Science.gov

Sample records for neutron reference field

  1. Monoenergetic fast neutron reference fields: II. Field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Ralf; Thomas, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron reference fields are required for the calibration of neutron detectors and dosemeters for various applications ranging from nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements to radiation protection. In a series of two separate publications the metrological aspects of the production and measurement of fast neutrons are reviewed. In the first part, requirements for the nuclear reactions used to produce neutron fields as well as methods for target characterization and the general layout of reference facilities were discussed. This second part focuses on the most important techniques for field characterization and includes the determination of the neutron fluence as well as the spectral neutron distribution and the determination of the fluence of contaminating photons. The measurements are usually carried out relative to reference cross sections which are reviewed in a separate contribution, but for certain conditions 'absolute' methods for neutron measurements can be used which are directly traceable to the international system of units (SI).

  2. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR Free-Field Environment (ACRR-FF-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity free-field reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  3. Characterization of neutron reference fields at US Department of Energy calibration fields.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Mallett, M W; Seagraves, D T; Gadd, M S; Markham, Robin L; Murphy, R O; Devine, R T

    2007-01-01

    The Health Physics Measurements Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has initiated a study of neutron reference fields at selected US Department of Energy (DOE) calibration facilities. To date, field characterisation has been completed at five facilities. These fields are traceable to the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) through either a primary calibration of the source emission rate or through the use of a secondary standard. However, neutron spectral variation is caused by factors such as room return, scatter from positioning tables and fixtures, source anisotropy and spectral degradation due to source rabbits and guide tubes. Perturbations from the ideal isotropic point source field may impact the accuracy of instrument calibrations. In particular, the thermal neutron component of the spectrum, while contributing only a small fraction of the conventionally true dose, can contribute a significant fraction of a dosemeter's response with the result that the calibration becomes facility-specific. A protocol has been developed to characterise neutron fields that relies primarily on spectral measurements with the Bubble Technology Industries (BTI) rotating neutron spectrometer (ROSPEC) and the LANL Bonner sphere spectrometer. The ROSPEC measurements were supplemented at several sites by the BTI Simple Scintillation Spectrometer probe, which is designed to extend the ROSPEC upper energy range from 5 to 15 MeV. In addition, measurements were performed with several rem meters and neutron dosemeters. Detailed simulations were performed using the LANL MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the magnitude of source anisotropy and scatter factors. PMID:17496290

  4. Characterisation of three high-energy photon and fast neutron reference radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Behrens, R; Röttger, S

    2008-01-01

    Three reference radiation fields for the purpose of radiation protection were characterised: (1) radiation field R-F, consisting of photons in the energy range of about 6 and 7 MeV and a small neutron contamination; (2) radiation field R-C, consisting of photons with energies of about 4.4 MeV and neutrons with energies up to 2.65 MeV; (3) radiation field R-CF, consisting of photons in the energy range of about 1 and 7 MeV and neutrons with energies about 1.5 MeV. The radiation fields R-F and R-C have previously been defined in the ISO standard 4037. Their neutron components, however, have never been described accurately in the past. The new radiation field R-CF is proposed for the first time. This radiation field can, e.g., be used to calibrate tissue-equivalent proportional counters instruments for measurements at flight altitudes. PMID:19131379

  5. The neutron component of two high-energy photon reference fields.

    PubMed

    Röttger, S; Schäler, K; Behrens, R; Nolte, R; Wissmann, F

    2007-01-01

    The 4.4 MeV photon reference field described in ISO 4037 is produced by the (12)C(p,p')(12)C (E(x) = 4.4389 MeV) reaction using a thick elemental carbon target and a proton beam with an energy of 5.7 MeV. The relative abundance of the isotope (13)C in elemental carbon is 1.10%. Therefore, the 4.4 MeV photon field is contaminated by neutrons produced by the (13)C(p,n) (13)N reaction (Q = -3.003 MeV). The ambient dose equivalent H*(10) produced by these neutrons is of the same order of magnitude as the ambient dose equivalent produced by the 4.4 MeV photons. For the calibration of dosemeters, especially those also sensitive to neutrons, the spectral fluence distribution of these neutrons has to be known in detail. On the other hand, a mixed photon/neutron field is very useful for the calibration of tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC), if this field combines a high-linear energy transfer (LET) component produced by low-energy neutrons and a low-LET component resulting from photons with about the same ambient dose equivalent and energies up to 7 MeV. Such a mixed field was produced at the PTB accelerator facility using a thin CaF(2) + (nat)C target and a 5.7 MeV proton beam. PMID:17675300

  6. Reference neutron fields of the KIGAM for the neutron energy range between 144 keV and 2.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. D.; Woo, H. J.; Choi, H. W.; Park, J. W.; Trinh, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    The Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) is constructing a reference neutron field facility as a national project. Neutron fields consist of mono-energetic sources of 144 keV, 250 keV, 565 keV, and 2.5 MeV have a fluence range from 102 neutrons/cm2/sec to 103 neutrons/cm2/sec. The systems for the reference neutron fields, such as a duo-plasmatron ion source, a 4-MHz beam bunching system, a neutron chamber, an irradiation room, a neutron time-of-flight (n-TOF) system, a long-counter, and a sample moving system, were designed and fabricated. The neutron energies of the reference neutron fields and their spreads were observed by using the n-TOF system. The neutron fluence was measured by using a long-counter for energies below 1 MeV and a proton-recoil counter for 2.5 MeV. The long-counter efficiency was calibrated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) which had a traceability of mono-energetic neutron sources to both Japanese and international standards. The efficiency of the proton-recoil counter was obtained by using a calculation with detailed construction information.

  7. Validation of IRDFF in 252Cf Standard and IRDF-2002 Reference Neutron Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Stanislav; Capote, Roberto; Greenwood, Lawrence; Griffin, Patrick; Kahler, Albert; Pronyaev, Vladimir; Trkov, Andrej; Zolotarev, Konstantin

    2016-02-01

    The results of validation of the latest release of International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File, IRDFF-1.03, in the standard 252Cf(s.f.) and reference 235U(nth,f) neutron benchmark fields are presented. The spectrum-averaged cross sections were shown to confirm IRDFF-1.03 in the 252Cf standard spontaneous fission spectrum; that was not the case for the current recommended spectra for 235U(nth,f). IRDFF was also validated in the spectra of the research reactor facilities ISNF, Sigma-Sigma and YAYOI, which are available in the IRDF-2002 collection. The ISNF facility was re-simulated to remove unphysical oscillations in the spectrum. IRDFF-1.03 was shown to reproduce reasonably well the spectrum-averaged data measured in these fields except for the case of YAYOI.

  8. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specifications: ACRR Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) Bucket Environment (ACRR-PLG-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parm, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 37 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  9. Direction distributions of neutrons and reference values of the personal dose equivalent in workplace fields.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T; Boschung, M; Coeck, M; Curzio, G; d'Errico, F; Fiechtner, A; Lacoste, V; Lindborg, L; Reginatto, M; Schuhmacher, H; Tanner, R; Vanhavere, F

    2007-01-01

    Within the EC project EVIDOS, double-differential (energy and direction) fluence spectra were determined by means of novel direction spectrometers. By folding the spectra with fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients, contributions to H*(10) for 14 directions, and values of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) and the effective dose E for 6 directions of a person's orientation in the field were determined. The results of the measurements and calculations obtained within the EVIDOS project in workplace fields in nuclear installations in Europe, i.e., at Krümmel (boiling water reactor and transport cask), at Mol (Venus research reactor and fuel facility Belgonucléaire) and at Ringhals (pressurised reactor and transport cask) are presented. PMID:17369265

  10. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR 44 Inch Lead-Boron (LB44) Bucket Environment (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the 44 inch Lead-Boron (LB44) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  11. Simulated workplace neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, V.; Taylor, G.; Röttger, S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of simulated workplace neutron fields, which aim at replicating radiation fields at practical workplaces, is an alternative solution for the calibration of neutron dosemeters. They offer more appropriate calibration coefficients when the mean fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients of the simulated and practical fields are comparable. Intensive Monte Carlo modelling work has become quite indispensable for the design and/or the characterization of the produced mixed neutron/photon fields, and the use of Bonner sphere systems and proton recoil spectrometers is also mandatory for a reliable experimental determination of the neutron fluence energy distribution over the whole energy range. The establishment of a calibration capability with a simulated workplace neutron field is not an easy task; to date only few facilities are available as standard calibration fields.

  12. Experimental test of a newly developed single-moderator, multi-detector, directional neutron spectrometer in reference monochromatic fields from 144 keV to 16.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Pola, A.; Bortot, D.; Gentile, A.; Introini, M. V.; Buonomo, B.; Lorenzoli, M.; Mazzitelli, M.; Sacco, D.

    2015-05-01

    A new directional neutron spectrometer called CYSP (CYlindrical SPectrometer) was developed within the NESCOFI@BTF (2011-2013) collaboration. The device, composed by seven active thermal neutron detectors located along the axis of a cylindrical moderator, was designed to simultaneously respond from the thermal domain up to hundreds of MeV neutrons. The new spectrometer condenses the performance of the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer in a single moderator; thus requiring only one exposure to determine the whole spectrum. The CYSP response matrix, determined with MCNP, has been experimentally evaluated with monochromatic reference neutron fields from 144 keV to 16.5 MeV, plus a 252Cf source, available at NPL (Teddington, UK). The results of the experiment confirmed the correctness of the response matrix within an overall uncertainty of ±2.5%. The new active spectrometer CYSP offers an innovative option for real-time monitoring of directional neutron fields as those produced in neutron beam-lines.

  13. Neutron field characteristics of Ciemat's Neutron Standards Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Garcia, Karen A; Mendez-Villafañe, Roberto; Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to characterize the neutron field produced by the calibration neutron sources of the Neutron Standards Laboratory at the Research Center for Energy, Environment, and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain. For (241)AmBe and (252)Cf neutron sources, the neutron spectra, the ambient dose equivalent rates and the total neutron fluence rates were estimated. In the calibration hall, there are several items that modify the neutron field. To evaluate their effects different cases were used, from point-like source in vacuum up to the full model. Additionally, using the full model, the neutron spectra were estimated to different distances along the bench; with these spectra, the total neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent rates were calculated. The hall walls induce the largest changes in the neutron spectra and the respective integral quantities. The free-field neutron spectrum is modified due the room return effect. PMID:25468287

  14. Characterisation of neutron fields at Cernavoda NPP.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Dumitrescu, Dorin; Chirosca, Alecsandru; Hager, Luke; Million, Marc; Bartz, James

    2013-04-01

    Near a nuclear reactor or a fuel container, mixed neutron/gamma fields are very common, necessitating routine neutron dosimetry. Accurate neutron dosimetry is complicated by the fact that the neutron effective dose is strongly dependent on the neutron energy and the direction distribution of the neutron fluence. Neutron field characterisation is indispensable if one wants to obtain a reliable estimate for the neutron dose. A measurement campaign at CANDU nuclear power plant located in Cernavoda, Romania, was set up to characterise the neutron fields in four different locations and to investigate the behaviour of different neutron personal dosemeters. This investigation intends to assist in choosing a suitable neutron dosimetry system at this nuclear power plant. PMID:22874895

  15. Reference Dosimetry for Fast Neutron and Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.T.L.

    2005-05-24

    Fast neutrons and protons undergo fundamentally different interactions in tissue. The former interact with nuclei, while the latter, as in the case of photons, interact mainly with atomic electrons. Protons do, however, also undergo some nuclear interactions, the probability of which increases with energy. For both modalities the practical instruments for determining the reference absorbed dose in a patient are ionization chambers. These provide indirect determination of absorbed dose because calibration factors measured in standard radiation fields, as well as conversion factors that require knowledge of various physical data, have to be applied. All dosimetry protocols recommend that reference absorbed dose measurements in the clinical situation be made with ionization chambers having 60Co calibration factors traceable to standards laboratories. Neutron doses determined with the current internationally accepted protocol (ICRU Report 45 [1989]) have a relative uncertainty of {+-}4.3% (1{sigma}), while proton doses determined with the two protocols (ICRU Report 59 [1998] and IAEA Report TRS 398 [2000]) presently in use have relative uncertainties (1{sigma}) of {+-}2.6 % and {+-}2.0%, respectively.

  16. Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganò, D.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A.; Rea, N.

    2015-05-01

    Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

  17. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. F.; Sale, K.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J. H.; Preston, C. C.

    1991-06-01

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry.

  18. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  19. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the third generation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1982-01-01

    In August 1981 the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy revised the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). It is the second revision since the inception of the IGRF in 1968. The revision extends the earlier series of IGRF models from 1980 to 1985, introduces a new series of definitive models for 1965-1976, and defines a provisional reference field for 1975- 1980. The revision consists of: 1) a model of the main geomagnetic field at 1980.0, not continuous with the earlier series of IGRF models together with a forecast model of the secular variation of the main field during 1980-1985; 2) definitive models of the main field at 1965.0, 1970.0, and 1975.0, with linear interpolation of the model coefficients specified for intervening dates; and 3) a provisional reference field for 1975-1980, defined as the linear interpolation of the 1975 and 1980 main-field models.-from Author

  20. Cold Neutrons Trapped in External Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gandolfi, S.; Carlson, J.; Pieper, Steven C.

    2011-01-07

    The properties of inhomogeneous neutron matter are crucial to the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and the crust of neutron stars. Advances in computational techniques now allow us to accurately determine the binding energies and densities of many neutrons interacting via realistic microscopic interactions and confined in external fields. We perform calculations for different external fields and across several shells to place important constraints on inhomogeneous neutron matter, and hence the large isospin limit of the nuclear energy density functionals that are used to predict properties of heavy nuclei and neutron star crusts. We find important differences between microscopic calculations and current density functionals; in particular, the isovector gradient terms are significantly more repulsive than in traditional models, and the spin-orbit and pairing forces are comparatively weaker.

  1. Cold neutrons trapped in external fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Gandolfi, S.; Carlson, J.; Pieper, S. C.

    2011-01-05

    The properties of inhomogeneous neutron matter are crucial to the physics of neutron-rich nuclei and the crust of neutron stars. Advances in computational techniques now allow us to accurately determine the binding energies and densities of many neutrons interacting via realistic microscopic interactions and confined in external fields. We perform calculations for different external fields and across several shells to place important constraints on inhomogeneous neutron matter, and hence the large isospin limit of the nuclear energy density functionals that are used to predict properties of heavy nuclei and neutron star crusts. We find important differences between microscopic calculations and current density functionals; in particular, the isovector gradient terms are significantly more repulsive than in traditional models, and the spin-orbit and pairing forces are comparatively weaker.

  2. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  3. One directional polarized neutron reflectometry with optimized reference layer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Jahromi, Saeed S.

    2012-09-01

    In the past decade, several neutron reflectometry methods for determining the modulus and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of an unknown multilayer thin film have been worked out among which the method of variation of surroundings and reference layers are of highest interest. These methods were later modified for measurement of the polarization of the reflected beam instead of the measurement of the intensities. In their new architecture, these methods not only suffered from the necessity of change of experimental setup but also another difficulty was added to their experimental implementations. This deficiency was related to the limitations of the technology of the neutron reflectometers that could only measure the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam. As the instruments are limited, the theory has to be optimized so that the experiment could be performed. In a recent work, we developed the method of variation of surroundings for one directional polarization analysis. In this new work, the method of reference layer with polarization analysis has been optimized to determine the phase and modulus of the unknown film with measurement of the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam.

  4. Magnetic field decay in isolated neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, Peter; Reisenegger, Andreas

    1992-01-01

    Three mechanisms that promote the loss of magnetic flux from an isolated neutron star - Ohmic decay, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall drift - are investigated. Equations of motions are solved for charged particles in the presence of a magnetic field and a fixed background of neutrons, while allowing for the creation and destruction of particles by weak interactions. Although these equations apply to normal neutrons and protons, the present interpretations of their solutions are extended to cover cases of neutron superfluidity and proton superconductivity. The equations are manipulated to prove that, in the presence of a magnetic force, the charged particles cannot be simultaneously in magnetostatic equilibrium and chemical equilibrium with the neutrons. The application of the results to real neutron stars is discussed.

  5. Polarized neutron reflectometry in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    2005-11-15

    A simple method is described to maintain the polarization of a neutron beam on its way through the large magnetic stray fields produced by a vertical field of a cryomagnet with a split-coil geometry. The two key issues are the proper shielding of the neutron spin flippers and an additional radial field component in order to guide the neutron spin through the region of the null point (i.e., point of reversal for the vertical field component). Calculations of the neutron's spin rotation as well as polarized neutron reflectometry experiments on an ErFe{sub 2}/DyFe{sub 2} multilayer show the perfect performance of the used setup. The recently commissioned cryomagnet M5 with a maximum vertical field of up to 7.2 T in asymmetric mode for polarized neutrons and 9 T in symmetric mode for unpolarized neutrons was used on the C5 spectrometer in reflectometry mode, at the NRU reactor in Chalk River, Canada.

  6. Magnetic Fields in Superconducting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lander, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    The interior of a neutron star is likely to be predominantly a mixture of superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons. This results in the quantization of the star’s magnetic field into an array of thin flux tubes, producing a macroscopic force very different from the Lorentz force of normal matter. We show that in an axisymmetric superconducting equilibrium the behavior of a magnetic field is governed by a single differential equation. Solving this, we present the first self-consistent superconducting neutron star equilibria with poloidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal fields and also give the first quantitative results for the corresponding magnetically induced distortions to the star. The poloidal component is dominant in all our configurations. We suggest that the transition from normal to superconducting matter in a young neutron star may cause a large-scale field rearrangement.

  7. Review of neutron calibration facilities and monitoring techniques: new needs for emerging fields.

    PubMed

    Gressier, V

    2014-10-01

    Neutron calibration facilities and monitoring techniques have been developed since the middle of the 20th century to support research and nuclear power energy development. The technical areas needing reference neutron fields and related instruments were mainly cross section measurements, radiation protection, dosimetry and fission reactors, with energy ranging from a few millielectronvolts to about 20 MeV. The reference neutron fields and calibration techniques developed for these purposes will be presented in this paper. However, in recent years, emerging fields have brought new needs for calibration facilities and monitoring techniques. These new challenges for neutron metrology will be exposed with their technical difficulties. PMID:24344349

  8. Characterization of a Pulse Neutron Source Yield under Field Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip C.; Hopper, Lindsay

    2009-03-10

    Technique of rapid evaluation of a pulse neutron sources such as neutron generators under field conditions has been developed. The phoswich sensor and pulse-shape discrimination techniques have been used for the simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons. The sensor has been calibrated using activation neutron detectors and a pulse deuterium-tritium fusion neutron source.

  9. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Denker, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Golnik, N.; Hohmann, E.; Leuschner, A.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Manessi, G.; Mayer, S.; Ott, K.; Röhrich, J.; Silari, M.; Trompier, F.; Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M.

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  10. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Love, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    This is a set of five world charts showing the declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, vertical component, and total intensity of the Earth's magnetic field at mean sea level at the beginning of 2005. The charts are based on the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) main model for 2005 and secular change model for 2005-2010. The IGRF is referenced to the World Geodetic System 1984 ellipsoid. Additional information about the USGS geomagnetism program is available at: http://geomag.usgs.gov/

  11. Use of Neutron Benchmark Fields for the Validation of Dosimetry Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of validation metrics for dosimetry cross sections in neutron benchmark fields is explored. The strength of some of the metrics in providing validation evidence is examined by applying them to the 252Cf spontaneous fission standard neutron benchmark field, the 235U thermal neutron fission reference benchmark field, the ACRR pool-type reactor central cavity reference benchmark fields, and the SPR-III fast burst reactor central cavity. The IRDFF dosimetry cross section library is used in the validation study and observations are made on the amount of coverage provided to the library contents by validation data available in these benchmark fields.

  12. Magnetic field evolution in superconducting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, Vanessa; Andersson, Nils; Glampedakis, Kostas; Lander, Samuel K.

    2015-10-01

    The presence of superconducting and superfluid components in the core of mature neutron stars calls for the rethinking of a number of key magnetohydrodynamical notions like resistivity, the induction equation, magnetic energy and flux-freezing. Using a multifluid magnetohydrodynamics formalism, we investigate how the magnetic field evolution is modified when neutron star matter is composed of superfluid neutrons, type-II superconducting protons and relativistic electrons. As an application of this framework, we derive an induction equation where the resistive coupling originates from the mutual friction between the electrons and the vortex/fluxtube arrays of the neutron and proton condensates. The resulting induction equation allows the identification of two time-scales that are significantly different from those of standard magnetohydrodynamics. The astrophysical implications of these results are briefly discussed.

  13. Icy Schwedeneck field may provide reference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Situated in an icy region of the Baltic Sea, Germany's first offshore field may provide the nation with the reference needed to encroach the arctic market. Production began last winter from one platform in the Schwedeneck-See field, located about three miles off the Baltic Coast. Total reserves have been estimated at more than 18 million bbl. Yearly production by the end of 1986 has been estimated at 294,000 bbl. The first two production platforms were installed in late 1983 in water depths ranging from 50 to 80 ft. Because of the ice hazards inherent in the Baltic, the platforms are concrete designed with steel decks.

  14. Anomalies of neutron field of the Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, Natalia

    This work is devoted to the researches of time and spatial heterogeneity of thermal neurtron flux (Fn) density in the troposphere of the Earth. We had already received the values of thermal neutron flux density on the surface of the Earth in the European part of Russia. The large-scale monitoring of thermal neutron flux density was carried out on structural cross-section from Drake Strait in the Atlantic Ocean to the high latitudes of Arctic. We observe the increase of Fn from 44о N to 59о N, from 0,4 to 2,9 •10-3 н/(c•cм2). The values of Fn were received in latitude Novorossiysk (0,4•10-3 n/(c•sm2)) , Moskow (0,7-1,5•10-3 n/(c•sm2)), Arhangelsk (1,3•10-3 n/(c•sm2)). High-rise dependance of the thermal neutron flux density on the surface of the Earth and in troposphere during transcontinental flights was researched. With the increasing of height from 0 to 8000 m the thermal neutron flux density rises to 180•10-3 н/(c•cм2) The measurements were carried out in latitude of Spitsbergen. The value of thermal neutron flux density on the North pole was measured. Fn is equal to 0,7•10-3 n/(c•sm2)) 890 20/ in North latitude. Recently it has been shown, that thermal neutrons render appreciable influence on alive organisms [Matveeva and etc., 2004, Masunaga S., 2001]. Abmormal increases of thermal neutron flux density are revealed in flora biogeocenosis. Daily background Fn demonstrate the specific abnormal flares for every biocenosis or biotope long-lasting (for tens of minutes) Fn - meaning during the «flares» in biogeocenosis depends on the contains of flora community and can reach 104 n/(с m2). [Plotnikova N.V., Siroeshkin A.V., 2005]. The researches of the neutron field in the World Ocean were received at the time of transatlantic expedition by the programme of RAS «Meridian» (2006, 2008). Abnormal increasing Fn had being observed in the area of equator and between 310N to 540N and 330S to 530S Moreover, the coordinates of these

  15. Dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, I.

    1998-04-01

    The gamma field accompanying neutrons may, in certain circumstances, play an important role in the analysis of neutron dosimetry and even in the interpretation of radiation induced steel embrittlement. At the High Flux Isotope Reactor pressure vessel the gamma induced reactions dominate the responses of {sup 237}Np and {sup 238}U dosimeters, and {sup 9}Be helium accumulation fluence monitors. The gamma induced atom displacement rate in steel is higher than corresponding neutron rate, and is the cause of ``accelerated embrittlement`` of HFIR materials. In a large body of water, adjacent to a fission plate, photofissions contribute significantly to the responses of fission monitors and need to be taken into account if the measurements are used for the qualification of the transport codes and cross-section libraries.

  16. Physics in Strong Magnetic Fields Near Neutron Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the behaviors of particles and energies in the magnetic fields of neutron stars. Different types of possible research using neutron stars as a laboratory for the study of strong magnetic fields are proposed. (CW)

  17. Electromagnetic field dynamics in Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    Neutron star mergers represent one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GW) within the bandwidth of advLIGO. In addition to GW, strong magnetic fields may offer the possibility of a characteristic electromagnetic signature allowing for concurrent detection. In this talk we present results from numerical evolutions of such mergers, studying the dynamics of both the gravitational and electromagnetic degrees of freedom.

  18. Neutron field measurements for alara purposes around a Van de Graaff accelerator building.

    PubMed

    Kockerols, P; Lebacq, A L; Gasparro, J; Hult, M; Janssens, H; Lövestam, G; Vanhavere, F

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements operates a 7.0 MV Van de Graaff accelerator to generate monoenergetic neutron radiation for experimental applications. Owing to increased intensities of generated neutron fields and the more stringent regulation related to the maximum dose for the public, a concrete shielding wall surrounding the experimental building was constructed. This paper presents a study aiming at evaluating the effect of the shielding on the neutron field outside the wall. For this purpose, the following measurements were carried out around the building: (1) cartography of the neutron field for different experimental conditions; (2) measurement of neutron spectra using multiple Bonner spheres; (3) activation measurements using gold discs followed by low-level gamma spectrometry. From the measurements, it can be concluded that the wall fulfils its purpose to reduce the neutron dose rate to the surrounding area to an acceptable level. PMID:15353736

  19. Characterization of neutron calibration fields at the TINT's 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liamsuwan, T.; Channuie, J.; Ratanatongchai, W.

    2015-05-01

    Reliable measurement of neutron radiation is important for monitoring and protection in workplace where neutrons are present. Although Thailand has been familiar with applications of neutron sources and neutron beams for many decades, there is no calibration facility dedicated to neutron measuring devices available in the country. Recently, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) has set up a multi-purpose irradiation facility equipped with a 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator. The facility is planned to be used for research, nuclear analytical techniques and, among other applications, calibration of neutron measuring devices. In this work, the neutron calibration fields were investigated in terms of neutron energy spectra and dose equivalent rates using Monte Carlo simulations, an in-house developed neutron spectrometer and commercial survey meters. The characterized neutron fields can generate neutron dose equivalent rates ranging from 156 μSv/h to 3.5 mSv/h with nearly 100% of dose contributed by neutrons of energies larger than 0.01 MeV. The gamma contamination was less than 4.2-7.5% depending on the irradiation configuration. It is possible to use the described neutron fields for calibration test and routine quality assurance of neutron dose rate meters and passive dosemeters commonly used in radiation protection dosimetry.

  20. Neutron field characterisation at mixed oxide fuel plant.

    PubMed

    Passmore, C; Million, M; Kirr, M; Bartz, J; Akselrod, M S; Devita, A; Berard, J

    2012-06-01

    A neutron field characterisation was conducted at the AREVA Melox Plant to determine the response of passive and active neutron dosemeters for several stages in the mixed oxide fuel manufacturing process. Landauer Europe provides radiation dosimetry to many contractors working at the Melox site. The studies were conducted to assist in determining the neutron radiation fields the workers are exposed to routinely, evaluate the need for specific neutron correction factors and to ensure that the most accurate neutron dose is reported for the Melox Plant workers. PMID:22028415

  1. An in-phantom comparison of neutron fields for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Woollard, J.E.; Blue, T.E.; Capala, J.

    1998-01-01

    Previously, the authors have developed the in-phantom neutron field assessment parameters T and D (Tumor) for the evaluation of epithermal neutron fields for use in BNCT. These parameters are based on an energy-spectrum-dependent neutron normal-tissue RBE and the treatment planning methodology of Gahbauer and his co-workers, which includes the effects of dose fractionation. In this paper, these neutron field assessment parameters were applied to The Ohio State University (OSU) design of an Accelerator Based Neutron Source (ABNS) (hereafter called the OSU-ABNS) and the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) epithermal neutron beam (hereafter called the BMRR-ENB), in order to judge the suitability of the OSU-ABNS for BNCT. The BMRR-ENB was chosen as the basis for comparison because it is presently being used in human clinical trials of BNCT and because it is the standard to which other neutron beams are most often compared.

  2. Reference data file for neutron spectrum adjustment and related radiation damage calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zsolnay, E.M. ); Nolthenius, H.J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Szondi, E.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The REAL-88 interlaboratory exercise organized by IAEA resulted in a neutron metrology file. (NMF-90) comprising problem dependent data for benchmark neutron fields, furthermore, nuclear data and computer programs for neutron spectrum adjustment and radiation damage parameter calculations for the service life assessment of nuclear facilities. Calculation results of some experienced laboratories are also present. This paper describes and analyses the content of the neutron metrology file and outlines the most important problems and tasks to be solved in the field of radiation damage parameter calculations. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  4. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D N; Atkinson, D P; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P B; Grim, G P; Aragonez, R J; Archuleta, T N; Batha, S H; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Danly, C R; Day, R D; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Hsu, A H; Jaramillo, S A; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Oertel, J A; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Buckles, R A; Cradick, J R; Kaufman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

    2011-10-24

    We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n') reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system will be presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system will be presented. We will also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  5. The neutron imaging system fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fittinghoff, D. N.; Atkinson, D. P.; Bower, D. E.; Drury, O. B.; Dzenitis, J. M.; Frank, M.; Liddick, S. N.; Moran, M. J.; Roberson, G. P.; Weiss, P. B.; Grim, G. P.; Aragonez, R. J.; Archuleta, T. N.; Batha, S. H.; Clark, D. D.; Clark, D. J.; Danly, C. R.; Day, R. D.; Fatherley, V. E.; Finch, J. P.; Garcia, F. P.; Gallegos, R. A.; Guler, N.; Hsu, A. H.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Loomis, E. N.; Mares, D.; Martinson, D. D.; Merrill, F. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Munson, C.; Murphy, T. J.; Oertel, J. A.; Polk, P. J.; Schmidt, D. W.; Tregillis, I. L.; Valdez, A. C.; Volegov, P. L.; Wang, T. F.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Buckles, R. A.; Cradick, J. R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Lutz, S. S.; Malone, R. M.; Traille, A.

    2013-11-01

    We have fielded a neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility to collect images of fusion neutrons produced in the implosion of inertial confinement fusion experiments and scattered neutrons from (n, n') reactions of the source neutrons in the surrounding dense material. A description of the neutron imaging system is presented, including the pinhole array aperture, the line-of-sight collimation, the scintillator-based detection system and the alignment systems and methods. Discussion of the alignment and resolution of the system is presented. We also discuss future improvements to the system hardware.

  6. Does mass accretion lead to field decay in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibazaki, N.; Murakami, T.; Shaham, Jacob; Nomoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    The recent discovery of cyclotron lines from gamma-ray bursts indicates that the strong magnetic fields of isolated neutron stars might not decay. The possible inverse correlation between the strength of the magnetic field and the mass accreted by the neutron star suggests that mass accretion itself may lead to the decay of the magnetic field. The spin and magnetic field evolution of the neutron star was calculated under the hypothesis of the accretion-induced field decay. It is shown that the calculated results are consistent with the observations of binary and millisecond radio pulsars.

  7. Personnel neutron dose assessment upgrade: Volume 2, Field neutron spectrometer for health physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Reece, W.D.; Miller, S.D.; Endres, G.W.R.; Durham, J.S.; Scherpelz, R.I.; Tomeraasen, P.L.; Stroud, C.M.; Faust, L.G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1988-07-01

    Both the (ICRP) and the (NCPR) have recommended an increase in neutron quality factors and the adoption of effective dose equivalent methods. The series of reports entitled Personnel Neutron Dose Assessment Upgrade (PNL-6620) addresses these changes. Volume 1 in this series of reports (Personnel Neutron Dosimetry Assessment) provided guidance on the characteristics, use, and calibration of personnel neutron dosimeters in order to meet the new recommendations. This report, Volume 2: Field Neutron Spectrometer for Health Physics Applications describes the development of a portable field spectrometer which can be set up for use in a few minutes by a single person. The field spectrometer described herein represents a significant advance in improving the accuracy of neutron dose assessment. It permits an immediate analysis of the energy spectral distribution associated with the radiation from which neutron quality factor can be determined. It is now possible to depart from the use of maximum Q by determining and realistically applying a lower Q based on spectral data. The field spectrometer is made up of two modules: a detector module with built-in electronics and an analysis module with a IBM PC/reg sign/-compatible computer to control the data acquisition and analysis of data in the field. The unit is simple enough to allow the operator to perform spectral measurements with minimal training. The instrument is intended for use in steady-state radiation fields with neutrons energies covering the fission spectrum range. The prototype field spectrometer has been field tested in plutonium processing facilities, and has been proven to operate satisfactorily. The prototype field spectrometer uses a /sup 3/He proportional counter to measure the neutron energy spectrum between 50 keV and 5 MeV and a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) to measure absorbed neutron dose.

  8. Methods of approximation of reference fields of different classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesova, Valentina I.

    1993-11-01

    The summary geomagnetic field on the reference field for the regional anomalies is surface of the Earth consists of the follow- the sum of the main geomagnetic field and ing components: the intermediate anomalies. Since the components mentioned above have the F0 = Fm + Fim + Fr + F1 + F (1) different space-spectral characteristics, different methods are used for the analytiwhere cal descriptions. The main geomagnetic field, being the global reference field, is approximated by F0 - the observed geomagnetic field the optimal way as a spherical harmonic Fm - the main geomagnetic field series [1]: Fim - the field of the intermediate anoma- n lies Fr - the field of the regional anomalies X = (g cosm\\ + n=i m=O F1 - the field of the local anomalies, - the external geomagnetic field.

  9. Rotational and magnetic field instabilities in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2014-01-14

    In this short review we present recent results on the dynamics of neutron stars and their magnetic fields. We discuss the progress that has been made, during the last 5 years, in understanding the rotational instabilities with emphasis to the one due to the f-mode, the possibility of using gravitational wave detection in constraining the parameters of neutron stars and revealing the equation of state as well as the detectability of gravitational waves produced during the unstable phase of a neutron star’s life. In addition we discuss the dynamics of extremely strong magnetic fields observed in a class of neutron stars (magnetars). Magnetic fields of that strength are responsible for highly energetic phenomena (giant flares) and we demonstrate that the analysis of the emitted electromagnetic radiation can lead in constraining the parameters of neutron stars. Furthermore, we present our results from the study of such violent phenomena in association with the emission of gravitational radiation.

  10. GCR Simulator Reference Field and a Spectral Approach for Laboratory Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara; Walker, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, an approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed against alternative simulation strategies. The neutron component and track structure characteristics of the simulated field are discussed in this context.

  11. Reference Materials for Reactor Neutron Fluence Rate and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelbrecht, C.

    2003-06-01

    Certified reference materials are distributed by the European Commission through the BCR® programme (over 500 CRMs) including a series of activation and fission monitor materials originally proposed by the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry. The current range (18 CRMs) includes materials to cover the complete energy spectrum, and suitable for different irradiation times. Fission monitors are 238UO2 or 237NpO2 in the form of microspheres. Activation monitors are high purity metals (Ni, Cu, Al, Fe, Nb, Rh, or Ti), certified for interfering trace impurities, or dilute aluminium-based alloys. Reference materials newly certified are IRMM-530R A1-0.1%Au, replacing the exhausted IRMM-530 material, used as comparator for k0- standardisation, and three new Al-Co alloys (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%Co). Others in the process of certification are A1-0.1%Ag and A1-2%Sc for thermal and epithermal fluence rate measurements and two uranium-doped glass materials intended for dosimetry by the fission-track technique. Various alloy compositions have been prepared for use as melt-wire temperature monitors with melting points ranging from 198 to 327ºC.

  12. Evaluation of neutron radiation field in carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Su, You-Wu; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Carbon ions have significant advantages in tumor therapy because of their physical and biological properties. In view of the radiation protection, the safety of patients is the most important issue in therapy processes. Therefore, the effects of the secondary particles produced by the carbon ions in the tumor therapy should be carefully considered, especially for the neutrons. In the present work, the neutron radiation field induced by carbon ions was evaluated by using the FLUKA code. The simulated results of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose was found to be in good agreement with the experiment data. In addition, energy deposition of carbon ions and neutrons in tissue-like media was studied, it is found that the secondary neutron energy deposition is not expected to exceed 1% of the carbon ion energy deposition in a typical treatment.

  13. Field parameters and dosimetric characteristics of a fast neutron calibration facility: experimental and Monte Carlo evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gualdrini, G.; Monteventi, F.

    2002-01-01

    At the ENEA Institute for Radiation Protection (IRP) the fast neutron calibration facility consists of a remote control device which allows locating different sources (Am-Be, Pu-Li, bare and D 2O moderated 252Cf) at the reference position, at the desired height from the floor, inside a 10×10×3 m 3 irradiation room. Either the ISO reference sources or the Pu-Li source have been characterised in terms of uncollided H*(10) and neutron fluence according to the ISO calibration procedures. A spectral fluence mapping, carried out with the Monte Carlo Code MCNP TM, allowed characterising the calibration point, in scattered field conditions, according to the most recent international recommendations. Moreover, the irradiation of personal dosemeters on the ISO water filled slab phantom was simulated to determine the field homogeneity of the calibration area and the variability of the neutron field (including the backscattered component) along the phantom surface. At the ENEA Institute for Radiation Protection the calibration of neutron area monitors as well as personal dosemeters can now be performed according to the international standards, at the same time guaranteeing suitable conditions for research and qualification purposes in the field of neutron dosimetry.

  14. A proposed International Geomagnetic Reference Field for 1965- 1985.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Fabiano, E.B.

    1982-01-01

    A set of spherical harmonic models describing the Earth's main magnetic field from 1965 to 1985 has been developed and is proposed as the next revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). A tenth degree and order spherical harmonic model of the main field was derived from Magsat data. A series of eighth degree and order spherical harmonic models of the secular variation of the main field was derived from magnetic observatory annual mean values. Models of the main field at 1965, 1970, 1975, and 1980 were obtained by extrapolating the main-field model using the secular variation models.-Authors spherical harmonic models Earth main magnetic field Magsat data

  15. Physics in strong magnetic fields near neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena occurring in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars are currently of great interest in high-energy astrophysics. Observations of rotation rate changes and cyclotron lines in pulsars and gamma-ray bursts indicate that surface magnetic fields of neutron stars often exceed a trillion gauss. In fields this strong, where electrons behave much as if they were in bound atomic states, familiar processes undergo profound changes, and exotic processes become important. Strong magnetic fields affect the physics in several fundamental ways: energies perpendicular to the field are quantized, transverse momentum is not conserved, and electron-positron spin is important. Neutron stars therefore provide a unique laboratory for the study of physics in extremely high fields that cannot be generated on earth.

  16. A method for evaluating personal dosemeters in workplace with neutron fields.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Nascimento, Luana; Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip

    2012-04-01

    Passive detectors, as albedo or track-etch, still dominate the field of neutron personal dosimetry, mainly due to their low-cost, high-reliability and elevated throughput. However, the recent appearance in the market of electronic personal dosemeters for neutrons presents a new option for personal dosimetry. In addition to passive detectors, electronic personal dosemeters necessitate correction factors, concerning their energy and angular response dependencies. This paper reports on the results of a method to evaluate personal dosemeters for workplace where neutrons are present. The approach here uses few instruments and does not necessitate a large mathematical workload. Qualitative information on the neutron energy spectrum is acquired using a simple spectrometer (Nprobe), reference values for H*(10) are derived from measurements with ambient detectors (Studsvik, Berthold and Harwell) and angular information is measured using personal dosemeters (electronic and bubbles dosemeters) disposed in different orientations on a slab phantom. PMID:21565843

  17. Temperature compensated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by a separate but identical magnetic field sensor and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  18. Precise determination of Cr and Co in certified reference material of silicon nitride by neutron activation analysis using internal standardization.

    PubMed

    Miura, Tsutomu; Matsue, Hideaki; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Chiba, Koichi

    2009-07-01

    Neutron activation analysis with an internal standard correction was applied to the determination of Cr and Co in a ceramics certified reference material (NMIJ CRM 8004-a silicon nitride powder). Cesium was used as an internal standard to compensate for any inhomogeneity of the neutron flux through an irradiation capsule and to improve the repeatability of gamma-ray measurements. It was found that the linearity of the calibration curves of Cr and Co was improved by using an internal standard. The analytical results of Cr and Co in NMIJ CRM 8004-a were in good agreement with those obtained by ICP-OES, ICP-sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS), and isotope dilution/ICP-SFMS for Cr. The relative expanded uncertainties (k = 2) were 1.9% for Cr and 1.5% for Co. The uncertainties were comparable to those of atomic spectrometric methods. PMID:19609027

  19. Determination of elements in National Bureau of Standards' geological Standard Reference Materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, C.C.; Glascock, M.D.; Carni, J.J.; Vogt, J.R.; Spalding, T.G.

    1982-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) have been used to determine elemental concentrations in two recently issued National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials (SRM's). The results obtained are in good agreement with the certified and information values reported by NBS for those elements in each material for which comparisons are available. Average concentrations of 35 elements in SRM 278 obsidian rock and 32 elements in SRM 688 basalt rock are reported for comparison with results that may be obtained by other laboratories.

  20. The Covariance and Biocovariance of the Stochartic Neutron Field

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The use of stochastic neutron field theory (neutron noise) for the measurement of reactor physics parameters goes back to the early work of Serber, Feynmann, and Orndoff. Since then, a large variety of methods and applications has been developed. In the majority of these methods, some form of modified one-point reactor kinetics was used for the interpretation of the measurements. In fact, the high level of sophistication of the instrumentation used was not matched by the theory. In 1965, Bell developed a general theory of the stochastic neutron field, and in 1987, Munoz-Cobo et al enlarged this treatment to include the effect of the detectors in the neutron field. In both instances, the complexity of the theoretical results were beyond the computing capabilities then available thus, the mismatch between experimental and theoretical methods remained in existence because the powerful Monte-Carlo methods then at work, were only applicable to static neutron fields. This problem was eliminated by the development of a time-dependent Monte-Carlo code specially written by T. E. Valentine for the analysis of stochastic measurements that gave them relevance to the results of the general theory. The purpose of this work is to illustrate the derivation of observables of the stochastic neutron filed from its general treatment.

  1. Relativistic mean field calculations in neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharya, Madhubrata; Roy, Subinit

    2014-08-14

    Relativistic mean field calculations have been employed to study neutron rich nuclei. The Lagrange's equations have been solved in the co-ordinate space. The effect of the continuum has been effectively taken into account through the method of resonant continuum. It is found that BCS approximation performs as well as a more involved Relativistic Continuum Hartree Bogoliubov approach. Calculations reveal the possibility of modification of magic numbers in neutron rich nuclei. Calculation for low energy proton scattering cross sections shows that the present approach reproduces the density in very light neutron rich nuclei.

  2. Magnetic field effects on gravitational waves from binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel

    2008-04-01

    Observational evidence indicates that a fair number of neutron star binaries and neutron star-black hole binaries have a sizable magnetic field which can be responsible for powering pulsars and colimating jets. Magnetic field effects additionally can have a strong influence on the dynamics of the fluid by redistributing angular momentum through different mechanisms (magnetic winding and braking, magneto-rotational instabilities) depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the typical time scales involved in the process. These processes can affect the multipolar structure of the source and consequently the produced gravitational wave. We present results of neutron star binary mergers both with and without magnetic field and discuss the magnetic effects on the gravitational waves, fluid structure, and merger timescale.

  3. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, T.; Bassler, N.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Liu, Y. H.; Koivunoro, H.; Auterinen, I.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Palmans, H.; Sharpe, P.; Langguth, P.; Hampel, G.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  4. Neutron Limit on the Strongly-Coupled Chameleon Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushin, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    One of the major open questions of cosmology is the physical origin of the dark energy. There are a few sets of theories which might explain this origin that could be tested experimentally. The chameleon dark energy theory postulates self-interacting scalar field that couples to matter. This coupling induces a screening mechanism chosen so that the field amplitude is nonzero in empty space but is greatly suppressed in regions of terrestrial matter density. On behalf of the INDEX collaboration, I will report the most stringent upper bound on the free neutron-chameleon coupling in the strongly-coupled limit of the chameleon theory using neutron interferometric techniques. In our experiment we measure neutron phase induced by chameleon field. We report a 95 % confidence level upper bound on the neutron-chameleon coupling ranging from β < 4 . 7 ×106 for a Ratra-Peebles index of n = 1 in the nonlinear scalar field potential to β < 2 . 4 ×107 for n = 6 , one order of magnitude more sensitive than the most recent free neutron limit for intermediate n. This work was supported by NIST; NSF Grants: PHY-1205342, PHY-1068712, PHY-1307426; DOE award DE-FG02-97ER41042; NSERC CREATE and DISCOVERY programs; CERC; IUCSS and IU FRS program.

  5. Second Research Coordination Meeting on Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis -- Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; Kellett, Mark A.

    2008-03-19

    The second meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Project on"Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis" was held at the IAEA, Vienna from 7-9 May, 2007. A summary of the presentations made by participants is given, along with reports on specifically assigned tasks and subsequent discussions. In order to meet the overall objectives of this CRP, the outputs have been reiterated and new task assignments made.

  6. Neutron activation analysis for reference determination of the implantation dose of cobalt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, R.P.H.; Bubert, H.; Palmetshofer, L.

    1992-05-15

    The authors prepared depth profilling reference materials by cobalt ion implantation at an ion energy of 300 keV into n-type silicon. The implanted Co dose was then determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) giving an analytical dynamic range of almost 5 decades and uncertainty of 1.5%. This form of analysis allows sources of error (beam spreading, misalignment) to be corrected. 70 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Gamma-ray bursts and neutron star field decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter; Blumenthal, George; Chuang, Kuan-Wen; Hurley, Kevin; Kargatis, Vincent; Liang, Edison; Linder, Eric

    1992-01-01

    Assuming a Galactic origin of gamma-ray bursts, we use pulsar data to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron stars and determine the sampling depths of current detectors. Based on these distance limits, we calculate the corresponding age distribution of Galactic neutron stars and apply an exponential field decay model to test whether the observed high incidence rate of cyclotron lines is consistent with suggested field decay time scales of order 10 exp 7 years. We find that the properties of the observed population of gamma-ray bursts are inconsistent with the idea that bursts originate at arbitrary times on neutron stars whose fields decay on time scales shorter than about 10 exp 9 years. Possible interpretations of this inconsistency are discussed.

  8. Evaluation of homogeneity of a certified reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvil, B.; Duke, M.J.M.; Ng, D.

    1986-01-01

    The homogeneity of the marine reference material TORT-1, a spray-dried and acetone-extracted hepatopancreatic material from the lobster, was tested for 26 elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Through a one-way analysis of variance based on six analyses on each of six bottles of TORT-1, it was concluded that the between-bottle heterogeneity is no greater than the within-bottle heterogeneity. The analytical results for those elements for which values were provided by NRC agree with the NRC values within 95% confidence limits. 8 references, 6 tables.

  9. Neutron limit on the strongly-coupled chameleon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Arif, M.; Cory, D. G.; Haun, R.; Heacock, B.; Huber, M. G.; Nsofini, J.; Pushin, D. A.; Saggu, P.; Sarenac, D.; Shahi, C. B.; Skavysh, V.; Snow, W. M.; Young, A. R.; Index Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The physical origin of the dark energy that causes the accelerated expansion rate of the Universe is one of the major open questions of cosmology. One set of theories postulates the existence of a self-interacting scalar field for dark energy coupling to matter. In the chameleon dark energy theory, this coupling induces a screening mechanism such that the field amplitude is nonzero in empty space but is greatly suppressed in regions of terrestrial matter density. However measurements performed under appropriate vacuum conditions can enable the chameleon field to appear in the apparatus, where it can be subjected to laboratory experiments. Here we report the most stringent upper bound on the free neutron-chameleon coupling in the strongly coupled limit of the chameleon theory using neutron interferometric techniques. Our experiment sought the chameleon field through the relative phase shift it would induce along one of the neutron paths inside a perfect crystal neutron interferometer. The amplitude of the chameleon field was actively modulated by varying the millibar pressures inside a dual-chamber aluminum cell. We report a 95% confidence level upper bound on the neutron-chameleon coupling β ranging from β <4.7 ×106 for a Ratra-Peebles index of n =1 in the nonlinear scalar field potential to β <2.4 ×107 for n =6 , one order of magnitude more sensitive than the most recent free neutron limit for intermediate n . Similar experiments can explore the full parameter range for chameleon dark energy in the foreseeable future.

  10. A compact neutron scatter camera for field deployment.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, John E M; Gerling, Mark D; Brennan, James S

    2016-08-01

    We describe a very compact (0.9 m high, 0.4 m diameter, 40 kg) battery operable neutron scatter camera designed for field deployment. Unlike most other systems, the configuration of the sixteen liquid-scintillator detection cells are arranged to provide omnidirectional (4π) imaging with sensitivity comparable to a conventional two-plane system. Although designed primarily to operate as a neutron scatter camera for localizing energetic neutron sources, it also functions as a Compton camera for localizing gamma sources. In addition to describing the radionuclide source localization capabilities of this system, we demonstrate how it provides neutron spectra that can distinguish plutonium metal from plutonium oxide sources, in addition to the easier task of distinguishing AmBe from fission sources. PMID:27587113

  11. Determination of TFTR far-field neutron detector efficiencies by local neutron flux spectrum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, D. L.; Ascione, G.; Kugel, H. W.; Roquemore, A. L.; Barcelo, T. W.; Kumar, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron detectors have often been located on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) test cell floor 3 m or more from the vacuum vessel for ease of detector access, to reduce radiation damage, minimize count saturation problems, and to avoid high magnetic fields. These detectors include Si surface-barrier diodes, fission chambers, natural diamond detectors, and T2 production in a moderated 3He cell. To evaluate the performance of these detectors during deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation, we determined the neutron flux spectrum incident on the principal detector enclosure using nuclide sample sets containing Al, Ti, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni, Zr, Nb, In, and Au activation foils. Foils were installed and then removed after ample exposure to TFTR D-T neutrons. High efficiency, high purity Ge detectors were used for gamma spectroscopy of the irradiated foils. The incident neutron fluence and spectral distribution were unfolded from the measured results, and used to derive absolute detector efficiencies.

  12. Geant4 simulation of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility.

    PubMed

    Prokopovich, D A; Reinhard, M I; Cornelius, I M; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-09-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility is used for testing and calibrating both active and passive radiation dosemeters for radiation protection applications in space and aviation. Through a combination of a primary particle beam, target and a suitable designed shielding configuration, the facility is able to reproduce the neutron component of the high altitude radiation field relevant to the jet aviation industry. Simulations of the facility using the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) toolkit provide an improved understanding of the neutron particle fluence as well as the particle fluence of other radiation components present. The secondary particle fluence as a function of the primary particle fluence incident on the target and the associated dose equivalent rates were determined at the 20 designated irradiation positions available at the facility. Comparisons of the simulated results with previously published simulations obtained using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, as well as with experimental results of the neutron fluence obtained with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, are made. PMID:20511404

  13. A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Schenkel, Thomas; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2012-02-15

    Field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron sources is pursued. Arrays of carbon nano-fibers promise the high field-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of field emitters with a density up to 10{sup 6} tips/cm{sup 2} and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. The critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

  14. A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali; Schenkel, Thomas

    2012-02-15

    We study field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron source. Arrays of carbon nano-fibers promise the high field-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of field emitters with a density up to 106 tips/cm2 and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. Lastly, the critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

  15. International Geomagnetic Reference Field: the 12th generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thébault, Erwan; Finlay, Christopher C.; Beggan, Ciarán D.; Alken, Patrick; Aubert, Julien; Barrois, Olivier; Bertrand, Francois; Bondar, Tatiana; Boness, Axel; Brocco, Laura; Canet, Elisabeth; Chambodut, Aude; Chulliat, Arnaud; Coïsson, Pierdavide; Civet, François; Du, Aimin; Fournier, Alexandre; Fratter, Isabelle; Gillet, Nicolas; Hamilton, Brian; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Hulot, Gauthier; Jager, Thomas; Korte, Monika; Kuang, Weijia; Lalanne, Xavier; Langlais, Benoit; Léger, Jean-Michel; Lesur, Vincent; Lowes, Frank J.; Macmillan, Susan; Mandea, Mioara; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Maus, Stefan; Olsen, Nils; Petrov, Valeriy; Ridley, Victoria; Rother, Martin; Sabaka, Terence J.; Saturnino, Diana; Schachtschneider, Reyko; Sirol, Olivier; Tangborn, Andrew; Thomson, Alan; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars; Vigneron, Pierre; Wardinski, Ingo; Zvereva, Tatiana

    2015-05-01

    The 12th generation of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) was adopted in December 2014 by the Working Group V-MOD appointed by the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA). It updates the previous IGRF generation with a definitive main field model for epoch 2010.0, a main field model for epoch 2015.0, and a linear annual predictive secular variation model for 2015.0-2020.0. Here, we present the equations defining the IGRF model, provide the spherical harmonic coefficients, and provide maps of the magnetic declination, inclination, and total intensity for epoch 2015.0 and their predicted rates of change for 2015.0-2020.0. We also update the magnetic pole positions and discuss briefly the latest changes and possible future trends of the Earth's magnetic field.

