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Sample records for neutron reflectometry study

  1. Isotope-Identifying neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitenko, Yu. V. Petrenko, A. V.; Gundorin, N. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2015-07-15

    The possibilities of an isotope-indentifying study of layered structures in different regimes of a neutron wave field are considered. The detection of specularly reflected neutrons and secondary radiation (caused by neutron capture) in the form of charged particles, γ quanta, and nuclear fission fragments, as well as neutrons spin-flipped in a noncollinear magnetic field and on nuclei of elements with spin, makes it possible to implement isotope-indentifying neutron reflectometry.

  2. Polarized neutron reflectometry at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Nikitenko, Yu. V.

    2007-05-01

    Polarized neutron reflectometry as a method for investigating layered nanostructures and its implementation at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor (Dubna, Russia) are described. The experimental data illustrating the studies of magnetic layered nanostructures and the development of the method of polarized neutron reflectometry on the polarized neutron spectrometer are presented. The directions of further development of the method of polarized neutron reflectometry are analyzed.

  3. Temperature-controlled neutron reflectometry sample cell suitable for study of photoactive thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, Kevin G.; Tanchak, Oleh M.; Barrett, Christopher J.; Watson, Mike J.; Fritzsche, Helmut

    2006-04-15

    We describe a novel cell design intended for the study of photoactive materials using neutron reflectometry. The cell can maintain sample temperature and control of ambient atmospheric environment. Critically, the cell is built with an optical port, enabling light irradiation or light probing of the sample, simultaneous with neutron reflectivity measurements. The ability to measure neutron reflectivity with simultaneous temperature ramping and/or light illumination presents unique opportunities for measuring photoactive materials. To validate the cell design, we present preliminary results measuring the photoexpansion of thin films of azobenzene polymer.

  4. Neutron Reflectometry Studies Define Prion Protein N-terminal Peptide Membrane Binding

    PubMed Central

    Le Brun, Anton P.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; Drew, Simon C.; James, Michael; Boland, Martin P.; Collins, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP), widely recognized to misfold into the causative agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, has previously been shown to bind to lipid membranes with binding influenced by both membrane composition and pH. Aside from the misfolding events associated with prion pathogenesis, PrP can undergo various posttranslational modifications, including internal cleavage events. Alpha- and beta-cleavage of PrP produces two N-terminal fragments, N1 and N2, respectively, which interact specifically with negatively charged phospholipids at low pH. Our previous work probing N1 and N2 interactions with supported bilayers raised the possibility that the peptides could insert deeply with minimal disruption. In the current study we aimed to refine the binding parameters of these peptides with lipid bilayers. To this end, we used neutron reflectometry to define the structural details of this interaction in combination with quartz crystal microbalance interrogation. Neutron reflectometry confirmed that peptides equivalent to N1 and N2 insert into the interstitial space between the phospholipid headgroups but do not penetrate into the acyl tail region. In accord with our previous studies, interaction was stronger for the N1 fragment than for the N2, with more peptide bound per lipid. Neutron reflectometry analysis also detected lengthening of the lipid acyl tails, with a concurrent decrease in lipid area. This was most evident for the N1 peptide and suggests an induction of increased lipid order in the absence of phase transition. These observations stand in clear contrast to the findings of analogous studies of Ab and α-synuclein and thereby support the possibility of a functional role for such N-terminal fragment-membrane interactions. PMID:25418300

  5. Methanol Diffusion into Thin Ionomer Films: An in situ Study Using Neutron Reflectometry .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lilin

    2008-03-01

    THUSITHA, N. ETAMPAWALA DVORA, PERAHIA ^ Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 JAROSLAW MAJEWSKI, Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 CHRISTOPHER J. CORNELIUS^ Sandia National Laboratories, MS 0886, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0886 The penetration of solvent into a polymer that consists of incompatable groups is determined by the specific interactions with the guest molecule, where interfacial structure and dynamics of the polymer affect the onset of the process. The current work presents a neutron reflectometry study of the penetration of methanol into sulfonated polyphenlylene thin films. The ionomer films were exposed to saturated deuterated methanol vapor and reflectometry patterns were recorded until equilibrium was reached. The process incorporates two stages where the vapors first wet the surface and then penetrate into the film. Significant swelling takes place as soon as the film is exposed to the vapors. Similar to previous studied in water, the onset diffusion is Fickian followed by an anomalous diffusion process. The entire process however is faster than that observed for water.

  6. Study of short-range motion of atomic hydrogen in amorphous silicon by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dozier, W.D.; Herwig, K.W.; Shinar, R.; Jia, H.; Shinar, J.

    1992-05-01

    Preliminary results of neutron reflectometry (NR) measurements on rf sputter-deposited a-Si:H/a-Si:D bilayers indicate that this technique may be used to monitor H and D motions over distances of {approx} 10 to 200 {Angstrom} with a nominal resolution of 5--10 {Angstrom}. In studying rf sputter-deposited thin films containing a high density of microvoids annealed at 270 C, we found that the hydrogen diffused a distance of only {approx} 100 {Angstrom}. Further annealing at 270 and 280 C produced no additional motion. This result is consistent with a model of this system in which the hydrogen is trapped in microvoids after moving a relatively short distance.

  7. Polarized neutron reflectometry study of thin Fe films prepared on V (100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. T.; Fritzsche, H.; Hauschild, J.; Maletta, H.

    2004-07-01

    The magnetic properties of ultrathin Fe (100) films were investigated by polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). Fe films with different thicknesses from 1 to 3nm were prepared by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) on a V buffer layer, which was deposited on a MgO (100) single crystal. In order to avoid oxidation the Fe films were covered with V capping layers. During the preparation process the growth of the films was monitored by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Combining the information obtained from PNR with X-ray reflectometry (XRR), the thicknesses of the Fe and V layers were determined precisely. From PNR measurements the absolute value of the magnetization of the films could be determined by fitting the spin-up and spin-down neutron reflectivities separately. The magnetic moments of the Fe films show a perfect linear dependence on the film thickness tFe. The fitting line intersects the abscissa at tFe=(0.1+/-0.01)nm. This means that the magnetic properties of the two V/Fe interfaces show up as a constant reduction of the magnetic moment equal to an Fe bulk layer of thickness tFe=(0.1+/-0.01)nm. Also to be corresponded to.

  8. Adsorption of cationic polyacrylamide at the cellulose-liquid interface: a neutron reflectometry study.

    PubMed

    Su, Jielong; Garvey, Christopher J; Holt, Stephen; Tabor, Rico F; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn; Batchelor, Warren; Garnier, Gil

    2015-06-15

    The layer thickness and density of high molecular weight cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) adsorbed at the cellulose-water interface was quantified by neutron reflectometry. The thickness of a full monolayer of CPAM of constant molecular weight (13 MD) but different charge densities, adsorbed with or without NaCl (10(-3) M), was studied. Thin cellulose films (40±7 Å) of roughness <10 Å were produced by spin coating a cellulose acetate-acetone solution and regenerating by alkaline hydrolysis. Film smoothness was greatly improved by controlling the concentration of cellulose acetate (0.13 wt%) and the hydrolysis time in sodium methoxide. The adsorption thickness of CPAM (40% charge 13 MD) at the solid-D2O interface was 43±4 Å on cellulose and 13±2 Å on silicon, an order of magnitude smaller than the CPAM radius of gyration. At constant molecular weight, the thickness of the CPAM layer adsorbed on cellulose increases with polymer charge density (10±1 Å at 5%). Addition of 10(-3) M NaCl decreased the thickness of CPAM layer already adsorbed on cellulose. However, the adsorption layer on cellulose of a CPAM solution equilibrated in 10(-3) M NaCl is much thicker (89±11 Å for 40% CPAM). For high molecular weight CPAMs adsorbed from solution under constant conditions, the adsorption layer can be varied by 1 order of magnitude via control of the variables affecting electrostatic intra- and inter-polymer chain interactions. PMID:25723785

  9. Deuterium Labeling Strategies for Creating Contrast in Structure-Function Studies of Model Bacterial Outer Membranes Using Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Le Brun, Anton P; Clifton, Luke A; Holt, Stephen A; Holden, Peter J; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-01-01

    Studying the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is challenging due to the complex nature of its structure. Therefore, simplified models are required to undertake structure-function studies of processes that occur at the outer membrane/fluid interface. Model membranes can be created by immobilizing bilayers to solid supports such as gold or silicon surfaces, or as monolayers on a liquid support where the surface pressure and fluidity of the lipids can be controlled. Both model systems are amenable to having their structure probed by neutron reflectometry, a technique that provides a one-dimensional depth profile through a membrane detailing its thickness and composition. One of the strengths of neutron scattering is the ability to use contrast matching, allowing molecules containing hydrogen and those enriched with deuterium to be highlighted or matched out against the bulk isotopic composition of the solvent. Lipopolysaccharides, a major component of the outer membrane, can be isolated for incorporation into model membranes. Here, we describe the deuteration of lipopolysaccharides from rough strains of Escherichia coli for incorporation into model outer membranes, and how the use of deuterated materials enhances structural analysis of model membranes by neutron reflectometry. PMID:26791981

  10. Early stages of oxidative stress-induced membrane permeabilization: a neutron reflectometry study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Hillary L; Howland, Michael C; Szmodis, Alan W; Li, Qijuan; Daemen, Luke L; Parikh, Atul N; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2009-03-18

    Neutron reflectometry was used to probe in situ the structure of supported lipid bilayers at the solid-liquid interface during the early stages of UV-induced oxidative degradation. Single-component supported lipid bilayers composed of gel phase, dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), and fluid phase, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), phospholipids were exposed to low-dose oxidative stress generated by UV light and their structures were examined by neutron reflectometry. An interrupted illumination mode, involving exposures in 15 min increments with 2 h intervals between subsequent exposures, and a continuous mode involving a single 60 (or 90) min exposure period were employed. In both cases, pronounced differences in the structure of the lipid bilayer after exposure were observed. Interrupted exposure led to a substantial decrease in membrane coverage but preserved its total thickness at reduced scattering length densities. These results indicate that the initial phase during UV-induced membrane degradation involves the formation of hydrophilic channels within the membrane. This is consistent with the loss of some lipid molecules we observe and attendant reorganization of residual lipids forming hemimicellar edges of the hydrophilic channels. In contrast, continuous illumination produced a graded interface of continuously varied scattering length density (and hence hydrocarbon density) extending 100-150 A into the liquid phase. Exposure of a DPPC bilayer to UV light in the presence of a reservoir of unfused vesicles showed low net membrane disintegration during oxidative stress, presumably because of surface back-filling from the bulk reservoir. Chemical evidence for membrane degradation was obtained by mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Further evidence for the formation of hydrophilic channels was furnished by fluorescence microscopy and imaging ellipsometry data. PMID:19275260

  11. Early Stages of Oxidative Stress-Induced Membrane Permeabilization: A Neutron Reflectometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Hillary L.; Howland, Michael C.; Szmodis, Alan W.; Li, Qijuan; Daemen, Luke L.; Parikh, Atul N.; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2009-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry was used to probe in situ the structure of supported lipid bilayers at the solid–liquid interface during the early stages of UV-induced oxidative degradation. Single-component supported lipid bilayers composed of gel phase, dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), and fluid phase, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), phospholipids were exposed to low-dose oxidative stress generated by UV light and their structures were examined by neutron reflectometry. An interrupted illumination mode, involving exposures in 15 min increments with 2 h intervals between subsequent exposures, and a continuous mode involving a single 60 (or 90) min exposure period were employed. In both cases, pronounced differences in the structure of the lipid bilayer after exposure were observed. Interrupted exposure led to a substantial decrease in membrane coverage but preserved its total thickness at reduced scattering length densities. These results indicate that the initial phase during UV-induced membrane degradation involves the formation of hydrophilic channels within the membrane. This is consistent with the loss of some lipid molecules we observe and attendant reorganization of residual lipids forming hemimicellar edges of the hydrophilic channels. In contrast, continuous illumination produced a graded interface of continuously varied scattering length density (and hence hydrocarbon density) extending 100–150 Å into the liquid phase. Exposure of a DPPC bilayer to UV light in the presence of a reservoir of unfused vesicles showed low net membrane disintegration during oxidative stress, presumably because of surface back-filling from the bulk reservoir. Chemical evidence for membrane degradation was obtained by mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Further evidence for the formation of hydrophilic channels was furnished by fluorescence microscopy and imaging ellipsometry data. PMID:19275260

  12. Domain-wall structure in thin films with perpendicular anisotropy: Magnetic force microscopy and polarized neutron reflectometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, David; Redondo, Carolina; Badini Confalonieri, Giovanni A.; Batallan, Francisco; Devishvili, Anton; Iglesias-Freire, Óscar; Asenjo, Agustina; Ross, Caroline A.; Toperverg, Boris P.

    2014-08-01

    Ferromagnetic domain patterns and three-dimensional domain-wall configurations in thin CoCrPt films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were studied in detail by combining magnetic force microscopy and polarized neutron reflectometry with micromagnetic simulations. With the first method, lateral dimension of domains with alternative magnetization directions normal to the surface and separated by domain walls in 20-nm-thick CoCrPt films were determined in good agreement with micromagnetic simulations. Quantitative analysis of data on reflectometry shows that domain walls consist of a Bloch wall in the center of the thin film, which is gradually transformed into a pair of Néel caps at the surfaces. The width and in-depth thickness of the Bloch wall element, transition region, and Néel caps are found consistent with micromagnetic calculations. A complex structure of domain walls serves to compromise a competition between exchange interactions, keeping spins parallel, magnetic anisotropy orienting magnetization normal to the surface, and demagnetizing fields, promoting in-plane magnetization. It is shown that the result of such competition strongly depends on the film thickness, and in the thinner CoCrPt film (10 nm thick), simple Bloch walls separate domains. Their lateral dimensions estimated from neutron scattering experiments agree with micromagnetic simulations.

  13. Polarized neutron reflectometry of magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toperverg, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Among a number of methods employed to characterize various types of magnetic nano-structures Polarized Neutron Reflectometry (PNR) is shown to be a unique tool providing a scope of quantitative information on magnetization arrangement over relevant scales. Deeply penetrating into materials neutron spins are able to resolve vectorial profile of magnetic induction with accuracy of a fraction of Oersted over a fraction of nano-meters. This property is exploited in measurements of specular PNR which hence constitutes the method of depth resolved vector magnetometry widely used to examine magnetic states in exchange coupled magnetic superlattices, exchange bias systems, spin valves, exchange springs, superconducting/ferromagnetic heterostructure, etc. Off-specular polarized neutron scattering (OS-PNS) measures the in-plane magnetization distribution over scales from hundreds of nanoto hundreds of micrometers providing, in combination with specular PNR, access to lateral long range fluctuations of the magnetization vector and magnetic domains in these systems. OSPNS is especially useful in studies of co-operative magnetization reversal processes in various films and multilayers laterally patterned into periodic arrays of stripes, or islands of various dimentions, shapes, internal structures, etc., representing an interest for e.g. spintronics. Smaller sizes of 10?100 nm are accessed with the method of Polarized Neutrons Grazing Incidence Small Angle Scattering (PN-GISAS), which in a combination with specular PNR and OS-PNS is used to study self-assembling of magnetic nano-particles on flat surfaces, while Polarized Neutron Grazing Incidence Diffraction (PN-GID) complete the scope of magnetic information over wide range of scales in 3D space. The review of recent results obtained employing the methods listed above is preceded by the detailed theoretical consideration and exemplified by new developments addressing with PNR fast magnetic kinetics in nano-systems.

  14. Steric Effects in Ionic Pairing and Polyelectrolyte Interdiffusion within Multilayered Films: A Neutron Reflectometry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Li; Ankner, John Francis; Sukhishvili, Prof. Svetlana A.

    2011-01-01

    Using a series of polycations synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), we investigate the effects of the polymer charge density and hydrophobicity on salt-induced interdiffusion of polymer layers within polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films. Polycations with two distinct hydrophobicities and various quaternization degrees (QPDMA and QPDEA) were derived from parent polymers of matched molecular weights poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) and poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDEA) by quaternization with either methyl or ethyl sulfate. Multilayers of these polycations with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) were assembled in low-salt conditions, and annealed in NaCl solutions to induce layer intermixing. As revealed by neutron reflectometry (NR), polycations with lower charge density resulted in a faster decay of film structure with distance from the substrate. Interestingly, when comparing polymer mobility in QPDEA/PSS and QPDMA/PSS films, layer intermixing was faster in the case of more hydrophobic QPDEA as compared to QPDMA, because of the weaker ionic pairing (due to the presence of a bulky ethyl spacer) between QPDEA and PSS.

  15. Polarized neutron reflectometry in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzsche, H.

    2005-11-15

    A simple method is described to maintain the polarization of a neutron beam on its way through the large magnetic stray fields produced by a vertical field of a cryomagnet with a split-coil geometry. The two key issues are the proper shielding of the neutron spin flippers and an additional radial field component in order to guide the neutron spin through the region of the null point (i.e., point of reversal for the vertical field component). Calculations of the neutron's spin rotation as well as polarized neutron reflectometry experiments on an ErFe{sub 2}/DyFe{sub 2} multilayer show the perfect performance of the used setup. The recently commissioned cryomagnet M5 with a maximum vertical field of up to 7.2 T in asymmetric mode for polarized neutrons and 9 T in symmetric mode for unpolarized neutrons was used on the C5 spectrometer in reflectometry mode, at the NRU reactor in Chalk River, Canada.

  16. Neutron Reflectometry as a Surface Probe: A Personal Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tun, Z.

    2008-03-01

    Development of neutron reflectometry has enabled neutron scattering laboratories worldwide to make important contributions to the study of surfaces, interfaces and thin-films. As a result, neutron scattering has become an invaluable research tool for the scientific disciplines that did not traditionally use neutrons for research as recently as 20 years ago. At Chalk River (Canada), one discipline with which we have formed a close affiliation is electrochemistry. Our decision in the early 1990s to reach out to this potential user community was based on the fact that Canada has many researchers active in corrosion science. The virtue of this affiliation is best demonstrated in our experiments where reflectometry is performed simultaneously on the sample being investigated with electro-impedance spectroscopy, a standard electrochemical technique. The two methods in combination have led to the results that would have otherwise been missed or wrongly interpreted.

  17. Neutron-reflectometry study of alcohol adsorption on various DLC coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, M.; Simič, R.; Hirayama, T.; Geue, T.; Korelis, P.

    2014-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are notable for their excellent tribological properties. Our understanding of the lubrication of DLC coatings has improved drastically over the past decade. However, only a few details are known about the properties of the adsorbed layers on DLC, which crucially affect their tribological properties under lubricated conditions. In this work we used neutron reflectometry to determine the thickness and the density of adsorbed layers of alcohol molecules on several different types of DLC coatings, i.e., non-hydrogenated (a-C) and hydrogenated, of which both non-doped (a-C:H) and doped (a-C:H:F and a-C:H:Si) coatings were used. The results showed that a 0.9-nm-thick and relatively dense (≈45%) layer of alcohol adsorbed on the a-C coating. In contrast, no adsorption layer was found on the a-C:H, confirming the important role of hydrogen, which predominantly acts as a dangling-bond passivation source and affects the reactivity and tribochemistry of DLC coatings. The incorporation of F into a DLC coating also did not cause an increase in the adsorption ability with respect to alcohol molecules. On the contrary, the incorporation of Si increased the reactivity of the DLC coating so that a 1.3-nm-thick alcohol layer with a 35% bulk density was detected on the surface. We also discuss the very good agreement of the current results with the surface energy of selected coatings found in these experiments.

  18. Chemical Depth Profiling from Neutron Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay Aktosun

    2006-03-21

    The material profile of a thin film can be analyzed by placing the film on a substrate and by sending a neutron beam onto it at various angles of incidence. Technically, the scattering length density of the film needs to be determined as a function of depth. A reflectometer is used to measure the amount of reflection (reflectivity) as a function of the angle of incidence. Mathematically, this is equivalent to sending the neutron beam onto the film at every energy but at a fixed angle of incidence. The film profile needs to be recovered from the measured reflectivity data. Unfortunately, the unique recovery is impossible, and many distinct unrelated profiles may correspond to the same reflectivity data. In our DOE/EPSCoR sponsored research, we have developed an analytical method to uniquely recover the profile of a thin film from the measured reflectivity data. We have shown that by taking reflectivity measurements with two different substrates, one can uniquely determine the film profile. Previously, it was known that one could uniquely recover the profile by taking reflectivity measurements with three different substrates, and our findings indicate that the same goal can be accomplished by using fewer measurements. At Mississippi State University we started an informal weekly seminar (called ''the reflectometry meeting'') at to attract various undergraduate and graduate students into the field. There were about 3 undergraduate students, 6 graduate students, and 2 faculty members attending these seminars. The PI has collaborated with Dr. Norm Berk at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on various aspects of neutron reflectometry, from which various interesting problems of theoretical and practical importance have arisen. One of these problems is closely related to the important mathematical problem known as analytic extrapolation. Under appropriate conditions (known to hold in neutron reflectometry), the reflection data taken in a finite interval

  19. Off-specular scattering in neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Baker, S.M.; Smith, G.; Fitzsimmons, M.

    1995-03-01

    When neutrons are scattered at small angles from planar, laterally homogeneous, stratified media, only specular (mirror like) reflection is observed. Sample inhomogeneities, such as interfacial roughness or voids, give rise to off-specular scattering which has been observed in many experiments with neutrons and x-rays. The easiest way to describe this scattering theoretically is based on the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), which uses the neutron wavefunctions that describe reflection from a smooth surface as the basis functions for perturbation theory. From the DWBA one may obtain a number of qualitative results which are supported by experiment. Examples include the Yoneda fringes observed in reflection experiments with microscopically rough surfaces and the constant-q{sub z} fringes observed for multilayers with correlated, rough interfaces. One must, however, use the DWBA with care. When the correlation range within the reflecting interfaces is large--for example, when a surface is composed of misoriented facets--the approximation breaks down. Some authors have also reported a lack of quantitative agreement between versions of the DWBA calculations and the scattering observed with microscopically rough surfaces. A remarkable feature of neutron (or x-ray) reflectometry is the length scales that are probed within reflecting surfaces. These range from a few hundred Angstroms up to several microns, allowing neutron scattering to probe objects of a size normally visible by optical microscopy! The intent of this paper is to provide a simple description of scattering from rough surfaces that is accessible to a wide audience. Mathematical completeness is sacrificed in favor of intuitive arguments and experimental examples.

  20. Neutron Reflectometry and QCM-D Study of the Interaction of Cellulases with Films of Amorphous Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Liu, Zelin; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Jablin, Michael S.; Dubey, Manish; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Halbert, Candice E.; Browning, James F.; Ankner, John; Akgun, Bulent; Wang, Chao; Esker, Alan R.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake A.; Kent, Michael S.

    2011-06-13

    Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) of the interaction of a fungal enzyme extract (T. viride) and an endoglucanse from A. niger with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by that the fact that several biomass pretreatments currently under investigation disrupt the native crystalline structure of cellulose and increase the amorphous content. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nanometer resolution and is highly sensitive to interfacial roughness, whereas QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. NR can be performed using either H₂O- or D₂O-based aqueous reservoirs. NR measurement of swelling of a cellulose film in D₂O and in H₂O revealed that D/H exchange on the cellulose chains must be taken into account when a D₂O-based reservoir is used. The results also show that cellulose films swell slightly more in D₂O than in H₂O. Regarding enzymatic digestion, at 20 °C in H₂O buffer the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, initially roughening the surface, followed by penetration and activity throughout the bulk of the film. In contrast, over the same time period, the endoglucanase was active mainly at the surface of the film and did not increase the surface roughness.

