with a somewhat better local control rate for high dose neutrons. An attempt was made to estimate RBE values for tumor control and normal tissue reactions by comparing the data for neutron irradiation with the data obtained with photons on a similar group of patients. From the values derived it must be concluded that the gain for neutron irradiation on these tumors in the pelvis will be negligible.

  14. Results of d+T fast neutron irradiation on advanced tumors of bladder and rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.

    1982-12-01

    From November, 1975 to November, 1981, around 400 patients were irradiated with 14 MeV d+T fast neutrons at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Special interest was focused on inoperable tumors of bladder and rectum. During the pilot phase of the study 47 patients were treated, mostly via two parallel opposed ports with dosages that ranged from 18 to more than 22 Gy. Although persistent local control was achieved in 23 patients (48%), 14 patients (29%) died of severe complications. By the introduction of a six field technique, the fatal complication rate could be reduced significantly. Since May 1978 patients were randomized in a three arm trial, using two dose levels on the neutron site. The preliminary results of a group of 91 patients show a similar survival in the three treatment arms with a somewhat better local control rate for high dose neutrons. An attempt was made to estimate RBE values for tumor control and normal tissue reaction by comparing the data for neutron irradiation with the data obtained with photons on a similar group of patients. From the values derived it must be concluded that the gain for neutron irradiation on these tumors in the pelvis will be negligible.

  15. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs.

  16. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, /sup 252/Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by /sup 60/Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use.

  17. Neutron irradiation of superconductors and damage energy scaling of different neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, P. A.; Weber, H. W.; Guinan, M. W.; Birtcher, R. C.; Brown, B. S.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1985-08-01

    Three different neutron sources were used to irradiate identical sets of NbTi superconductors up to about half the lifetime dose of a superconducting magnet in a fusion reactor. Based on a careful source characterization of the TRIGA Mark-II reactor in Vienna, the spallation neutron source IPNS at Argonne and the 14 MeV neutron source RTNS-II at Livermore, the damage energy cross sections were calculated for four different types of NbTi alloys (42, 46.5, 49 and 54 wt % Ti). The experimental results on the variations of critical current densities j sub c with neutron dose are found to scale within the experimental uncertainties with the appropriate damage energy cross sections. This first explicit proof of damage energy scaling for j sub c-variations in superconductors is considered to be most valuable for the evaluation of radiation damage in superconductors under fusion reactor conditions.

  18. Tritium Retention and Permeation in Ion- and Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten under US-Japan PHENIX Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Chikada, Takumi; Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a FNSF, a DEMO and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to intense heat and neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while minimizing in-vessel inventories and ex-vessel permeation of tritium. Recent work at Tritium Plasma Experiment demonstrated that tritium diffuses in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. US-Japan PHENIX collaboration (2013-2019) investigates irradiation response on tritium behavior in tungsten, and performs one-of-a-kind neutron-irradiation with Gd thermal neutron shield at High Flux Isotope Reactor, ORNL. This presentation describes the challenge in elucidating tritium behavior in neutron-irradiated PFCs, the PHENIX plans for neutron-irradiation and post irradiation examination, and the recent findings on tritium retention and permeation in 14MeV neutron-irradiated and Fe ion irradiated tungsten. This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  19. Neutron capture effects in lunar gadolinium and the irradiation histories of some lunar rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Marti, K.

    1971-01-01

    The Gd isotopic composition in 19 lunar rock and soil samples from three Apollo sites is reported. The analytical techniques and the high precision mass spectrometric measurements are discussed. Enrichments in the Gd-158 oxide to G-157 oxide ratio due to neutron capture range up to 0.75%. Integrated 'thermal' neutron fluxes derived from the isotopic anomalies of Gd are compared with spallation Kr data from aliquot samples to construct a model which gives both average cosmic-ray irradiation depths and effective neutron exposure ages for some rocks. Rock 14310 is the first lunar sample where Kr anomalies due to resonance neutron capture in Br are observed. A Kr-81/Kr exposure age of 262 (plus or minus 7)m.y. is calculated for this rock.

  20. Effect of initial oxygen content on the void swelling behavior of fast neutron irradiated copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Garner, F. A.

    2004-08-01

    Density measurements were performed on high purity copper specimens containing ⩽10 and ˜90 wt ppm oxygen following irradiation in FFTF MOTA 2B. Significant amounts of swelling were observed in both the low-oxygen and oxygen-doped specimens following irradiation to ˜17 dpa at 375 °C and ˜47 dpa at 430 °C. Oxygen doping up to 360 appm (˜90 wt ppm) did not significantly affect the void swelling of copper for these irradiation conditions. This implies that surface energy reduction associated with oxygen segregation and chemisorption on void surfaces is not a significant factor controlling the void swelling behavior in copper irradiated with neutrons to high doses at ˜400 °C.

  1. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver

    SciTech Connect

    Bortolussi, S.; Altieri, S.

    2007-12-15

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ({phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min}) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a {phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min} ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  2. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations. PMID:18196797

  3. Significant disparity in base and sugar damage in DNA resulting from neutron and electron irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Dalong; Nico, Jeffrey S.; Karam, Lisa; Timofeeva, Olga; Blakely, William F.; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a comparison of the effects of neutron and electron irradiation of aqueous DNA solutions was investigated to characterize potential neutron signatures in DNA damage induction. Ionizing radiation generates numerous lesions in DNA, including base and sugar lesions, lesions involving base–sugar combinations (e.g. 8,5′-cyclopurine-2′-deoxynucleosides) and DNA–protein cross-links, as well as single- and double-strand breaks and clustered damage. The characteristics of damage depend on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the incident radiation. Here we investigated DNA damage using aqueous DNA solutions in 10 mmol/l phosphate buffer from 0–80 Gy by low-LET electrons (10 Gy/min) and the specific high-LET (∼0.16 Gy/h) neutrons formed by spontaneous 252Cf decay fissions. 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), (5′R)-8,5′-cyclo-2′-deoxyadenosine (R-cdA) and (5′S)-8,5′-cyclo-2′-deoxyadenosine (S-cdA) were quantified using liquid chromatography–isotope-dilution tandem mass spectrometry to demonstrate a linear dose dependence for induction of 8-OH-dG by both types of radiation, although neutron irradiation was ∼50% less effective at a given dose compared with electron irradiation. Electron irradiation resulted in an exponential increase in S-cdA and R-cdA with dose, whereas neutron irradiation induced substantially less damage and the amount of damage increased only gradually with dose. Addition of 30 mmol/l 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (TRIS), a free radical scavenger, to the DNA solution before irradiation reduced lesion induction to background levels for both types of radiation. These results provide insight into the mechanisms of DNA damage by high-LET 252Cf decay neutrons and low-LET electrons, leading to enhanced understanding of the potential biological effects of these types of irradiation. PMID:25034731