  16. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  17. Microdosimetry of epithermal neutron field at the Kyoto University reactor.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Y; Endo, S; Ishikawa, M; Hoshi, M; Takada, M; Kobayashi, T; Sakurai, Y; Utsumi, H; Uehara, S; Hayabuchi, N; Maeda, N; Takatuji, T; Fujika, K

    2002-01-01

    Microdosimetric spectra were measured in order to gain the microdosimetric parameters of some epithermal neutron fields. Changes in dose mean lineal energy YD as a function of depth of heavy water showed a trend of softening with heavy water of the beam. The neutron absorbed dose was obtained by using the frequency mean lineal energy. Results show good agreement with measurements with the activation method using gold foil. This study demonstrated how microdosimetric parameters change in radiation quality as a function of heavy water depth. PMID:12194334

  18. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering study of the NIST mAb reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Liu, Yun; Krueger, Susan; Curtis, Joseph

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of great interest to the biopharmaceutical industry because they can be engineered to target specific antigens. Due to their importance, the biomanufacturing initiative at NIST is developing an IgG1 mAb reference material `NIST mAb', which can be used by industry, academia, and regulatory authorities. As part of this collaborative effort, we aim at characterizing the reference material using neutron scattering techniques. We have studied the small-angle scattering profile of the NIST mAb in a histidine buffer at 0 and 150 mM NaCl. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we generate an ensemble of structures and calculate their theoretical scattering profile, which can be directly compared with experimental data. Moreover, we analyze the structure factor to understand the effect of solution conditions on the protein-protein interactions. Finally, we have measured the solution scattering of the NIST mAb, while simultaneously performing freeze/thaw cycles, in order to investigate if the solution structure was affected upon freezing. The results from neutron scattering not only support the development of the reference material, but also provide insights on its stability and guide efforts for its development under different formulations.

  19. EPR dosimetry in a mixed neutron and gamma radiation field.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Fattibene, P; Tikunov, D; Bartolotta, A; Carosi, A; Doca, M C

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy for criticality dosimetry was evaluated for tooth enamel, mannose and alanine pellets during the 'international intercomparison of criticality dosimetry techniques' at the SILENE reactor held in Valduc in June 2002, France. These three materials were irradiated in neutron and gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions in order to evaluate their neutron sensitivity. The neutron response was found to be around 10% for tooth enamel, 45% for mannose and between 40 and 90% for alanine pellets according their type. According to the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of criticality accident absorbed dose, analyzed results show the EPR potentiality and complementarity with regular criticality techniques. PMID:15353687

  20. Measurement of neutron and gamma radiation in a mixed field.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, S; Bechtel, E; Brucker, G J

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a study of dosimeters with a range of 0 to 0.2 mGy that were developed by the authors and built by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). These instruments are a type of air-filled ion chamber that is self-reading by means of an internal carbon fiber electrometer. Two types of these dosimeters were constructed: one with an ion chamber wall made of a conductive hydrogenous material, and the other device made with a conductive wall lining of non-hydrogenous material. Both types of dosimeters have the same sensitivity for gamma radiation, but greatly different sensitivities for fast neutrons, thus making it possible to measure gamma radiation and neutron doses separately in a mixed radiation field. The results indicate that such pairs of dosimeters can be used for the first time to accurately monitor personnel for gamma ray and neutron doses in real time. Since the difference in neutron sensitivities is due to the properties of wall materials, periodic calibrations of the dosimeter system can be accomplished using only gamma rays after the material constants are measured. The absolute number of neutron induced transmutations in sulfur was required for this work. Methods and techniques which were applied to determine this quantity are described in the text. This approach was one of several dosimetric procedures utilized in this investigation. PMID:7558835

  1. Neutron field measurements at the Aladdin Synchrotron Light Source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Li, Y; DeLuca, P M; Otte, R; Rowe, E M

    1986-01-01

    The neutron field near the inflector of the 800-MeV electron storage ring was studied. Photon-induced neutrons are produced by 100-MeV electrons bombarding the inflector during injection into the synchrotron ring. Neutrons were measured with moderating detectors made of 15 X 15 X 20 cm Lucite blocks and Au activation foils. Detector response was established with a Pu-Be neutron source and a 25.4-cm polyethylene sphere and Au foil detector. The neutron yield was 0.97 +/- 0.14 X 10(12) kJ-1. For 1.38 W of electron pulse power, the dose equivalent rate 1 m aside and 1 m above the inflector was 4.35 +/- 0.47 mu Sv s-1 and 3.13 +/- 0.23 mu Sv s-1, respectively. A measured dose equivalent transmission curve for polyethylene yielded an attenuation coefficient of 15.7 m-1. PMID:3943962

  2. Characterisation of neutron fields: challenges in assessing the directional distribution.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Reginatto, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    The SCK·CEN has carried out neutron field characterisation campaigns at several nuclear reactors. The main goal of these measurement campaigns was to evaluate the performance of different neutron personal dosemeters. To be able to evaluate the performance of neutron personal dosemeters in terms of Hp(10), knowledge of the directional distribution is indispensable. This distribution was estimated by placing several personal dosemeters on all six sides of a slab phantom. The interpretation and conversion of this information into a reliable value for Hp(10) requires great care. The data were analysed using three methods. In the first approach, a linear interpolation was performed on three perpendicular axes. In the other two approaches, an icosahedron was used to model the angle of incidence of the neutrons and a linear interpolation or a Bayesian analysis was performed. This study describes the limitations and advantages of each of these methods and provides recommendations for their use to estimate the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) for neutron dosimetry. PMID:24966340

  3. Neutron interference in the gravitational field of a ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Robert D.; Mallett, Ronald L.

    2015-07-01

    The neutron split-beam interferometer has proven to be particularly useful in measuring Newtonian gravitational effects such as those studied by Colella, Overhauser, and Werner (COW). The development of the ring laser has led to numerous applications in many areas of physics including a recent general relativistic prediction of frame dragging in the gravitational field produced by the electromagnetic radiation in a ring laser. This paper introduces a new general technique based on a canonical transformation of the Dirac equation for the gravitational field of a general linearized spacetime. Using this technique it is shown that there is a phase shift in the interference of two neutron beams due to the frame-dragging nature of the gravitational field of a ring laser.

  4. Search for strongly coupled Chameleon scalar field with neutron interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Arif, M.; Cory, D.; Haun, R.; Heacock, B.; Huber, M.; Nsofini, J.; Pushin, D. A.; Saggu, P.; Sarenac, D.; Shahi, C.; Skavysh, V.; Snow, M.; Young, A.

    2015-04-01

    The dark energy proposed to explain the observed accelerated expansion of the universe is not understood. A chameleon scalar field proposed as a dark energy candidate can explain the accelerated expansion and evade all current gravity experimental bounds. It features an effective range of the chameleon scalar field that depends on the local mass density. Hence a perfect crystal neutron interferometer, that measures relative phase shift between two paths, is a prefect tool to search for the chameleon field. We are preparing a two-chamber helium gas cell for the neutron interferometer. We can lower the pressure in one cell so low that the chameleon field range expands into the cell and causes a measurable neutron phase shift while keeping the pressure difference constant. We expect to set a new upper limit of the Chameleon field by at least one order of magnitude. This work is supported by NSF Grant 1205977, DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER41042, Canadian Excellence Research Chairs program, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and Collaborative Research and Training Experience Program

  5. Simulation of the Magnetic Field Evolution in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, J.; Reisenegger, A.; Valdivia, J. A.

    Using a numerical simulation, we study the effects of ambipolar diffusion and ohmic diffusion on the magnetic field evolution in the interior of an isolated neutron star (Goldreich & Reisenegger 1992; Reisenegger et al. 2005; Hoyos et al. 2007). We are interested in the behavior of the magnetic field on a long time scale, over which all Alfven and sound waves have been damped. We model the stellar interior as an electrically neutral plasma composed of neutrons, protons and electrons, which can interact with each other through collisions and electromagnetic forces. Weak interactions convert neutrons and charged particles into each other, erasing chemical imbalances. As a first step, we assume that the magnetic field points in one fixed Cartesian direction but can vary along an orthogonal direction. We start with a uniform-density background threaded by a homogeneous magnetic field and study the evolution of a magnetic perturbation as well as the density fluctuations it induces in the particles. We show that the system evolves through different quasi-equilibrium states and estimate the characteristic time scales on which these quasi-equilibria occur as a function of the magnetic field intensity, the collisional strength between the particles, the weak interaction rate, and the ohmic resistivity. We intend in a near future to extend this simulation to two dimensions in order to study an axially symmetric star geometry.

  6. A Reference Field for GCR Simulation and an LET-Based Implementation at NSRL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Walker, Steven A.; Norbury, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) on long duration deep space missions presents a serious health risk to astronauts, with large uncertainties connected to the biological response. In order to reduce the uncertainties and gain understanding about the basic mechanisms through which space radiation initiates cancer and other endpoints, radiobiology experiments are performed. Some of the accelerator facilities supporting such experiments have matured to a point where simulating the broad range of particles and energies characteristic of the GCR environment in a single experiment is feasible from a technology, usage, and cost perspective. In this work, several aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is within physical uncertainties, allowing a single reference field for deep space missions to be defined. Third, an approach for simulating the reference field at NSRL is presented. The approach allows for the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum of the reference field to be approximately represented with discrete ion and energy beams and implicitly maintains a reasonably accurate charge spectrum (or, average quality factor). Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed and weighed against alternative simulation strategies. The neutron component and track structure characteristics of the proposed strategy are discussed in this context.

  7. The neutron standard fields at the BR1 reactor at SCK.CEN

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemans, J.; Malambu, E.; Borms, L.

    2011-07-01

    The BR1 research reactor at SCK-CEN is characterized by a wide variety of irradiation possibilities, a large reactor core, and strong flexibility in its operation. A full MCNP model of BR1 has been recently developed in order to complement the results that can be obtained from activation dosimetry. After a general presentation of the reactor, this paper pays particular attention to its standard {sup 235}U(n,f) fast neutron field MARK III. This irradiation field is a useful tool for integral measurements and for detector calibrations. With the support of MCNP calculations, irradiations in MARK III can be directly referred to the pure {sup 235}U(n,f) fast neutron spectrum. (authors)

  8. Determination of multielements in a typical Japanese diet certified reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shogo; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji

    2003-08-01

    Multielements in a typical Japanese diet certified reference material prepared at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) of Japan, in collaboration with the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) of Japan were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Five samples (ca. 510-1000 mg) and comparative standards were irradiated for a short time (10 s) at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10(12) n cm(-2) s(-1) (pneumatic transfer) and for a long time (6 h) at a thermal neutron flux of 3.7 x 10(12) n cm(-2) s(-1) (central thimble) in the Rikkyo University Research Reactor (TRIGA Mark-II, 100 kW). The irradiated samples were measured by conventional gama-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, and by anti-coincidence and coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry with a coaxial Ge detector and a well-type NaI(Tl) detector. The concentrations of 38 elements were determined by these methods. PMID:12945682

  9. Dose homogeneity specification for reference dosimetry of nonstandard fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eunah; Soisson, Emilie; Seuntjens, Jan

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the sensitivity of the plan-class specific correction factor to dose distributions in composite nonstandard field dosimetry. Methods: A cylindrical water-filled PMMA phantom was constructed at the center of which reference absorbed dose could be measured. Ten different TomoTherapy-based IMRT fields were created on the CT images of the phantom. The dose distribution for each IMRT field was estimated at the position of a radiation detector or ionization chamber. The dose in each IMRT field normalized to that in a reference 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field was measured using a PTW micro liquid ion chamber. Based on the new dosimetry formalism, a plan-class specific correction factor k{sub Q{sub p{sub c{sub s{sub r,Q}{sup f{sub p}{sub c}{sub s}{sub r},f{sub r}{sub e}{sub f}}}}}} for each field was measured for two Farmer-type chambers, Exradin A12 and NE2571, as well as for a smaller Exradin A1SL chamber. The dependence of the measured correction factor on parameters characterizing dose distribution was analyzed. Results: Uncertainty on the plan-class specific correction factor measurement was in the range of 0.3%-0.5% and 0.3%-0.8% for the Farmer-type chambers and the Exradin A1SL, respectively. When the heterogeneity of the central region of the target volume was less than 5%, the correction factor did not differ from unity by more than 0.7% for the three air-filled ionization chambers. For more heterogeneous dose deliveries, the correction factor differed from unity by up to 2.4% for the Farmer-type chambers. For the Exradin A1SL, the correction factor was closer to unity due to the reduced effect of dose gradients, while it was highly variable in different IMRT fields because of a more significant impact of positioning uncertainties on the response of this chamber. Conclusions: The authors have shown that a plan-class specific correction factor can be specified as a function of plan evaluation parameters especially for Farmer-type chambers. This work

  10. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations. PMID:18196797

  11. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver

    SciTech Connect

    Bortolussi, S.; Altieri, S.

    2007-12-15

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ({phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min}) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a {phi}{sub max}/{phi}{sub min} ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  12. Reference dosimetry calculations for neutron capture therapy with comparison of analytical and voxel models.

    PubMed

    Goorley, J T; Kiger, W S; Zamenhof, R G

    2002-02-01

    As clinical trials of Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) are initiated in the U.S. and other countries, new treatment planning codes are being developed to calculate detailed dose distributions in patient-specific models. The thorough evaluation and comparison of treatment planning codes is a critical step toward the eventual standardization of dosimetry, which, in turn, is an essential element for the rational comparison of clinical results from different institutions. In this paper we report development of a reference suite of computational test problems for NCT dosimetry and discuss common issues encountered in these calculations to facilitate quantitative evaluations and comparisons of NCT treatment planning codes. Specifically, detailed depth-kerma rate curves were calculated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP4B for four different representations of the modified Snyder head phantom, an analytic, multishell, ellipsoidal model, and voxel representations of this model with cubic voxel sizes of 16, 8, and 4 mm. Monoenergetic and monodirectional beams of 0.0253 eV, 1, 2, 10, 100, and 1000 keV neutrons, and 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10 MeV photons were individually simulated to calculate kerma rates to a statistical uncertainty of <1% (1 std. dev.) in the center of the head model. In addition, a "generic" epithermal neutron beam with a broad neutron spectrum, similar to epithermal beams currently used or proposed for NCT clinical trials, was computed for all models. The thermal neutron, fast neutron, and photon kerma rates calculated with the 4 and 8 mm voxel models were within 2% and 4%, respectively, of those calculated for the analytical model. The 16 mm voxel model produced unacceptably large discrepancies for all dose components. The effects from different kerma data sets and tissue compositions were evaluated. Updating the kerma data from ICRU 46 to ICRU 63 data produced less than 2% difference in kerma rate profiles. The depth-dose profile data

  13. The freedom to choose neutron star magnetic field equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Lasky, Paul D.

    2016-08-01

    Our ability to interpret and glean useful information from the large body of observations of strongly magnetised neutron stars rests largely on our theoretical understanding of magnetic field equilibria. We answer the following question: is one free to arbitrarily prescribe magnetic equilibria such that fluid degrees of freedom can balance the equilibrium equations? We examine this question for various models for neutron star matter; from the simplest single-fluid barotrope to more realistic non-barotropic multifluid models with superfluid/superconducting components, muons and entropy. We do this for both axi- and non-axisymmetric equilibria, and in Newtonian gravity and general relativity. We show that, in axisymmetry, the most realistic model allows complete freedom in choosing a magnetic field equilibrium whereas non-axisymmetric equilibria are never completely arbitrary.

  14. Fission of 232Th in a spallation neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurevich, V. I.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Yakovlev, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial distributions of thorium fission reaction rate in a spallation neutron field of thick lead target bombarded by protons or deuterons with energy between 1.0 and 3.7 GeV were measured. Approximately a linear dependence of the thorium fission rate on the beam energy is observed. The mean fission cross section of 232Th <σ f > ≈ 123 mb and it does not depend on energy and type of the beam particles.

  15. Dynamical model of the magnetic field of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dixon, D. D.; Kaus, P. E.

    1992-02-01

    Attention is given to a dynamical model of the magnetization of a neutron star. The model exhibits three distinct behaviors, as characterized in the 2D parameter space of the two relevant parameters. In one region of the parameter space, the magnetization, and correspondingly the magnetic field, behaves erratically and nonperiodically, occasionally producing large pulses of the directional electric and magnetic field. It is suggested that this field is associated with 'bursters', very energetic gamma-rich pulses of the order of 1-s duration, and believed to emanate from solo neutron stars. A second region of parameter space shows the magnetization precessing at a constant period around the spin or conserved angular momentum direction. The third region is a 'dead' region, where the magnetization is aligned with the spin axis, and the star is nonradiating. The model suggests a life history of a neutron star in which the star typically evolves initially from a burster, later becoming a pulsar, and ending as a dead star.

  16. Torsional oscillations of neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime

    2015-11-01

    To determine the frequencies of magnetic oscillations in neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields, we derive the perturbation equations. We assume that the field strength of the global magnetic structure is so small that such fields are negligible compared with tangled fields, which may still be far from a realistic configuration. Then, we systematically examine the spectra of the magnetic oscillations, as varying the magnetic field strength and stellar mass. The frequencies without crust elasticity are completely proportional to the strength of the magnetic field, whose proportionality constant depends strongly on the stellar mass. On the other hand, the oscillation spectra with crust elasticity become more complicated, where the frequencies even for weak magnetic fields are different from the crustal torsional oscillations without magnetic fields. For discussing spectra, the critical field strength can play an important role, and it is determined in such a way that the shear velocity is equivalent to the Alfvén velocity at the crust basis. Additionally, we find that the effect of the crust elasticity can be seen strongly in the fundamental oscillations with a lower harmonic index, ℓ. Unlike the stellar models with a pure dipole magnetic field, we also find that the spectra with highly tangled magnetic fields become discrete, where one can expect many of the eigenfrequencies. Maybe these frequencies could be detected after the violent phenomena breaking the global magnetic field structure.

  17. High electric field deuterium ion sources for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk

    Active interrogation systems for highly enriched uranium require improved fieldable neutron sources. The target technology for deuterium-tritium neutron generators is well understood and the most significant improvement can be achieved by improving the deuterium ion source through increased output and, in some cases, lifetime of the ion source. We are developing a new approach to a deuterium ion sources based upon the field desorption/evaporation of deuterium from the surfaces of metal tips. Electrostatic field desorption (EFD) desorbs previously adsorbed deuterium as ions under the influence of high electric fields (several V/A), without removing tip material. Single etched wire tip experiments have been performed and have shown that this is difficult but can be achieved with molybdenum and tungsten tips. Electrostatic field evaporation (EFE) evaporates ultra thin deuterated titanium films as ions. It has been shown that several 10s of atomic layers can be removed within a few nanoseconds from etched tungsten tips. In the course of these studies titanium deposition and deuteration methods were studied and new detection methods developed. Space charge effects resulting from the large ion currents were identified to be the most likely cause of some unusual ion emission characteristics. In addition, on W < 110 > oriented substrates a surprising body-centered cubic crystal structure of the titanium film was found and studied. The ion currents required for neutron generator applications can be achieved by microfabrication of metal tip arrays. Field desorption studies of microfabricated field emitter tip arrays have been conducted for the first time. Maximum fields of 3 V/A have been applied to the array tip surfaces to date, although fields of ˜ 2 V/A to ˜ 2.5 V/A are more typical. Desorption of atomic deuterium ions has been observed at fields of roughly 2 V/A at room temperature. The desorption of common surface adsorbates, such as hydrogen, carbon, water, and

  18. A militarily fielded thermal neutron activation sensor for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, E. T. H.; McFee, J. E.; Ing, H.; Andrews, H. R.; Tennant, D.; Harper, E.; Faust, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence has developed a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor system to detect anti-tank landmines on roads and tracks in peacekeeping operations. A key part of the system is a thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor which is placed above a suspect location to within a 30 cm radius and confirms the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.835 MeV gamma ray associated with thermal neutron capture on 14N. The TNA uses a 100 μg252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm×7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. The system, consisting of the TNA sensor head, including source, detectors and shielding, the high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics and the data processing methodology are described. Results of experiments to characterize detection performance are also described. The experiments have shown that anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less can be detected in roughly a minute or less, but deeper mines and mines significantly displaced horizontally take considerably longer time. Mines as deep as 30 cm can be detected for long count times (1000 s). Four TNA detectors are now in service with the Canadian Forces as part of the four multi-sensor systems, making it the first militarily fielded TNA sensor and the first militarily fielded confirmation sensor for landmines. The ability to function well in adverse climatic conditions has been demonstrated, both in trials and operations.

  19. Neutron Interference in the Gravitational Field of a Ring Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischetti, Robert

    2013-04-01

    A number of analyses of neutron interference effects due to various metric perturbations have been found in the literature [1,2]. However, the approach of each author depends on a specific metric. I will present a new general technique giving the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformed Hamiltonian for a Dirac particle in the most general linearized space-time metric. I will then apply this new technique to calculate the phase shift on a neutron beam interferometer due to the gravitational field of a ring laser [3].[4pt] [1] D. M Greenberger and A. W. Overhauser, Rev. Mod. Phys. 51, 43--78 (1979).[0pt] [2] F. W. Hehl and W. T. Ni, Phys. Rev. D, vol 42, no. 6, pp. 2045-2048, 1990.[0pt] [3] R. L. Mallett, Phys. Lett. A 269, 214 (2000).

  20. Long-term evolution of crustal neutron star magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urpin, V. A.; Chanmugam, G.; Sang, Yeming

    1994-01-01

    We have derived an analytic solution to the asymptotic behavior of dipolar magnetic fields that are generated in the crusts of neutron stars. We show that if the conductivity is due to impurity scattering, as expected for late stages of evolution, the surface field strength at the magnetic pole declines with the power law B(sub p) approximately = (t/t(sub 0))(exp -2/3). The results are shown to be qualitatively consistent with detailed numerical calculations. These latter results are consistent with some recent analyses of pulsar statistics and the magnetic fields of several binary pulsars with white dwarf companions whose ages have been determined. The dependence of the surface magnetic field on spin period of the pulsar is derived.

  1. Neutron-activation analysis of several US Geological Survey and National Bureau of Standards reference materials

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    In this work, several US Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) and National Bureau of Standards (N.B.S.) reference samples have been analyzed in an effort to improve the quality of elemental concentration data available on these materials, so they can be used in a program of verification of factor analysis source resolution procedures. The analyses of these samples were performed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The samples analyzed were: U.S.G.S. Green River Shale, N.B.S. 45b Homogeneous River Sediment, U.S.G.S. Analyzed Peridotite N.B.S. 1579 Powdered Lead-based Paint, U.S.G.S. Hawaian Basalt U.S.G.S. Marine Mud, U.S.G.S. Analyzed Cody Shale U.S.G.S. Glass Mountain Rhyolite, N.B.S. Argillaceous Limestone No. 1, and a sample of Spex ultrapure graphite. Neutron activation analysis was employed because of the high sensitivity that can be attained in determining elemental concentrations. Although INAA is a relatively simple method and the reproducibility of the data is good, the method shows some inaccuracies. The basic theory and technique are reviewed in an attempt to show where problems can arise and how they can be dealt with.

  2. A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, Birk; Solano, I.; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 ML of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2} of tip array area.

  3. A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk; Solano, I.; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2008-05-01

    Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 ML of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 109-1010 n/cm2 of tip array area.

  4. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 × 109 n cm-2 s-1 at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h-1. These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  5. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-01

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field. PMID:17440252

  6. Measurement and modeling of polarized specular neutron reflectivity in large magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Maranville, Brian B.; Kirby, Brian J.; Grutter, Alexander J.; Kienzle, Paul A.; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Liu, Yaohua; Dennis, Cindi L.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a large applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the vacuum energy states for spin-up and spin-down neutrons. For polarized neutron reflectometry, this must be included in the reference potential energy of the Schrödinger equation that is used to calculate the expected scattering from a magnetic layered structure. For samples with magnetization that is purely parallel or antiparallel to the applied field which defines the quantization axis, there is no mixing of the spin states (no spin-flip scattering) and so this additional potential is constant throughout the scattering region. When there is non-collinear magnetization in the sample, however, there will be significant scattering from one spin state into the other, and the reference potentials will differ between the incoming and outgoing wavefunctions, changing the angle and intensities of the scattering. The theory of the scattering and recommended experimental practices for this type of measurement are presented, as well as an example measurement. PMID:27504074

  7. Measurement and modeling of polarized specular neutron reflectivity in large magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maranville, Brian B.; Kirby, Brian J.; Grutter, Alexander J.; Kienzle, Paul A.; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Liu, Yaohua; Dennis, Cindi L.

    2016-06-09

    The presence of a large applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the vacuum energy states for spin-up and spin-down neutrons. For polarized neutron reflectometry, this must be included in the reference potential energy of the Schrödinger equation that is used to calculate the expected scattering from a magnetic layered structure. For samples with magnetization that is purely parallel or antiparallel to the applied field which defines the quantization axis, there is no mixing of the spin states (no spin-flip scattering) and so this additional potential is constant throughout the scattering region. When there is non-collinear magnetization in the sample,more » however, there will be significant scattering from one spin state into the other, and the reference potentials will differ between the incoming and outgoing wavefunctions, changing the angle and intensities of the scattering. In conclusion, the theory of the scattering and recommended experimental practices for this type of measurement are presented, as well as an example measurement.« less

  8. Simulated magnetic field expulsion in neutron star cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfritz, J. G.; Pons, J. A.; Rea, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Viganò, D.

    2016-03-01

    The study of long-term evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields is key to understanding the rich diversity of NS observations, and to unifying their nature despite the different emission mechanisms and observed properties. Such studies in principle permit a deeper understanding of the most important parameters driving their apparent variety, e.g. radio pulsars, magnetars, X-ray dim isolated NSs, gamma-ray pulsars. We describe, for the first time, the results from self-consistent magnetothermal simulations considering not only the effects of the Hall-driven field dissipation in the crust, but also adding a complete set of proposed driving forces in a superconducting core. We emphasize how each of these core-field processes drive magnetic evolution and affect observables, and show that when all forces are considered together in vectorial form, the net expulsion of core magnetic flux is negligible, and will have no observable effect in the crust (consequently in the observed surface emission) on megayear time-scales. Our new simulations suggest that strong magnetic fields in NS cores (and the signatures on the NS surface) will persist long after the crustal magnetic field has evolved and decayed, due to the weak combined effects of dissipation and expulsion in the stellar core.

  9. Effects of hole doping by neutron irradiation of magnetic field induced electronic phase transitions in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Yaguchi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated effects of hole doping by fast-neutron irradiation on the magnetic-field induced phase transitions in graphite using specimens irradiated with fast neutrons. Resistance measurements have been done in magnetic fields of up to above 50 T and at temperatures down to about 1.5 K. The neutron irradiation creates lattice defects acting as acceptors, affecting the imbalance of the electron and hole densities and the Fermi level. We have found that the reentrant field from the field induced state back to the normal state shifts towards a lower field with hole doping, suggestive of the participation of electron subbands in the magnetic-field induced state.

  10. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  11. Conditions for jet formation in accreting neutron stars: the magnetic field decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Federico; Aguilera, Deborah N.; Romero, Gustavo E.

    2011-02-01

    Accreting neutron stars can produce jets only if they are weakly magnetized (B ~ 108 G). On the other hand, neutron stars are compact objects born with strong surface magnetic fields (B ~ 1012 G). In this work we study the conditions for jet formation in a binary system formed by a neutron star and a massive donor star once the magnetic field has decayed due to accretion. We solve the induction equation for the magnetic field diffusion in a realistic neutron star crust and discuss the possibility of jet launching in systems like the recently detected Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients.

  12. Characterisation of mixed neutron photon workplace fields at nuclear facilities by spectrometry (energy and direction) within the EVIDOS project.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Bartlett, D; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T; Boschung, M; Coeck, M; Curzio, G; d'Errico, F; Fiechtner, A; Lacoste, V; Lindborg, L; Reginatto, M; Schuhmacher, H; Tanner, R; Vanhavere, F

    2007-01-01

    Within the EC project EVIDOS, 17 different mixed neutron-photon workplace fields at nuclear facilities (boiling water reactor, pressurised water reactor, research reactor, fuel processing, storage of spent fuel) were characterised using conventional Bonner sphere spectrometry and newly developed direction spectrometers. The results of the analysis, using Bayesian parameter estimation methods and different unfolding codes, some of them especially adapted to simultaneously unfold energy and direction distributions of the neutron fluence, showed that neutron spectra differed strongly at the different places, both in energy and direction distribution. The implication of the results for the determination of reference values for radiation protection quantities (ambient dose equivalent, personal dose equivalent and effective dose) and the related uncertainties are discussed. PMID:17890781

  13. FIELD VALIDATION OF EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) REFERENCE METHOD 23

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy and precision of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Reference Method 23 was evaluated at a trichloroethylene degreasing facility and an ethylene dichloride plant. The method consists of a procedure for obtaining an integrated sample followed by gas chromatographic ...

  14. Monitoring Neutron Generator Output in a Mixed Neutron-Gamma Field Using a Plastic Scintillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra,S.; Wielopolski, L.

    2007-10-28

    Quantitative neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy employing neutron generators (NGs) entails monitoring them for possible fluctuations in their neutron output. We accomplished this using a plastic scintillator and recording a spectrum from which we selected a neutron region-of-interest (nROI) to discriminate between neutrons and the accompanying high-energy gamma-rays. We show that the selected nROI is insensitive to changes in the gamma-ray background, thus allowing satisfactory normalization of the gamma-ray spectra of an in-situ system for analyzing soil carbon.

  15. Neutron star cooling: A challenge to the nuclear mean field

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Sy Than; Nguyen Van Giai

    2009-12-15

    The two recent density-dependent versions of the finite-range M3Y interaction (CDM3Yn and M3Y-Pn) have been probed against the bulk properties of asymmetric nuclear matter (NM) in the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock (HF) formalism. The same HF study has also been done with the famous Skyrme (SLy4) and Gogny (D1S and D1N) interactions that were well tested in the nuclear structure calculations. Our HF results are compared with those given by other many-body calculations like the Dirac-Brueckner Hartree-Fock approach or ab initio variational calculations using free nucleon-nucleon interaction and by both the nonrelativistic and relativistic mean-field studies using different model parameters. Although the two considered density-dependent versions of the M3Y interaction were proven to be quite realistic in the nuclear structure or reaction studies, they give two distinct behaviors of the NM symmetry energy at high densities, like the Asy-soft and Asy-stiff scenarios found earlier with other mean-field interactions. As a consequence, we obtain two different behaviors of the proton fraction in the {beta}-equilibrium that in turn can imply two drastically different mechanisms for the neutron star cooling. While some preference of the Asy-stiff scenario was found based on predictions of the latest microscopic many-body calculations or empirical NM pressure and isospin diffusion data deduced from heavy-ion collisions, a consistent mean-field description of nuclear structure database is more often given by some Asy-soft type interaction like the Gogny or M3Y-Pn ones. Such a dilemma poses an interesting challenge to the modern mean-field approaches.

  16. EuTEPC: measurements in gamma and neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Moro, D; Chiriotti, S

    2015-09-01

    The EuTEPC (European TEPC) is a novel spherical tissue-equivalent gas-proportional single-wire counter that has been designed and constructed at the National Laboratories of Legnaro of Italian Nuclear Physics Institute in collaboration with the University of Padova, the DLR (German Aerospace Centre) and Austrian Institute of Technology. Its peculiarity is the spherical A-150 cathode wall which is sub-divided in nine sectors. Each sector is properly and differently biased, in order to obtain a uniform electric field along the anode wire, for reaching a good isotropic response and energy resolution. The counter components can be easily replaced and reassembled including the anode wire. The counter could be used as a monitor area inside the International Space Station. This paper describes first microdosimetric measurements in (60)Co, (137)Cs and (241)Am-Be(α,n) gamma and neutron fields performed with the EuTEPC filled with pure propane gas. Measurements have been performed simulating sites sizes, ranging from 0.05 up to 0.25 mg cm(-2) in pure propane, which correspond from 0.7 up to 3.3 µm equivalent site sizes in propane-TE gas. Comparisons with some literature spectra are presented. PMID:25877529

  17. Application of the TLD albedo technique for monitoring and interpretation of neutron stray radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesch, E.; Burgkhardt, B.

    1980-09-01

    A single sphere albedo technique with TLD 600/TLD 700 detectors has been applied in neutron monitoring to calibrate albedo dosimeters and to interpret neutron stray radiation fields in terms of neutron dose equivalent separated for the energy groups below 0.4 eV, 0.4-10 keV and 10 keV-10 MeV, and Eeff for fast neutrons. The paper describes the technique for field and personnel monitoring under the aspect of an on-line computer program for data recording and processing.

  18. Characteristics of Neutron Fields for Radiation Protection and Other Applications at the Kinki University Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Tatsuya; Morishima, Hiroshige; Urabe, Itsumasa; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-06-01

    In order to get useful information about neutron energy spectrum and neutron dose, a versatile and accurate reactor model of the Kinki University Reactor (UTR-KINKI) was developed under the three-dimensional continuous-energy MCNP Monte Carlo code. The agreement between MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values was very good. This paper describes characteristics of neutron fields at the Kinki University Reactor calculated with the present MCNP model of the UTR-KINKI. From the results obtained it was clear that these neutron fields are applicable to development and performance evaluation of personnel dosimeters and experimental studies on biological effects of low levels of radiation.

  19. Calculation verification of the utilization of LR-0 for reference neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ján, Milčák; Michal, Košťál; Marie, Švadlenková; Michal, Koleška; Vojtěch, Rypar

    2014-11-01

    Well-defined neutron spectrum is crucial for calibration and testing of detectors for spectrometry and dosimetry purposes. As a possible source of neutrons nuclear reactors can be utilized. In reactor core most of the neutrons are originated from fission and neutron spectra is usually some form of moderated spectra of fast neutrons. The reactor LR-0 is an experimental light-water zero-power pool-type reactor originally designed for research of the VVER type reactor cores, spent-fuel storage lattices and benchmark experiments. The main reactor feature that influences the performance of experiments is the flexible arrangement of the core. Special types of the possible core arrangements on the reactor LR-0 can provide different neutron spectra in special experimental channels. These neutron spectra are modified by inserting different materials around the channel and whole core is driven by standard fuel assemblies. Fast, epithermal or thermal spectra can be simulated using graphite, H2O, D2O insertions, air, Cd foils or fuel with different enrichment.

  20. Internal composition of proto-neutron stars under strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzon, B.; Dexheimer, V.; Schramm, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study the effects of magnetic fields and rotation on the structure and composition of proto-neutron stars. A hadronic chiral SU(3) model is applied to cold neutron stars and proto-neutron stars with trapped neutrinos and at fixed entropy per baryon. We obtain general relativistic solutions for neutron and proto-neutron stars endowed with a poloidal magnetic field by solving Einstein-Maxwell field equations in a self-consistent way. As the neutrino chemical potential decreases in value over time, this alters the chemical equilibrium and the composition inside the star, leading to a change in the structure and in the particle population of these objects. We find that the magnetic field deforms the star and significantly alters the number of trapped neutrinos in the stellar interior, together with strangeness content and temperature in each evolution stage.

  1. Neutron Star Magnetic Field Evolution, Crust Movement, and Glitches: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruderman, Malvin; Zhu, Tianhua; Chen, Kaiyou

    1998-08-01

    In the paper "Neutron Star Magnetic Field Evolution, Crust Movement, and Glitches" by Malvin Ruderman, Tianhua Zhu, and Kaiyou Chen (ApJ, 492, 267 [1998]), the following corrections should be made: Four lines below equation (24), "with v_phi still the same as that of the Vela" should be replaced by "with each vortex line-flux-tube intersection force still the same as that in Vela." Just after equation (25), "as long as 3 - n is less than 1, but 3 - n = 1 otherwise" should be inserted. There is no change in Table 1. The authors also note that a new analysis of observations of the period history of PSR 0540-69 gives a most probable spin-down index n = 2.5 (S. Eikenberg, G. Fazio, and S. Ransom, ApJ, 492, 754 [1998]), which removes the major discrepancy between the observed and model spin-down indices and makes the remarks about it below equation (25) no longer relevant.

  2. Radiation fields from neutron generators shielded with different materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichester, D. L.; Blackburn, B. W.

    2007-08-01

    As a general guide for assessing radiological conditions around a DT neutron generator numerical modeling has been performed to assess neutron and photon dose profiles for a variety of shield materials ranging from 1 to 100 cm thick. In agreement with accepted radiation safety practices high-Z materials such as bismuth and lead have been found to be ineffective biological shield materials, owing in part to the existence of (n,2n) reaction channels available with 14.1 MeV DT neutrons, while low-Z materials serve as effective shields for these sources. Composite materials such as a mixture of polyethylene and bismuth, or regular concrete, are ideal shield materials for neutron generator radiation because of their ability to attenuate internally generated photon radiation resulting from neutron scattering and capture within the shields themselves.

  3. Neutron Scattering at Highest Magnetic Fields at the Helmholtz Centre Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeibidl, P.; Tennant, A.; Ehmler, H.; Bird, M.

    2010-04-01

    The Helmholtz Centre Berlin (HZB), formerly Hahn-Meitner Institute is a user facility for the study of structure and dynamics with neutrons and synchrotron radiation with special emphasis on experiments under extreme conditions. Neutron scattering is uniquely suited to study magnetic properties on a microscopic length scale, because neutrons have comparable wavelengths and, due to their magnetic moment, they interact with the atomic magnetic moments. At HZB a dedicated instrument for neutron scattering at extreme fields is under construction, the Extreme Environment Diffractometer ExED. It is projected according to the “time-of-flight” principle for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering and for the special geometric constraints of analysing samples in a high field magnet. The new magnet will not only allow for novel experiments, it will be at the forefront of development in magnet technology itself. The design of the magnet will follow the Series Connected Hybrid System Technology (SCH) developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) in Tallahassee, Florida. To compromise between the needs of the magnet design for highest fields and the concept of the neutron instrument, the magnetic field will be generated by means of a coned solenoid with horizontal field orientation. By using resistive insert coils, which are mounted in the room temperature bore of a superconducting cable-in-conduit (CIC) magnet, fields above 30 Tesla can be obtained in a geometry optimised for the demands of neutron scattering.

  4. Moderator design studies for a new neutron reference source based on the D-T fusion reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Piper, Roman K.; Rathbone, Bruce A.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The radioactive isotope Californium-252 (252Cf) is relied upon internationally as a neutron calibration source for ionizing radiation dosimetry because of its high specific activity. The source may be placed within a heavy-water (D2O) moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum representative of neutron fields common to commercial nuclear power plant environments, among others. Due to termination of the U.S. Department of Energy loan/lease program in 2012, the expense of obtaining 252Cf sources has undergone a significant increase, rendering high output sources largely unattainable. On the other hand, the use of neutron generators in research and industry applications has increased dramatically in recent years. Neutron generators based on deuteriumtritium (D-T) fusion reaction provide high neutron fluence rates and, therefore, could possibly be used as a replacement for 252Cf. To be viable, the 14 MeV D-T output spectrum must be significantly moderated to approximate common workplace environments. This paper presents the results of an effort to select appropriate moderating materials and design a configuration to reshape the primary neutron field toward a spectrum approaching that from a nuclear power plant workplace. A series of Monte-Carlo (MCNP) simulations of single layer high- and low-Z materials are used to identify initial candidate moderators. Candidates are refined through a similar series of simulations involving combinations of 2-5 different materials. The simulated energy distribution using these candidate moderators are rated in comparison to a target spectrum. Other properties, such as fluence preservation and/or enhancement, prompt gamma production and other characteristics are also considered.

  5. Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generator using a novel field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J. L. Falabella, S.; Sanchez, J.; Tang, V.; Wang, H.

    2014-11-21

    Active interrogation using neutrons is an effective method for detecting shielded nuclear material. A lightweight, lunch-box-sized, battery-operated neutron source would enable new concepts of operation in the field. We have developed at-scale components for a highly portable, completely self-contained, pulsed Deuterium-Tritium (DT) neutron source producing 14 MeV neutrons with average yields of 10{sup 7} n/s. A gated, field ionization ion source using etched electrodes has been developed that produces pulsed ion currents up to 500 nA. A compact Cockcroft-Walton high voltage source is used to accelerate deuterons into a metal hydride target for neutron production. The results of full scale DT tests using the field ionization source are presented.

  6. Quantification of the sensitivity range in neutron dark-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, B.; Harti, R. P.; Strobl, M.; Hovind, J.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Grünzweig, C.

    2015-12-01

    In neutron grating interferometry, the dark-field image visualizes the scattering properties of samples in the small-angle and ultra-small-angle scattering range. These angles correspond to correlation lengths from several hundred nanometers up to several tens of micrometers. In this article, we present an experimental study that demonstrates the potential of quantitative neutron dark-field imaging. The dark-field signal for scattering from different particle sizes and concentrations of mono-dispersive polystyrene particles in aqueous solution is compared to theoretical predictions and the good agreement between measurements and calculations underlines the quantitative nature of the measured values and reliability of the technique with neutrons.

  7. Quantification of the sensitivity range in neutron dark-field imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, B.; Harti, R. P.; Hovind, J.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Strobl, M.; Van Swygenhoven, H.

    2015-12-15

    In neutron grating interferometry, the dark-field image visualizes the scattering properties of samples in the small-angle and ultra-small-angle scattering range. These angles correspond to correlation lengths from several hundred nanometers up to several tens of micrometers. In this article, we present an experimental study that demonstrates the potential of quantitative neutron dark-field imaging. The dark-field signal for scattering from different particle sizes and concentrations of mono-dispersive polystyrene particles in aqueous solution is compared to theoretical predictions and the good agreement between measurements and calculations underlines the quantitative nature of the measured values and reliability of the technique with neutrons.

  8. Polarisation Analysis Neutron Spectrometer, POLANO, at J-PARC - Concept and Magnetic Field Optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohoyama, K.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Nanbu, M.; Iwasa, K.; Ohkawara, M.; Kaneko, N.; Ino, T.; Hayashida, H.; Oku, T.; Kira, H.; Tasaki, S.; Takeda, M.; Kimura, H.; Sato, T. J.

    2016-04-01

    The status of the polarised neutron spectrometer constructed at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex through a collaboration between Tohoku University and KEK will be reported. In particular, the optimisation of magnetic fields to minimise neutron- beam depolarisation using the finite element method will be discussed on the basis of several simulations using the finite element method.

  9. Gamma ray bursts from comet neutron star magnetosphere interaction, field twisting and E sub parallel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Consider the problem of a comet in a collision trajectory with a magnetized neutron star. The question addressed in this paper is whether the comet interacts strongly enough with a magnetic field such as to capture at a large radius or whether in general the comet will escape a magnetized neutron star. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Neutron star structure in the presence of conformally coupled scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-10-01

    Neutron star models are studied in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, using two different numerical equations of state (EoS) representing different degrees of stiffness. In both cases we obtain a complete solution by matching the interior numerical solution of the coupled Einstein-scalar field hydrostatic equations, with an exact metric on the surface of the star. These are then used to find the effect of the scalar field and its coupling to geometry, on the neutron star structure, particularly the maximum neutron star mass and radius. We show that in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, neutron stars are less dense and have smaller masses and radii than their counterparts in the minimally coupled case, and the effect increases with the magnitude of the scalar field at the center of the star.

  11. Neutron Star Structure in the Presence of Conformally Coupled Scalar Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-01

    Neutron star models are studied in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, using two different numerical equations of state (EoS) representing different degrees of stiffness. In both cases we obtain a complete solution by matching the interior numerical solution of the coupled Einstein-scalar field hydrostatic equations, with an exact metric on the surface of the star. These are then used to find the effect of the scalar field and its coupling to geometry, on the neutron star structure, particularly the maximum neutron star mass and radius. We show that in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, neutron stars are less dense and have smaller masses and radii than their counterparts in the minimally coupled case, and the effect increases with the magnitude of the scalar field at the center of the star.

  12. Proton and neutron skins of light nuclei within the relativistic mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, L. S.; Toki, H.; Ozawa, A.; Meng, J.

    2004-01-01

    The relativistic mean field (RMF) theory is applied to the analysis of ground-state properties of Ne, Na, Cl and Ar isotopes. In particular, we study the recently established proton skin in Ar isotopes and neutron skin in Na isotopes as a function of the difference between the proton and the neutron separation energy. We use the TMA effective interaction in the RMF Lagrangian, and describe pairing correlation by the density-independent delta-function interaction. We calculate single neutron and proton separation energies, quadrupole deformations, nuclear matter radii and differences between proton radii and neutron radii, and compare these results with the recent experimental data.

  13. A method for comparing degradation of boron trifluoride and helium detectors in neutron and gamma fields

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, T.; Tonner, P.; Keller, N.; Buyers, W.J.L.

    1998-06-01

    A method developed to measure the degradation of neutron detectors in neutron and gamma fields has been applied to five models of boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}) detectors from major suppliers, and to a special helium ({sup 3}He) detector model. The detectors tested all have about the same nominal thermal neutron sensitivity and overall dimensions. The results showed widely different neutron and gamma durability for BF{sub 3} models, an undesirable time-dependent gamma degradation followed by recovery for some BF{sub 3} models, and very robust performance of the modified {sup 3}He detector.

  14. Topological currents in neutron stars: kicks, precession, toroidal fields, and magnetic helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Charbonneau, James; Zhitnitsky, Ariel E-mail: arz@phas.ubc.ca

    2010-08-01

    The effects of anomalies in high density QCD are striking. We consider a direct application of one of these effects, namely topological currents, on the physics of neutron stars. All the elements required for topological currents are present in neutron stars: degenerate matter, large magnetic fields, and parity violating processes. These conditions lead to the creation of vector currents capable of carrying momentum and inducing magnetic fields. We estimate the size of these currents for many representative states of dense matter in the neutron star and argue that they could be responsible for the large proper motion of neutron stars (kicks), the toroidal magnetic field and finite magnetic helicity needed for stability of the poloidal field, and the resolution of the conflict between type-II superconductivity and precession. Though these observational effects appear unrelated, they likely originate from the same physics — they are all P-odd phenomena that stem from a topological current generated by parity violation.

  15. Field Testing Near-IR and Neutron Spectrometer Prospecting: Applications to Resource Prospector on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Colaprete, A.; Heldmann, J. L.; Deans, M. C.

    2015-10-01

    The Resource Prospector payload includes a near-infrared spectrometer and neutron spectrometer for surficial and near-surface volatile prospecting. Here we describe results from a field test in the Mojave Desert using the two instruments.

  16. Improvement of depth dose distribution using multiple-field irradiation in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, N; Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y; Takata, T; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M; Nakagawa, Y; Watanabe, T; Kinashi, Y; Masunaga, S; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K; Suzuki, M

    2015-12-01

    It is important that improvements are made to depth dose distribution in boron neutron capture therapy, because the neutrons do not reach the innermost regions of the human body. Here, we evaluated the dose distribution obtained using multiple-field irradiation in simulation. From a dose volume histogram analysis, it was found that the mean and minimum tumor doses were increased using two-field irradiation, because of improved dose distribution for deeper-sited tumors. PMID:26282566

  17. Neutron field measurements of the CRNA OB26 irradiator using a Bonner sphere spectrometer for radiation protection purposes.

    PubMed

    Mazrou, H; Allab, M

    2012-08-01

    The present work deals with the Bonner sphere spectrometer (BSS) measurements performed, to support the authors' Monte-Carlo calculations, to estimate accurately the main characteristics of the neutron field of the (241)Am-Be-based OB26 irradiator acquired for radiation protection purposes by the Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers. The measurements were performed at a reference irradiation position selected at 150 cm from the geometrical centre of the neutron source. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter. The response matrix of the present spectrometer has been taken to be similar to the original Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) (Braunschweig, Germany) BSS's response matrix, with a five bins per decade energy group structure, as there is no significant difference in the BSS's physical characteristics. Thereafter, the authors' BSS measurements were used together with MCNP5 results to unfold the neutron spectrum by means of MAXED and GRAVEL computer codes from the U.M.G. 3.3 package, developed at PTB. Besides, sensitivity analysis has been performed to test the consistency of the unfolding procedure. It reveals that no significant discrepancy was observed in the total neutron fluence and total ambient dose values following the perturbation of some pertinent unfolding parameters except for the case where a 10 bins energy structure was assumed for the guess spectrum. In this latter case, a 5 % difference was observed in the ambient dose equivalent compared with the reference case. Finally, a comparative study performed between different counting systems together with MCNP5 and predictive formulas results shows that they were globally satisfactory, highlighting thereby the relevance of the unfolding procedure and the reliability of the obtained results. PMID:22345213

  18. The effect of thermal neutron field slagging caused by cylindrical BF3 counters in diffusion media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorshkov, G. V.; Tsvetkov, O. S.; Yakovlev, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Computations are carried out in transport approximation (first collision method) for the attenuation of the field of thermal neutrons formed in counters of the CHM-8 and CHMO-5 type. The deflection of the thermal neutron field is also obtained near the counters and in the air (shade effect) and in various decelerating media (water, paraffin, plexiglas) for which the calculations are carried out on the basis of diffusion theory. To verify the calculations, the distribution of the density of the thermal neutrons at various distances from the counter in the water is measured.

  19. Development of a compact neutron source based on field ionization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Allen, Ian; Dickinson, Michael R.; Schenkel, Thomas; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2010-11-25

    The authors report on the use of carbon nanofiber nanoemitters to ionize deuterium atoms for the generation of neutrons in a deuterium-deuterium reaction in a preloaded target. Acceleration voltages in the range of 50-80 kV are used. Field emission of electrons is investigated to characterize the emitters. The experimental setup and sample preparation are described and first data of neutron production are presented. Ongoing experiments to increase neutron production yields by optimizing the field emitter geometry and surface conditions are discussed.

  20. Periodic magnetic field as a polarized and focusing thermal neutron spectrometer and monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Williams, D. L.; Fuller, M. J.; Gary, C. K.; Piestrup, M. A.; Pantell, R. H.; Feinstein, J.; Flocchini, R. G.; Boussoufi, M.; Egbert, H. P.; Kloh, M. D.; Walker, R. B.

    2010-01-15

    A novel periodic magnetic field (PMF) optic is shown to act as a prism, lens, and polarizer for neutrons and particles with a magnetic dipole moment. The PMF has a two-dimensional field in the axial direction of neutron propagation. The PMF alternating magnetic field polarity provides strong gradients that cause separation of neutrons by wavelength axially and by spin state transversely. The spin-up neutrons exit the PMF with their magnetic spins aligned parallel to the PMF magnetic field, and are deflected upward and line focus at a fixed vertical height, proportional to the PMF period, at a downstream focal distance that increases with neutron energy. The PMF has no attenuation by absorption or scatter, as with material prisms or crystal monochromators. Embodiments of the PMF include neutron spectrometer or monochromator, and applications include neutron small angle scattering, crystallography, residual stress analysis, cross section measurements, and reflectometry. Presented are theory, experimental results, computer simulation, applications of the PMF, and comparison of its performance to Stern-Gerlach gradient devices and compound material and magnetic refractive prisms.

  1. Temperature compensated and self-calibrated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by the magnetic field sensors and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  2. Characterization of the IRSN neutron multisphere spectrometer (HERMEIS) at European standard calibration fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheminet, A.; Lacoste, V.; Gressier, V.; Hubert, G.; Martin, A.; Pépino, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a new spectrometry system for neutron energies from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV. This high energy range multisphere extended IRSN system (HERMEIS) is a high gas pressure3He-based Bonner spheres set. It is adapted to low neutron fluence rate measurements and one of its main application concerns the determination of cosmic-ray-induced neutron spectra at ground level and mountain altitudes. The neutron fluence response matrix of the set of 13 Bonner spheres, including three extended ones with tungsten and lead shells, was calculated with the radiation transport code MCNPX-2.6f. Reliable fluence responses being mandatory for a correct evaluation of the atmospheric neutron spectra, HERMEIS was characterized at standard monoenergetic, quasi-monoenergetic and realistic neutron fields facilities. Measurements with monoenergetic neutron beams of 144 keV, 565 keV, 5 MeV and 17 MeV were performed at the NPL standard Van de Graaff facility. For the characterization of the response functions at higher energies, measurements were done at the Svedberg Laboratory, with 46 MeV and 144 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons. Finally, to demonstrate the suitability of the system for broad cosmic-ray neutron spectra, measurements were performed at the TSL Atmospheric-like Neutrons from thIck TArget (ANITA) and also at the CERN European Realistic Field (CERF) facilities. Data from the realistic spectra were unfolded with the GRAVEL unfolding code and as a whole, a good agreement was found between the experimental and Monte-Carlo calculated neutron fluence energy distributions.

  3. Summary Report: First Research Coordination Meeting on ReferenceDatabase for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; Trkov, Andrej

    2005-10-31

    Potential problems associated with nuclear data for neutronactivation analysis were identified, the scope of the work to beundertaken was defined together with its priorities, and tasks wereassigned to participants. Data testing and measurements refer to gammaspectrum peak evaluations, detector efficiency calibration, neutronspectrum characteristics and reference materials analysis.

  4. Summary Report: First Research Coordination Meeting on ReferenceDatabase for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; Trkov, Andrej

    2005-10-01

    Potential problems associated with nuclear data for neutronactivation analysis were identified, the scope of the work to beundertaken was defined together with its priorities, and tasks wereassigned to participants. Data testing and measurements refer to gammaspectrumpeak evaluations, detector efficiency calibration, neutronspectrum characteristics and reference materials analysis.

  5. Effects of Magnetic Field Topology on Secondary Neutron Spectra in MagLIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbe, Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in Magneto-Inertial Fusion schemes requires both inertial and magnetic confinement of the fuel and charged fusion products. Recent theoretical and experimental work has demonstrated the confinement of charged fusion products by magnetic fields in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments. This confinement can be inferred from the ratio of secondary to primary neutron yields and the shape of secondary neutron spectra. In this work we investigate the effects of magnetic field topology on the shape of secondary neutron spectra. The MagLIF design has a cylindrical geometry and includes both axial and azimuthal magnetic fields. The azimuthal field is initially in the liner surrounding the fuel but instability growth may cause it to penetrate into the fuel. Charged fusion products (such as tritons or alpha particles) that are isotropically emitted and then confined by an axial field will flow parallel and anti-parallel to the field with equal intensities. In the case of tritons, this motion results in a secondary neutron spectrum emitted in the axial direction that is symmetric. However, in an azimuthal field such particles exhibit singular orbits and there is a net ion drift along the axis. This ion drift can cause the secondary neutron spectrum to be asymmetric. We examine the effects on the spectrum shape of confinement by a combination of axial and azimuthal fields.