  1. Neutron reflectometry and QCM-D study of the interaction of cellulases with films of amorphous cellulose.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Liu, Zelin; Murton, Jaclyn K; Jablin, Michael; Dubey, Manish; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Halbert, Candice; Browning, James; Ankner, John; Akgun, Bulent; Wang, Chao; Esker, Alan R; Sale, Kenneth L; Simmons, Blake A; Kent, Michael S

    2011-06-13

    Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) of the interaction of a fungal enzyme extract ( T. viride ) and an endoglucanse from A. niger with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by that the fact that several biomass pretreatments currently under investigation disrupt the native crystalline structure of cellulose and increase the amorphous content. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nanometer resolution and is highly sensitive to interfacial roughness, whereas QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. NR can be performed using either H(2)O- or D(2)O-based aqueous reservoirs. NR measurement of swelling of a cellulose film in D(2)O and in H(2)O revealed that D/H exchange on the cellulose chains must be taken into account when a D(2)O-based reservoir is used. The results also show that cellulose films swell slightly more in D(2)O than in H(2)O. Regarding enzymatic digestion, at 20 °C in H(2)O buffer the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, initially roughening the surface, followed by penetration and activity throughout the bulk of the film. In contrast, over the same time period, the endoglucanase was active mainly at the surface of the film and did not increase the surface roughness. PMID:21553874

  2. Neutron reflectometry study on an interface of octane and D 2O at low surfactant (C 10E 4) concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, U.; Esibov, L.; Crow, M. L.; Steyerl, A.

    1996-02-01

    We study the surface and interface roughness of a two-liquid film system using neutron reflectometry. The middle phase and bottom phase are extracted from a three-phase microemulsion containing 2 wt% non-ionic surfactant C 10E 4, 81 wt% D 2O and 17 wt% octane (C 8H 18). The system is formed by spreading a few drops of the middle phase of the microemulsion on the bottom phase of the microemulsion. The middle phase does not wet the bottom phase, but demixes to form a top octane-water mixture layer with a thickness of ∼ 580 Å. The mean surface roughness of the system is found to be 7 Å but the data are insensitive to interface roughness. An extended capillary wave model for a two-liquid-film system is derived to account for the coupling between the surface and interface. The dispersion relation yields two fundamental modes. In a calculation of mean-square roughness (< ζ2> 1/2) a high- k-cutoff is needed to account for non-linear terms in the Navier-Stokes equation. A low- k cutoff is also needed to avoid a “slip phenomenon” at the interface, which characterizes one of the modes. It turns out that for the parameters of our experiment the narrowing of k region is so significant that the mode causing the slip is strongly suppressed. As a consequence, the calculated interface roughness is much smaller than that derived from ordinary capillary wave theory.

  3. Neutron Reflectometry Study of the Conformation of HIV Nef Bound to Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Michael S.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Satija, Sushil; Akgun, Bulent; Nanda, Hirsh; Curtis, Joseph E.; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Morgan, Christopher R.; Engen, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Nef is an HIV-1 accessory protein that directly contributes to AIDS progression. Nef is myristoylated on the N-terminus, associates with membranes, and may undergo a transition from a solution conformation to a membrane-associated conformation. It has been hypothesized that conformational rearrangement enables membrane-associated Nef to interact with cellular proteins. Despite its medical relevance, to our knowledge there is no direct information about the conformation of membrane-bound Nef. In this work, we used neutron reflection to reveal what we believe are the first details of the conformation of membrane-bound Nef. The conformation of Nef was probed upon binding to Langmuir monolayers through the interaction of an N-terminal His tag with a synthetic metal-chelating lipid, which models one of the possible limiting cases for myr-Nef. The data indicate that residues are inserted into the lipid headgroups during interaction, and that the core domain lies directly against the lipid headgroups, with a thickness of ∼40 Å. Binding of Nef through the N-terminal His tag apparently facilitates insertion of residues, as no insertion occurred upon binding of Nef through weak electrostatic interactions in the absence of the specific interaction through the His tag. PMID:20858440

  4. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Junghans, Ann; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Zebda, Noureddine; Birukov, Konstantin; Viapiano, Mariano; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-12-10

    In this study, neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells' adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell — surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  5. Neutron Reflectometry Studies of the Adsorbed Structure of the Amelogenin, LRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Perez-Salas, Ursula; Masica, David L.; Philo, John; Krueger, Susan; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-03-21

    Amelogenins make up over 90 percent of the protein present during enamel formation and have been demonstrated to be critical in proper enamel development, but the mechanism governing this control is not well understood. Leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the charged regions from the full protein thought to control crystal regulation. In this work, we utilized neutron reflectivity (NR) to investigate the structure and orientation of LRAP adsorbed from solutions onto molecularly smooth COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) surfaces. Sedimentation velocity experiments revealed that LRAP is primarily a monomer in saturated calcium phosphate (SCP) solutions (0.15 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. LRAP adsorbed as ~33 Å thick layers at ~70% coverage as determined by NR. Rosetta simulations of the dimensions of LRAP in solution (37 Å diameter) indicate that the NR determined z dimension is consistent with an LRAP monomer. Sedimentation velocity experiments and Rosetta simulation show that the LRAP monomer has an extended, asymmetric shape in solution. The NR data suggests that the protein is not completely extended on the surface, having some degree of structure away from the surface. A protein orientation with the C-terminal and inner N-terminal region (~8-24)) located near the surface is consistent with the higher scattering length density (SLD) and higher protein hydration found near the surface by NR. This work presents new information on the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP in solution and adsorbed onto surfaces. It also presents further evidence that the monomeric species may be an important functional form of amelogenin proteins.

  6. Neutron Reflectometry Studies of the Adsorbed Structure of the Amelogenin, LRAP

    PubMed Central

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Perez-Salas, Ursula; Masica, David L.; Philo, John; Kienzle, Paul; Krueger, Susan; Majkrzak, Charles F.; Gray, Jeffrey L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    Amelogenins make up over 90 percent of the protein present during enamel formation and have been demonstrated to be critical in proper enamel development, but the mechanism governing this control is not well understood. Leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the charged regions from the full protein thought to control crystal regulation. In this work, we utilized neutron reflectivity (NR) to investigate the structure and orientation of LRAP adsorbed from solutions onto molecularly smooth COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) surfaces. Sedimentation velocity (SV) experiments revealed that LRAP is primarily a monomer in saturated calcium phosphate (SCP) solutions (0.15 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. LRAP adsorbed as ~32 Å thick layers at ~70% coverage as determined by NR. Rosetta simulations of the dimensions of LRAP in solution (37 Å diameter) indicate that the NR determined z dimension is consistent with an LRAP monomer. SV experiments and Rosetta simulation show that the LRAP monomer has an extended, asymmetric shape in solution. The NR data suggests that the protein is not completely extended on the surface, having some degree of structure away from the surface. A protein orientation with the C-terminal and inner N-terminal region (residues ~8–24) located near the surface is consistent with the higher scattering length density (SLD) found near the surface by NR. This work presents new information on the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP in solution and adsorbed onto surfaces. It also presents further evidence that the monomeric species may be an important functional form of amelogenin proteins. PMID:23477285

  7. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Ann; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Zebda, Noureddine; Birukov, Konstantin; Viapiano, Mariano; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-12-01

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells' adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell — surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  8. Neutron Reflectometry and QCM-D Study of the Interaction of Cellulase Enzymes with Films of Amorphous Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, Candice E; Ankner, John Francis; Kent, Michael S; Jaclyn, Murton K; Browning, Jim; Cheng, Gang; Liu, Zelin; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Supratim, Datta; Michael, Jablin; Bulent, Akgun; Alan, Esker; Simmons, Blake

    2011-01-01

    Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) of the interaction of a commercial fungal enzyme extract (T. viride), two purified endoglucanses from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima), and a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens) with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nm resolution, while QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. At 20 oC and 0.3 mg/ml, the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, beginning from the surface followed by activity throughout the bulk of the film. For similar conditions, Cel9A and Cel5A were active for only a short period of time and only at the surface of the film, with Cel9A releasing 40 from the ~ 700 film and Cel5A resulting in only a slight roughening/swelling effect at the surface. Subsequent elevation of the temperature to the Topt in each case resulted in a very limited increase in activity, corresponding to the loss of an additional 60 from the film for Cel9A and 20 from the film for Cel5A, and very weak penetration into and digestion within the bulk of the film, before the activity again ceased. The results for Cel9A and Cel5A contrast sharply with results for Cel45A where very rapid and extensive penetration and digestion within the bulk of the film was observed at 20 C. We speculate that the large differences are due

  9. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Junghans, Ann; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Zebda, Noureddine; Birukov, Konstantin; Viapiano, Mariano; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-12-10

    In this study, neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells' adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutronmore » reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell — surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.« less

  10. Neutron Reflectometry at Elevated Pressures and Temperatures - Novel P-T Cell and Preliminary Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickmott, D.; Lerner, A. H.; Wang, P.; Majewski, J.; Taylor, M.

    2011-12-01

    Processes at mineral-fluid interfaces control a wide-range of phenomena of crucial importance in energy and environmental applications, including fluid flow, mineral precipitation and dissolution, and corrosion and scaling. In geological systems, geothermal energy production, CO2 sequestration, oil and gas production, and nuclear reactors and waste repositories, these critical mineral-fluid interactions occur at high pressures (P) and temperatures (T). Unfortunately the details of these phenomena are poorly understood because of the technical difficulties with conducting in-situ investigations of mineral/fluid interfaces at relevant geological conditions. Neutron reflectometry offers the possibility of studying fluid/solid processes in-situ at elevated Ps and Ts. In neutron reflectometry an unpolarized neutron beam (wavelength 1.5 to 16 Å) is directed at a solid/fluid (or other) interface at a glancing angle and a range of momentum transfer vectors (Q) are measured elucidating changes in material layering and fluid density within a few dozen Å of the solid/liquid interface. Neutron reflectometry is an ideal technique for investigating such processes at elevated P/T because neutrons are strongly penetrating and able to pass through robust, high P/T aluminum cells with minimal neutron attenuation. Additionally, neutrons are highly sensitive to deuterium due to its large neutron scattering cross section, allowing heavy water to be detected. Thus, neutron scattering has advantages over x-ray techniques, which cannot detect water and which cannot penetrate large-volume P cells. A new LANL neutron cell allows neutron reflectometry studies at conditions up to 200°C and 200 MPa, corresponding to a crustal depth of 6 km. The 5 in. diameter cell is constructed of anodized AA7075 aluminum with a 2 in. diameter sample chamber. The neutron cell and P system can accommodate fluid environments varying in pH and mineral and CO2 saturations. Neutron reflectometry studies will

  11. Characterisation of coated aerosols using optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S. H.; Ward, A.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Thin organic films are believed to form naturally on the surface of aerosols [1,2] and influence aerosol properties. Cloud condensation nuclei formation and chemical reactions such as aerosol oxidation are effected by the presence of thin films [3]. There is a requirement to characterise the physical properties of both the core aerosol and its organic film in order to fully understand the contribution of coated aerosols to the indirect effect. Two complementary techniques have been used to study the oxidation of thin organic films on the surface of aerosols; laser optical tweezers and neutron reflectometry. Micron sized polystyrene beads coated in oleic acid have been trapped in air using two counter propagating laser beams. Polystyrene beads are used as a proxy for solid aerosol. The trapped aerosol is illuminated with a white LED over a broadband wavelength range and the scattered light collected to produce a Mie spectrum [4]. Analysis of the Mie spectrum results in determination of the core polystyrene bead radius, the oleic acid film thickness and refractive index dispersion of the core and shell [5]. A flow of ozone gas can then be introduced into the aerosol environment to oxidise the thin film of oleic acid and the reaction followed by monitoring the changes in the Mie spectrum. The results demonstrate complete removal of the oleic acid film. We conclude that the use of a counter propagating optical trap combined with white light Mie spectroscopy can be used to study a range of organic films on different types of aerosols and their oxidation reactions. Neutron reflectometry has been used as a complementary technique to study the oxidation of monolayer films at the air-water interface in order to gain information on reaction kinetics. The oxidation of an oleic acid film at the air-water interface by the common tropospheric oxidant ozone has been studied using a Langmuir trough. Results indicate complete removal of the oleic acid film with ozone in agreement

  12. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  13. Morphological origin for the stratification of P3HT:PCBM blend film studied by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Center for Nanophase Material Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 ; Browning, James F.; Halbert, Candice E.; Xiao, Kai; Shao, Ming; Hong, Kunlun

    2013-11-25

    Understanding the origin for the film stratification of electron donor/acceptor blend is crucial for high efficiency organic photovoltaic cell. In this study, P3HT:PCBM blend is deposited onto hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrate to examine the film stratifications. The neutron reflectivity results show that, on the different surfaces, PCBM diffuses toward the two interfacial regions in an identical fashion during thermal annealing. This evidences that the film stratification is not affected by the substrates. Instead, since P3HT remains more amorphous in the interfacial regions and PCBM is miscible with amorphous P3HT, PCBM preferentially diffuses to the interfacial regions, resulting in the stratification.

  14. Surface physics with cold and thermal neutron reflectometry. Progress report, April 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Steyerl, A.

    1993-09-01

    Within the past two and one half years of the project ``Surface Physics With Cold and Thermal Neutron Reflectometry`` a new thermal neutron reflectometer was constructed at the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC). It was used to study various liquid and solid surfaces. Furthermore, neutron reflection experiments were be un at different laboratories in collaboration with Dr. G.P. Fetcher (at Argonne National Laboratory), Dr. T. Russell (IBM Almaden) and Drs. S.K. Satija and A. Karim (at the National Institute for Standards and Technology). The available resources allowed partial construction of an imaging system for ultracold neutrons. It is expected to provide an extremely high resolution in momentum and energy transfer in surface studies using neutron reflectometry. Much of the work reported here was motivated by the possibility of later implementation at the planned Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge. In a separate project the first concrete plans for an intense source of ultracold neutrons for the Advanced Neutron Source were developed.

  15. The Search for Nanobubbles by Using Specular and Off-Specular Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Gutfreund, Philipp; Maccarini, Marco; Dennison, Andrew J C; Wolff, Max

    2016-09-01

    We apply specular and off-specular neutron reflection at the hydrophobic silicon/water interface to check for evidence of nanoscopic air bubbles whose presence is claimed after an ad hoc procedure of solvent exchange. Nanobubbles and/or a depletion layer at the hydrophobic/water interface have long been discussed and generated a plethora of controversial scientific results. By combining neutron reflectometry (NR), off-specular reflectometry (OSS), and grazing incidence small angle neutron scattering (GISANS), we studied the interface between hydrophobized silicon and heavy water before and after saturation with nitrogen gas. Our specular reflectometry results can be interpreted by assuming a submolecular sized depletion layer and the off-specular measurements show no change with nitrogen super saturated water. This picture is consistent with the assumption that, following the solvent exchange, no additional nanobubbles are introduced at significant concentrations (if present at all). Furthermore, we discuss the results in terms of the maximum surface coverage of nanobubbles that could be present on the hydrophobic surface compatibly with the sensitivity limit of these techniques. PMID:27516185

  16. Neutron reflectometry on highly absorbing films and its application to 10B4C-based neutron detectors

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, F.; Khaplanov, A.; Devishvili, A.; Schmidt, S.; Höglund, C.; Birch, J.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Gutfreund, P.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Van Esch, P.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool used for studies of surfaces and interfaces. The absorption in the typical studied materials is neglected and this technique is limited only to the reflectivity measurement. For strongly absorbing nuclei, the absorption can be directly measured by using the neutron-induced fluorescence technique which exploits the prompt particle emission of absorbing isotopes. This technique is emerging from soft matter and biology where highly absorbing nuclei, in very small quantities, are used as a label for buried layers. Nowadays, the importance of absorbing layers is rapidly increasing, partially because of their application in neutron detection; a field that has become more active also due to the 3He-shortage. We extend the neutron-induced fluorescence technique to the study of layers of highly absorbing materials, in particular 10B4C. The theory of neutron reflectometry is a commonly studied topic; however, when a strong absorption is present the subtle relationship between the reflection and the absorption of neutrons is not widely known. The theory for a general stack of absorbing layers has been developed and compared to measurements. We also report on the requirements that a 10B4C layer must fulfil in order to be employed as a converter in neutron detection. PMID:26997902

  17. One directional polarized neutron reflectometry with optimized reference layer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Jahromi, Saeed S.

    2012-09-01

    In the past decade, several neutron reflectometry methods for determining the modulus and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of an unknown multilayer thin film have been worked out among which the method of variation of surroundings and reference layers are of highest interest. These methods were later modified for measurement of the polarization of the reflected beam instead of the measurement of the intensities. In their new architecture, these methods not only suffered from the necessity of change of experimental setup but also another difficulty was added to their experimental implementations. This deficiency was related to the limitations of the technology of the neutron reflectometers that could only measure the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam. As the instruments are limited, the theory has to be optimized so that the experiment could be performed. In a recent work, we developed the method of variation of surroundings for one directional polarization analysis. In this new work, the method of reference layer with polarization analysis has been optimized to determine the phase and modulus of the unknown film with measurement of the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam.

  18. Variable temperature, relative humidity (0%-100%), and liquid neutron reflectometry sample cell suitable for polymeric and biomimetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harroun, T. A.; Fritzsche, H.; Watson, M. J.; Yager, K. G.; Tanchak, O. M.; Barrett, C. J.; Katsaras, J.

    2005-06-01

    We describe a variable temperature, relative humidity (0%-100% RH), and bulk liquid neutron reflectometry sample cell suitable for the study of polymeric and biomimetic materials (e.g., lipid bilayers). Compared to previous reflectometry cells, one of the advantages of the present sample environment is that it can accommodate ovens capable of handling either vapor or bulk liquid hydration media. Moreover, the design of the sample cell is such that temperature gradients are minimal over a large area (˜80cm2) allowing for the nontrivial 100% RH condition to be attained. This permits the study, by neutron reflectometry, of samples that are intrinsically unstable in bulk water conditions, and is demonstrated by the lamellar repeat spacing of lipid bilayers at 100% RH being indistinguishable from those same bilayers hydrated in liquid water.

  19. Neutron reflectometry: Filling Δq with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshanov, N. K.

    2016-06-01

    Luminosity of the reflectometer is defined as the neutron flux incident onto the sample surface for measurements made with a given momentum transfer resolution Δq. The filling of Δq with neutrons near a certain q depends not only on the source luminance and the source-sample tract transmittance, but also on the neutron beam tailoring. The correct choice of the working wavelength and measurements with optimum neutron beam parameters increase luminosity in several times. New optimization criteria for neutron reflectometers are suggested. Standard schemes of the reflectivity measurement with monochromatic and white beams are re-examined. Optimization of reflectivity measurements generally requires numerical calculations. Analytically, its potential is demonstrated by considering thermalized neutron beams. Such innovations as velocity selector on the basis of aperiodic multilayers, small angle Soller collimator with traps for neutrons reflected from the channel walls and fan beam time-of-flight technique are proposed to further increase the luminosity of reflectometers.

  20. Theoretical foundation of X-ray and neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiao-Lin; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    1995-06-01

    This review attempts to give a systematic exposition of the theoretical foundation underlying surface depth profiling at the molecular level using X-ray and neutron specular reflectometry. It covers the fundamentals of X-ray and neutron interactions with matter, the direct theory of specular reflection from stratified media, the inverse theory of specular reflection for obtaining the surface depth profile from measured specular reflection data, and demonstration of how the theories can be used in practice. The part on X-ray and neutron interactions with matter begins with the basic quantum mechanical and classical electromagnetic descriptions of scattering, discusses the important concepts of scattering and absorption cross sections, the scattering length density and the refractive index of matter, and derives the one-dimensional Helmholtz wave equation which fully describes the specular reflection of slow neutrons and X-rays from a macroscopic stratified medium. The direct theory begins with the development of the solution of the Helmholtz wave equation in the form of a discrete formulation, namely, Parratt's recurrence relation, and proceeds to several continuous formulations, such as the Born and distorted wave Born (DWBA) approximations, the small-curvature approximation (SCA), the modified WKB approximation (MWKB) and the weighted-superposition approximation (WSA), and ends with a discussion about the effect of surface roughness. The inverse theory presents methods for the reconstruction of the depth profile of the surface scattering length density from a set of specular reflection data. This includes the feasibility of data inversion, some simple examples of analytic data inversion, a matrix-iteration method (MIM), and a groove-tracking method (GTM). For demonstration of the use of the theories, we give an example of neutron reflectivity data analyses, from which the surface-layering phenomenon in bicontinuous microemulsions is revealed.

  1. Influence of the liquid helium meniscus on neutron reflectometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinane, C. J.; Kirichek, O.; Charlton, T. R.; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2016-02-01

    Neutron reflectometry offers a unique opportunity for the direct observation of nanostratification in 3He-4He mixtures in the ultra-low temperature limit. Unfortunately the results of recent experiments could not be well-modelled on account of a seemingly anomalous variation of reflectivity with momentum transfer. We now hypothesize that this effect is attributable to an optical distortion caused by the liquid's meniscus near the container wall. The validity of this idea is tested and confirmed through a subsidiary experiment on a D2O sample, showing that the meniscus can significantly distort results if the beam size in the horizontal plane is comparable with, or bigger than, the diameter of the container. The meniscus problem can be eliminated if the beam size is substantially smaller than the diameter of the container, such that reflection takes place only from the flat region of the liquid surface thus excluding the meniscus tails. Practical measures for minimizing the meniscus distortion effect are discussed.

  2. Self-diffusion and defect annihilation in nanocrystalline Fe films probed by neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Sujoy; Schmidt, Harald; Tietze, Ursula; Lott, Dieter; Lalla, N. P.; Gupta, Ajay

    2009-07-01

    Self-diffusion in ion-beam-sputtered nanocrystalline Fe is studied between 310 and 510°C , using neutron reflectometry on [Fnate(7nm)/F57e(3nm)]15 isotope multilayers. Neutron reflectometry has the advantage over other methods of diffusivity determination, that diffusion lengths on the order of 1 nm and below can be determined. This enables diffusion experiments in a nanostructure which is not significantly modified by grain growth during annealing. The determined diffusivities are time depended and decrease by more than two orders of magnitude during isothermal annealing. In early stages, diffusion is controlled by frozen-in nonequilibrium point defects (interstitials or vacancies) present after deposition. The decrease in the diffusivities can be attributed to the annihilation of these point defects. For very long annealing times the diffusivities above 400°C are in good agreement with volume diffusivities measured in single crystals given in literature. However, at a temperature of 400°C and below the diffusivities are still higher than extrapolated literature data also after more than 8 days of annealing, indicating that defect annihilation is still going on.

  3. Structure and stability of phospholipid bilayers hydrated by a room-temperature ionic liquid/water solution: a neutron reflectometry study.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Antonio; Heinrich, Frank; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Fragneto, Giovanna; Watkins, Erik; Ballone, Pietro

    2014-10-23

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) measurements were carried out to probe the structure and stability of two model biomembranes consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) phospholipid bilayers hydrated by water solutions of two prototypical room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), namely, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and choline chloride ([Chol][Cl]) at concentrations of 0.1 M and 0.5 M, respectively. The raw data were analyzed by fitting a distribution of scattering length densities arising from the different chemical species in the system. The results of this analysis show that (a) for all systems and concentrations that we considered, the thickness of the bilayers shrinks by ∼1 Å upon dissolving the ionic liquid into water and that (b) the RTIL ions enter the bilayer, finding their way to a preferred location in the lipid range that is nearly independent of the lipid and of the [bimim](+) or [Chol](+) choice. The volume fraction of RTIL sorbed in/on the bilayer, however, does depend on the lipid, but, again, is the same for [bmim][Cl] and for [Chol][Cl]. Thus, the RTIL occupies ∼5% of the bilayer volume in POPC, rising to ∼10% in DMPC. Repeating the measurements and data analysis after rinsing in pure water shows that the changes in the bilayer due to the RTIL sorption are irreversible and that a measurable amount of IL remains in the lipid fraction, that is, ∼2.5% of the bilayer volume in POPC and ∼8% in DMPC. PMID:25251987

  4. Using Neutron Reflectometry to Discern the Structure of Fibrinogen Adsorption at the Stainless Steel/Aqueous Interface.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mary H; Browning, Kathryn L; Barker, Robert D; Clarke, Stuart M

    2016-06-23

    Neutron reflectometry has been successfully used to study adsorption on a stainless steel surface by means of depositing a thin steel film on silicon. The film was characterized using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry), and GIXRD (grazing incidence X-ray diffraction), demonstrating the retention both of the austenitic phase and of the required composition for 316L stainless steel. The adsorption of fibrinogen from a physiologically-relevant solution onto the steel surface was studied using neutron reflectometry and QCM (quartz crystal microbalance) and compared to that on a deposited chromium oxide surface. It was found that the protein forms an irreversibly bound layer at low concentrations, with maximum protein concentration a distance of around 20 Å from the surface. Evidence for a further diffuse reversibly-bound layer forming at higher concentrations was also observed. Both the structure of the layer revealed by the neutron reflectometry data and the high water retention predicted by the QCM data suggest that there is a significant extent of protein unfolding upon adsorption. A lower extent of adsorption was seen on the chromium surfaces, although the adsorbed layer structures were similar, suggesting comparable adsorption mechanisms. PMID:27244444

  5. Comparative structure analysis of magnetic fluids at interface with silicon by neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, M. V.; Petrenko, V. I.; Gapon, I. V.; Bulavin, L. A.; Vorobiev, A. A.; Soltwedel, O.; Balasoiu, M.; Vekas, L.; Zavisova, V.; Kopcansky, P.