  4. Deuterium trapping at defects created with neutron and ion irradiations in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Hatano; M. Shimada; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; V.Kh. Alimov; M. Hara; J. Shi; M. Kobayashi; T. Oda; G. Cao; K. Okuno; T. Tanaka; K. Sugiyama; J. Roth; B. Tyburska-Püschel; J. Dorner; N. Yoshida; N. Futagami; H. Watanabe; M. Hatakeyama; H. Kurishita; M. Sokolov; Y. Katoh

    2013-07-01

    The effects of neutron and ion irradiations on deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) were investigated. Specimens of pure W were irradiated with neutrons to 0.3 dpa at around 323 K and then exposed to high-flux D plasma at 473 and 773 K. The concentration of D significantly increased by neutron irradiation and reached 0.8 at% at 473 K and 0.4 at% at 773 K. Annealing tests for the specimens irradiated with 20 MeV W ions showed that the defects which play a dominant role in the trapping at high temperature were stable at least up to 973 K, while the density decreased at temperatures equal to or above 1123 K. These observations of the thermal stability of traps and the activation energy for D detrapping examined in a previous study (˜1.8 eV) indicated that the defects which contribute predominantly to trapping at 773 K were small voids. The higher concentration of trapped D at 473 K was explained by additional contributions of weaker traps. The release of trapped D was clearly enhanced by the exposure to atomic hydrogen at 473 K, though higher temperatures are more effective for using this effect for tritium removal in fusion reactors.

  5. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  6. Radioactivity of neutron-irradiated cat's-eye chrysoberyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S. M.; Tay, T. S.

    1999-04-01

    The recent report of marketing of radioactive chrysoberyl cat's-eyes in South-East Asian markets has led us to use an indirect method to estimate the threat to health these color-enhanced gemstones may pose if worn close to skin. We determined the impurity content of several cat's-eye chrysoberyls from Indian States of Orissa and Kerala using PIXE, and calculated the radioactivity that would be generated from these impurities and the constitutional elements if a chrysoberyl was irradiated by neutrons in a nuclear reactor for color enhancement. Of all the radioactive nuclides that could be created by neutron irradiation, only four ( 46Sc, 51Cr, 54Mn and 59Fe) would not have cooled down within a month after irradiation to the internationally accepted level of specific residual radioactivity of 2 nCi/g. The radioactivity of 46Sc, 51Cr and 59Fe would only fall to this safe limit after 15 months and that of 54Mn could remain above this limit for several years.

  7. Impurities effect on the swelling of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Donne, M.D.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.

    1995-09-01

    An important factor controlling the swelling behaviour of fast neutron irradiated beryllium is the impurity content which can strongly affect both the surface tension and the creep strength of this material. Being the volume swelling of the old beryllium (early sixties) systematically higher than that of the more modem one (end of the seventies), a sensitivity analysis with the aid of the computer code ANFIBE (ANalysis of Fusion Irradiated BEryllium) to investigate the effect of these material properties on the swelling behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium has been performed. Two sets of experimental data have been selected: the first one named Western refers to quite recently produced Western beryllium, whilst the second one, named Russian refers to relatively old (early sixties) Russian beryllium containing a higher impurity rate than the Western one. The results obtained with the ANFIBE Code were assessed by comparison with experimental data and the used material properties were compared with the data available in the literature. Good agreement between calculated and measured values has been found.

  8. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  9. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (∼90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S-W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage, providing insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  10. Fast neutron irradiation effects on magnetization relaxation in YBCO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lensink, J.G.; Griessen, R. . Faculty of Physics and Astronomy); Wiesinger, H.P.; Sauerzopf, F.M.; Weber, H.W. ); Crabtree, G.W. )

    1991-07-01

    A high-quality YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} single crystal has been investigated by torque magnetometry prior to and following fast neutron irradiation to a fluence of 2{times}10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). In addition to large enhancements of the critical current densities, which have been observed in similar form previously by Sauerzopf et al, we find a dramatic change in the relaxation behavior following irradiation. At low temperatures ({le} 50 k) the relaxation rates are lowered by factors up to 4 in the irradiated state in a magnetic field of 1.5 T. At higher temperatures, on the other hand, they are enhanced compared to the unirradiated state. Both before and after irradiation, the magnetization relaxation follows a logarithmic time dependence, which we ascribe to thermally activated flux motion.

  11. RhG-CSF improves radiation-induced myelosuppression and survival in the canine exposed to fission neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zu-Yin; Li, Ming; Han, A-Ru-Na; Xing, Shuang; Ou, Hong-Ling; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Xie, Ling; Zhao, Yan-Fang; Xiao, He; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Zhen-Hu; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Cong, Yu-Wen; Luo, Qing-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Fission-neutron radiation damage is hard to treat due to its critical injuries to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal systems, and so far few data are available on the therapeutic measures for neutron-radiation syndrome. This study was designed to test the effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) in dogs which had received 2.3 Gy mixed fission-neutronirradiation with a high ratio of neutrons (~90%). Following irradiation, rhG-CSF treatment induced 100% survival versus 60% in controls. Only two of five rhG-CSF-treated dogs experienced leukopenia (white blood cells [WBC] count < 1.0 × 10(9)/L) and neutropenia (neutrophil [ANC] count < 0.5 × 10(9)/L), whereas all irradiated controls displayed a profound period of leukopenia and neutropenia. Furthermore, administration of rhG-CSF significantly delayed the onset of leukopenia and reduced the duration of leucopenia as compared with controls. In addition, individual dogs in the rhG-CSF-treated group exhibited evident differences in rhG-CSF responsiveness after neutron-irradiation. Finally, histopathological evaluation of the surviving dogs revealed that the incidence and severity of bone marrow, thymus and spleen damage decreased in rhG-CSF-treated dogs as compared with surviving controls. Thus, these results demonstrated that rhG-CSF administration enhanced recovery of myelopoiesis and survival after neutron-irradiation. PMID:21785235

  12. The medical-irradiation characteristics for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    At the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor, the mix irradiation of thermal and epi-thermal neutrons, and the solo irradiation of epi-thermal neutrons are available additionally to the thermal neutron irradiation, and then the neutron capture therapy (NCT) at this facility became more flexible, after the update in 1996. The estimation of the depth dose distributions in NCT clinical irradiation, were performed for the standard irradiation modes of thermal, mixed and epi-thermal neutrons, from the both sides of experiment and calculation. On the assumption that the 10B concentration in tumor part was 40 ppm and the ratio of tumor to normal tissue was 3.5, the advantage depth were estimated to 5.4, 6.0, and 8.0, for the respective standard irradiation modes. It was confirmed that the various irradiation conditions can be selected according to the target-volume conditions, such as size, depth, etc. Besides, in the viewpoint of the radiation shielding for patient, it was confirmed that the whole-body exposure is effectively reduced by the new clinical collimators, compared with the old one. PMID:12408307

  13. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  14. Influence of heat-treatment on tensile behavior of neutron irradiated molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Abe, K.; Satou, M.; Ueda, K.; Namba, C.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of stress-relieved and recrystallized molybdenum were irradiated at five temperatures between 646 and 1073 K in FFTF/MOTA cycle 11. The exposure levels were in the range of 6.8 to 34 dpa depending on the irradiation temperatures. After irradiation tensile tests and hardness test were carried out at room temperature. The total elongation of stress-relived specimens irradiated at 792, 873 and 1073 K ranged from 9 to 13%, and those of recrystallized specimens irradiated at these temperatures were almost 0%. The fracture modes of the stress-relieved specimens irradiated at 646-873 K were transgranular type and those of recrystallized specimens irradiated at 646-1073 K were intergranular type. Grain growth and intergranular fracture surface were observed in the stress-relieved specimen irradiated at 1073 K but it still has 9% total elongation. It is important that the stress-relived molybdenum had enough ductility at room temperature after neutron exposures up to relatively high fluences.