  6. Estimating field scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, A. M.; Helgason, W. D.; Ireson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to "field scale", integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a two year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 5002 m2 area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field scale surface soil moisture, but accounted for less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (1) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time stable neutron probe monitoring location, (2) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (3) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.004 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.012 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. It is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  7. Estimating field-scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Amber M.; Helgason, Warren D.; Ireson, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological, and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to field scale, integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field-scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth-scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a 2-year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 500 m × 500 m study area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field-scale surface soil moisture, but measurements represented less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (a) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time-stable neutron probe monitoring location, (b) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (c) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.005 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.014 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. Based upon its observed performance and its minimal data requirements, it is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  8. Asymmetric neutrino production in magnetized proto-neutron stars in fully relativistic mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Hidaka, Jun; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Kuroda, Takami; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Ryu, Chung-Yeol; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    We calculate the neutrino production cross-section in the proto-neutron-star matter under a strong magnetic field in the relativistic mean-field approach. We introduce a new parameter-set which can reproduce the 1.96 solar mass neutron star. We find that the production process increases emitted neutrinos along the direction parallel to the magnetic field and decrease those along its opposite direction. It means that resultant asymmetry due to the neutrino absorption and scattering process in the magnetic field becomes larger by the addition of the neutrino production process.

  9. Effects of neutrino emissivity on the cooling of neutron stars in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Eduardo Lenho; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanço

    2015-12-01

    One of the most interesting kind of neutron stars are the pulsars, which are highly magnetized neutron stars with fields up to 1014 G at the surface. The strength of magnetic field in the center of a neutron star remains unknown. According to the scalar virial theorem, magnetic field in the core could be as large as 1018 G. In this work we study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the cooling of neutron stars coming from direct Urca process. Direct Urca process is an extremely efficient mechanism for cooling a neutron star after its formation. The matter is described using a relativistic mean-field model at zero temperature with eight baryons (baryon octet), electrons and muons. We obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density for different magnetic fields. We calculate numerically the cooling of neutron stars for a parametrized magnetic field and compare the results for the case without a magnetic field.

  10. An evaluation of thermal and epithermal neutron activation analysis compton suppression methods for biological reference materials.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S; Wu, D

    1999-01-01

    For neutron activation analysis (NAA), the usual matrix problems of sodium, chlorine, and bromine are well known to give rise to high backgrounds that inhibit the determination of several trace elements for short-lived or medium-lived NAA. For long counting times in long-lived NAA, very low backgrounds are required to achieve good sensitivities. We have investigated the use of thermal and epithermal NAA in conjunction with Compton suppression to determine several elements such as arsenic, antimony, cadmium, and mercury, at the level of a few nanograms. The values of these techniques are discussed in contrast to the standard radiochemical methods. PMID:10676521

  11. Spin precession of slow neutrons in Einstein-Cartan gravity with torsion, chameleon, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. N.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze a spin precession of slow neutrons in the Einstein-Cartan gravity with torsion, chameleon and magnetic field. For the derivation of the Heisenberg equation of motion of the neutron spin we use the effective low-energy potential, derived by Ivanov and Wellenzohn [Phys. Rev. D 92, 125004 (2015)] for slow neutrons, coupled to gravitational, chameleon, and torsion fields to order 1 /m , where m is the neutron mass. In addition to these low-energy interactions we switch on the interaction of slow neutrons with a magnetic field. We show that to linear order approximation with respect to gravitational, chameleon, and torsion fields the Dirac Hamilton operator for fermions (neutrons), moving in spacetimes created by rotating coordinate systems, contains the anti-Hermitian operators of torsion-fermion (neutron) interactions, caused by torsion scalar and tensor space-space-time and time-space-space degrees of freedom. Such anti-Hermitian operators violate C P and T invariance. In the low-energy approximation the C P and T violating torsion-fermion (neutron) interactions appear only to order O (1 /m ). One may assume that in the rotating Universe and galaxies the obtained anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions might be an origin of (i) violation of C P and T invariance in the Universe and (ii) of baryon asymmetry. We show that anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions of relativistic fermions, violating C P and T invariance, (i) cannot be removed by nonunitary transformations of the Dirac fermion wave functions and (ii) are conformal invariant. According to general requirements of conformal invariance of massive particle theories in gravitational fields [see R. H. Dicke, Phys. Rev. 125, 2163 (1962) and A. J. Silenko, Phys. Rev. D 91, 065012 (2015)], conformal invariance of anti-Hermitian torsion-fermion interactions is valid only if the fermion mass is changed by a conformal factor.

  12. Calibration approaches of cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture measurement in cropped fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Baroni, G.; Oswald, S. E.

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose-zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. This study evaluates the applicability of the cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture in cropped fields. Measurements of cosmic-ray neutrons (fast neutrons) were performed at a lowland farmland in Bornim (Brandenburg, Germany) cropped with sunflower and winter rye. Three field calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for cosmic-ray neutron sensing were evaluated in this study. The cosmic-ray sensing (CRS) probe was calibrated against a network of classical point-scale soil moisture measurements. A large CRS parameter variability was observed by choosing calibration periods within the different growing stages of sunflower and winter rye. Therefore, it was not possible to identify a single set of parameters perfectly estimating soil moisture for both sunflower and winter rye periods. On the other hand, CRS signal and its parameter variability could be understood by some crop characteristics and by predicting the attenuated neutrons by crop presence. This study proves the potentiality of the cosmic-ray neutron sensing at the field scale; however, its calibration needs to be adapted for seasonal vegetation in cropped fields.

  13. Performance of a PADC personal neutron dosemeter at simulated and real workplace fields of the nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Fiechtner, A; Boschung, M; Wernli, C

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the EVIDOS (Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields) project, funded by the EC, measurements with PADC personal neutron dosemeters were carried out at several workplace fields of the nuclear industry and at simulated workplace fields. The measured personal neutron dose equivalents of the PADC personal neutron dosemeter are compared with values that were assessed within the EVIDOS project by other partners. The detection limits for different spectra types are given. In cases were the neutron dose was too low to be measured by the PADC personal neutron dosemeter, the response is estimated by convoluting the responses to monoenergetic neutrons with the dose energy distribution measured within EVIDOS. The advantages and limitations of the PADC personal neutron dosemeter are discussed. PMID:17578876

  14. On the Magnetic Field of Pulsars with Realistic Neutron Star Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belvedere, R.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a neutron star model fulfilling global and not local charge neutrality, both in the static and in the uniformly rotating cases. The model is described by the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations, in which all fundamental interactions are accounted for in the framework of general relativity and relativistic mean field theory. Uniform rotation is introduced following Hartle's formalism. We show that the use of realistic parameters of rotating neutron stars, obtained from numerical integration of the self-consistent axisymmetric general relativistic equations of equilibrium, leads to values of the magnetic field and radiation efficiency of pulsars that are very different from estimates based on fiducial parameters that assume a neutron star mass M = 1.4 M ⊙, radius R = 10 km, and moment of inertia I = 1045 g cm2. In addition, we compare and contrast the magnetic field inferred from the traditional Newtonian rotating magnetic dipole model with respect to the one obtained from its general relativistic analog, which takes into account the effect of the finite size of the source. We apply these considerations to the specific high-magnetic field pulsar class and show that, indeed, all of these sources can be described as canonical pulsars driven by the rotational energy of the neutron star, and have magnetic fields lower than the quantum critical field for any value of the neutron star mass.

  15. ON THE MAGNETIC FIELD OF PULSARS WITH REALISTIC NEUTRON STAR CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, R.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Ruffini, R. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2015-01-20

    We have recently developed a neutron star model fulfilling global and not local charge neutrality, both in the static and in the uniformly rotating cases. The model is described by the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-Thomas-Fermi equations, in which all fundamental interactions are accounted for in the framework of general relativity and relativistic mean field theory. Uniform rotation is introduced following Hartle's formalism. We show that the use of realistic parameters of rotating neutron stars, obtained from numerical integration of the self-consistent axisymmetric general relativistic equations of equilibrium, leads to values of the magnetic field and radiation efficiency of pulsars that are very different from estimates based on fiducial parameters that assume a neutron star mass M = 1.4 M {sub ☉}, radius R = 10 km, and moment of inertia I = 10{sup 45} g cm{sup 2}. In addition, we compare and contrast the magnetic field inferred from the traditional Newtonian rotating magnetic dipole model with respect to the one obtained from its general relativistic analog, which takes into account the effect of the finite size of the source. We apply these considerations to the specific high-magnetic field pulsar class and show that, indeed, all of these sources can be described as canonical pulsars driven by the rotational energy of the neutron star, and have magnetic fields lower than the quantum critical field for any value of the neutron star mass.

  16. Elucidating High Field Phases of the Multiferroic MnWO4 with a Pulsed Magnetic Field and Time of Flight Neutron Laue Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Nojiri, H; Yoshii, Shunsuke; Yasui, Motoyoshi; Okada, Kyoko; Matsuda, M.; Santodonato, Louis J; Granroth, Garrett E; Ross, Kathyrn; Carlo, Jeremy P; Gaulin, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    We have combined time-of-flight neutron Laue diffraction and pulsed high magnetic fields at the Spallation Neutron Source to study the phase diagram of the multiferroic material MnWO4. The control of the field-pulse timing enabled an exploration of magnetic Bragg scattering through the time dependence of both the neutron wavelength and the pulsed magnetic field. This allowed us to observe several magnetic Bragg peaks in different field-induced phases of MnWO4 with a single instrument configuration. These phases were not previously amenable to neutron diffraction studies due to the large fields involved.

  17. Gravitationally enhanced depolarization of ultracold neutrons in magnetic-field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, P. G.; Pendlebury, J. M.; Devenish, N. E.

    2014-01-01

    Trapped ultracold neutrons (UCNs) have for many years been the mainstay of experiments to search for the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron, a critical parameter in constraining scenarios of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Because their energies are so low, UCNs preferentially populate the lower region of their physical enclosure and do not sample uniformly the ambient magnetic field throughout the storage volume. This leads to a substantial increase in the rate of depolarization, as well as to shifts in the measured frequency of the stored neutrons. Consequences for EDM measurements are discussed.

  18. Radiative Neutron β-Decay in Effective Field Theory

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Susan; Bernard, Véronique; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Zhang, Chi

    2005-01-01

    We consider radiative β-decay of the neutron in heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. Nucleon-structure effects not encoded in the weak coupling constants gA and gV are determined at next-to-leading order in the chiral expansion, and enter at the O(0.5%)-level, making a sensitive test of the Dirac structure of the weak currents possible. PMID:27308159

  19. APPLICATION OF A "VITURAL FIELD REFERENCE DATABASE" TO ASSESS LAND-COVER MAP ACCURACIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An accuracy assessment was performed for the Neuse River Basin, NC land-cover/use
    (LCLU) mapping results using a "Virtual Field Reference Database (VFRDB)". The VFRDB was developed using field measurement and digital imagery (camera) data collected at 1,409 sites over a perio...

  20. AN ASSESSMENT OF GROUND TRUTH VARIABILITY USING A "VIRTUAL FIELD REFERENCE DATABASE"

    EPA Science Inventory



    A "Virtual Field Reference Database (VFRDB)" was developed from field measurment data that included location and time, physical attributes, flora inventory, and digital imagery (camera) documentation foy 1,01I sites in the Neuse River basin, North Carolina. The sampling f...

  1. A remarkable focusing property of a parabolic mirror for neutrons in the gravitational field: Geometric proof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalovich, S.

    2014-11-01

    An extraordinary focusing property of a parabolic mirror for ultracold neutrons in the presence of the gravitational field was first reported by Steyerl and co-authors. It was shown that all neutrons emitted from the focus of the mirror will be reflected back upon the same focus passing a point of return in the gravitational field in between. The present note offers a complementary geometric proof of this feature and discusses its application to many-mirror systems. The results can also be applied to electrons and ions in an electric field.

  2. Comparison of photon-photon and photon-magnetic field pair production rates. [in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, M. L.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron stars were proposed as the site of gamma-ray burst activity and the copious supply of MeV photons admits the possibility of electron-positron pair production. If the neutron star magnetic field is sufficiently intense (10 to the 12th power G), both photon-photon (2 gamma) and photon-magnetic field (gamma) pair production should be important mechanisms. Rates for the two processes were calculated using a Maxwellian distribution for the photons. The ratio of 1 gamma to 2 gamma pair production rates was obtained as a function of photon temperature and magnetic field strength.

  3. Neutron stars in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model: Mean-field limit versus full field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Vazquez, R.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2015-08-01

    Using a solitonic model of nuclear matter, the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) Skyrme model, we compare neutron stars obtained in the full field theory, where gravitational backreaction is completely taken into account, with calculations in a mean-field approximation using the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff approach. In the latter case, a mean-field-theory equation of state is derived from the original BPS field theory. We show that in the full field theory, where the energy density is nonconstant even at equilibrium, there is no universal and coordinate-independent equation of state of nuclear matter, in contrast to the mean-field approximation. We also study how neutron star properties are modified by going beyond mean-field theory and find that the differences between mean-field theory and exact results can be considerable. Further, we compare both exact and mean-field results with some theoretical and phenomenological constraints on neutron star properties, demonstrating thus the relevance of our model even in its most simple version.

  4. New high field magnet for neutron scattering at Hahn-Meitner Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M.; Tennant, D. A.; Smeibidl, P.

    2006-11-01

    The Berlin Neutron Scattering Center BENSC at the Hahn-Meitner-Institute (HMI) is a user facility for the study of structure and dynamics of condensed matter with neutrons and synchrotron radiation with special emphasis on experiments under extreme conditions. Neutron scattering is uniquely suited to study magnetic properties on a microscopic length scale, because neutrons have comparable wavelengths and, due to their magnetic moment, they interact with the atomic magnetic moments. Magnetic interactions and magnetic phenomena depend on thermodynamic parameters like magnetic field, temperature and pressure. At HMI special efforts are being made to offer outstanding sample environments such as very low temperatures or high magnetic fields or combination of both. For the future a dedicated instrument for neutron scattering at extreme fields is under construction, the Extreme Environment Diffractometer ExED. For this instrument the existing superconducting magnets as well as a future hybrid system can be used. The highest fields, above 30 T will be produced by the planned series-connected hybrid magnet system, designed and constructed in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL.

  5. Possible theoretical explanations for occasional days of non-field-aligned diffusion at neutron monitor energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown previously (Anath et al., 1973 and Kane, 1974) that 20 to 25% of days, the diffusion component of the cosmic-ray neutron diurnal anisotropy is directed more than 30 degrees away from the ecliptic projection of the interplanetary magnetic field averaged over the same 24 hours. A number of explanations for this deviation are discussed and it is concluded that transverse gradient drifts due to gradients perpendicular to the ecliptic are likely, that diurnal variations in the diffusion component of the neutron anisotropy may affect results from single stations and that the 24 hour mean interplanetary magnetic field may not be the field appropriate to the streaming equation at neutron monitor energies.

  6. Quantification of the sensitivity range in neutron dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Betz, B; Harti, R P; Strobl, M; Hovind, J; Kaestner, A; Lehmann, E; Van Swygenhoven, H; Grünzweig, C

    2015-12-01

    In neutron grating interferometry, the dark-field image visualizes the scattering properties of samples in the small-angle and ultra-small-angle scattering range. These angles correspond to correlation lengths from several hundred nanometers up to several tens of micrometers. In this article, we present an experimental study that demonstrates the potential of quantitative neutron dark-field imaging. The dark-field signal for scattering from different particle sizes and concentrations of mono-dispersive polystyrene particles in aqueous solution is compared to theoretical predictions and the good agreement between measurements and calculations underlines the quantitative nature of the measured values and reliability of the technique with neutrons. PMID:26724039

  7. Determination of the gamma-ray spectrum in a strong neutron/gamma-ray mixed field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Lin, Yi-Chun; Nievaart, Sander; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-10-01

    The knowledge of gamma-ray spectrum highly affects the accuracy of the correspondingly derived gamma-ray dose and the correctness of calculated neutron dose in the neutron/gamma-ray mixed field dosimetry when using the paired ionization chambers technique. It is of our interest to develop a method to determine the gamma-ray spectrum in a strong neutron/gamma-ray mixed field. The current type detector, Mg(Ar) ionization chamber with 6 different thick caps incorporated with the unfolding technique, was used to determine the gamma-ray spectrum in the THOR epithermal neutron beam, which contains intense neutrons and gamma rays. The applied caps had nominal thicknesses from 1 to 6 mm. Detector response functions of the applied Mg(Ar) chamber with different caps were calculated using MCNP5 with a validated chamber model. The spectrum unfolding process was performed using the well-known SAND-II algorithm. The unfolded result was found much softer than the originally calculated spectrum at the design stage. A large portion of low energy continuum was shown in the adjusted spectrum. This work gave us a much deeper insight into the THOR epithermal neutron beam and also showed a way to determine the gamma-ray spectrum.

  8. Reference field specification and preliminary beam selection strategy for accelerator-based GCR simulation.

    PubMed

    Slaba, Tony C; Blattnig, Steve R; Norbury, John W; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities and possible biological considerations. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, a preliminary approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. This approach is not a final design for the GCR simulator, but rather a single step within a broader design strategy. It is shown that the beam selection methodology is tied directly to the reference environment, allows facility constraints to be incorporated, and may be adjusted to account for additional constraints imposed by biological or animal care considerations. The major biology questions are not addressed herein but are discussed in a companion paper published in the present issue of this journal. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed

  9. Reference field specification and preliminary beam selection strategy for accelerator-based GCR simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norbury, John W.; Rusek, Adam; La Tessa, Chiara

    2016-02-01

    The galactic cosmic ray (GCR) simulator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) is intended to deliver the broad spectrum of particles and energies encountered in deep space to biological targets in a controlled laboratory setting. In this work, certain aspects of simulating the GCR environment in the laboratory are discussed. Reference field specification and beam selection strategies at NSRL are the main focus, but the analysis presented herein may be modified for other facilities and possible biological considerations. First, comparisons are made between direct simulation of the external, free space GCR field and simulation of the induced tissue field behind shielding. It is found that upper energy constraints at NSRL limit the ability to simulate the external, free space field directly (i.e. shielding placed in the beam line in front of a biological target and exposed to a free space spectrum). Second, variation in the induced tissue field associated with shielding configuration and solar activity is addressed. It is found that the observed variation is likely within the uncertainty associated with representing any GCR reference field with discrete ion beams in the laboratory, given current facility constraints. A single reference field for deep space missions is subsequently identified. Third, a preliminary approach for selecting beams at NSRL to simulate the designated reference field is presented. This approach is not a final design for the GCR simulator, but rather a single step within a broader design strategy. It is shown that the beam selection methodology is tied directly to the reference environment, allows facility constraints to be incorporated, and may be adjusted to account for additional constraints imposed by biological or animal care considerations. The major biology questions are not addressed herein but are discussed in a companion paper published in the present issue of this journal. Drawbacks of the proposed methodology are discussed

  10. SU-E-T-471: Small Field Jaw/MLC Reference Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J; Alvarez, P; Followill, D; Lowenstein, J; Molineu, A; Summers, P; Kry, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In recent years the need for small field data of MLCs has increased due to the use of intensity-modulated radiation (IMRT), but moreover the use of stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) has increased, which uses not simply small field sizes, but small jaw and field sizes together. Having reference data for these small fields that is reliable would be invaluable to the physics community. Our study has gathered these values and the data distributions from the Radiological Physics Center's (RPC) site visits between 1990 and the present. Methods: For all measurements, the RPC used a 25 × 25 × 25cm water phantom placed at 100cm SSD. All measurements were made with an Exradin A16 cylindrical ion chamber at an effective depth of 10 cm. A total of 42 Varian machine measurements were used to compose the data for a 6 MV beam and 5 TrueBeam 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) beams were used for FFF data. Results: Jaw/MLC fields were measured for both 6 MV and 6 MF FFF beams with the jaws and MLCs both at the following field sizes: 6×6, 4×4, 3×3, and 2×2cm. Measurements were normalized to the 10×10 field readings (defined by the jaws and MLC). Spread in the data was minimal and demonstrates a high level of accuracy of acquired data. Conclusion: Small field Jaw/MLC reference data for Varian 6MV and 6 MV FFF beams has been analyzed and presented here, composed of the aggregation of numerous RPC site visits. Obtaining reliable small field data remains difficult, however the RPC has collected high fidelity small field Jaw/MLC data. The data are presented as a reference along with their distributions, in such a way that the physicist can act based upon their own desired agreement with the reference data.

  11. Benchmarking of activation reaction distribution in an intermediate energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Morev, Mikhail N; Hirota, Masahiro; Abe, Takuya; Koike, Yuya; Iwai, Satoshi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction rate depth profiles inside concrete shield irradiated by intermediate energy neutron were calculated using a Monte-Carlo code and compared with an experiment. An irradiation field of intermediate neutron produced in the forward direction from a thick (stopping length) target bombarded by 400 MeV nucleon(-1) carbon ions was arranged at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. Ordinary concrete shield of 90 cm thickness was installed 50 cm downstream the iron target. Activation detectors of aluminum, gold and gold covered with cadmium were inserted at various depths. Irradiated samples were extracted after exposure and gamma-ray spectrometry was performed for each sample. Comparison of experimental and calculated shows good agreement for both low- and high-energy neutron-induced reaction except for (27)Al(n,X)(24)Na reaction at the surface. PMID:21515619

  12. Investigation of the Neutron Quantum States in the Earth’s Gravitational Field

    PubMed Central

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petukhov, A. K.; Börner, H. G.; Baranova, T. A.; Gagarski, A. M.; Petrov, G. A.; Protasov, K. V.; Voronin, A. Yu.; Baeßler, S.; Abele, H.; Westphal, A.; Lucovac, L.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the neutron quantum states in the potential well formed by the Earth’s gravitational field and a horizontal mirror. The estimated characteristic sizes of the neutron wave functions in two lowest quantum states correspond to their expectations with an accuracy of ≈25 %. The spatial density distribution in a standing neutron wave above a mirror was measured for a set of a few lowest quantum states. A position-sensitive neutron detector with an extra high spatial resolution of 1 μm to 2 μm was developed and tested for this particular task. Although this experiment was not designed or optimized to search for an additional short-range force, nevertheless it allowed us to slightly improve the published boundary in the nanometer range of characteristic distances. We studied systematical uncertainties in the chosen “flow-through” method as well as the feasibility to improve further the accuracy in this experiment. PMID:27308133

  13. Accessing Interior Vector Magnetic Field Components in Neutron EDM Experiments via Boundary Value Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaster, Brad

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new technique for the determination and monitoring of the interior vector magnetic field components during the operation of neutron EDM experiments. If a suitable three-dimensional volume surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined which contains no interior currents or magnetization, each of the interior vector field components will satisfy the Laplace Equation within this volume. Therefore, if the field components can be measured on the boundary, the interior vector field components can be determined uniquely via numerical solution of the Laplace Equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the magnetic field components and magnetic field gradients in the fiducial volumes of neutron EDM experiments.

  14. Slowly rotating neutron stars in scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.; Doneva, Daniela D.; Popchev, Dimitar

    2016-04-01

    In the scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field, the coupling constants, and the coupling functions in general, which are observationally allowed, can differ significantly from those in the massless case. This fact naturally implies that the scalar-tensor neutron stars with a massive scalar field can have rather different structure and properties in comparison with their counterparts in the massless case and in general relativity. In the present paper, we study slowly rotating neutron stars in scalar-tensor theories with a massive gravitational scalar. Two examples of scalar-tensor theories are examined—the first example is the massive Brans-Dicke theory and the second one is a massive scalar-tensor theory indistinguishable from general relativity in the weak-field limit. In the latter case, we study the effect of the scalar field mass on the spontaneous scalarization of neutron stars. Our numerical results show that the inclusion of a mass term for the scalar field indeed changes the picture drastically compared to the massless case. It turns out that mass, radius, and moment of inertia for neutron stars in massive scalar-tensor theories can differ drastically from the pure general relativistic solutions if sufficiently large masses of the scalar field are considered.

  15. Field-theory calculation of the electric dipole moment of the neutron and paramagnetic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, S. A.; Griffith, J.; Sapirstein, J.

    2012-07-01

    Electric dipole moments (edms) of bound states that arise from the constituents having edms are studied with field-theoretic techniques. The systems treated are the neutron and a set of paramagnetic atoms. In the latter case it is well known that the atomic edm differs greatly from the electron edm when the internal electric fields of the atom are taken into account. In the nonrelativistic limit these fields lead to a complete suppression, but for heavy atoms large enhancement factors are present. A general bound-state field theory approach applicable to both the neutron and paramagnetic atoms is set up. It is applied first to the neutron, treating the quarks as moving freely in a confining spherical well. It is shown that the effect of internal electric fields is small in this case. The atomic problem is then revisited using field-theory techniques in place of the usual Hamiltonian methods, and the atomic enhancement factor is shown to be consistent with previous calculations. Possible application of bound-state techniques to other sources of the neutron edm is discussed.

  16. Crystal-field levels in UBr 3 determined by neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murasik, A.; Furrer, A.; Szczepaniak, W.

    1980-03-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments have been performed in UBr 3 in order to determine the crystal-field levels. Four transitions between the ground state and all excited states have been observed, thus the crystal-field level scheme could be unambigously assigned. The Russell-Saunders coupling scheme has been used to derive the crystal-field parameters which cannot be accounted for by a simple point charge calculation.

  17. Inelastic neutron scattering investigation of crystal-field splittings in UBr 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murasik, A.; Furrer, A.

    1980-10-01

    An inelastic neutron scattering technique was used to measure the crystal-field splittings in UBr 3 at various temperatures and momentum transfers. In the interpretation of the observed energy spectra it turns out that the Russell-Saunders coupling scheme is a reasonable approximation. The crystal-field level scheme could be unambiguously assigned. The detailed nature of the crystal-field transition from the ground state to the first-excited state is not yet fully understood.

  18. Signatures of field induced spin polarization of neutron star matter in seismic vibrations of paramagnetic neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrukov, S. I.; Yang, J.; Podgainy, D. V.; Weber, F.

    2003-04-01

    A macroscopic model of the dissipative magneto-elastic dynamics of viscous spin polarized nuclear matter is discussed in the context of seismic activity of a paramagnetic neutron star. The source of the magnetic field of such a star is attributed to Pauli paramagnetism of baryon matter promoted by a seed magnetic field frozen into the star in the process of gravitational collapse of a massive progenitor. Particular attention is given to the effect of shear viscosity of incompressible stellar material on the timing of non-radial torsional magneto-elastic pulsations of the star triggered by starquakes. By accentuating the fact that this kind of vibration is unique to the seismology of a paramagnetic neutron star we show that the high-frequency modes decay faster than the low-frequency modes. The obtained analytic expressions for the period and relaxation time of this mode, in which the magnetic susceptibility and viscosity enter as input parameters, are then quantified by numerical estimates for these parameters taken from early and current works on transport coefficients of dense matter. It is found that the effect of viscosity is crucial for the lifetime of magneto-torsion vibrations but it does not appreciably affect the periods of this seismic mode which fall in the realm of periods of pulsed emission of soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous x-ray pulsars - young super-magnetized neutron stars, radiating, according to the magnetar model, at the expense of the magnetic energy release. Finally, we present arguments that the long periodic pulsed emission of these stars in a quiescent regime of radiation can be interpreted as a manifestation of weakly damped seismic magneto-torsion vibrations exhibiting the field induced spin polarization of baryon matter.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of the operational quantities at the realistic mixed neutron-photon radiation fields CANEL and SIGMA.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, V; Gressier, V

    2007-01-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety owns two facilities producing realistic mixed neutron-photon radiation fields, CANEL, an accelerator driven moderator modular device, and SIGMA, a graphite moderated americium-beryllium assembly. These fields are representative of some of those encountered at nuclear workplaces, and the corresponding facilities are designed and used for calibration of various instruments, such as survey meters, personal dosimeters or spectrometric devices. In the framework of the European project EVIDOS, irradiations of personal dosimeters were performed at CANEL and SIGMA. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to estimate the reference values of the personal dose equivalent at both facilities. The Hp(10) values were calculated for three different angular positions, 0 degrees, 45 degrees and 75 degrees, of an ICRU phantom located at the position of irradiation. PMID:17578872

  20. Quantitative Neutron Dark-field Imaging through Spin-Echo Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, Markus; Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Kaestner, Anders; Pappas, Catherine; Habicht, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Neutron dark-field imaging constitutes a seminal progress in the field of neutron imaging as it combines real space resolution capability with information provided by one of the most significant neutron scattering techniques, namely small angle scattering. The success of structural characterizations bridging the gap between macroscopic and microscopic features has been enabled by the introduction of grating interferometers so far. The induced interference pattern, a spatial beam modulation, allows for mapping of small-angle scattering signals and hence addressing microstructures beyond direct spatial resolution of the imaging system with high efficiency. However, to date the quantification in the small angle scattering regime is severely limited by the monochromatic approach. To overcome such drawback we here introduce an alternative and more flexible method of interferometric beam modulation utilizing a spin-echo technique. This novel method facilitates straightforward quantitative dark-field neutron imaging, i.e. the required quantitative microstructural characterization combined with real space image resolution. For the first time quantitative microstructural reciprocal space information from small angle neutron scattering becomes available together with macroscopic image information creating the potential to quantify several orders of magnitude in structure sizes simultaneously. PMID:26560644

  1. Quantitative Neutron Dark-field Imaging through Spin-Echo Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Strobl, Markus; Sales, Morten; Plomp, Jeroen; Bouwman, Wim G; Tremsin, Anton S; Kaestner, Anders; Pappas, Catherine; Habicht, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Neutron dark-field imaging constitutes a seminal progress in the field of neutron imaging as it combines real space resolution capability with information provided by one of the most significant neutron scattering techniques, namely small angle scattering. The success of structural characterizations bridging the gap between macroscopic and microscopic features has been enabled by the introduction of grating interferometers so far. The induced interference pattern, a spatial beam modulation, allows for mapping of small-angle scattering signals and hence addressing microstructures beyond direct spatial resolution of the imaging system with high efficiency. However, to date the quantification in the small angle scattering regime is severely limited by the monochromatic approach. To overcome such drawback we here introduce an alternative and more flexible method of interferometric beam modulation utilizing a spin-echo technique. This novel method facilitates straightforward quantitative dark-field neutron imaging, i.e. the required quantitative microstructural characterization combined with real space image resolution. For the first time quantitative microstructural reciprocal space information from small angle neutron scattering becomes available together with macroscopic image information creating the potential to quantify several orders of magnitude in structure sizes simultaneously. PMID:26560644

  2. Field ionization characteristics of an ion source array for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    B. Bargsten Johnson; P. R. Schwoebel; P. J. Resnick; C. E. Holland; L. Hertz; D. L. Chichester

    2013-11-01

    A new deuterium ion source is being developed to improve the performance of existing compact neutron generators. The ion source is a microfabricated array of metal tips with an integrated gate (i.e., grid) and produces deuterium ions by field ionizing (or field desorbing) a supply of deuterium gas. Deuterium field ion currents from arrays at source temperatures of 77?K and 293?K are studied. Ion currents from single etched-wire tips operating under the same conditions are used to help understand array results. I-F characteristics of the arrays were found to follow trends similar to those of the better understood single etched-wire tip results; however, the fields achieved by the arrays are limited by electrical breakdown of the structure. Neutron production by field ionization at 293?K was demonstrated for the first time from microfabricated array structures with integrated gates.

  3. Field ionization characteristics of an ion source array for neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Bargsten Johnson, B.; Schwoebel, P. R.; Resnick, P. J.; Holland, C. E.; Hertz, K. L.; Chichester, D. L.

    2013-11-07

    A new deuterium ion source is being developed to improve the performance of existing compact neutron generators. The ion source is a microfabricated array of metal tips with an integrated gate (i.e., grid) and produces deuterium ions by field ionizing (or field desorbing) a supply of deuterium gas. Deuterium field ion currents from arrays at source temperatures of 77 K and 293 K are studied. Ion currents from single etched-wire tips operating under the same conditions are used to help understand array results. I-F characteristics of the arrays were found to follow trends similar to those of the better understood single etched-wire tip results; however, the fields achieved by the arrays are limited by electrical breakdown of the structure. Neutron production by field ionization at 293 K was demonstrated for the first time from microfabricated array structures with integrated gates.

  4. Exploring the Magnetic field and Black Hole Spin in Black Hole--Neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Sarvnipun; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Megevand, Miguel; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    A sizable magnetic field in neutron star-black hole binaries can have a strong influence on the merger dynamics of the fluid by redistributing angular momentum through different mechanisms. The magnetic field can also be responsible for collimating jets. BH spin can increase the number of orbits before merger as compared to a binary with a non-spinning BH. The corresponding decrease in ISCO can alter the tidal disruption suffered by the NS. We present results of fully relativistic black hole--neutron star simulations proceeding from quasi-circular initial data generated with the Lorene libraries. We explore the effect of magnetic field and spin by evolving four sets of nearly identical initial data which differ in their magnetic field and spin values. We examine the gravitational wave signature through direct simulation. Finally, we compare the fluid structure and explore the magnetic field configuration in the post-merger remnant disk. )

  5. Comparison of DD, DT and Cf-252 neutron excitation of light and medium mass nuclei for field PGNAA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabury, E. H.; Blackburn, B. W.; Chichester, D. L.; Wharton, C. J.; Caffrey, A. J.

    2007-08-01

    Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron activation analysis can offer significant cost and safety advantages in the identification of explosives and toxic chemicals. As an example, the US military examined over a thousand suspect chemical munitions with Idaho National Laboratory's PINS Chemical Assay System last year. PGNAA requires, of course, a neutron source to excite the atomic nuclei of the item under test via neutron capture and inelastic neutron scattering reactions and the choice of neutron source can drastically affect PGNAA system performance. We have carried out Monte Carlo and laboratory experiments comparing DD, DT and Cf-252 neutrons incident on light and medium mass chemical elements, toward optimizing the design of future neutron-generator-based PGNAA systems for field use. We report the excitation of (n, γ) and (n, n‧) gamma rays from these elements by each type of neutron source.

  6. Neutron production using a pyroelectric driven target coupled with a gated field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J. L.; Tang, V.; Falabella, S.; Naranjo, B.; Putterman, S.

    2013-04-19

    A palm sized, portable neutron source would be useful for widespread implementation of detection systems for shielded, special nuclear material. We present progress towards the development of the components for an ultracompact neutron generator using a pulsed, meso-scale field ionization source, a deuterated (or tritiated) titanium target driven by a negative high voltage lithium tantalate crystal. Neutron production from integrated tests using an ion source with a single, biased tungsten tip and a 3 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm, vacuum insulated crystal with a plastic deuterated target are presented. Component testing of the ion source with a single tip produces up to 3 nA of current. Dielectric insulation of the lithium tantalate crystals appears to reduce flashover, which should improve the robustness. The field emission losses from a 3 cm diameter crystal with a plastic target and 6 cm diameter crystal with a metal target are compared.

  7. Religious Studies: The Shaping of a Field and a Guide to Reference Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippy, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the development of religious studies as an academic discipline. Examines the work of leading thinkers in the field, including anthropologists Sir James Fraser and Edward Burnett Taylor, sociologist Max Weber, and psychologist Erik Erikson. Identifies some of the many reference works that deal with religious studies. (SG)

  8. Researching Refugee and Forced Migration Studies: An Introduction to the Field and the Reference Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Elisa

    1999-01-01

    Describes the evolution of refugee and forced migration studies, identifies factors that render it a challenging field to research, and highlights a variety of Internet-based and other electronic resources that can be used to locate monographs, periodicals, grey literature, and current information. Provides a bibliography of reference materials in…

  9. Four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars in the weak-field limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, Joseph; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    The opportunity to study physics at supra-nuclear densities through x-ray observations of neutron stars has led to in-depth investigations of certain approximately universal relations that can remove degeneracies in pulse profile models. One such set of relations, the three-hair relations, were found to hold in neutron stars that rotate rigidly, but neutron stars can also rotate differentially, as is the case for proto-neutron stars and hypermassive transient remnants of binary mergers. We extend the three-hair relations to differentially rotating stars for the first time with a generic rotation law using two approximations: a weak-field scheme (an expansion in powers of the neutron star compactness) and a perturbative differential rotation scheme (an expansion about rigid rotation). The resulting relations include the fourth moment, hence deemed the four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars, and are found to be approximately independent of the equation of state to a higher degree than the three-hair relations for uniformly rotating stars. Our results can be instrumental in the development of four-hair relations for rapidly differentially rotating stars in full general relativity using numerical simulations.

  10. Evaluation of models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) comprises a definitive main-field model for 1985.0, a main-field model for 1990.0, and a forecast secular-variation model for the period 1990-1995. The five 1985.0 main-field models and five 1990.0 main-field models that were proposed have been evaluated by comparing them with one another, with magnetic observatory data, and with Project MAGNET aerial survey data. The comparisons indicate that the main-field models proposed by IZMIRAN, and the secular-variation model proposed jointly by the British Geological Survey and the US Naval Oceanographic Office, should be assigned relatively lower weight in the derivation of the new IGRF models. -Author

  11. Dependence of TLD thermoluminescence yield on absorbed dose in a thermal neutron field.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Roy, M S

    1997-01-01

    The emission from 6LiF and 7LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) exposed to the mixed field of thermal neutrons and gamma-rays of the thermal facility of a TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor has been investigated for various thermal neutron fluences of the order of magnitude of those utilised in radiotherapy, with the purpose of investigating the reliability of TLD readouts in such radiation fields and of giving some information for better obtainment of the absorbed dose values. The emission after exposure in this mixed field is compared with the emission after gamma-rays only. The glow curves have been deconvoluted into gaussian peaks, and the differences in the characteristics of the peaks observed for the two radiation fields, having different linear energy transfers, and for different doses are shown. Irreversible radiation damage in dosimeters having high sensitivity to thermal neutrons is also reported, showing a memory effect of the previous thermal neutron irradiation history which is not restored by anneal treatment. PMID:9463872

  12. Magnetic Field R&D for the neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammei, Russell R.

    2014-09-01

    The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. Supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Canada Research Chairs program.

  13. Extension of the VITESS polarized neutron suite towards the use of imported magnetic field distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoshin, S.; Rubtsov, A.; Bodnarchuk, V.; Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.

    2014-07-01

    Latest developments of the polarized neutron suite in the VITESS simulation package allowed for simulations of time-dependent spin handling devices (e.g. radio-frequency (RF) flippers, adiabatic gradient RF-flippers) and the instrumentation built upon them (NRSE, SESANS, MIEZE, etc.). However, till now the magnetic field distribution in such devices have been considered as "ideal" (sinusoidal, triangular or rectangular), when the main practical interest is in the use of arbitrary magnetic field distributions (either obtained by the field mapping or by FEM calculations) that may significantly influence the performance of real polarized neutron instruments and is the key issue in the practical use of the simulation packages. Here we describe modified VITESS modules opening the possibility to load the magnetic field 3-dimensional space map from an external source (file). Such a map can be either obtained by direct measurements or calculated by dedicated FEM programs (such as ANSYS, MagNet, Maxwell or similar). The successful use of these new modules is demonstrated by a very good agreement of neutron polarimetric experiments with performance of the spin turner with rotating magnetic field and an adiabatic gradient RF-flipper simulated by VITESS using calculated 3-dimensional field maps (using MagNet) and magnetic field mapping, respectively.

  14. HYPERCRITICAL ACCRETION ONTO A NEWBORN NEUTRON STAR AND MAGNETIC FIELD SUBMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Cristian G.; Page, Dany; Lee, William H. E-mail: page@astro.unam.mx

    2013-06-20

    We present magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the late post-supernova hypercritical accretion to understand its effect on the magnetic field of the newborn neutron star. We consider as an example the case of a magnetic field loop protruding from the star's surface. The accreting matter is assumed to be non-magnetized, and, due to the high accretion rate, matter pressure dominates over magnetic pressure. We find that an accretion envelope develops very rapidly, and once it becomes convectively stable, the magnetic field is easily buried and pushed into the newly forming neutron star crust. However, for low enough accretion rates the accretion envelope remains convective for an extended period of time and only partial submergence of the magnetic field occurs due to a residual field that is maintained at the interface between the forming crust and the convective envelope. In this latter case, the outcome should be a weakly magnetized neutron star with a likely complicated field geometry. In our simulations we find the transition from total to partial submergence to occur around M-dot {approx}10 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Back-diffusion of the submerged magnetic field toward the surface, and the resulting growth of the dipolar component, may result in a delayed switch-on of a pulsar on timescales of centuries to millennia.

  15. Development and application of setup for ac magnetic field in neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Klimko, Sergey; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P; Zabel, Hartmut

    2010-10-01

    We report on a new setup developed for neutron scattering experiments in periodically alternating magnetic fields at the sample position. The assembly consisting of rf generator, amplifier, wide band transformer, and resonance circuit. It allows to generate homogeneous ac magnetic fields over a volume of a few cm(3) and variable within a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. The applicability of the device is exemplified by ac polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR): a new method established to probe remagnetization kinetics in soft ferromagnetic films. Test experiments with iron films demonstrate that the ac field within the accessible range of frequencies and amplitudes produces a dramatic effect on the PNR signal. This shows that the relevant ac field parameters generated by the device match well with the scales involved in the remagnetization processes. Other possible applications of the rf unit are briefly discussed. PMID:21034083

  16. Development and application of setup for ac magnetic field in neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Klimko, Sergey; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P.; Zabel, Hartmut

    2010-10-15

    We report on a new setup developed for neutron scattering experiments in periodically alternating magnetic fields at the sample position. The assembly consisting of rf generator, amplifier, wide band transformer, and resonance circuit. It allows to generate homogeneous ac magnetic fields over a volume of a few cm{sup 3} and variable within a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. The applicability of the device is exemplified by ac polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR): a new method established to probe remagnetization kinetics in soft ferromagnetic films. Test experiments with iron films demonstrate that the ac field within the accessible range of frequencies and amplitudes produces a dramatic effect on the PNR signal. This shows that the relevant ac field parameters generated by the device match well with the scales involved in the remagnetization processes. Other possible applications of the rf unit are briefly discussed.

  17. Constraints on Neutron Star Radii Based on Chiral Effective Field Theory Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hebeler, K.; Lattimer, J. M.; Pethick, C. J.; Schwenk, A.

    2010-10-15

    We show that microscopic calculations based on chiral effective field theory interactions constrain the properties of neutron-rich matter below nuclear densities to a much higher degree than is reflected in commonly used equations of state. Combined with observed neutron star masses, our results lead to a radius R=9.7-13.9 km for a 1.4M{sub {center_dot}} star, where the theoretical range is due, in about equal amounts, to uncertainties in many-body forces and to the extrapolation to high densities.

  18. Neutron field for activation experiments in horizontal channel of training reactor VR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanik, Milan; Katovsky, Karel; Vins, Miroslav; Soltes, Jaroslav; Zavorka, Lukas

    2014-11-01

    The experimental channels of nuclear reactors often serve for nuclear data measurement and validation. The dosimetry-foils activation technique was employed to measure neutron field parameters in the horizontal radial channel of the training reactor VR-1, and to test the possibility of using the reactor for scientific purposes. The reaction rates, energy spectral indexes, and neutron spectrum at several irradiation positions of the experimental channel were determined. The experimental results show the feasibility of the radial channel for irradiating experiments and open new possibilities for data validation by using this nuclear facility.

  19. Neutron Imaging and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Ian S; McGreevy, Robert L; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2009-04-01

    Neutron Imaging and Applications offers an introduction to the basics of neutron beam production and instrumentation in addition to the wide scope of techniques that provide unique imaging capabilities over a broad and diverse range of applications. An instructional overview of neutron sources, optics and detectors, allows readers to delve more deeply into the discussions of radiography, tomography, phase contrast imaging and prospective applications using advanced neutron holography techniques and polarized beams. A section devoted to overviews in a growing range of applications describes imaging of fuel cells and hydrogen storage devices for a robust hydrogen economy; new directions in material science and engineering; the investigation of precious artifacts of cultural heritage importance; determination of plant physiology and growth processes; imaging of biological tissues and macromolecules, and the practical elements of neutron imaging for homeland security and contraband detection. Written by key experts in the field, researchers and engineers involved with imaging technologies will find Neutron Imaging and Applications a valuable reference.

  20. Sensitivity Reach of the Neutron EDM Experiment: The Electric Field Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Cooper, M.; Currie, S. A.; Makela, M. F.; Ramsey, J. C.; Tajima, S.; Womack, T. L.; Long, J. C.; Stanislaus, S.

    2010-08-04

    The search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron tests physics beyond the Standard Model such as new sources of CP-violation and Supersymmetry. The nEDM experiment aims to improve the sensitivity on the current limit of the electric dipole moment of the neutron to <10{sup -27} e{center_dot}cm. The experiment will use a flux of Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCNs) produced and stored in a bath of superfluid He-II. A change in precession frequency is expected for a non-zero EDM when an electric field is applied parallel and antiparallel to a magnetic field across the neutron storage cell. A dominant parameter in terms of reducing the statistical uncertainty of this measurement is the strength of the applied electric field. An experiment to measure if superfluid He-II can sustain up to 50 kV/cm for a volume and electrode spacings comparable to the nEDM experiment has been constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists in a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter central volume inside a suitable cryostat that in turn is connected to a dilution refrigerator unit. A description of test runs and the status of the experiment is presented.

  1. Sensitivity Reach of the Neutron EDM Experiment: The Electric Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Cooper, M.; Currie, S. A.; Makela, M. F.; Ramsey, J. C.; Tajima, S.; Womack, T. L.; Long, J. C.; Stanislaus, S.

    2010-08-01

    The search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron tests physics beyond the Standard Model such as new sources of CP-violation and Supersymmetry. The nEDM experiment aims to improve the sensitivity on the current limit of the electric dipole moment of the neutron to <10-27 eṡcm. The experiment will use a flux of Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCNs) produced and stored in a bath of superfluid He-II. A change in precession frequency is expected for a non-zero EDM when an electric field is applied parallel and antiparallel to a magnetic field across the neutron storage cell. A dominant parameter in terms of reducing the statistical uncertainty of this measurement is the strength of the applied electric field. An experiment to measure if superfluid He-II can sustain up to 50 kV/cm for a volume and electrode spacings comparable to the nEDM experiment has been constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists in a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter central volume inside a suitable cryostat that in turn is connected to a dilution refrigerator unit. A description of test runs and the status of the experiment is presented.

  2. Magnetic field dependence of the neutron spin resonance in CeB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnichenko, P. Y.; Demishev, S. V.; Semeno, A. V.; Ohta, H.; Cameron, A. S.; Surmach, M. A.; Jang, H.; Friemel, G.; Dukhnenko, A. V.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Filipov, V. B.; Schneidewind, A.; Ollivier, J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Inosov, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    In zero magnetic field, the famous neutron spin resonance in the f -electron superconductor CeCoIn5 is similar to the recently discovered exciton peak in the nonsuperconducting CeB6. A magnetic field splits the resonance in CeCoIn5 into two components, indicating that it is a doublet. Here we employ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to scrutinize the field dependence of spin fluctuations in CeB6. The exciton shows a markedly different behavior without any field splitting. Instead, we observe a second field-induced magnon whose energy increases with field. At the ferromagnetic zone center, however, we find only a single mode with a nonmonotonic field dependence. At low fields, it is initially suppressed to zero together with the antiferromagnetic order parameter, but then reappears at higher fields inside the hidden-order phase, following the energy of an electron spin resonance (ESR). This is a unique example of a ferromagnetic resonance in a heavy-fermion metal seen by both ESR and INS consistently over a broad range of magnetic fields.

  3. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H *(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H *(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy‑1 was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H *(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy‑1 at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to thermal

  4. A comprehensive spectrometry study of a stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Mares, Vladimir; Romero-Expósito, Maite; Farah, Jad; Trinkl, Sebastian; Domingo, Carles; Dommert, Martin; Stolarczyk, Liliana; Van Ryckeghem, Laurent; Wielunski, Marek; Olko, Pawel; Harrison, Roger M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the stray neutron radiation field in scanning proton therapy considering a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom and a clinically-relevant beam condition. Using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry systems (ERBSS), Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group measured neutron spectra at ten different positions around a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom irradiated for a brain tumor with a scanning proton beam. This study compares the different systems and unfolding codes as well as neutron spectra measured in similar conditions around a water tank phantom. The ten spectra measured with two ERBSS systems show a generally similar thermal component regardless of the position around the phantom while high energy neutrons (above 20 MeV) were only registered at positions near the beam axis (at 0°, 329° and 355°). Neutron spectra, fluence and ambient dose equivalent, H (*)(10), values of both systems were in good agreement (<15%) while the unfolding code proved to have a limited effect. The highest H (*)(10) value of 2.7 μSv Gy(-1) was measured at 329° to the beam axis and 1.63 m from the isocenter where high-energy neutrons (E  ⩾  20 MeV) contribute with about 53%. The neutron mapping within the gantry room showed that H (*)(10) values significantly decreased with distance and angular position with respect to the beam axis dropping to 0.52 μSv Gy(-1) at 90° and 3.35 m. Spectra at angles of 45° and 135° with respect to the beam axis measured here with an anthropomorphic phantom showed a similar peak structure at the thermal, fast and high energy range as in the previous water-tank experiments. Meanwhile, at 90°, small differences at the high-energy range were observed. Using ERBSS systems, neutron spectra mapping was performed to characterize the exposure of scanning proton therapy patients. The ten measured spectra provide precise information about the exposure of healthy organs to

  5. Inelastic neutron scttering study o fcrystal field levels in PrOs4As12

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Songxue; Dai, Pengcheng; Barnes, Ted {F E }; Kang, H. J.; Lynn, J. W.; Ye, Feng; Maple, M. B.

    2008-01-01

    We use neutron scattering to study the Pr$^{3+}$ crystalline electric field (CEF) excitations in the filled skutterudite PrOs$_4$As$_{12}$. By comparing the observed levels and their strengths under neutron excitation with the theoretical spectrum and neutron excitation intensities, we identify the Pr$^{3+}$ CEF levels, and show that the ground state is a magnetic $\\Gamma_4^{(2)}$ triplet, and the excited states $\\Gamma_1$, $\\Gamma_4^{(1)}$ and $\\Gamma_{23}$ are at 0.4, 13 and 23~meV, respectively. A comparison of the observed CEF levels in PrOs$_4$As$_{12}$ with the heavy fermion superconductor PrOs$_4$Sb$_{12}$ reveals the microscopic origin of the differences in the ground states of these two filled skutterudites.

  6. Neutron field parameter measurements on the JET tokamak by means of super-heated fluid detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gherendi, M.; Craciunescu, T.; Pantea, A.; Zoita, V. L.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Baltog, I.; Edlington, T.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S.; Murari, A.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    The neutron field parameters (fluence and energy distribution) at a specific location outside the JET Torus Hall have been measured by means of super-heated fluid detectors (or 'bubble detectors') in combination with an independent, time-of-flight, technique. The bubble detector assemblies were placed at the end of a vertical line of sight at about 16 m from the tokamak mid plane. Spatial distributions of the neutron fluence along the radial and toroidal directions have been obtained using two-dimensional arrays of bubble detectors. Using a set of three bubble detector spectrometers the neutron energy distribution was determined over a broad energy range, from about 10 keV to above 10 MeV, with an energy resolution of about 30% at 2.5 MeV. The very broad energy response allowed for the identification of energy features far from the main fusion component (around 2.45 MeV for deuterium discharges).

  7. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makishima, K.

    2016-05-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1?7) × 10^8 T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states.

  8. Exterior field of slowly and rapidly rotating neutron stars: Rehabilitating spacetime metrics involving hyperextreme objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manko, V. S.; Ruiz, E.

    2016-05-01

    The 4-parameter exact solution presumably describing the exterior gravitational field of a generic neutron star is presented in a concise explicit form defined by only three potentials. In the equatorial plane, the metric functions of the solution are found to be given by particularly simple expressions that make them very suitable for the use in concrete applications. Following Pappas and Apostolatos, we perform a comparison of the multipole structure of the solution with the multipole moments of the known physically realistic Berti-Stergioulas numerical models of neutron stars to argue that the hyperextreme sectors of the solution are not less (but are possibly even more) important for the correct description of rapidly rotating neutron stars than the subextreme sector involving exclusively the black-hole constituents. We have also worked out in explicit form an exact analog of the well-known Hartle-Thorne approximate metric.

  9. Neutron field parameter measurements on the JET tokamak by means of super-heated fluid detectors.

    PubMed

    Gherendi, M; Zoita, V L; Craciunescu, T; Johnson, M Gatu; Pantea, A; Baltog, I; Edlington, T; Hellesen, C; Kiptily, V; Conroy, S; Murari, A; Popovichev, S

    2012-10-01

    The neutron field parameters (fluence and energy distribution) at a specific location outside the JET Torus Hall have been measured by means of super-heated fluid detectors (or "bubble detectors") in combination with an independent, time-of-flight, technique. The bubble detector assemblies were placed at the end of a vertical line of sight at about 16 m from the tokamak mid plane. Spatial distributions of the neutron fluence along the radial and toroidal directions have been obtained using two-dimensional arrays of bubble detectors. Using a set of three bubble detector spectrometers the neutron energy distribution was determined over a broad energy range, from about 10 keV to above 10 MeV, with an energy resolution of about 30% at 2.5 MeV. The very broad energy response allowed for the identification of energy features far from the main fusion component (around 2.45 MeV for deuterium discharges). PMID:23130800

  10. Four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars in the weak-field limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, Joseph; Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-10-01

    The opportunity to study physics at supra-nuclear densities through x-ray observations of neutron stars has led to in-depth investigations of certain approximately universal relations that can remove degeneracies in pulse profile models. One such set of relations determines all of the multipole moments of a neutron star just from the first three (the mass monopole, the current dipole and the mass quadrupole moment) approximately independently of the equation of state. These three-hair relations were found to hold in neutron stars that rotate rigidly, as is the case in old pulsars, but neutron stars can also rotate differentially, as is the case for proto-neutron stars and hypermassive transient remnants of binary mergers. We here extend the three-hair relations to differentially rotating stars for the first time with a generic rotation law using two approximations: a weak-field scheme (an expansion in powers of the neutron star compactness) and a perturbative differential rotation scheme (an expansion about rigid rotation). These approximations allow us to analytically derive approximately universal relations that allow us to determine all of the multipole moments of a (perturbative) differentially rotating star in terms of only the first four moments. These new four-hair relations for differentially rotating neutron stars are found to be approximately independent of the equation of state to a higher degree than the three-hair relations for uniformly rotating stars. Our results can be instrumental in the development of four-hair relations for rapidly differentially rotating stars in full general relativity using numerical simulations.