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption of surfactant coated magnetic nanoparticles from highly stable magnetic fluids on crystalline functionalized silicon is studied by neutron reflectometry. Two types of magnetic fluids based on nanomagnetite dispersed and stabilized in non-polar organic solvent (deuterated benzene) and strongly polar solvent (heavy water) are considered. In both cases the interface shows the formation of just one well-defined adsorption layer of nanoparticles, which is insensitive to the effect of the external magnetic field. Still, the particle concentration in the benzene-based fluid is higher in the vicinity to the silicon surface as compared to the bulk distribution. Despite the presence of an aggregate fraction in the water-based system the width of the adsorption layer is consistent with the size of separated particles, thus showing the preferable adsorption of non-aggregated particles.

  6. Analysis of biosurfaces by neutron reflectometry: From simple to complex interfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Junghans, Ann; Watkins, Erik B.; Barker, Robert D.; Singh, Saurabh; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2015-03-01

    Because of its high sensitivity for light elements and the scattering contrast manipulation via isotopic substitutions, neutron reflectometry (NR) is an excellent tool for studying the structure of soft-condensed material. These materials include model biophysical systems as well as in situ living tissue at the solid–liquid interface. The penetrability of neutrons makes NR suitable for probing thin films with thicknesses of 5–5000 Å at various buried, for example, solid–liquid, interfaces [J. Daillant and A. Gibaud, Lect. Notes Phys. 770, 133 (2009); G. Fragneto-Cusani, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13, 4973 (2001); J. Penfold, Curr. Opin. Colloid Interface Sci. 7, 139 (2002)].more » Over the past two decades, NR has evolved to become a key tool in the characterization of biological and biomimetic thin films. Highlighted In the current report are some of the authors' recent accomplishments in utilizing NR to study highly complex systems, including in-situ experiments. Such studies will result in a much better understanding of complex biological problems, have significant medical impact by suggesting innovative treatment, and advance the development of highly functionalized biomimetic materials.« less

  7. Analysis of biosurfaces by neutron reflectometry: From simple to complex interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Junghans, Ann; Watkins, Erik B.; Barker, Robert D.; Singh, Saurabh; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2015-03-01

    Because of its high sensitivity for light elements and the scattering contrast manipulation via isotopic substitutions, neutron reflectometry (NR) is an excellent tool for studying the structure of soft-condensed material. These materials include model biophysical systems as well as in situ living tissue at the solid–liquid interface. The penetrability of neutrons makes NR suitable for probing thin films with thicknesses of 5–5000 Å at various buried, for example, solid–liquid, interfaces [J. Daillant and A. Gibaud, Lect. Notes Phys. 770, 133 (2009); G. Fragneto-Cusani, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13, 4973 (2001); J. Penfold, Curr. Opin. Colloid Interface Sci. 7, 139 (2002)]. Over the past two decades, NR has evolved to become a key tool in the characterization of biological and biomimetic thin films. Highlighted In the current report are some of the authors' recent accomplishments in utilizing NR to study highly complex systems, including in-situ experiments. Such studies will result in a much better understanding of complex biological problems, have significant medical impact by suggesting innovative treatment, and advance the development of highly functionalized biomimetic materials.

  8. Probing the hydration of ultrathin antifouling organosilane adlayers using neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Natalia M; Fritzsche, Helmut; Blaszykowski, Christophe; Sheikh, Sonia; Vezvaie, Mansoor; Thompson, Michael

    2014-02-11

    Neutron reflectometry data and modeling support the existence of a relatively thick, continuous phase of water stemming from within an antifouling monoethylene glycol silane adlayer prepared on oxidized silicon wafers. In contrast, this physically distinct (from bulk) interphase is much thinner and only interfacial in nature for the less effective adlayer lacking internal ether oxygen atoms. These results provide further insight into the link between antifouling and surface hydration. PMID:24471689

  9. Thermal stability of photovoltaic a-Si:H determined by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Qviller, A. J. Haug, H.; You, C. C.; Hasle, I. M.; Marstein, E. S.; Frommen, C.; Hauback, B. C.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Vorobiev, A.; Østreng, E.; Fjellvåg, H.; Hjörvarsson, B.

    2014-12-08

    Neutron and X-ray reflectometry were used to determine the layer structure and hydrogen content of thin films of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited onto crystalline silicon (Si) wafers for surface passivation in solar cells. The combination of these two reflectometry techniques is well suited for non-destructive probing of the structure of a-Si:H due to being able to probe buried interfaces and having sub-nanometer resolution. Neutron reflectometry is also unique in its ability to allow determination of density gradients of light elements such as hydrogen (H). The neutron scattering contrast between Si and H is strong, making it possible to determine the H concentration in the deposited a-Si:H. In order to correlate the surface passivation properties supplied by the a-Si:H thin films, as quantified by obtainable effective minority carrier lifetime, photoconductance measurements were also performed. It is shown that the minority carrier lifetime falls sharply when H has been desorbed from a-Si:H by annealing.

  10. Depth profile of the ferromagnetic order in a YBa2Cu3O7/La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 superlattice on a LSAT substrate: A polarized neutron reflectometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe-Laverde, M. A.; Satapathy, D. K.; Marozau, I.; Malik, V. K.; Das, S.; Sen, K.; Stahn, J.; Rühm, A.; Kim, J.-H.; Keller, T.; Devishvili, A.; Toperverg, B. P.; Bernhard, C.

    2013-03-01

    Using polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) we have investigated a [YBa2Cu3O7(10 nm)/La2/3Ca1/3MnO3(9 nm)]10 (YBCO/LCMO) superlattice grown by pulsed laser deposition on a La0.3Sr0.7Al0.65Ta0.35O3 (LSAT) substrate. Due to the high structural quality of the superlattice and the substrate, the specular reflectivity signal extends with a high signal-to-background ratio beyond the fourth-order superlattice Bragg peak. This allows us to obtain more detailed and reliable information about the magnetic depth profile than in previous PNR studies on similar superlattices that were partially impeded by problems related to the low-temperature structural transitions of the SrTiO3 substrates. In agreement with the previous reports, our PNR data reveal a strong magnetic proximity effect showing that the depth profile of the magnetic potential differs significantly from the one of the nuclear potential that is given by the YBCO and LCMO layer thickness. We present fits of the PNR data using different simple blocklike models for which either a large ferromagnetic moment is induced on the YBCO side of the interfaces or the ferromagnetic order is suppressed on the LCMO side. We show that a good agreement with the PNR data and with the average magnetization as obtained from dc magnetization data can only be obtained with the latter model where a so-called depleted layer with a strongly suppressed ferromagnetic moment develops on the LCMO side of the interfaces. We also show that the PNR data are still compatible with the presence of a small, ferromagnetic Cu moment of 0.25μB on the YBCO side that was previously identified with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry measurements on the same superlattice [D. K. Satapathy , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.197201 108, 197201 (2012)]. We discuss that the depleted layer thus should not be mistaken with a “dead” layer that is entirely nonmagnetic but rather may contain a

  11. Exploring Strain Induced Magnetization Effects in Metamagnetic Artificial Multiferroics using Polarized Neutron Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Steven; Herklotz, Andreas; Wong, Anthony; Ward, Thomas; Lauter, Valeria

    There is currently a strong drive to realize a controllable magnetic ordering transition for use in next generation spintronic based memory and computation devices. One proposed method to gain such control is the use of a changing strain in a thin film metamagnetic artificial multiferroic system. While basic concepts using electric field actuated piezoelectric strain have been recently demonstrated1, there is very little understanding of the details of strains effect on such magnetic phase transitions. Using the depth sensitive method of polarized neutron reflectometry we have been able to probe the fine details of strains contribution to the metamagnetic transition in thin films of metamagnetic FeRh2. Here we explore the effects of changing lattice strain as a function of depth using both a barium titanate substrate's structural phase transitions3 and He ion implantation. These studies have discovered a remarkably large coupling between the systems strain state and the switching behavior across the magnetostructural metamagnetic transition. 1 Cherifi, R. O. et al. Nat. Mater. 31, 345-351 (2014), 2 Bennett, S. P. et al. Sci. Rep. 5, 9142 (2015), 3 Bennett, S. P. et al. submitted (2015)

  12. Toward the solution of the inverse problem in neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, V.O. de; Well, A.A. van; Sacks, P.E.; Adenwalla, S.; Felcher, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    The authors show that the chemical depth profile of a film of unknown structure can be retrieved unambiguously from neutron reflection data by adding to the system a known magnetic layer. Three independent reflectivities are obtained by taking measurements with the sample magnetized in a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface and subsequently parallel to it, and using in the latter geometry neutrons polarized either in the direction of the field or opposite to it. The procedure consists of two steps. First, from the three reflectivities both the real and imaginary parts of the reflection coefficient of the unknown film are extracted within the framework of the rigorous dynamical theory. Second, the neutron scattering-length density (and consequently the chemical depth profile) is obtained by a suitable numerical technique for the conventional Schroedinger inverse scattering problem. Computer experiments were conducted for selected cases: starting from the profiles the reflectivities were calculated in a limited range of q and then the original profiles were successfully recovered. The influence on the accuracy of the recovered depth profile of the counting statistics and the cutoffs at low and high q are discussed.

  13. Application of polarized neutron reflectometry and x-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry for determining the inhomogeneous magnetic structure in Fe/Gd multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, E. A.; Haskel, D.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Jiang, J. S.; Kirby, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of the magnetic structure of multilayer [Fe (35 {angstrom})/Gd (50 {angstrom}){sub 5}] with variation in temperature and an applied magnetic field was determined using a complementary approach combining polarized neutron and X-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry. Self-consistent simultaneous analysis of X-ray and neutron spectra allowed us to determine the elemental and depth profiles in the multilayer structure with unprecedented accuracy, including the identification of an inhomogeneous intralayer magnetic structure with near-atomic resolution.

  14. Characterization of Chemical Speciation in Ultra Thin Uranium Oxide Films by Neutron Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng

    2012-06-20

    Motivation for this project is due to more than 17 kg of HEU and 400 g of Pu have been interdicted through an international effort to control nuclear smuggling. Nuclear forensics - Detection and analysis of nuclear materials recovered from either the capture of unused materials or from the radioactive debris following a nuclear explosion or activities, which can contribute significantly for national security. Develop new nuclear forensic methods can be applied to: (a) Environmental swipes, (b) Small particulates, and (c) Thin films. Conclusions of the project are: (1) A unique approach: Neutron Reflectometry + Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy; and (2) Detection of chemical speciation with {angstrom}-level resolution.

  15. Focusing neutron reflectometry: Implementation and experience on the TOF-reflectometer Amor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, J.; Glavic, A.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool to investigate chemical and magnetic depth profiles near surfaces. The advantages of neutrons compared to x-rays are their sensitivity to isotopes, the high penetration capabilities and the high sensitivity to magnetic induction. The biggest disadvantage however is the low flux available, which leads to much longer counting times on much larger samples. In order to boost the performance of neutron reflectometers, a focusing guide system was developed and realised over recent years. Here we report on the application and performance of a down-scaled demonstrator of such a Selene guide, installed as an add-on on the time-of-flight (TOF) reflectometer Amor at the PSI. Due to the limited size of the guide, the flux is concentrated to a footprint of at most 2 mm width. It is thus possible to avoid illumination of contacts even on small samples. Despite the fact that typical samples measured on Amor with a size of 10 × 10mm2 are markedly under illuminated, the presented set-up leads to a reduction in counting time of 80%. The use of the demonstrator thus allows for in-situ or in-operando investigations with a time resolution of a few minutes for a qz range from 0.005Å-1 to 0.08Å-1. Besides a short recapitulation of the concept of focusing reflectometry, a detailed description of the data reduction and its quality is given, followed by an application example.

  16. Feasibility study of ultrafast reflectometry for plasma position control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Masi, Gianluca; Cavazzana, Roberto; Finotti, Claudio; Martines, Emilio; Marchiori, Giuseppe; Moresco, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    The traditional and widely used O-mode microwave reflectometry diagnostics will be crucial for real-time plasma position control purposes in the next generation of tokamaks like ITER or DEMO. Different studies and experimental tests, demonstrated the reliability of such a system to complement and replace the magnetic measurements in order to estimate the plasma-wall gap with good temporal and spatial resolution. In RFX-mod, an innovative multiband reflectometry scheme, the ultrafast reflectometry technique, has been developed and successfully tested. This simplified scheme is based on a bidirectional frequency modulation (sweep time <1 μs) for each band and proved itself to be able to recover the position of the different cut-off density layers directly from the group delay analysis. In this contribution, we study the possibility of using this scheme for real-time plasma position control: we discuss both the reliability of correctly identifying the separatrix position starting from a discrete density profile reconstruction and the robustness of the measurements against fast dynamic events. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the European Commission.

  17. Motofit - integrating neutron reflectometry acquisition, reduction and analysis into one, easy to use, package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The efficient use of complex neutron scattering instruments is often hindered by the complex nature of their operating software. This complexity exists at each experimental step: data acquisition, reduction and analysis, with each step being as important as the previous. For example, whilst command line interfaces are powerful at automated acquisition they often reduce accessibility by novice users and sometimes reduce the efficiency for advanced users. One solution to this is the development of a graphical user interface which allows the user to operate the instrument by a simple and intuitive "push button" approach. This approach was taken by the Motofit software package for analysis of multiple contrast reflectometry data. Here we describe the extension of this package to cover the data acquisition and reduction steps for the Platypus time-of-flight neutron reflectometer. Consequently, the complete operation of an instrument is integrated into a single, easy to use, program, leading to efficient instrument usage.

  18. Structure of electrolyte decomposition products on high voltage spinel cathode materials determined by in situ neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Jim; Veith, Gabriel; Baggetto, Loic; Dudney, Nancy; Tenhaeff, Wyatt

    2012-02-01

    Interfacial reactions on electrical energy storage (EES) materials mediate their stability, durability, and cycleablity. Understanding these reactions in situ is difficult since they occur at the liquid-solid interface of an optically absorbing material that hinders the use of techniques such as infra-red spectroscopy. Furthermore, since the interfaces involve liquids classic vacuum-based analytical methods can only probe reaction products, which are stable under vacuum. Here, we present the results of an in situ neutron reflectometry study detailing the formation of a thick solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) on a high voltage spinel cathode material. The cathode/electrolyte system used in this study is a LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 thin film subjected to a 1.2 molar LiPF6 in 1:1 ethylene carbonate - dimethyl carbonate electrolyte solution.

  19. Monitoring Soil Moisture in Saline Soils using Neutron Probe, Time Domain Reflectometry, and Heat Dissipation Sensor Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    Knowledge of spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture content (SMC) is important for understanding of land-atmosphere interactions, groundwater recharge, and water balance. Different measurement methods have contrasting strengths and weaknesses. Traditional neutron probe measurements cannot be automated and are time-intensive. However, there are widespread problems with using automated time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring SMC due to high soil salinity/electrical conductivity. The objective of this study was to show how these limitations can be overcome by using multiple methods. Neutron probe access tubes, TDR probes (coated and uncoated), and heat dissipation sensors (HDS) were installed at an engineered field laboratory in a semiarid setting. The texture of the soils was sandy clay loam, including 0.3 m of uncompacted topsoil with low salinity and non-swelling clays underlain by 1.0 to 1.7 m of compacted subsoil with high salinity and swelling clays. A neutron probe was used to manually measure SMC profiles at 20 locations at approximately monthly intervals over a 3.5 yr period. During a 4 to 5 yr overlapping period, daily automated measurements were made at 8 locations of apparent dielectric constant (Ka) and bulk electrical conductivity (EC) profiles using TDR (128 probes) and matric potential profiles using HDS (54 sensors). TDR measurements in the high salinity soils were effectively calibrated in situ using neutron probe measurements. Modeled estimates of spatial average water content were generally within 0.01 m3/m3. A similar approach was used to combine neutron probe, TDR, and HDS measurements to generate in situ soil water retention functions. These functions were then used to estimate SMC from matric potential measurements. These approaches allowed SMC to be monitored in high salinity swelling soils and provided much higher resolution time series than were obtained from the limited neutron probe measurements.

  20. Time-of-Flight Polarized Neutron Reflectometry on PLATYPUS: Status and Future Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saerbeck, T.; Cortie, D. L.; Brück, S.; Bertinshaw, J.; Holt, S. A.; Nelson, A.; James, M.; Lee, W. T.; Klose, F.

    Time-of-flight (ToF) polarized neutron reflectometry enables the detailed investigation of depth-resolved magnetic structures in thin film and multilayer magnetic systems. The general advantage of the time-of-flight mode of operation over monochromatic instruments is a decoupling of spectral shape and polarization of the neutron beam with variable resolution. Thus, a wide Q-range can be investigated using a single angle of incidence, with resolution and flux well-adjusted to the experimental requirement. Our paper reviews the current status of the polarization equipment of the ToF reflectometer PLATYPUS and presents first results obtained on stratified Ni80Fe20/α-Fe2O3 films, revealing the distribution of magnetic moments in an exchange bias system. An outlook on the future development of the PLATYPUS polarization system towards the implementation of a polarized 3He cell is presented and discussed with respect to the efficiency and high Q-coverage up to 1 Å-1 and 0.15 Å-1 in the vertical and lateral momentum transfer, respectively.

  1. Separation and correlation of structural and magnetic roughness in a Ni thin film by polarized off-specular neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Basu, Saibal

    2009-02-01

    Diffuse (off-specular) neutron and x-ray reflectometry has been used extensively for the determination of interface morphology in solids and liquids. For neutrons, a novel possibility is off-specular reflectometry with polarized neutrons to determine the morphology of a magnetic interface. There have been few such attempts due to the lower brilliance of neutron sources, though magnetic interaction of neutrons with atomic magnetic moments is much easier to comprehend and easily tractable theoretically. We have obtained a simple and physically meaningful expression, under the Born approximation, for analyzing polarized diffuse (off-specular) neutron reflectivity (PDNR) data. For the first time PDNR data from a Ni film have been analyzed and separate chemical and magnetic morphologies have been quantified. Also specular polarized neutron reflectivity measurements have been carried out to measure the magnetic moment density profile of the Ni film. The fit to PDNR data results in a longer correlation length for in-plane magnetic roughness than for chemical (structural) roughness. The magnetic interface is smoother than the chemical interface. PMID:21817297

  2. Percolating bulk-heterostructures from neutron reflectometry and small angle scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, Daniel; Duxbury, Phillip

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel algorithm for efficiently calculating the simulated small angle scattering data of any discretized morphological model of arbitrary scale and resolution, referred to as the distribution function method (DFM). Unlike standard SAS fitting methods, the DFM algorithm allows for the calculation of form factors and structure factors from complex nanoscale morphologies commonly encountered in many modern polymeric and nanoparticle based systems, which have no exact analytical corollary. The computational efficiency of the DFM algorithm suggests it's use in morphological model refinement. We will present a number of simple examples to demonstrate the accuracy and limits of the algorithm, followed by an example of incorporation of the DFM algorithm into reverse Monte Carlo structural refinement of bulk-heterojunction two-phase morphologies, such as those commonly found in organic photovoltaic devices. We will show that morphological features introduced via direct incorporation of experimental neutron reflectometry and SANS data to the models has a direct effect on the results of device simulations. The authors thank CORE-CM at Michigan State University for it's funding of this research.

  3. Interactions of Endoglucanases with Amorphous Cellulose Films Resolved by Neutron Reflectometry and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Liu, Zelin; Kent, Michael S; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Michael, Jablin; Jaclyn, Murton K; Halbert, Candice E; Datta, Supratim; Chao, Wang; Brown, Page

    2012-01-01

    A study of the interaction of four endoglucanases with amorphous cellulose films by neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) is reported. The endoglucanases include a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens), a processive endoglucanase from a marine bacterium (Cel5H from S. degradans), and two from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima). The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. The endoglucanases displayed highly diverse behavior. Cel45A and Cel5H, which possess carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), penetrated and digested within the bulk of the films to a far greater extent than Cel9A and Cel5A, which lack CBMs. While both Cel45A and Cel5H were active within the bulk of the films, striking differences were observed. With Cel45A, substantial film expansion and interfacial broadening were observed, whereas for Cel5H the film thickness decreased with little interfacial broadening. These results are consistent with Cel45A digesting within the interior of cellulose chains as a classic endoglucanase, and Cel5H digesting predominantly at chain ends consistent with its designation as a processive endoglucanase.

  4. Electrochemical modification of the passive oxide layer on a Ti film observed by in situ neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tun, Z.; Noeel, J.J.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1999-03-01

    Anodization and the effect of subsequently applying cathodic potential to a thin-film Ti electrode in an aqueous NaCl solution have been studied with in situ neutron reflectometry. This new technique provides further insight into the processes underlying anodic oxide formation and hydrogen absorption under cathodic polarization. The results (Pilling-Bedworth ratio, anodization ratio, the onset of fluctuations in electrode current under cathodic potential, etc.) are generally in agreement with the literature, but this new technique provides further insight into the electrochemical processes. The anodized oxide is observed to be not porous, and has the density of the rutile structure for its entire thickness. However, it comprises two distinct regions: an inner region similar in thickness and composition to the original air-grown oxide, and an outer region containing a significant amount of hydrogen. The similarity of the inner region to the original oxide suggests that the underlying oxide growth mechanism for Ti is the point-defect model. Under applied cathodic potentials the overall oxide thickness remains constant, but the inner region is gradually converted to a material similar in hydrogen content to the outer region. The onset of massive hydrogen penetration seems to occur when the conversion is complete, or when the inner region has been reduced to only a few atomic layers.

  5. 90° magnetic coupling in a NiFe/FeMn/biased NiFe multilayer spin valve component investigated by polarized neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Callori, S. J. Bertinshaw, J.; Cortie, D. L.; Cai, J. W. Zhu, T.; Le Brun, A. P.; Klose, F.

    2014-07-21

    We have observed 90° magnetic coupling in a NiFe/FeMn/biased NiFe multilayer system using polarized neutron reflectometry. Magnetometry results show magnetic switching for both the biased and free NiFe layers, the latter of which reverses at low applied fields. As these measurements are only capable of providing information about the total magnetization within a sample, polarized neutron reflectometry was used to investigate the reversal behavior of the NiFe layers individually. Both the non-spin-flip and spin-flip neutron reflectometry signals were tracked around the free NiFe layer hysteresis loop and were used to detail the evolution of the magnetization during reversal. At low magnetic fields near the free NiFe coercive field, a large spin-flip signal was observed, indicating magnetization aligned perpendicular to both the applied field and pinned layer.