  15. Mechanical properties of neutron-irradiated nickel-containing martensitic steels: I. Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Hashimoto, N.; Sokolov, M. A.; Shiba, K.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2006-10-01

    Tensile and Charpy specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and these steels doped with 2% Ni were irradiated at 300 and 400 °C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) up to ≈12 dpa and at 393 °C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to ≈15 dpa. In HFIR, a mixed-spectrum reactor, ( n, α) reactions of thermal neutrons with 58Ni produce helium in the steels. Little helium is produced during irradiation in FFTF. After HFIR irradiation, the yield stress of all steels increased, with the largest increases occurring for nickel-doped steels. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increased up to two times and 1.7 times more in steels with 2% Ni than in those without the nickel addition after HFIR irradiation at 300 and 400 °C, respectively. Much smaller differences occurred between these steels after irradiation in FFTF. The DBTT increases for steels with 2% Ni after HFIR irradiation were 2-4 times greater than after FFTF irradiation. Results indicated there was hardening due to helium in addition to hardening by displacement damage and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  16. Quantum transport in neutron-irradiated modulation-doped heterojunctions. I. Fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, W.; Zhou, J.; Huang, Y.; Cai, L.

    1988-12-15

    We have investigated the characteristics of low-temperature quantum transport in Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs modulation-doped heterojunctions irradiated by fast neutrons of about 14 MeV energy. The concentration and the mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2D EG) under low magnetic fields decrease with increase in the concentrations of scatterers, such as ionized impurities, lattice defects, and interface roughness. On the other hand, under strong magnetic fields, the Hall plateau broadening associated with the Landau localized states, and the Shubnikov--de Hass (SdH) oscillation enhancement associated with the Landau extended states, increase markedly after fast-neutron irradiation.

  17. Quantum transport in neutron-irradiated modulation-doped heterojunctions. II. Thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, W.; Zhou, J.; Huang, Y.; Cai, L.

    1988-12-15

    We have investigated the characteristics of the low-temperature quantum transport Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs modulation-doped heterojunctions irradiated by thermal neutrons of about 0.025 eV energy. Time-dependent effects related to nuclear radiation such as ..beta../sup -/ decay and ..gamma.. radiation are discussed in detail. The concentration and the mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2D EG) under low magnetic fields, the Hall plateau broadening, and the Shubnikov--de Haas (SdH) oscillation enhancement under strong magnetic fields all increase immediately after the irradiation, and then relax for long times. Above all, parallel conduction without illumination is first observed by us with a higher flux of thermal neutrons.

  18. Terahertz generation from electron- and neutron-irradiated semiconductor crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereznaya, S. A.; Korotchenko, Z. V.; Redkin, R. A.; Sarkisov, S. Yu.; Brudnyi, V. N.; Kosobutsky, A. V.; Atuchin, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Terahertz generation from the InP, InSb, GaAs and GaSe crystal surfaces excitated by femtosecond laser pulses has been studied. The terahertz spectra emitted from the native crystals and the crystals previously irradiated by high-energy neutrons or electrons have been recorded. Also, a simulation of the terahertz emission process has been performed. A weak terahertz signal generated from the GaSe native surface has been registered. In the case of electron-irradiated GaSe, the signal is increased several fold because of increased laser radiation absorption.

  19. Welding-induced mechanical properties in austenitic stainless steels before and after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, R.; Schäublin, R.; Gavillet, D.; Baluc, N.

    2007-03-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of welded joints made of austenitic stainless steels have been investigated. The materials are welded AISI 304 and AISI 347, so-called test weld materials, irradiated with neutrons at 573 K to doses of 0.3 and 1.0 dpa. In addition, an AISI 304 from a decommissioned pressurised water reactor, so-called in-service material, which had accumulated a maximum dose of 0.35 dpa at about 573 K, was investigated. The mechanical properties of heat-affected zones and base materials were analysed before and after irradiation. Tensile parameters were determined at room temperature and at 573 K, for all materials and irradiation conditions. In the test weld materials it is found that radiation hardening is lower and loss of ductility is higher in the heat-affected zone than in the base material. In the in-service material radiation hardening is about the same in heat-affected zone and base material. After irradiation, deformation takes place by stacking faults and twins, at both room temperature and high temperature, contrary to unirradiated materials, where deformation takes place by twinning at room temperature and by dislocation cells at high temperature. No defect free channels are observed.

  20. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B.

    1994-12-31

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on {sup 3}He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type.

  1. Observation of Gamma Irradiation-Induced Suppression of Reversed Annealing in Neutron Irradiated MCZ Si Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Gul, R.; Harkonen, J.; Kierstead, J.; Metcalfe, J.; Seidel, S.

    2009-02-06

    For the development of radiation-hard Si detectors for the SiD BeamCal program for the future ILC (International Linear Collider), n-type MCZ Si detectors have been irradiated first by fast neutrons to flueneces of 1.5 x 1014 and 3 x 1014 neq/cm2, and then by gamma up to 500 Mrad. The motivation of this mixed radiation project is to develop a Si detector that can utilize the gamma/electron radiation that exists in the ICL radiation environment, which also includes neutrons. By using the positive space charge (SC) created by gamma radiation in MCZ Si detectors, one can cancel the negative space charge created by neutrons, thus reducing the overall/net space charge density and therefore the full depletion voltage of the detector.

  2. The effect of neutron irradiation dose on vacancy defect accumulation and annealing in pure nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhkov, A. P.; Arbuzov, V. L.; Perminov, D. A.