  11. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    covered, particularly as a compendium of papers on spectrometry for radiation protection has been published relatively recently [1]. The CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA), whereby national measurement standards and certificates issued by different national metrology institutes (NMIs) can be recognized internationally, is covered only briefly, although the key comparisons which underpin the CIPM MRA are highlighted. The papers included in this issue concentrate on the primary physical quantities—neutron source emission rate and neutron fluence, papers on the latter quantity covering the wide range of neutron energies for which standards are required. Neutron cross sections are fundamental to neutron physics and their importance in neutron metrology is also covered. A large amount of work by acknowledged experts in neutron metrology has gone into the preparation of this special issue and we are indebted to them for their time and effort. The list of contributors begins with the authors of the papers but also includes the referees who provided invisible but invaluable input. We are grateful for the support and encouragement of Professor Georgio Moscati, president of the CCRI when the work was proposed, Dr Kim Carneiro the current president, and Dr Penny Allisy-Roberts the executive secretary of the CCRI. When this work was first proposed a list of potential topics was drawn up by the then chairman of Section (III) Dr Horst Klein. It is a measure of his insight and knowledge of the field that the resulting document matches almost exactly the original plan he drew up. This special issue is thus a tribute to his very extensive contribution to the field. We sincerely hope its contents provide an accurate picture of the present state of neutron metrology in view of Dr Klein's conviction of the importance in metrology of getting things right. Reference [1] Thomas D J and Klein H (ed) 2003 Neutron and photon spectrometry techniques for radiation protection Radiat

  12. Multipolar electromagnetic fields around neutron stars: exact vacuum solutions and related properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétri, J.

    2015-06-01

    The magnetic field topology in the surrounding of neutron stars is one of the key questions in pulsar magnetospheric physics. A very extensive literature exists about the assumption of a dipolar magnetic field but very little progress has been made in attempts to include multipolar components in a self-consistent way. In this paper, we study the effect of multipolar electromagnetic fields anchored in the star. We give exact analytical solutions in closed form for any order l and apply them to the retarded point quadrupole (l = 2), hexapole (l = 3) and octopole (l = 4), a generalization of the retarded point dipole (l = 1). We also compare the Poynting flux from each multipole and show that the spin-down luminosity depends on the ratio R/rL, R being the neutron star radius and rL the light-cylinder radius. Therefore the braking index also depends on R/rL. As such multipole fields possess very different topology, most importantly smaller length scales compared to the dipolar field, especially close to the neutron star, we investigate the deformation of the polar caps induced by these multipolar fields. Such fields could have a strong impact on the interpretation of the pulsed radio emission suspected to emanate from these polar caps as well as on the inferred geometry deduced from the high-energy light-curve fitting and on the magnetic field strength. Discrepancies between the two-pole caustic model and our new multipole caustic model are emphasized with the quadrupole field. To this respect, we demonstrate that working with only a dipole field can be very misleading.

  13. The design of the inelastic neutron scattering mode for the Extreme Environment Diffractometer with the 26 T High Field Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowiak, Maciej; Stüßer, Norbert; Prokhnenko, Oleksandr

    2015-10-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer is a neutron time-of-flight instrument, designed to work with a constant-field hybrid magnet capable of reaching fields over 26 T, unprecedented in neutron science; however, the presence of the magnet imposes both spatial and technical limitations on the surrounding instrument components. In addition to the existing diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering modes, the instrument will operate also in an inelastic scattering mode, as a direct time-of-flight spectrometer. In this paper we present the Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations, the results of which illustrate the performance of the instrument in the inelastic-scattering mode. We describe the focussing neutron guide and the chopper system of the existing instrument and the planned design for the instrument upgrade. The neutron flux, neutron spatial distribution, divergence distribution and energy resolution are calculated for standard instrument configurations.

  14. Effect of Reference Scheme on Power and Phase of the Local Field Potential.

    PubMed

    Shirhatti, Vinay; Borthakur, Ayon; Ray, Supratim

    2016-05-01

    Brain signals are often analyzed in the spectral domain, where the power spectral density (PSD) and phase differences and consistency can reveal important information about the network. However, for proper interpretation, it is important to know whether these measures depend on stimulus/behavioral conditions or the reference scheme used to analyze data. We recorded local field potential (LFP) from an array of microelectrodes chronically implanted in area V1 of monkeys under different stimulus/behavioral conditions and computed PSD slopes, coherence, and phase difference between LFPs as a function of frequency and interelectrode distance while using four reference schemes: single wire, average, bipolar, and current source density. PSD slopes were dependent on reference scheme at low frequencies (below 200 Hz) but became invariant at higher frequencies. Average phase differences between sites also depended critically on referencing, switching from 0 degrees for single-wire to 180 degrees for average reference. Results were consistent across different stimulus/behavioral conditions. We were able to account for these results based on the coherence profile across sites and properties of the spectral estimator. Our results show that using different reference schemes can have drastic effects on phase differences and PSD slopes and therefore must be interpreted carefully to gain insights about network properties. PMID:26942748

  15. Use of D-T-produced fast neutrons for in vivo body composition analysis: a reference method for nutritional assessment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kehayias, J J

    2004-05-01

    Body composition has become the main outcome of many nutritional intervention studies including osteoporosis, malnutrition, obesity, AIDS, and aging. Traditional indirect body composition methods developed with healthy young adults do not apply to the elderly or diseased. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used to assess in vivo elements characteristic of specific body compartments. Non-bone phosphorus for muscle is measured by the (31)P(n, alpha)(28)Al reaction, and nitrogen for protein via the (14)N(n,2n)(13)N fast neutron reaction. Inelastic neutron scattering is used to measure total body carbon and oxygen. Body fat is derived from carbon after correcting for contributions from protein, bone, and glycogen. Carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) is used to measure the distribution of fat and lean tissue in the body and to monitor small changes of lean mass. A sealed, D-T neutron generator is used for the production of fast neutrons. Carbon and oxygen mass and their ratio are measured in vivo at a radiation exposure of less than 0.06 mSv. Gamma-ray spectra are collected using large BGO detectors and analyzed for the 4.43 MeV state of carbon and 6.13 MeV state of oxygen, simultaneously with the irradiation. P and N analysis by delayed fast neutron activation is performed by transferring the patient to a shielded room equipped with an array of NaI(Tl) detectors. A combination of measurements makes possible the assessment of the "quality" of fat-free mass. The neutron generator system is used to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments, to study mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging, and to investigate methods for preserving function and quality of life in the elderly. It is also used as a reference method for the validation of portable instruments of nutritional assessment. PMID:14747891

  16. Experimental setup for the determination of the correction factors of the neutron doseratemeters in fast neutron fields

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, Elena; Bercea, Sorin; Dudu, Dorin; Celarel, Aurelia

    2013-12-16

    The use of the U-120 Cyclotron of the IFIN-HH allowed to perform a testing bench with fast neutrons in order to determine the correction factors of the doseratemeters dedicated to neutron measurement. This paper deals with researchers performed in order to develop the irradiation facility testing the fast neutrons flux generated at the Cyclotron. This facility is presented, together with the results obtain in determining the correction factor for a doseratemeter dedicated to the neutron dose equivalent rate measurement.

  17. Implications of X-ray tube parameter deviations in X-ray reference fields.

    PubMed

    Behnke, B; Hupe, O; Ambrosi, P

    2016-02-01

    For the purpose of radiation protection, ICRU Report 57/ICRP Publication 74 provides a list of monoenergetic conversion coefficients to be used with, among others, photon reference fields generated with X-ray tubes. A comprehensive definition of these photon reference fields can be found in international standard ISO 4037; however, it lacks thorough indication of the allowed deviations of essential parameters that influence these X-ray reference fields. These parameters are the high-voltage tube potential, the thickness of the beryllium window and the purity and thickness of the filter materials used to create different radiation qualities. Small variations of these parameters can lead to significant changes in the created X-ray spectra and, hence, the spectra-dependent conversion coefficients for phantom-related radiation-protection quantities. This can lead to situations in which the conversion coefficients listed in ISO 4037 cannot be used, resulting in time-consuming spectrometry measurements. In this work, the impact on the resulting conversion coefficients is investigated using a simplified mathematical approximation model. The findings are validated with an independent X-ray spectra calculation programme. As a result, well-founded upper limit values on the allowed deviations of the essential X-ray tube parameters are proposed to be used in a future revision of ISO 4037. PMID:25889609

  18. DOSIMETRIC response of a REM-500 in low energy neutron fields typical of nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Matysiak, W; Atanackovic, J; Waker, A J

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the response of a REM-500 to assess neutron quality factor and dose equivalent in low energy neutron fields, which are commonly encountered in the workplace environment of nuclear power stations. The McMaster University 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility was used to measure the response of the instrument in monoenergetic neutron fields in the energy range 51 to 727 keV by bombarding a thin LiF target with 1.93-2.50 MeV protons. The energy distribution of the neutron fields produced in the facility was measured by a (3)He filled gas ionization chamber. The MCA mode of the REM-500 instrument was used to collect lineal energy distributions at varying neutron energies and to calculate the frequency and dose-mean lineal energies. The effective quality factor, Q-, was also calculated using the values of Q(y)listed in the REM-500 operation manual and compared with those of ICRP 60. The authors observed a continuously increasing trend in y - F, y-D, and Q-with an increase in neutron energy. It is interesting to note that standard tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) filled with tissue equivalent(TE) gas give rise to a similar trend for these microdosimetric quantities of interest in the same energy range; however, the averages calculated in this study are larger by about 15%compared to a TEPC filled with propane-based TE gas probably because of the larger stopping power of protons in propane compared to TE gas. These somewhat larger event sizes did not result in any significant increase in the Q-compared to those obtained from a TEPC filled with TE gas and were found to be in good agreement with other measurements reported earlier at corresponding neutron energies. The instrument quality factor response, R(Q), defined as the ratio of measured quality factor to the calculated quality factor in an ICRU tissue sphere,was found to vary with neutron energy. The instrument response,R(Q), was ~0.6 at 727 keV, which deteriorates further to

  19. Neutron detection in a high-gamma field using solution-grown stilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, M. M.; Clarke, S. D.; Adamowicz, N.; Pozzi, S. A.; Zaitseva, N.; Carman, L.

    2016-01-01

    A solution-based technique for growing large-volume stilbene scintillators was developed in 2013; crystals up to diameters of 10 cm, or larger, have been grown while preserving excellent pulse shape discrimination (PSD) properties. The goal of this study is to evaluate the PSD capabilities of 5.08 by 5.08-cm stilbene crystals grown by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Inrad Optics when exposed to a 1000 to 1 gamma ray-neutron ratio and operating at a 100-kHz count rate. Results were compared to an equivalent EJ-309 liquid scintillation detector. 252Cf neutron pulses were recorded in two experiments where 60Co and 137Cs sources created the high-gamma field. The high count rate created numerous double pulses that were cleaned using fractional and template approaches designed to remove double pulses while preserving neutron counts. PSD was performed at a threshold of 42 keVee (440-keV proton) for stilbene and 60 keVee (610-keV proton) for EJ-309 liquid. The lower threshold in stilbene resulted in a neutron intrinsic efficiency of approximately 14.5%, 10% higher than EJ-309 liquid, for bare 252Cf and 13% for 252Cf in the high-gamma field. Despite the lower threshold, the gamma misclassification rate in stilbene was approximately 3×10-6, nearly a factor-of-five lower than what we found with the EJ-309 liquid.

  20. Comparison of different MC techniques to evaluate BNCT dose profiles in phantom exposed tovarious neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Durisi, E; Koivunoro, H; Visca, L; Borla, O; Zanini, A

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose in BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) consists of several radiation components with different physical properties and biological effectiveness. In order to assess the clinical efficacy of the beams, determining the dose profiles in tissues, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used. This paper presents a comparison between dose profiles calculated in different phantoms using two techniques: MC radiation transport code, MCNP-4C2 and BNCT MC treatment planning program, SERA (simulation environment for radiotherapy application). In this study MCNP is used as a reference tool. A preliminary test of SERA is performed using six monodirectional and monoenergetic beams directed onto a simple water phantom. In order to deeply investigate the effect of the different cross-section libraries and of the dose calculation methodology, monoenergetic and monodirectional beams directed toward a standard Snyder phantom are simulated. Neutron attenuation curves and dose profiles are calculated with both codes and the results are compared. PMID:19939825

  1. Field calibration of PADC track etch detectors for local neutron dosimetry in man using different radiation qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Boschung, Markus; Mayer, Sabine; Clasie, Benjamin; Kry, Stephen F.; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    In order to quantify the dose from neutrons to a patient for contemporary radiation treatment techniques, measurements inside phantoms, representing the patient, are necessary. Published reports on neutron dose measurements cover measurements performed free in air or on the surface of phantoms and the doses are expressed in terms of personal dose equivalent or ambient dose equivalent. This study focuses on measurements of local neutron doses inside a radiotherapy phantom and presents a field calibration procedure for PADC track etch detectors. An initial absolute calibration factor in terms of Hp(10) for personal dosimetry is converted into neutron dose equivalent and additional calibration factors are derived to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence for different radiation therapy beam qualities and depths in the phantom. The neutron spectra used for the calculation of the calibration factors are determined in different depths by Monte Carlo simulations for the investigated radiation qualities. These spectra are used together with the energy dependent response function of the PADC detectors to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence. The resulting total calibration factors are 0.76 for a photon beam (in- and out-of-field), 1.00 (in-field) and 0.84 (out-of-field) for an active proton beam and 1.05 (in-field) and 0.91 (out-of-field) for a passive proton beam, respectively. The uncertainty for neutron dose measurements using this field calibration method is less than 40%. The extended calibration procedure presented in this work showed that it is possible to use PADC track etch detectors for measurements of local neutron dose equivalent inside anthropomorphic phantoms by accounting for spectral changes in the neutron fluence.

  2. Different resistance patterns of reference and field strains of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Karina L.; Dorneles, Elaine M. S.; Poester, Fernando P.; Martins, Paulo S.; Pauletti, Rebeca B.; Lage, Andrey P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of the B. abortus reference strains and field isolates on media containing different inhibitor agents. Reference strains were seeded on tryptose agar containing: i-erythritol (1.0 mg/mL), fuchsin (20 μg/mL and 80 μg/mL), thionin (2.5 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL), rifampicin (200 μg/mL) and safranin O (200 μg/mL). Field isolates were tested only on media containing i-erythritol, rifampicin and thionin. Furthermore, each suspension was also inoculated on tryptose agar incubated in air, to test its ability to grow without CO 2 . Sensitivity to fuchsin was similar among reference strains evaluated. Growth of S19, 544 and 2308 but not RB51 were inhibited on media containing rifampicin. Medium with safranin O showed no inhibition for RB51, 544 and 2308, but it partially inhibited the S19 growth as well as medium containing i-erythritol. Treatment/control growth ratio for 2308 on tryptose agar containing thionin (2.5 μg/mL) was approximatelly 1.0, whereas S19 and RB51 showed 0.85 and 0.89 ratios, respectively. Growth of 544, S19 and RB51 but not 2308 was completely inhibited on medium with thionin (10 μg/mL). All field strains grew on medium containing i-erythritol, but were completelly inhibited by rifampicin. With exception of A1 ( B. abortus biovar 3) all field isolates grew on medium with thionin, although some strains showed a treatment/control growth ratio of 0.75–0.80 (10 μg/mL). These results showed that tryptose agar with thionin, i-erythritol or rifampicin could be useful for differentiating vaccine, challenge and field strains of B. abortus. PMID:26221116

  3. Different resistance patterns of reference and field strains of Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Karina L; Dorneles, Elaine M S; Poester, Fernando P; Martins Filho, Paulo S; Pauletti, Rebeca B; Lage, Andrey P

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of the B. abortus reference strains and field isolates on media containing different inhibitor agents. Reference strains were seeded on tryptose agar containing: i-erythritol (1.0 mg/mL), fuchsin (20 μg/mL and 80 μg/mL), thionin (2.5 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL), rifampicin (200 μg/mL) and safranin O (200 μg/mL). Field isolates were tested only on media containing i-erythritol, rifampicin and thionin. Furthermore, each suspension was also inoculated on tryptose agar incubated in air, to test its ability to grow without CO 2 . Sensitivity to fuchsin was similar among reference strains evaluated. Growth of S19, 544 and 2308 but not RB51 were inhibited on media containing rifampicin. Medium with safranin O showed no inhibition for RB51, 544 and 2308, but it partially inhibited the S19 growth as well as medium containing i-erythritol. Treatment/control growth ratio for 2308 on tryptose agar containing thionin (2.5 μg/mL) was approximatelly 1.0, whereas S19 and RB51 showed 0.85 and 0.89 ratios, respectively. Growth of 544, S19 and RB51 but not 2308 was completely inhibited on medium with thionin (10 μg/mL). All field strains grew on medium containing i-erythritol, but were completelly inhibited by rifampicin. With exception of A1 ( B. abortus biovar 3) all field isolates grew on medium with thionin, although some strains showed a treatment/control growth ratio of 0.75-0.80 (10 μg/mL). These results showed that tryptose agar with thionin, i-erythritol or rifampicin could be useful for differentiating vaccine, challenge and field strains of B. abortus. PMID:26221116

  4. NOAA/NGDC candidate models for the 12th generation International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, Patrick; Maus, Stefan; Chulliat, Arnaud; Manoj, Chandrasekharan

    2015-05-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) is a model of the geomagnetic main field and its secular variation, produced every 5 years from candidate models proposed by a number of international research institutions. For this 12th generation IGRF, three candidate models were solicited: a main field model for the 2010.0 epoch, a main field model for the 2015.0 epoch, and the predicted secular variation for the five-year period 2015 to 2020. The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC), part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has produced three candidate models for consideration in IGRF-12. The 2010 main field candidate was produced from Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) satellite data, while the 2015 main field and secular variation candidates were produced from Swarm and Ørsted satellite data. Careful data selection was performed to minimize the influence of magnetospheric and ionospheric fields. The secular variation predictions of our parent models, from which the candidate models were derived, have been validated against independent ground observatory data.

  5. Hydrogen Concentration and Strain Fields Near Fatigue Cracks in Pipeline Steel Measured Via Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Matthew; Slifka, Andrew; Drexler, Elizabeth; Hydrogen Pipeline Safety Team

    Hydrogen (H2) is desirable for energy storage as it is cleaner burning and can store a larger amount of energy than an equal mass of gasoline. One problem in the development of a hydrogen economy is to find or develop materials that ensure the safe, reliable, and cost-effective flow of energy from the source to the user. It is expected steels will be needed to serve this function. However, the existing network of natural gas pipeline, for example, is constructed of ferrous materials which are susceptible to embrittlement and subsequent increased fatigue crack growth rates after exposure to hydrogen. In order to improve current modeling efforts, experimental determination of hydrogen concentration, hydrogen diffusion rates, and strain fields are required to inform and validate the model. Here we report neutron imaging measurements of the hydrogen concentration near a fatigue crack and the corresponding strain field, measured via neutron transmission Bragg edge spectroscopy. Nist Materials Measurement Laboratory, Applied Chemicals and Materials Division.

  6. Field-dependent neutron depolarization study of the ferrite formation in medium-carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Te Velthuis, S.G.E.; Van Dijk, N.H.; Rekveldt, M.T.; Sietsma, J.; Van Der Zwaag, S.

    2000-03-14

    Neutron depolarization experiments have been performed on the ferrite and pearlite phase transformations of the medium-carbon C60 and C35 steels. The interaction of the polarized neutron beam with the ferromagnetic ferrite grains gives information on the mean magnetization and the magnetic correlation length. From these parameters the ferrite fraction and the mean ferrite grain size are determined in situ as a function of time and temperature during the phase transformation. The applied magnetic field was varied periodically in order to record a full hysteresis curve of the magnetization, which gives essential information on the microstructure of the ferromagnetic ferrite grains. The field dependence of the mean particle size during the early stages of the pearlite formation is a strong indication of multi-domain behavior, which is absent in the austenite-ferrite transformation and at the end of the pearlite formation.

  7. Neutron-skin thickness of finite nuclei in relativistic mean-field models with chiral limits

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Weizhou; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2007-11-15

    We study several structure properties of finite nuclei using relativistic mean-field Lagrangians constructed according to the Brown-Rho scaling due to the chiral symmetry restoration at high densities. The models are consistent with current experimental constraints for the equations of state of symmetric matter at both normal and supranormal densities and of asymmetric matter at subsaturation densities. It is shown that these models can successfully describe the binding energies and charge radii of finite nuclei. Compared to calculations with usual relativistic mean-field models, these models give a reduced thickness of neutron skin in {sup 208}Pb between 0.17 fm and 0.21 fm. The reduction of the predicted neutron skin thickness is found to be due to not only the softening of the symmetry energy but also the scaling property of {rho} meson required by the partial restoration of chiral symmetry.

  8. Quark-hadron phase transition in a neutron star under strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabhi, A.; Pais, H.; Panda, P. K.; Providência, C.

    2009-11-01

    We study the effect of a strong magnetic field on the properties of neutron stars with a quark-hadron phase transition. It is shown that the magnetic field prevents the appearance of a quark phase, enhances the leptonic fraction, decreases the baryonic density extension of the mixed phase and stiffens the total equation of state, including both the stellar matter and the magnetic field contributions. Two parametrizations of a density-dependent static magnetic field, increasing, respectively, fast and slowly with the density and reaching 2-4 × 1018 G in the centre of the star, are considered. The compact stars with strong magnetic fields have maximum mass configurations with larger masses and radii and smaller quark fractions. The parametrization of the magnetic field with density has a strong influence on the star properties.

  9. Neutron stars in a perturbative f(R) gravity model with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Keleş, Vildan; Ryu, C.Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: cemsinan@msgsu.edu.tr E-mail: kelesvi@itu.edu.tr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    In Kaluza-Klein electromagnetism it is natural to associate modified gravity with strong electromagnetic fields. Hence, in this paper we investigate the combined effects of a strong magnetic field and perturbative f(R) gravity on the structure of neutron stars. The effect of an interior strong magnetic field of about 10{sup 17−18} G on the equation of state is derived in the context of a quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) equation of state (EoS) including effects of the magnetic pressure and energy along with occupied Landau levels. Adopting a random orientation of interior field domains, we solve the modified spherically symmetric hydrostatic equilibrium equations derived for a gravity model with f(R) = R+αR{sup 2}. Effects of both the finite magnetic field and the modified gravity are detailed for various values of the magnetic field and the perturbation parameter α along with a discussion of their physical implications. We show that there exists a parameter space of the modified gravity and the magnetic field strength, in which even a soft equation of state can accommodate a large ( > 2 M{sub s}un) maximum neutron star mass.

  10. Assessment of models proposed for the 1985 revision of the international geomagnetic reference field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Zunde, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Geomagnetic measurements from land, marine and aerial surveys conducted in the years 1945-1964 were used to test the 14 models proposed as additions, for that period, to the series of definitive geomagnetic reference field (DGRF) models. Overall, NASA's 'SFAS' models and the BGS (British Geological Survey) models agree best with these data. Comparisons of the two proposed definitive main-field models for 1980.0, with each other and with the existing IGRF 1980 main-field model, show mostly close agreement, with the greatest absolute differences (several tens of nanotesla) occurring in the region of Antarctica. Comparison of the the three proposed forecast secular-variation models for 1985-1990 with estimates of recent rates of change at 148 magnetic observatories shows that the IZMIRAN (U.S.S.R.) and USGS models are in closest agreement with these data. ?? 1987.

  11. Reference-ellipsoid and the normal gravity field in post-Newtonian geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Mazurova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    We apply general relativity to construct the post-Newtonian background manifold that serves as a reference spacetime in relativistic geodesy for conducting relativistic calculation of the geoid undulation and the deflection of the plumb line from the vertical. We chose an axisymmetric ellipsoidal body made up of a perfect homogeneous fluid uniformly rotating around a fixed axis, as a source generating the reference geometry. We reformulate and extend hydrodynamic calculations of rotating fluids done by previous researchers to the realm of relativistic geodesy to set up the algebraic equations defining the shape of the post-Newtonian reference ellipsoid. We explicitly perform all integrals characterizing gravitational field inside and outside the fluid body and represent them in terms of the elementary functions depending on its eccentricity. We fully explore the coordinate freedom of the equations describing the post-Newtonian ellipsoid and evaluate the deviation of the post-Newtonian level surface from the Newtonian (Maclaurin) ellipsoid. We also derive the post-Newtonian normal gravity field of the rotating fluid in terms of the parameters characterizing the post-Newtonian ellipsoid including relativistic mass, angular velocity and eccentricity. We formulate the post-Newtonian theorems of Pizzetti and Clairaut that are used in geodesy to connect the geometric parameters of the Earth figure to physically measurable force of gravity at its pole and equator.

  12. The role of the brain's frontal eye fields in constructing frame of reference.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel

    2012-08-01

    Establishing contextual reference during discourse is a vital part of language function. Personal pronouns (e.g., he/she/it) are used to refer to previously experienced objects, utterances and events. These items, however, are often no longer present in the environment and have to be maintained and manipulated in working memory (WM). One aspect of this is the construction of a spatial frame of reference (e.g., "He was in front of it" where "he" is established as figure and "it" is the ground). The WM processes underlying this function may be different from those involved in establishing a non-spatial relation (e.g., "He was older than her"). The brain's frontal eye fields (FEFs), responsible for eye movement control, are known to be involved in processing spatial WM. This paper reviews both functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments and a subsequent behavioral interference study demonstrating a specific role for the FEFs and the brain's eye movement control system in manipulation of WM content for establishing object-centered spatial reference frames during verbally cued recall of recent visual and linguistic experiences. PMID:22806655

  13. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Plaster, Brad

    2014-09-01

    A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. A concept has been developed which provides for a real-time determination of the spatial dependence of the vector components of the magnetic field (and, hence, the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior fiducial volume of the SNS neutron EDM experiment solely from exterior measurements at fixed discrete locations. This technique will be especially important during the operation of the experiment, when direct measurements of the field gradients present within the fiducial volume will not be physically possible. Our method, which is based on the solution to the Laplace Equation, is completely general and does not require the field to possess any type of symmetry. We describe the concept and our systematic approach for optimizing the locations of these exterior measurements. We also present results from prototyping studies of a field monitoring system deployed within a half-scale prototype of the experiment's magnetic field environment. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of

  14. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B.

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  15. Spin-Down Mechanisms in Neutron Stars with ``Anomalous'' Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2015-08-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are attributed to a number of factors, the most common assumption being the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This energy loss mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori. This typically causes a discrepancy in the characteristic age of these objects and the age of their associated Supernova Remnants (SNRs). In this work we consider neutron stars with ``anomalous'' magnetic fields - namely magnetars, high-B radio pulsars, and the Central Compact Objects (proposed to be `anti-magnetars’) that are securely associated with SNRs. Without making any assumptions about the initial spin periods of these objects and by constraining the SNR ages to match their associated pulsar ages, we compare the predictions of distinct energy loss mechanisms, such as field decay and the emission of relativistic winds using all observed data on the braking indices. This study has important implications on the proposed emission models for these exotic objects and helps in resolving the PSR-SNR age discrepancy.

  16. Advances in Neutron Spectroscopy and High Magnetic Field Instrumentation for studies of Correlated Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Granroth, Garrett E

    2011-01-01

    Neutron Spectroscopy has provided critical information on the magnetism in correlated electron systems. Specifically quantum magnets, superconductors, and multi-ferroics are areas of productive research. A discussion of recent measurements on the SEQUOIA spectrometer will provide examples of how novel instrumentation concepts are used on the latest generation of spectrometers to extend our knowledge in such systems. The now ubiquitous function of sample rotation allows for full mapping of volumes of $Q$ and $\\omega$ space. An instrument focused on low angles could extend these maps to cover more of the first Brillioun zone. Innovative chopper cascades allow two unique modes of operation. Multiplexed measurements allow the simultaneous measurement of high and low energy features in an excitation spectrum. Alternatively by limiting the neutron bandwidth incident on the Fermi Chopper, background from subsequent time frames is removed, enabling the observation of weak, large energy transfer features. Finally the implementation of event-based detection for neutron experiments is time correlated experiments. Diffraction studies of the high field spin states in MnWO$_4$ using magnetic fields up to 30 T, provided by a pulsed magnet, illustrate this method. Expanding the high field studies to spectroscopy will require a novel instrument, focused around a world class DC magnet, like Zeemans proposed for the SNS.

  17. Effects of neutrino emissivity on the cooling of neutron stars in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, Eduardo Lenho; Chiapparini, Marcelo; Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanço

    2015-12-17

    One of the most interesting kind of neutron stars are the pulsars, which are highly magnetized neutron stars with fields up to 10{sup 14} G at the surface. The strength of magnetic field in the center of a neutron star remains unknown. According to the scalar virial theorem, magnetic field in the core could be as large as 10{sup 18} G. In this work we study the influence of strong magnetic fields on the cooling of neutron stars coming from direct Urca process. Direct Urca process is an extremely efficient mechanism for cooling a neutron star after its formation. The matter is described using a relativistic mean-field model at zero temperature with eight baryons (baryon octet), electrons and muons. We obtain the relative population of each species of particles as function of baryon density for different magnetic fields. We calculate numerically the cooling of neutron stars for a parametrized magnetic field and compare the results for the case without a magnetic field.

  18. Fluence measurement of fast neutron fields with a highly efficient recoil proton telescope using active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Taforeau, J; Higueret, S; Husson, D; Kachel, M; Lebreton, L

    2014-10-01

    The spectrometer ATHENA (Accurate Telescope for High-Energy Neutron metrology Applications) is being developed at the LNE-IRSN and aims at characterising energy and fluence of fast neutron fields. The detector is a recoil proton telescope and measures neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. This telescope is intended to become a primary standard for both energy and fluence measurements. The neutron detection is achieved by a polyethylene radiator for n-p conversion, three 50-µm-thick silicon sensors that use CMOS technology for proton tracking and a 3-mm-thick silicon diode to measure the residual proton energy. The use of CMOS sensors and silicon diode, owing to a large detection solid angle, increases the intrinsic efficiency of the detector by a factor of 10 compared with conventional designs. The ability of the spectrometer to determine the neutron energy was demonstrated and reported elsewhere. This paper focuses on the fluence measurement of monoenergetic neutron fields in the range of 5-20 MeV. Experimental investigations, performed at the AMANDE facility, indicate a good estimation of neutron fluence at various energies. In addition, a complete description of uncertainties budget is presented in this paper and a Monte Carlo propagation of uncertainty sources leads to a fluence measurement with a precision ∼3-5 % depending on the neutron energy. PMID:24243312

  19. Transient particle acceleration in strongly magnetized neutron stars. II - Effects due to a dipole field geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1991-01-01

    Sheared Alfven waves generated by nonradial crustal disturbances above the polar cap of a strongly magnetized neutron star induce an electric field component parallel to B. An attempt is made to determine the manner in which the strong radial dependence of B affects the propagation of these sheared Alfven waves, and whether this MHD process is still an effective particle accelerator. It is found that although the general field equation is quite complicated, a simple wavelike solution can still be obtained under the conditions of interest for which the Alfven phase velocity decouples from the wave equation. The results may be applicable to gamma-ray burst sources.

  20. The use of passive personal neutron dosemeters to determine the neutron dose equivalent component of radiation fields in spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D T; Hager, L G; Tanner, R J

    2004-01-01

    For the altitude range and inclination of the International Space Station (ISS), secondary neutrons can be a major contributor to dose equivalent inside a spacecraft. The exact proportion is very dependent on the amount of shielding of the primary galactic cosmic radiation and trapped particles, but is likely to lie in the range of 10-50%. Personal neutron dosemeters of simple design, processed using simple techniques developed for personal dosimetry, may be used to estimate this neutron component. PMID:15353682

  1. Constraints on Non-Newtonian Gravity From the Experiment on Neutron Quantum States in the Earth’s Gravitational Field

    PubMed Central

    Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Protasov, K. V.

    2005-01-01

    An upper limit to non-Newtonian attractive forces is obtained from the measurement of quantum states of neutrons in the Earth’s gravitational field. This limit improves the existing constraints in the nanometer range. PMID:27308134

  2. Neutron scattering studies of crude oil viscosity reduction with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Enpeng

    topic. Dr. Tao with his group at Temple University, using his electro or magnetic rheological viscosity theory has developed a new technology, which utilizes electric or magnetic fields to change the rheology of complex fluids to reduce the viscosity, while keeping the temperature unchanged. After we successfully reduced the viscosity of crude oil with field and investigated the microstructure changing in various crude oil samples with SANS, we have continued to reduce the viscosity of heavy crude oil, bunker diesel, ultra low sulfur diesel, bio-diesel and crude oil and ultra low temperature with electric field treatment. Our research group developed the viscosity electrorheology theory and investigated flow rate with laboratory and field pipeline. But we never visualize this aggregation. The small angle neutron scattering experiment has confirmed the theoretical prediction that a strong electric field induces the suspended nano-particles inside crude oil to aggregate into short chains along the field direction. This aggregation breaks the symmetry, making the viscosity anisotropic: along the field direction, the viscosity is significantly reduced. The experiment enables us to determine the induced chain size and shape, verifies that the electric field works for all kinds of crude oils, paraffin-based, asphalt-based, and mix-based. The basic physics of such field induced viscosity reduction is applicable to all kinds of suspensions.

  3. Neutron scattering facility for continuous high magnetic fields up to 40 T at Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeibidl, P.; Mezei, F.; Meissner, M.; Prokes, K.; Schröder-Smeibidl, B.; Steiner, M.

    2003-05-01

    The neutron scattering facility BENSC at Hahn-Meitner-Institut offers outstanding research opportunities to the international scientific user community. Experiments on an advanced suite of instruments can be performed in uniquely high magnetic fields up to 17.5 T at temperatures down to 30 mK simultaneously. To further extend the range of continuous magnetic fields for neutron scattering, HMI has proposed a new facility with resistive magnets up to 40 T.

  4. Relativistic mean field model for entrainment in general relativistic superfluid neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, G. L.; Joynt, R.

    2003-07-01

    General relativistic superfluid neutron stars have a significantly more intricate dynamics than their ordinary fluid counterparts. Superfluidity allows different superfluid (and superconducting) species of particles to have independent fluid flows, a consequence of which is that the fluid equations of motion contain as many fluid element velocities as superfluid species. Whenever the particles of one superfluid interact with those of another, the momentum of each superfluid will be a linear combination of both superfluid velocities. This leads to the so-called entrainment effect whereby the motion of one superfluid will induce a momentum in the other superfluid. We have constructed a fully relativistic model for entrainment between superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons using a relativistic σ-ω mean field model for the nucleons and their interactions. In this context there are two notions of “relativistic”: relativistic motion of the individual nucleons with respect to a local region of the star (i.e. a fluid element containing, say, an Avogadro’s number of particles), and the motion of fluid elements with respect to the rest of the star. While it is the case that the fluid elements will typically maintain average speeds at a fraction of that of light, the supranuclear densities in the core of a neutron star can make the nucleons themselves have quite high average speeds within each fluid element. The formalism is applied to the problem of slowly rotating superfluid neutron star configurations, a distinguishing characteristic being that the neutrons can rotate at a rate different from that of the protons.

  5. Cooling of neutron stars and emissivity of neutrinos by the direct Urca process under influence of a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, E. L.; Chiapparini, M.; Negreiros, R. P.

    2016-04-01

    Neutron stars are born with high temperatures and during a few seconds suffer rapid cooling by emission of neutrinos. The direct Urca process is the main mechanism to explain this loss of energy. In this work we study the influence of a strong magnetic field on the composition of nuclear matter at high densities and zero temperature. We describe the matter through a relativistic mean-field model with eight light baryons (baryon octet), electrons, muons magnetic field. As output of the numerical calculations, we obtain the relative population for a parametrized magnetic field. We calculate the cooling of neutron stars with different mass and magnetic fields due to direct Urca process.

  6. Astronomers Use X-Rays To Probe Gravitational Field Of A Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    With NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have detected features that may be the first direct evidence of the effect of gravity on radiation from a neutron star. This finding, if confirmed, could enable scientists to measure the gravitational field of neutron stars and determine whether they contain exotic forms of matter not seen on Earth. A team led by George Pavlov of Penn State University in University Park observed 1E 1207.4-5209, a neutron star in the center of a supernova remnant about 7,000 light years from Earth. The results were presented on June 6, 2002, at the American Astronomical Society in Albuquerque, NM. Pavlov's group found two dips, or absorption features, in the spectrum of X-rays from the star. If these dips are due to the absorption of X-rays near the star by helium ions in a strong magnetic field, they indicate that the gravitational field reduces the energies of X-rays escaping from near the surface of a neutron star. "This interpretation is consistent with the data," said Pavlov, "but the features may be a blend of many other features. More precise measurements, preferably with Chandra's grating spectrometer, are needed." "These absorption features may be the first evidence of the effect of gravity on radiation near the surface of an isolated neutron star," said Pavlov. "This is particularly important because it would allow us to set limits on the type of matter that comprises this star." Neutron stars are formed when a massive star runs out of fuel and its core collapses. A supernova explosion occurs and the collapsed core is compressed to a hot object about 12 miles in diameter, with a thin atmosphere of hydrogen and possibly heavier ions in a gravitational field 100 billion times as strong as Earth's. These objects, which have a density of more than 1 billion tons per teaspoonful, are called neutron stars because they have been thought to be composed mostly of neutrons. Although neutron stars have been studied extensively for

  7. Surface temperature of a magnetized neutron star and interpretation of the ROSAT data. 1: Dipole fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Dany

    1995-01-01

    We model the temperature distribution at the surface of a magnetized neutron star and study the effects on the observed X-ray spectra and light curves. Generalrelativistic effects, i.e., redshift and lensing, are fully taken into account. Atmospheric effects on the emitted spectral flux are not included: we consider only blackbody emission at the local effective temperature. In this first paper we restrict ourselves to dipole fields. General features are studied and compared with the ROSAT data from the pulsars 0833 - 45 (Vela), 0656 + 14, 0630 + 178 (Geminga), and 1055 - 52, the four cases for which there is strong evidence that thermal radiation from the stellar surface is detected. The composite spectra we obtain are not very different from a blackbody spectrum at the star's effective temperature. We conclude that, as far as blackbody spectra are considered, temperature estimates using single-temperature models give results practically identical to our composite models. The change of the (composite blackbody) spectrum with the star's rotational phase is also not very large and may be unobservable inmost cases. Gravitational lensing strongly suppresses the light curve pulsations. If a dipole field is assumed, pulsed fractions comparable to the observed ones can be obtained only with stellar radii larger than those which are predicted by current models of neutron star struture, or with low stellar masses. Moreover, the shapes of the theoretical light curves with dipole fields do not correspond to the observations. The use of magnetic spectra may raise the pulsed fraction sufficiently but will certainly make the discrepancy with the light curve shapes worse: dipole fields are not sufficient to interpret the data. Many neutron star models with a meson condensate or hypersons predict very small radii, and hence very strong lensing, which will require highly nondipolar fields to be able to reproduce the observed pulsed fractions, if possible at all: this may be a new

  8. Disordered Nuclear Pasta, Magnetic Field Decay, and Crust Cooling in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp . Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  9. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta, with non-spherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp. Predictions of light curves for the low mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust). This research was supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  10. Quantification of the neutron dark-field imaging signal in grating interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünzweig, C.; Kopecek, J.; Betz, B.; Kaestner, A.; Jefimovs, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Gasser, U.; Bunk, O.; David, C.; Lehmann, E.; Donath, T.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2013-09-01

    Here we report on a mathematical description for the neutron dark-field image (DFI) contrast based on the influence of the thickness-dependent beam broadening caused by scattering interactions and multiple refraction in the sample. We conduct radiography experiments to verify that the DFI signal exponentially decays as a function of thickness for both magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. Here we introduce a material-dependent parameter, the so-called linear diffusion coefficient Ω. This allows us to perform a quantitative DFI-computed tomography. Additionally, we conduct correlative small-angle neutron-scattering experiments and validate the mathematical assumption that the angular broadening of the direct beam is proportional to the square root of the number of discrete layers.

  11. Full QCD calculation of neutron electric dipole moment with the external electric field method

    SciTech Connect

    Shintani, E.; Aoki, S.; Kuramashi, Y.

    2008-07-01

    We have calculated the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) in the presence of the CP violating {theta} term in lattice QCD with two-flavor dynamical clover quarks, using the external electric field method. Accumulating a large number of statistics by the averages over 16 different source points and over forward and backward nucleon propagators, we have obtained nonzero signals of neutron and proton EDM beyond 1 standard deviation at each quark mass in full QCD. We have investigated the quark mass dependence of nucleon EDM in full QCD, and have found that nucleon EDM in full QCD does not decrease toward the chiral limit, as opposed to the theoretical expectation. We briefly discuss possible reasons for this behavior.

  12. Suppression of Ultracold Neutron Depolarization on Material Surfaces with Magnetic Holding Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Raymond

    2009-05-01

    The depolarization of Ultracold Neutrons(UCN) was measured within 1-m long, 2 3/4" diameter electropolished copper, diamondlike carbon-coated copper, and stainless steel guide tubes as a function of magnetic holding field. The UCN were trapped between a 6 Tesla solenoidal magnetic field and a 3/8" copper aperture. A series of Helmholtz coils produced a magnetic field over the length of the test guide of either 10 or 250 Gauss. The surface depolarization was observed to be suppressed at the higher holding field on the measured copper guides. These measurements will aid in the determination of the upper limit of depolarization of UCN in the UCN beta asymmetry measurement at LANL (UCNA) and in understanding the mechanisms for depolarization in non-magnetic guides.

  13. Origin of the neutron skin thickness of {sup 208}Pb in nuclear mean-field models

    SciTech Connect

    Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Vinas, X.; Warda, M.

    2010-11-15

    We study whether the neutron skin thickness {Delta}r{sub np} of {sup 208}Pb originates from the bulk or from the surface of the nucleon density distributions, according to the mean-field models of nuclear structure, and find that it depends on the stiffness of the nuclear symmetry energy. The bulk contribution to {Delta}r{sub np} arises from an extended sharp radius of neutrons, whereas the surface contribution arises from different widths of the neutron and proton surfaces. Nuclear models where the symmetry energy is stiff, as typical of relativistic models, predict a bulk contribution in {Delta}r{sub np} of {sup 208}Pb about twice as large as the surface contribution. In contrast, models with a soft symmetry energy like common nonrelativistic models predict that {Delta}r{sub np} of {sup 208}Pb is divided similarly into bulk and surface parts. Indeed, if the symmetry energy is supersoft, the surface contribution becomes dominant. We note that the linear correlation of {Delta}r{sub np} of {sup 208}Pb with the density derivative of the nuclear symmetry energy arises from the bulk part of {Delta}r{sub np}. We also note that most models predict a mixed-type (between halo and skin) neutron distribution for {sup 208}Pb. Although the halo-type limit is actually found in the models with a supersoft symmetry energy, the skin-type limit is not supported by any mean-field model. Finally, we compute parity-violating electron scattering in the conditions of the {sup 208}Pb parity radius experiment (PREX) and obtain a pocket formula for the parity-violating asymmetry in terms of the parameters that characterize the shape of the {sup 208}Pb nucleon densities.

  14. Realistic exact solution for the exterior field of a rotating neutron star

    SciTech Connect

    Pachon, Leonardo A.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Sanabria-Gomez, Jose D.

    2006-05-15

    A new six-parametric, axisymmetric, and asymptotically flat exact solution of Einstein-Maxwell field equations having reflection symmetry is presented. It has arbitrary physical parameters of mass, angular momentum, mass-quadrupole moment, current octupole moment, electric charge, and magnetic dipole, so it can represent the exterior field of a rotating, deformed, magnetized, and charged object; some properties of the closed-form analytic solution such as its multipolar structure, electromagnetic fields, and singularities are also presented. In the vacuum case, this analytic solution is matched to some numerical interior solutions representing neutron stars, calculated by Berti and Stergioulas [E. Berti and N. Stergioulas, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 350, 1416 (2004)], imposing that the multipole moments be the same. As an independent test of accuracy of the solution to describe exterior fields of neutron stars, we present an extensive comparison of the radii of innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) obtained from the Berti and Stergioulas numerical solutions, the Kerr solution [R. P. Kerr, Phys. Rev. Lett. 11, 237 (1963)], the Hartle and Thorne solution [J. B. Hartle and K. S. Thorne, Astrophys. J. 153, 807 (1968)], an analytic series expansion derived by Shibata and Sasaki [M. Shibata and M. Sasaki, Phys. Rev. D 58, 104011 (1998)], and our exact solution. We found that radii of ISCOs from our solution fits better than others with realistic numerical interior solutions.

  15. Pair production and annihilation in strong magnetic fields. [of neutron stars and pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Electromagnetic phenomena occurring in the presence of strong magnetic fields are currently of great interest in high-energy astrophysics. In particular, the process of pair production by single photons in the presence of fields of order 10 to the 12th power Gauss is of importance in cascade models of pulsar gamma ray emission, and may also become significant in theories of other radiation phenomena whose sources may be neutron stars (e.g., gamma ray bursts). In addition to pair production, the inverse process of pair annihilation is greatly affected by the presence of superstrong magnetic fields. The most significant departures from annihilation processes in free space are a reduction in the total rate for annihilation into two photons, a broadening of the familiar 511-keV line for annihilation at rest, and the possibility for annihilation into a single photon which dominates the two-photon annihilation for B (10 to 13th power Gauss) The physics of these pair conversion processes, which is reviewed briefly, can become quite complex in the teragauss regime, and can involve calculations which are technically difficult to incorporate into models of emission mechanisms in neutron star magnetospheres. However, theoretical work, especially the case of pair annihilation, also suggests potential techniques for more direct measurements of field strengths near the stellar surface.

  16. Basic Restriction and Reference Level in Anatomically-based Japanese Models for Low-Frequency Electric and Magnetic Field Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yukinori; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    Human exposed to electric and/or magnetic fields at low frequencies may cause direct effect such as nerve stimulation and excitation. Therefore, basic restriction is regulated in terms of induced current density in the ICNIRP guidelines and in-situ electric field in the IEEE standard. External electric or magnetic field which does not produce induced quantities exceeding the basic restriction is used as a reference level. The relationship between the basic restriction and reference level for low-frequency electric and magnetic fields has been investigated using European anatomic models, while limited for Japanese model, especially for electric field exposures. In addition, that relationship has not well been discussed. In the present study, we calculated the induced quantities in anatomic Japanese male and female models exposed to electric and magnetic fields at reference level. A quasi static finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method was applied to analyze this problem. As a result, spatially averaged induced current density was found to be more sensitive to averaging algorithms than that of in-situ electric field. For electric and magnetic field exposure at the ICNIRP reference level, the maximum values of the induced current density for different averaging algorithm were smaller than the basic restriction for most cases. For exposures at the reference level in the IEEE standard, the maximum electric fields in the brain were larger than the basic restriction in the brain while smaller for the spinal cord and heart.

  17. Impact of the revision of 10CFR835 with regard to neutron field surveys.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G

    2008-08-01

    The compliance requirements for Department of Energy facilities are codified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835. The regulation was recently revised to adopt the 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Although the impacts of this change include areas other than neutron dosimetry, the intent of this text is to outline the new regulation's effect on neutron instrument calibrations and field surveys. A significant change as a result of the adoption of the ICRP 60 recommendations is the change in the quality factor applied to operational quantities including the quantity used for area monitoring and instrument calibrations, notably the ambient dose equivalent, H*(d). Since the definitions of the operational quantities were not changed, the absorbed dose values for these quantities remain consistent with previous recommendations so the only adjustment necessary is to account for the revised quality factors. For this work, commonly encountered neutron spectra were folded with energy dependent conversion coefficients, h*(10)(E), determined using the old and new quality factors to compute conversion coefficients for the various sources. Additionally, the effect on a single point calibration for the widely used "Rem ball" is discussed. In general, the change in conversion coefficients under the newer guidelines results in a 5 to 15% increase in H*(10), which will require modifications to instrument calibrations. PMID:18617798

  18. Fully Relativistic Simulations of Black Holes and Neutron Stars with Global Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick

    We propose to conduct fully relativistic simulations of the merger of compact objects to investigate their connection to the population of short-duration, hard-spectrum gamma ray bursts. In particular, we will explore possible observational signatures that may lead to the simultaneous study of such mergers through both their gravitational radiation and through an electromagnetic counterpart. The combination of so-called multi-messenger observations can yield significantly more astrophysical content than either gravitational radiation or electromagnetic radiation alone. Through the work described herein to extend our previous efforts we will arrive at a numerical tool set that allows us to simulate the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or with a black hole that include (i) full general relativity, (ii) a hydrodynamic treatment of the neutron star material, (iii) electromagnetic fields in both the stellar material and globally and (iv) a treatment of energy transport and losses via neutrinos. These physics modules run within the publicly available, distributed adaptive mesh refinement framework (named HAD) developed by our collaboration. The numerical tools that we develop and release will likely be of use in other areas of computational astrophysics. Furthermore, predications and the interpretation of the signatures from compact object mergers may make a timely contribution to current efforts to study these systems observationally as well as efforts underway to detect these mergers through their gravitational radiation for the first time.

  19. X-ray studies of neutron stars and their magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing results obtained over the past quarter century mainly with Japanese X-ray astronomy satellites, a review is given to some aspects of neutron stars (NSs), with a particular emphasis on the magnetic fields (MFs) of mass-accreting NSs and magnetars. Measurements of electron cyclotron resonance features in binary X-ray pulsars, using the Ginga and Suzaku observatories, clarified that their surface MFs are concentrated in a narrow range of (1-7) × 10(8) T. Extensive studies of magnetars with Suzaku reinforced their nature as neutron stars with truly strong MFs, and revealed several important clues to their formation, evolution, and physical states. Taking all these results into account, a discussion is made on the origin and evolution of these strong MFs. One possible scenario is that the MF of NSs is a manifestation of some fundamental physics, e.g., neutron spin alignment or chirality violation, and the MF makes transitions from strong to weak states. PMID:27169348

  20. Interior Vector Magnetic Field Monitoring via External Measurements for the SNS Neutron EDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima; Brown, Michael; Carr, Robert; Filippone, Bradley; Osthelder, Charles; Plaster, Bradley; Slutsky, Simon; Swank, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    A prototype of a magnetic field monitoring system designed to reconstruct the vector magnetic field components (and, hence, all nine of the ∂Bi / ∂xj field gradients) within the interior measurement fiducial volume solely from external measurements is under development for the SNS neutron EDM experiment. A first-generation room-temperature prototype array has already been tested. A second-generation prototype array consisting of 12 cryogenic-compatible fluxgate magnetometer probes will be deployed within the cold region of the experiment's 1 / 3 -scale cryogenic magnet testing apparatus. We will report progress towards the development of this second-generation prototype. This work was supported in part by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics under Award No. DE-FG02-08ER41557.

  1. Physical processes in the strong magnetic fields of accreting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical formulae are fitted to observational data on physical processes occurring in strong magnetic fields surrounding accreting neutron stars. The propagation of normal modes in the presence of a quantizing magnetic field is discussed in terms of a wave equation in Fourier space, quantum electrodynamic effects, polarization and mode ellipticity. The results are applied to calculating the Thomson scattering, bremsstrahlung and Compton scattering cross-sections, which are a function of the frequency, angle and polarization of the magnetic field. Numerical procedures are explored for solving the radiative transfer equations. When applied to modeling X ray pulsars, a problem arises in the necessity to couple the magnetic angle and frequency dependence of the cross-sections with the hydrodynamic equations. The use of time-dependent averaging and approximation techniques is indicated.

  2. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  3. Determining the neutron star surface magnetic field strength of two Z sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoqiang; Huang, Chunping; Wang, Yanan

    2013-02-01

    From the extreme position of disk motion, we infer the neutron star (NS) surface magnetic field strength (B 0) of Z-source GX 17+2 and Cyg X-2. The inferred B 0 of GX 17+2 and Cyg X-2 are ~(1-5)×108 G and ~(1-3)×108 G, respectively, which are not inferior to that of millisecond X-ray pulsars or atoll sources. It is likely that the NS magnetic axis of Z sources is parallel to the axis of rotation, which could result in the lack of pulsations in these sources.

  4. [Human behavior in the solar radiation field with reference to ultraviolet exposure].