  6. H-mode filament studies with reflectometry in ASDEX upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, J.; Conway, G. D.; Manso, M. E.; Müller, H. W.; Silva, C.; da Silva, F.; Guimarãis, L.; Silva, A.

    2014-12-01

    Broadband swept (i.e. frequency modulation of the continuous wave; FM-CW) and fixed frequency reflectometry (FFR) were used for the first time to study plasma filamentary activity; experiments were performed in ELMy H-mode plasmas at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Electron density profiles were studied with FM-CW providing a first insight into filamentary activity and enabling us to localize the density layers probed with FFR. A novel filament detection technique was developed using a threshold criterion on the phase derivative signals from FFR. This technique was applied together with conditional averaging in measurements performed in the vicinity of the separatrix. Results showed good agreement with data from Langmuir probes and it was found that the majority of filaments propagate with dominant poloidal velocity in both periods of in-between edge localized modes (ELMs) (Vθ ≈ 575 m s-1) and at the ELM onset (Vθ ≈ 1180 m s-1). A time delay between the maximum filament activity at the outer mid-plane and the ELM peak at the inner divertor currents (≈ -461  ±  50 μs) agrees with expected time scales for the ELM lifetime. In inter-ELM periods we were able to estimate typical poloidal and toroidal sizes of filaments (Sθ ≈ [5.75-11.50] cm and Sϕ ≈ [33-66] cm) and a magnetohydrodynamic mode structure emerged from the measurements with poloidal and toroidal mode numbers (m ≈ [8-12] and n ≈ [2, 3]) in the range of possible peeling-ballooning modes.

  7. Operando Measurement of Solid Electrolyte Interphase Formation at Working Electrode of Li-Ion Battery by Time-Slicing Neutron Reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Hiroyuki; Harada, Masashi; Kondo, Yasuhito; Kondo, Hiroki; Suganuma, Yoshitake; Takahashi, Naoko; Sugiyama, Jun; Seno, Yoshiki; Yamada, Norifumi L

    2016-04-20

    We report the first operando measurement of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation at an electrode using in situ neutron reflectometry. The results revealed the growth of the SEI and intercalation of ions during the charge reaction. Furthermore, we propose a way of evaluating the charge used for the SEI formation. PMID:27031783

  8. Structural Features of Membrane-bound Glucocerebrosidase and α-Synuclein Probed by Neutron Reflectometry and Fluorescence Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Thai Leong; Jiang, Zhiping; Heinrich, Frank; Gruschus, James M.; Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; Barros, Marilia; Curtis, Joseph E.; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GCase), the enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease, are a common genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson disease and related disorders, implicating the role of this lysosomal hydrolase in the disease etiology. A specific physical interaction exists between the Parkinson disease-related protein α-synuclein (α-syn) and GCase both in solution and on the lipid membrane, resulting in efficient enzyme inhibition. Here, neutron reflectometry was employed as a first direct structural characterization of GCase and α-syn·GCase complex on a sparsely-tethered lipid bilayer, revealing the orientation of the membrane-bound GCase. GCase binds to and partially inserts into the bilayer with its active site most likely lying just above the membrane-water interface. The interaction was further characterized by intrinsic Trp fluorescence, circular dichroism, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Both Trp fluorescence and neutron reflectometry results suggest a rearrangement of loops surrounding the catalytic site, where they extend into the hydrocarbon chain region of the outer leaflet. Taking advantage of contrasting neutron scattering length densities, the use of deuterated α-syn versus protiated GCase showed a large change in the membrane-bound structure of α-syn in the complex. We propose a model of α-syn·GCase on the membrane, providing structural insights into inhibition of GCase by α-syn. The interaction displaces GCase away from the membrane, possibly impeding substrate access and perturbing the active site. GCase greatly alters membrane-bound α-syn, moving helical residues away from the bilayer, which could impact the degradation of α-syn in the lysosome where these two proteins interact. PMID:25429104

  9. Correlating Interfacial Structure and Magnetism in Thin-Film Oxide Heterostructures Using Transmission Electron Microscopy and Polarized Neutron Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgeon, Steven Richard

    Oxide thin-films have attracted considerable attention for a new generation of spintronics devices, where both electron charge and spin are used to transport information. However, a poor understanding of the local features that mediate magnetization and coupling in these materials has greatly limited their deployment into new information and communication technologies. This thesis describes direct, local measurements of structure-property relationships in ferrous thin-films and La1--xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) / Pb(ZrxTi1--x)O3 (PZT) thin-film heterostructures using spatially-resolved characterization techniques. In the first part of this thesis we explore the properties of ferrous spintronic thin-films. These films serve as a model system to establish a suite of interfacial characterization techniques for subsequent studies. We then study the static behavior of LSMO / PZT devices with polarization set by the underlying substrate. Using transmission electron microscopy and geometric phase analysis we reveal the presence of significant local strain gradients in these films for the first time. Electron energy loss spectroscopy mapping of the LSMO / PZT interface reveals Mn valence changes induced by charge-transfer screening. Bulk magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectometry indicate that these chemical and strain changes are associated with a graded magnetization across the LSMO layer. Density functional theory calculations are presented, which show that strain and charge-transfer screening act locally to suppress magnetization in the LSMO by changing the Mn orbital polarization. In the second half of this thesis, we explore asymmetric screening effects on magnetization LSMO / PZT composites. We find that the local ferroelectric polarization can vary widely and that this may be responsible for reduced charge-transfer effects, as well as magnetic phase gradients at interfaces. From this information and electron energy loss spectroscopy, we construct a map of the magnetic

  10. First Measurements of the Inclined Boron Layer Thermal-Neutron Detector for Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Crow, Lowell; Van Vuure, Thorwald L; Robertson, Lee; Riedel, Richard A; Richards, John D; Cooper, Ronald G; Remec, Igor; Ankner, John Francis; Browning, Jim

    2010-01-01

    A prototype detector based on the inclined boron layer principle is introduced. For typical measurement conditions at the Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, its count rate capability is shown to be superior to that of the current detector by nearly two orders of magnitude.

  11. Birefringence in anisotropic optical fibres studied by polarised light Brillouin reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A S; Burdin, V V; Konstantinov, Yu A; Petukhov, A S; Drozdov, I R; Kuz'minykh, Ya S; Besprozvannykh, V G

    2015-01-31

    Modal birefringence (the difference between the effective refractive indices of orthogonal polarisation modes) is one of the key parameters of anisotropic single-mode fibres, characterising their ability to preserve a linearly polarised state of input light. This parameter is commonly measured using short pieces of fibre, but such procedures are destructive and allow the birefringence to be determined only at the ends of long fibres. In this study, polarised light Brillouin reflectometry is used to assess birefringence uniformity throughout the length of an anisotropic fibre. (optical fibres)

  12. Kinetic study of antibody adhesion on a silicon wafer by laser reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Bibiana D.; Valverde, Juana R.; Rasia, Rodolfo J.

    2003-05-01

    Antibody adhesion kinetic in real time has been studied by laser reflectometry technique. An ellipsometer is used to measure the light intensity reflected by a silicon wafer. Light intensity reflected by the wafer presents a minimum at the pseudo-Brewster angle. Then, the reflectance increases as the antibodies (monoclonal anti- AB) adhere on interface. Mathematical analysis of reflectance curves versus time verifies that the antibody adhesion at the interface follows Langmuir kinetics (Prog. Biomed. Opt. Imaging 1(5) (2000) 19) for low antibody concentrations. Parameters obtained allow to carry out a detailed study of the antibody adsorption and the antigen-antibody interaction. This conduces to development of an optical immunosensor for detection and quantification of soluble antigens, and a novel method for commercial antiserum quality control. This technique does not require labeled antibodies, being also independent of cellular factors. Also, this technique is quicker and sensible than the conventional immunohematology methods.

  13. Numerical Study of Microwave Reflectometry in Plasmas with 2D Turbulent Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    E. Mazzucato

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of the role played by 2D turbulent fluctuations in microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves from a plasma cutoff. The results indicate that, if the amplitude of fluctuations is below a threshold which is set by the spectrum of poloidal wavenumbers, the measured backward field appears to originate from a virtual location behind the reflecting layer, and to arise from the phase modulation of the probing wave, with an amplitude given by 1D geometric optics. These results suggest a possible scheme for turbulence measurements in tokamaks, where the backward field is collected with a wide aperture antenna, and the virtual reflecting layer is imaged onto the plane of an array of detectors. Such a scheme should be capable of providing additional information on the nature of the short-scale turbulence observed in tokamaks, which still remains one of the unresolved issues in fusion research.

  14. Characterization of the Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome OmcA in Solution and on Hematite Surfaces by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and Neutron Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Johs, A.; Shi, L.; Droubay, T.; Ankner, J.F.; Liang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate shuttling of electrons to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite (α-Fe2O3). No information is yet available concerning OmcA structure in physiologically relevant conditions such as aqueous environments. We purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and its interaction at the hematite-water interface by neutron reflectometry. SAXS showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with an overall dimension of 34 × 90 × 65 Å3. To our knowledge, we obtained the first direct evidence that OmcA undergoes a redox state-dependent conformational change in solution whereby reduction decreases the overall length of OmcA by ∼7 Å (the maximum dimension was 96 Å for oxidized OmcA, and 89 Å for NADH and dithionite-reduced OmcA). OmcA was also found to physically interact with electron shuttle molecules such as flavin mononucleotide, resulting in the formation of high-molecular-weight assemblies. Neutron reflectometry showed that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces, where it assumes an orientation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. These novel insights into the molecular structure of OmcA in solution, and its interaction with insoluble hematite and small organic ligands, demonstrate the fundamental structural bases underlying OmcA's role in mediating redox processes. PMID:20550916

  15. Characterization of the Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome OmcA in Solution and on Hematite Surfaces by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering and Neutron Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Shi, Liang; Droubay, Timothy C.; Ankner, John F.; Liang, L.

    2010-06-01

    The outer membrane protein OmcA is an 85 kDa decaheme c-type cytochrome located on the surface of the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. It is assumed to mediate shuttling of electrons to extracellular acceptors that include solid metal oxides such as hematite (a-Fe2O3). No information is yet available concerning OmcA structure in physiologically relevant conditions such as aqueous environments. We purified OmcA and characterized its solution structure by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), and its interaction at the hematite-water interface by neutron reflectometry. SAXS showed that OmcA is a monomer that adopts a flat ellipsoidal shape with an overall dimension of 34 x 90 x 65A˚ 3. To our knowledge, we obtained the first direct evidence that OmcA undergoes a redox state-dependent conformational change in solution whereby reduction decreases the overall length of OmcA by ~7 A˚ (the maximum dimension was 96 A˚ for oxidized OmcA, and 89 A˚ for NADH and dithionite-reduced OmcA). OmcA was also found to physically interact with electron shuttle molecules such as flavin mononucleotide, resulting in the formation of high-molecular-weight assemblies. Neutron reflectometry showed that OmcA forms a well-defined monomolecular layer on hematite surfaces, where it assumes an orientation that maximizes its contact area with the mineral surface. These novel insights into the molecular structure of OmcA in solution, and its interaction with insoluble hematite and small organic ligands, demonstrate the fundamental structural bases underlying OmcA’s role in mediating redox processes.

  16. X-Ray And Polarized Neutron Reflectometry: Characterization Of Si/Co/Si And Si/Ni/Si Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Debarati; Basu, Saibal; Poswal, A. K.; Roy, S.; Dev, B. N.

    2010-12-01

    Technologically important metal silicides formed through interdiffusion in metal/Si systems has been probed using two complementary techniques viz. x-ray reflectivity (XRR) and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). Both structural and magnetic characterization with good depth resolution has been achieved in these systems. We have studied two systems Si/Co/Si and Si/Ni/Si which relate to important applications in ferromagnetic/ non-magnetic semiconductor layered structures for memory devices.

  17. Electric Field and Structural Phase Transition Induced Magnetization Effects in BaTiO3 -FeRh Heterostructures Probed using Polarized Neutron Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Steven; Ward, Thomas; Biegalski, Michael; Wong, Tony; Liu, Zhiqi; Ambaye, Haile; Glavic, Artur

    2015-03-01

    The ability to change the magnetic state of a material with an electric field opens up a plethora of possible devices in spintronics and memory applications. A strong candidate material for such a control is FeRh, whose magneto-structural phase transition from antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) at T ~350K, has shown to be controllably changed by an electric field when grown on ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO). It has been suggested that this shift is largely due to the -0.47% in plane compressive strain induced by the piezoelectric BTO. Here we show a sharp repeatable change in magnetization as the system is heated/cooled through the tetragonal to orthorhombic (280-290K) and orthorhombic to rhombohedral (180-205K) crystalline phase transitions of BTO. To further characterize the effect polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) was used to evolve the depth profile of magnetization in FeRh within the temperature vicinity of these transitions with and without the application of electric field. This work was carried out at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) supported by the Scientific User Facilities Divisions, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE.

  18. Evaluating the solid electrolyte interphase formed on silicon electrodes: a comparison of ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Fears, T M; Doucet, M; Browning, J F; Baldwin, J K S; Winiarz, J G; Kaiser, H; Taub, H; Sacci, R L; Veith, G M

    2016-05-18

    This work details the in situ characterization of the interface between a silicon electrode and an electrolyte using a linear fluorinated solvent molecule, 0.1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in deuterated dimethyl perfluoroglutarate (d6-PF5M2) (1.87 × 10(-2) mS cm(-1)). The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition and thickness determined via in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were compared. The data show that SEI expansion and contraction (breathing) during electrochemical cycling were observed via both techniques; however, ex situ XPS suggests that the SEI thickness increases during Si lithiation and decreases during delithiation, while in situ NR suggests the opposite. The most likely cause of this discrepancy is the selective removal of SEI components (top 20 nm of the SEI) during the electrode rinse process, which is required to remove the electrolyte residue prior to ex situ analysis, demonstrating the necessity of performing SEI characterization in situ. PMID:27149427

  19. Evaluating the solid electrolyte interphase formed on silicon electrodes: A comparison of ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in situ neutron reflectometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doucet, Mathieu; Browning, Jim; Baldwin, J. K.; Winiarz, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Helmut; Taub, H.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2016-04-15

    This work details the in situ characterization of the interface between a silicon electrode and an electrolyte using a linear fluorinated solvent molecule, 0.1 M lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) in deuterated dimethyl perfluoroglutarate (d6-PF5M2) (1.87 x 10-2 mS/cm-1). The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) composition and thickness determined via in situ neutron reflectometry (NR) and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were compared. The data show that SEI expansion and contraction (breathing) during electrochemical cycling was observed via both techniques; however, ex situ XPS suggests that the SEI thickness increases during Si lithiation and decreases during delithiation, while in situ NR suggestsmore » the opposite. The most likely cause of this discrepancy is the selective removal of SEI components (top 20 nm of the SEI) during the electrode rinse process, required to remove electrolyte residue prior to ex situ analysis, demonstrating the necessity of performing SEI characterizations in situ.« less

  20. Microwave Reflectometry for Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is about microwave reflectometry -- a radar technique for plasma density measurements using the reflection of electromagnetic waves by a plasma cutoff. Both the theoretical foundations of reflectometry and its practical application to the study of magnetically confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper. In particular, the role of short-scale density fluctuations is discussed at length, both as a unique diagnostic tool for turbulence studies in thermonuclear plasmas and for the deleterious effects that fluctuations may have on the measurement of the average plasma density with microwave reflectometry.

  1. Dielectric relaxation study of mixtures of alkyl methacrylates and 1-alcohols using time-domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivagurunathan, P.; Dharmalingam, K.; Ramachandran, K.; Prabhakar Undre, B.; Khirade, P. W.; Mehrotra, S. C.

    2006-05-01

    Dielectric relaxation measurements on alkyl methacrylates (methyl methacrylate, ethyl methacrylate and butyl methacrylate) with 1-alcohols (1-propanol, 1-pentanol, 1-heptanol, 1-octanol and 1-decanol) have been carried out using time-domain reflectometry (TDR) over the frequency range 10 MHz to 20 GHz at 303 K for different concentrations of alcohols. The dielectric parameters, namely the static dielectric constant (ɛ0), the dielectric constant at microwave frequencies (ɛ∞) and the relaxation time (τ) were determined. The Kirkwood correlation factor, which contains information regarding solute-solvent interaction and corresponding structural information, the excess permittivity and the excess inverse relaxation time were also determined. The values of the static dielectric constant and the relaxation time increase with the percentage of alkyl methacrylates in the alcohol, whereas the static dielectric constant decreases and the relaxation time increases with an increase in the alkyl chain length of both the methacrylates and the alcohols.

  2. Long-range antiferromagnetic order in epitaxial Mn2GaC thin films from neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingason, A. S.; Pálsson, G. K.; Dahlqvist, M.; Rosen, J.

    2016-07-01

    The nature of the magnetic structure in magnetic so-called MAX phases is a topic of some controversy. Here we present unpolarized neutron-diffraction data between 3.4 and 290.0 K and momentum transfer between Q =0.0 and1.1 Å-1, as well as complementary x-ray-diffraction data on epitaxial thin films of the MAX phase material Mn2GaC . This inherently layered material exhibits neutron-diffraction peaks consistent with long-ranged antiferromagnetic order with a periodicity of two structural unit cells. The magnetic structure is present throughout the measured temperature range. The results are in agreement with first-principles calculations of antiferromagnetic structures for this material where the Mn-C-Mn atomic trilayers are found to be ferromagnetically coupled internally but spin flipped or rotated across the Ga layers. The present findings have significant bearing on the discussion regarding the nature of the magnetic structure in magnetic MAX phases.

  3. Study of local properties of fibre Bragg gratings by the method of optical space-domain reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Korolev, I G; Vasil'ev, Sergei A; Medvedkov, O I; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2003-08-31

    The method of optical space-domain reflectometry for measuring local spatial characteristics of fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) is described in detail. It is demonstrated experimentally that, by using IR and UV radiation sources, this method provides good sensitivity ({approx}10{sup -4}) of measuring the modulation amplitude of the induced refractive index in the core of an optical fibre and a high spatial resolution ({approx}100 {mu}m and better). The factors affecting the accuracy of measurements as well as technical and methodological limitations of the method are considered. A comparative analysis of modern methods for studying the spatial properties of FBGs is performed and applications of these methods are considered. (special issue devoted to the memory of academician a m prokhorov)

  4. Neutron reflectometry of anionic surfactants on sapphire: A strong maximum in the adsorption near the critical micelle concentration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning Ning; Thomas, Robert K; Rennie, Adrian R

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of the anionic surfactants, lithium, sodium and cesium dodecylsulfates, and sodium decylsulfonate, on the positively charged C-plane (0001) of sapphire (alumina) has been measured using neutron reflection. For each of the four surfactants there is a strong maximum in the adsorption at about the critical micelle concentration. The maximum becomes more marked from lithium to cesium. The measurements were reproduced over a range of different physical conditions and could not be accounted for in terms of impurities. The maximum is explained quantitatively by using the combination of a mass action model to calculate the mean activity of the surfactant, and a cooperative model of the adsorption (Frumkin), in which saturation of the layer is not attained until well above the critical micelle concentration. PMID:26990955

  5. A numerical study of fixed frequency reflectometry measurements of plasma filaments with radial and poloidal velocity components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, J.; da Silva, F.; Heuraux, S.; Manso, M. E.; Conway, G. D.; Silva, C.

    2014-11-01

    A 2D finite-differences time-domain full-wave code is used to simulate the measurements of plasma filaments with fixed frequency O-mode reflectometry. The plasma is modeled by a linear slab plasma plus a Gaussian perturbation propagating in a direction that can vary from poloidal to radial. The plasma background density gradient is chosen in agreement with the steep edge transport barrier of H-modes in the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak. Illustrative results are presented and different types of reflectometry responses are observed depending on filament sizes and propagation directions. The reflectometry signatures obtained here with numerical simulations support previous experimental findings on filament measurements.

  6. Magnetic reflectometry of heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Macke, S; Goering, E

    2014-09-10

    Measuring the magnetic configuration at complex buried layers and interfaces is an important task, which requires especially a non-destructive probing technique. X-ray resonant magnetic reflectometry (XRMR) combines the non-destructive depth profiling potential of x-ray reflectometry with the excellent sensitivity for magnetic phenomena, utilizing the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect. It provides the magnetic spatial distribution with a precision down to the angstrom scale, combined with element and symmetry specificity, sub-monolayer sensitivity, and the possible separation of spin and orbital magnetic moments. This review provides an overview to the XRMR technique in a tutorial way. We focus on the introduction to the theory, measurement types, and data simulation. We provide related experimental examples and show selected applications. PMID:25121937

  7. Dielectric relaxation studies of methyl cellulose with phenol derivatives in non-polar solvents using time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Kumar, P.; Malathi, M.; Khirade, P. W.

    2009-11-01

    Dielectric relaxation measurements of methyl cellulose with substituted phenols p-cresol, m-cresol and o-cresol mixture in different non-polar solvents CCl 4, benzene and 1,4-dioxan for different concentrations over the frequency range of 10 MHz-20 GHz at 303 K have been carried out using Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). Dielectric parameters such as static permittivity ( ε0) and relaxation time ( τ) were determined and discussed to yield information on the molecular structure and dynamics of the mixture. The dielectric constant and relaxation time were found to be high for methyl cellulose with p-cresol in CCl 4 compared with the other mixtures.

  8. Correlation reflectometry at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Soldatov, S.; Vowinkel, B.; Mueller, P.

    2010-11-15

    In high temperature fusion plasmas the transport of energy and particles is commonly believed to be driven by turbulence. Turbulence quantities as correlation length and decorrelation time are important for the confinement properties of a plasma. Besides other diagnostics, correlation reflectometry has proven to be a suitable tool for the measurement of turbulence properties. At the medium sized Toroidal EXperiment for Technical Oriented Research (TEXTOR) the existing correlation reflectometry has been recently upgraded. A new reflectometer based on a microwave synthesizer has been developed and installed for the investigation of turbulence properties in a fusion plasma. Together with the existing reflectometer the measurement of radial correlation length and decorrelation time becomes available. Both reflectometers are computer controlled and allow to program individual frequency sequences and the duration of each frequency step. With the existing poloidal antenna array at {theta}=0 deg. and on top of the vacuum vessel, the system allows the measurement of radial correlation and poloidal correlations at the same time. First experiments have been performed and the results on the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in a fusion plasma are presented.

  9. Neutron personnel dosimetry intecomparison studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted sixteen Neutron Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Studies (PDIS) since 1974. During these studies dosimeters are mailed to DOSAR, exposed to low-level (typically in the 0.3 -- 5.0 mSv range) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) was used as the primary radiation source in PDIS 1--12 and radioisotopic neutron sources at DOSAR's Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RADCAL) were mainly used, along with sources and accelerators at cooperating institutions, in PDIS 13--16. Conclusions based on 13,560 measurements made by 146 different participating organizations (102 - US) are presented.

  10. Fast sweeping reflectometry upgrade on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Molina, D.; Ducobu, L.; Leroux, F.; Barbuti, A.; Heuraux, S.

    2010-10-15

    In order to study the temporal dynamics of turbulence, the sweep time of our reflectometry has been shortened from 20 to 2 {mu}s with 1 {mu}s dead time. Detailed technical aspects of the upgrade are given, namely, about the stability of the ramp generation, the detection setup, and the fast acquisition module. A review of studies (velocity measurement of the turbulence, modifications of the wavenumber spectrum, radial mapping of correlation time, etc.) offered by such improvements is presented.

  11. Radio-frequency reflectometry on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs single electron transistor

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Keane, Z. K.; Scriven, P.; Micolich, A. P.; Hamilton, A. R.; Aagesen, M.; Lindelof, P. E.