    2012-02-01

    In order to investigate the dose dependence of vacancy defect evolution in nickel, specimens of high-purity Ni were neutron-irradiated at ˜330 K in the IVV-2M reactor (Russia) to fluencies in the range of 1 × 10 21-1 × 10 23 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) corresponding to displacement dose levels in the range of about 0.0001-0.01 dpa and subsequently stepwise annealed to about 900 K. Ni was characterized both in as-irradiated state as well as after post-irradiation annealing by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The formation of three-dimensional vacancy clusters (3D-VCs) in cascades was observed under neutron irradiation, the concentration of 3D-VCs increases with increasing dose level. 3D-VCs collapse into secondary-type clusters (stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs), and vacancy loops) during stepwise annealing at 350-450 K. It is shown that the thermal stability of SFTs grow with increasing dose level, probably, it is due to growth of the average SFT size during annealing. The results of annealing experiments on electron-irradiated Ni at 300 K are indicated in the paper, for comparison. We also have briefly discussed the positron response to the SFT-like structures.

  3. Grain boundary segregation in neutron-irradiated 304 stainless steel studied by atom probe tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, T.; Nozawa, Y.; Van Renterghem, W.; Matsukawa, Y.; Hatakeyama, M.; Nagai, Y.; Al Mazouzi, A.; Van Dyck, S.

    2012-06-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of solute atoms at a grain boundary (GB) in 304 stainless steel (SS), neutron-irradiated to a dose of 24 dpa at 300 °C in the fuel wrapper plates of a commercial pressurized water reactor, was investigated using laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). Ni, Si, and P enrichment and Cr and Fe depletion at the GB were evident. The full-width at half-maximum of the RIS region was ˜3 nm for the concentration profile peaks of Ni and Si. The atomic percentages of Ni, Si, and Cr at the GB were ˜19%, ˜7%, and ˜14%, respectively, in agreement with previously-reported values for neutron-irradiated SS. A high number density of intra-granular Ni-Si rich precipitates formed in the matrix. A precipitate-denuded zone with a width of ˜10 nm appeared on both sides of the GB.

  4. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong Chun

    2011-06-28

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY and CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  5. The effect of neutron irradiation on silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nine types of SiC fiber have been exposed to neutron radiation in the Advanced Test Reactor at 250 C for various lengths of time ranging from 83 to 128 days. The effects of these exposures have been initially determined using scanning electron microscopy. The fibers tested were Nicalon{trademark} CG, Tyranno, Hi-Nicalon{trademark}, Dow Corning SiC, Carborundum SiC, Textron SCS-6, polymethysilane (PMS) derived SiC from the University of Michigan, and two types of MER SiC fiber. This covers a range of fibers from widely used commercial fibers to developmental fibers. Consistent with previous radiation experiments, Nicalon fiber was severely degraded by the neutron irradiation. Similarly, Tyranno suffered severe degradation. The more advanced fibers which approach the composition and properties of SiC performed well under irradiation. Of these, the Carborundum SiC fiber appeared to perform the best. The Hi-Nicalon and Dow Corning Fibers exhibited good general stability, but also appear to have some surface roughening. The MER fibers and the Textron SCS-6 fibers both had carbon cores which adversely influenced the overall stability of the fibers.

  6. Defect structure development in a pure iron and dilute iron alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, A.; Maeda, H.; Hamada, K.; Ishida, I.

    The defect structure and mechanical property changes were observed for pure iron of 99.99% purity and a series of Fe-(0.1% and 0.4%) Cr and Fe-(0.1% and 0.4%) Mn dilute alloys irradiated with neutrons. From the comparison of the defect structures with yield strength change, a large contribution of the invisible defect clusters to the irradiation hardening was expected in the specimens irradiated in Japan Materials Test Reactor (JMTR), whereas these clusters are not found after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The electron irradiation experiments showed that addition of chromium and manganese to 0.1% in pure iron, development of large dislocation loops is suppressed, and frequent nucleation of small loops at the early stage of the electron irradiation is observed, similar to that in ultra-high purity iron of 99.9999% purity. The mechanisms of dislocation loop development in the early stage of irradiation for Fe-Cr and Fe-Mn are considered to be different.

  7. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructural evolution in candidate low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Yutaka; Kohyama, Akira; Yoshino, Masahiko; Asakura, Kentaro

    1994-09-01

    Fe-(2.25-12)Cr-2W-V, Ta low activation ferritic steels (JLF series steels) were developed in the fusion materials development program of Japanese universities. Microstructural observations, including precipitation response, were performed after neutron irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA. The preirradiation microstructure was stable after irradiation at low temperature (< 683 K). Recovery of martensitic lath structure and coarsening of precipitates took place above 733 K. Precipitates observed after irradiation were the same as those in unirradiated materials in 7-9Cr steels, and no irradiation induced phase was identified. The irradiation induced shift in DBTT in the 9Cr-2W steel proved to be very small which is a reflection of stable precipitation response in these steels. A high density of fine α' precipitates was observed in the 12Cr steel which might be responsible for the large irradiation hardening found in the 12Cr steel. Void formation was observed in 7-9Cr steels irradiated at 683 K, but the amount of void swelling was very small.

  8. The neutron irradiation effect on the mechanical properties and structure of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Fabritsiev, S.A.; Pokrovsky, A.S.; Bagautdinov, R.M.

    1999-10-01

    The neutron irradiation effect on the mechanical properties and structure of beryllium are presented. Irradiation was performed in the BOR-60 reactor up to doses of 0.7--1.1 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) at irradiation temperatures of 350 C, 400 C, 520 C, 780 C. Two modifications of RF beryllium, i.e., DShG-200 and TShG-56, were chosen for investigation. For irradiation at temperatures of 350--400 C Be hardening due to the accumulation of radiation defect complexes. Hardening is accompanied with a sharp drop in plasticity at T{sub test} {le} 300 C. The fracture of samples is of brittle, mainly transcrystallite, type. High-temperature irradiation (T{sub irr} = 780 C) gives rise to large helium pores over the grain boundaries and smaller pores in the grain body. Fracture is brittle and intercrystalline at T{sub test} {ge} 600 C. Helium embrittlement is also accompanied with a drop in the Be mechanical properties. The conclusion is made that the irradiation temperature range, where irradiated beryllium has a satisfactory level of properties, is rather narrow: 300 C {le} T {le} 500 C.

  9. Radiation damage induced in Al2O3 single crystal sequentially irradiated with reactor neutrons and 90 MeV Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirour, H.; Izerrouken, M.; Sari, A.

    2016-06-01

    The present investigation reports the effect of 90 MeV Xe ion irradiation on neutron irradiated Al2O3 single crystals. Three irradiation experiments were performed, with neutrons only, 90 MeV Xe ions only and with neutrons followed by 90 MeV Xe ions. Neutron and 90 MeV Xe ion irradiations were performed at NUR research reactor, Algiers, Algeria and at GANIL accelerator, Caen, France respectively. After irradiation, the radiation damage was investigated by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), optical absorption measurements, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Raman technique revealed that the concentration of the defects formed in Al2O3 samples subsequently irradiated with neutrons and 90 MeV Xe ions is lower than that formed in Al2O3 samples which were irradiated only with neutrons. This reveals the occurrence of ionization-induced recovery of the neutron damage. Furthermore, as revealed by XRD analysis, a new peak is appeared at about 2θ = 38.03° after irradiation at high fluence (>3 × 1013 Xe/cm2). It can be assigned to the formation of new lattice plane.