    PubMed

    Schauberger, G; Keck, G; Cabaj, A

    1992-09-01

    There is a causal relation between solar ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer. For epidemiological investigations, quantification of the UV exposure is essential. To set up a risk assessment for the whole population, a representative survey was performed in Austria. The questionnaire refers to three sectors of everyday life: work, recreation and holidays; in addition the use of solaria is asked about for a further investigation. The UV exposure caused by humans' behaviour in the field of solar radiation was analysed from various demographic aspects. For some subpopulations the UV exposure sustained during work, recreation and holidays was compared. Groups with high occupational UV exposure show a weaker tendency to stay outdoors during leisure time and holidays than groups characterized by high UV exposure in their leisure time, who also prefer sun-intensive activities during holidays. PMID:1399598

  5. The Hidden Magnetic Field of the Young Neutron Star in Kesteven 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabaltas, Natalia; Lai, Dong

    2012-04-01

    Recent observations of the central compact object in the Kesteven 79 supernova remnant show that this neutron star (NS) has a weak dipole magnetic field (a few × 1010 G) but an anomalously large (~64%) pulse fraction in its surface X-ray emission. We explore the idea that a substantial sub-surface magnetic field exists in the NS crust, which produces diffuse hot spots on the stellar surface due to anisotropic heat conduction, and gives rise to the observed X-ray pulsation. We develop a general-purpose method, termed "Temperature Template with Full Transport" (TTFT), that computes the synthetic pulse profile of surface X-ray emission from NSs with arbitrary magnetic field and surface temperature distributions, taking into account magnetic atmosphere opacities, beam pattern, vacuum polarization, and gravitational light bending. We show that a crustal toroidal magnetic field of order a few × 1014 G or higher, varying smoothly across the crust, can produce sufficiently distinct surface hot spots to generate the observed pulse fraction in the Kes 79 NS. This result suggests that substantial sub-surface magnetic fields, much stronger than the "visible" dipole fields, may be buried in the crusts of some young NSs, and such hidden magnetic fields can play an important role in their observational manifestations. The general TTFT tool we have developed can also be used for studying radiation from other magnetic NSs.

  6. Potential and Reality at the Reference Desk: Reflections on a "Return to the Field."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Charles A.

    1984-01-01

    Reports reflections of library school reference teacher who practiced for year as day-to-day reference librarian. Highlights include ideal reference librarianship; concepts helpful in explaining low morale; changes in basic reference service elements (information resources, clients, librarians); current coping strategies; and ways in which to cope…

  7. Neutron distribution, electric dipole polarizability and weak form factor of 48Ca from chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Kyle

    2016-03-01

    How large is the 48Ca nucleus? While the electric charge distribution of this nucleus was accurately measured decades ago, both experimental and ab initio descriptions of the neutron distribution are deficient. We address this question using ab initio calculations of the electric charge, neutron, and weak distributions of 48Ca based on chiral effective field theory. Historically, chiral effective field theory calculations of systems larger than 4 nucleons have been plagued by strong systematic errors which result in theoretical descriptions that are too dense and over bound. We address these errors using a novel approach that permits us to accurately reproduce binding energy and charge radius of 48Ca, and to constrain electroweak observables such as the neutron radius, electric dipole polarizability, and the weak form factor. For a full list of contributors to this work, please see ``Neutron and weak-charge distributions of the 48Ca nucleus,'' Nature Physics (2015) doi:10.1038/nphys3529.

  8. Simulation of the Geomagnetic Cut-off with GEANT using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, J.; Bercuci, A.; Vulpescu, B.

    2001-08-01

    The International Geomagnetic Reference Field is used in a GEANT3 simulation to calculate the geomagnetic cut-off for cosmic rays entering in the Earth's magnetic field. The calculations are done in the back tracking method, where antiprotons start from the top of atmosphere and are tracked to outer space. The geomagnetic cut-off functions are estimated in momentum steps of 0.2 GeV for 131 directions in 1655 locations covering in a nearly equidistant grid the surface of the Earth. For special locations, where neutrino or low energy muon data have been measured, the cut-off functions are calculated in a fine grid of 21601 directions. The estimated geomagnetic cut-offs can be verified by the experimental results for primary protons and helium nuclei measured in different geomagnetic latitudes during the shuttle mission of the AMS prototype. These precise tables of the geomagnetic cut-off can be used in the frame of the CORSIKA code to calculate atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes.

  9. Comparison of Reference Values in Whole Blood of DMDmdx/J and C57BL/6J Mice Using Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metairon, S.; Zamboni, C. B.; Suzuki, M. F.; Júnior, C. R. B.; Sant'Anna, O. A.

    2011-08-01

    The Br, Ca, Cl, K, Na and S concentrations in whole blood of DMDmdx/J and C57BL/6J mice were determined using Neutron Activation Analysis technique. Reference values obtained from twenty one whole blood samples of these strains were analyzed in the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN (São Paulo, Brasil). These data contribute for applications in veterinary medicine related to biochemistry analyses using whole blood as well as to evaluate the performance of treatments in muscular dystrophy.

  10. Neutron contribution to CaF2:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeter response in mixed (n/y) field environments.

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Griffin, Patrick Joseph

    2003-07-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), particularly CaF{sub 2}:Mn, are often used as photon dosimeters in mixed (n/{gamma}) field environments. In these mixed field environments, it is desirable to separate the photon response of a dosimeter from the neutron response. For passive dosimeters that measure an integral response, such as TLDs, the separation of the two components must be performed by postexperiment analysis because the TLD reading system cannot distinguish between photon- and neutron-produced response. Using a model of an aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 (CaF{sub 2}:Mn) chip, a systematic effort has been made to analytically determine the various components that contribute to the neutron response of a TLD reading. The calculations were performed for five measured reactor neutron spectra and one theoretical thermal neutron spectrum. The five measured reactor spectra all have experimental values for aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chips. Calculations were used to determine the percentage of the total TLD response produced by neutron interactions in the TLD and aluminum equilibrator. These calculations will aid the Sandia National Laboratories-Radiation Metrology Laboratory (SNL-RML) in the interpretation of the uncertainty for TLD dosimetry measurements in the mixed field environments produced by SNL reactor facilities.

  11. Neutron Contribution to CaF2:Mn Thermoluminescent Dosimeter Response in Mixed (n/y) Field Environments

    SciTech Connect

    DEPRIEST, KENDALL R.

    2002-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), particularly CaF{sub 2}:Mn, are often used as photon dosimeters in mixed (n/{gamma}) field environments. In these mixed field environments, it is desirable to separate the photon response of a dosimeter from the neutron response. For passive dosimeters that measure an integral response, such as TLDs, the separation of the two components must be performed by post-experiment analysis because the TLD reading system cannot distinguish between photon and neutron produced response. Using a model of an aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chip, a systematic effort has been made to analytically determine the various components that contribute to the neutron response of a TLD reading. The calculations were performed for five measured reactor neutron spectra and one theoretical thermal neutron spectrum. The five measured reactor spectra all have dosimetry quality experimental values for aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chips. Calculations were used to determined the percentage of the total TLD response produced by neutron interactions in the TLD and aluminum equilibrator. These calculations will aid the Sandia National Laboratories-Radiation Metrology Laboratory (SNL-RML) in the interpretation of the uncertainty for TLD dosimetry measurements in the mixed field environments produced by SNL reactor facilities.

  12. ESR response of CFQ-Gd2O3 dosimeters to a mixed neutron-gamma field: Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Hoseininaveh, M; Ranjbar, A H

    2015-11-01

    Clear fused quartz (CFQ) may be considered a suitable material for electron and gamma dose measurements using electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. Research has been ongoing to optimize the neutron capture therapy (NCT) mechanism and its effects in cancer treatment. Neutron sources of the mixed neutron-gamma field are a challenge for this treatment method. A reliable dosimetric measurement and treatment should be able to determine various components of this mixed field. In this study, the ESR response of cylindrical and spherical shells of CFQ dosimeters, filled with Gd2O3, when exposed to a thermal neutron beam, has been investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. In order to maximize the ESR response, the dimensions of the outer and inner parts of the samples have been chosen as variables, and the amount of energy deposited in the samples has been determined. The optimum size of the samples has been determined, and the capability of discriminating gamma and neutron dose in a mixed neutron-gamma field regarding the CFQ-Gd2O3 dosimeter has also been widely studied. PMID:26342935

  13. Experimental determination of detection limits for performing neutron activation analysis for gold in the field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzemba, M.S.; Weldy, J.; Pearcy, E.; Prikryl, J.; Pickett, D.

    1999-11-01

    Measurements are presented of gold concentration in rock/soil samples by delayed neutron activation analysis using a device and method that are potentially field portable. The device consists of a polyethylene moderator and {sup 252}Cf as the source of neutrons for activating the samples and a high-purity germanium detector to measure the 412-keV gamma-ray emissions from activated gold. This information is used to extract the gold concentration in the sample. Two types of samples were investigated: (1) pure SiO{sub 2} doped with a known amount of gold chloride and (2) US Geological Survey standards. The former types were used to evaluate optimum device performance and to calibrate the device and method. The latter types were used to show typical system performance for the intended application (field exploration for gold deposits). It was found that the device was capable of determining gold concentrations to {approximately}10 ppb with a turnaround time (the sum of irradiation, decay, and counting times) of {approximately}10 days. For samples where the gold concentration was much higher (i.e., gold ore), turnaround times are {approximately}2 days and could be shortened further by sacrificing accuracy (e.g., lessening irradiation, decay, and counting times) or by augmenting source strength.

  14. Neutron scattering study of the field-induced tricritical point in MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindervater, J.; Bauer, A.; Garst, M.; Janoschek, M.; Martin, N.; Mühlbauer, S.; Häussler, W.; Böni, P.; Pfleiderer, C.

    The intermetallic compound MnSi attracts great scientific interest due to two unusual phase transitions, namely the transition from the conical phase to a skyrmion lattice in small fields and the transition from the helical to the paramagnetic phase without external magnetic field that was recently identified to be a fluctuation induced first-order transition, i.e. a so called Brazovskii-transition. Recent measurements of the specific heat provide striking evidence for a tricritical point (TCP), were the first order transition alters to second order. We report neutron spin echo measurements using the MIEZE technique. The recorded quasi elastic linewidth shows a change of the characteristic spin fluctuations at the TCP. The combination with additional SANS measurements and a generalized Brazovskii theory establishes a consistent picture of the statics and dynamics of the transition. Financial support by ERC-AdG (291079 TOPFIT) and through DFG TRR80 is greatfully acknowledged.

  15. Magnetic Field and Pressure Dependence of Small Angle Neutron Scattering in MnSi

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleiderer, C.; Reznik, D.; Pintschovius, L.; Haug, J.

    2007-10-12

    We report small angle neutron scattering of spontaneous and magnetic field aligned components of the helical spin polarization in MnSi for temperatures T down to 0.35 K, at pressures p up to 21 kbar, and magnetic field B up to 0.7 T. The parameter range of our study spans the first order transition between helical order and partial magnetic order at p{sub c}=14.6 kbar, which coincides with the onset of an extended regime of non-Fermi liquid resistivity. Our study suggests that MnSi above p{sub c} is not dominated by the remnants of the first order transition at p{sub c}, but that an unidentified mechanism favors stabilization of a new ground state other than helical order.

  16. Field-Scale Soil Moisture Observations in Irrigated Agriculture Fields Using the Cosmic-ray Neutron Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, T. E.; Avery, W. A.; Finkenbiner, C. E.; Wang, T.; Brocca, L.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 40% of global food production comes from irrigated agriculture. With the increasing demand for food even greater pressures will be placed on water resources within these systems. In this work we aimed to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture at the field-scale (~500 m) using the newly developed cosmic-ray neutron rover near Waco, NE. Here we mapped soil moisture of 144 quarter section fields (a mix of maize, soybean, and natural areas) each week during the 2014 growing season (May to September). The 11 x11 km study domain also contained 3 stationary cosmic-ray neutron probes for independent validation of the rover surveys. Basic statistical analysis of the domain indicated a strong inverted parabolic relationship between the mean and variance of soil moisture. The relationship between the mean and higher order moments were not as strong. Geostatistical analysis indicated the range of the soil moisture semi-variogram was significantly shorter during periods of heavy irrigation as compared to non-irrigated periods. Scaling analysis indicated strong power law behavior between the variance of soil moisture and averaging area with minimal dependence of mean soil moisture on the slope of the power law function. Statistical relationships derived from the rover dataset offer a novel set of observations that will be useful in: 1) calibrating and validating land surface models, 2) calibrating and validating crop models, 3) soil moisture covariance estimates for statistical downscaling of remote sensing products such as SMOS and SMAP, and 4) provide center-pivot scale mean soil moisture data for optimal irrigation timing and volume amounts.

  17. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases. PMID:27455499

  18. Realistic exact solution for the exterior field of a rotating neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachón, Leonardo A.; Rueda, Jorge A.; Sanabria-Gómez, José D.

    2006-05-01

    A new six-parametric, axisymmetric, and asymptotically flat exact solution of Einstein-Maxwell field equations having reflection symmetry is presented. It has arbitrary physical parameters of mass, angular momentum, mass-quadrupole moment, current octupole moment, electric charge, and magnetic dipole, so it can represent the exterior field of a rotating, deformed, magnetized, and charged object; some properties of the closed-form analytic solution such as its multipolar structure, electromagnetic fields, and singularities are also presented. In the vacuum case, this analytic solution is matched to some numerical interior solutions representing neutron stars, calculated by Berti and Stergioulas [E. Berti and N. Stergioulas, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc.MNRAA40035-8711 350, 1416 (2004)10.1111/j.1365-2966.2004.07740.x], imposing that the multipole moments be the same. As an independent test of accuracy of the solution to describe exterior fields of neutron stars, we present an extensive comparison of the radii of innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) obtained from the Berti and Stergioulas numerical solutions, the Kerr solution [R. P. Kerr, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 11, 237 (1963)10.1103/PhysRevLett.11.237], the Hartle and Thorne solution [J. B. Hartle and K. S. Thorne, Astrophys. J.ASJOAB0004-637X 153, 807 (1968)10.1086/149707], an analytic series expansion derived by Shibata and Sasaki [M. Shibata and M. Sasaki, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ0556-2821 58, 104011 (1998)10.1103/PhysRevD.58.104011], and our exact solution. We found that radii of ISCOs from our solution fits better than others with realistic numerical interior solutions.

  19. Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) method for measurements of soil moisture in cropped fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Rivera Villarreyes, Carlos; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. However, so far only few methods are on the way to close this gap between point measurements and remote sensing. This study evaluates the applicability of the Ground Albedo Neutron Sensing (GANS) for integral quantification of seasonal soil moisture in the root zone at the scale of a field or small watershed, making use of the crucial role of hydrogen as neutron moderator relative to other landscape materials. GANS measurements were performed at two locations in Germany under different vegetative situations and seasonal conditions. Ground albedo neutrons were measured at (i) a lowland Bornim farmland (Brandenburg) cropped with sunflower in 2011 and winter rye in 2012, and (ii) a mountainous farmland catchment (Schaefertal, Harz Mountains) since middle 2011. At both sites depth profiles of soil moisture were measured at several locations in parallel by frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) for comparison and calibration. Initially, calibration parameters derived from a previous study with corn cover were tested under sunflower and winter rye periods at the same farmland. GANS soil moisture based on these parameters showed a large discrepancy compared to classical soil moisture measurements. Therefore, two new calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for GANS were evaluated in this study. This included different sets of calibration parameters based on different growing periods of sunflower. New calibration parameters showed a good agreement with FDR network during sunflower period (RMSE = 0.023 m3 m-3), but they underestimated soil moisture in the winter rye period. The GANS approach resulted to be highly affected by temporal changes of biomass and crop types which suggest the need of neutron corrections for long-term observations with crop rotation. Finally

  20. Reference Sets, Identities, and Aspirations in a Complex Organizational Field: The Case of American Four-Year Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brint, Steven; Riddle, Mark; Hanneman, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces cluster analysis and reference set analysis as tools for understanding structure, identity, and aspiration in complex organizational fields. Cluster analysis is used to identify the structure of the organizational field in American four-year colleges and universities. The article shows that presidential choices of reference…

  1. Out-of-field photon and neutron dose equivalents from step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Salehpour, Mohammad . E-mail: msalehpour@mdanderson.org; Followill, David S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Kuban, Deborah A.; White, R. Allen; Rosen, Isaac I.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To measure the photon and neutron out-of-treatment-field dose equivalents to various organs from different treatment strategies (conventional vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy [IMRT]) at different treatment energies and delivered by different accelerators. Methods and Materials: Independent measurements were made of the photon and neutron out-of-field dose equivalents resulting from one conventional and six IMRT treatments for prostate cancer. The conventional treatment used an 18-MV beam from a Clinac 2100; the IMRT treatments used 6-MV, 10-MV, 15-MV, and 18-MV beams from a Varian Clinac 2100 accelerator and 6-MV and 15-MV beams from a Siemens Primus accelerator. Photon doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Rando phantom, and neutron fluence was measured with gold foils. Dose equivalents to the colon, liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, thyroid, and active bone marrow were determined for each treatment approach. Results: For each treatment approach, the relationship between dose equivalent per MU, distance from the treatment field, and depth in the patient was examined. Photon dose equivalents decreased approximately exponentially with distance from the treatment field. Neutron dose equivalents were independent of distance from the treatment field and decreased with increasing tissue depth. Neutrons were a significant contributor to the out-of field dose equivalent for beam energies {>=}15 MV. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon and neutron dose equivalents can be estimated to any point in a patient undergoing a similar treatment approach from the distance of that point to the central axis and from the tissue depth. This information is useful in determining the dose to critical structures and in evaluating the risk of associated carcinogenesis.

  2. Cosmic Rays and Clouds, 2. Atmospheric Electric Field Effect In Different Neutron Multiplicities According To Emilio Segre' Observatory One Minute Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Ne'Eman, Yu.; Pustil'Nik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospheric electric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS of Emilio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-off rigidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine the atmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutron intensity and for multiplicities m=1, m=2, m=3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison and excluding primary CR variations we use also one minute data on neutron multiplicities obtained by NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). In February 2000 were observed 14 periods of thun- derstorms with different durations (up to about 1000 min), the maximum strength of electric field was 110 kV/m. Thunderstorms were observed also in March 2000 (6 pe- riods with maximal field 112 kV/m), in April 2000 (9; 70 kV/m), in May 2000 (4; 10 kV/m), in October 2000 (10; 70 kV/m), in November 2000 (5; 50 kV/m), in De- cember 2000 (7; 88 kV/m), in January 2001 (12; 62 kV/m), in February 2001 (10; 88 kV/m). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (1995) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by captchuring of slow negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping few neutrons. As it was shown in Dorman et al. (1999), the biggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicity m=1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We will control this conclusion on the basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field. REFERENCES: Dorman L.I. and Dorman I.V., 1995. "Cosmic-ray atmospheric electric field effects". Canadian J. of Physics, Vol. 73, pp. 440-443. L.I. Dorman, I.V. Dorman, N. Iucci, M. Parisi, G. Villoresi, and I.G. Zuk- erman, 1999. "Emilio Segre' Observatory and Expected Time-Variations of Neutron Monitor Total and Multiplicities Counting Rates Caused by Cosmic Ray Particle

  3. Can magnetic-field windup kill the r-mode instability of neutron stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, John; Lindblom, Lee; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-03-01

    At second order in perturbation theory, the unstable r-mode of a rotating star includes growing differential rotation whose form and growth rate are determined by gravitational radiation reaction. With no magnetic field, the angular velocity of a fluid element grows exponentially until the mode reaches its nonlinear saturation amplitude and remains nonzero after saturation. With a background magnetic field, the differential rotation winds up and amplifies the field, and previous work suggests that the amplification may damp out the instability. A background magnetic field, however, turns the time-independent perturbations corresponding to adding differential rotation into perturbations with characteristic frequencies of order the Alfven frequency. We argue that magnetic field growth stops soon after the mode reaches its saturation amplitude. We show that this is the case for a toy model, where magnetic amplification for small saturation amplitude is too small to damp the r-mode. For a more realistic model of a cold, rotating neutron star, an analogous upper limit depends on the assumption that there are no marginally unstable perturbations.

  4. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant melanoma with special reference to absorbed doses to the normal skin and tumor.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Hiratsuka, J; Kobayashi, T; Sakurai, Y; Yoshino, K; Karashima, H; Turu, K; Araki, K; Mishima, Y; Ichihashi, M

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-two patients with malignant melanoma were treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using 10B-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The estimation of absorbed dose and optimization of treatment dose based on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in melanoma patients is described. The doses of gamma-rays were measured using small TLDs of Mg2SiO4 (Tb) and thermal neutron fluence was measured using gold foil and wire. The total absorbed dose to the tissue from BNCT was obtained by summing the primary and capture gamma-ray doses and the high LET radiation doses from 10B(n, alpha)7Li and 14N(n,p)14C reactions. The key point of the dose optimization is that the skin surrounding the tumour is always irradiated to 18 Gy-Eq, which is the maximum tolerable dose to the skin, regardless of the 10B-concentration in the tumor. The neutron fluence was optimized as follows. (1) The 10B concentration in the blood was measured 15-40 min after the start of neutron irradiation. (2) The 10B-concentration in the skin was estimated by multiplying the blood 10B value by a factor of 1.3. (3) The neutron fluence was calculated. Absorbed doses to the skin ranged from 15.7 to 37.1 Gy-Eq. Among the patients, 16 out of 22 patients exhibited tolerable skin damage. Although six patients showed skin damage that exceeded the tolerance level, three of them could be cured within a few months after BNCT and the remaining three developed severe skin damage requiring skin grafts. The absorbed doses to the tumor ranged from 15.7 to 68.5 Gy-Eq and the percentage of complete response was 73% (16/22). When BNCT is used in the treatment of malignant melanoma, based on the pharmacokinetics of BPA and radiobiological considerations, promising clinical results have been obtained, although many problems and issues remain to be solved. PMID:14626847

  5. Spin period change and the magnetic fields of neutron stars in Be X-ray binaries in the SMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klus, H.; Ho, W. C. G.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Townsend, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the long term average spin period, rate of change of spin period and X-ray luminosity during outbursts for 42 Be X-ray binary systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We also collect and calculate parameters of each system and use this data to determine that all systems contain a neutron star which is accreting via a disc, rather than a wind, and that if these neutron stars are near spin equilibrium, then over half of them, including all with spin periods over about 100 seconds, have magnetic fields over the quantum critical level of 4.4×1013 G. If these neutron stars are not close to spin equilibrium, then their magnetic fields are inferred to be much lower, on the order of 106-1010 G, comparable to the fields of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries. Both results are unexpected and have implications for the rate of magnetic field decay and the isolated neutron star population.

  6. Correlation between effective and ambient neutron doses in radiation fields of nuclear-physics facilities at the joint institute for nuclear research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, S. V.; Lesovaya, E. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.

    2015-01-01

    The questions of a correlation between normative and operational quantities in the dosimetry of ionizing radiation still attract the attention of professionals working in the field. Since the neutron fields of nuclear-physics facilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) are highly varied, the question of whether the ambient neutron dose always serves as a conservative estimate of the effective dose (in the terms of which the dose limits are set) is of practical importance for radiation monitoring at JINR. We studied the correlation between the calculated values of effective and ambient neutron doses obtained based on a representative set of neutron spectra measured at JINR with the use of a multisphere neutron spectrometer. It is demonstrated that measuring the ambient neutron dose may not serve as a confirmation of compliance with the set dose limits in "hard" neutron fields.

  7. In-situ neutron scattering studies of magnetic shape memory alloys under stress, temperature, and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W; Sisneros, Thomas A; Kabra, Saurabh; Schlagel, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized the SMARTS engineering neutron diffractometer to study the crystallographic orientation and phase transformations in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni 2MnGa under conditions of temperature (200-600K), stress (500MPa), and magnetic field (2T). Neutrons are uniquely suited to probe the crystallographic response of materials to external stimuli because of their high penetration, which allows them to sample the bulk of the material (as opposed to the surface) as well as pass through environmental chambers. A single crystal of Ni{sub 5}MnGa was repeatedly thermally cycled through the Austenitic-Martensitic phase transformation under varying conditions of applied stress, magnetic field or both. In-situ neutron diffraction was used to quantitatively monitor the population of the crystallographic variants in the martensitic phase as a function of the external stimuli during cooling. Neutron diffraction was used to monitor variant selection in the Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloy Ni{sub 2}Mn Ga during austenitic to martensitic transformation under varying conditions of externally applied stress and magnetic field. Qualitatively, the results were to be expected in this simple example. The shorter and magnetically soft c-axis of the tetragonal martensitic phase aligned with the compressive stress or magnetic field. However, neutron diffraction proved useful in directly quantifying the selection of the preferred variant by external influence. For instance, by quantifying the variant selection, the neutron diffraction results made apparent that the sample 'remembered' a loading cycle following a 'reset' cycle with no external applied stress. Moreover, the power of in-situ neutron diffraction will become more apparent when applied to more complex, less understood, samples such as polycrystalline samples or composite samples.

  8. Crystal fields in YbInNi4 determined with magnetic form factor and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severing, A.; Givord, F.; Boucherle, J.-X.; Willers, T.; Rotter, M.; Fisk, Z.; Bianchi, A.; Fernandez-Diaz, M. T.; Stunault, A.; Rainford, B. D.; Taylor, J.; Goremychkin, E.

    2011-04-01

    The magnetic form factor of YbInNi4 has been determined via the flipping ratios R with polarized neutron diffraction, and the scattering function S(Q,ω) was measured in an inelastic neutron scattering experiment. Both experiments were performed with the aim of determining the crystal-field scheme. The magnetic form factor clearly excludes the possibility of a Γ7 doublet as the ground state. The inelastic neutron data exhibit two almost equally strong peaks at 3.2 meV and 4.4 meV which points, in agreement with earlier neutron data, toward a Γ8 quartet ground state. Further possibilities such as a quasiquartet ground state are discussed.

  9. Full-reference quality assessment of stereoscopic images by learning binocular receptive field properties.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Li, Kemeng; Lin, Weisi; Jiang, Gangyi; Yu, Mei; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-10-01

    Quality assessment of 3D images encounters more challenges than its 2D counterparts. Directly applying 2D image quality metrics is not the solution. In this paper, we propose a new full-reference quality assessment for stereoscopic images by learning binocular receptive field properties to be more in line with human visual perception. To be more specific, in the training phase, we learn a multiscale dictionary from the training database, so that the latent structure of images can be represented as a set of basis vectors. In the quality estimation phase, we compute sparse feature similarity index based on the estimated sparse coefficient vectors by considering their phase difference and amplitude difference, and compute global luminance similarity index by considering luminance changes. The final quality score is obtained by incorporating binocular combination based on sparse energy and sparse complexity. Experimental results on five public 3D image quality assessment databases demonstrate that in comparison with the most related existing methods, the devised algorithm achieves high consistency with subjective assessment. PMID:26011880

  10. Synchronous scanning of reference mirror and objective lens for high-resolution full-field interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwagi, Ken; Kasuya, Yosuke; Kojima, Shuto; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    We realized a long-scanning-range and high-resolution interferometry in a time-domain full-field microscopic scheme by adopting a simple configuration. A reference mirror was synchronously scanned with an objective lens, which was installed in a common path, to prevent lateral resolution degradation due to defocus at the mirror. High axial resolution was obtained using a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generated by a 1.55 µm pump. The SC was generated by propagating a femtosecond pulse at 1.55 µm through a highly nonlinear dispersion shifted fiber with a small dispersion slope. We designed and constructed an interferometer carefully to utilize the entire bandwidth. The broad bandwidth of the interferometer achieved an axial resolution of 2.50 µm in air. The synchronous scanning maintained a lateral resolution longer than 1 mm. The system successfully yielded a cross-sectional image of two layers of scotch tape along the 400-µm-depth and 90-nm-step surface profiles.

  11. B-Field Determination from Magnetoacoustic Oscillations in Kilohertz Quasi-periodic Oscillation Neutron Star Binaries: Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, L. G.; Bradshaw, C. F.; Wood, K. S.

    2001-10-01

    We present a method for determining the B-field around neutron stars based on observed kilohertz and viscous quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies used in combination with the best-fit optical depth and temperature of a Comptonization model. In the framework of the transition layer QPO model, we analyze the magnetoacoustic wave (MAW) formation in the layer between a neutron star surface and the inner edge of a Keplerian disk. We derive formulas for the MAW frequencies for different regimes of radial transition layer oscillations. We demonstrate that our model can use the QPO as a new kind of probe to determine the magnetic field strengths for 4U 1728-42, GX 340+0, and Scorpius X-1 in the zone where the QPOs occur. Observations indicate that the dependence of the viscous frequency on the Keplerian frequency is closely related to the inferred dependence of the MAW frequency on the Keplerian frequency for a dipole magnetic field. The MAW dependence is based on a single parameter, the magnetic moment of the star as estimated from the field strength in the transition layer. The best-fit magnetic moment parameter is about (0.5-1)×1025 G cm3 for all studied sources. From observational data, the magnetic fields within distances less than 20 km from the neutron star for all three sources are strongly constrained to be dipole fields with the strengths of 107-108 G on the neutron star surface.

  12. MeV-GeV neutrino propagation as a signal of magnetic field amplification in neutron star merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraija, N.

    2016-09-01

    Short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) have widely been accepted to arise from a compact object binary merger; neutron star-neutron star or neutron star-black hole. During the merger of a binary neutron star system, magnetic field can be amplified beyond magnetar field strength (∼1015-1016 G) by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Considering this effect on the GRB "fireball" dynamics, we study the emission, propagation and oscillation of multi MeV-GeV neutrinos through their self-energies and using these we compute the neutrino effective potential up to order MW-4. Additionally, we calculate the number of neutrino events and neutrino flavor ratios that we would expect on Hyper-Kamiokande and DeepCore experiments. We found that MeV neutrinos in a strong magnetic field could provide information of the topology of the field, and that the number of GeV neutrinos expected in DeepCore detector would be directly affected by the strength of the field. It is worth noting that our estimates correspond to the only trustworthy method for verifying the effect of the magnetic field amplification.

  13. Neutron study of crystal field excitations in single crystal CeCu2Ge2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhaupt, Michael; Faulhaber, Enrico; Schneidewind, Astrid; Deppe, Micha; Hradil, Klaudia

    2010-03-01

    CeCu2Ge2 is the counterpart of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2. CeCu2Ge2 is a magnetically ordering (TN= 4.1 K) Kondo lattice with a moderate Sommerfeld coefficient of 140 mJ/molK^2 [1]. Inelastic neutron measurements on a polycrystalline sample revealed a doublet ground state and a quasi-quartet at 16.5 meV [1] though a splitting of the 4f^1 (J=5/2) ground state multiplet into 3 doublets is expected from the point symmetry of the Ce^3+ ions. We performed detailed inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA at FRM II at temperatures between 10 K and 300 K and for different crystallographic directions from low to high momentum transfers. In this way we obtained a reliable separation of magnetic and phonon contributions. From our results we infer that the quasi-quartet consists in fact of two doublets at 17 and 18 meV which exhibit a strong directional dependence of their transition matrix elements to the ground state doublet. Finally we will present a new set of crystal field parameters and their implications on other magnetic properties. [1] G. Knopp et al., Z. Physik B 77 (1989) 95

  14. Modeling the structure of magnetic fields in Neutron Stars: from the interior to the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciantini, Niccolò; Pili, Antonio G.; Del Zanna, Luca

    2016-05-01

    The phenomenology of the emission of pulsars and magnetars depends dramatically on the structure and properties of their magnetic field. In particular it is believed that the outbursting and flaring activity observed in AXPs and SRGs is strongly related to their internal magnetic field. Recent observations have moreover shown that charges are present in their magnetospheres supporting the idea that their magnetic field is tightly twisted in the vicinity of the star. In principle these objects offer a unique opportunity to investigate physics in a regime beyond what can be obtained in the laboratory. We will discuss the properties of equilibrium models of magnetized neutron stars, and we will show how internal and external currents can be related. These magnetic field configurations will be discussed considering also their stability, relevant for their origin and possibly connected to events like SNe and GRBs. We will also show what kind of deformations they induce in the star, that could lead to emission of gravitational waves. In the case of a twisted magnetosphere we will show how the amount of twist regulates their general topology. A general formalism based on the simultaneous numerical solution of the general relativistic Grad-Shafranov equation and Einstein equations will be presented.

  15. Absorbed dose to water determination with ionization chamber dosimetry and calorimetry in restricted neutron, photon, proton and heavy-ion radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Brede, H J; Greif, K-D; Hecker, O; Heeg, P; Heese, J; Jones, D T L; Kluge, H; Schardt, D

    2006-08-01

    Absolute dose measurements with a transportable water calorimeter and ionization chambers were performed at a water depth of 20 mm in four different types of radiation fields, for a collimated (60)Co photon beam, for a collimated neutron beam with a fluence-averaged mean energy of 5.25 MeV, for collimated proton beams with mean energies of 36 MeV and 182 MeV at the measuring position, and for a (12)C ion beam in a scanned mode with an energy per atomic mass of 430 MeV u(-1). The ionization chambers actually used were calibrated in units of air kerma in the photon reference field of the PTB and in units of absorbed dose to water for a Farmer-type chamber at GSI. The absorbed dose to water inferred from calorimetry was compared with the dose derived from ionometry by applying the radiation-field-dependent parameters. For neutrons, the quantities of the ICRU Report 45, for protons the quantities of the ICRU Report 59 and for the (12)C ion beam, the recommended values of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) protocol (TRS 398) were applied. The mean values of the absolute absorbed dose to water obtained with these two independent methods agreed within the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of 1.8% for calorimetry and of 3.0% for ionometry for all types and energies of the radiation beams used in this comparison. PMID:16861773

  16. In vivo observation of tree drought response with low-field NMR and neutron imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-05-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature inmore » the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. Lastly, these results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment.« less

  17. In vivo Observation of Tree Drought Response with Low-Field NMR and Neutron Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Michael W.; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F.; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee T.; Nelson, Ron O.; Vogel, Sven C.; Sandin, Henrik J.; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment. PMID:27200037

  18. In vivo Observation of Tree Drought Response with Low-Field NMR and Neutron Imaging.

    PubMed

    Malone, Michael W; Yoder, Jacob; Hunter, James F; Espy, Michelle A; Dickman, Lee T; Nelson, Ron O; Vogel, Sven C; Sandin, Henrik J; Sevanto, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a living tree in a greenhouse over 2 months. By continuously running the system, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of half an hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistent both with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments show that our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accounting for the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstrate a change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditions for the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system to perform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment. PMID:27200037

  19. Simultaneous Observation of Solar Neutrons and Effects on Terrestrial Magnetic Field in Association with a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamani, Wara; Ticona, Rolando; Ricaldi, Edgar

    2009-04-01

    On November 2, 2003 at 17:03:00 UT a solar flare, registered by the GOES satellite, was also recorded by the Neutron Monitor (NM64) of Cosmic Ray Laboratory at Mount Chacaltaya. This flare affected the local geomagnetic field (F): there were variations in the intensity of the horizontal component (H), declination component (D) and vertical component (Z). Variations on these components, estimated as 71 nT, 10 deg. and 19 nT, respectively, have been observed with the Patacamaya's Geomagnetic Observatory; as well as a net increased field (F), estimated as 66 nT, recorded by the Villa Remedios Geomagnetic Observatory. The duration of the magnetic and neutron signals was approximately 40 and 54 minutes, respectively, which shows that the flare was intense and with large emission of neutrons.

  20. Pulse-shape discrimination of the new plastic scintillators in neutron-gamma mixed field using fast digitizer card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jančář, A.; Kopecký, Z.; Dressler, J.; Veškrna, M.; Matěj, Z.; Granja, C.; Solar, M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently invented plastic scintillator EJ-299-33 enables pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and thus measurement of neutron and photon spectra in mixed fields. In this work we compare the PSD properties of EJ-299-33 plastic and the well-known NE-213 liquid scintillator in monoenergetic neutron fields generated by the Van de Graaff accelerator using the 3H(d, n)4He reaction. Pulses from the scintillators are processed by a newly developed digital measuring system employing the fast digitizer card. This card contains two AD converters connected to the measuring computer via 10 Gbps optical ethernet. The converters operate with a resolution of 12 bits and have two differential inputs with a sampling frequency 1 GHz. The resulting digital channels with different gains are merged into one composite channel with a higher digital resolution in a wide dynamic range of energies. Neutron signals are fully discriminated from gamma signals. Results are presented.

  1. Organ dose conversion coefficients for pediatric reference computational phantoms in external photon radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lienard A.

    In the event of a radiological accident or attack, it is important to estimate the organ doses to those exposed. In general, it is difficult to measure organ dose directly in the field and therefore dose conversion coefficients (DCC) are needed to convert measurable values such as air kerma to organ dose. Previous work on these coefficients has been conducted mainly for adults with a focus on radiation protection workers. Hence, there is a large gap in the literature for pediatric values. This study coupled a Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code with International Council of Radiological Protection (ICRP)-adopted University of Florida and National Cancer Institute pediatric reference phantoms to calculate a comprehensive list of dose conversion coefficients (mGy/mGy) to convert air-kerma to organ dose. Parameters included ten phantoms (newborn, 1-year, 5-year, 10-year, 15-year old male and female), 28 organs over 33 energies between 0.01 and 20 MeV in six (6) irradiation geometries relevant to a child who might be exposed to a radiological release: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right-lateral (RLAT), left-lateral (LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). Dose conversion coefficients to the red bone marrow over 36 skeletal sites were also calculated. It was hypothesized that the pediatric organ dose conversion coefficients would follow similar trends to the published adult values as dictated by human anatomy, but be of a higher magnitude. It was found that while the pediatric coefficients did yield similar patterns to that of the adult coefficients, depending on the organ and irradiation geometry, the pediatric values could be lower or higher than that of the adult coefficients.

  2. The field evaporation of deuterated titanium as a neutron generator ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, B.; Johnson, B. Bargsten; Schwoebel, P. R.

    2010-11-01

    The field evaporation of deuterated titanium films is being investigated as a deuterium ion source for deuterium-tritium neutron generators. It has been found that titanium and deuterated titanium films having thicknesses of up to at least 70 layers assume a body-centered-cubic crystal structure when grown on ⟨110⟩ oriented tungsten substrates. Deuterated titanium films having thicknesses exceeding 50 atomic layers have been controllably field evaporated from the surface of tungsten tips in less than 20 ns. At ion current densities exceeding ˜106 A/cm2 and film thicknesses greater than ˜20 layers, space charge effects decrease the ratio of D to TiDx ions to less than 1. Decreasing the evaporation rate such that ion current densities are of the order of 105 A/cm2 increases the D to TiDx ratio for the evaporation of a film thickness of greater than ˜20 layers by the reduction in space charge effects that can inhibit the dissociation of titanium-deuterium complexes. Atomic deuterium ion yields of ˜10-7 μC of D+/tip have been observed and yields of >10-6 μC of D+/tip should be possible using larger tip radii. The field evaporation of titanium from an array of microfabricated tips has been demonstrated for the first time.

  3. Suppression of Ultracold Neutron Depolarization on Material Surfaces with Magnetic Holding Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, Raymond

    2009-10-01

    Experiments involving polarized Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) for high precision measurements require the use of high Fermi potential materials with a low spin flip probability per bounce. Previous studies show that the spin flip probability for materials vary on the order of 10-3 to 10-6. In this study, the depolarization of UCN was measured within 1-m long, 2 3/4" diameter bare copper, electropolished copper, diamond-like carbon-coated copper, and stainless steel guide tubes as a function of the magnetic holding field. The UCN were trapped between a 6 Tesla solenoidal magnet and a copper plate. A series of Helmholtz coils produced a magnetic holding field over the length of the test guide at 10, 100, or 250 Gauss. The surface depolarization was observed to be suppressed at higher holding fields. These measurements will aid in the determination of an upper limit on depolarization of UCN in the UCNA beta asymmetry measurement at LANL and in understanding the mechanisms for depolarization in non-magnetic guides.

  4. Neutron and gamma field investigations in the VVER-1000 mock-up concrete shielding on the reactor LR-0

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, S.; Egorov, A.; Osmera, B.; Marik, M.; Rypar, V.; Cvachovec, F.; Kolros, A.

    2011-07-01

    Two sets of neutron and gamma field investigations were carried out in the dismountable model of radiation shielding of the VVER-1000 mock-up on the LR-0 reactor. First, measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate and fast neutrons and gamma flux spectra in the operational neutron monitor channel inside a concrete shielding for different shapes and locations of the channel (cylindrical channel in a concrete, channels with collimator in a concrete, cylindrical channel in a graphite). In all cases measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate were done with and without an additional moderator-polyethylene insert inside the channel. Second, measurements and calculations of the {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate spatial distribution inside a concrete. The {sup 3}He(n,p)T reaction rate measurements and calculations were carried out exploring the relative thermal neutron density in the channels and its space distribution in the concrete. Fast neutrons and gamma measurements were carried out with a stilbene (45 x 45 mm) scintillation spectrometer in the energy regions 0.5-10 MeV (neutrons) and 0.2-10 MeV (gammas). (authors)

  5. Study of the tensor correlation in a neutron-rich sd-shell region with mean-field and beyond-mean-field methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Satoru; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi

    2008-04-29

    We study the effect of the tensor force on nuclear structure with mean-field and beyond-mean-field methods. An important correlation induced by the tensor force is a two-particle-two-hole (2p2h) correlation, which cannot be treated with a standard mean-field method. To treat the 2p2h tensor correlation, we develop a new framework [charge- and parity-projected Hartree-Fock (CPPHF) method], which is a beyond-mean-field method. In the CPPHF method, we introduce single-particle states with parity and charge mixing. The parity and charge projections are performed on a total wave function before variation. We apply the CPPHF method to oxygen isotopes including neutron-rich ones. The potential energy from the tensor force has the same order of magnitude as that from the LS force and becomes smaller with neutron number, which indicates that excess neutrons do not contribute to the 2p2h tensor correlation significantly. We also study the effect of the tensor force on spin-orbit-splitting (ls-splitting) in a neutron-rich fluorine isotope {sup 23}F. The tensor force reduces the ls-splitting for the proton d-orbits by about 3 MeV. This effect is important to reproduce the experimental value.

  6. Effects of Magnetic Field and Rotation on 3P2 Superfluidity in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kota; Nitta, Muneto

    2014-09-01

    It is believed that an anisotropic 3P2 superfluid state is realized in the core of neutron stars. Historically, a lot of works (Anderson et al. (1961), Hoffberg et al. (1970) and Tamagaki (1970)) discussed the properties of 3P2 superfluid state. Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation was derived by Fujita, Tsuneto (1972) and Richardson (1972). After that, Mermin (1974) solved the problem of minimizing GL free energy density for d-wave pairing and showed what ground states are realized. By using these results, Sauls and Serene (1978) concluded that the unitary phase is realized in BCS limit, and Sauls et al. (1982) showed 3P2 vortices have a spontaneous magnetization. In this presentation, we firstly introduce GL equation and show some analogy to that of spin2-BEC. In BCS limit, degenerate ground states are parameterized by one parameter. We show effects of gradient terms, magnetic field and rotation on ground states and half-quantized 3P2 vortices are the most stable states under certain conditions. Next, by using an anisotropic GL equation, we discuss a spontaneous magnetization caused by half-quantized 3P2 vortices and compare results with that of integer vortices. Finally, we comment on possible effects of 3P2 superfluid state on neutron star observables. It is believed that an anisotropic 3P2 superfluid state is realized in the core of neutron stars. Historically, a lot of works (Anderson et al. (1961), Hoffberg et al. (1970) and Tamagaki (1970)) discussed the properties of 3P2 superfluid state. Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation was derived by Fujita, Tsuneto (1972) and Richardson (1972). After that, Mermin (1974) solved the problem of minimizing GL free energy density for d-wave pairing and showed what ground states are realized. By using these results, Sauls and Serene (1978) concluded that the unitary phase is realized in BCS limit, and Sauls et al. (1982) showed 3P2 vortices have a spontaneous magnetization. In this presentation, we firstly introduce GL equation and

  7. Assessment of soil moisture dynamics on an irrigated maize field using cosmic ray neutron sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiffele, Lena Maria; Baroni, Gabriele; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2015-04-01

    In recent years cosmic ray neutron sensing (CRS) developed as a valuable, indirect and non-invasive method to estimate soil moisture at a scale of tens of hectares, covering the gap between point scale measurements and large scale remote sensing techniques. The method is particularly promising in cropped and irrigated fields where invasive installation of belowground measurement devices could conflict with the agricultural management. However, CRS is affected by all hydrogen pools in the measurement footprint and a fast growing biomass provides some challenges for the interpretation of the signal and application of the method for detecting soil moisture. For this aim, in this study a cosmic ray probe was installed on a field near Braunschweig (Germany) during one maize growing season (2014). The field was irrigated in stripes of 50 m width using sprinkler devices for a total of seven events. Three soil sampling campaigns were conducted throughout the growing season to assess the effect of different hydrogen pools on calibration results. Additionally, leaf area index and biomass measurements were collected to provide the relative contribution of the biomass on the CRS signal. Calibration results obtained with the different soil sampling campaigns showed some discrepancy well correlated with the biomass growth. However, after the calibration function was adjusted to account also for lattice water and soil organic carbon, thus representing an equivalent water content of the soil, the differences decreased. Soil moisture estimated with CRS responded well to precipitation and irrigation events, confirming also the effective footprint of the method (i.e., radius 300 m) and showing occurring water stress for the crop. Thus, the dynamics are in agreement with the soil moisture determined with point scale measurements but they are less affected by the heterogeneous moisture conditions within the field. For this reason, by applying a detailed calibration, CRS proves to be a

  8. Neutron Dark-Field Imaging of the Domain Distribution in the Intermediate State of Lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, T.; Schulz, M.; Grünzweig, C.; Kaestner, A.; Bauer, A.; Böni, P.; Mühlbauer, S.

    2016-02-01

    The intermediate state (IS) of a type-I superconductor is characterized by coexistence of Meissner phase and normal conducting phase. Experiments on the topology of the IS show a variety of universal domain patterns which are also seen in various other physical, chemical or even biological systems on various length and time scales. The possibility to easily tune the domain structure of the IS by a variation of magnetic field or temperature ideally qualifies type-I superconductors as general model systems for the investigation of domain nucleation and distribution. However, the experimental observation of the IS domain structure was up to now restricted to either thin films or surfaces. We demonstrate how neutron grating interferometry (nGI) probes the IS domain distribution in the interior of a bulk single-crystalline lead sample. By means of nGI, we are able to visualize the field penetration process into the superconductor as well as the hysteretic behavior of the intermediate state morphology. Finally, the impact of nGI for investigations on bulk domain nucleation is discussed, as this technique is applicable on many other systems that reveal a phase separation on a micrometer length scale.

  9. A modification of the force field approach to describe sub neutron monitor energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, K.; Gieseler, J.; Heber, B.; Kühl, P.

    2014-12-01

    As they propagate through the heliosphere, Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) are modulated by various effects before they are detected at Earth. This transport can be described by the Parker equation (Parker, 1965). It calculates the phase space distribution of GCRs depending on the main modulation processes: convection, drifts, diffusion and adiabatic energy changes. A first order approximation of this equation is the force field approach, reducing it to a one-parameter dependency, the solar modulation potential. Utilizing this approach, Usoskin et al. (2005; 2011) reconstructed the solar modulation potential between 1936 and 2010, which by now is commonly used in many fields. However, it has been shown previously e.g. by Herbst et al. (2010) that the solar modulation potential depends not only on the Local Interstellar Spectrum (LIS) but also on the energy range of interest. Using the LIS by Usoskin et al. (2005) together with published proton intensity spectra obtained by PAMELA as well as neutron monitor and spacecraft measurements, we have investigated this energy dependence further. As expected, the results show severe limitations at lower energies including a strong dependence on the solar magnetic epoch. Based on these results, we will present a tool to describe GCR proton spectra in the energy range from a few hundred MeV to 40 GeV over the last four solar cycles.

  10. Evaluation of the spectrometric and dose characteristics of neutron fields inside the Russian segment of the ISS by fission detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshakov, V. A.; Vorob'ev, I. B.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Lyagushin, V. I.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Kushin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring the dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons inside the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) from March 21 until November 10, 2002 are presented. Statistically reliable results of measurement are obtained by using thorium- and uranium-based fission detectors with cadmium and boron filters. The kits of the detectors with filters have been arranged in three compartments within assembled passive detectors in the BRADOS space experiment. The ambient dose rate H* = 139 μSv day and an energy spectrum of neutrons in the range of 10-2-104 MeV is obtained as average for the ISS compartments and is compared with the measurements carried out inside the compartments of the MIR space station. Recommendations on how to improve the procedure for using the fission detectors to measure the characteristics of neutron fields inside the compartments of space stations are formulated.

  11. Neutron stars and strange stars in the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model

    SciTech Connect

    P. Wang; S. Lawley; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

    2005-06-01

    We investigate the equations of state for pure neutron matter and strange hadronic matter in {beta}-equilibrium, including {Lambda}, {Sigma} and {Xi} hyperons. The masses and radii of pure neutron stars and strange hadronic stars are obtained. For a pure neutron star, the maximum mass is about 1.8 M{sub sun}, while for a strange hadronic star, the maximum mass is around 1.45M{sub sun}. The typical radii of pure neutron stars and strange hadronic stars are about 11.0-12.3 km and 10.7-11.7 km, respectively.

  12. SU-E-T-560: Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Radiation Field Around a Medical 18 MV Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, F; Czarnecki, D; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Today the majority of radiation therapy treatments are performed at medical electron linear accelerators (linacs). The accelerated electrons are used for the generation of bremsstrahlung photons. The use of higher electron respectively photon energies has some advantages over lower energies such as the longer dose build-up. However photons with energies higher than ∼7 MeV can additionally to the interaction with bound electrons undergo inelastic reactions with nuclei. These photonuclear reactions lead to the emission of fast neutrons which contaminate the primary photon field. The neutrons might penetrate through the collimators and deliver out-of-field dose to the patient. Furthermore the materials inside the linac head as well as the air inside the treatment room get activated which might deliver dose to the medical employees even when the linac is not in operation. A detailed knowledge of these effects is essential for adequate radiation protection of the employees and an optimal patient treatment. Methods: It is a common method to study the radiation fields of such linacs by means of Monte Carlo simulations. For the investigation of the effects caused by photonuclear reactions a typical linac in high energy mode (Varian Clinac 18 MV-X) as well as the surrounding bunker were modelled and simulated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA which includes extensive nuclear reaction and neutron transport models additional to electron-photon transport as well as capabilities for a detailed study of effective dose distributions and activation yields. Results: Neutron spectra as well as neutron effective dose distributions within the bunker were obtained, reaching up to some mSv/Gy in the patient’s plane. The results are normalized per Gy in the depth dose maximum at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size. Therefore an absolute interpretation is possible. Conclusion: The obtained data gives a better understanding of the photonuclear reaction caused effects.

  13. Investigation of the field-induced ferromagnetic phase transition in spin-polarized neutron matter: A lowest order constrained variational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bordbar, G. H.; Rezaei, Z.; Montakhab, Afshin

    2011-04-15

    In this article, the lowest order constrained variational method is used to investigate the magnetic properties of spin-polarized neutron matter in the presence of strong magnetic field at zero temperature employing the AV{sub 18} potential. Our results indicate that a ferromagnetic phase transition is induced by a strong magnetic field with strength greater than 10{sup 18} G, leading to a partial spin polarization of the neutron matter. It is also shown that the equation of state of neutron matter in the presence of a magnetic field is stiffer than in the absence of a magnetic field.

  14. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, M. T. Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Dávila, J.

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  15. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, M. T.; Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Dávila, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    2015-07-01

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e'n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction 10B(n,α)7Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (˜1.6 104 neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  16. Risk of Developing Second Cancer From Neutron Dose in Proton Therapy as Function of Field Characteristics, Organ, and Patient Age

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharatou Jarlskog, Christina; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk of a second malignancy after treatment of a primary brain cancer using passive scattered proton beam therapy. The focus was on the cancer risk caused by neutrons outside the treatment volume and the dependency on the patient's age. Methods and Materials: Organ-specific neutron-equivalent doses previously calculated for eight different proton therapy brain fields were considered. Organ-specific models were applied to assess the risk of developing solid cancers and leukemia. Results: The main contributors (>80%) to the neutron-induced risk are neutrons generated in the treatment head. Treatment volume can influence the risk by up to a factor of {approx}2. Young patients are subject to significantly greater risks than are adult patients because of the geometric differences and age dependency of the risk models. Breast cancer should be the main concern for females. For males, the risks of lung cancer, leukemia, and thyroid cancer were significant for pediatric patients. In contrast, leukemia was the leading risk for an adult. Most lifetime risks were <1% (70-Gy treatment). The only exceptions were breast, thyroid, and lung cancer for females. For female thyroid cancer, the treatment risk can exceed the baseline risk. Conclusion: The risk of developing a second malignancy from neutrons from proton beam therapy of a brain lesion is small (i.e., presumably outweighed by the therapeutic benefit) but not negligible (i.e., potentially greater than the baseline risk). The patient's age at treatment plays a major role.

  17. Magnetic field instability in a neutron star driven by the electroweak electron-nucleon interaction versus the chiral magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvornikov, Maxim; Semikoz, Victor B.

    2015-03-01

    We show that the Standard Model electroweak interaction of ultrarelativistic electrons with nucleons (the e N interaction) in a neutron star (NS) permeated by a seed large-scale helical magnetic field provides its growth up to ≳1 015 G during a time comparable with the ages of young magnetars ˜1 04 yr . The magnetic field instability originates from the parity violation in the e N interaction entering the generalized Dirac equation for right and left massless electrons in an external uniform magnetic field. We calculate the average electric current given by the solution of the modified Dirac equation containing an extra current for right and left electrons (positrons), which turns out to be directed along the magnetic field. Such a current includes both a changing chiral imbalance of electrons and the e N potential given by a constant neutron density in a NS. Then we derive the system of the kinetic equations for the chiral imbalance and the magnetic helicity which accounts for the e N interaction. By solving this system, we show that a sizable chiral imbalance arising in a neutron protostar due to the Urca process eL-+p →N +νeL diminishes very rapidly because of a huge chirality-flip rate. Thus the e N term prevails over the chiral effect, providing a huge growth of the magnetic helicity and the helical magnetic field.