    2014-01-06

    Radio frequency reflectometry is demonstrated in a sub-micron undoped AlGaAs/GaAs device. Undoped single electron transistors (SETs) are attractive candidates to study single electron phenomena, due to their charge stability and robust electronic properties after thermal cycling. However, these devices require a large top-gate, which is unsuitable for the fast and sensitive radio frequency reflectometry technique. Here, we demonstrate that rf reflectometry is possible in an undoped SET.

  12. Neutron scattering for analysis of processes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagurov, A. M.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Samoylova, N. Yu; Drozhzhin, O. A.; Antipov, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The review is concerned with analysis and generalization of information on application of neutron scattering for elucidation of the structure of materials for rechargeable energy sources (mainly lithium-ion batteries) and on structural rearrangements in these materials occurring in the course of electrochemical processes. Applications of the main methods including neutron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, neutron reflectometry and neutron introscopy are considered. Information on advanced neutron sources is presented and a number of typical experiments are outlined. The results of some studies of lithium-containing materials for lithium-ion batteries, carried out at IBR-2 pulsed reactor, are discussed. The bibliography includes 50 references.

  13. Actinide Studies with Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the effects of sputtering due to nuclear fission is crucial to the nuclear industry and has wide-reaching applications, including nuclear energy, space science, and national defense. A new program at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center uses ultracold neutrons (UCN) to induce fission in actinides such as uranium and plutonium. UCN are an ideal tool for finely controlling induced fission as a function of depth in an actinide sample. The mechanism for fission-induced surface damage is not well understood, especially regarding the effect of a surface oxide layer. We will discuss our experimental strategy for studies of UCN-induced fission and the ejected material, and present preliminary data from enriched and depleted uranium. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the G. T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science and the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program for this work.

  14. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region

    SciTech Connect

    Beghian, L.E.; Kegel, G.H.R.

    1991-08-01

    During the report period we have investigated the following areas: Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering measurements on {sup 14}N, {sup 181}Ta, {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu; Prompt fission spectra for {sup 232}Th, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu; Theoretical studies of neutron scattering; Neutron filters; New detector systems; and Upgrading of neutron target assembly, data acquisition system, and accelerator/beam-line apparatus.

  15. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  16. Neutronic Design Studies for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, LA

    2001-08-01

    Neutronics analyses are now in progress to support initial selection of target system design features, materials, geometry, and component sizes for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Calculations have been performed to determine the neutron, proton, heavy ion, and gamma-ray flux spectra as a function of time, energy, and space for the major components of the target station (target, moderators, reflectors, etc.). These analyses were also performed to establish an initial set of performance characteristics for the neutron source. The methodology, reference performance characteristics, and results of initial optimization studies involving moderator poison plate location, target material performance, reflector performance, moderator position and premoderator performance for the target system are presented in this paper.

  17. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. F.; Sale, K.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J. H.; Preston, C. C.

    1991-06-01

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry.

  18. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  19. Study of the reflectivity of neutron supermirrors influenced by surface oil layers.

    PubMed

    Veres, Tamás; Cser, László

    2010-06-01

    Neutron guides made of supermirror-coated glass are important components of most neutron scattering instruments, thus their quality and possible deterioration due to various deleterious effects (e.g., surface contamination or defects) deserve careful examination. The modification of the reflectivity of supermirrors and the transmission of neutron guides due to surface contamination with hydrocarbon oil has been investigated using neutron reflectometry together with model calculations. A significant loss in the neutron reflectivity was observed for supermirrors covered with thin hydrocarbon oil films, which were confirmed in model calculations. Simulations carried out for several typical arrangements show drastic decreases in the transmitted neutron flux of neutron guides. These simulations show that determining the distortion of the beam profile (using a slit or a pin hole) enables the detection of oil contamination even in an operating neutron guide. PMID:20590233

  20. Estimation of the daily water consumption by maize under Atlantic climatic conditions (A Coruña, NW Spain) using Frequency Domain Reflectometry - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas-Valero, R. M.; Mirás-Avalos, J. M.; Vidal-Vázquez, E.

    2012-03-01

    Climatic variables and soil present a high spatio-temporal variability. Evapotranspiration estimations based on climatic variables may be inadequate for assessing soil water content in the root-influenced zone and/or soil water consumption by plants. Other methods may provide better estimates of this water consumption. The aim of this study was to quantify the soil moisture dynamics in the root-influenced zone and to assess the daily water consumption by the crop using Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR). The studied site is located in A Coruña (Spain). The study was carried out from June to October in 2008 and 2009, in a maize (Zea mays, L.) field on a silt-clay textured soil. Evapotranspiration was estimated by the Penman-Monteith equation using meteorological data from a station located on the experimental site. Soil water content in the root-influenced zone (0-60 cm depth) was hourly monitored each 20 cm (0-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and 40-60 cm) using FDR. Evaluations were performed on days with slight or no rainfall. During the study period, the magnitude of the diurnal soil water loss was more evident in the first layer (0-20 cm depth) and less important in the subsequent soil layers. The greatest consumption occurred between 14 and 19 h, up to 53.64% of the total. Overall, daily water consumption increased significantly with soil water content (p-value < 0.001). In general, water losses from the 0-20 cm soil layer were greater than in subsoil horizons due to maize water-uptake and evaporation. In contrast, water content in the deepest part of the soil profile was close to saturation, even on the driest days of the studied period. Evapotranspiration overestimate maize water requirements as its values were greater than those measured with the probe. In conclusion, FDR allows a more accurate estimation of the soil water balance. Therefore, monitoring soil water content would be useful in the assessment of saturation risks or water stress (drought), thus aiding in the

  1. Nuclear and neutron matter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wiringa, R.B.; Akmal, A.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1995-08-01

    We are studying nuclear and neutron matter with the new Argonne v{sub 18} NN and Urbana 3N potentials. We use variational wave functions and a diagrammatic cluster expansion with Fermi hypernetted and single-operator chain (FHNC/SOC) integral equations to evaluate the energy expectation value. Initial results show some interesting differences with our previous calculations with the older Argonne v{sub 14} potential. In particular, there are a number of diagrams involving L{center_dot}S and L{sup 2} terms which were small with the older model and were rather crudely estimated or even neglected. It appears that these terms are more important with the new potential and will have to be evaluated more accurately. Work on this subject is in progress. A simple line of attack is to just add additional diagrams at the three-body cluster level. A longer term approach may be to adapt some of the methods for evaluating nucleon clusters used in the few-body and closed shell nuclei described above.

  2. Potential of space-borne GNSS reflectometry to constrain simulations of the ocean circulation. A case study for the South African current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saynisch, Jan; Semmling, Maximilian; Wickert, Jens; Thomas, Maik

    2015-11-01

    The Agulhas current system transports warm and salty water masses from the Indian Ocean into the Southern Ocean and into the Atlantic. The transports impact past, present, and future climate on local and global scales. The size and variability, however, of the respective transports are still much debated. In this study, an idealized model based twin experiment is used to study whether sea surface height (SSH) anomalies estimated from reflected signals of the Global Navigation Satellite System reflectometry (GNSS-R) can be used to determine the internal water mass properties and transports of the Agulhas region. A space-borne GNSS-R detector on the International Space Station (ISS) is assumed and simulated. The detector is able to observe daily SSH fields with a spatial resolution of 1-5∘. Depending on reflection geometry, the precision of a single SSH observation is estimated to reach 3 cm (20 cm) when the carrier phase (code delay) information of the reflected GNSS signal is used. The average precision over the Agulhas region is 7 cm (42 cm). The proposed GNSS-R measurements surpass the radar-based satellite altimetry missions in temporal and spatial resolution but are less precise. Using the estimated GNSS-R characteristics, measurements of SSH are generated by sampling a regional nested general circulation model of the South African oceans. The artificial observations are subsequently assimilated with a 4DVAR adjoint data assimilation method into the same ocean model but with a different initial state and forcing. The assimilated and the original, i.e., the sampled model state, are compared to systematically identify improvements and degradations in the model variables that arise due to the assimilation of GNSS-R based SSH observations. We show that SSH and the independent, i.e., not assimilated model variables velocity, temperature, and salinity improve by the assimilation of GNSS-R based SSH observations. After the assimilation of 90 days of SSH observations

  3. Experimental studies of gravity with slow neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Ichikawa, Go; Hirota, Katsuya; Shimizu, Hirohiko; Sumi, Naoyuki; Matsumoto, Satoru; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Shima, Tatsushi; Mishima, Kenji; Ino, Takashi; Seki, Yoshichika

    2014-09-01

    Neutron is a chargeless massive particle with the lifetime in the macroscopic range, which is suitable for precision measurement of the small influence of new physics including gravity. We have started the experimental studies of the gravity with slow neutrons in order to search non-Newtonian effect at the short range which is lead by the existence of extra-dimension of the space. Combination of the pulsed neutrons provided by J-PARC and the advanced optical devices enables us to perform new types of high precision measurements. Neutron scattering with noble gas target enables us to measure the interaction at the range of the order of 1 nm. The apparatus was installed into beamline NOP and commissioning has been started. Neutron interferometer has the advantage to measure the gravitational potential precisely. We are developing the large-scale interferometer using long-wavelength neutrons, which is realized by using multilayer mirrors. Ultra-cold neutrons in a small cavity can be bound to the discrete energy eigenstates by Earth's gravitational field. We are discussing the direct measurement of the spatial localization of the neutrons with high resolution detectors, for example, CCD and nuclear emulation.

  4. Poloidal asymmetry in perpendicular plasma rotation and radial electric field measured with correlation reflectometry at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, S.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Wassenhove, G. Van

    2008-09-15

    Measurements of plasma rotation and electric field are crucial for the study of plasma confinement and transport. The present paper is devoted to experimental observations of poloidal asymmetry in perpendicular plasma rotation with correlation reflectometry on TEXTOR.

  5. Neutron Decay Array for beta-delayed neutron Decay Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, Giuseppe; Pereira, J.; Hosmer, P.; Kern, L.; Kratz, K.; Montes, F.; Reeder, P.; Santi, P.; Schatz, H.; Schertz, F.; Wör, A.

    The Neutron Emission Ratio Observer (NERO), has been constructed for use at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory to work in conjunction with the NSCL Beta Counting System BCS [1] in order to detect β-delayed neutrons. The design of the detector provides high and flat efficiency for a wide range of neutron energies, as well as a low neutron background.

  6. Full-wave feasibility study of magnetic diagnostic based on O-X mode conversion and oblique reflectometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghini, Orso; Choi, Myunghee; Volpe, Francesco

    2014-02-12

    An innovative millimeter wave diagnostic is proposed to measure the local magnetic field and the edge current as a function of the minor radius in the pedestal region. The idea behind such diagnostic is to localize and characterize a direction of reduced reflectivity at the O-mode cutoff layer. We modeled the wave scattering and mode-conversion processes by means of the finite-element COMSOL Multiphysics code in two dimensions (2D). Sensitivity studies were performed for parameters mocking up DIII-D plasmas. Simulations confirmed the presence of a minimum in reflectivity of an externally injected O-mode beam, and confirmed that this minimum depends on the magnetic field at the cutoff, as expected from the OX mode conversion physics. This study gives confidence in the feasibility of the diagnostic.

  7. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  8. Development of Microwave Imaging Reflectometry for KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Hong, I.; Nam, Y.; Kim, M.; Leem, J.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, K. W.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2011-10-01

    A microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) system for KSTAR is being developed to measure 2-D (poloidal × radial) image of the electron density fluctuations for turbulence based transport study. Prior to the full system, two-frequency prototype system will be tested for the 2012 KSTAR campaign. The system is capable to measure poloidal wave numbers from 0.5 to 2 cm-1 with a 16 channel array of detectors that can image ~ 13 cm length of the poloidal plane. Due to the standing wave problem of lens based system (sharing optics with 2nd ECEI system), a new system based on reflective optics is being designed. The RF electronics, capable of simultaneous measurement of the reflected beams from two cut-off layers, has been developed and the laboratory test results with a corrugated reflecting target will be presented. Work supported by NRF Korea and US DOE.

  9. Time domain reflectometry in time variant plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherner, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of time-dependent electron density fluctuations on a synthesized time domain reflectometry response of a one-dimensional cold plasma sheath are considered. Numerical solutions of the Helmholtz wave equation, which describes the electric field of a normally incident plane wave in a specified static electron density profile, are used. A study of the effects of Doppler shifts resulting from moving density fluctuations in the electron density profile of the sheath is included. Varying electron density levels corrupt time domain and distance measurements. Reducing or modulating the electron density levels of a given electron density profile affects the time domain response of a plasma and results in motion of the turning point, and the effective motion has a significant effect on measuring electron density locations.

  10. Neutron Scattering Studies of Fluorite Compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Michael Andrew

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The properties of some important compounds with the fluorite structure have been investigated using neutron scattering techniques. All of the compounds in this study have important technological applications, as well as being of intrinsic scientific interest. Inelastic neutron scattering and high temperature technology have been used to measure phonon energies in thorium dioxide at temperatures above 3000K. These phonon energies have been used to determine the elastic constants as a function of temperature. Thorium dioxide provides an interesting comparison with uranium dioxide which has been studied in order to try and establish the cause of the anomalously large enthalpy of this compound. Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to demonstrate that the dynamic ionic-disorder which occurs in ThO_2 behaves in a similar way to that observed in UO _2 at high temperature. Whilst at only 12K, splittings have been measured in the crystal field excitations of UO_2 which have a significant effect on the theoretical analysis of its thermodynamic properties. This experiment was performed using neutrons scattered with a high energy transfer. Elastic and quasielastic diffuse scattering have both been used to investigate the vacancy-stabilised cubic structure of yttria doped zirconia. Computer modelling of the measured neutron scattering intensities has played a vital role in this part of the study. By the combination of neutron scattering measurements and computational techniques a three part model has been developed for the defect structure in yttria-stabilised zirconia which can explain the ionic conductivity in this compound. Ionic disorder has been observed in the anti-fluorite compounds lithium oxide and magnesium silicide at high temperature, using diffuse quasielastic neutron scattering. The full phonon energy dispersion relation and the elastic constants at high temperature have also

  11. Strong Bragg backscattering in reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Heuraux, S.; Popov, A. Yu

    2009-06-01

    The reflection of the probing microwave occurring in the vicinity of the backscattering Bragg resonance point (far from the cut-off) at a high enough density fluctuation level and leading to a large jump of the reflected wave phase and a corresponding time delay is described analytically using a 1D model. Explicit expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients are derived and compared against results of numerical modelling. The criteria for transition to the nonlinear regime of strong Bragg backscattering (BBS) is obtained for both O-mode and X-mode reflectometry. It is shown that a strong nonlinear regime of BBS may occur in ITER at the 0.5-2% relative density perturbation level both for the ordinary and extraordinary mode probing. The possibility of probing wave trapping leading to strong enhancement of the electric field and associated high phase variation of the reflected wave due to BBS is demonstrated.

  12. Time domain reflectometry for SLC BPM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. R.

    1985-03-01

    A maintenance manual for troubleshooting installed SLC Position Monitor stripline assemblies and the associated cabling, using time Domain Reflectometry is presented. Once a technician becomes familiar with this manual's procedures, the Table of Contents can serve as a checklist.

  13. Neutron Scattering Studies of Vortex Matter in Type-II Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Xinsheng Ling

    2012-02-02

    The proposed program is an experimental study of the fundamental properties of Abrikosov vortex matter in type-II superconductors. Most superconducting materials used in applications such as MRI are type II and their transport properties are determined by the interplay between random pinning, interaction and thermal fluctuation effects in the vortex state. Given the technological importance of these materials, a fundamental understanding of the vortex matter is necessary. The vortex lines in type-II superconductors also form a useful model system for fundamental studies of a number of important issues in condensed matter physics, such as the presence of a symmetry-breaking phase transition in the presence of random pinning. Recent advances in neutron scattering facilities such as the major upgrade of the NIST cold source and the Spallation Neutron Source are providing unprecedented opportunities in addressing some of the longstanding issues in vortex physics. The core component of the proposed program is to use small angle neutron scattering and Bitter decoration experiments to provide the most stringent test of the Bragg glass theory by measuring the structure factor in both the real and reciprocal spaces. The proposed experiments include a neutron reflectometry experiment to measure the precise Q-dependence of the structure factor of the vortex lattice in the Bragg glass state. A second set of SANS experiments will be on a shear-strained Nb single crystal for testing a recently proposed theory of the stability of Bragg glass. The objective is to artificially create a set of parallel grain boundaries into a Nb single crystal and use SANS to measure the vortex matter diffraction pattern as a function of the changing angle between the applied magnetic field to the grain boundaries. The intrinsic merits of the proposed work are a new fundamental understanding of type-II superconductors on which superconducting technology is based, and a firm understanding of phases

  14. β-delayed neutron emission studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Rissanen, J.; Taín, J. L.; Algora, A.; Kratz, K. L.; Lhersonneau, G.; Pfeiffer, B.; Agramunt, J.; Cano-Ott, D.; Gorlychev, V.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Martínez, T.; Achouri, L.; Calvino, F.; Cortés, G.; Eronen, T.; García, A.; Parlog, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Pretel, C.; Valencia, E.

    2014-01-01

    The study of β-delayed neutron emission plays a major role in different fields such as nuclear technology, nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. However the quality of the existing experimental data nowadays is not sufficient for the various technical and scientific applications and new high precision measurements are necessary to improve the data bases. One key aspect to the success of these high precission measurements is the use of a very pure ion beam that ensures that only the ion of interest is produced. The combination of the IGISOL mass separator with the JYFLTRAP Penning trap is an excellent tool for this type of measurement because of the ability to deliver isobarically and even isomerically clean beams. Another key feature of the installation is the non-chemical selectivity of the IGISOL ion source which allows measurements in the important region of refractory elements. This paper summarises the β-delayed neutron emission studies that have been carried out at the IGISOL facility with two different neutron detectors based on 3He counters in a polyethylene moderator: the Mainz neutron detector and the BEta deLayEd Neutron detector.

  15. Nuclear-spectroscopy problems studied with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy with neutrons continues to have a major impact on the progress of nuclear science. Neutrons, being uncharged, are particularly useful for the study of low energy reactions. Recent advances in time-of-flight spectroscopy, as well as in the gamma ray spectroscopy following neutron capture, have permitted precision studies of unbound and bound nuclear levels and related phenomena. By going to new energy domains, by using polarized beams and targets, through the invention of new kinds of detectors, and through the general improvement in beam quantity and quality, new features of nuclear structure and reactions have been obtained that are not ony interesting per se but are also grist for old and new theory mills. The above technical advances have opened up new opportunities for further discoveries.

  16. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Paul Samuel

    For many years, wiring has been treated as a system that could be installed and expected to work for the life of the aircraft. As aircraft age far beyond their original expected life span, this attitude is rapidly changing. Wiring problems have recently been identified as the cause of several tragic mishaps and hundreds of thousands of lost mission hours. Intermittent wiring faults have been and continue to be difficult to resolve. Test methods that pinpoint faults on the ground can miss intermittent failures. New test methods involving spread spectrum signals are investigated that could be used in flight to locate intermittent failures, including open circuits, short circuits, and arcs. Spread spectrum time domain reflectometry (SSTDR) and sequence time domain reflectometry (STDR) are analyzed in light of the signals commonly present on aircraft wiring. Pseudo noise codes used for the generation of STDR and SSTDR signals are analyzed for application in a STDR/SSTDR test system in the presence of noise. The effects of Mil-Std 1553 and white noise on the STDR and SSTDR signals are discussed analytically, through simulations, and with the use of test hardware. A test system using STDR and SSTDR is designed, built, and used to collect STDR and SSTDR test data. The data collected with the STDR/SSTDR test hardware is analyzed and compared to the theoretical results. Experimental data for open and short circuits collected using SSTDR and a curve fitting algorithm shows a maximum range estimation error of +/-0.2 ft for 75O coaxial cable up to 100ft, and +/-0.6ft for a sample 32.5ft non-controlled impedance aircraft cable. Mil-Std 1553 is specified to operate reliably with a signal-to-noise ratio of 17.5dB, and the SSTDR test system was able to locate an open circuit on a cable also carrying simulated Mil-Std 1553 data where the SSTDR signal was 50dB below the Mil-Std 1553 signal. STDR and SSTDR are shown to be effective in detecting and locating dry and wet arcs on wires.

  17. Theoretical Studies of Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    2003-01-01

    Among the newly discovered classes of X-ray sources which have attracted wide attention are close binary systems in which mass is transferred via Roche lobe overflow from a low mass donor star to its neutron star companion. Many of these sources exhibit intense bursts of X-ray radiation as well as periodic and quasi-periodic phenomena. Intensive analysis of these sources as a class has provided insight into the accretion process in binary star systems and into the magnetic field, rotational, and nuclear evolution of the underlying neutron star. In this proposal we have focused on theoretical studies of the hydrodynamical and nuclear processes that take place on the surface of accreting neutron stars in these systems. The investigation of these processes is critical for providing an understanding of a number of outstanding problems related to their transient behavior and evolution.

  18. Neutron-scattering studies of magnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, S.K.; Crabtree, G.W.; Hinks, D.G.; Mook, H.A.; Pringle, O.A.

    1982-01-01

    Results obtained in the last few years obtained by neutron diffraction on the nature of the magnetic ordering in magnetic superconductors are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of the complex intermediate phase in ferromagnetic superconductors where both superconductivity and ferromagnetism appear to coexist.

  19. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of thaumatin

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, Susana C. M.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Leal, Ricardo M. F.; Mitchell, Edward P.; Forsyth, V. Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary neutron crystallographic data from the sweet protein thaumatin have been recorded using the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results illustrate the feasibility of a full neutron structural analysis aimed at further understanding the molecular basis of the perception of sweet taste. Such an analysis will exploit the use of perdeuterated thaumatin. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the sweet protein thaumatin is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the gel-acupuncture method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2 Å on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL). The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, the distribution of charge on the protein surface and localized water in the structure. This information will be of interest for understanding the specificity of thaumatin–receptor interactions and will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the perception of taste.

  20. Ames collaborative study of cosmic ray neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, J. E.; Hughes, L.; Mccaslin, J. B.; Stephens, L. D.; Rindi, A.; Smith, A. R.; Thomas, R. H.; Griffith, R. V.; Welles, C. G.; Baum, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a collaborative study to define both the neutron flux and the spectrum more precisely and to develop a dosimetry package that can be flown quickly to altitude for solar flare events are described. Instrumentation and analysis techniques were used which were developed to measure accelerator-produced radiation. The instruments were flown in the Ames Research Center high altitude aircraft. Neutron instrumentation consisted of Bonner spheres with both active and passive detector elements, threshold detectors of both prompt-counter and activation-element types, a liquid scintillation spectrometer based on pulse-shape discrimination, and a moderated BF3 counter neutron monitor. In addition, charged particles were measured with a Reuter-Stokes ionization chamber system and dose equivalent with another instrument. Preliminary results from the first series of flights at 12.5 km (41,000 ft) are presented, including estimates of total neutron flux intensity and spectral shape and of the variation of intensity with altitude and geomagnetic latitude.