  10. Characterization of the fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor after core conversion.

    PubMed

    Marques, J G; Sousa, M; Santos, J P; Fernandes, A C

    2011-08-01

    The fast neutron irradiation facility of the Portuguese Research Reactor was characterized after the reduction in uranium enrichment and rearrangement of the core configuration. In this work we report on the determination of the hardness parameter and the 1MeV equivalent neutron flux along the facility, in the new irradiation conditions, following ASTM E722 standard. PMID:21071234

  11. Particle LET spectra from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J. S.; Holtkamp, D. B.

    1988-12-01

    Cumulative fractions for LET spectra were measured for particles ejected from microelectronics packaging materials subjected to neutron and proton irradiation. The measurements for the neutron irradiation compare well with Monte Carlo theoretical calculations. The spectra can be used to access microelectronics vulnerabilities in strategic-nuclear- weapon, space-trapped, and neutral-beam directed-energy particle environments.

  12. Optical absorption and luminescence in neutron-irradiated, silica-based fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Clinard, F.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this work are to assess the effects of thermal annealing and photobleaching on the optical absorption of neutron-irradiated, silica fibers of the type proposed for use in ITER diagnostics, and to measure x-ray induced luminescence of unirradiated (virgin) and neutron-irradiated fibers.

  13. Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

    2011-09-01

    Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

  14. Neutron-irradiation creep of silicon carbide materials beyond the initial transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai; Ozawa, Kazumi; Shimoda, Kazuya; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation creep beyond the transient regime was investigated for various silicon carbide (SiC) materials. The materials examined included polycrystalline or monocrystalline high-purity SiC, nanopowder sintered SiC, highly crystalline and near-stoichiometric SiC fibers (including Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno SA3, isotopically-controlled Sylramic and Sylramic-iBN fibers), and a Tyranno SA3 fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite fabricated through a nano-infiltration transient eutectic phase process. Neutron irradiation experiments for bend stress relaxation tests were conducted at irradiation temperatures ranging from 430 to 1180 °C up to 30 dpa with initial bend stresses of up to ∼1 GPa for the fibers and ∼300 MPa for the other materials. Initial bend stress in the specimens continued to decrease from 1 to 30 dpa. Analysis revealed that (1) the stress exponent of irradiation creep above 1 dpa is approximately unity, (2) the stress normalized creep rate is ∼1 × 10-7 [dpa-1 MPa-1] at 430-750 °C for the range of 1-30 dpa for most polycrystalline SiC materials, and (3) the effects on irradiation creep of initial microstructures-such as grain boundary, crystal orientation, and secondary phases-increase with increasing irradiation temperature.

  15. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-10-01

    The Fe-Cr-Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe-Cr-Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe-Cr-Al alloys with 10-18 wt % Cr and 2.9-4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 °C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2<111> and a<100> were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich α‧ is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. A structure-property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  16. Neutron-irradiation creep of silicon carbide materials beyond the initial transient

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Katoh, Yutai; Ozawa, Kazumi; Shimoda, Kazuya; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance Lewis; Koyanagi, Takaaki

    2016-06-04

    Irradiation creep beyond the transient regime was investigated for various silicon carbide (SiC) materials. Here, the materials examined included polycrystalline or monocrystalline high-purity SiC, nanopowder sintered SiC, highly crystalline and near-stoichiometric SiC fibers (including Hi-Nicalon Type S, Tyranno SA3, isotopically-controlled Sylramic and Sylramic-iBN fibers), and a Tyranno SA3 fiber–reinforced SiC matrix composite fabricated through a nano-infiltration transient eutectic phase process. Neutron irradiation experiments for bend stress relaxation tests were conducted at irradiation temperatures ranging from 430 to 1180 °C up to 30 dpa with initial bend stresses of up to ~1 GPa for the fibers and ~300 MPa for themore » other materials. Initial bend stress in the specimens continued to decrease from 1 to 30 dpa. Analysis revealed that (1) the stress exponent of irradiation creep above 1 dpa is approximately unity, (2) the stress normalized creep rate is ~1 × 10–7 [dpa–1 MPa–1] at 430–750 °C for the range of 1–30 dpa for most polycrystalline SiC materials, and (3) the effects on irradiation creep of initial microstructures—such as grain boundary, crystal orientation, and secondary phases—increase with increasing irradiation temperature.« less

  17. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-10-01

    The Fe-Cr-Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe-Cr-Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe-Cr-Al alloys with 10-18 wt % Cr and 2.9-4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 °C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2<111> and a<100> were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich α‧ is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. A structure-property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α‧ precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  18. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-14

    The Fe Cr Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe Cr Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe Cr Al alloys with 10 18 wt % Cr and 2.9 4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition.more » Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2 111 and a 100 were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Furthermore, a structure property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α' precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.« less

  19. Radiation tolerance of neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Hu, Xunxiang; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-14

    The Fe Cr Al alloy system has the potential to form an important class of enhanced accident-tolerant cladding materials in the nuclear power industry owing to the alloy system's higher oxidation resistance in high-temperature steam environments compared with traditional zirconium-based alloys. However, radiation tolerance of Fe Cr Al alloys has not been fully established. In this study, a series of Fe Cr Al alloys with 10 18 wt % Cr and 2.9 4.9 wt % Al were neutron irradiated at 382 C to 1.8 dpa to investigate the irradiation-induced microstructural and mechanical property evolution as a function of alloy composition. Dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a/2 111 and a 100 were detected and quantified. Results indicate precipitation of Cr-rich is primarily dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Mechanical testing of sub-size-irradiated tensile specimens indicates the hardening response seen after irradiation is dependent on the bulk chromium composition. Furthermore, a structure property relationship was developed; it indicated that the change in yield strength after irradiation is caused by the formation of these radiation-induced defects and is dominated by the large number density of Cr-rich α' precipitates at sufficiently high chromium contents after irradiation.

  20. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutronmore » irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.« less

  1. Energy spectra of primary knock-on atoms under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M. R.; Marian, J.; Sublet, J.-Ch.

    2015-12-01

    Materials subjected to neutron irradiation will suffer from a build-up of damage caused by the displacement cascades initiated by nuclear reactions. Previously, the main "measure" of this damage accumulation has been through the displacements per atom (dpa) index, which has known limitations. This paper describes a rigorous methodology to calculate the primary atomic recoil events (often called the primary knock-on atoms or PKAs) that lead to cascade damage events as a function of energy and recoiling species. A new processing code SPECTRA-PKA combines a neutron irradiation spectrum with nuclear recoil data obtained from the latest nuclear data libraries to produce PKA spectra for any material composition. Via examples of fusion relevant materials, it is shown that these PKA spectra can be complex, involving many different recoiling species, potentially differing in both proton and neutron number from the original target nuclei, including high energy recoils of light emitted particles such as α-particles and protons. The variations in PKA spectra as a function of time, neutron field, and material are explored. The application of PKA spectra to the quantification of radiation damage is exemplified using two approaches: the binary collision approximation and stochastic cluster dynamics, and the results from these different models are discussed and compared.