  18. Field-Tested Reference Materials: A Survey of What Has Worked Best.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Brenda; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 33 reference items--including several CD-ROM products--published during 1991-92 that were recommended by librarians. Materials are listed in the following areas: general works; business, science, and technology; fine arts; history and genealogy; medicine and health; and social sciences and humanities. A…

  19. Field Characterization of Potential Reference Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico: Chemical and Biological Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Jed G. Campbell, Peggy S. Harris, Darrin D. Dantin, Steve S. Foss, Robert L. Quarles, James C. Moore and Cynthia A. Chancy. Submitted. Characterization of Potential Reference Areas in the Gulf of Mexico: Near-Coastal Sediment Chemical and Biological Quality. En...

  20. Efficient Location of Research Reference Sources in the Field of Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Pat; Jay, Danielle

    More than 45 basic dance reference research sources that would be useful to students, scholars, teachers, historians, and therapists are discussed in this bibliographic essay. Aspects of dance covered include choreography, criticism, teaching principles, aesthetic theory, dance therapy, and history. Sources are grouped by type: dictionaries and…

  1. Creating long term gridded fields of reference evapotranspiration in Alpine terrain based on a re-calibrated Hargreaves method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, K.; Bartsch, A.

    2015-05-01

    A new approach for the construction of high resolution gridded fields of reference evapotranspiration for the Austrian domain on a daily time step is presented. Forcing fields of gridded data of minimum and maximum temperatures are used to estimate reference evapotranspiration based on the formulation of Hargreaves. The calibration constant in the Hargreaves equation is recalibrated to the Penman-Monteith equation, which is recommended by the FAO, in a monthly and station-wise assessment. This ensures on one hand eliminated biases of the Hargreaves approach compared to the formulation of Penman-Monteith and on the other hand also reduced root mean square errors and relative errors on a daily time scale. The resulting new calibration parameters are interpolated in time to a daily temporal resolution for a standard year of 365 days. The overall novelty of the approach is the conduction of surface elevation as a predictor to estimate the re-calibrated Hargreaves parameter in space. A third order spline is fitted to the re-calibrated parameters against elevation at every station and yields the statistical model for assessing these new parameters in space by using the underlying digital elevation model of the temperature fields. Having newly calibrated parameters for every day of year and every grid point, the Hargreaves method is applied to the temperature fields, yielding reference evapotranspiration for the entire grid and time period from 1961-2013. With this approach it is possible to generate high resolution reference evapotranspiration fields starting when only temperature observations are available but re-calibrated to meet the requirements of the recommendations defined by the FAO.

  2. Mixed-Field Dosimetry of a Fast Neutron Beam at the Portuguese Research Reactor for the Irradiation of Electronic Circuits - Measurements and Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, A. C.; Gonçalves, I. C.; Marques, J. G.; Santos, J.; Ramalho, A. J. G.; Osvay, M.

    2003-06-01

    The neutron and photon fields present at the Fast Neutron Beam of RPI were simulated with MCNP-4C and measured with activation foils, TLDs and ionisation chambers. In general, there is a good agreement between calculations and measurements, although the model overestimates the thermal neutron component. Aluminum oxide TLDs were found to be promising for monitoring the photon dose in actual irradiations of circuits.

  3. Decay heat measurement of fusion related materials in an ITER-like neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Maekawa, F.; Wada, M.; Nishitani, T.; Takeuchi, H.

    2002-12-01

    Decay heat is one of the most important factors for the safety aspect of ITER. Especially, the prediction of decay heat with an uncertainty less than 15% for the three most important materials, i.e., copper, type-316 stainless steel (SS316) and tungsten, is strongly requested by designers of ITER. To provide experimental decay heat data needed for validation of decay heat calculations for SS316 and copper, an experiment was conducted as the ITER/EDA task T-426. An ITER-like neutron field was constructed, and decay heat source distributions in thick copper and SS316 plates were measured with the whole energy absorption spectrometer. The measured decay heat distributions in the thick sample plates were compared with the predicted values by MCNP calculations. It was found that the use of an effective activation cross-section calculated by MCNP was needed to consider the self-shielding effects and, for both cases, MCNP calculations could predict the decay heat adequately.

  4. Molecular dynamics force-field refinement against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Lynch, Vickie E.

    2015-11-23

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) is one of the experimental techniques of choice for probing the dynamics at length and time scales that are also in the realm of full-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This overlap enables extension of current fitting methods that use time-independent equilibrium measurements to new methods fitting against dynamics data. We present an algorithm that fits simulation-derived incoherent dynamical structure factors against QENS data probing the diffusive dynamics of the system. We showcase the difficulties inherent to this type of fitting problem, namely, the disparity between simulation and experiment environment, as well as limitations in the simulationmore » due to incomplete sampling of phase space. We discuss a methodology to overcome these difficulties and apply it to a set of full-atom MD simulations for the purpose of refining the force-field parameter governing the activation energy of methyl rotation in the octa-methyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane molecule. Our optimal simulated activation energy agrees with the experimentally derived value up to a 5% difference, well within experimental error. We believe the method will find applicability to other types of diffusive motions and other representation of the systems such as coarse-grain models where empirical fitting is essential. In addition, the refinement method can be extended to the coherent dynamic structure factor with no additional effort.« less

  5. Molecular dynamics force-field refinement against quasi-elastic neutron scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Lynch, Vickie E.

    2015-11-23

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) is one of the experimental techniques of choice for probing the dynamics at length and time scales that are also in the realm of full-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This overlap enables extension of current fitting methods that use time-independent equilibrium measurements to new methods fitting against dynamics data. We present an algorithm that fits simulation-derived incoherent dynamical structure factors against QENS data probing the diffusive dynamics of the system. We showcase the difficulties inherent to this type of fitting problem, namely, the disparity between simulation and experiment environment, as well as limitations in the simulation due to incomplete sampling of phase space. We discuss a methodology to overcome these difficulties and apply it to a set of full-atom MD simulations for the purpose of refining the force-field parameter governing the activation energy of methyl rotation in the octa-methyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane molecule. Our optimal simulated activation energy agrees with the experimentally derived value up to a 5% difference, well within experimental error. We believe the method will find applicability to other types of diffusive motions and other representation of the systems such as coarse-grain models where empirical fitting is essential. In addition, the refinement method can be extended to the coherent dynamic structure factor with no additional effort.

  6. Crystal electric field excitations in quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pinaki; Flint, R.; Kong, T.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; de Boissieu, M.; Lory, P.-F.; Beutier, G.; Hiroto, T.

    All of the known quasicrystals with local moments exhibit frustration and spin glass-like behavior at low temperature. The onset of the spin freezing temperature is believed to be affected by the crystal electric field (CEF) splitting of the local moments. The quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 and its related icosahedral quasicrystal phase, i-Tb-Cd, form a set of model systems to explore how magnetism evolves from a conventional lattice (approximant phase) to an aperiodic quasicrystal. Though TbCd6 shows long-range antiferromagnetic ordering (TN = 24 K), only spin glass like behavior is observed in i-Tb-Cd with a spin freezing temperature of TF = 6 K. To investigate further, we have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of TbCd6 and observed two distinct CEF excitations at low energies which points to a high degeneracy of the CEF levels related to the Tb surrounding with almost icosahedral symmetry. Work at Ames Laboratory was supported by the DOE, BES, Division of Materials Sciences & Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. This research used resources at Institut Laue-Langevin, France.

  7. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  8. Axial Symmetric Solutions to Einstein's Field Equations for Deformed Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubairi, Omair; Weber, Fridolin

    2016-03-01

    Traditional models of neutron stars are constructed under of assumption that they are perfect spheres. This is not correct, however, if the matter inside of neutron stars is described by an non-isotropic model for the equation of state. Examples of such stars are magnetars and neutron stars that would contain color-superconducting quark matter. In this work, we derive the stellar structure equations which describe the properties of non-isotropic neutron stars. The equations are solved numerically in two dimensions. We calculate stellar properties such as masses and radii along with pressure and density profiles and investigate any changes from conventional spherically symmetric neutron stars. This work was supported through the National Science Foundation under Grants PHYS-1411708 and DUE-1259951. Additional computing resources were provided by the CSRC at SDSU and the Department of Sciences at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

  9. Radioactivity measurements of ITER materials using the TFTR D-T neutron field

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Barnes, C.W.; Kugel, H.W.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1994-08-01

    The availability of high D-T fusion neutron yields at TFTR has provided a useful opportunity to directly measure D-T neutron-induced radioactivity in a realistic tokamak fusion reactor environment for materials of vital interest to ITER. These measurements are valuable for characterizing radioactivity in various ITER candidate materials. for validating complex neutron transport calculations, and for meeting fusion reactor licensing requirements. The radioactivity measurements at TFTR involve potential ITER materials including stainless steel 316, vanadium, titanium, chromium, silicon, iron, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, aluminum, copper, zinc. zirconium, niobium, and tungsten. Small samples of these materials were irradiated close to the plasma and just outside the vacuum vessel wall of TFTR, locations of different neutron energy spectra. Saturation activities for both threshold and capture reactions were measured. Data from dosimetric reactions have been used to obtain preliminary neutron energy spectra. Spectra from the first wall were compared to calculations from ITER and to measurements from accelerator-based tests.

  10. [Dietary reference intakes of trace elements for Japanese and problems in clinical fields].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    In the dietary reference intakes, EAR(estimated average requirement), RDA(recommended dietary allowance), AL(adequate intake), DG(tentative dietary goal for preventing life style related diseases) and UL(tolerable upper intake level) of eight types of trace elements (iron: Fe, zinc: Zn, copper: Cu, manganese: Mn, iodine: I, selenium: Se, chromium: Cr, molybdenum: Mo) have been set. However, in the meals of hospitals, only iron of which has been taken into account. The content of these trace elements in the enteral nutrient released after 2000 was determined by considering the content of dietary reference intakes of trace elements for Japanese and considered so not fall into deficiency. However, enteral nutrient must be used considering the content of Zn, Cu and the Zn/Cu ratio, the selenium content, and the route of administration, in order to avoid falling into deficiency. PMID:27455794

  11. Typing of cytopathic and noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus reference and Canadian field strains using a neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Magar, R; Minocha, H C; Montpetit, C; Carman, P S; Lecomte, J

    1988-01-01

    Cytopathic and noncytopathic reference strains as well as Canadian field isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus were analyzed by neutralization and immunofluorescence tests using a bovine viral diarrhea virus-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody. Results on reference strains indicated three major antigenic groups: I) NADL-like, II) New York 1-like and III) Oregon C24V-like. Field isolates could be segregated into groups I and II and none could be typed into the group III. It appears that most bovine viral diarrhea virus strains share a common antigen which carries a major neutralization epitope. These characteristics would make this monoclonal antibody a useful reagent for taxonomic and epizootiological studies. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2450629

  12. Significant change in the construction of a door to a room with slowed down neutron field by means of commonly used inexpensive protective materials.

    PubMed

    Konefał, Adam; Łaciak, Marcin; Dawidowska, Anna; Osewski, Wojciech

    2014-12-01

    The detailed analysis of nuclear reactions occurring in materials of the door is presented for the typical construction of an entrance door to a room with a slowed down neutron field. The changes in the construction of the door were determined to reduce effectively the level of neutron and gamma radiation in the vicinity of the door in a room adjoining the neutron field room. Optimisation of the door construction was performed with the use of Monte Carlo calculations (GEANT4). The construction proposed in this paper bases on the commonly used inexpensive protective materials such as borax (13.4 cm), lead (4 cm) and stainless steel (0.1 and 0.5 cm on the side of the neutron field room and of the adjoining room, respectively). The improved construction of the door, worked out in the presented studies, can be an effective protection against neutrons with energies up to 1 MeV. PMID:24324249

  13. Performances of special stainless steels and alloys in pulp and paper industries: Industrial references, laboratory and field test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dupoiron, F.; Schweitzer, G.; Charles, J.; Audouard, J.P.

    1994-12-31

    Due to improvements in the pulp and paper processes, and the new environmental regulations, the use of special stainless steels and alloys is increasing in this industry. This paper presents the results of industrial references, field tests and laboratory data on the use of stainless steels in delignification, bleaching and papermaking stages. Emphasis is put on the economical and safety advantages of the use of high alloyed steels in service as well as during fabrication.

  14. Creating long-term gridded fields of reference evapotranspiration in Alpine terrain based on a recalibrated Hargreaves method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, Klaus; Bartsch, Annett

    2016-03-01

    A new approach for the construction of high-resolution gridded fields of reference evapotranspiration for the Austrian domain on a daily time step is presented. Gridded data of minimum and maximum temperatures are used to estimate reference evapotranspiration based on the formulation of Hargreaves. The calibration constant in the Hargreaves equation is recalibrated to the Penman-Monteith equation in a monthly and station-wise assessment. This ensures, on one hand, eliminated biases of the Hargreaves approach compared to the formulation of Penman-Monteith and, on the other hand, also reduced root mean square errors and relative errors on a daily timescale. The resulting new calibration parameters are interpolated over time to a daily temporal resolution for a standard year of 365 days. The overall novelty of the approach is the use of surface elevation as the only predictor to estimate the recalibrated Hargreaves parameter in space. A third-order polynomial is fitted to the recalibrated parameters against elevation at every station which yields a statistical model for assessing these new parameters in space by using the underlying digital elevation model of the temperature fields. With these newly calibrated parameters for every day of year and every grid point, the Hargreaves method is applied to the temperature fields, yielding reference evapotranspiration for the entire grid and time period from 1961-2013. This approach is opening opportunities to create high-resolution reference evapotranspiration fields based only temperature observations, but being as close as possible to the estimates of the Penman-Monteith approach.

  15. Relativistic mean-field models with scaled hadron masses and couplings: Hyperons and maximum neutron star mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, K. A.; Kolomeitsev, E. E.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2016-06-01

    An equation of state of cold nuclear matter with an arbitrary isotopic composition is studied within a relativistic mean-field approach with hadron masses and coupling constants depending self-consistently on the scalar mean-field. All hadron masses decrease universally with the scalar field growth, whereas meson-nucleon coupling constants can vary differently. More specifically we focus on two modifications of the KVOR model studied previously. One extension of the model (KVORcut) demonstrates that the equation of state stiffens if the increase of the scalar-field magnitude with the density is bounded from above at some value for baryon densities above the saturation nuclear density. This can be realized if the nucleon vector-meson coupling constant changes rapidly as a function of the scalar field slightly above the desired value. The other version of the model (MKVOR) utilizes a smaller value of the nucleon effective mass at the nuclear saturation density and a saturation of the scalar field in the isospin asymmetric matter induced by a strong variation of the nucleon isovector-meson coupling constant as function of the scalar field. A possibility of hyperonization of the matter in neutron star interiors is incorporated. Our equations of state fulfill majority of known empirical constraints including the pressure-density constraint from heavy-ion collisions, direct Urca constraint, gravitational-baryon mass constraint for the pulsar J0737-3039B, and the constraint on the maximum mass of the neutron stars.

  16. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  17. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953. PMID:23938362

  18. Children and adults exposed to low-frequency magnetic fields at the ICNIRP reference levels: theoretical assessment of the induced electric fields.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Neufeld, E; Christ, A; Chen, X L; Kuster, N; van Rhoon, G C

    2012-04-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects, the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined reference levels for time varying magnetic fields. Restrictions on the electric fields induced in the human body are provided based on biological response data for peripheral nerve stimulation and the induction of phosphenes. Numerical modeling is commonly used to assess the induced electric fields for various exposure configurations. The objective of this study was to assess the variations of the electric fields induced in children and adults and to compare the exposure at reference levels with the basic restrictions as function of anatomy. We used the scalar potential finite element method to calculate the induced electric fields in six children and two adults when exposed to uniform magnetic fields polarized in three orthogonal directions. We found that the induced electric fields are within the ICNIRP basic restrictions in nearly all cases. In PNS tissues, we found electric fields up to 95% (upper uncertainty limit due to discretization errors, k = 2) of the ICNIRP basic restrictions for exposures at the general public reference levels. For occupational reference levels, we found an over-exposure of maximum 79% (k = 2) in PNS tissues. We further found that the ICNIRP recommendations on spatial averaging in 2 × 2 × 2 mm³ contiguous tissue volumes and removal of peak values by the 99th percentile cause the results to depend strongly on the grid discretization step (i.e. an uncertainty of more than 50% at 2 mm) and the number of distinguished tissues in the anatomical models. The computational results obtained by various research institutes should be robust for different discretization settings and various anatomical models. Therefore, we recommend considering alternative routines for small anatomical structures such as non-contiguous averaging without taking the 99th percentile in future guidelines leading to consistent

  19. Children and adults exposed to low-frequency magnetic fields at the ICNIRP reference levels: theoretical assessment of the induced electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, J. F.; Paulides, M. M.; Neufeld, E.; Christ, A.; Chen, X. L.; Kuster, N.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2012-04-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects, the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined reference levels for time varying magnetic fields. Restrictions on the electric fields induced in the human body are provided based on biological response data for peripheral nerve stimulation and the induction of phosphenes. Numerical modeling is commonly used to assess the induced electric fields for various exposure configurations. The objective of this study was to assess the variations of the electric fields induced in children and adults and to compare the exposure at reference levels with the basic restrictions as function of anatomy. We used the scalar potential finite element method to calculate the induced electric fields in six children and two adults when exposed to uniform magnetic fields polarized in three orthogonal directions. We found that the induced electric fields are within the ICNIRP basic restrictions in nearly all cases. In PNS tissues, we found electric fields up to 95% (upper uncertainty limit due to discretization errors, k = 2) of the ICNIRP basic restrictions for exposures at the general public reference levels. For occupational reference levels, we found an over-exposure of maximum 79% (k = 2) in PNS tissues. We further found that the ICNIRP recommendations on spatial averaging in 2 × 2 × 2 mm3 contiguous tissue volumes and removal of peak values by the 99th percentile cause the results to depend strongly on the grid discretization step (i.e. an uncertainty of more than 50% at 2 mm) and the number of distinguished tissues in the anatomical models. The computational results obtained by various research institutes should be robust for different discretization settings and various anatomical models. Therefore, we recommend considering alternative routines for small anatomical structures such as non-contiguous averaging without taking the 99th percentile in future guidelines leading to consistent

  20. Validation of the neutron and gamma fields in the JSI TRIGA reactor using in-core fission and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Kaiba, Tanja; Radulović, Vladimir; Jazbec, Anže; Rupnik, Sebastjan; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-02-01

    CEA developed fission chambers and ionization chambers were utilized at the JSI TRIGA reactor to measure neutron and gamma fields. The measured axial fission rate distributions in the reactor core are generally in good agreement with the calculated values using the Monte Carlo model of the reactor thus verifying both the computational model and the fission chambers. In future, multiple absolutely calibrated fission chambers could be used for more accurate online reactor thermal power monitoring. PMID:25479432

  1. The Her X-1 spectrum: A measure of the field near the magnetic poles of a neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The steep high energy cutoff observed in the spectrum for Her X-1 was analyzed in terms of the severely modified Thomson scattering that dominates the radiative transfer in a highly magnetized plasma near the surface of a neutron star. The data indicate a field of about 1013 G near the magnetic poles and the stopping of accreting matter by nuclear collisions in the neighboring plasma.

  2. The Her X-1 spectrum - A measure of the field near the magnetic poles of a neutron star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Rothschild, R. E.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1976-01-01

    The steep high energy cutoff observed in the spectrum for Her X-1 is analyzed in terms of the severely modified Thomson scattering that dominates the radiative transfer in a highly magnetized plasma near the surface of a neutron star. The data are shown to indicate a field of about 10 to the 13th G near the magnetic poles and the stopping of accreting matter by nuclear collisions in the neighboring plasma

  3. [Good medical practice for drugs. Definition, guidelines, references, field of action and applications].

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Proper use of drugs can be defined as the use of the right product, in a correct dosage, during an adequate length of time, for a given patient and provided he has no serious side effects.It is virtually impossible, with such a number of drugs, such a number of clinical situations to prescribe adequately without using references or guidelines. References may lead to a unique choice, when the diagnosis is certain and the drug to be given is unique. With a good initial and continuous medical education, doctors can take easily this type of decision. The Summary of Products Characteristics (SPC) helps them; by sticking to this fundamental reference, prescription might be more precise and safe. In a lot of clinical situations the choice between a large numbers of therapeutic strategies necessitates use of a guideline based on scientific knowledge. Finally, a given therapeutic strategy can be as effective as and considerably less expensive than another. In such cases, payers can drive doctors to the prescription of the less expensive strategy.Some difficulties are common to all references and guidelines: 1. A lot of clinical situations are not covered by guidelines. 2. Guidelines should be updated each time there is a modification of knowledge: it is extremely difficult to do. 3. A great number of guidelines exist, issued by scientific community, health authorities or the payers. Sometime you can find a proposition in a guideline and the reverse in another guideline. It could be confusing. 4. Guidelines should be evaluated rigorously to know if they fulfil their goals. 5. Some of those guidelines simply cannot help doctors. They are too complex or do not take into account practical situations.We have made an inventory of those various guidelines and their weaknesses and we propose some solutions to increase their utility. We propose an analysis of the situation and some solutions to improve the quality and the relevance of the guidelines: to create groups of coordination

  4. Simultaneous soil moisture and properties estimation for a drip irrigated field by assimilating cosmic-ray neutron intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xujun; Hendricks Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Jiménez Bello, Miguel Ángel; Rosolem, Rafael; Bogena, Heye; Alzamora, Fernando Martínez; Chanzy, André; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-08-01

    Neutron intensity measured by the aboveground cosmic-ray neutron intensity probe (CRP) allows estimating soil moisture content at the field scale. In this work, synthetic neutron intensities were used to remove the bias of simulated soil moisture content or update soil hydraulic properties (together with soil moisture) in the Community Land Model (CLM) using the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter. The cosmic-ray forward model COSMIC was used as the non-linear measurement operator which maps between neutron intensity and soil moisture. The novel aspect of this work is that synthetically measured neutron intensity was used for real time updating of soil states and soil properties (or soil moisture bias) and posterior use for the real time scheduling of irrigation (data assimilation based real-time control approach). Uncertainty of model forcing and soil properties (sand fraction, clay fraction and organic matter density) were considered in the ensemble predictions of the soil moisture profiles. Horizontal and vertical weighting of soil moisture was introduced in the data assimilation in order to handle the scale mismatch between the cosmic-ray footprint and the CLM grid cell. The approach was illustrated in a synthetic study with the real-time irrigation scheduling of fields of citrus trees. After adjusting soil moisture content by assimilating neutron intensity, the irrigation requirements were calculated based on the water deficit method. Model bias was introduced by using coarser soil texture in the data assimilation experiments than in reality. A series of experiments was done with different combinations of state, parameter and bias estimation in combination with irrigation scheduling. Assimilation of CRP neutron intensity improved soil moisture characterization. Irrigation requirement was overestimated if biased soil properties were used. The soil moisture bias was reduced by 35% after data assimilation. The scenario of joint state-parameter estimation

  5. Mineralogy and instrumental neutron activation analysis of seven National Bureau of Standards and three Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas clay reference samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosterman, John W.; Flanagan, F.J.; Bragg, Anne; Doughten, M.W.; Filby, R.H.; Grimm, Catherine; Mee, J.S.; Potts, P.J.; Rogers, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of 3 oxides and 29 elements in 7 National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and 3 Instituto de Pesquisas Techno16gicas (IPT) reference clay samples were etermined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The analytical work was designed to test the homogeneity of constituents in three new NBS reference clays, NBS-97b, NBS-98b, and NBS-679. The analyses of variance of 276 sets of data for these three standards show that the constituents are distributed homogeneously among bottles of samples for 94 percent of the sets of data. Three of the reference samples (NBS-97, NBS-97a, and NBS-97b) are flint clays; four of the samples (NBS-98, NBS-98a, NBS-98b, and IPT-32) are plastic clays, and three of the samples (NBS-679, IPT-28, and IPT-42) are miscellaneous clays (both sedimentary and residual). Seven clays are predominantly kaolinite; the other three clays contain illite and kaolinite in the approximate ratio 3:2. Seven clays contain quartz as the major nonclay mineral. The mineralogy of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri (NBS-97a and NBS-98a) differs markedly from that of the flint and plastic clays from Pennsylvania (NBS-97, NBS-97b, NBS-98, and NBS-98b). The flint clay NBS-97 has higher average chromium, hafnium, lithium, and zirconium contents than its replacement, reference sample NBS-97b. The differences between the plastic clay NBS-98 and its replacement, NBS-98b, are not as pronounced. The trace element contents of the flint and plastic clays from Missouri, NBS-97a and NBS-98a, differ significantly from those of the clays from Pennsylvania, especially the average rare earth element (REE) contents. The trace element contents of clay sample IPT-32 differ from those of the other plastic clays. IPT-28 and IPT-42 have some average trace element contents that differ not only between these two samples but also from all the other clays. IPT-28 has the highest summation of the average REE contents of the 10 samples. The uranium content of NBS-98a, 46

  6. Magnetic field dependent small-angle neutron scattering on a Co nanorod array: evidence for intraparticle spin misalignment

    PubMed Central

    Günther, A.; Bick, J.-P.; Szary, P.; Honecker, D.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Keiderling, U.; Feoktystov, A. V.; Tschöpe, A.; Birringer, R.; Michels, A.

    2014-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of a cobalt nanorod array have been studied by means of magnetic field dependent small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Measurement of the unpolarized SANS cross section dΣ/dΩ of the saturated sample in the two scattering geometries where the applied magnetic field H is either perpendicular or parallel to the wavevector k i of the incoming neutron beam allows one to separate nuclear from magnetic SANS, without employing the usual sector-averaging procedure. The analysis of the SANS data in the saturated state provides structural parameters (rod radius and centre-to-centre distance) that are in good agreement with results from electron microscopy. Between saturation and the coercive field, a strong field dependence of dΣ/dΩ is observed (in both geometries), which cannot be explained using the conventional expression of the magnetic SANS cross section of magnetic nanoparticles in a homogeneous nonmagnetic matrix. The origin of the strong field dependence of dΣ/dΩ is believed to be related to intradomain spin misalignment, due to magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropies and magnetostatic stray fields. PMID:24904245

  7. Calculated and measured depth dose profiles in a phantom exposed to neutron radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Tanner, J.E.; Sigalla, L.A.; Hadlock, D.E.

    1989-05-01

    An accurate evaluation of doses caused by external sources of neutron radiation depends on knowledge of the transport of radiation inside the human body. Health physicists use two primary methods for studying this radiation transport: computer calculations and measurements. Both computer calculations and measurements were performed under well controlled, nearly identical conditions to determine the extent of their agreement. A comparison of the dose profiles predicted by both measurements and calculations was thus possible. The measurements were performed in a cylindrical phantom made of tissue equivalent plastic. The phantom size, 61 cm high and 30 cm in diameter, was chosen to approximate the human torso and to match the dimensions of cylindrical phantoms used by previous calculations. Holes were drilled down through the phantom to accommodate small tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) at various depths in the phantom. These counters were used to measure the neutron dose inside the phantom when it was exposed to various sources of neutrons. The holes in the phantom could also accommodate miniature Geiger-Mueller detectors to measure the gamma component of the dose. Neutron and gamma dose profiles were measured for two different sources of neutrons: an unmoderated /sup 252/Cf source and a 733-keV neutron beam generated by a Van de Graaff accelerator. 14 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Field and temperature dependence of electromagnon scattering in TbMnO3 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbein, S.; Steffens, P.; Finger, T.; Komarek, A. C.; Sidis, Y.; Link, P.; Braden, M.

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering techniques have been used to study the field-induced multiferroic transition and the temperature dependence of magnetic excitations in TbMnO3. The significant changes in the spin-wave spectra across the field-induced transition perfectly agree with a rotation of the cycloidal spiral plane and with efficient pinning in the commensurate high-field phase. Further analysis of the Q dependence allows the identification of an electromagnon in the multiferroic high-field phase whose energy and polarization precisely matches previous infrared data. This and the zero-field temperature dependence of a zone-center magnon, which exactly agrees with that of an optically detected excitation, document that the inverse Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction induces an electromagnon hybrid excitation in TbMnO3.

  9. Parallax studies of four selected fields. [and their central and reference stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. L.; Gatewood, G. D.; Worek, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    Astrometric studies have been completed for four central stars Wolf 294, 39 Com, Case 2, and Vega - and selected reference stars in each of those regions. The parallax of Wolf 294 was measured as 0.1806 + or - 0.0033 arcsec. 39 Com is a visual/astrometric binary with an estimated period of 125 yr and a parallax of 0.0297 + or - 0.0044 arcsec. C 2 was measured as a white dwarf from a Warner and Swasey Observatory spectral survey; its white dwarf status is confirmed by its parallax of 0.0186 + or - 0.0109 arcsec. Vega's parallax was measured as 0.1243 + or - 0.0049 arcsec; a small apparent nonrandom distribution in the residuals is most likely an error from the neutral density filter used for magnitude reduction of the central star.

  10. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  11. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature. PMID:26057186

  12. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source.

    PubMed

    Lord, J S; McKenzie, I; Baker, P J; Blundell, S J; Cottrell, S P; Giblin, S R; Good, J; Hillier, A D; Holsman, B H; King, P J C; Lancaster, T; Mitchell, R; Nightingale, J B; Owczarkowski, M; Poli, S; Pratt, F L; Rhodes, N J; Scheuermann, R; Salman, Z

    2011-07-01

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument. PMID:21806196

  13. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  14. An assessment of the near-surface accuracy of the international geomagnetic reference field 1980 model of the main geomagnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.; Zunde, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    The new International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model of the main geomagnetic field for 1980 is based heavily on measurements from the MAGSAT satellite survey. Assessment of the accuracy of the new model, as a description of the main field near the Earth's surface, is important because the accuracy of models derived from satellite data can be adversely affected by the magnetic field of electric currents in the ionosphere and the auroral zones. Until now, statements about its accuracy have been based on the 6 published assessments of the 2 proposed models from which it was derived. However, those assessments were either regional in scope or were based mainly on preliminary or extrapolated data. Here we assess the near-surface accuracy of the new model by comparing it with values for 1980 derived from annual means from 69 magnetic observatories, and by comparing it with WC80, a model derived from near-surface data. The comparison with observatory-derived data shows that the new model describes the field at the 69 observatories about as accurately as would a model derived solely from near-surface data. The comparison with WC80 shows that the 2 models agree closely in their description of D and I near the surface. These comparisons support the proposition that the new IGRF 1980 main-field model is a generally accurate description of the main field near the Earth's surface in 1980. ?? 1985.

  15. Vertical Field of View Reference Point Study for Flight Path Control and Hazard Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. Raymond, Jr.; Rudisill, Marianne; Kramer, Lynda J.; Busquets, Anthony M.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers within the eXternal Visibility System (XVS) element of the High-Speed Research (HSR) program developed and evaluated display concepts that will provide the flight crew of the proposed High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) with integrated imagery and symbology to permit path control and hazard avoidance functions while maintaining required situation awareness. The challenge of the XVS program is to develop concepts that would permit a no-nose-droop configuration of an HSCT and expanded low visibility HSCT operational capabilities. This study was one of a series of experiments exploring the 'design space' restrictions for physical placement of an XVS display. The primary experimental issues here was 'conformality' of the forward display vertical position with respect to the side window in simulated flight. 'Conformality' refers to the case such that the horizon and objects appear in the same relative positions when viewed through the forward windows or display and the side windows. This study quantified the effects of visual conformality on pilot flight path control and hazard avoidance performance. Here, conformality related to the positioning and relationship of the artificial horizon line and associated symbology presented on the forward display and the horizon and associated ground, horizon, and sky textures as they would appear in the real view through a window presented in the side window display. No significant performance consequences were found for the non-conformal conditions.

  16. Flow reference method testing and analysis: Field test plan, Texas Utilities Decordova Steam Electric Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Werner, A.S.

    1997-05-30

    This report describes the experimental design and test plan for the first of three field tests that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted in 1997 as part of a major study to evaluate potential improvements to Method 2, EPA`s test method for measuring flue gas volumetric flow in stacks. The experimental design involved four test teams taking concurrent in-stack measurements with velocity sensing probes. Seven types of probes were included in the study. Three test matrices were used to gather data for inter-probe and inter-team comparisons and to assess the impact of velocity decline near the stack wall on volumetric flow measurements.

  17. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Sheu, R J

    2015-04-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with (252)Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing (252)Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6_8 extended-range sphere versus the 6″ standard sphere). PMID:25280480

  18. Neutron diffraction study of the magnetic-field-induced transition in Mn{sub 3}GaC

    SciTech Connect

    Çakir, Ö.; Acet, M.; Farle, M.; Senyshyn, A.

    2014-01-28

    The antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}GaC undergoes an isostructural cubic–cubic first order transition from a low-temperature, large-cell-volume antiferromagnetic state to a high-temperature, small-cell-volume ferromagnetic state at around 160 K. The transition can also be induced by applying a magnetic field. We study here the isothermal magnetic-field-evolution of the transition as ferromagnetism is stabilized at the expense of antiferromagnetism. We make use of the presence of the two distinct cell volumes of the two magnetic states as a probe to observe by neutron diffraction the evolution of the transition, as the external magnetic field carries the system from the antiferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic state. We show that the large-volume antiferromagnetic and the small-volume ferromagnetic states coexist in the temperature range of the transition. The ferromagnetic state is progressively stabilized as the field increases.

  19. Functional referents and acoustic similarity: field playback experiments with rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hauser

    1998-06-01

    Rhesus monkeys, Macaca mulatta, on the island of Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico produce one or more of five acoustically distinctive calls when they find food. Three of these calls ('warbles', 'harmonic arches' and 'chirps') are produced by individuals finding high-quality, rare food items, whereas the other two calls ('coos' and 'grunts') are produced upon encountering lower-quality, common food items, and in non-food contexts as well. To determine how rhesus classify such acoustic variation, I conducted habituation experiments using a subset of the five call types. I designed experiments to reveal whether classification is based primarily on acoustic features or on the basis of a call's functional referent; caller identity was held constant within sessions. Habituation to 'warbles' transferred to 'harmonic arches', and vice versa. Thus, although these two calls are acoustically distinctive, they appeared to be perceptually clustered into one category based on referential similarities. In contrast, habituation to 'grunts' was followed by dishabituation to 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches', and habituation to 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches' was followed by dishabituation to 'grunts'. Dishabituation could be due to acoustic or referential differences. Significantly, the magnitude of the dishabituating response was asymmetric and depended upon the call type used in the habituation series. Thus, when subjects were habituated to 'grunts', they responded significantly more to tests of 'warbles' or 'harmonic arches' than when the sequence was reversed. These results suggest that for rhesus monkey food-associated calls, referential differences carry more weight during perceptual classification than do acoustical differences. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:9642008

  20. Historical sketches of Sandia National Laboratories nuclear field testing. Volume 1: Full discussion except for sensitive references

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.R.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains historical sketches that cover the major activities of Sandia nuclear field testing, from early atmospheric shots until 1990. It includes a chronological overview followed by more complete discussions of atmospheric, high-altitude, underwater, cratering, and underground nuclear testing. Other activities related to nuclear testing and high-explosive tests are also described. A large number of references are cited for readers who wish to learn more about technical details. Appendices, written by several authors, provide more insight for a variety of special aspects of nuclear testing and related work. Two versions of this history were published: volume 1 has an unlimited distribution, and volume 2 has a limited distribution.

  1. Dynamic stabilization of the magnetic field surrounding the neutron electric dipole moment spectrometer at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Afach, S.; Fertl, M.; Franke, B. E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch; Kirch, K.; Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Daum, M.; Henneck, R.; Lauss, B. E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch; Meier, M.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G.; Bodek, K.; Zejma, J.; Grujic, Z.; Kasprzak, M.; Weis, A.; Hélaine, V.; Koch, H.-C.; and others

    2014-08-28

    The Surrounding Field Compensation (SFC) system described in this work is installed around the four-layer Mu-metal magnetic shield of the neutron electric dipole moment spectrometer located at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The SFC system reduces the DC component of the external magnetic field by a factor of about 20. Within a control volume of approximately 2.5 m × 2.5 m × 3 m, disturbances of the magnetic field are attenuated by factors of 5–50 at a bandwidth from 10{sup −3} Hz up to 0.5 Hz, which corresponds to integration times longer than several hundreds of seconds and represent the important timescale for the neutron electric dipole moment measurement. These shielding factors apply to random environmental noise from arbitrary sources. This is achieved via a proportional-integral feedback stabilization system that includes a regularized pseudoinverse matrix of proportionality factors which correlates magnetic field changes at all sensor positions to current changes in the SFC coils.

  2. Children and adults exposed to electromagnetic fields at the ICNIRP reference levels: theoretical assessment of the induced peak temperature increase.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Neufeld, E; Christ, A; Kuster, N; van Rhoon, G C

    2011-08-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels. Restrictions on induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR(wb)) are provided to keep the whole-body temperature increase (T(body, incr)) under 1 °C during 30 min. Additional restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR(10g)) are provided to prevent excessive localized tissue heating. The objective of this study is to assess the localized peak temperature increase (T(incr, max)) in children upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite-difference time-domain modeling was used to calculate T(incr, max) in six children and two adults exposed to orthogonal plane-wave configurations. We performed a sensitivity study and Monte Carlo analysis to assess the uncertainty of the results. Considering the uncertainties in the model parameters, we found that a peak temperature increase as high as 1 °C can occur for worst-case scenarios at the ICNIRP reference levels. Since the guidelines are deduced from temperature increase, we used T(incr, max) as being a better metric to prevent excessive localized tissue heating instead of localized peak SAR. However, we note that the exposure time should also be considered in future guidelines. Hence, we advise defining limits on T(incr, max) for specified durations of exposure. PMID:21772085

  3. [A social-health care coordination reference in the fields of mental health and child abuse].

    PubMed

    García-Panal, Leticia; García-Panal, Javier; Delgado-Mata, Eulalia

    2016-01-01

    The intervention in families with children at risk of abuse stays as a clear example of the need for intersectional coordination mechanisms within the socio-health care framework. Different health services (such as primary care, paediatrics, mental health, community and social services, family support teams and schools) create a network in order to link their main goals in the interest of ensuring children's welfare and improving familieś situation. This essay aims at describing a performance based on the mentioned guidelines, even though there is no accepted and widespread protocol in this regard. We start our research with a one parent family with two children. The mother suffers from a mental health disorder and she fails to adhere to treatment. Both the father of the two children and his family took advantage of this situation to discredit the mother's capability of taking care of her children. This perception had a great impact in her self-esteem and therefore in her willingness and strength to recover. Meetings were held to share relevant information about both the family's general situation, the children's quality of life and the mother's health. Based on this information, the main goals were set in each professional field in order to develop the intervention project. This example of intersectional coordination shows the importance of its standardization for the sake of ensuring a comprehensive attention towards situations that involve initially individuals but that ends up affecting the whole family. PMID:26549871

  4. Magnetic field optimization and design of a superconducting neutron Wollaston prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Parnell, S. R.; Wang, T.; Baxter, D. V.; Pynn, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present finite element simulations of a superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism (WP) for neutron scattering with high encoding efficiency and low Larmor phase aberrations. To achieve this, we develop and quantify the design criteria. The validation of simulation tools used for this work are investigated by using two software packages: RADIA and MagNet©. Based on the optimization criteria, various possible configurations of WP are explored with MagNet, from which the best configuration is chosen for further optimization. To optimize the best configuration, the influence of various physical parameters is investigated, including the dimensions, shapes and arrangements of components of the device. The optimum WP was built and measured at both pulsed and constant wavelength neutron sources. In flipping mode, a neutron spin flipping efficiency of ∼98.5% was measured independent of neutron wavelength and applied current. In a precession mode, measurements showed a highly linear Larmor phase variation along the horizontal direction with low depolarization. Simulations of the device agree well with the experimental measurements. Possible applications of the device are also discussed.

  5. Field test and calibration of neutron coincidence counters for high-mass plutonium samples

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Dickinson, R.J.; Douglas, I.; Orr, C.; Rogers, F.J.G.; Wells, G.; Schenkel, R.; Smith, G.; Fattgh, A.; Ramalho, A.

    1987-02-01

    Five different neutron coincidence systems were evaluated and calibrated for high-mass PuO/sub 2/ samples. The samples were from 2 to 7.2 kg of PuO/sub 2/ in mass, with a large range of burnup. This report compares the equipment and the results, with an evaluation of deadtime and multiplication corrections.

  6. Non-invasive Field Measurements of Soil Water Content Using a Pulsed 14 MeV Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra S.; Wielopolski L.; Omonode, R.; Novak, J.; Frederick, J.; Chan, A.

    2012-01-26

    Current techniques of soil water content measurement are invasive and labor-intensive. Here, we demonstrate that an in situ soil carbon (C) analyzer with a multi-elemental analysis capability, developed for studies of terrestrial C sequestration, can be used concurrently to non-invasively measure the water content of large-volume ({approx}0.3 m{sup 3}) soil samples. Our objectives were to investigate the correlations of the hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) signals with water to the changes in the soil water content in laboratory experiments, and in an agricultural field. Implementing prompt gamma neutron activation analyses we showed that in the field, the signal from the H nucleus better indicates the soil water content than does that from the O nucleus. Using a field calibration, we were able to use the H signal to estimate a minimum detectable change of {approx}2% volumetric water in a 0-30 cm depth of soil.

  7. Cavity Misalignment and Off-Axis Field Effects on Transverse Beam Dynamic in Spallation Neutron Source Superconducting Linac

    SciTech Connect

    J. Stovall; Marc Doleans; J. Galambos; Eugene Tanke; Sang-ho Kim; Ronald Sundelin

    2001-05-01

    For highly relativistic beams, transverse motion due to off-axis fields is not a concern because the transverse RF magnetic and electric forces for off-axis particles cancel each other. Since The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will accelerate moderately relativistic H- particle beam, transverse motion due to off-axis fields has to be checked. Misaligned cavities have physically the same transverse effect on particles moving on axis as off-axis particles passing through perfectly aligned cavities. The main purpose of this paper is to calculate the impact on the transverse motion of the beam from the superconducting cavity (SC) misalignment in SNS. Quadrupole misalignment is then added to obtain a more general statement for the transverse behavior of the beam under alignment errors. For this issue, we use on-axis and off-axis electromagnetic field data from Superfish to calculate beam properties of the SNS beam all along the SC linac with misaligned cavities.

  8. POPULATION SYNTHESIS OF YOUNG ISOLATED NEUTRON STARS: THE EFFECT OF FALLBACK DISK ACCRETION AND MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Lei; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2013-10-01

    The spin evolution of isolated neutron stars (NSs) is dominated by their magnetic fields. The measured braking indices of young NSs show that the spin-down mechanism due to magnetic dipole radiation with constant magnetic fields is inadequate. Assuming that the NS magnetic field is buried by supernova fallback matter and re-emerges after accretion stops, we carry out a Monte Carlo simulation of the evolution of young NSs, and show that most of the pulsars have braking indices ranging from –1 to 3. The results are compatible with the observational data of NSs associated with supernova remnants. They also suggest that the initial spin periods of NSs might occupy a relatively wide range.

  9. Comparison of In-Situ Geomagnetic Field Measurement with International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) Model to Study the Ionosphere over Akure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oladeji Oloketuyi, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    The ionosphere over Akure, south-western Nigeria (7o 15'N 5o 12'E) was investigated for a period of two years (2005-2006) from direct observation and model. Ionosphere over Akure was monitored and measured using a locally produced magnetometer. The International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model was used to evaluate the magnetic field over Akure at the same epoch as the direct measurements. The measured values were compared with model values at every local for discrepancies. Diurnal and Seasonal effects were investigated using the two means. The magnetic data generated from locally made magnetometer provided a comprehensive understanding of the geomagnetic variation over the region. The comparison of measured and modeled values showed remarkable deviation. The discrepancies in the values may be attributed to local sources captured in the direct measurements.

  10. Testing Models of Magnetic Field Evolution of Neutron Stars with the Statistical Properties of their Spin Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Xie, Yi

    2012-10-01

    We test models for the evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields (B). Our model for the evolution of the NS spin is taken from an analysis of pulsar timing noise presented by Hobbs et al.. We first test the standard model of a pulsar's magnetosphere in which B does not change with time and magnetic dipole radiation is assumed to dominate the pulsar's spin-down. We find that this model fails to predict both the magnitudes and signs of the second derivatives of the spin frequencies (\\ddot{\

  11. Neutron spectroscopic study of crystalline electric field excitations in stoichiometric and lightly stuffed Yb2Ti2O7

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gaudet, J.; Maharaj, D. D.; Sala, G.; Kermarrec, E.; Ross, K. A.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Granroth, G. E.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2015-10-27

    Time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy has been used to determine the crystalline electric field Hamiltonian, eigenvalues and eigenvectors appropriate to the J=7/2 Yb3+ ion in the candidate quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7. The precise ground state of this exotic, geometrically frustrated magnet is known to be sensitive to weak disorder associated with the growth of single crystals from the melt. Such materials display weak “stuffing,” wherein a small proportion, approximately 2%, of the nonmagnetic Ti4+ sites are occupied by excess Yb3+. We have carried out neutron spectroscopic measurements on a stoichiometric powder sample of Yb2Ti2O7, as well as a crushed singlemore » crystal with weak stuffing and an approximate composition of Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y with x = 0.046. All samples display three crystalline electric field transitions out of the ground state, and the ground state doublet itself is identified as primarily composed of mJ = ±1/2, as expected. However, stuffing at low temperatures in Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y induces a similar finite crystalline electric field lifetime as is induced in stoichiometric Yb2Ti2O7 by elevated temperature. In conclusion, an extended strain field exists about each local “stuffed” site, which produces a distribution of random crystalline electric field environments in the lightly stuffed Yb2+xTi2–xO7+y, in addition to producing a small fraction of Yb ions in defective environments with grossly different crystalline electric field eigenvalues and eigenvectors.« less

  12. The fission track detector revisited: application to individual neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Prêtre, S; Aroua, A; Boschung, M; Grecescu, M; Valley, J F; Wernli, C

    1996-08-01

    A system based on fission fragment tracks had previously been developed for individual neutron dosimetry. The dosimeter detects both fast neutrons by means of the 232Th(n,f) reaction, and thermal and albedo neutrons by means of the 235U(n,f) reaction. The fission tracks produced in a plastic foil are chemically etched and counted by spark discharges. The response of the dosimeter has recently been re-investigated in 36 different neutron fields: monoenergetic beams, reference fields near isotopic sources, and radiation fields encountered in a variety of situations inside nuclear power plants. The results obtained have been compared to those computed by convolution of the neutron spectra with the energy response functions of the dosimeters. In practical situations, it is essential to know the shape of the neutron spectrum, approximately at least, in order to perform an acceptably accurate dose evaluation. For that purpose, the neutron fields encountered inside nuclear power plants have been grouped into four categories, for which algorithms for dose evaluation have been developed. Concerning the neutron equivalent dose, the error associated with this approach does not exceed a factor of 2, a performance which is comparable to other detection systems used in the field of individual neutron dosimetry. PMID:8690594

  13. Using a Tandem Pelletron accelerator to produce a thermal neutron beam for detector testing purposes.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Praena, J; Fernández, B; Macías, M; Bedogni, R; Terrón, J A; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Arias de Saavedra, F; Porras, I; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-01-01

    Active thermal neutron detectors are used in a wide range of measuring devices in medicine, industry and research. For many applications, the long-term stability of these devices is crucial, so that very well controlled neutron fields are needed to perform calibrations and repeatability tests. A way to achieve such reference neutron fields, relying on a 3 MV Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at the CNA (Seville, Spain), is reported here. This paper shows thermal neutron field production and reproducibility characteristics over few days. PMID:26595777

  14. Direct observation of electronic and nuclear ground state splitting in external magnetic field by inelastic neutron scattering on oxidized ferrocene and ferrocene containing polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appel, Markus; Frick, Bernhard; Elbert, Johannes; Gallei, Markus; Stühn, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The quantum mechanical splitting of states by interaction of a magnetic moment with an external magnetic field is well known, e.g., as Zeeman effect in optical transitions, and is also often seen in magnetic neutron scattering. We report excitations observed in inelastic neutron spectroscopy on the redox-responsive polymer poly(vinylferrocene). They are interpreted as splitting of the electronic ground state in the organometallic ferrocene units attached to the polymer chain where a magnetic moment is created by oxidation. In a second experiment using high resolution neutron backscattering spectroscopy we observe the hyperfine splitting, i.e., interaction of nuclear magnetic moments with external magnetic fields leading to sub-μeV excitations observable in incoherent neutron spin-flip scattering on hydrogen and vanadium nuclei.

  15. Shell structure in neutron-rich Ca and Ni nuclei under semi-realistic mean fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, H.

    2010-05-15

    Shell structure in the neutron-rich Ca and Ni nuclei is investigated by the spherical Hartree-Fock calculations with semi-realistic NN interactions. Specific ingredients of the effective interaction, particularly the tensor force, often play a key role in the Z dependence of the neutron shell structure. Such examples are found in N=32 and N=40; N=32 becomes magic or submagic in {sup 52}Ca while its magicity is broken in {sup 60}Ni, and N=40 is submagic (though not magic) in {sup 68}Ni but not in {sup 60}Ca. Comments are given on the doubly magic nature of {sup 78}Ni. We point out that the loose binding can lead to a submagic number N=58 in {sup 86}Ni, assisted by the weak pair coupling.

  16. Neutron Spectrometer Prospecting in the Mojave Volatiles Project Analog Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Heldmann, J. L.; Colaprete, A.; Hunt, D. R.; Deans, M. C.; Lim, D. S.; Foil, G.; Fong, T.

    2015-01-01

    We know that volatiles are sequestered at the poles of the Moon. While we have evidence of water ice and a number of other compounds based on remote sensing, the detailed distribution, and physical and chemical form are largely unknown. Additional orbital studies of lunar polar volatiles may yield further insights, but the most important next step is to use landed assets to fully characterize the volatile composition and distribution at scales of tens to hundreds of meters. To achieve this range of scales, mobility is needed. Because of the proximity of the Moon, near real-time operation of the surface assets is possible, with an associated reduction in risk and cost. This concept of operations is very different from that of rovers on Mars, and new operational approaches are required to carry out such real-time robotic exploration. The Mojave Volatiles Project (MVP) was a Moon-Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) program project aimed at (1) determining effective approaches to operating a real-time but short-duration lunar surface robotic mission, and (2) performing prospecting science in a natural setting, as a test of these approaches. Here we describe some results from the first such test, carried out in the Mojave Desert between 16 and 24 October, 2014. The test site was an alluvial fan just E of the Soda Mountains, SW of Baker, California. This site contains desert pavements, ranging from the late Pleistocene to early-Holocene in age. These pavements are undergoing dissection by the ongoing development of washes. A principal objective was to determine the hydration state of different types of desert pavement and bare ground features. The mobility element of the test was provided by the KREX-2 rover, designed and operated by the Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center. The rover-borne neutron spectrometer measured the neutron albedo at both thermal and epithermal energies. Assuming uniform geochemistry and material bulk density, hydrogen as

  17. Neutron spectrometry for radiation protection: Three examples

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhagen, P.

    1995-12-31

    Workers and the general public are exposed to neutron radiation from a variety of sources, including fission and fusion reactors, accelerators, the nuclear fuel and nuclear weapons cycles, and cosmic rays in space, in aircraft and on the earth. Because the health effects of neutrons depend strongly on their energy, neutron spectrometry is essential for accurate risk-related neutron dosimetry. In addition, the penetration of neutrons through protective shielding changes their energy and can be difficult to calculate reliably, so the measurement of energy spectra is often needed to verify neutron transport calculations. The Environmental Measurements Laboratory has been measuring neutron energy spectra for over 20 years, primarily with multisphere (or Bonner sphere) spectrometers. Because of this experience, the Laboratory has responded to a number of requests to provide reference neutron energy spectra at critical locations in or near nuclear facilities and radiation fields. This talk will describe the author`s instruments and three recent examples of their use: outside the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), up to two kilometers from the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) bare reactor, and in a Canadian Forces jet aircraft at commercial aviation altitudes. All of these studies have implications beyond routine occupational radiation protection. For example, the APRF measurements are part of the broad effort to resolve the discrepancy between measured and calculated thermal neutron activation at Hiroshima, one of the most important unsolved problems in radiation dosimetry.

  18. Instantaneous and daily values of the surface energy balance over agricultural fields using remote sensing and a reference field in an arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kustas, W.P.; Moran, M.S.; Jackson, R. D.; Gay, L.W.; Duell, L.F.W.; Kunkel, K.E.; Matthias, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    Remotely sensed surface temperature and reflectance in the visible and near infrared wavebands along with ancilliary meteorological data provide the capability of computing three of the four surface energy balance components (i.e., net radiation, soil heat flux, and sensible heat flux) at different spatial and temporal scales. As a result, under nonadvective conditions, this enables the estimation of the remaining term (i.e., the latent heat flux). One of the practical applications with this approach is to produce evapotranspiration (ET) maps for agricultural regions which consist of an array of fields containing different crops at varying stages of growth and soil moisture conditions. Such a situation exists in the semiarid southwest at the University of Arizona Maricopa Agricultural Center, south of Phoenix. For one day (14 June 1987), surface temperature and reflectance measurements from an aircraft 150 m above ground level (agl) were acquired over fields from zero to nearly full cover at four times between 1000 MST and 1130 MST. The diurnal pattern of the surface energy balance was measured over four fields, which included alfalfa at 60% cover, furrowed cotton at 20% and 30% cover, and partially plowed what stubble. Instantaneous and daily values of ET were estimated for a representative area around each flux site with an energy balance model that relies on a reference ET. This reference value was determined with remotely sensed data and several meteorological inputs. The reference ET was adjusted to account for the different surface conditions in the other fields using only remotely sensed variables. A comparison with the flux measurements suggests the model has difficulties with partial canopy conditions, especially related to the estimation of the sensible heat flux. The resulting errors for instantaneous ET were on the order of 100 W m-2 and for daily values of order 2 mm day-1. These findings suggest future research should involve development of methods to

  19. An image-based skeletal model for the ICRP reference adult male-specific absorbed fractions for neutron-generated recoil protons.