  1. X-ray reflectometry studies on the effect of water on the surface structure of [C4mpyr][NTf2] ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Lauw, Y; Horne, M D; Rodopoulos, T; Webster, N A S; Minofar, B; Nelson, A

    2009-12-28

    The effect of water on the surface structure of 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethylsulfonylimide [C(4)mpyr][NTf(2)] ionic liquid was investigated using X-ray reflectometry. The measured reflectivity data suggests a significant amount of water is adsorbed at the surface, with the first layer from the gas (nitrogen)-liquid phase boundary mainly occupied by a mixture of cations and water. Beyond the cation + water layer, the scattering length density increases towards the bulk value, indicating a decreasing amount of water and cations, and/or an increasing amount of anions. The orientation of the butyl chain of cation at the phase boundary and the population of water at the surface were described based on results from an independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. We show that the presence of water in the ionic liquid has a non-monotonic effect on the overall thickness of the surface. At low water content, the addition of water does not change the surface thickness since water is mainly present in the bulk. As the water content increases, the surface swells before eventually shrinking down close to the solubility limit of water. The non-monotonic surface thickness is used to explain the anomalous trend of surface tension in ionic liquid-water mixtures reported in the literature. PMID:20024422

  2. Development and utilization of optical low coherence reflectometry for the study of multiple scattering in randomly distributed solid-liquid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Summer Lockerbie

    The investigation of Optical Low Coherence Reflectometry (OLCR) for evaluation of highly scattering suspensions involves a balance between the observation of real systems and theoretical development. The main focus of this work was the development and utilization of OLCR to investigate highly scattering solid-liquid suspensions over a wide range of particle sizes, using monodispersed, bimodal, and polydispersed polystyrene nanosphere suspensions and Department of Energy (DOE) waste surrogates. The results were the first experimental demonstration that coherent optical backscattering from media with randomly distributed spherical nanoparticles is dominated by Mie resonances. Industrial process samples of various sizes and dispersity were also measured to expand the applicability of OLCR to a wide range of process needs. Current research has focused on the deconvolution of sample parameters from the tailing decay profiles of highly scattering matrices. Significant progress has been made on data analysis methods for monodispersed and more complex compositions of polystyrene suspensions and these methods have been applied to HLW surrogate suspensions and several industrial models. The research described within this dissertation has implications for measurement needs on basic science, industrial, and national laboratory levels. The scope of this research includes advancements in both fundamental understanding of multiple scattering through analysis of model systems and in development and application of the technology to current measurement needs within industry.

  3. Neutron scattering studies of heavy Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, S. M.

    1985-08-01

    Heavy Fermions are f electron materials characterized by a large linear term in the low temperature specific heat and a large magnetic susceptibility at low temperatures. This implies that there is a narrow peak in the f electron density of states at the Fermi energy. Typical examples are CeAl3, UBe13, CeCu2Si2, CeCu6, U2Zn17 and UPt3. Neutron scattering measurements can play an important role in understanding the magnetic interactions in these systems. Measurements of the form reveal details about the nature of the wave functions. Inelastic scattering studies gives information about the energy scale of the spin fluctuations and the narrow f-resonance. Such measurements on the above systems are reviewed with the goal of establishing systematics between the information obtained in neutron studies and that from bulk measurements.

  4. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  5. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1996-12-19

    The goals of this three-year study were: (1) design a neutron focusing system for use with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of cold neutrons appropriate for prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA); (2) orchestrate the construction of the focusing system, integrate it into the TCNS neutron guide complex, and measure its performance; and (3) design, setup, and test a cold-neutron PGAA system which utilizes the guided focused cold neutron beam. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which the authors wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, the authors obtained gains of 3 to 5 for 4 different converging guide geometries. During the second year of the DOE grant, the subject of this final report, Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company was contracted to build a converging neutron guide focusing system to the specifications. Considerable time and effort were spent working with Ovonics on selecting the materials for the converging neutron guide system. The major portion of the research on the design of a cold-neutron PGAA system was also completed during the second year. At the beginning of the third year of the grant, a converging neutron guide focusing system had been ordered, and a cold-neutron PGAA system had been designed. Since DOE did not fund the third year, there was no money to purchase the required equipment for the cold-neutron PGAA system and no money to perform tests of either the converging neutron guide or the cold-neutron PGAA system. The research already accomplished would have little value without testing the systems which had been designed. Thus the project was continued at a pace that could be sustained with internal funding.

  6. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  7. Neutron reflectivity studies of ionomer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrys, B. J.; Bhutto, A. A.; Bucknall, D. G.; Braiewa, R.; Vesely, D.; Weiss, R. A.

    Preliminary results are presented of a neutron reflectivity study of the interfacial width between lithium- and zinc-sulphonated deuterated polystyrene with polycarbonate (PC). Both systems are partially miscible and exhibit an upper critical solution temperature behaviour. The interdiffusion in these systems was measured by annealing at a temperature above the glass-transition temperature of both polymers. The interfacial profiles obtained for these systems were described by symmetric Gaussian interfaces. No significant diffusion was observed.

  8. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies on the Multilamellae Formed by Mixing Lamella-Forming Cationic Diblock Copolymers with Lipids and Their Interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Wei; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Liu, I-Ting; Hu, Yuan; Jeng, U-Ser; Gilbert, Elliot Paul

    2016-02-23

    We demonstrate that the lamella-forming polystyrene-block-poly(N-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodine) (PS-b-P4VPQ), with similar sizes of the PS and P4VPQ blocks, can be dispersed in the aqueous solutions by forming lipid/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (d62-DPPC) in D2O, a broad correlation peak is found in the scattering profile that signifies the formation of the loosely ordered d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. The thicknesses of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are close to the PS layer and the condensed brush layer thicknesses as determined from previous neutron reflectometry studies on the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer at the air-water interface. Such well-dispersed d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are capable of forming multilamellae with DNA in aqueous solution. It is found that the encapsulation of DNA in the hydrophilic layer of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae slightly increases the thickness of the hydrophilic layer. Adding CaCl2 can enhance the DNA adsorption in the hydrophilic brush layer, and it is similar to that observed in the neutron reflectometry study of the DNA adsorption by the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer. PMID:26818185

  9. Neutron scattering study of dilute supercritical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, H.D.; Wignall, G.D.; Shah, V.M.; Londono, J.D.; Bienkowski, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    Dilute solutions in supercritical solvents exhibit interesting microstructures that are related to their dramatic macroscopic behavior. In typical attractive solutions, solutes are believed to be surrounded by clusters of solvent molecules, and solute molecules are believed to congregate in the vicinity of one another. Repulsive solutions, on the other hand, exhibit a local region of reduced solvent density around the solute with solute-solute congregation. Such microstructures influence solubility, partial molar volume, reaction kinetics, and many other properties. We have undertaken to observe these interesting microstructures directly by neutron scattering experiments on dilute noble gas systems including Ar. The three partial structure factors for such systems and the corresponding pair correlation functions can be determined by using the isotope substitution technique. The systems studied are uniquely suited for our objectives because of the large coherent neutron scattering length of the isotope {sup 36}Ar and because of the accurate potential energy functions that are available for use in molecular simulations and theoretical calculations to be compared with the scattering results. We will describe our experiment, the unique apparatus we have built for it, and the neutron scattering results from our initial allocations of beam time. We will also describe planned scattering experiments to follow those with noble gases, including study of long-chain molecules in supercritical solvents. Such studies will involve hydrocarbon mixtures with and without deuteration to provide contrast.

  10. Exchange bias studied with polarized neutron reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    te Velthuis, S. G. E.

    2000-01-05

    The role of Polarized Neutron Reflectivity (PNR) for studying natural and synthetic exchange biased systems is illustrated. For a partially oxidized thin film of Co, cycling of the magnetic field causes a considerable reduction of the bias, which the onset of diffuse neutron scattering shows to be due to the loosening of the ferromagnetic domains. On the other hand, PNR measurements of a model exchange bias junction consisting of an n-layered Fe/Cr antiferromagnetic (AF) superlattice coupled with an m-layered Fe/Cr ferromagnetic (F) superlattice confirm the predicted collinear magnetization in the two superlattices. The two magnetized states of the F (along or opposite to the bias field) differ only in the relative orientation of the F and adjacent AF layer. The possibility of reading clearly the magnetic state at the interface pinpoints the commanding role that PNR is having in solving this intriguing problem.

  11. Polarized neutron reflectivity study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFeB/W thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaye, Haile; Zhan, Xiao; Li, Shufa; Lauter, Valeria; Zhu, Tao

    In this work we study the origin of PMA in MgO/CoFeB/W trilayer systems using polarized neutron reflectivity. Recently, the spin Hall effect in the heavy metals, such as Pt and Ta, has been of significant interest for highly efficient magnetization switching of the ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched by such a heavy metal and an oxide, which can be used for spintronic based memory and logic devices. Most work has focused on heavy-metal/ferromagnet/oxide trilayer (HM/FM/MO) structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), where the oxide layer plays the role of breaking inversion symmetry .No PMA was found in W/CoFeB/MgO films. An insertion of Hf layer in between the W and CoFeB layers, however, has been found to create a strong PMA. Roughness and formation of interface alloys by interdiffusion influences the extent of PMA. We intend to identify these influences using the depth sensitive technique of PNR. In our previous study, we have successfully performed polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) measurements on the Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/Ta thin film with MgO thickness of 1 nm. The PNR measurements were carried out using the BL-4A Magnetic Reflectometer at SNS. This work has been supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB933102). Research at SNS was supported by the Office of BES, DOE.

  12. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    Neutron radiography has the ability to differentiate between gas and liquid in two-phase flow due both to the density difference and the high neutron scattering probability of hydrogen. Previous studies have used dynamic neutron radiography -- in both real-time and high-speed -- for air-water, steam-water and gas-liquid metal two-phase flow measurements. Radiography with thermal neutrons is straightforward and efficient as thermal neutrons are easier to detect with relatively higher efficiency and can be easily extracted from nuclear reactor beam ports. The quality of images obtained using neutron radiography and the imaging speed depend on the neutron beam intensity at the imaging plane. A high quality neutron beam, with thermal neutron intensity greater than 3.0x 10 6 n/cm2-s and a collimation ratio greater than 100 at the imaging plane, is required for effective dynamic neutron radiography up to 2000 frames per second. The primary objectives of this work are: (1) to optimize a neutron radiography facility for dynamic neutron radiography applications and (2) to investigate a new technique for three-dimensional neutron radiography using information obtained from neutron scattering. In this work, neutron transport analysis and experimental validation of a dynamic neutron radiography facility is studied with consideration of real-time and high-speed neutron radiography requirements. A beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility, for a target thermal neutron flux of 1.0x107 n/cm2-s, has been analyzed, constructed and experimentally verified at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance is evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes using copper activation flux-mapping technique. The development of different facility components, such as beam tube liner, gamma ray filter, beam shutter and biological shield, is achieved analytically using neutron attenuation and divergence theories. Monte

  13. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    , ranging from large-scale structures and dynamics of polymers and biological systems, to electronic properties of today's technological materials. Neutron scattering developed into a vast field, encompassing many different experimental techniques aimed at exploring different aspects of matter's atomic structure and dynamics. Modern magnetic neutron scattering includes several specialized techniques designed for specific studies and/or particular classes of materials. Among these are magnetic reflectometry aimed at investigating surfaces, interfaces, and multilayers, small-angle scattering for the large-scale structures, such as a vortex lattice in a superconductor, and neutron spin-echo spectroscopy for glasses and polymers. Each of these techniques and many others offer exciting opportunities for examining magnetism and warrant extensive reviews, but the aim of this chapter is not to survey how different neutron-scattering methods are used to examine magnetic properties of different materials. Here, we concentrate on reviewing the basics of the magnetic neutron scattering, and on the recent developments in applying one of the oldest methods, the triple axis spectroscopy, that still is among the most extensively used ones. The developments discussed here are new and have not been coherently reviewed. Chapter 2 of this book reviews magnetic small-angle scattering, and modern techniques of neutron magnetic reflectometry are discussed in Chapter 3.

  14. BNL feasibility studies of spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Van Steenbergen, A.; Weng, W.T.

    1995-12-01

    This paper is the summary of conceptual design studies of a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS) conducted by an interdepartmental study group at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The study was made of two periods. First, a scenario based on the use of a 600 MeV Linac followed by two fast-cycling 3.6 GeV Synchrotrons was investigated. Then, in a subsequent period, the attention of the study was directed toward an Accumulator scenario with two options: (1) a 1.25 GeV normal conducting Linac followed by two Accumulator Rings, and (2) a 2.4 GeV superconducting Linac followed by a single Accumulator Ring. The study did not make any reference to a specific site.

  15. Study of a nTHGEM-based thermal neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Tao; Zhang, Ying; Xie, Yu-Guang; Zhou, Liang; Xu, Hong; Yang, Gui-An; Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jin-Jie; Sun, Zhi-Jia; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2016-07-01

    With new generation neutron sources, traditional neutron detectors cannot satisfy the demands of the applications, especially under high flux. Furthermore, facing the global crisis in 3He gas supply, research on new types of neutron detector as an alternative to 3He is a research hotspot in the field of particle detection. GEM (Gaseous Electron Multiplier) neutron detectors have high counting rate, good spatial and time resolution, and could be one future direction of the development of neutron detectors. In this paper, the physical process of neutron detection is simulated with Geant4 code, studying the relations between thermal conversion efficiency, boron thickness and number of boron layers. Due to the special characteristics of neutron detection, we have developed a novel type of special ceramic nTHGEM (neutron THick GEM) for neutron detection. The performance of the nTHGEM working in different Ar/CO2 mixtures is presented, including measurements of the gain and the count rate plateau using a copper target X-ray source. A detector with a single nTHGEM has been tested for 2-D imaging using a 252Cf neutron source. The key parameters of the performance of the nTHGEM detector have been obtained, providing necessary experimental data as a reference for further research on this detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11127508, 11175199, 11205253, 11405191), Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, CAEP (2013DB06, 2013BB04) and CAS (YZ201512)

  16. Neutrons scattering studies in the actinide region

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1992-09-01

    During the report period were investigated the following areas: prompt fission neutron energy spectra measurements; neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from [sup 239]Pu; neutron scattering in [sup 181]Ta and [sup 197]Au; response of a [sup 235]U fission chamber near reaction thresholds; two-parameter data acquisition system; black'' neutron detector; investigation of neutron-induced defects in silicon dioxide; and multiple scattering corrections. Four Ph.D. dissertations and one M.S. thesis were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of three journal articles, four conference papers in proceedings, and eleven abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. There are currently four Ph.D. and one M.S. candidates working on dissertations directly associated with the project. In addition, three other Ph.D. candidates are working on dissertations involving other aspects of neutron physics in this laboratory.

  17. Neutrons scattering studies in the actinide region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kegel, G. H. R.; Egan, J. J.

    1992-09-01

    During the last report period, we investigated the following areas: prompt fission neutron energy spectra measurements; neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from Pu-239; neutron scattering in Ta-181 and Au-197; response of a U-235 fission chamber near reaction thresholds; two-parameter data acquisition system; 'black' neutron detector; investigation of neutron-induced defects in silicon dioxide; and multiple scattering corrections. Four Ph.D. dissertations and one M.S. thesis were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of three journal articles, four conference papers in proceedings, and eleven abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. There are currently four Ph.D. and one M.S. candidates working on dissertations directly associated with the project. In addition, three other Ph.D. candidates are working on dissertations involving other aspects of neutron physics in this laboratory.

  18. Neutron capture studies of 206Pb at a cold neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillebeeckx, P.; Belgya, T.; Borella, A.; Kopecky, S.; Mengoni, A.; Quétel, C. R.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Trešl, I.; Wynants, R.

    2013-11-01

    Gamma-ray transitions following neutron capture in 206Pb have been studied at the cold neutron beam facility of the Budapest Neutron Centre using a metallic sample enriched in 206Pb and a natural lead nitrate powder pellet. The measurements were performed using a coaxial HPGe detector with Compton suppression. The observed -rays have been incorporated into a decay scheme for neutron capture in 206Pb . Partial capture cross sections for 206Pb(n,) at thermal energy have been derived relative to the cross section for the 1884keV transition after neutron capture in 14N . From the average crossing sum a total thermal neutron capture cross section of mb was derived for the 206Pb(n,) reaction. The thermal neutron capture cross section for 206Pb has been compared with contributions due to both direct capture and distant unbound s-wave resonances. From the same measurements a thermal neutron-induced capture cross section of mb was determined for the 207Pb(n,) reaction.

  19. TEM study of neutron-irradiated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, L.L.; Bentley, J.; Farrell, K.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a transmission electron microscopy study of the defect structure in iron neutron-irradiated to low fluences (less than or equal to 1 dpa) at temperatures of 455 to 1013/sup 0/K are presented. The dislocation microstructures coarsen with increasing irradiation temperature from decorated dislocations, through clusters of dislocation loops, to near-edge, interstitial dislocation loops with b = a<100>, and network segments. Significant cavity formation occurred only at 548 to 723/sup 0/K, with homogeneous distributions found only at 623 and 673/sup 0/K. The maximum swelling of 0.07% occurred at 673/sup 0/K. Large cavities had a truncated octahedral shape with (111) facets and (100) truncations. Damage halos were observed around boron-containing precipitates. The effects of interstitial impurities on microstructural development and the differences in the observed microstructures compared to those in refractory bcc metals are discussed. 8 figures, 6 tables.

  20. Use of ultracold neutrons for condensed-matter studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-05-01

    Ultracold neutrons have such low velocities that they are reflected by most materials at all incident angles and can be stored in material bottles for long periods of time during which their intrinsic properties can be studied in great detail. These features have been mainly used for fundamental-physics studies including the detection of a possible neutron electric dipole moment and the precise determination of neutron-decay properties. Ultracold neutrons can also play a role in condensed-matter studies with the help of high-resolution spectrometers that use gravity as a strongly dispersive medium for low-velocity neutrons. Such studies have so far been limited by the low intensity of existing ultracold-neutron sources but could be reconsidered with more intense sources, which are now envisaged. This report provides a broad survey of the properties of ultracold neutrons (including their reflectivity by different types of samples), of ultracold-neutron spectrometers that are compared with other high-resolution instruments, of results obtained in the field of condensed matter with these instruments, and of neutron microscopes. All these subjects are illustrated by numerous examples.

  1. Neutron scattering studies of the heavy Fermion superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A. I.

    Recent neutron scattering measurements of the heavy Fermion superconductors are described. Those materials offer an exciting opportunity for neutron scattering since the f-electrons, which couple directly to magnetic scattering measurements, seem to be the same electrons which form the superconducting state below T sub c. In addition, studies of the magnetic fluctuations in these, and other heavy Fermion systems, by inelastic magnetic neutron scattering can provide information about the nature of the low temperature Fermi liquid character of these novel compounds.

  2. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  3. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population. PMID:26509624

  4. Study of a loop heat pipe using neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Cimbala, John M; Brenizer, Jack S; Chuang, Abel Po-Ya; Hanna, Shane; Thomas Conroy, C; El-Ganayni, A A; Riley, David R

    2004-10-01

    An explanation is given of what a loop heat pipe (LHP) is, and how it works. It is then shown that neutron imaging (both real time neutron radioscopy and single exposure neutron radiography) is an effective experimental tool for the study of LHPs. Specifically, neutron imaging has helped to identify and correct a cooling water distribution problem in the condenser, and has enabled visualization of two-phase flow (liquid and vapor) in various components of the LHP. In addition, partial wick dry-out, a phenomenon of great importance in the effective operation of LHPs, is potentially identifiable with neutron imaging. It is anticipated that neutron radioscopy and radiography will greatly contribute to our understanding of LHP operation, and will lead to improvement of LHP modeling and design. PMID:15246420

  5. Study of neutron focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wehring, B.W.; Uenlue, K.

    1995-03-06

    Funds were received for the first year of a three year DOE Nuclear Engineering Research Grant, ``Study of Neutron Focusing at the Texas Cold Neutron Source`` (FGO2-92ER75711). The purpose of this three year study was to develop a neutron focusing system to be used with the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) to produce an intense beam of neutrons. A prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility was also to be designed, setup, and tested under the three year project. During the first year of the DOE grant, a new procedure was developed and used to design a focusing converging guide consisting of truncated rectangular cone sections. Detailed calculations were performed using a 3-D Monte Carlo code which we wrote to trace neutrons through the curved guide of the TCNS into the proposed converging guide. Using realistic reflectivities for Ni-Ti supermirrors, we obtained gains of 3 to 5 for the neutron flux averaged over an area of 1 {times} 1 cm.

  6. Differential reflectometry versus tactile sense detection of subgingival calculus in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakibaie, Fardad; Walsh, Laurence J.

    2012-10-01

    Detecting dental calculus is clinically challenging in dentistry. This study used typodonts with extracted premolar and molar teeth and simulated gingival tissue to compare the performance of differential reflectometry and periodontal probing. A total of 30 extracted teeth were set in an anatomical configuration in stone to create three typodonts. Clear polyvinyl siloxane impression material was placed to replicate the periodontal soft tissues. Pocket depths ranged from 10 to 15 mm. The three models were placed in a phantom head, and an experienced dentist assessed the presence of subgingival calculus first using the DetecTar (differential reflectometry) and then a periodontal probe. Scores from these two different methods were compared to the gold standard (direct examination of the root surface using 20× magnification) to determine the accuracy and reproducibility. Differential reflectometry was more accurate than tactile assessment (79% versus 60%), and its reproducibility was also higher (Cohen kappa 0.54 versus 0.39). Both methods performed better on single rooted premolar teeth than on multirooted teeth. These laboratory results indicate that differential reflectometry allows more accurate and reproducible detection of subgingival calculus than conventional probing, and supports its use for supplementing traditional periodontal examination methods in dental practice.

  7. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  8. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  9. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  10. Laser reflectometry of submegahertz liquid meniscus ringing.

    PubMed

    Farahi, R H; Passian, A; Jones, Y K; Tetard, L; Lereu, A L; Thundat, T G

    2009-10-15

    Optical techniques that permit nondestructive probing of interfacial dynamics of various media are of key importance in numerous applications such as ellipsometry, mirage effect, and all-optical switching. Characterization of the various phases of microjet droplet formation yields important information for volume control, uniformity, velocity, and rate. The ringing of the meniscus and the associated relaxation time that occurs after droplet breakoff affect subsequent drop formation and is an indicator of the physical properties of the fluid. Using laser reflectometry, we present an analysis of the meniscus oscillations in an orifice of a piezoelectric microjet. PMID:19838255

  11. Solitons for optical time-domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanon, Amikam; Friberg, Stephen R.; Fujii, Yoichi

    1996-06-01

    We describe the propagation of solitons in an optical time-domain reflectometry geometry. Intense nonsolitons usually broaden nonlinearly as they propagate out to a scatterer and broaden linearly as they return to their origin. In contrast, solitons propagate with a fixed pulse width or narrow on their way out to the scatterer. Returning, they broaden or narrow depending on their chirp at the scattering point. For a fixed return-pulse timing resolution we find 2.6 times or more energy can be launched when solitons are used than for normal dispersion pulses.

  12. Neutron Beta Decay Studies with Nab

    SciTech Connect

    Baessler, S.; Alarcon, R.; Alonzi, L. P.; Balascuta, S.; Barron-Palos, L.; Bowman, James David; Bychkov, M. A.; Byrne, J.; Calarco, J; Chupp, T.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Crawford, C.; Frlez, E.; Gericke, M. T.; Glück, F.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Gudkov, V.; Harrison, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Ito, T.; Makela, M.; Martin, J.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGovern, S.; Page, S.; Penttila, Seppo I; Pocanic, Dinko; Salas-Bacci, A.; Tompkins, Z.; Wagner, D.; Wilburn, W. S.; Young, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurements in neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay and allow for several stringent tests of the standard model. This paper discusses the design and the expected performance of the Nab spectrometer.

  13. Neutron Scattering Studies of Fluorite Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Jonathan Peter

    1992-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The nature and mobility of defects in ionic materials with the fluorite structure have been studied using neutron scattering techniques. These systems model the behaviour of the fission fuel UO_2 at elevated temperature. A powder sample of beta -PbF_2 has been investigated using neutron diffraction, which gives the time-averaged occupation of sites in the unit cell. The temperature dependence of the lattice parameter, the concentration of Frenkel defects, and the thermal parameters of both fluorine and lead ions, have been determined at temperatures from ambient to well above the transition to the fast-ion phase. The defect structure of the anion-excess fluorite (Sr,Y)Cl_{2.03} has been studied using the coherent diffuse scattering from single -crystal samples. Excess chlorine ions are found to aggregate into cuboctahedral clusters whose ionic coordinates agree with those calculated from a simple hard sphere model. At elevated temperature the scattering exhibits quasielastic energy broadening, indicating the dynamic nature of the disorder. It is possible to account for the high temperature scattering in terms of 'snapshot' models of the diffusing anions and their associated relaxation fields, and to estimate the anion self diffusion coefficient from coherent scattering alone. Consistent and complementary information on the diffusion of chlorine ions in (Sr,Y)Cl_ {2.03} has been obtained from the quasielastic energy broadening of the single-crystal incoherent scattering measured at elevated temperature. Comparison with previous results from SrCl_2 shows that chlorine diffusion is faster in (Sr,Y)Cl_{2.03 }, and that the diffusional process in the anion-excess fluorite resembles that found when the level of thermally generated disorder is high in the pure compound. The coherent scatterer UO_{2 + delta} (delta = 0.13,0.14) transforms from a mixture of oxides at ambient temperature to a

  14. Neutron diffraction studies of viral fusion peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Jeremy P.; J. M. Darkes, Malcolm; Katsaras, John; Epand, Richard M.