  2. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-03-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10(-9) MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal-ventral, ventral-dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV. PMID:26661852

  3. Determining organ dose conversion coefficients for external neutron irradiation by using a voxel mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Ning, Jing; Zhou, Hongmei; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2016-01-01

    A set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients has been calculated for neutrons with energies <20 MeV using a developed voxel mouse model and Monte Carlo N-particle code (MCNP), for the purpose of neutron radiation effect evaluation. The calculation used 37 monodirectional monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range 10−9 MeV to 20 MeV, under five different source irradiation configurations: left lateral, right lateral, dorsal–ventral, ventral–dorsal, and isotropic. Neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for selected organs of the body were presented in the paper, and the effect of irradiation geometry conditions, neutron energy and the organ location on the organ dose was discussed. The results indicated that neutron dose conversion coefficients clearly show sensitivity to irradiation geometry at neutron energy below 1 MeV. PMID:26661852

  4. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h-1. These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  5. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field. PMID:17440252

  6. Protecting Intestinal Epithelial Cell Number 6 against Fission Neutron Irradiation through NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Gong-Min; Gao, Ya-Bing; Wang, Shui-Ming; Xu, Xin-Ping; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Jing; Li, Jin-Feng; Wang, Yun-Liang; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the change of NF-κB signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cell induced by fission neutron irradiation and the influence of the PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor LY294002. Three groups of IEC-6 cell lines were given: control group, neutron irradiation of 4Gy group, and neutron irradiation of 4Gy with LY294002 treatment group. Except the control group, the other groups were irradiated by neutron of 4Gy. LY294002 was given before 24 hours of neutron irradiation. At 6 h and 24 h after neutron irradiation, the morphologic changes, proliferation ability, apoptosis, and necrosis rates of the IEC-6 cell lines were assayed and the changes of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt pathway were detected. At 6 h and 24 h after neutron irradiation of 4Gy, the proliferation ability of the IEC-6 cells decreased and lots of apoptotic and necrotic cells were found. The injuries in LY294002 treatment and neutron irradiation group were more serious than those in control and neutron irradiation groups. The results suggest that IEC-6 cells were obviously damaged and induced serious apoptosis and necrosis by neutron irradiation of 4Gy; the NF-κB signaling pathway in IEC-6 was activated by neutron irradiation which could protect IEC-6 against injury by neutron irradiation; LY294002 could inhibit the activity of IEC-6 cells. PMID:25866755

  7. Genome Resilience and Prevalence of Segmental Duplications Following Fast Neutron Irradiation of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Bolon, Yung-Tsi; Stec, Adrian O.; Michno, Jean-Michel; Roessler, Jeffrey; Bhaskar, Pudota B.; Ries, Landon; Dobbels, Austin A.; Campbell, Benjamin W.; Young, Nathan P.; Anderson, Justin E.; Grant, David M.; Orf, James H.; Naeve, Seth L.; Muehlbauer, Gary J.; Vance, Carroll P.; Stupar, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast neutron radiation has been used as a mutagen to develop extensive mutant collections. However, the genome-wide structural consequences of fast neutron radiation are not well understood. Here, we examine the genome-wide structural variants observed among 264 soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] plants sampled from a large fast neutron-mutagenized population. While deletion rates were similar to previous reports, surprisingly high rates of segmental duplication were also found throughout the genome. Duplication coverage extended across entire chromosomes and often prevailed at chromosome ends. High-throughput resequencing analysis of selected mutants resolved specific chromosomal events, including the rearrangement junctions for a large deletion, a tandem duplication, and a translocation. Genetic mapping associated a large deletion on chromosome 10 with a quantitative change in seed composition for one mutant. A tandem duplication event, located on chromosome 17 in a second mutant, was found to cosegregate with a short petiole mutant phenotype, and thus may serve as an example of a morphological change attributable to a DNA copy number gain. Overall, this study provides insight into the resilience of the soybean genome, the patterns of structural variation resulting from fast neutron mutagenesis, and the utility of fast neutron-irradiated mutants as a source of novel genetic losses and gains. PMID:25213171

  8. Neutron irradiation effects in magnesium-aluminate spinel doped with transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsyna, V. T.; Afanasyev-Charkin, I. V.; Kobyakov, V. A.; Sickafus, K. E.

    2000-12-01

    We present data on optical properties for stoichiometric (MgO · Al 2O 3) and non-stoichiometric (MgO · 2Al 2O 3) spinel crystals: (1) nominally pure; (2) doped with transition metals Mn, Cr, and Fe to a concentration of 0.01 wt%; (3) irradiated with neutrons to a fluence of 1.8×10 21 m -2; (4) post-annealed at 650 K. The temperature during neutron irradiation was 350 K. Optical absorption and thermoluminescence measurements were performed on irradiated and annealed samples at room temperature. Results of absorption measurements show spectra with the following features: (1) a prominent band at 2.33 eV (for stoichiometric spinel); (2) overlapping bands attributed to hole centers (3.17 eV); (3) optical centers on antisite defects (3.78 and 4.14 eV); (4) F +- and F-centers (4.75 and 5.3 eV); (5) bands related to defect complexes. For nominally pure samples, the efficiency of optical center formation in stoichiometric spinel is half that in non-stoichiometric spinel. Doped crystals exhibit high efficiencies for defect creation, independent of spinel composition. All dopants enhance the efficiency of defect creation in spinel. Doping with Mn has the least effect on increasing the number of radiation-induced stable defects. Apparently, impurities in spinel serve as centers for stabilization of irradiation-induced interstitials or vacancies.

  9. Microstructural analysis of neutron-irradiated martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, J. J.; Klueh, R. L.

    1996-06-01

    Four martensitic steels for fusion applications were examined by transmission electron microscopy after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at 420°C to 7.8 X 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV), about 35 dpa. There were two commercial steels, 9Cr-IMoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW, and two experimental reduced-activation steels, 9Cr-2WV and 9Cr-2WVTa. Before irradiation, the tempered martensite microstructures of the four steels contained a high dislocation density, and the major precipitate was M 23C 6 carbide, with few MC carbides. Irradiation caused minor changes in these precipitates. Voids were found in all irradiated specimens, but swelling remained below 1%, with the 9Cr-1MoVNb having the highest void density. Although the 12Cr-IMoVW steel showed the best swelling resistance, it also contained the highest density of radiation-induced new phases, which were identified as chi-phase and possibly α'. Radiation-induced chi-phase was also observed in the 9Cr-1MoVNb steel. The two reduced-activation steels showed very stable behavior under irradiation: a high density of dislocation loops replaced the original high dislocation density; moderate void swelling occurred, and no new phase formed. The differences in microstructural evolution of the steels can explain some of the mechanical properties observations made in these steels.