    PubMed

    Jokisch, D W; Rajon, D A; Bahadori, A A; Bolch, W E

    2011-11-01

    Recoiling hydrogen nuclei are a principle mechanism for energy deposition from incident neutrons. For neutrons incident on the human skeleton, the small sizes of two contrasting media (trabecular bone and marrow) present unique problems due to a lack of charged-particle (protons) equilibrium. Specific absorbed fractions have been computed for protons originating in the human skeletal tissues for use in computing neutron dose response functions. The proton specific absorbed fractions were computed using a pathlength-based range-energy calculation in trabecular skeletal samples of a 40 year old male cadaver. PMID:21983482

  20. Footprint characteristics revised for field-scale soil moisture monitoring with cosmic-ray neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhli, M.; Schrön, M.; Zreda, M.; Schmidt, U.; Dietrich, P.; Zacharias, S.

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron probes are widely used to monitor environmental water content near the surface. The method averages over tens of hectares and is unrivaled in serving representative data for agriculture and hydrological models at the hectometer scale. Recent experiments, however, indicate that the sensor response to environmental heterogeneity is not fully understood. Knowledge of the support volume is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation and validation of hydrogeophysical data. In a previous study, several physical simplifications have been introduced into a neutron transport model in order to derive the characteristics of the cosmic-ray probe's footprint. We utilize a refined source and energy spectrum for cosmic-ray neutrons and simulate their response to a variety of environmental conditions. Results indicate that the method is particularly sensitive to soil moisture in the first tens of meters around the probe, whereas the radial weights are changing dynamically with ambient water. The footprint radius ranges from 130 to 240 m depending on air humidity, soil moisture, and vegetation. The moisture-dependent penetration depth of 15 to 83 cm decreases exponentially with distance to the sensor. However, the footprint circle remains almost isotropic in complex terrain with nearby rivers, roads or hill slopes. Our findings suggest that a dynamically weighted average of point measurements is essential for accurate calibration and validation. The new insights will have important impact on signal interpretation, sensor installation, data interpolation from mobile surveys, and the choice of appropriate resolutions for data assimilation into hydrological models.

  1. Development of neutron measurement in high gamma field using new nuclear emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kawarabayashi, J.; Ishihara, K.; Takagi, K.; Tomita, H.; Iguchi, T.; Naka, T.; Morishima, K.; Maeda, S.

    2011-07-01

    To precisely measure the neutron emissions from a spent fuel assembly of a fast breeder reactor, we formed nuclear emulsions based on a non-sensitized Oscillation Project with Emulsion tracking Apparatus (OPERA) film with AgBr grain sizes of 60, 90, and 160 nm. The efficiency for {sup 252}Cf neutron detection of the new emulsion was calculated to be 0.7 x 10{sup -4}, which corresponded to an energy range from 0.3 to 2 MeV and was consistent with a preliminary estimate based on experimental results. The sensitivity of the new emulsion was also experimentally estimated by irradiating with 565 keV and 14 MeV neutrons. The emulsion with an AgBr grain size of 60 nm had the lowest sensitivity among the above three emulsions but was still sensitive enough to detect protons. Furthermore, the experimental data suggested that there was a threshold linear energy transfer of 15 keV/{mu}m for the new emulsion, below which no silver clusters developed. Further development of nuclear emulsion with an AgBr grain size of a few tens of nanometers will be the next stage of the present study. (authors)

  2. Spatiotemporal characterization of soil moisture fields in agricultural areas using cosmic-ray neutron probes and data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Trenton; Wang, Tiejun

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 40% of global food production comes from irrigated agriculture. With the increasing demand for food even greater pressures will be placed on water resources within these systems. In this work we aimed to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture at the field-scale (~500 m) using the newly developed cosmic-ray neutron rover near Waco, NE USA. Here we mapped soil moisture of 144 quarter section fields (a mix of maize, soybean, and natural areas) each week during the 2014 growing season (May to September). The 12 by 12 km study domain also contained three stationary cosmic-ray neutron probes for independent validation of the rover surveys. Basic statistical analysis of the domain indicated a strong relationship between the mean and variance of soil moisture at several averaging scales. The relationships between the mean and higher order moments were not significant. Scaling analysis indicated strong power law behavior between the variance of soil moisture and averaging area with minimal dependence of mean soil moisture on the slope of the power law function. In addition, we combined the data from the three stationary cosmic-ray neutron probes and mobile surveys using linear regression to derive a daily soil moisture product at 1, 3, and 12 km spatial resolutions for the entire growing season. The statistical relationships derived from the rover dataset offer a novel set of observations that will be useful in: 1) calibrating and validating land surface models, 2) calibrating and validating crop models, 3) soil moisture covariance estimates for statistical downscaling of remote sensing products such as SMOS and SMAP, and 4) provide daily center-pivot scale mean soil moisture data for optimal irrigation timing and volume amounts.

  3. A review on the relativistic effective field theory with parameterized couplings for nuclear matter and neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, C. A. Zen

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear science has developed many excellent theoretical models for many-body systems in the domain of the baryon-meson strong interaction for the nucleus and nuclear matter at low, medium and high densities. However, a full microscopic understanding of nuclear systems in the extreme density domain of compact stars is still lacking. The aim of this contribution is to shed some light on open questions facing the nuclear many-body problem at the very high density domain. Here we focus our attention on the conceptual issue of naturalness and its role in shaping the baryon-meson phase space dynamics in the description of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and neutrons stars. In particular, in order to stimulate possible new directions of research, we discuss relevant aspects of a recently developed relativistic effective theory for nuclear matter within Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD) with genuine many-body forces and derivative natural parametric couplings. Among other topics we discuss in this work the connection of this theory with other known effective QHD models of the literature and its potentiality in describing a new physics for dense matter. The model with parameterized couplings exhausts the whole fundamental baryon octet (n, p, Σ-, Σ0, Σ+, Λ, Ξ-, Ξ0) and simulates n-order corrections to the minimal Yukawa baryon couplings by considering nonlinear self-couplings of meson fields and meson-meson interaction terms coupled to the baryon fields involving scalar-isoscalar (σ, σ∗), vector-isoscalar (ω, ɸ), vector-isovector (ϱ) and scalar-isovector (δ) virtual sectors. Following recent experimental results, we consider in our calculations the extreme case where the Σ- experiences such a strong repulsion that its influence in the nuclear structure of a neutron star is excluded at all. A few examples of calculations of properties of neutron stars are shown and prospects for the future are discussed.

  4. Detection of a Bacteriophage Gene Encoding a Mu-like Portal Protein in Haemophilus parasuis Reference Strains and Field Isolates by Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A nested PCR assay was developed to determine the presence of a gene encoding a bacteriophage Mu-like portal protein, gp29, in 15 reference strains and 31 field isolates of Haemophilus parasuis. Specific primers, based on the gene’s sequence, were utilized. A majority of the virulent reference strai...

  5. Neutron scattering studies of crude oil viscosity reduction with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Enpeng

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a very powerful laboratory technique for micro structure research which is similar to the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and light scattering for microstructure investigations in various materials. In small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique, the neutrons are elastically scattered by changes of refractive index on a nanometer scale inside the sample through the interaction with the nuclei of the atoms present in the sample. Because the nuclei of all atoms are compact and of comparable size, neutrons are capable of interacting strongly with all atoms. This is in contrast to X-ray techniques where the X-rays interact weakly with hydrogen, the most abundant element in most samples. The SANS refractive index is directly related to the scattering length density and is a measure of the strength of the interaction of a neutron wave with a given nucleus. It can probe inhomogeneities in the nanometer scale from 1nm to 1000nm. Since the SANS technique probes the length scale in a very useful range, this technique provides valuable information over a wide variety of scientific and technological applications, including chemical aggregation, defects in materials, surfactants, colloids, ferromagnetic correlations in magnetism, alloy segregation, polymers, proteins, biological membranes, viruses, ribosome and macromolecules. Quoting the Nobel committee, when awarding the prize to C. Shull and B. Brockhouse in 1994: "Neutrons tell you where the atoms are and what the atoms do". At NIST, there is a single beam of neutrons generated from either reactor or pulsed neutron source and selected by velocity selector. The beam passes through a neutron guide then scattered by the sample. After the sample chamber, there are 2D gas detectors to collect the elastic scattering information. SANS usually uses collimation of the neutron beam to determine the scattering angle of a neutron, which results in an even lower signal-to-noise ratio for

  6. Neutron metrology laboratory facility simulation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mariana; Salgado, Ana P; Filho, Aidano S; Pereira, Walsan W; Patrão, Karla C S; Fonseca, Evaldo S

    2014-10-01

    The Neutron Low Scattering Laboratory in Brazil has been completely rebuilt. Evaluation of air attenuation parameters and neutron component scattering in the room was done using Monte Carlo simulation code. Neutron fields produced by referenced neutron source were used to calculate neutron scattering and air attenuation. PMID:24864318

  7. Cyclotron absorption of X rays by a classical plasma in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhelezniakov, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The cyclotron absorption of electromagnetic waves in an equilibrium classical plasma in a strong magnetic field is investigated on the basis of a kinetic equation and by means of Kirchhoff's law. A study is carried out of the influence of vacuum polarization by the magnetic field on the polarization of the ordinary and extraordinary waves and on the coefficients of cyclotron absorption of these waves in the plasma. The results obtained are of interest for the theory of the emission of X-ray sources associated with neutron stars in binary systems and above all for the theory of the origin of the X rays in the spectrum of the source Her X-1.

  8. Dipolar structures in magnetite ferrofluids studied with small-angle neutron scattering with and without applied magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Klokkenburg, M; Erné, B H; Wiedenmann, A; Petukhov, A V; Philipse, A P

    2007-05-01

    Field-induced structure formation in a ferrofluid with well-defined magnetite nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment was studied with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a function of the magnetic interactions. The interactions were tuned by adjusting the size of the well-defined, single-magnetic-domain magnetite (Fe3O4) particles and by applying an external magnetic field. For decreasing particle dipole moments, the data show a progressive distortion of the hexagonal symmetry, resulting from the formation of magnetic sheets. The SANS data show qualitative agreement with recent cryogenic transmission electron microscopy results obtained in 2D [Klokkenburg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 185702 (2006)] on the same ferrofluids. PMID:17677066

  9. Characterization of phosphorus segregation in neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steels by atom probe field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Jayaram, R.; Russell, K.F.

    1995-04-01

    An atom probe field ion microscopy characterization of A533B and Russian VVER 440 and 1000 pressure vessel steels has been performed to determine the phosphorus coverage of grain and lath boundaries. Field ion micrographs of grain and lath boundaries have revealed that they are decorated with a semi-continuous film of discrete brightly-imaging precipitates that were identified as molybdenum carbonitride precipitates. In addition, extremely high phosphorus levels were measured at the boundaries. The phosphorus segregation was found to be confined to an extremely narrow region indicative of monolayer-type segregation. The phosphorus coverages determined from the atom probe results of the unirradiated materials were in excellent agreement with predictions based on McLean`s equilibrium model of grain boundary segregation. The boundary phosphorus coverage of a neutron-irradiated weld material was significantly higher than that observed in the unirradiated material.

  10. Dipolar structures in magnetite ferrofluids studied with small-angle neutron scattering with and without applied magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Klokkenburg, M.; Erne, B. H.; Petukhov, A. V.; Philipse, A. P.; Wiedenmann, A.

    2007-05-15

    Field-induced structure formation in a ferrofluid with well-defined magnetite nanoparticles with a permanent magnetic dipole moment was studied with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) as a function of the magnetic interactions. The interactions were tuned by adjusting the size of the well-defined, single-magnetic-domain magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) particles and by applying an external magnetic field. For decreasing particle dipole moments, the data show a progressive distortion of the hexagonal symmetry, resulting from the formation of magnetic sheets. The SANS data show qualitative agreement with recent cryogenic transmission electron microscopy results obtained in 2D [Klokkenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 185702 (2006)] on the same ferrofluids.

  11. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  12. Neutron star deformation due to poloidal-toroidal magnetic fields of arbitrary multipole order: a new analytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrano, A.; Suvorov, A. G.; Melatos, A.

    2015-03-01

    A recipe is presented to construct an analytic, self-consistent model of a non-barotropic neutron star with a poloidal-toroidal field of arbitrary multipole order, whose toroidal component is confined in a torus around the neutral curve inside the star, as in numerical simulations of twisted tori. The recipe takes advantage of magnetic field aligned coordinates to ensure continuity of the mass density at the surface of the torus. The density perturbation and ellipticity of such a star are calculated in general and for the special case of a mixed dipole-quadrupole field as a worked example. The calculation generalizes previous work restricted to dipolar, poloidal-toroidal and multipolar, poloidal-only configurations. The results are applied, as an example, to magnetars whose observations (e.g. spectral features and pulse modulation) indicate that the internal magnetic fields may be at least one order of magnitude stronger than the external fields, as inferred from their spin-downs, and are not purely dipolar.

  13. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  14. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  15. Spin period change and the magnetic fields of neutron stars in Be X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klus, H.; Ho, W. C. G.; Coe, M. J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Townsend, L. J.

    2014-02-01

    We report on the long-term average spin period, rate of change of spin period and X-ray luminosity during outbursts for 42 Be X-ray binary systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We also collect and calculate parameters of each system and use these data to determine that all systems contain a neutron star which is accreting via a disc, rather than a wind, and that if these neutron stars are near spin equilibrium, then over half of them, including all with spin periods over about 100 s, have magnetic fields over the quantum critical level of 4.4 × 1013 G. If these neutron stars are not close to spin equilibrium, then their magnetic fields are inferred to be much lower, of the order of 106-1010 G, comparable to the fields of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries. Both results are unexpected and have implications for the rate of magnetic field decay and the isolated neutron star population.

  16. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  17. NEW HYPERON EQUATIONS OF STATE FOR SUPERNOVAE AND NEUTRON STARS IN DENSITY-DEPENDENT HADRON FIELD THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Banik, Sarmistha; Hempel, Matthias; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2014-10-01

    We develop new hyperon equation of state (EoS) tables for core-collapse supernova simulations and neutron stars. These EoS tables are based on a density-dependent relativistic hadron field theory where baryon-baryon interaction is mediated by mesons, using the parameter set DD2 for nucleons. Furthermore, light and heavy nuclei along with interacting nucleons are treated in the nuclear statistical equilibrium model of Hempel and Schaffner-Bielich which includes excluded volume effects. Of all possible hyperons, we consider only the contribution of Λs. We have developed two variants of hyperonic EoS tables: in the npΛφ case the repulsive hyperon-hyperon interaction mediated by the strange φ meson is taken into account, and in the npΛ case it is not. The EoS tables for the two cases encompass a wide range of densities (10{sup –12} to ∼1 fm{sup –3}), temperatures (0.1 to 158.48 MeV), and proton fractions (0.01 to 0.60). The effects of Λ hyperons on thermodynamic quantities such as free energy per baryon, pressure, or entropy per baryon are investigated and found to be significant at higher densities. The cold, β-equilibrated EoS (with the crust included self-consistently) results in a 2.1 M {sub ☉} maximum mass neutron star for the npΛφ case, whereas that for the npΛ case is 1.95 M {sub ☉}. The npΛφ EoS represents the first supernova EoS table involving hyperons that is directly compatible with the recently measured 2 M {sub ☉} neutron stars.

  18. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields: existing facilities and future needs.

    PubMed

    Pomp, S; Bartlett, D T; Mayer, S; Reitz, G; Röttger, S; Silari, M; Smit, F D; Vincke, H; Yasuda, H

    2014-10-01

    The argument that well-characterised quasi-monoenergetic neutron (QMN) sources reaching into the energy domain >20 MeV are needed is presented. A brief overview of the existing facilities is given, and a list of key factors that an ideal QMN source for dosimetry and spectrometry should offer is presented. The authors conclude that all of the six QMN facilities currently in existence worldwide operate in sub-optimal conditions for dosimetry. The only currently available QMN facility in Europe capable of operating at energies >40 MeV, TSL in Uppsala, Sweden, is threatened with shutdown in the immediate future. One facility, NFS at GANIL, France, is currently under construction. NFS could deliver QMN beams up to about 30 MeV. It is, however, so far not clear if and when NFS will be able to offer QMN beams or operate with only so-called white neutron beams. It is likely that by 2016, QMN beams with energies >40 MeV will be available only in South Africa and Japan, with none in Europe. PMID:24153422

  19. Comparison of out-of-field photon doses in 6 MV IMRT and neutron doses in proton therapy for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, Basit S.; Bednarz, Bryan; Seco, Joao; Hancox, Cindy; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess lateral out-of-field doses in 6 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) and compare them with secondary neutron equivalent dose contributions in proton therapy. We simulated out-of-field photon doses to various organs as a function of distance, patient's age, gender and treatment volumes based on 3, 6, 9 cm field diameters in the head and neck and spine region. The out-of-field photon doses to organs near the field edge were found to be in the range of 2, 5 and 10 mSv Gy-1 for 3 cm, 6 cm and 9 cm diameter IMRT fields, respectively, within 5 cm of the field edge. Statistical uncertainties calculated in organ doses vary from 0.2% to 40% depending on the organ location and the organ volume. Next, a comparison was made with previously calculated neutron equivalent doses from proton therapy using identical field arrangements. For example, out-of-field doses for IMRT to lung and uterus (organs close to the 3 cm diameter spinal field) were computed to be 0.63 and 0.62 mSv Gy-1, respectively. These numbers are found to be a factor of 2 smaller than the corresponding out-of-field doses for proton therapy, which were estimated to be 1.6 and 1.7 mSv Gy-1 (RBE), respectively. However, as the distance to the field edge increases beyond approximately 25 cm the neutron equivalent dose from proton therapy was found to be a factor of 2-3 smaller than the out-of-field photon dose from IMRT. We have also analyzed the neutron equivalent doses from an ideal scanned proton therapy (assuming not significant amount of absorbers in the treatment head). Out-of-field doses were found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to out-of-field doses in IMRT or passive scattered proton therapy. In conclusion, there seem to be three geometrical areas when comparing the out-of-target dose from IMRT and (passive scattered) proton treatments. Close to the target (in-field, not analyzed here) protons offer a distinct advantage due to the lower

  20. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Lin, Y; Tsai, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  1. Study of a nTHGEM-based thermal neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Tao; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Yu-Guang; Zhou, Liang; Xu, Hong; Yang, Gui-An; Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jin-Jie; Sun, Zhi-Jia; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2016-07-01

    With new generation neutron sources, traditional neutron detectors cannot satisfy the demands of the applications, especially under high flux. Furthermore, facing the global crisis in 3He gas supply, research on new types of neutron detector as an alternative to 3He is a research hotspot in the field of particle detection. GEM (Gaseous Electron Multiplier) neutron detectors have high counting rate, good spatial and time resolution, and could be one future direction of the development of neutron detectors. In this paper, the physical process of neutron detection is simulated with Geant4 code, studying the relations between thermal conversion efficiency, boron thickness and number of boron layers. Due to the special characteristics of neutron detection, we have developed a novel type of special ceramic nTHGEM (neutron THick GEM) for neutron detection. The performance of the nTHGEM working in different Ar/CO2 mixtures is presented, including measurements of the gain and the count rate plateau using a copper target X-ray source. A detector with a single nTHGEM has been tested for 2-D imaging using a 252Cf neutron source. The key parameters of the performance of the nTHGEM detector have been obtained, providing necessary experimental data as a reference for further research on this detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11127508, 11175199, 11205253, 11405191), Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, CAEP (2013DB06, 2013BB04) and CAS (YZ201512)

  2. Simulation of neutron production using MCNPX+MCUNED.

    PubMed

    Erhard, M; Sauvan, P; Nolte, R

    2014-10-01

    In standard MCNPX, the production of neutrons by ions cannot be modelled efficiently. The MCUNED patch applied to MCNPX 2.7.0 allows to model the production of neutrons by light ions down to energies of a few kiloelectron volts. This is crucial for the simulation of neutron reference fields. The influence of target properties, such as the diffusion of reactive isotopes into the target backing or the effect of energy and angular straggling, can be studied efficiently. In this work, MCNPX/MCUNED calculations are compared with results obtained with the TARGET code for simulating neutron production. Furthermore, MCUNED incorporates more effective variance reduction techniques and a coincidence counting tally. This allows the simulation of a TCAP experiment being developed at PTB. In this experiment, 14.7-MeV neutrons will be produced by the reaction T(d,n)(4)He. The neutron fluence is determined by counting alpha particles, independently of the reaction cross section. PMID:24132389

  3. Old and new neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ruderman, M.

    1984-09-01

    The youngest known radiopulsar in the rapidly spinning magnetized neutron star which powers the Crab Nebula, the remnant of the historical supernova explosion of 1054 AD. Similar neutron stars are probably born at least every few hundred years, but are less frequent than Galactic supernova explosions. They are initially sources of extreme relativistic electron and/or positron winds (approx.10/sup 38/s/sup -1/ of 10/sup 12/ eV leptons) which greatly decrease as the neutron stars spin down to become mature pulsars. After several million years these neutron stars are no longer observed as radiopulsars, perhaps because of large magnetic field decay. However, a substantial fraction of the 10/sup 8/ old dead pulsars in the Galaxy are the most probable source for the isotropically distributed ..gamma..-ray burst detected several times per week at the earth. Some old neutron stars are spun-up by accretion from companions to be resurrected as rapidly spinning low magnetic field radiopulsars. 52 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Neutron spectroscopic study of Crystal-field excitation in Yb2 (Ti2 - x Ybx) O7 -x/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, Jonathan; Maharaj, Dalini; Kermarrec, Edwin; Granroth, Garrett; Ross, Kate; Dabowska, Hanna; Gaulin, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Among the rare-earth titanate pyrochlores, Yb2 Ti2O7 has attracted much attention as a potential realization of a quantum spin ice. While strong quantum effects are absent in classical spin ice compounds, they are thought to be significant in Yb2 Ti2O7 because of its effective spin S=1/2 and its XY spin anisotropy, quantities both determined by the Crystal-Electric Field (CEF) levels. However, a thorough neutron spectroscopy study of the CEF levels is still lacking. Here, we report time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering measurements on Yb2 Ti2O7 . Our results lead to the unambiguous determination of the CEF levels, the ground-state wavefunction and therefore the nature of the spin anisotropy of the J=7/2 Yb3+ . A significant sample dependence in the low temperature heat capacity has been reported and attributed to an excess of Yb3+ (''stuffing'') in the structure. Our measurements, carried out on two well-characterized samples with different levels of stuffing, allow us to discuss the impact of such disorder on the CEF levels.

  5. Crystal field excitations in CeCu2Ge2: Revisited employing a single crystal and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhaupt, Michael; Faulhaber, Enrico; Schneidewind, Astrid; Deppe, Micha; Hradil, Klaudia

    2012-04-01

    The intermetallic compound, CeCu2Ge2, is the counterpart of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2. CeCu2Ge2 is a magnetically ordering (TN = 4.1K) Kondo lattice with a moderate Sommerfeld coefficient of 140 mJ/ molK2. Earlier inelastic neutron measurements on a polycrystalline sample revealed a doublet ground state and a quasi-quartet excited state at 16.5 meV, although a splitting of the 4f1 (J = 5/2) ground state multiplet into 3 doublets is expected from the point symmetry of the Ce3+ ions. We performed detailed inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a single crystal at the thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA at FRM II for different crystallographic directions. From our results we infer that the quasi-quartet, in fact, consists of two doublets at 17.0 and 18.3 meV which exhibit a strong directional dependence of their transition matrix elements to the ground state doublet. Finally, we will present a new set of crystal field parameters.

  6. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2012-07-01

    account the shielding of the core potential for outer electrons by inner electrons, and an optimal finite-element decomposition of each individual longitudinal wave function. These measures largely enhance the convergence properties compared to the previous code, and lead to speed-ups by factors up to two orders of magnitude compared with the implementation of the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method used by Engel and Wunner in [D. Engel, G. Wunner, Phys. Rev. A 78 (2008) 032515]. New version program summaryProgram title: HFFER II Catalogue identifier: AECC_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: v 55 130 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 293 700 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95 Computer: Cluster of 1-13 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Linux Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, parallelized using MPI directives. RAM: 1 GByte per node Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, BLAS, FMlib (included in the package) Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECC_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 302 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Quantitative modellings of features observed in the X-ray spectra of isolated magnetic neutron stars are hampered by the lack of sufficiently large and accurate databases for atoms and ions up to the last fusion product, iron, at strong magnetic field strengths. Our code is intended to provide a powerful tool for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of medium-Z atoms and ions at neutron star magnetic field strengths with sufficient accuracy in a routine way to create such databases. Solution method: The

  7. Analysis of geomagnetic secular variation during 1980-1985 and 1985- 1990, and geomagnetic models proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peddie, N.W.

    1992-01-01

    The secular variation of the main geomagnetic field during the periods 1980-1985 and 1985-1990 was analyzed in terms of spherical harmonics up to the eighth degree and order. Data from worldwide magnetic observatories and the Navy's Project MAGNET aerial surveys were used. The resulting pair of secular-variation models was used to update the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) model for 1980, resulting in new mainfield models for 1985.0 and 1990.0. These, along with the secular-variation model for 1985-1990, were proposed for the 1991 revision of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). -Author

  8. Poroelastic references

    SciTech Connect

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on the Biot theory (forward and inverse approaches), the double-porosity and dual-permeability theory, and seismic wave propagation in fracture porous media, in RIS format, to approach seismic monitoring in a complex fractured porous medium such as Brady?s Geothermal Field.

  9. Study of magnetic field effects for accretions with highly magnetized neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasano, Makoto; Enoto, Teruaki; Makishima, Kazuo; Sakurai, Soki

    Neutron stars (NSs) in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), namely those with massive privary stars, generally have strong magnetic fields (˜10 (12) G). In contrast, those in typical low mass binary systems (LMXBs) are weakly magnetized (˜10 (9-10) G). This clear difference in the magnetic field strength is considered to be primarily responsible for the systematic differences in X-ray properties between NSs in HMXBs and those in LMXBs. However, these can also be possible contributions from their accretion-scheme differences, i.e., wind capture in HMXBs and disk accretion in LMXBs. To separate these two effects, we may utilize a few highly-magnetized NSs in LMXBs, including Her X-1, GX 1+4, 4U 1626-67, and a recently recognized object 4U 1822-37 (Sasano et al. PASJ in press, arXiv:1311.4618). In this study, we compare spectral and timing properties of these exceptional strong-field NSs, with those of more typical objects in LMXBs an HMXBs. Their properties that are common with typical HMXBs can be regarded as a signature of strong magnetic fields while those shared by typical LMXBs can be attributed to the disk-fed accretion geometry.

  10. Quantum diffusion of ultra-cold neutrons in a rough waveguide in a gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, Mauricio

    We report the results of our study of propagation of gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). Our theoretical study is done within the frame of the general theory of transport in systems with random rough boundaries developed by Meyerovich et al. We present a theoretical description of GRANIT experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for waveguides with one- and two-dimensional (1Dd and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant (phi) which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. phi is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. For waveguides with 1D roughness most of the calculations can be performed analytically for the main common types of CF. For waveguides with 2D roughness the final calculations are mostly numerical. We also developed useful scaling equations for phi which can allow experimentalists to accommodate our results to different experimental setups. The reliable identification of the CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. In order to deal with this issue, we perform numerical experiments relevant for the identification of the roughness CF. We generate surfaces with predetermined CF using rotation of uncorrelated surfaces or using Monte Carlo simulations based on the Ising model. These numerical experiments show how to circumvent the difficulties that arise in extracting the correlation properties of surface roughness using the data on the surface profile obtained in STM-like experiments. This experience helps us to analyze the new rough mirror and make theoretical predictions for ongoing GRANIT experiments. We also propose an alternative waveguide design which can improve the accuracy of experimental results.

  11. Neutron-Resonance Capture Analysis of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, H.; Bode, P.; Blaauw, M.; Corvi, F.

    1999-11-14

    Epithermal neutron activation analysis is a well-established approach to improve the sensitivity for certain elements by suppressing the activation of interfering elements. If epithermal neutrons of a given energy could be selected, the signal-to-noise ratio might be further improved by taking advantage of resonance capture. This reaction occurs mainly by intermediate and heavy nuclei. Moreover, most of these reactions take place with epithermal or fast neutrons. Intense epithermal neutrons are available as ''white'' beams at accelerator-driven neutron sources. Neutron resonance capture offers interesting analytical opportunities. Low-Z elements have little capture of epithermal neutrons and are thus virtually absent in the time-of-flight spectrum. Relatively large objects can be placed in the neutron beam and analyzed nondestructively. The induced radioactivity is relatively low. If an element has several stable isotopes, each of these isotopes can be recognized by its specific resonances. This would allow for multitracer studies with several isotopically labeled compounds. Different from mass spectrometry, the sample remains intact and can be used for further studies after analysis. Applications may be in the field of archaeology, metallurgy, and certification of reference materials.

  12. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Tobias; Blaickner, Matthias; Schütz, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert; Kratz, Jens V; Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Otto, Gerd; Hampel, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the (7)Li(n,α)(3)H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also

  13. A 2015 International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) candidate model based on Swarm's experimental absolute magnetometer vector mode data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Pierre; Hulot, Gauthier; Olsen, Nils; Léger, Jean-Michel; Jager, Thomas; Brocco, Laura; Sirol, Olivier; Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lalanne, Xavier; Chulliat, Arnaud; Bertrand, François; Boness, Axel; Fratter, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Each of the three satellites of the European Space Agency Swarm mission carries an absolute scalar magnetometer (ASM) that provides the nominal 1-Hz scalar data of the mission for both science and calibration purposes. These ASM instruments, however, also deliver autonomous 1-Hz experimental vector data. Here, we report on how ASM-only scalar and vector data from the Alpha and Bravo satellites between November 29, 2013 (a week after launch) and September 25, 2014 (for on-time delivery of the model on October 1, 2014) could be used to build a very valuable candidate model for the 2015.0 International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). A parent model was first computed, describing the geomagnetic field of internal origin up to degree and order 40 in a spherical harmonic representation and including a constant secular variation up to degree and order 8. This model was next simply forwarded to epoch 2015.0 and truncated at degree and order 13. The resulting ASM-only 2015.0 IGRF candidate model is compared to analogous models derived from the mission's nominal data and to the now-published final 2015.0 IGRF model. Differences among models mainly highlight uncertainties enhanced by the limited geographical distribution of the selected data set (essentially due to a lack of availability of data at high northern latitude satisfying nighttime conditions at the end of the time period considered). These appear to be comparable to differences classically observed among IGRF candidate models. These positive results led the ASM-only 2015.0 IGRF candidate model to contribute to the construction of the final 2015.0 IGRF model.

  14. Neutron spectroscopic study of crystalline electric field excitations in stoichiometric and lightly stuffed Yb2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudet, J.; Maharaj, D. D.; Sala, G.; Kermarrec, E.; Ross, K. A.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Granroth, G. E.; Gaulin, B. D.

    2015-10-01

    Time-of-flight neutron spectroscopy has been used to determine the crystalline electric field (CEF) Hamiltonian, eigenvalues and eigenvectors appropriate to the J =7 /2 Yb3 + ion in the candidate quantum spin ice pyrochlore magnet Yb2Ti2O7 . The precise ground state (GS) of this exotic, geometrically frustrated magnet is known to be sensitive to weak disorder associated with the growth of single crystals from the melt. Such materials display weak "stuffing," wherein a small proportion, ≈2 % , of the nonmagnetic Ti4 + sites are occupied by excess Yb3 +. We have carried out neutron spectroscopic measurements on a stoichiometric powder sample of Yb2Ti2O7 , as well as a crushed single crystal with weak stuffing and an approximate composition of Yb2 +xTi2 -xO7 +y with x =0.046 . All samples display three CEF transitions out of the GS, and the GS doublet itself is identified as primarily composed of mJ=±1 /2 , as expected. However, stuffing at low temperatures in Yb2 +xTi2 -xO7 +y induces a similar finite CEF lifetime as is induced in stoichiometric Yb2Ti2O7 by elevated temperature. We conclude that an extended strain field exists about each local "stuffed" site, which produces a distribution of random CEF environments in the lightly stuffed Yb2 +xTi2 -xO7 +y , in addition to producing a small fraction of Yb ions in defective environments with grossly different CEF eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  15. Magnetic Transitions in Iron Porphyrin Halides by Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Ab-initio Studies of Zero-Field Splittings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stavretis, Shelby E.; Atanasov, Mihail; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Hunter, Seth C.; Neese, Frank; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2015-10-02

    Zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters of nondeuterated metalloporphyrins [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Br, I; H2TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) are determined by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The ZFS values are D = 4.49(9) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)F], and D = 8.8(2) cm–1, E = 0.1(2) cm–1 and D = 13.4(6) cm–1, E = 0.3(6) cm–1 for monoclinic polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Br] and [Fe(TPP)I], respectively. Along with our recent report of the ZFS value of D = 6.33(8) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Cl], these data provide a rare, complete determination of ZFS parameters in a metalloporphyrin halide series. The electronic structure of [Fe(TPP)X] (X =more » F, Cl, Br, I) has been studied by multireference ab initio methods: the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and the N-electron valence perturbation theory (NEVPT2) with the aim of exploring the origin of the large and positive zero-field splitting D of the 6A1 ground state. D was calculated from wave functions of the electronic multiplets spanned by the d5 configuration of Fe(III) along with spin–orbit coupling accounted for by quasi degenerate perturbation theory. Results reproduce trends of D from inelastic neutron scattering data increasing in the order from F, Cl, Br, to I. A mapping of energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the S = 3/2 excited states on ligand field theory was used to characterize the σ- and π-antibonding effects decreasing from F to I. This is in agreement with similar results deduced from ab initio calculations on CrX63- complexes and also with the spectrochemical series showing a decrease of the ligand field in the same directions. A correlation is found between the increase of D and decrease of the π- and σ-antibonding energies eλX (λ = σ, π) in the series from X = F to I. Analysis of this correlation using second-order perturbation theory expressions in terms of angular overlap parameters rationalizes the experimentally deduced trend

  16. Magnetic Transitions in Iron Porphyrin Halides by Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Ab Initio Studies of Zero-Field Splittings.

    PubMed

    Stavretis, Shelby E; Atanasov, Mihail; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Hunter, Seth C; Neese, Frank; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2015-10-19

    Zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters of nondeuterated metalloporphyrins [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Br, I; H₂TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) have been directly determined by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The ZFS values are D = 4.49(9) cm⁻¹ for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)F], and D = 8.8(2) cm⁻¹, E = 0.1(2) cm⁻¹ and D = 13.4(6) cm⁻¹, E = 0.3(6) cm⁻¹ for monoclinic polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Br] and [Fe(TPP)I], respectively. Along with our recent report of the ZFS value of D = 6.33(8) cm⁻¹ for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Cl], these data provide a rare, complete determination of ZFS parameters in a metalloporphyrin halide series. The electronic structure of [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Cl, Br, I) has been studied by multireference ab initio methods: the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and the N-electron valence perturbation theory (NEVPT2) with the aim of exploring the origin of the large and positive zero-field splitting D of the ⁶A₁ ground state. D was calculated from wave functions of the electronic multiplets spanned by the d⁵ configuration of Fe(III) along with spin–orbit coupling accounted for by quasi degenerate perturbation theory. Results reproduce trends of D from inelastic neutron scattering data increasing in the order from F, Cl, Br, to I. A mapping of energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the S = 3/2 excited states on ligand field theory was used to characterize the σ- and π-antibonding effects decreasing from F to I. This is in agreement with similar results deduced from ab initio calculations on CrX₆³⁻ complexes and also with the spectrochemical series showing a decrease of the ligand field in the same directions. A correlation is found between the increase of D and decrease of the π- and σ-antibonding energies e(λ)(X) (λ = σ, π) in the series from X = F to I. Analysis of this correlation using second-order perturbation theory expressions in terms of angular overlap parameters rationalizes the

  17. A review on the relativistic effective field theory with parameterized couplings for nuclear matter and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcellos, C. A. Zen

    2015-12-17

    Nuclear science has developed many excellent theoretical models for many-body systems in the domain of the baryon-meson strong interaction for the nucleus and nuclear matter at low, medium and high densities. However, a full microscopic understanding of nuclear systems in the extreme density domain of compact stars is still lacking. The aim of this contribution is to shed some light on open questions facing the nuclear many-body problem at the very high density domain. Here we focus our attention on the conceptual issue of naturalness and its role in shaping the baryon-meson phase space dynamics in the description of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and neutrons stars. In particular, in order to stimulate possible new directions of research, we discuss relevant aspects of a recently developed relativistic effective theory for nuclear matter within Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD) with genuine many-body forces and derivative natural parametric couplings. Among other topics we discuss in this work the connection of this theory with other known effective QHD models of the literature and its potentiality in describing a new physics for dense matter. The model with parameterized couplings exhausts the whole fundamental baryon octet (n, p, Σ{sup −}, Σ{sup 0}, Σ{sup +}, Λ, Ξ{sup −}, Ξ{sup 0}) and simulates n-order corrections to the minimal Yukawa baryon couplings by considering nonlinear self-couplings of meson fields and meson-meson interaction terms coupled to the baryon fields involving scalar-isoscalar (σ, σ∗), vector-isoscalar (ω, Φ), vector-isovector (ϱ) and scalar-isovector (δ) virtual sectors. Following recent experimental results, we consider in our calculations the extreme case where the Σ{sup −} experiences such a strong repulsion that its influence in the nuclear structure of a neutron star is excluded at all. A few examples of calculations of properties of neutron stars are shown and prospects for the future are discussed.

  18. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Tessa, C La; Berger, T; Kaderka, R; Schardt, D; Burmeister, S; Labrenz, J; Reitz, G; Durante, M

    2014-04-21

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient's body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm³ cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence ⁶LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and ⁷LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ≤ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 < E < 10 MeV during the treatment with scanned carbon ions. The highest yield of thermal neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same

  19. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Tessa, C.; Berger, T.; Kaderka, R.; Schardt, D.; Burmeister, S.; Labrenz, J.; Reitz, G.; Durante, M.

    2014-04-01

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient’s body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm3 cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence 6LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and 7LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ⩽ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 < E < 10 MeV during the treatment with scanned carbon ions. The highest yield of thermal neutrons is observed for photons and, among ions, for passively modulated beams. For the treatment with high-energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order

  20. A note on electromagnetic fields of a slowly rotating magnetized neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Nucita, A. A.; Qadir, A.

    2003-05-01

    Using the electromagnetic fields of an aligned rotating magnetic dipole in a Schwarzschild background, the fields and the surface and bulk charge densities had been computed for an obliquely rotating dipole by De Paolis, Qadir and Tarman (Nuovo Cimento B, 114 (1999) 11). Rezzolla, Ahmedov and Miller (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 322 (2001) 723) had argued that the analysis was not valid as the Kerr background should have been used. As such the charge density and fields obtained earlier needed to be recomputed using their analysis. This suggestion has been followed here.

  1. Individual neutron monitoring in workplaces with mixed neutron/photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Bolognese-Milsztajn, T; Bartlett, D; Boschung, M; Coeck, M; Curzio, G; d'Errico, F; Fiechtner, A; Giusti, V; Gressier, V; Kyllönen, J; Lacoste, V; Lindborg, L; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Molinos, C; Pelcot, G; Reginatto, M; Schuhmacher, H; Tanner, R; Vanhavere, F; Derdau, D

    2004-01-01

    EVIDOS ('evaluation of individual dosimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields') is an European Commission (EC)-sponsored project that aims at a significant improvement of radiation protection dosimetry in mixed neutron/photon fields via spectrometric and dosimetric investigations in representative workplaces of the nuclear industry. In particular, new spectrometry methods are developed that provide the energy and direction distribution of the neutron fluence from which the reference dosimetric quantities are derived and compared to the readings of dosemeters. The final results of the project will be a comprehensive set of spectrometric and dosimetric data for the workplaces and an analysis of the performance of dosemeters, including novel electronic dosemeters. This paper gives an overview of the project and focuses on the results from measurements performed in calibration fields with broad energy distributions (simulated workplace fields) and on the first results from workplaces in the nuclear industry, inside a boiling water reactor and around a spent fuel transport cask. PMID:15353743

  2. Non-singular spherical harmonic expressions of geomagnetic vector and gradient tensor fields in the local north-oriented reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Chen, C.; Lesur, V.; Wang, L.

    2015-07-01

    General expressions of magnetic vector (MV) and magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of spherical harmonics at different degrees/orders are relatively complicated and singular at the poles. In this paper, we derived alternative non-singular expressions for the MV, the MGT and also the third-order partial derivatives of the magnetic potential field in the local north-oriented reference frame. Using our newly derived formulae, the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields and also the third-order partial derivatives of the magnetic potential field at an altitude of 300 km are calculated based on a global lithospheric magnetic field model GRIMM_L120 (GFZ Reference Internal Magnetic Model, version 0.0) with spherical harmonic degrees 16-90. The corresponding results at the poles are discussed and the validity of the derived formulas is verified using the Laplace equation of the magnetic potential field.

  3. Discovery of a candidate old, isolated neutron star in the field of a galactic cirrus cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, John T.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Perlman, Eric S.; Donahue, Megan E.; Schachter, Jonathan F.

    1995-01-01

    New x-ray optical, and radio observations of the bright, unidentified x-ray source MS 0317.7-6647 are presented suggesting that this source is a likely compact stellar remnant. As part of the Einstein Extended Medium Sensivity Survey, this source was discovered serendipitously in the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter pointing towards the nearby (4.5 Mpc) spiral galaxy NGC 1313. The very high x-ray to optical flux ratio, pointlike ROSAT HRI detection, and extremely soft component in the x-ray spectrum of MS 0317.7-6647 eliminate all the usual classes of optical counterparts to faint x-ray sources except for a very massive x-ray binary (and black hole candidate) in NGC 1313, a nearby, companionless pulsar similar to Geminga, or a very nearby ( approximately 100 pc) isolated, old neutron star slowly accreting interstellar matter onto its magnetic poles. The presence of an IR cirrus cloud which shadows the approximately 0.25 keV x-ray background in this direction supports the latter possibilty.

  4. Study of microdosimetric energy deposition patterns in tissue-equivalent medium due to low-energy neutron fields using a graphite-walled proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Waker, A J; Aslam

    2011-06-01

    To improve radiation protection dosimetry for low-energy neutron fields encountered in nuclear power reactor environments, there is increasing interest in modeling neutron energy deposition in metrological instruments such as tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs). Along with these computational developments, there is also a need for experimental data with which to benchmark and test the results obtained from the modeling methods developed. The experimental work described in this paper is a study of the energy deposition in tissue-equivalent (TE) medium using an in-house built graphite-walled proportional counter (GPC) filled with TE gas. The GPC is a simple model of a standard TEPC because the response of the counter at these energies is almost entirely due to the neutron interactions in the sensitive volume of the counter. Energy deposition in tissue spheres of diameter 1, 2, 4 and 8 µm was measured in low-energy neutron fields below 500 keV. We have observed a continuously increasing trend in microdosimetric averages with an increase in neutron energy. The values of these averages decrease as we increase the simulated diameter at a given neutron energy. A similar trend for these microdosimetric averages has been observed for standard TEPCs and the Rossi-type, TE, spherical wall-less counter filled with propane-based TE gas in the same energy range. This implies that at the microdosimetric level, in the neutron energy range we employed in this study, the pattern of average energy deposited by starter and insider proton recoil events in the gas is similar to those generated cumulatively by crosser and stopper events originating from the counter wall plus starter and insider recoil events originating in the sensitive volume of a TEPC. PMID:21476858

  5. Atmospheric electric field effect in different neutron multiplicities according to Emilio Segre Obervatory one minute data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorman, L. I.; Dorman, I. V.; Iucci, N.; Ne'eman, Yu.; Pustilnik, L. A.; Sternlieb, A.; Villoresi, G.; Zukerman, I. G.

    2001-08-01

    On the basis of cosmic ray and atmospherice lectric field one minute data obtained by NM and EFS ofE milio Segre' Observatory (hight 2025 m above s.l., cut-offr igidity for vertical direction 10.8 GV) we determine thea tmospheric electric field effect in CR for total neutroni ntensity and for multiplicities m ≥1, m ≥2, m ≥3, m ≥4,m ≥5, m ≥6, m ≥7, and m ≥8, as well as for m=1, m=2,m =3, m=4, m=5, m=6, and m=7. For comparison ande xcluding primary CR variations we use also data obtainedb y NM of University "Roma Tre" (about sea level, cut-off rigidity 6.7 GV). According to the theoretical calculations of Dorman and Dorman (1995) the electric field effect in the NM counting rate must be caused mainly by catching ofs low negative muons by lead nucleus with escaping fewn eutrons. As it was shown in Dorman et al. (1999), theb iggest electric field effect is expected in the multiplicitym =1, much smaller in m=2 and negligible effect is expected in higher multiplicities. We will control this conclusion ont he basis of our experimental data. Obtained results give a possibility to estimate total acceleration and deceleration of CR particles by the atmospheric electric field._

  6. Efficient implementation of three-dimensional reference interaction site model self-consistent-field method: Application to solvatochromic shift calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minezawa, Noriyuki; Kato, Shigeki

    2007-02-01

    The authors present an implementation of the three-dimensional reference interaction site model self-consistent-field (3D-RISM-SCF) method. First, they introduce a robust and efficient algorithm for solving the 3D-RISM equation. The algorithm is a hybrid of the Newton-Raphson and Picard methods. The Jacobian matrix is analytically expressed in a computationally useful form. Second, they discuss the solute-solvent electrostatic interaction. For the solute to solvent route, the electrostatic potential (ESP) map on a 3D grid is constructed directly from the electron density. The charge fitting procedure is not required to determine the ESP. For the solvent to solute route, the ESP acting on the solute molecule is derived from the solvent charge distribution obtained by solving the 3D-RISM equation. Matrix elements of the solute-solvent interaction are evaluated by the direct numerical integration. A remarkable reduction in the computational time is observed in both routes. Finally, the authors implement the first derivatives of the free energy with respect to the solute nuclear coordinates. They apply the present method to "solute" water and formaldehyde in aqueous solvent using the simple point charge model, and the results are compared with those from other methods: the six-dimensional molecular Ornstein-Zernike SCF, the one-dimensional site-site RISM-SCF, and the polarizable continuum model. The authors also calculate the solvatochromic shifts of acetone, benzonitrile, and nitrobenzene using the present method and compare them with the experimental and other theoretical results.

  7. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-01

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data. PMID:23710630

  8. Methodology and Determination of Field of View of Neutron and Gamma Detectors in the Atucha Spent Fuel Storage Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W; Wenner, M; Haghighat, A; Sitaraman, S; Ham, Y S

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we seek to create a model by determining the field of view (FOV) of a detector (i.e. which assemblies contribute to the detector response) in the Atucha-I spent fuel pool. The FOV is determined by solving the adjoint transport equation using the 3-D, parallel PENTRAN (Parallel Environment Neutral-particle TRANsport) Sn code, with the detector cross section as the adjoint source. If this adjoint function is coupled with the source spectrum, then the contribution to the detector from each assembly can be determined. First, the reactor criticality was modeled using the MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) Monte Carlo code in order to determine the power distribution in each assembly. Using the power distribution data, the assemblies were divided and homogenized into 8 axial and 3 radial zones for burnup analysis. Depletion calculations were performed for each zone using the ORIGEN-ARP (Automatic Rapid Processing) utility from the SCALE 5.1 (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code package. Spent fuel pool and detector were modeled in 2-D in PENTRAN as the detector plus 3 fuel assemblies along both x and y axes. Using the resulting adjoint function combined with the source spectrum, they have determined the FOVs of the fission chamber neutron detector that was used at Atucha, and concluded that 2 assemblies along x and y axes are needed for both cases (i.e. the 4 adjacent assemblies plus the next surrounding 12). For the neutron detector, 88% of the response comes from the nearest 4 assemblies, with 99% from the nearest 16. Results for a uniformly sensitive gamma detector indicate that 2 assemblies in both directions are also needed, with 89% of the response coming from the adjacent assemblies. A Monte Carlo calculation using MCNP was performed to benchmark the neutron result, giving a similar result (87% MCNP vs. 88% PENTRAN). Based on these studies, we have developed a database of FOVs as a function of burnup and decay conditions for

  9. Isotope-Identifying neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitenko, Yu. V. Petrenko, A. V.; Gundorin, N. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2015-07-15

    The possibilities of an isotope-indentifying study of layered structures in different regimes of a neutron wave field are considered. The detection of specularly reflected neutrons and secondary radiation (caused by neutron capture) in the form of charged particles, γ quanta, and nuclear fission fragments, as well as neutrons spin-flipped in a noncollinear magnetic field and on nuclei of elements with spin, makes it possible to implement isotope-indentifying neutron reflectometry.

  10. Velocity field measurement in gas-liquid metal two-phase flow with use of PIV and neutron radiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Mishima, K; Tobita, Y; Suzuki, T; Matsubayashi, M

    2004-10-01

    To establish reasonable safety concepts for the realization of commercial liquid-metal fast breeder reactors, it is indispensable to demonstrate that the release of excessive energy due to re-criticality of molten core could be prevented even if a severe core damage accident took place. Two-phase flow due to the boiling of fuel-steel mixture in the molten core pool has a larger liquid-to-gas density ratio and higher surface tension in comparison with those of ordinary two-phase flows such as air-water flow. In this study, to investigate the effect of the recirculation flow on the bubble behavior, visualization and measurement of nitrogen gas-molten lead bismuth in a rectangular tank was performed by using neutron radiography and particle image velocimetry techniques. Measured flow parameters include flow regime, two-dimensional void distribution, and liquid velocity field in the tank. The present technique is applicable to the measurement of velocity fields and void fraction, and the basic characteristics of gas-liquid metal two-phase mixture were clarified. PMID:15246418

  11. Spin-orbit and orbit-orbit strengths for the radioactive neutron-rich doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn in relativistic mean-field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Haozhao; Zhao Pengwei; Li Lulu; Meng Jie

    2011-01-15

    Relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory is applied to investigate the properties of the radioactive neutron-rich doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn and the corresponding isotopes and isotones. The two-neutron and two-proton separation energies are well reproduced by the RMF theory. In particular, the RMF results agree with the experimental single-particle spectrum in {sup 132}Sn as well as the Nilsson spin-orbit parameter C and orbit-orbit parameter D thus extracted, but remarkably differ from the traditional Nilsson parameters. Furthermore, the present results provide a guideline for the isospin dependence of the Nilsson parameters.

  12. Out-of-field neutron and leakage photon exposures and the associated risk of second cancers in high-energy photon radiotherapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Takam, R; Bezak, E; Marcu, L G; Yeoh, E

    2011-10-01

    Determination and understanding of out-of-field neutron and photon doses in accelerator-based radiotherapy is an important issue since linear accelerators operating at high energies (>10 MV) produce secondary radiations that irradiate parts of the patient's anatomy distal to the target region, potentially resulting in detrimental health effects. This paper provides a compilation of data (technical and clinical) reported in the literature on the measurement and Monte Carlo simulations of peripheral neutron and photon doses produced from high-energy medical linear accelerators and the reported risk and/or incidence of second primary cancer of tissues distal to the target volume. Information in the tables facilitates easier identification of (1) the various methods and measurement techniques used to determine the out-of-field neutron and photon radiations, (2) reported linac-dependent out-of-field doses, and (3) the risk/incidence of second cancers after radiotherapy due to classic and modern treatment methods. Regardless of the measurement technique and type of accelerator, the neutron dose equivalent per unit photon dose ranges from as low as 0.1 mSv/Gy to as high as 20.4 mSv/Gy. This radiation dose potentially contributes to the induction of second primary cancer in normal tissues outside the treated area. PMID:21756083

  13. Phase space representation of neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field in relation to solar activity in cycles 21 and 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H. G.; Lopes, I.

    2016-07-01

    Heliospheric modulation of galactic cosmic rays links solar cycle activity with neutron monitor count rate on earth. A less direct relation holds between neutron monitor count rate and atmospheric electric field because different atmospheric processes, including fluctuations in the ionosphere, are involved. Although a full quantitative model is still lacking, this link is supported by solid statistical evidence. Thus, a connection between the solar cycle activity and atmospheric electric field is expected. To gain a deeper insight into these relations, sunspot area (NOAA, USA), neutron monitor count rate (Climax, Colorado, USA), and atmospheric electric field (Lisbon, Portugal) are presented here in a phase space representation. The period considered covers two solar cycles (21, 22) and extends from 1978 to 1990. Two solar maxima were observed in this dataset, one in 1979 and another in 1989, as well as one solar minimum in 1986. Two main observations of the present study were: (1) similar short-term topological features of the phase space representations of the three variables, (2) a long-term phase space radius synchronization between the solar cycle activity, neutron monitor count rate, and potential gradient (confirmed by absolute correlation values above ~0.8). Finally, the methodology proposed here can be used for obtaining the relations between other atmospheric parameters (e.g., solar radiation) and solar cycle activity.

  14. Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, E.I.; Furman, W.I.; Lychagin, W.I.; Muzichka, G.V.; Nekhaev, G.V.; Safronov, Yu.V.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Strelkov, A.V.; Bowman, C.D.; Crawford, B.E.; Stephenson, S.L.; Howell, C.R.; Tornow, W.; Levakov, B.G.; Litvin, V.I.; Lyzhin, A.E.; Magda, E.P.; Mitchell, G.E.