    2000-03-01

    Membrane fusion plays a vital role in a large and diverse number of essential biological processes. Despite this fact, the precise molecular events that occur during fusion are still not known. We are currently engaged on a study of membrane fusion as mediated by viral fusion peptides. These peptides are the N-terminal regions of certain viral envelope proteins that mediate the process of fusion between the viral envelope and the membranes of the host cell during the infection process. As part of this study, we have carried out neutron diffraction measurements at the ILL, BeNSC and Chalk River, on a range of viral fusion peptides. The peptides, from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), influenza A and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), were incorporated into stacked phospholipid bilayers. Some of the peptides had been specifically deuterated at key amino acids. Lamellar diffraction data were collected and analysed to yield information on the peptide conformation, location and orientation relative to the bilayer.

  15. GPS/GNSS reflectometry nanosatellite demonstration mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Martin J.; Liddle, J. Douglas; Jason, Susan J.

    2003-01-01

    Loss of life, injury and huge economic losses are incurred annually due to irregular and insufficient sea-state information. Figures indicate that, each year, the marine insurance industry pays out over $2 billion in claims for weather-related accidents, while bad weather causes one ship of over 500 t to sink somewhere on the globe every week. Accurate knowledge of local ocean conditions is therefore crucial in providing forecasts and early warnings of severe weather conditions. Space-borne systems, particularly satellites, provide the ideal platform for global monitoring of sea conditions via altimetric measurements. As an alternative to active altimetry, another concept is passively receiving reflected signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) and other Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites. This concept was first developed by Dr Manuel Martin-Neira at ESAESTEC. ESA's Passive Reflectometry and Interferometry System makes use of GPS/GNSS signals from satellites and their reflection off the ocean surface to derive oceanic properties such as surface height, significant wave height, wind speed and wind direction. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd are proposing a nanosatellite demonstration mission to ascertain the feasibility of the GPS ocean reflectometry concept.

  16. SEOP polarized 3He Neutron Spin Filters for the JCNS user program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, Earl; Salhi, Zahir; Theisselmann, Tobias; Starostin, Denis; Schmeissner, Johann; Feoktystov, Artem; Mattauch, Stefan; Pistel, Patrick; Radulescu, Aurel; Ioffe, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Over the past several years the JCNS has been developing in-house applications for neutron polarization analysis (PA). These methods include PA for separation of incoherent from coherent scattering in soft matter studies (SANS), and online polarization for analysis for neutron reflectometry, SANS, GISANS and eventually spectroscopy. This paper will present an overview of the user activities at the JCNS at the MLZ and gives an overview of the polarization 3He methods and devices used. Additionally we will summarise current projects which will further support the user activities using polarised 3He spin filters.

  17. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region. Progress report, August 1, 1992--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu; Two-parameter measurement of nuclear lifetimes; ``Black`` neutron detector; Data reduction techniques for neutron scattering experiments; Inelastic neutron scattering studies in {sup 197}Au; Elastic and inelastic scattering studies in {sup 239}Pu; and neutron induced defects in silicon dioxide MOS structures.

  18. Upgrades to the Polarized Neutron Reflectometer Asterix at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, Roger

    2015-03-16

    We have upgraded the polarized neutron reflectometer, Asterix, at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos for the benefit of the research communities that study magnetic and complex-fluid films, both of which play important roles in support of the DOE’s energy mission. The upgrades to the instrument include: • A secondary spectrometer that was integrated with a Huber sample goniometer purchased with other funds just prior to the start of our project. The secondary spectrometer provides a flexible length for the scattered flight path, includes a mechanism to select among 3 alternative polarization analyzers as well as a support for new neutron detectors. Also included is an optic rail for reproducible positioning of components for Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME). The entire secondary spectrometer is now non-magnetic, as required for neutron Larmor labeling. • A broad-band neutron polarizer for the incident neutron beam based on the V geometry. • A wide-angle neutron polarization analyzer • A 2d position-sensitive neutron detector • Electromagnetic coils (Wollaston prisms) for SESAME plus the associated power supplies, cooling, safety systems and integration into the data acquisition system. The upgrades allowed a nearly effortless transition between configurations required to serve the polarized neutron reflectometry community, users of the 11 T cryomagnet and users of SESAME.

  19. Neutron spectrum studies in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.; Putnam, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been and currently is used to provide irradiation fields to study the effects of intense radiation on samples of reactor materials. These samples include fuel, cladding, control and structural materials. The ATR is also used to irradiate target materials for the production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications as well as for scientific research. Routine monitoring of the thermal'' and fast'' neutron levels have been conducted during every operational cycle since its startup in 1970. The routine neutron dosimetry has been primarily accomplished using the {sup 59}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 60}Co reaction for thermal'' neutrons and the {sup 58}Ni(n,p) {sup 58}Co reaction for fast'' neutrons as described in ASTM standard methods E261, E262, and E264. Neutron spectrum studies have now been conducted in the epithermal and fast neutron energy ranges for the various capsule irradiation test facilities and the routine neutron monitoring locations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Sensitivity studies for the weak r process: neutron capture rates

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, R.; Mumpower, M.; Sinclair, R.; Jones, K. L.; Hix, W. R.; McLaughlin, G. C.

    2014-04-15

    Rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis involves thousands of nuclear species far from stability, whose nuclear properties need to be understood in order to accurately predict nucleosynthetic outcomes. Recently sensitivity studies have provided a deeper understanding of how the r process proceeds and have identified pieces of nuclear data of interest for further experimental or theoretical study. A key result of these studies has been to point out the importance of individual neutron capture rates in setting the final r-process abundance pattern for a ‘main’ (A ∼ 130 peak and above) r process. Here we examine neutron capture in the context of a ‘weak’ r process that forms primarily the A ∼ 80 r-process abundance peak. We identify the astrophysical conditions required to produce this peak region through weak r-processing and point out the neutron capture rates that most strongly influence the final abundance pattern.

  1. Birefringence insensitive optical coherence domain reflectometry system

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Davis, Joseph G.

    2002-01-01

    A birefringence insensitive fiber optic optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) system is provided containing non-polarization maintaining (non-PM) fiber in the sample arm and the reference arm without suffering from signal degradation caused by birefringence. The use of non-PM fiber significantly reduces the cost of the OCDR system and provides a disposable or multiplexed section of the sample arm. The dispersion in the reference arm and sample arm of the OCDR system are matched to achieve high resolution imaging. This system is useful in medical applications or for non-medical in situ probes. The disposable section of non-PM fiber in the sample arm can be conveniently replaced when contaminated by a sample or a patient.

  2. Neutron density distributions of neutron-rich nuclei studied with the isobaric yield ratio difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Bai, Xiao-Man; Yu, Jiao; Wei, Hui-Ling

    2014-09-01

    The isobaric yield ratio difference (IBD) between two reactions of similar experimental setups is found to be sensitive to nuclear density differences between projectiles. In this article, the IBD probe is used to study the density variation in neutron-rich 48Ca . By adjusting diffuseness in the neutron density distribution, three different neutron density distributions of 48Ca are obtained. The yields of fragments in the 80 A MeV 40, 48Ca + 12C reactions are calculated by using a modified statistical abrasion-ablation model. It is found that the IBD results obtained from the prefragments are sensitive to the density distribution of the projectile, while the IBD results from the final fragments are less sensitive to the density distribution of the projectile.

  3. Slow Neutron Velocity Spectrometer Transmission Studies Of Pu

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Havens, W. W. Jr.; Melkonian, E.; Rainwater, L. J.; Levin, M.

    1951-05-28

    The slow neutron transmission of several samples of Pu has been investigated with the Columbia Neutron Velocity Spectrometer. Data are presented in two groups, those covering the energy region from 0 to 6 ev, and those covering the region above 6 ev. Below 6 ev the resolution was relatively good, and a detailed study of the cross section variation was made. Work above 6 ev consisted of merely locating levels and obtaining a rough idea of their strengths.

  4. Neutron characterization study for D-T, p-7Li neutron sources with new BCA based direct collision coupling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan-bo; Yang, Xin; Qian, Da-zhi; Li, Run-dong; Tang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    The T(D,n)4He and 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron sources have been used for decades in nuclear physics research, stellar nucleosynthesis research and neutron therapy research. In this work, the neutron characterization including neutron yield, spectra, and angular distribution for D-T and p-7Li sources have been studied with our new binary collision approximation (BCA) based direct collision coupling method. Distinguished from the traditional path integration method for getting the neutron weight, the new model establishes a relationship between the scattering cross section and the impact parameter, which allows the secondary neutron generation carrying out jointly with ions BCA tracking. The experimental measurements of neutron characterizations have been employed for these two reactions, and the new algorithm is validated.

  5. Neutron Imaging Studies of In Situ Growth of Neutron and Gamma Detector Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strange, Nicholas; Crain, Christopher; Wahida, Fatema; Stroupe, Zach; Larese, J. Z.

    The studies described here are aimed at addressing the critical need to develop dependable crystal growth techniques of solid-state materials used as radiation detectors for both national security and medical applications. We present our activities using pulsed neutron, radiographic imaging and simultaneous diffraction techniques to examine the synthesis of both CZT and CLYC with the goal of identifying the conditions that favor the production of defect free materials. Using a pulsed neutron beam and time of flight detection methods, we exploit the penetrating power and wavelength dependence of neutron absorption to perform measurements during crystal growth. Furthermore, solid boules can be examined either inside the furnace or free standing. The objective of these studies include the validation/improvement of the modeling studies of CLYC and CZT growth behavior, the development of new/improved furnace design, and the identification of optimum growth techniques that enable the production of large boules of defect free, single crystalline materials in a timely/cost effective manner. We provide our preliminary results that include the experiential setup at LANSCE and sample neutron radiographic and synchrotron based IR images of CZT flat solid plates.

  6. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations. PMID:25479433

  7. GNSS-Reflectometry based water level monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckheinrich, Jamila; Schön, Steffen; Beyerle, Georg; Apel, Heiko; Semmling, Maximilian; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Due to climate changing conditions severe changes in the Mekong delta in Vietnam have been recorded in the last years. The goal of the German Vietnamese WISDOM (Water-related Information system for the Sustainable Development Of the Mekong Delta) project is to build an information system to support and assist the decision makers, planners and authorities for an optimized water and land management. One of WISDOM's tasks is the flood monitoring of the Mekong delta. Earth reflected L-band signals from the Global Navigation Satellite System show a high reflectivity on water and ice surfaces or on wet soil so that GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) could contribute to monitor the water level in the main streams of the Mekong delta complementary to already existing monitoring networks. In principle, two different GNSS-R methods exist: the code- and the phase-based one. As the latter being more accurate, a new generation of GORS (GNSS Occultation, Reflectometry and Scatterometry) JAVAD DELTA GNSS receiver has been developed with the aim to extract precise phase observations. In a two week lasting measurement campaign, the receiver has been tested and several reflection events at the 150-200 m wide Can Tho river in Vietnam have been recorded. To analyze the geometrical impact on the quantity and quality of the reflection traces two different antennas height were tested. To track separately the direct and the reflected signal, two antennas were used. To derive an average height of the water level, for a 15 min observation interval, a phase model has been developed. Combined with the coherent observations, the minimum slope has been calculated based on the Least- Squares method. As cycle slips and outliers will impair the results, a preprocessing of the data has been performed. A cycle slip detection strategy that allows for automatic detection, identification and correction is proposed. To identify outliers, the data snooping method developed by Baarda 1968 is used. In this

  8. Neutron-induced reaction studies using stored ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glorius, Jan; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Reifarth, René

    2015-11-01

    Storage rings provide unique possibilities for investigations of nuclear reactions. Radioactive ions can be stored if the ring is connected to an appropriate facility and reaction studies are feasible at low beam intensities because of the recycling of beam particles. Using gas jet or droplet targets, charged particle-induced reactions on short-lived isotopes can be studied in inverse kinematics. In such a system a high-flux reactor could serve as a neutron target extending the experimental spectrum to neutron-induced reactions. Those could be studied over a wide energy range covering the research fields of nuclear astrophysics and reactor safety, transmutation of nuclear waste and fusion.

  9. Reconstruction of edge density profiles on Large Helical Device using ultrashort-pulse reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yuya; Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Kawahata, Kazuo; Nagayama, Yoshio; Hojo, Hitoshi

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has been expected to be one of the key diagnostics to measure density profiles. We have applied an ultrashort-pulse reflectometry (USPR) system to Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science. Wide frequency band system is required to obtain wide density profile since an incident wave is reflected at the density layer corresponding to its cutoff frequency. The reflectometry utilizes an impulse with less than 30 ps pulse width as a source. Since the bandwidth of an impulse has an inverse relation to the pulse width, we can cover the frequency range of micro- to millimeter waves (18-40 GHz) with a single source. The density profiles can be reconstructed by collecting time-of-flight (TOF) signals for each frequency component of an impulse reflected from the corresponding cutoff layer. We utilize the signal record analysis (SRA) method to reconstruct the density profiles from the TOF signal. The effectiveness of the SRA method for the profile reconstruction is confirmed by a simulation study of the USPR using a finite-difference time domain method. PMID:19044596

  10. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Y.; Sarachik, M.P.; Friedman, J.R.; Robinson, R.A.; Kelley, T.M.; Nakotte, H.; Christianson, A.C.; Trouw, F.; Aubin, S.M.J.; Hendrickson, D.N.

    1998-11-09

    The authors report zero-field inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a 14-gram deuterated sample of Mn{sub 12}-Acetate consisting of a large number of identical spin-10 magnetic clusters. Their resolution enables them to see a series of peaks corresponding to transitions between the anisotropy levels within the spin-10 manifold. A fit to the spin Hamiltonian H = {minus}DS{sub z}{sup 2} + {mu}{sub B}B{center_dot}g{center_dot}S-BS{sub z}{sup 4} + C(S{sub +}{sup 4} + S{sub {minus}}{sup 4}) yields an anisotropy constant D = (0.54 {+-} 0.02) K and a fourth-order diagonal anisotropy coefficient B = (1.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup {minus}3}K. Unlike EPR measurements, their experiments do not require a magnetic field and yield parameters that do not require knowledge of the g-value.

  11. Neutron diffraction studies of natural glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.C.; Erwin Desa, J.A.; Weeks, R.A.; Sinclair, R.N.; Bailey, D.K.

    1983-08-01

    A neutron diffraction investigation has been carried out of the structures of several naturally occurring glasses, viz. Libyan Desert glass, a Fulgurite, Wabar glass, Lechatelierite from Canon Diablo, a Tektite, Obsidian (3 samples), and Macusani glass. Libyan Desert sand has also been examined, together with crystalline ..cap alpha..-quartz and ..cap alpha..-cristobalite. A comparison of data for the natural glasses and synthetic vitreous silica (Spectrosil B) in both reciprocal and real space allows a categorisation into Silicas, which closely resemble synthetic vitreous silica, and Silicates, for which the resemblance to silica is consistently less striking. The data support the view that Libyan Desert glass and sand have a common origin, while the Tektite has a structure similar to that of volcanic glasses.

  12. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Carbonate Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Hadi Y.; Leventouri, Theodora; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.

    1998-11-01

    Moghaddam H.Y., Leventouri Th.* (Dept. of Physics & Alloy Research Center, Florida Atlantic Univ.) Chakoumakos B.C. (Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Lab.**,kou@ornl.gov) We report Rietveld structural refinements of neutron diffraction data of a highly crystalline, single-phase natural carbonate apatite,(francolite of Epirus, Greece), in order to elucidate the details of carbonate substitution in the apatites. The composition is Ca9.56Na0.38Mg0.08(PO4)4.82(CO3)0.946(SO4)0.2F2.34, as determined by electron microprobe analysis. We report refinements of data for the native francolite as a function of temperature between 296K and 10K after the material had been heated at 750 °C to drive off adsorbed water and CO2. The neutron diffractioii@data were collected using a wavelength 1.0912 A on the HB4 high resolution powder diffractometer at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic displacement parameters can reveal the contribution from the temperature independent static positional disorder. Difference displacement parameters evaluated along various bonding directions are being used to describe the mechanics and dynamics of the carbonate for phosphate substitution.*Supported by a SURA-ORNL Summer Cooperative Research Program 1998.**Supported by the Division of Materials Sciences,U.S. D.O.E. (contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 with Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation).

  13. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew; Colston, Billy W.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  14. Halo Nucleus Be11: A Spectroscopic Study via Neutron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, K. T.; Jones, K. L.; Bey, A.; Ahn, S. H.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Brown, S. M.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hahn, K. I.; Kolata, J. J.; Kozub, R. L.; Liang, J. F.; Matei, C.; Matoš, M.; Matyas, D.; Moazen, B.; Nesaraja, C.; Nunes, F. M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Roberts, A.; Shapira, D.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.; Spassova, I.; Stracener, D. W.; Villano, A. N.; Wilson, G. L.

    2012-05-01

    The best examples of halo nuclei, exotic systems with a diffuse nuclear cloud surrounding a tightly bound core, are found in the light, neutron-rich region, where the halo neutrons experience only weak binding and a weak, or no, potential barrier. Modern direct-reaction measurement techniques provide powerful probes of the structure of exotic nuclei. Despite more than four decades of these studies on the benchmark one-neutron halo nucleus Be11, the spectroscopic factors for the two bound states remain poorly constrained. In the present work, the Be10(d,​p) reaction has been used in inverse kinematics at four beam energies to study the structure of Be11. The spectroscopic factors extracted using the adiabatic model were found to be consistent across the four measurements and were largely insensitive to the optical potential used. The extracted spectroscopic factor for a neutron in an nℓj=2s1/2 state coupled to the ground state of Be10 is 0.71(5). For the first excited state at 0.32 MeV, a spectroscopic factor of 0.62(4) is found for the halo neutron in a 1p1/2 state.

  15. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Karim, Julia Abdul

    2011-03-01

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO4) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1×1013 ncm-2s-1. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

  16. Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Karim, Julia Abdul

    2011-03-30

    Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

  17. Using Fast Neutrons to Study Collective Nuclear Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. W.

    2013-03-01

    For many years, the inelastic scattering of accelerator-produced fast neutrons has been used at the University of Kentucky to study nuclei which have been described as vibrational Recent data which have emerged from studies with this reaction and from other probes is reviewed, and conclusions about the applicability of the vibrational phonon description for multiphonon quadrupole and octupole excitations are given.

  18. A survey of reflectometry techniques with applications to TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo, I.; Stacey, W.M.; Wilgen, J.; Hanson, G.; Bigelow, T.; Thomas, C.E.; Bretz, N.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents a review of reflectometry with particular attention to eXtraordinary mode (X-mode) reflectometry using the novel technique of dual frequency differential phase. The advantage of using an X-mode wave is that it can probe the edge of the plasma with much higher resolution and using a much smaller frequency range than with the Ordinary mode (O-Mode). The general problem with previous full phase reflectometry techniques is that of keeping track of the phase (on the order of 1000 fringes) as the frequency is swept over the band. The dual frequency phase difference technique has the advantage that since it is keeping track of the phase difference of two frequencies with a constant frequency separation, the fringe counting is on the order of only 3 to 5 fringes. This fringe count, combined with the high resolution of the X-mode wave and the small plasma access requirements of reflectometry, make X-mode reflectometry a very attractive diagnostic for today`s experiments and future fusion devices.

  19. Neutron-Induced Charged Particle Studies at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye Young; Haight, Robert C.

    2014-09-01

    Direct measurements on neutron-induced charged particle reactions are of interest for nuclear astrophysics and applied nuclear energy. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) produces neutrons in energy of thermal to several hundreds MeV. There has been an effort at LANSCE to upgrade neutron-induced charged particle detection technique, which follows on (n,z) measurements made previously here and will have improved capabilities including larger solid angles, higher efficiency, and better signal to background ratios. For studying cross sections of low-energy neutron induced alpha reactions, Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is designed with segmented anodes for improving signal-to-noise ratio near reaction thresholds. Since double-differential cross sections on (n,p) and (n,a) reactions up to tens of MeV provide important information on deducing nuclear level density, the ionization chamber will be coupled with silicon strip detectors (DSSD) in order to stop energetic charged particles. In this paper, we will present the status of this development including the progress on detector design, calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy - Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  20. Simulation study of Fast Neutron Radiography using GEANT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishnoi, S.; Thomas, R. G.; Sarkar, P. S.; Datar, V. M.; Sinha, A.

    2015-02-01

    Fast neutron radiography (FNR) is an important non-destructive technique for the imaging of thick bulk material. We are designing a FNR system using a laboratory based 14 MeV D-T neutron generator [1]. Simulation studies have been carried using Monte Carlo based GEANT4 code to understand the response of the FNR system for various objects. Different samples ranging from low Z, metallic and high Z materials were simulated for their radiographic images. The quality of constructed neutron radiography images in terms of relative contrast ratio and the contrast to noise ratio were investigated for their dependence on various parameters such as thickness, voids inside high/low Z material and also for low Z material hidden behind high Z material. We report here the potential and limitations of FNR for imaging different materials and a few configurations and also the possible areas where FNR can be implemented.

  1. A Fluka study of underground cosmogenic neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Empl, A.; Hungerford, E.V.; Jasim, R.; Mosteiro, P. E-mail: evhunger@central.uh.edu E-mail: mosteiro@gmail.com

    2014-08-01

    Neutrons produced by cosmic muon interactions are important contributors to backgrounds in underground detectors when searching for rare events. Typically such neutrons can dominate the background, as they are particularly difficult to shield and detect. Since actual data is sparse and not well documented, simulation studies must be used to design shields and predict background rates. Thus validation of any simulation code is necessary to assure reliable results. This work compares in detail predictions of the FLUKA simulation code to existing data, and uses this code to report a simulation of cosmogenic backgrounds for typical detectors embedded in a water tank with liquid scintillator shielding.

  2. Fractal properties of lysozyme: a neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Lushnikov, S G; Svanidze, A V; Gvasaliya, S N; Torok, G; Rosta, L; Sashin, I L

    2009-03-01

    The spatial structure and dynamics of hen egg white lysozyme have been investigated by small-angle and inelastic neutron scattering. Analysis of the results was carried using the fractal approach, which allowed determination of the fractal and fracton dimensions of lysozyme, i.e., consideration of the protein structure and dynamics by using a unified approach. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of thermal denaturation of lysozyme have revealed changes in the fractal dimension in the vicinity of the thermal denaturation temperature that reflect changes in the spatial organization of protein. PMID:19391977

  3. Neutron depolarization study of phase transformations in steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, N. H.; Te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Rekveldt, M. Th.; Sietsma, J.; van der Zwaag, S.

    1999-06-01

    Three-dimensional neutron depolarization experiments have been performed in order to study the phase transformations from austenite (γ-Fe) into ferrite (α-Fe) and cementite (Fe 3C) in two medium-carbon steel samples with different carbon concentrations. The rotation of the neutron polarization vector during transmission through the sample is a direct measure for the ferromagnetic ferrite fraction. The degree of depolarization is related to the magnetic correlation length, which gives an indication of the characteristic length scales of the microstructure.