  10. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing

  11. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Shimoda, K.; Kondo, S.; Hinoki, T.; Ozawa, K.; Katoh, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180 °C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. The apparent stress exponent of the irradiation creep slightly exceeded unity, and instantaneous creep coefficient at 380-790 °C was estimated to be ∼1 × 10-5 [MPa-1 dpa-1] at ∼0.1 dpa and 1 × 10-7 to 1 × 10-6 [MPa-1 dpa-1] at ∼1 dpa. The irradiation creep strain appeared greater than that for the high purity SiC. Microstructural observation and data analysis indicated that the grain-boundary sliding associated with the secondary phases contributes to the irradiation creep at 380-790 °C to 0.01-0.11 dpa.

  12. Nano-cluster stability following neutron irradiation in MA957 oxide dispersion strengthened material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribis, J.; Lozano-Perez, S.

    2014-01-01

    ODS steels are promising materials for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors since their fine distribution of nano-clusters confers excellent mechanical properties. However, the nano-feature stability needs to be assessed under neutron irradiation. Before irradiation, the characterizations show that nano-particles are finely distributed within the ferritic matrix and are identified to have a pyrochlore type structure. After irradiation of the MA957 alloy in the Phenix French reactor at 412 °C up to 50 dpa and 430 °C up to 75 dpa, transmission electron microscopy characterization reveals a very slight density fall but no distinguishable difference in nano-features size before and after irradiation. In addition, after both irradiations, the nano-oxides are still (Y, Ti, O) compounds with orientation relationship with the matrix. A multislice simulation of high resolution images suggests that nano-particles still have a fcc pyrochlore type structure after irradiation. A possible change of lattice parameter seems to be highlighted, possibly due to disordering by cascade effect.

  13. Quantitative TEM analysis of precipitation and grain boundary segregation in neutron irradiated EUROFER 97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethloff, Christian; Gaganidze, Ermile; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of irradiation induced microstructural defects is essential for assessing the applicability of structural steels like the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel EUROFER 97 in upcoming fusion reactors. In this work Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is used to analyze the types and structure of precipitates, and the evolution of their size distributions and densities caused by neutron irradiation to a dose of 32 displacements per atom (dpa) at 330-340 °C in the irradiation experiment ARBOR 1. A significant growth of MX and M23C6 type precipitates is observed after neutron irradiation, while the precipitate density remains unchanged. Hardening caused by MX and M23C6 precipitate growth is assessed by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening (DBH) model, and shown to be of minor importance when compared to other irradiation effects like dislocation loop formation. Additionally, grain boundary segregation of chromium induced by neutron irradiation was investigated and detected in irradiated specimens.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of neutron irradiated ultrafine grained ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad Alsabbagh; Apu Sarkar; Brandon Miller; Jatuporn Burns; Leah Squires; Douglas Porter; James I. Cole; K. L. Murty

    2014-10-01

    Neutron irradiation effects on ultra-fine grain (UFG) low carbon steel prepared by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) has been examined. Counterpart samples with conventional grain (CG) sizes have been irradiated alongside with the UFG ones for comparison. Samples were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to 1.24 dpa. Atom probe tomography revealed manganese, silicon-enriched clusters in both ECAP and CG steel after neutron irradiation. X-ray quantitative analysis showed that dislocation density in CG increased after irradiation. However, no significant change was observed in UFG steel revealing better radiation tolerance.

  15. New E‧ centers in neutron-irradiated α-quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkovtsev, R. I.; Pan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Several E‧-type defects have been revealed in neutron-irradiated natural and synthetic α-quartz by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. For the known E'2 center the primary spin Hamiltonian parameter matrices g and A(29Si) (hyperfine interaction with 29Si) have been refined and provide compelling evidence for spin trapping on the long-bond Si atom. The EPR spectra of the new E'11 center demonstrate that the super-hyperfine structure arises from the interaction with 27Al, the first-ever example of Al-associated E‧ centers in crystalline quartz. The matrices g and A(29Si) of E'11 and another new center (E'12) support the forward-oriented configuration proposed for the E'α center in amorphous silica.

  16. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. PGNAA system preliminary design and measurement of In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator for boron concentration measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zizhu; Chong, Yizheng; Chen, Xinru; Jin, Congjun; Yang, Lijun; Liu, Tong

    2015-12-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system has been recently developed at the 30-kW research reactor In-Hospital Neutron Irradiator (IHNI) in Beijing. Neutrons from the specially designed thermal neutron beam were used. The thermal flux of this beam is 3.08×10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) at a full reactor power of 30 kW. The PGNAA system consists of an n-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of 40% efficiency, a digital spectrometer, and a shielding part. For both the detector shielding part and the neutron beam shielding part, the inner layer is composed of (6)Li2CO3 powder and the outer layer lead. The boron-10 sensitivity of the PGNAA system is approximately 2.5 cps/ppm. Two calibration curves were produced for the 1-10 ppm and 10-50 ppm samples. The measurement results of the control samples were in accordance with the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) results. PMID:26242556

  18. Effects of thermal annealing of power BJTs, MOSFETs, and SITs following neutron and gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasca, Albert J.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    The electrical and switching characteristics of high power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluences and gamma doses must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect switch performance are briefly discussed. The effects of post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K for NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), N-channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and N-channel Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are discussed in terms of recovery of degraded electrical and switching parameters caused by either neutron or gamma irradiation. The important experimental results from these annealing tests show that BJTs have very good recovery to leakage current degradation but poor recovery to current gain degradation; MOSFETs show some recovery in gate-source threshold voltage degradation but no significant recovery in drain-source on-resistance degradation; and likewise, SITs show no significant recovery in drain-source on-resistance degradation.

  19. Effects of thermal annealing of power BJTs, MOSFETs, and SITs following neutron and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Frasca, A.J. ); Schwarze, G.E. )

    1991-01-10

    The electrical and switching characteristics of high power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluences and gamma doses must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect switch performance are briefly discussed. The effects of post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K for NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), N-channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and N-channel Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are discussed in terms of recovery of degraded electrical and switching parameters caused by either neutron or gamma irradiation. The important experimental results from these annealing tests show that BJTs have very good recovery to leakage current degradation but poor recovery to current gain degradation; MOSFETs show some recovery in gate-source threshold voltage degradation but no significant recovery in drain-source on-resistance degradation; and likewise, SITs show no significant recovery in drain-source on-resistance degradation.