    2003-08-26

    In order to resolve long-standing discrepancies in indirect measurements of the neutron-neutron scattering length ann and contribute to solving the problem of the charge symmetry of the nuclear force, the collaboration DIANNA (Direct Investigation of ann Association) plans to measure the neutron-neutron scattering cross section {sigma}nn. The key issue of our approach is the use of the through-channel in the Russia reactor YAGUAR with a peak neutron flux of 10{sup 18} /cm2/s. The proposed experimental setup is described. Results of calculations are presented to connect {sigma}nn with the nn-collision detector count rate and the neutron flux density in the reactor channel. Measurements of the thermal neutron fields inside polyethylene converters show excellent prospects for the realization of the direct nn-experiment.

  15. The null magnetic field as reference for the study of geomagnetic directional effects in animals and man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beischer, D. E.

    1971-01-01

    Techniques for producing very low and zero magnetic fields are considered, giving attention to the compensation of the geomagnetic field by a Helmholtz coil system, approaches utilizing the shielding power of highly permeable alloys, and the complete exclusion of the geomagnetic field with the aid of a superconductive shield. Animal experiments in low magnetic fields are discussed, together with the exposure of man to 'null' magnetic fields and the Josephson junction as a possible biosensor of magnetic fields. It is found that neither the functions nor the behavior of man changes significantly during a two-week exposure to magnetic fields below 50 gammas.

  16. Deconfinement to quark matter in neutron stars - The influence of strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.; Schramm, S.; Hempel, M.

    2013-03-25

    We use an extended version of the hadronic SU(3) non-linear realization of the sigma model that also includes quarks to study hybrid stars. Within this approach, the degrees of freedom change naturally as the temperature/density increases. Different prescriptions of charge neutrality, local and global, are tested and the influence of strong magnetic fields and the anomalous magnetic moment on the particle population is discussed.

  17. Magnetic Transitions in Iron Porphyrin Halides by Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Ab-initio Studies of Zero-Field Splittings

    SciTech Connect

    Stavretis, Shelby E.; Atanasov, Mihail; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Hunter, Seth C.; Neese, Frank; Xue, Zi-Ling

    2015-10-02

    Zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters of nondeuterated metalloporphyrins [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Br, I; H2TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) are determined by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The ZFS values are D = 4.49(9) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)F], and D = 8.8(2) cm–1, E = 0.1(2) cm–1 and D = 13.4(6) cm–1, E = 0.3(6) cm–1 for monoclinic polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Br] and [Fe(TPP)I], respectively. Along with our recent report of the ZFS value of D = 6.33(8) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Cl], these data provide a rare, complete determination of ZFS parameters in a metalloporphyrin halide series. The electronic structure of [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Cl, Br, I) has been studied by multireference ab initio methods: the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and the N-electron valence perturbation theory (NEVPT2) with the aim of exploring the origin of the large and positive zero-field splitting D of the 6A1 ground state. D was calculated from wave functions of the electronic multiplets spanned by the d5 configuration of Fe(III) along with spin–orbit coupling accounted for by quasi degenerate perturbation theory. Results reproduce trends of D from inelastic neutron scattering data increasing in the order from F, Cl, Br, to I. A mapping of energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the S = 3/2 excited states on ligand field theory was used to characterize the σ- and π-antibonding effects decreasing from F to I. This is in agreement with similar results deduced from ab initio calculations on CrX63- complexes and also with the spectrochemical series showing a decrease of the ligand field in the same directions. A correlation is found between the increase of D and decrease of the π- and σ-antibonding energies eλX (λ = σ, π) in the series from X = F to I. Analysis of this

  18. TU-F-BRE-09: Towards the Establishment of Dosimetric References in Small Fields Using the New Concept of Dose-Area Product

    SciTech Connect

    Dufreneix, S; Bordy, J; Delaunay, F; Delaunay, F; Daures, J; Gouriou, J; Le Roy, M; Ostrowsky, A; Rapp, B; Sommier, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To establish dosimetric references of absorbed dose in water in radiation fields smaller than 2 cm used in radiotherapy thanks to a new methodology based on the use of dosimeters larger than the field size. Methods: A new graphite calorimeter was constructed with a large sensitive volume (diameter of the core: 30 mm). This primary dosimeter was fully characterized and compared to previous LNE-LNHB graphite calorimeters in a 60Co large field. A specially designed graphite parallel-plate ionization chamber with a 30 mm collecting electrode was also assembled and tested. Measurements were then conducted in two 6 MV small circular fields of 2 cm and 1 cm diameter respectively, using the new concept of dose-area product instead of punctual dose commonly used in radiotherapy. Results: The dose rate established in a large 60Co field with the new calorimeter is in agreement within 0.4% with previous calorimeters. The ionization chamber shows good characteristics except for a 0.06% drift per hour in water. The ratio of calorimetric against ionometric measurements in the 2 cm diameter field is 1.1% higher than the one in the 1 cm diameter field (with respectively 0.30% and 1.03% type A uncertainty for each field). Conclusion: Results presented here highlight the possibility of measuring dose-area products in small fields with a graphite calorimeter and a parallel-plate ionization chamber. Measurements in a 0.75 cm diameter field are already underway to confirm the trend observed in the 2 cm and 1 cm diameter fields. The last step to establish precise dosimetric references in small fields is to calculate correction factors thanks to Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Comparison of experimental and computational neutron spectroscopy at a 14 MeV neutron generator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Edward; Cousins, Tom; Desrosiers, Marc; Jones, Trevor; Buhr, Rob; Rambousky, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    At any neutron production facility, the energy spectrum at any meaningful distance from the target will be modified. For the case of a facility used to provide reference irradiations of electronics and other devices at various target-to-device distances it is important to have knowledge of these spectral modifications. In addition, it is desirable to have the ability to generate near real-time measurement capability. Advances in neutron metrology have made it possible to determine neutron energy spectra in real time to high levels of accuracy. This paper outlines a series of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations designed to quantify the scattering effects for a 14 MeV neutron generator facility, and makes appropriate recommendations for near real-time measurements of these fields.

  20. Personnel neutron dosimetry improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.F.; Hoffman, J.M.; Brake, R.J.; Bliss, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    We are investigating methods to improve neutron dosimetry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the track etch dosemeter CR-39. Specifically, use of CR-39 for dynamic environments, typically encountered at the LANL Plutonium Facility, is shown to be a superior method for personnel neutron dosimetry when compared to the currently used TLD system. The results of glovebox experiments simulating hydrogenous shielding used at LANL, temporal variations of neutron correction factors used at the Plutonium Facility, trial implementation at this facility and preliminary neutron spectroscopy measurements are presented and compared to reference dosimetry measurements. Our results confirm that use of a TLD system in a facility implementing hydrogenous shielding requires frequent field re-calibration. When such correction factors are not re-evaluated frequently, or are maintained at pre-shielding levels, significant (i.e., 2- to 3-fold) overestimation of the neutron dose equivalent can occur.

  1. Personnel neutron dosimetry improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.F.; Hoffman, J.M.; Brake, R.J. ); Bliss, J.L. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating methods to improve neutron dosimetry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the track etch dosemeter CR-39. Specifically, use of CR-39 for dynamic environments, typically encountered at the LANL Plutonium Facility, is shown to be a superior method for personnel neutron dosimetry when compared to the currently used TLD system. The results of glovebox experiments simulating hydrogenous shielding used at LANL, temporal variations of neutron correction factors used at the Plutonium Facility, trial implementation at this facility and preliminary neutron spectroscopy measurements are presented and compared to reference dosimetry measurements. Our results confirm that use of a TLD system in a facility implementing hydrogenous shielding requires frequent field re-calibration. When such correction factors are not re-evaluated frequently, or are maintained at pre-shielding levels, significant (i.e., 2- to 3-fold) overestimation of the neutron dose equivalent can occur.

  2. Measurement of residual stress fields in FHPP welding: a comparison between DSPI combined with hole-drilling and neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Matias R.; Albertazzi, Armando; Staron, Peter; Pisa, Marcelo

    2013-04-01

    This paper shows a portable device to measure mainly residual stress fields outside the optical bench. This system combines the traditional hole drilling technique with Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry. The novel feature of this device is the high degree of compaction since only one base supports simultaneously the measurement module and the hole-drilling device. The portable device allows the measurement of non-uniform residual stresses in accordance with the ASTM standard. In oil and gas offshore industries, alternative welding procedures among them, the friction hydro pillar processing (FHPP) is highlighted and nowadays is an important maintenance tool since it has the capability to produce structure repairs without risk of explosions. In this process a hole is drilled and filled with a consumable rod of the same material. The rod, which could be cylindrical or conical, is rotated and pressed against the hole, leading to frictional heating. In order to assess features about the residual stress distribution generated by the weld into the rod as well as into the base material around the rod, welded samples were evaluated by neutron diffraction and by the hole drilling technique having a comparison between them. For the hole drilling technique some layers were removed by using electrical discharge machining (EDM) after diffraction measurements in order to assess the bulk stress distribution. Results have shown a good agreement between techniques.

  3. Snow water equivalent measured with cosmic-ray neutrons: reviving a little known but highly successful field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desilets, D.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary cosmic-ray neutrons are attenuated strongly by water in either solid or liquid form, suggesting a method for measuring snow water equivalent that has several advantages over alternative technologies. The cosmic-ray attenuation method is passive, portable, highly adaptable, and operates over an exceptionally large range of snow pack thicknesses. But despite promising initial observations made in the 1970s, the technique today remains practically unknown to snow hydrologists. Side-by-side measurements performed over the past several years with a snow pillow and a submerged cosmic-ray probe demonstrate that the cosmic-ray attenuation method merits consideration for a wide range of applications—especially those where alternative methods are made problematic by dense vegetation, rough terrain, deep snowpack or a lack of vehicular access. During the snow-free season, the instrumentation can be used to monitor soil moisture, thus providing another widely sought field measurement. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. With main facilities in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, C.A., Sandia has major R&D responsibilities in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and economic competitiveness.

  4. Neutron diffraction study of magnetic field induced behavior in the heavy Fermion Ce3Co4Sn13

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Andrew D; Goremychkin, E. A.; Gardner, J. S.; Kang, H. J.; Chung, J.-H.; Manuel, P.; Thompson, J. D.; Sarrao, J. L.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The specific heat of Ce3Co4Sn13 exhibits a crossover from heavy Fermion behavior with antiferromagnetic correlations at low field to single impurity Kondo behavior above 2 T. We have performed neutron diffraction measurements in magnetic fields up to 6 Tesla on single crystal samples. The (001) position shows a dramatic increase in intensity in field which appears to arise from static polarization of the 4f level and which at 0.14 K also exhibits an anomaly near 2T reflecting the crossover to single impurity behavior.

  5. Annotated bibliography of selected references on shoreline barrier island deposits with emphasis on Patrick Draw Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Schatzinger, R.A.

    1993-07-01

    This bibliography contains 290 annotated references on barrier island and associated depositional environments and reservoirs. It is not an exhaustive compilation of all references on the subject, but rather selected papers on barrier islands, and the depositional processes of formation. Papers that examine the morphology and internal architecture of barrier island deposits, exploration and development technologies are emphasized. Papers were selected that aid in understanding reservoir architecture and engineering technologies to help maximize recovery efficiency from barrier island oil reservoirs. Barrier islands from Wyoming, Montana and the Rocky Mountains basins are extensively covered.

  6. Utility of galaxy catalogs for following up gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers with wide-field telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Vousden, Will E-mail: imandel@star.sr.bham.ac.uk

    2014-03-20

    The first detections of gravitational waves from binary neutron star mergers with advanced LIGO and Virgo observatories are anticipated in the next five years. These detections could pave the way for multi-messenger gravitational-wave (GW) and electromagnetic (EM) astronomy if GW triggers are successfully followed up with targeted EM observations. However, GW sky localization is relatively poor, with expected localization areas of ∼10-100 deg{sup 2}; this presents a challenge for following up GW signals from compact binary mergers. Even for wide-field instruments, tens or hundreds of pointings may be required. Prioritizing pointings based on the relative probability of successful imaging is important since it may not be possible to tile the entire gravitational-wave localization region in a timely fashion. Galaxy catalogs were effective at narrowing down regions of the sky to search in initial attempts at joint GW/EM observations. The relatively limited range of initial GW instruments meant that few galaxies were present per pointing and galaxy catalogs were complete within the search volume. The next generation of GW detectors will have a 10-fold increase in range thereby increasing the expected number of galaxies per unit solid angle by a factor of ∼1000. As an additional complication, catalogs will be highly incomplete. Nevertheless, galaxy catalogs can still play an important role in prioritizing pointings for the next era of GW searches. We show how to quantify the advantages of using galaxy catalogs to prioritize wide-field follow-ups as a function of only two parameters: the three-dimensional volume within the field of view of a telescope after accounting for the GW distance measurement uncertainty, and the fraction of the GW sky localization uncertainty region that can be covered with telescope pointings. We find that the use of galaxy catalogs can improve the probability of successful imaging by ∼10% to ∼300% relative to follow-up strategies that

  7. Evaluation of the impact of non-uniform neutron radiation fields on the dose received by glove box radiation workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Arthur Bryan

    The effort to estimate the radiation dose received by an occupationally exposed worker is a complex task. Regulatory guidance assumes that the stochastic risks from uniform and non-uniform whole-body irradiations are equal. An ideal uniform irradiation of the whole body would require a broad parallel radiation field of relatively high-energy radiation, which many occupationally exposed workers do not experience. In reality, workers are exposed to a non-uniform irradiation of the whole body such as a radiation field with one or more types of radiation, each with varying energies and/or fluence rates, incident on the worker. Most occupational radiation exposure at LANL is due to neutron radiation. Many of these exposures originate from activities performed in glove boxes with nuclear materials. A standard Los Alamos 2 x 2 x 2 glove box is modeled with the source material being clean weapons grade plutonium. Dosimeter tally planes were modeled to stimulate the various positions that a dosimeter can be worn. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to determine whole body dose. Various geometries of source position and phantom location were used to determine the effects of streaming on the radiation dose a worker may receive. Based on computational and experimental results, the effects of a non-uniform radiation field have on radiation dose received by a worker in a glove box environment are: (1) Dosimeter worn at chest level can overestimate the whole body dose between a factor of two to six depending on location of the phantom with the source material close to the front of the glove box, (2) Dosimeter should be worn at waist level instead of chest level to more accurately reflect the whole body dose received, (3) Dose can be significantly higher for specific locations of the worker relative to the position of the source, (4) On the average the testes contribute almost 44% of the whole body dose for a male, and (5) Appropriate design considerations such as more shielding

  8. Certification of Total Arsenic in Blood and Urine Standard Reference Materials by Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis and Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Rick L.; Davis, W. Clay; Yu, Lee; Murphy, Karen E.; Guthrie, William F.; Leber, Dennis D.; Bryan, Colleen E.; Vetter, Thomas W.; Shakirova, Gulchekhra; Mitchell, Graylin; Kyle, David J.; Jarrett, Jeffery M.; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Jones, Robert L.; Eckdahl, Steven; Wermers, Michelle; Maras, Melissa; Palmer, C. D.; Verostek, M.F.; Geraghty, C. M.; Steuerwald, Amy J.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    A newly developed procedure for determination of arsenic by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) was used to measure arsenic at four levels in SRM 955c Toxic Elements in Caprine Blood and at two levels in SRM 2668 Toxic Elements in Frozen Human Urine for the purpose of providing mass concentration values for certification. Samples were freeze-dried prior to analysis followed by neutron irradiation for 3 h at a fluence rate of 1×1014cm−2s−1. After sample dissolution in perchloric and nitric acids, arsenic was separated from the matrix by extraction into zinc diethyldithiocarbamate in chloroform, and 76As quantified by gamma-ray spectroscopy. Differences in chemical yield and counting geometry between samples and standards were monitored by measuring the count rate of a 77As tracer added before sample dissolution. RNAA results were combined with inductively coupled plasma – mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) values from NIST and collaborating laboratories to provide certified values of (10.81 ± 0.54) μg/kg and (213.1 ± 0.73) μg/kg for SRM 2668 Levels I and II, and certified values of (21.66 ± 0.73) μg/kg, (52.7 ± 1.1) μg/kg, and (78.8 ± 4.9) μg/kg for SRM 955c Levels 2, 3, and 4 respectively. Because of discrepancies between values obtained by different methods for SRM 955c Level 1, an information value of < 5 μg/kg was assigned for this material. PMID:26300575

  9. Non-singular spherical harmonic expressions of geomagnetic vector and gradient tensor fields in the local north-oriented reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Chen, C.; Lesur, V.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    General expressions of magnetic vector (MV) and magnetic gradient tensor (MGT) in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of spherical harmonics at different degrees and orders, are relatively complicated and singular at the poles. In this paper, we derived alternative non-singular expressions for the MV, the MGT and also the higher-order partial derivatives of the magnetic field in local north-oriented reference frame. Using our newly derived formulae, the magnetic potential, vector and gradient tensor fields at an altitude of 300 km are calculated based on a global lithospheric magnetic field model GRIMM_L120 (version 0.0) and the main magnetic field model of IGRF11. The corresponding results at the poles are discussed and the validity of the derived formulas is verified using the Laplace equation of the potential field.

  10. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Rai, K.S.F.

    1994-01-11

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields is described. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning. 2 figures.

  11. High energy neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Rai Ko S.F.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring dose equivalents in neutron radiation fields. The device includes nested symmetrical hemispheres (forming spheres) of different neutron moderating materials that allow the measurement of dose equivalents from 0.025 eV to past 1 GeV. The layers of moderating material surround a spherical neutron counter. The neutron counter is connected by an electrical cable to an electrical sensing means which interprets the signal from the neutron counter in the center of the moderating spheres. The spherical shape of the device allows for accurate measurement of dose equivalents regardless of its positioning.

  12. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: A review of current work. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Ledney, G.D.; Madonna, G.S.; Elliott, T.B.; Moore, M.M.; Jackson, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, the authors developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60 (Co sources). Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections.

  13. Evaluation of a personal and environmental dosemeter based on CR-39 track detectors in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M; Parravicini, A; Sashala Naik, A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the evaluation of the dosimetric capability of a detector based on a CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector coupled to a 1 cm thickness of PMMA radiator was made with the aim of understanding the applicability of this technique to personal and environmental neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has been exposed to monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at PTB in Braunschweig, Germany and at Ithemba Laboratories, in Faure, South Africa, with peak energies ranging from 0.565 to 100 MeV. The results showed a response that is almost independent of the neutron energy in the whole energy range. PMID:24324248

  14. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  15. Measurement of the neutron fields produced by a 62 MeV proton beam on a PMMA phantom using extended range Bonner sphere spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amgarou, K.; Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Carinci, G.; Russo, S.

    2011-10-01

    The experimental characterization of the neutron fields produced as parasitic effect in medical accelerators is assuming an increased importance for either the patient protection or the facility design aspects. Medical accelerators are diverse in terms of particle type (electrons or hadrons) and energy, but the radiation fields around them have in common (provided that a given threshold energy is reached) the presence of neutrons with energy span over several orders of magnitude. Due to the large variability of neutron energy, field or dosimetry measurements in these workplaces are very complex, and in general, cannot be performed with ready-to-use commercial instruments. In spite of its poor energy resolution, the Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) is the only instrument able to simultaneously determine all spectral components in such workplaces. The energy range of this instrument is limited to E<20 MeV if only polyethylene spheres are used, but can be extended to hundreds of MeV by including metal-loaded spheres (extended range BSS, indicated with ERBSS). With the aim of providing useful data to the scientific community involved in neutron measurements at hadron therapy facilities, an ERBSS experiment was carried out at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) of INFN—LNS (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud), where a proton beam routinely used for ophthalmic cancer treatments is available. The 62 MeV beam was directed towards a PMMA phantom, simulating the patient, and two neutron measurement points were established at 0° and 90° with respect to the beam-line. Here the ERBSS of UAB (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona— Grup de Física de les Radiacions) and INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati) were exposed to characterize the "forward" and "sideward" proton-induced neutron fields. The use of two ERBSS characterized by different set of spheres, central detectors, and independently established and

  16. New developments in APSTNG neutron probe diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The development and investigation of a small associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) show potential to allow the associated-particle diagnostic method to be moved out of the laboratory into field applications. The APSTNG interrogates the inspected object with 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron inside a cone encompassing the region of interest. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify many nuclides. Flight-times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles separate the prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra and can yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide, from a single orientation. Chemical substances are identified by comparing relative spectral line intensities with ratios of elements in reference compounds. The high-energy neutrons and gamma-rays penetrate large objects and dense materials. The gamma-ray dector and neutron generator can be located on the same side of the interrogated object, so spaces behind walls and other confirmed areas can be inspected. No collimators or radiation shielding are needed, the neutron generator is relatively simple and small, and commercial-grade electronics are employed. A complete system could be transported in an automotive van. Proof-of-concept laboratory experiments have been successfully performed for simulated nuclear, chemical warfare, and conventional munitions. Inspection applications have been investigated for presence of cocaine in propane tanks, uranium and plutonium smuggling, and radioactive and toxic waste characterization. An advanced APSTNG tube is being designed and constructed that will be transportable and rugged, yield a substantial neutron output increase, and provide sufficiently improved lifetime to allow operation at more than an order of magnitude increase in neutron flux.

  17. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  18. Criteria for personal dosimetry in mixed radiation fields in space. [analyzing trapped protons, tissue disintegration stars, and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The complexity of direct reading and passive dosimeters for monitoring radiation is studied to strike the right balance of compromise to simplify the monitoring procedure. Trapped protons, tissue disintegration stars, and neutrons are analyzed.

  19. Prototype Neutron Energy Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Mitchell, Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Richard Maurer, Ronald Wolff

    2010-06-16

    The project goals are: (1) Use three to five pressurized helium tubes with varying polyethylene moderators to build a neutron energy spectrometer that is most sensitive to the incident neutron energy of interest. Neutron energies that are of particular interest are those from the fission neutrons (typically around 1-2 MeV); (2) Neutron Source Identification - Use the neutron energy 'selectivity' property as a tool to discriminate against other competing processes by which neutrons are generated (viz. Cosmic ray induced neutron production [ship effect], [a, n] reactions); (3) Determine the efficiency as a function of neutron energy (response function) of each of the detectors, and thereby obtain the composite neutron energy spectrum from the detector count rates; and (4) Far-field data characterization and effectively discerning shielded fission source. Summary of the presentation is: (1) A light weight simple form factor compact neutron energy spectrometer ready to be used in maritime missions has been built; (2) Under laboratory conditions, individual Single Neutron Source Identification is possible within 30 minutes. (3) Sources belonging to the same type of origin viz., (a, n), fission, cosmic cluster in the same place in the 2-D plot shown; and (4) Isotopes belonging to the same source origin like Cm-Be, Am-Be (a, n) or Pu-239, U-235 (fission) do have some overlap in the 2-D plot.

  20. Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2009-09-04

    In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

  1. TESTING MODELS OF MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION OF NEUTRON STARS WITH THE STATISTICAL PROPERTIES OF THEIR SPIN EVOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shuangnan; Xie Yi

    2012-10-01

    We test models for the evolution of neutron star (NS) magnetic fields (B). Our model for the evolution of the NS spin is taken from an analysis of pulsar timing noise presented by Hobbs et al.. We first test the standard model of a pulsar's magnetosphere in which B does not change with time and magnetic dipole radiation is assumed to dominate the pulsar's spin-down. We find that this model fails to predict both the magnitudes and signs of the second derivatives of the spin frequencies ({nu}-double dot). We then construct a phenomenological model of the evolution of B, which contains a long-term decay (LTD) modulated by short-term oscillations; a pulsar's spin is thus modified by its B-evolution. We find that an exponential LTD is not favored by the observed statistical properties of {nu}-double dot for young pulsars and fails to explain the fact that {nu}-double dot is negative for roughly half of the old pulsars. A simple power-law LTD can explain all the observed statistical properties of {nu}-double dot. Finally, we discuss some physical implications of our results to models of the B-decay of NSs and suggest reliable determination of the true ages of many young NSs is needed, in order to constrain further the physical mechanisms of their B-decay. Our model can be further tested with the measured evolutions of {nu}-dot and {nu}-double dot for an individual pulsar; the decay index, oscillation amplitude, and period can also be determined this way for the pulsar.

  2. Critical Heat Flux -CHF in Liquid Metal in Presence of a Magnetic Field with Particular Reference to Fusion Reactor Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, F. J.

    2010-04-01

    The effect of a magnetic field on critical heat flux-CHF in liquids metal is discussed within framework of Helmholtz instabilities. Utilizing a classical simplified model and considering the effect of magnetic field, an analytical expression for the critical heat flux-CHF was derived. Combining this equation with the expression for the heat transfer coefficients deduced in previous work yields an analytical equation for the temperature difference at the minimum. The above equations to predict an enhancement for critical heat flux which is reasonable due to stabilizer effect of magnetic field, however, disagree with the available experimental measurements made on mercury where a indication of the premature onset of critical heat flux with a horizontal magnetic field was observed. Therefore, the reason for this is not clear and the behavior of the CHF in the same manner that the bubble frequency is still unresolved.

  3. Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin-cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Vaknin, D.; Garlea, Vasile O; Demmel, F.; Mamontov, Eugene; Nojiri, H; Martin, Catalin; Chiorescu, Irinel; Qiu, Y.; Luban, M.; Kogerler, P.; Fielden, J.; Engelhardt, L; Rainey, C

    2010-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr8}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight CrIII paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

  4. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  5. Risk estimation for fast neutrons with regard to solid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, A M; Walsh, L

    2001-12-01

    In the absence of epidemiological information on the effects of neutrons, their cancer mortality risk coefficient is currently taken as the product of two low-dose extrapolations: the nominal risk coefficient for photons and the presumed maximum relative biological effectiveness of neutrons. This approach is unnecessary. Since linearity in dose is assumed for neutrons at low to moderate effect levels, the risk coefficient can be derived in terms of the excess risk from epidemiological observations at an intermediate dose of gamma rays and an assumed value, R(1), of the neutron RBE relative to this reference dose of gamma rays. Application of this procedure to the A-bomb data requires accounting for the effect of the neutron dose component, which, according to the current dosimetry system, DS86, amounts on average to 11 mGy in the two cities at a total dose of 1 Gy. With R(1) tentatively set to 20 or 50, it is concluded that the neutrons have caused 18% or 35%, respectively, of the total effect at 1 Gy. The excess relative risk (ERR) for neutrons then lies between 8 per Gy and 16 per Gy. Translating these values into risk coefficients in terms of the effective dose, E, requires accounting for the gamma-ray component produced by the neutron field in the human body, which will require a separate analysis. The risk estimate for neutrons will remain essentially unaffected by the current reassessment of the neutron doses in Hiroshima, because the doses are unlikely to change much at the reference dose of 1 Gy. PMID:11741494

  6. SU-E-T-242: Monte Carlo Simulations Used to Test the Perturbation of a Reference Ion Chamber Prototype Used for Small Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez Quino, L; Calvo, O; Huerta, C; DeWeese, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the perturbation due to the use of a novel Reference Ion Chamber designed to measure small field dosimetry (KermaX Plus C by IBA). Methods: Using the Phase-space files for TrueBeam photon beams available by Varian in IAEA-compliant format for 6 and 15 MV. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc to investigate the perturbation introduced by a reference chamber into the PDDs and profiles measured in water tank. Field sizes ranging from 1×1, 2×2,3×3, 5×5 cm2 were simulated for both energies with and without a 0.5 mm foil of Aluminum which is equivalent to the attenuation equivalent of the reference chamber specifications in a water phantom of 30×30×30 cm3 and a pixel resolution of 2 mm. The PDDs, profiles, and gamma analysis of the simulations were performed as well as a energy spectrum analysis of the phase-space files generated during the simulation. Results: Examination of the energy spectrum analysis performed shown a very small increment of the energy spectrum at the build-up region but no difference is appreciated after dmax. The PDD, profiles and gamma analysis had shown a very good agreement among the simulations with and without the Al foil, with a gamma analysis with a criterion of 2% and 2mm resulting in 99.9% of the points passing this criterion. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential benefits of using the KermaX Plus C as reference chamber in the measurement of PDD and Profiles for small fields since the perturbation due to in the presence of the chamber the perturbation is minimal and the chamber can be considered transparent to the photon beam.

  7. On the theory of phase transitions in dense neutron matter with generalized Skyrme interactions and anisotropic spin-triplet p-wave pairing in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    In the framework of the generalized non-relativistic Fermi-liquid approach we study phase transitions in spatially uniform dense pure neutron matter from normal to superfluid states with a spin-triplet p-wave pairing (similar to anisotropic superfluid phases 3He-A1 and 3He-A2) in a steady and homogeneous strong magnetic field H (but |\\mu_{\\text{n}}| H\\ll E_{\\text{c}}<\\varepsilon_{\\text{F}}(n) , where \\mu_{\\text{n}} is the magnetic dipole moment of a neutron, E_{\\text{c}} is the cutoff energy and \\varepsilon_{\\text{F}}(n) is the Fermi energy in neutron matter with density of particles n). The previously derived general formulas (valid for the arbitrary parametrization of the effective Skyrme interaction in neutron matter) for phase transition (PT) temperatures T_{\\text{c}1,2}(n,H) (which are nonlinear functions of the density n and linear functions of the magnetic field H) are specified here for new generalized BSk20 and BSk21 parameterizations of the Skyrme forces (with additional terms dependent on the density n) in the interval 0.1\\cdot n_{0} < n<3.0\\cdot n_{0} , where n_{0}=0.17\\ \\text{fm}^{-3} is the nuclear density. Our main results are mathematical expressions and figures for PT temperatures in the absence of magnetic field, T_{\\text{c0,BSk20}}(n)< 0.17\\ \\text{MeV} and T_{\\text{c0,BSk21}}(n)< 0.064\\ \\text{MeV} (at E_{\\text{c}}=10\\ \\text{MeV} ), and T_{\\text{c1,2}}(n,H) in strong magnetic fields (which may approach to 10^{17}\\ \\text{G} or even more as in the liquid outer core of magnetars —strongly magnetized neutron stars). These are realistic non-monotone functions with a bell-shaped density profile.

  8. Comparison of Haemophilus parasuis reference strains and field isolates by using random amplified polymorphic DNA and protein profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemophilus parasuis is the causative agent of Glässer’s disease and is a pathogen of swine in high-health status herds. Reports on serotyping of field strains from outbreaks describe that approximately 30% of them are nontypable and therefore cannot be traced. Molecular typing methods have been use...

  9. Barrier Island Ecology: A Professional Development Activity for Faculty and Staff of Calhoun Community College. Field Trip Reference Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Don; And Others

    As part of the Professional Development Workshop at Calhoun Community College, the Department of Natural Sciences conducted the third annual Spring Wilderness Pilgrimage in March 1989, a week-long environmental awareness field trip for faculty and staff. Designed as a study of the plants and animals on a barrier island off the coast of Florida,…

  10. Magnetic field angle dependence of out-of-plane precession in spin torque oscillators having an in-plane magnetized free layer and a perpendicularly magnetized reference layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Tsunegi, Sumito; Tamaru, Shingo; Yakushiji, Kay; Fukushima, Akio; Matsumoto, Rie; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    Out-of-plane (OP) precession in spin torque oscillators having an in-plane (IP) magnetized free layer and a perpendicularly magnetized reference layer was studied. The bias voltage (V B) and magnetic field angle (θ) dependence of the OP precession were investigated. The absolute values of the critical magnetic fields (H\\text{B}\\text{c - } and H\\text{B}\\text{c + }) between which OP precession is excited increased as V B increased and as θ changed from the IP to the OP direction. The IP components of H\\text{B}\\text{c +/- } converged to a constant value regardless of θ. This result indicates that excitation of OP precession is suppressed entirely by the IP component of the magnetic field, and the contribution of the OP component can be ignored. The experimentally observed precession behavior was successfully modeled by macrospin simulations.

  11. Hard-tail emission in the soft state of low-mass X-ray binaries and their relation to the neutron star magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Mastuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi

    2016-08-01

    Average hard-tail X-ray emission in the soft state of nine bright Atoll low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) are investigated by using the light curves of MAXI/GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope). Two sources (4U 1820-30 and 4U 1735-44) exhibit a large hardness ratio (15-50 keV/2-10 keV: HR >0.1), while the other sources distribute at HR ≲ 0.1. In either case, HR does not depend on the 2-10 keV luminosity. Therefore the difference of HR is due to the 15-50 keV luminosity, which is Comptonized emission. The Compton cloud is assumed to be around the neutron star. The size of the Compton cloud would affect the value of HR. Although the magnetic field of an NS-LMXB is weak, we could expect a larger Alfvén radius than the innermost stable circular orbit or the neutron star radius in some sources. In such cases, the accretion inflow is stopped at the Alfvén radius and would create a relatively large Compton cloud. This would result in the observed larger Comptonized emission. By attributing the difference of the size of Compton cloud to the Alfvén radius, we can estimate the magnetic fields of neutron stars. The obtained lower/upper limits are consistent with the previous results.

  12. Hard-tail emission in the soft state of low-mass X-ray binaries and their relation to the neutron star magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Kazumi; Mihara, Tatehiro; Mastuoka, Masaru; Sugizaki, Mutsumi

    2016-06-01

    Average hard-tail X-ray emission in the soft state of nine bright Atoll low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS-LMXBs) are investigated by using the light curves of MAXI/GSC (Gas Slit Camera) and Swift/BAT (Burst Alert Telescope). Two sources (4U 1820-30 and 4U 1735-44) exhibit a large hardness ratio (15-50 keV/2-10 keV: HR >0.1), while the other sources distribute at HR ≲ 0.1. In either case, HR does not depend on the 2-10 keV luminosity. Therefore the difference of HR is due to the 15-50 keV luminosity, which is Comptonized emission. The Compton cloud is assumed to be around the neutron star. The size of the Compton cloud would affect the value of HR. Although the magnetic field of an NS-LMXB is weak, we could expect a larger Alfvén radius than the innermost stable circular orbit or the neutron star radius in some sources. In such cases, the accretion inflow is stopped at the Alfvén radius and would create a relatively large Compton cloud. This would result in the observed larger Comptonized emission. By attributing the difference of the size of Compton cloud to the Alfvén radius, we can estimate the magnetic fields of neutron stars. The obtained lower/upper limits are consistent with the previous results.

  13. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  14. Parametric Evaluation of Active Neutron Interrogation for the Detection of Shielded Highly-Enriched Uranium in the Field

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chcihester; E. H. Seabury; S. J. Thompson; R. R. C. Clement

    2011-10-01

    Parametric studies using numerical simulations are being performed to assess the performance capabilities and limits of active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). Varying the shield material, HEU mass, HEU depth inside the shield, and interrogating neutron source energy, the simulations account for both neutron and photon emission signatures from the HEU with resolution in both energy and time. The results are processed to represent different irradiation timing schemes and several different classes of radiation detectors, and evaluated using a statistical approach considering signal intensity over background. This paper describes the details of the modeling campaign and some preliminary results, weighing the strengths of alternative measurement approaches for the different irradiation scenarios.

  15. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  16. Determination of the response function for two personal neutron dosemeter designs based on PADC.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S; Assenmacher, F; Boschung, M

    2014-10-01

    Since 1998 neutron dosimetry based on PADC (poly allyl diglycol carbonate) is done with a so-called original Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) design at PSI. The original design (i.e. holder) was later changed. Both designs are optimised for use in workplaces around high-energy accelerators, where the neutron energy spectra are dominated by fast neutrons ranging up to some 100 MeV. In addition to the change of the dosemeter design a new evaluation method based on a microscope scanning technique has been introduced and the etching conditions have been optimised. In the present work, the responses obtained with the original and the new dosemeter designs are compared for fields of radionuclide sources and monoenergetic reference fields using the new evaluation method. The response curves in terms of the personal dose equivalent for normally incident neutrons were built as functions of the incident neutron energy. PMID:24179145

  17. (Depth-dose curves of the beta reference fields (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2.

    PubMed

    Brunzendorf, Jens

    2012-08-01

    The most common reference fields in beta dosimetry are the ISO 6980 series 1 radiation fields produced by the beta secondary standard BSS2 and its predecessor BSS. These reference fields require sealed beta radiation sources ((147)Pm, (85)Kr or (90)Sr/(90)Y) in combination with a source-specific beam-flattening filter, and are defined only at a given distance from the source. Every radiation sources shipped with the BSS2 is sold with a calibration certificate of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The calibration workflow also comprises regular depth-dose measurements. This work publishes complete depth-dose curves of the series 1 sources (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (90)Sr/(90)Y in ICRU tissue up to a depth of 11 mm,when all electrons are stopped. For this purpose, the individual depth-dose curves of all BSS2 sources calibrated so far have been determined, i.e. the complete datasets of all BSS2 beta sources have been re-evaluated. It includes 191 depth-dose curves of 116 different sources comprising more than 2200 data points in total. Appropriate analytical representations of the nuclide-specific depth-dose curves are provided for the first time. PMID:22267274

  18. METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1964-01-14

    This patent relates to a method of producing neutrons in which there is produced a heated plasma containing heavy hydrogen isotope ions wherein heated ions are injected and confined in an elongated axially symmetric magnetic field having at least one magnetic field gradient region. In accordance with the method herein, the amplitude of the field and gradients are varied at an oscillatory periodic frequency to effect confinement by providing proper ratios of rotational to axial velocity components in the motion of said particles. The energetic neutrons may then be used as in a blanket zone containing a moderator and a source fissionable material to produce heat and thermal neutron fissionable materials. (AEC)

  19. Development, field testing of a laser instrument for the measurement of sediment reference concentration in the MARGINS Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Y.C.

    1998-05-22

    A small grant was added to an ongoing Navy program to extend the scope of ongoing work by development of a new laser instrument. The instrument, MSCAT (Miniature Scattering and Transmissometry) uses small angle scattering to obtain the needed multi-parameter information for measurement of particle size distribution and number density. During the short course of the grant, the instrument was built and tested in a field experiment off the coast of North Carolina. Useful data were obtained, and these have been presented at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union in 1994.

  20. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo; Massillon-JL, Guerda

    2014-11-01

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism1. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  1. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor Massillon-JL, Guerda; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo

    2014-11-07

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism{sup 1}. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  2. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  3. Determination of the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Dzhosyuk, S. N.; Copete, A.; Doyle, J. M.; Yang, L.; Coakley, K. J.; Golub, R.; Korobkina, E.; Kreft, T.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Thompson, A. K.; Yang, G. L.; Huffman, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    We report progress on an experiment to measure the neutron lifetime using magnetically trapped neutrons. Neutrons are loaded into a 1.1 T deep superconducting Ioffe-type trap by scattering 0.89 nm neutrons in isotopically pure superfluid 4He. Neutron decays are detected in real time using the scintillation light produced in the helium by the beta-decay electrons. The measured trap lifetime at a helium temperature of 300 mK and with no ameliorative magnetic ramping is substantially shorter than the free neutron lifetime. This is attributed to the presence of neutrons with energies higher than the magnetic potential of the trap. Magnetic field ramping is implemented to eliminate these neutrons, resulting in an 833−63+74s trap lifetime, consistent with the currently accepted value of the free neutron lifetime. PMID:27308147

  4. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  5. Analysis and design of three dimensional supersonic nozzles. Volume 1: Nozzle-exhaust flow field analysis by a reference plane characteristics technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P.

    1972-01-01

    A second order numerical method employing reference plane characteristics has been developed for the calculation of geometrically complex three dimensional nozzle-exhaust flow fields, heretofore uncalculable by existing methods. The nozzles may have irregular cross sections with swept throats and may be stacked in modules using the vehicle undersurface for additional expansion. The nozzles may have highly nonuniform entrance conditions, the medium considered being an equilibrium hydrogen-air mixture. The program calculates and carries along the underexpansion shock and contact as discrete discontinuity surfaces, for a nonuniform vehicle external flow.

  6. Electric Field and Structural Phase Transition Induced Magnetization Effects in BaTiO3 -FeRh Heterostructures Probed using Polarized Neutron Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Steven; Ward, Thomas; Biegalski, Michael; Wong, Tony; Liu, Zhiqi; Ambaye, Haile; Glavic, Artur

    2015-03-01

    The ability to change the magnetic state of a material with an electric field opens up a plethora of possible devices in spintronics and memory applications. A strong candidate material for such a control is FeRh, whose magneto-structural phase transition from antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) at T ~350K, has shown to be controllably changed by an electric field when grown on ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO). It has been suggested that this shift is largely due to the -0.47% in plane compressive strain induced by the piezoelectric BTO. Here we show a sharp repeatable change in magnetization as the system is heated/cooled through the tetragonal to orthorhombic (280-290K) and orthorhombic to rhombohedral (180-205K) crystalline phase transitions of BTO. To further characterize the effect polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) was used to evolve the depth profile of magnetization in FeRh within the temperature vicinity of these transitions with and without the application of electric field. This work was carried out at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) supported by the Scientific User Facilities Divisions, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE.

  7. Variational calculation of ground-state energy of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields. [at neutron star surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, E. G.; Ruderman, M. A.; Lee, J.-F.; Sutherland, P. G.; Hillebrandt, W.; Mueller, E.

    1977-01-01

    Variational calculations of the binding energies of iron atoms and condensed matter in strong magnetic fields (greater than 10 to the 12th gauss). These calculations include the electron exchange energy. The cohesive energy of the condensed matter, which is the difference between these two binding energies, is of interest in pulsar theories and in the description of the surfaces of neutron stars. It is found that the cohesive energy ranges from 2.6 keV to 8.0 keV.

  8. Survey of welding processes for field fabrication of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel pressure vessels. [128 references

    SciTech Connect

    Grotke, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    Any evaluation of fabrication methods for massive pressure vessels must consider several welding processes with potential for heavy-section applications. These include submerged-arc and shielded metal-arc, narrow-joint modifications of inert-gas metal-arc and inert-gas tungsten-arc processes, electroslag, and electron beam. The advantage and disadvantages of each are discussed. Electroslag welding can be dropped from consideration for joining of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel because welds made with this method do not provide the required mechanical properties in the welded and stress relieved condition. The extension of electron-beam welding to sections as thick as 4 or 8 inches (100 or 200 mm) is too recent a development to permit full evaluation. The manual shielded metal-arc and submerged-arc welding processes have both been employed, often together, for field fabrication of large vessels. They have the historical advantage of successful application but present other disadvantages that make them otherwise less attractive. The manual shielded metal-arc process can be used for all-position welding. It is however, a slow and expensive technique for joining heavy sections, requires large amounts of skilled labor that is in critically short supply, and introduces a high incidence of weld repairs. Automatic submerged-arc welding has been employed in many critical applications and for welding in the flat position is free of most of the criticism that can be leveled at the shielded metal-arc process. Specialized techniques have been developed for horizontal and vertical position welding but, used in this manner, the applications are limited and the cost advantage of the process is lost.

  9. Response characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Fix, J.J.; Hadley, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Yoder, R.C.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Nichols, L.L.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1983-09-01

    Performance characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters in current use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were determined from their evaluation of neutron dose equivalent received after irradiations with specific neutron sources at either the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) or the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The characteristics assessed included: lower detection level, energy response, precision and accuracy. It was found that when all of the laboratories employed a common set of calibrations, the overall accuracy was approximately +-20%, which is within uncertainty expected for these dosimeters. For doses above 80 mrem, the accuracy improved to better than 10% when a common calibration was used. Individual differences found in this study may reflect differences in calibration technique rather than differences in the dose rates of actual calibration standards. Second, at dose rates above 100 mrem, the precision for the best participants was generally below +-10% which is also within expected limits for these types of dosimeters. The poorest results had a standard deviation of about +-25%. At the lowest doses, which were sometimes below the lower detection limit, the precision often approached or exceeded +-100%. Third, the lower level of detection for free field /sup 252/Cf neutrons generally ranged between 20 and 50 mrem. Fourth, the energy dependence study provided a characterization of the response of the dosimeters to neutron energies far from the calibration energy. 11 references, 22 figures, 26 tables.

  10. Neutron stars - General review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.; Canuto, V.

    1974-01-01

    A review is presented of those properties of neutron stars upon which there is general agreement and of those areas which currently remain in doubt. Developments in theoretical physics of neutron star interiors are summarized with particular attention devoted to hyperon interactions and the structure of interior layers. Determination of energy states and the composition of matter is described for successive layers, beginning with the surface and proceeding through the central region into the core. Problems encountered in determining the behavior of matter in the ultra-high density regime are discussed, and the effects of the magnetic field of a neutron star are evaluated along with the behavior of atomic structures in the field. The evolution of a neutron star is outlined with discussion centering on carbon detonation, cooling, vibrational damping, rotation, and pulsar glitches. The role of neutron stars in cosmic-ray propagation is considered.

  11. Steady induction effects in geomagnetism. Part 1C: Geomagnetic estimation of steady surficial core motions: Application to the definitive geomagnetic reference field models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    1993-01-01

    In the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core magnetic earth model, the non-linear inverse steady motional induction problem was solved using the method presented in Part 1B. How that method was applied to estimate steady, broad-scale fluid velocity fields near the top of Earth's core that induce the secular change indicated by the Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field (DGRF) models from 1945 to 1980 are described. Special attention is given to the derivation of weight matrices for the DGRF models because the weights determine the apparent significance of the residual secular change. The derived weight matrices also enable estimation of the secular change signal-to-noise ratio characterizing the DGRF models. Two types of weights were derived in 1987-88: radial field weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the radial geomagnetic field component at Earth's surface implied by the DGRF's, and general weights for fitting the evolution of the broad-scale portion of the scalar potential specified by these models. The difference is non-trivial because not all the geomagnetic data represented by the DGRF's constrain the radial field component. For radial field weights (or general weights), a quantitatively acceptable explication of broad-scale secular change relative to the 1980 Magsat epoch must account for 99.94271 percent (or 99.98784 percent) of the total weighted variance accumulated therein. Tolerable normalized root-mean-square weighted residuals of 2.394 percent (or 1.103 percent) are less than the 7 percent errors expected in the source-free mantle/frozen-flux core approximation.

  12. Contributions of the electronic spin and orbital current to the CoCl{sub 4}{sup 2-} magnetic field probed in polarised neutron diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cassam-Chenaie, Patrick; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2012-08-14

    Polarised neutron diffraction experiments conducted at 4.2 K on Cs{sub 3}CoCl{sub 5} crystals have been analysed by using a four-dimensional model Hilbert space made of ab initio n-electron wave functions of the CoCl{sub 4}{sup 2-} molecular ion. Two spin-orbit mixing coefficients and several configuration interaction coefficients have been optimized by fitting calculated magnetic structure factors to experimental ones, to obtain the best ensemble density operator that is representable in the model space. A goodness of fit, {chi}{sup 2}, less then 1 has been obtained for the first time for the two experimental data sets available. In the present article, the optimized density operators are used to calculate the magnetic field densities that are the genuine observables probed in neutron diffraction experiments. Density maps of such observables are presented for the first time and numerical details are provided. The respective contributions of spin density and orbital current to the magnetic field density are analyzed.

  13. Neutron measurement support for radiation material science in research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bregadze, Yu.I.; Grigor'ev, E.I.; Ivanov, V.B.; Klinov, A.V.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Starostov, B.I.; Yaryna, V.P.

    1987-07-01

    The authors discuss the need for development of a support system for unity in neutron measurement. Basic problems are outlined with regard to the support of neutron measurement unity for specialized service, such as research of working neutron fields, monitoring neutron fields during irradiation, and classification, analysis and storage of information about the controlled neutron field. Methods of realizing the metrological functions of the Metrological Center of Neutron Measurements are discussed as is the technical equipment used by the Center.

  14. New PTB thermal neutron calibration facility: first results.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Reginatto, M; Wershofen, H; Wiegel, B; Zimbal, A

    2014-10-01

    A new thermal neutron calibration facility based on a moderator assembly has been set up at PTB. It consists of 16 (241)Am-Be radionuclide sources mounted in a graphite block, 1.5 m wide, 1.5 m high and 1.8 m deep. The sources are distributed to eight different positions, at a mean distance of ∼1.25 m from the front face of the moderator. The neutron field at the reference position, 30 cm in front of the moderator device and 75 cm above the floor, has been characterised using calculations, Bonner sphere measurements and gold foil activation. First results are shown. The field is highly thermalised: 99 % in terms of fluence. It is quite homogenous within a 20 cm×20 cm area, but the absolute value of the thermal neutron fluence rate is small and yields an ambient dose equivalent rate of 3 µSv h(-1). PMID:24403346

  15. Neutron measurements in Spanish nuclear power plants with a Bonner sphere spectrometer system.

    PubMed

    Fernández, F; Domingo, C; Amgarou, K; Bouassoule, T; García, M J

    2007-01-01

    Neutron spectrometric measurements with an active Bonner Sphere System (BSS) allowed us to determine the reference dosimeter values in Ascó I and II and Cofrentes (PWR, BWR) Spanish nuclear power plants. Under a request from the Spanish National Nuclear Safety Council, the UAB group was in charge of characterising the neutron fields at several measurement points (a total of 10) inside the containment building of these nuclear installations using an active BSS and a home-made MITOM unfolding code. The measurement results in the three installations confirm the presence of low-energy neutron components in almost all selected points. This developed BSS can be considered as a reference system in neutron radiation protection when defining the corresponding protocols for a correct personal dosimetry in nuclear power plant installations. PMID:17525063

  16. Precision Neutron Polarimetry for Neutron Beta Decay

    PubMed Central

    Penttila, S. I.; Bowman, J. D.

    2005-01-01

    The abBA collaboration is developing a new type of field-expansion spectrometer for a measurement of the three correlation coefficients a, A, and B and the shape parameter b. The measurement of A and B requires precision neutron polarimetry. We will polarize a pulsed cold neutron beam from the SNS using a 3He neutron spin filter. The well-known polarizing cross section for n-3He has a 1/v dependence, where v is the neutron velocity, which is used to determine the absolute beam polarization through a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. We show that by measuring the TOF dependence of A and B, the coefficients and the neutron polarization can be determined with a small loss of the statistical precision and with negligible systematic error. We conclude that it is possible to determine the neutron polarization averaged over a long run in the neutron beta decay experiment with a statistical error less than 10−4. We discuss various sources of systematic uncertainty in the measurement of A and B and conclude that the fractional systematic errors are less than 2 × 10−4. PMID:27308142

  17. Investigating temporal field sampling strategies for site-specific calibration of three soil moisture-neutron intensity parameterisation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, J.; Rosolem, R.; Baatz, R.; Wagener, T.; Bogena, H. R.

    2015-07-01

    The Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensor (CRNS) can provide soil moisture information at scales relevant to hydrometeorological modelling applications. Site-specific calibration is needed to translate CRNS neutron intensities into sensor footprint average soil moisture contents. We investigated temporal sampling strategies for calibration of three CRNS parameterisations (modified N0, HMF, and COSMIC) by assessing the effects of the number of sampling days and soil wetness conditions on the performance of the calibration results while investigating actual neutron intensity measurements, for three sites with distinct climate and land use: a semi-arid site, a temperate grassland, and a temperate forest. When calibrated with 1 year of data, both COSMIC and the modified N0 method performed better than HMF. The performance of COSMIC was remarkably good at the semi-arid site in the USA, while the N0mod performed best at the two temperate sites in Germany. The successful performance of COSMIC at all three sites can be attributed to the benefits of explicitly resolving individual soil layers (which is not accounted for in the other two parameterisations). To better calibrate these parameterisations, we recommend in situ soil sampled to be collected on more than a single day. However, little improvement is observed for sampling on more than 6 days. At the semi-arid site, the N0mod method was calibrated better under site-specific average wetness conditions, whereas HMF and COSMIC were calibrated better under drier conditions. Average soil wetness condition gave better calibration results at the two humid sites. The calibration results for the HMF method were better when calibrated with combinations of days with similar soil wetness conditions, opposed to N0mod and COSMIC, which profited from using days with distinct wetness conditions. Errors in actual neutron intensities were translated to average errors specifically to each site. At the semi-arid site, these errors were below the

  18. EPA QUICK REFERENCE GUIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Quick Reference Guides are compilations of information on chemical and biological terrorist agents. The information is presented in consistent format and includes agent characteristics, release scenarios, health and safety data, real-time field detection, effect levels, samp...

  19. Value of Information References

    SciTech Connect

    Morency, Christina

    2014-12-12

    This file contains a list of relevant references on value of information (VOI) in RIS format. VOI provides a quantitative analysis to evaluate the outcome of the combined technologies (seismology, hydrology, geodesy) used to monitor Brady's Geothermal Field.

  20. Dynamics of quantum spin liquid and spin solid phases in IPA-CuCl3 under an applied magnetic field studied with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zheludev, Andrey I; Garlea, Vasile O; Masuda, T.; Manaka, H.; Regnault, L.-P.; Ressouche, E.; Grenier, B.; Chung, J.-H.; Qiu, Y.; Habicht, Klaus; Kiefer, K.; Boehm, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Inelastic and elastic neutron scattering is used to study spin correlations in the quasi-one-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet IPA-CuCl3 in strong applied magnetic fields. A condensation of magnons and commensurate transverse long-range ordering is observe at a critical field Hc=9.5 T. The field dependencies of the energies and polarizations of all magnon branches are investigated both below and above the transition point. Their dispersion is measured across the entire one-dimensional Brillouin zone in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The critical wave vector of magnon spectrum truncation Masuda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 047210 2006 is found to shift from hc0,35 at HHC to hc=0.25 for HHC. A drastic reduction of magnon bandwidths in the ordered phase Garlea et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 167202 2007 is observed and studied in detail. New features of the spectrum, presumably related to this bandwidth collapse, are observed just above the transition field.