  20. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  1. Migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    The model of the migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium and the formation of helium-vacancy pore nuclei in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation has been proposed. As illustrations of its application, the dependences of the characteristics of pore nuclei on the temperature of neutron irradiation have been calculated. The results of the calculations have been compared with the experimental data in the literature on measuring the characteristics of radiation-induced porosity that arises upon the irradiation of shells of fuel elements of a 16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Si-Ti-Nb-V-B steel in a fast BN600 neutron reactor at different temperatures.

  2. Effects of hole doping by neutron irradiation of magnetic field induced electronic phase transitions in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Yaguchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated effects of hole doping by fast-neutron irradiation on the magnetic-field induced phase transitions in graphite using specimens irradiated with fast neutrons. Resistance measurements have been done in magnetic fields of up to above 50 T and at temperatures down to about 1.5 K. The neutron irradiation creates lattice defects acting as acceptors, affecting the imbalance of the electron and hole densities and the Fermi level. We have found that the reentrant field from the field induced state back to the normal state shifts towards a lower field with hole doping, suggestive of the participation of electron subbands in the magnetic-field induced state.

  3. Optical absorption and luminescence studies of fast neutron-irradiated complex oxides for jewellery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova-Ulmane, N.; Skvortsova, V.; Popov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We studied the optical absorption and luminescence of agate (SiO2), topaz (Al2[SiO4](F,OH)2), beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18), and prehnite (Ca2Al(AlSi3O10)(OH)2) doped with different concentrations of transition metal ions and exposed to fast neutron irradiation. The exchange interaction between the impurity ions and the defects arising under neutron irradiation causes additional absorption as well as bands' broadening in the crystals. These experimental results allow us to suggest the method for obtaining new radiation-defect induced jewellery colors of minerals due to neutron irradiation.

  4. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, I.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Sentkerestiova, J.; Bem, P.

    2010-10-15

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum.

  5. Biomedical irradiation system for boron neutron capture therapy at the Kyoto University Reactor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K; Ujeno, Y; Ishida, M R

    1990-01-01

    Physics studies related to radiation source, spectroscopy, beam quality, dosimetry, and biomedical applications using the Kyoto University Reactor Heavy Water Facility are described. Also, described are a Nickel Mirror Neutron Guide Tube and a Super Mirror Neutron Guide Tube that are used both for the measurement of boron concentration in phantom and living tissue and for precise measurements of neutron flux in phantom in the presence of both light and heavy water. Discussed are: (1) spectrum measurements using the time of flight technique, (2) the elimination of gamma rays and fast neutrons from a thermal neutron irradiation field, (3) neutron collimation without producing secondary gamma rays, (4) precise neutron flux measurements, dose estimation, and the measurement of boron concentration in tumor and its periphery using guide tubes, (5) the dose estimation of boron-10 for the first melanoma patient, and (6) special-purpose biological irradiation equipment. Other related subjects are also described. PMID:2176458

  6. Irradiation tests of ITER candidate Hall sensors using two types of neutron spectra.

    PubMed

    Ďuran, I; Bolshakova, I; Viererbl, L; Sentkerestiová, J; Holyaka, R; Lahodová, Z; Bém, P

    2010-10-01

    We report on irradiation tests of InSb based Hall sensors at two irradiation facilities with two distinct types of neutron spectra. One was a fission reactor neutron spectrum with a significant presence of thermal neutrons, while another one was purely fast neutron field. Total neutron fluence of the order of 10(16) cm(-2) was accumulated in both cases, leading to significant drop of Hall sensor sensitivity in case of fission reactor spectrum, while stable performance was observed at purely fast neutron spectrum. This finding suggests that performance of this particular type of Hall sensors is governed dominantly by transmutation. Additionally, it further stresses the need to test ITER candidate Hall sensors under neutron flux with ITER relevant spectrum. PMID:21033987

  7. Optical absorption of neutron-irradiated silica fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Bennett, B.L.

    1996-10-01

    Induced-loss spectra of silica-based optical fibers exposed to high (10{sup 23} n-m{sup {minus}2}) and low (10{sup 21} n-m{sup {minus}2}) fluences of neutrons at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) have been measured. Two types of fibers consisting of a pure fused silica core with fluorine-doped ({approximately}4 mole %) cladding were obtained from Fiberguide Industries and used in the as-received condition. Anhydroguide{trademark} and superguide{trademark} fibers contained less than 1 ppm, and 600 to 800 ppm of OH, respectively. The data suggest that presently available silica fibers can be used in plasma diagnostics, but the choice and suitability depends upon the spectral region of interest. Low-OH content fibers can be used for diagnostic purposes in the interval {approximately}800 to 1400 mn if the exposure is to high-fluence neutrons. For low-fluence neutron exposures, the low-OH content fibers are best suited for use in the interval {approximately}800 to 2000 nm, and the high-OH content fibers are the choice for the interval {approximately}400 to 800 nm.

  8. Neutron and X-ray diffraction analysis of the effect of irradiation dose and temperature on microstructure of irradiated HT-9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbrucker, P. L.; Brown, D. W.; Anderoglu, O.; Balogh, L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sisneros, T. A.; Almer, J.; Tulk, E. F.; Morgenroth, W.; Dippel, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    Material harvested from several positions within a nuclear fuel duct (the ACO-3 duct) used in a 6-year irradiation of a fuel assembly in the Fast Flux Test Reactor Facility (FFTF) was examined using neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction. Samples with a wide range of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature history, reaching doses of up to 147 dpa and temperatures of up to 777 K, were examined. The response of various microstructural characteristics such as the weight fraction of M23C6 carbides, the dislocation density and character, and the crystallographic texture were determined using whole profile analysis of the diffraction data and related to the macroscopic mechanical behavior. For instance, the dislocation density was observed to be intimately linked with observed flow strength of the irradiated materials, following the Taylor law. In general, at the high doses studied in this work, the irradiation temperature is the predominant controlling factor of the dislocation density and, thus, the flow strength of the irradiated material. The results, representing some of the first diffraction work done on samples exposed to such a high received dose, demonstrate how non-destructive and stand-off diffraction techniques can be used to characterize irradiation induced microstructure and at least estimate mechanical properties in irradiated materials without exposing workers to radiation hazards.

  9. Post-irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClintock, D. A.; Ferguson, P. D.; Mansur, L. K.

    2010-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of the target module. Though cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel are expected to dictate its lifetime, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  10. Neutron and X-ray irradiation of silicon based Mach-Zehnder modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nasr-Storey, S. S.; Détraz, S.; Olanterä, L.; Sigaud, C.; Soós, C.; Pezzullo, G.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.; Zeiler, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    We report on our recent investigation into the potential for using silicon-based Mach-Zehnder modulators in the harshest radiation environments of the High-Luminosity LHC. The effect of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the performance of the devices have been investigated using the 20 MeV neutron beam line at the Cyclotron Resource Centre in Louvain-La-Neuve and the X-ray irradiation facility in the CERN PH department. The devices were exposed to a total fluence and ionizing dose of 1.2×1015 n cm-2 and 1.3 MGy respectively.