  4. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mák, Michael; Štefanica, Jirí; Dostál, Václav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  5. Structure of unbound neutron-rich 9He studied using single-neutron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Kalanee, T.; Gibelin, J.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Keeley, N.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Force, C.; Gaudefroy, L.; Gillibert, A.; Guillot, J.; Iwasaki, H.; Krupko, S.; Lapoux, V.; Mittig, W.; Mougeot, X.; Nalpas, L.; Pollacco, E.; Rusek, K.; Roger, T.; Savajols, H.; de Séréville, N.; Sidorchuk, S.; Suzuki, D.; Strojek, I.; Orr, N. A.

    2013-09-01

    The 8He(d,p) reaction was studied in inverse kinematics at 15.4A MeV using the MUST2 Si-CsI array in order to shed light on the level structure of 9He. The well known 16O(d,p)17O reaction, performed here in reverse kinematics, was used as a test to validate the experimental methods. The 9He missing mass spectrum was deduced from the kinetic energies and emission angles of the recoiling protons. Several structures were observed above the neutron-emission threshold and the angular distributions were used to deduce the multipolarity of the transitions. This work confirms that the ground state of 9He is located very close to the neutron threshold of 8He and supports the occurrence of parity inversion in 9He.

  6. Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Porous Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Reshma R.; Desa, J. A. Erwin; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.

    2011-07-15

    Compacts of silica micro-spheres prepared for different times at sintering temperatures of 640 deg. C and 740 deg. C have been studied by Ultra Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Stress versus strain measurements display several breakage points related to a range of nearest neighbour coordination around each microsphere.

  7. Nab: precise experimental study of unpolarized neutron beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocanic, Dinko; Nab Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Nab, a program of experimental study of unpolarized neutron decays at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN, aims to determine a, the electron-neutrino correlation with precision of δa / a =10-3 , and b, the Fierz interference term, with uncertainty δb ~= 3 ×10-3 . Neutron beta decay's simple theoretical description in the Standard Model (SM) is overconstrained by the set of available observables, providing opportunities to search for evidence of SM extensions. Planned Nab results will lead to a new precise determination of the ratio λ =GA /GV , and to significant reductions in the allowed limits for both right- and left-handed scalar and tensor currents. Alternatively, the experiment may detect a discrepancy from SM predictions consistent with certain realizations of supersymmetry. An optimized, asymmetric spectrometer has been designed to achieve the narrow proton momentum response function required to meet the physics goals of the experiment. The apparatus is to be used in a follow-up measurement (ABba) of asymmetry observables A and B in polarized neutron decay. Nab is funded, now in the construction stage, with planned beam readiness in 2016. We discuss the experiment's motivation, expected reach, design and method. Nab, a program of experimental study of unpolarized neutron decays at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge, TN, aims to determine a, the electron-neutrino correlation with precision of δa / a =10-3 , and b, the Fierz interference term, with uncertainty δb ~= 3 ×10-3 . Neutron beta decay's simple theoretical description in the Standard Model (SM) is overconstrained by the set of available observables, providing opportunities to search for evidence of SM extensions. Planned Nab results will lead to a new precise determination of the ratio λ =GA /GV , and to significant reductions in the allowed limits for both right- and left-handed scalar and tensor currents. Alternatively, the experiment may detect a discrepancy from SM

  8. Time domain reflectometry as a rock mass monitoring technique

    SciTech Connect

    Francke, J.L.; Terrill, L.J.; Allen, W.W.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes the practices and methods used in a study of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) as an inexpensive deformation monitoring tool in underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is being developed near Carlsbad, New Mexico, for the disposal of transuranic nuclear wastes in bedded salt 655 m (2150 ft) below the surface. Data collected from WIPP geomechanical monitoring are used to characterize conditions, confirm design assumptions, and understand and predict the performance of the deep salt excavation. The geomechanical monitoring techniques ranging from inspection of observation boreholes to advanced radar surveys. In 1989 TDR was introduced as a monitoring tool with the installation of 12.7 mm (0.5 in) diameter TDR cables in the underground excavations. In 1993, a new TDR system was installed in a separate location. Based on experience with the previous installation, enhancements were implemented into the new TDR system that: (1) extended the period of performance by increasing cable diameter to 22. 2 mm (0.875 in), (2) increased accuracy in locating areas of deformation by aligning cables with nearby observation boreholes, and (3) improved data acquisition and analyses using a standard laptop computer, eliminating the chart recorder previously used. In summary, the results of a correlation between the TDR signatures to nearby observation boreholes and geomechanical instrumentation will be presented.

  9. Study of 19C by One-Neutron Knockout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jongwon; Kim, Sunji; Satou, Yoshiteru; Orr, Nigel A.; Nakamura, Takashi; Kondo, Yosuke; Gibelin, Julien; Achouri, N. Lynda; Aumann, Thomas; Baba, Hidetada; Delaunay, Franck; Doornenbal, Pieter; Fukuda, Naoki; Inabe, Naohito; Isobe, Tadaaki; Kameda, Daisuke; Kanno, Daiki; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Toshio; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Leblond, Sylvain; Lee, Jenny; Marqués, F. Miguel; Minakata, Ryogo; Motobayashi, Tohru; Murai, Daichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Muto, Kotomi; Nakashima, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Noritsugu; Navin, Alahari; Nishi, Seijiro; Ogoshi, Shun; Otsu, Hideaki; Sato, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yohei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kento; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Ryuki; Togano, Yasuhiro; Tuff, Adam G.; Vandebrouck, Marine; Yoneda, Ken-ichiro

    2016-03-01

    The spectroscopic structure of 19C, a prominent one-neutron halo nucleus, has been studied with a 20C secondary beam at 290 MeV/nucleon and a carbon target. Neutron-unbound states populated by the one-neutron knockout reaction were investigated by means of the invariant mass method. The preliminary relative energy spectrum and parallel momentum distribution of the knockout residue, 19C*, were reconstructed from the measured four momenta of the 18C fragment, neutron, and beam. Three resonances were observed in the spectrum, which correspond to the states at Ex = 0.62(9), 1.42(10), and 2.89(10) MeV. The parallel momentum distributions for the 0.62-MeV and 2.89-MeV states suggest spin-parity assignments of 5/2+ and 1/2-, respectively. The 1.42-MeV state is in line with the reported 5/22+ state.

  10. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.

  11. Directly coupled vs conventional time domain reflectometry in soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR), a technique for estimation of soil water, measures the travel time of an electromagnetic pulse on electrodes embedded in the soil, but has limited application in commercial agriculture due to costs, labor, and sensing depth. Conventional TDR systems have employed ana...

  12. Time domain reflectometry for SLC BPM system. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.R.

    1985-03-01

    This document is intended for use as a maintenance manual for troubleshooting installed SLC Beam Position Monitor stripline assemblies and the associated cabling, using Time Domain Reflectometry. Once a technician becomes familiar with this manual's procedures, the Table of Contents can serve as a checklist.

  13. A Partial Cylindrical Thermo-Time Domain Reflectometry Sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermo-time domain reflectometry (T-TDR) sensors are multi-functional devices that can be used to measure soil thermal properties and water content. These sensors can also be used to obtain indirect estimates of bulk density, air-filled porosity and percent saturation. However, the small size of the...

  14. Preliminary neutron crystallographic study of human transthyretin

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, Melina; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Teixeira, Susana C. M.; Mason, Sax A.; Mitchell, Edward P.; Cooper, Jonathan B.; Forsyth, V. Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary studies of perdeuterated crystals of human transthyretin (TTR) have been carried out using the LADI-III and D19 diffractometers at the Institut Laue–Langevin in Grenoble. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full crystallographic analysis to a resolution of 2.0 Å using Laue diffraction and also illustrate the potential of using monochromatic instruments such as D19 for higher resolution studies where larger crystals having smaller unit cells are available. This study will yield important information on hydrogen bonding, amino-acid protonation states and hydration in the protein. Such information will be of general interest for an understanding of the factors that stabilize/destabilize TTR and for the design of ligands that may be used to counter TTR amyloid fibrillogenesis. PMID:22102249

  15. Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

  16. Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2014-02-12

    The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

  17. The neutron moderated detector and groundbased cosmic ray modulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, P. H.; Raubenheimer, B. C.

    1985-01-01

    Reports appear on modulation studies with the neutron monitor without lead. Some of these studies cast doubt on the reliability of this detector. The stability of the neutron moderated detector (NMD) at Sanae, Antarctic is discussed. The barometric coeficient of the 4NMD for epoch 1976 appears not to differ statistically from the 0.73%/mb of the 3NM64. The monthly averaged hourly counting rate of our 4NMD and 3NM64 correlates very well (correlation coefficient: 98%) over the years from 1974-1984, with the 4NMD showing a 8% larger long term modulation effect than the 3NM64, indicating a difference in sensitivities of the two detectors. From this difference in sensitivities spectra of ground level solar proton events and modulation functions of Forbush decreases are deduced.

  18. Experimental study on the performance of an epithermal neutron flux monitor for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xingcai; Manabe, Masanobu; Tamaki, Shingo; Liu, Shuangtong; Sato, Fuminobu; Murata, Isao; Wang, Tieshan

    2016-07-01

    The performance of an epithermal neutron (0.5eVneutron capture therapy (BNCT) was experimentally studied by using a prototype monitor in an appropriate neutron field at the intense deuterium-tritium neutron source facility OKTAVIAN of Osaka University, Japan. It was convinced from the experimental results that the developed monitor worked well and the epithermal neutron fluxes in BNCT neutron sources can be measured within 5% by the monitor. PMID:27110926

  19. Neutron scattering study of unconventional superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seunghun

    2014-06-30

    My group’s primary activity at the University of Virginia supported by DOE is to study novel electronic, magnetic, and structural phenomena that emerge out of strong interactions between electrons. Some of these phenomena are unconventional superconductivity, exotic states in frustrated magnets, quantum spin liquid states, and magneto-electricity. The outcome of our research funded by the grant advanced microscopic understanding of the emergence of the collective states in the systems.

  20. Explosives detection studies using Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detection of explosives in luggage or air cargo. We present here the principle results of a two-year study of a few-view tomographic FNTS system using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP to simulate neutron transmission through simple luggage phantoms and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves to determine system performance. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing MCNP generated neutron transmission data. Transmission data for few (3-5) angles and relatively coarse resolution ({approximately}2 cm) are used to create a tomographic reconstruction of elemental distributions within the object. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms and the concept of transmission-derived cross sections for use in elemental analysis have been validated by application to experimental data. Elemental distributions are combined in an explosives detection algorithm to provide an indication of the presence or absence of explosives. The algorithm in current use, termed the ``equivalent explosive`` algorithm, determines the quantity of explosive that can be formed using the measured amount of the constituent elements in each pixel. Reconstruction and explosives detection algorithms have been applied to a series of randomly packed suitcases to generated ROC that describe system performance in terms of the probability of detection and of false alarms. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as neutron source reaction and incident particle energy, flight path length, and the position of the interrogated object.

  1. a Study of Prompt Neutron Emission in Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of URANIUM-235.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklyn, Christopher Barry

    An original experiment was performed to measure the angular correlation of fission neutrons from thermal -neutron-induced fission of ('235)U, with respect to the light fission fragment direction, as a function of fragment mass division and neutron energy. A Monte Carlo model, with a realistic description of the fission fragment de -excitation process, was developed to simulate the observed neutron-fragment angular correlation data. The model was capable of investigating various possible forms of neutron emission which were classified into emission before, during and after full fragment acceleration, and correspondingly named scission acceleration and prompt neutron emission. Simulated neutron-fragment angular correlations displaying similar distributions with respect to the light fragment direction for different forms of neutron emission are shown to exhibit differing distributions when examined as a function of fragment mass division or neutron energy, thus illustrating the sensitivity of the experiment to the forms of neutron emission occurring in fission. A primary conclusion of the investigation was that neutron emission solely from fully accelerated fragments, whether isotropically or anisotropically emitted in the fragment centre of mass system, was unable to adequately describe the observed neutron-fragment angular correlations. Simulation of the fission process with some neutron emission before or during fragment acceleration exhibited a closer correspondence with observed phenomena. Within the scope of this work the form of neutron emission that produced the closest overall correspondence with experimental data was a simulation in which 20% of the emitted neutrons were isotropically emitted scission neutrons with a Maxwellian energy distribution of temperature 1.0 MeV. The remaining neutrons were emitted from fully accelerated fragments, being isotropic in the fragment centre of mass frame, except for the n-th(n > 1) neutrons from the light fragment, which

  2. Neutron irradiated uranium silicides studied by neutron diffraction and Rietveld analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Mueller, M.H.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1990-11-01

    The irradiation behavior of high-density uranium silicides has been a matter of interest to the nuclear industry for use in high power or low enrichment applications. Transmission electron microscopy studies have found that heavy ion bombardment renders U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} amorphous at temperatures below about 250 C and that U{sub 3}Si becomes mechanically unstable suffering rapid growth by plastic flow. In this present work, crystallographic changes preceding amorphization by fission fragment damage have been studied by high-resolution neutron diffraction as a function of damage produced by uranium fission at room temperature. Initially, both silicides had tetragonal crystal structures. Crystallographic and amorphous phases were studied simultaneously by combining conventional Rietveld refinement of the crystallographic phases with Fourier-filtering analysis of the non-crystalline scattering component. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; et al

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions,more » (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ’) reactions.« less

  4. Scissors Mode of 162Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions, (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ') reactions.

  5. Neutron and Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Studies of Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tranquada,J.M.

    2008-09-01

    Superconductors hold the promise for a more stable and efficient electrical grid, but new isotropic, high-temperature superconductors are needed in order to reduce cable manufacturing costs. The effort to understand high-temperature superconductivity, especially in the layered cuprates, provides guidance to the search for new superconductors. Neutron scattering has long provided an important probe of the collective excitations that are involved in the pairing mechanism. For the cuprates, neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques also provide information on competing types of order, such as charge and spin stripes, that appear to be closely connected to the superconductivity. Recently, inelastic x-ray scattering has become competitive for studying phonons and may soon provide valuable information on electronic excitations. Examples of how these techniques contribute to our understanding of superconductivity are presented.

  6. Full-wave simulations on ultrashort-pulse reflectometry for helical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hojo, H.; Fukuchi, A.; Itakura, A.; Mase, A.

    2004-10-01

    The full-wave simulations on ultrashort-pulse reflectometry for helical plasmas are studied based on the FDTD method in two dimensions. The propagation of an ultrashort-pulse electromagnetic wave is computed in helical plasmas modeled for the Large Helical Device magnetic field configuration. The density-profile reconstruction is performed by the Abel inversion method with the time delay data for the reflected waves from plasma, and it is shown that the reconstructed density profile coincides well with the original profile.

  7. Measurement of shear-wave velocity by ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S.; Antich, P.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    There exists a growing body of research that relates the measurement of pressure-wave velocity in bone to different physiological conditions and treatment modalities. The shear-wave velocity has been less studied, although it is necessary for a more complete understanding of the mechanical properties of bone. Ultrasound critical-angle reflectometry (UCR) is a noninvasive and nondestructive technique previously used to measure pressure-wave velocities both in vitro and in vivo. This note describes its application to the measurement of shear-wave velocity in bone, whether directly accessible or covered by soft tissue.

  8. Neutron structure and mechanistic studies of diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Julian C.-H.; Mustyakimov, Marat; Schoenborn, Benno P.; Langan, Paul; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2010-11-01

    The structure and mechanism of diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) have been studied using a variety of methods, including isotopic labelling, X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography. The neutron structure of DFPase, mechanistic studies and subsequent rational design efforts are described. Diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) is a calcium-dependent phosphotriesterase that acts on a variety of highly toxic organophosphorus compounds that act as inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase. The mechanism of DFPase has been probed using a variety of methods, including isotopic labelling, which demonstrated the presence of a phosphoenzyme intermediate in the reaction mechanism. In order to further elucidate the mechanism of DFPase and to ascertain the protonation states of the residues and solvent molecules in the active site, the neutron structure of DFPase was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. The proposed nucleophile Asp229 is deprotonated, while the active-site solvent molecule W33 was identified as water and not hydroxide. These data support a mechanism involving direct nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on the substrate and rule out a mechanism involving metal-assisted water activation. These data also allowed for the re-engineering of DFPase through rational design to bind and productively orient the more toxic S{sub P} stereoisomers of the nerve agents sarin and cyclosarin, creating a modified enzyme with enhanced overall activity and significantly increased detoxification properties.

  9. Systematic study on the performance of elliptic focusing neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin Rodriguez, D.; DiJulio, D. D.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-02-01

    In neutron scattering experiments there is an increasing trend towards the study of smaller volume samples, which make the use of focusing optics more important. Focusing guide geometries based on conic-sections, such as those with parabolic and elliptic shapes, have been extensively used in both recently built neutron instruments and upgrades of existing hardware. A large fraction of proposed instruments at the European Spallation Source feature the requirement of good performance when measuring on small samples. The optimised design of a focusing system comes after time consuming Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations. Therefore, in order to help reduce the time needed to design such focusing systems, it is necessary to study systematically the performance of focusing guides. In the present work, we perform a theoretical analysis of the focusing properties of neutron beams, and validate them using a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and Particle Swarm Optimisations (PSOs), where there is a close correspondence between the maximum divergence of the beam and the shape of the guide. The analytical results show that two limits can be considered, which bound a range of conic section shapes that provide optimum performance. Finally, we analyse a more realistic guide example and we give an assessment of the importance of the contribution from multiple reflections in different systems.

  10. Advanced Two-Dimensional Thermal Neutron Detectors for Scattering Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, J.; Harder, J.; Mahler, G.J.; Makowiecki, D.S.; Mead, J.A.; Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B.

    2002-11-18

    Advances in neutron scattering studies will be given a large boost with the advent of new spallation and reactor sources at present under consideration or construction. An important element for future experiments is a commensurate improvement in neutron detection techniques. At Brookhaven, a development program is under way for greatly increasing the angular coverage, rate capability and resolution of detectors for scattering studies. For example, a curved detector with angular coverage of 120{sup o} by 15{sup o} has recently been developed for protein crystallography at a spallation source. Based on neutron detection using {sup 3}He, the detector has the following major, new attributes: eight identical proportional wire segments operating in parallel, a single gas volume with seamless readout at segment boundaries, parallax errors eliminated in the horizontal plane by the detector's appropriate radius of curvature, high-throughput front-end electronics, position decoding based on high performance digital signal processing. The detector has a global rate capability greater than 1 million per second, position resolution less than 1.5 mm FWHM, timing resolution about 1 {micro}s, efficiency of 50% and 90% at 1{angstrom} and 4 {angstrom} respectively, and an active area 1.5 m x 20 cm.

  11. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, T.D. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 {times} 10{sup {minus}11}cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi} and 20 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cGy{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/n{sub epi}, respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  12. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1993-05-25

    Results that shed new light on the study of protein dynamics were obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The triple axis instrument H-9 supplied by the cold source was used to perform a detailed study of the quasi-elastic spectrum and the Debye-Waller factor for trypsin in powder form, in solution, and in crystals. A preliminary study of myoglobin crystals was also done. A new way to view the results of quasi-elastic scattering experiments is sketched, and the data on trypsin are presented and analyze according to this new picture.

  13. GNSS-Reflectometry: Forest canopies polarization scattering properties and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) can be a new promising remote sensing tool in the ocean, snow/ice and land surfaces, e.g., vegetation biomass monitoring. Although GNSS-R provides a potentially special L-band multi-angular and multi-polarization measurement, the theoretical vegetation scattering properties and mechanisms for GNSS-R are not understood clearly. In this paper, the GNSS-R vegetation polarization scattering properties are studied and modeled at different incidence angles (specular direction). The bistatic scattering model Bi-mimics is employed, which is the first-order radiative transfer equation. As a kind of forest stand, the Aspen’s crown layer is composed of entire leaves, and its parameters in Mimics handbook are used as model input. The specular circular polarizations (co-polarization RR and cross-polarization LR) are simulated. For cross-polarization, the received polarization is assumed as a linear (horizontal and vertical) polarizations and ±45° linear polarizations. Therefore, the HR VR, +45R and -45R polarizations are simulated here. Contributions from different scattering components at RR, LR and VR polarization are also presented. For co-polarization, it is large in the whole specular angles (10-80°). The scattering trends of the other cross polarization (HR, LR, +45R and -45R) are a little similar when compared to the RR and RV. Therefore, the RHCP and V polarizations are more favorable to collect the reflected signals. The trunk heights and crown depths do not affect the scattering trends of RR, RV and RL, while the trunk height has some effect on the scattering amplitude of different polarizations. The azimuth angle has more effects on RR, RL and RV scattering, especially in lower than 50°. The observation angles and polarization combinations are extremely important for GNSS-R remote sensing.

  14. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  15. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Irons

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, Alan; Aristizabal, Ricardo; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool that can be used to identify the phases present and to measure the spacing of the atomic planes in a material. Thus, the residual stresses can be determined within a component and/or the phases present. New intercritically austempered irons rely on the unique properties of the austenite phase present in their microstructures. If these materials are to see widespread use, methods to verify the quality (behavior consistency) of these materials and to provide guidance for further optimization will be needed. Neutron diffraction studies were performed at the second generation neutron residual stress facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a variety of intercritically austempered irons. For similar materials, such as TRIP steels, the strengthening mechanism involves the transformation of metastable austenite to martensite during deformation. For the intercritically austempered ductile irons two different deformation/strengthening mechanisms, phase transformation and slip, dependent upon the iron chemistry, were observed. Lattice strain and phase fraction data as a function of applied stress are presented.

  16. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region. Progress report, August 1, 1988--July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Beghian, L.E.; Kegel, G.H.R.

    1991-08-01

    During the report period we have investigated the following areas: Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering measurements on {sup 14}N, {sup 181}Ta, {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu; Prompt fission spectra for {sup 232}Th, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu; Theoretical studies of neutron scattering; Neutron filters; New detector systems; and Upgrading of neutron target assembly, data acquisition system, and accelerator/beam-line apparatus.

  17. Preparation of radioactive rare earth targets for neutron capture study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G. G.; Rogers, P. S. Z.; Palmer, P. D.; Dry, D. E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    The understanding of thc details of nucleosynthesis in stars remains a great challenge. Though the basic mechanisms governing the processes have been known since the pioneering work of Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (l), we are now evolving into a condition where we can ask more specific questions. Of particular interest are the dynamics of the s ('slow') process. In this process the general condition is one in which sequential neutron captures occur at time scales long compared with the beta decay half lives of the capturing nuclides. The nucleosynthesis period for C or Ne burning stellar shells is believed to be in the year to few year time frame (2). This means that radionuclides with similar half lives to this burning period serve as 'branch point' nuclides. That is, there will be a competition between a capture to the next heavier isotope and a beta decay to the element of nexl higher atomic number. By understanding the abundances of these competing reactions we can learn about the dynamics of the nucleosynthesis process in the stellar medium. Crucial to this understanding is that we have a knowledge of the underlying neutron reaction cross sections on these unstable nuclides in the relevant stellar energy regions (neutrons of 0.1-100 KeV). Tm (1.9 years) and ls'Sm (90 ycws) have decay properties that permit their handling in an open fume hood. These Iwo were therefore selected to be the first radionuclides for neutron capture study in what will be an ongoing effort.

  18. Neutron Reflectivity Study of Interdiffusion of Ionomers into Van der Waals Polymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etampawala, Thusitha; Ratnaweera, Dilru; Wijesinghe, Sidath; Perahia, Dvora; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2012-02-01

    The slow dynamic processes in amorphous ionic polymers are affected by physical cross-links resulting from clustering of the ionic groups. Therefore in addition to entanglement barriers, the motion of the polymers is coupled to the dynamics of the ionic clusters where the resulting dynamics is an interplay between the effects of the two types of barriers. Using neutron reflectometry we have probed a model system where interfacial diffusion of a Van der Waals polymer, polystyrene, into its sulfonated analogs. Results controlling the molecular weights that determine the overall number of entanglements as well as the degree of sulfonation which affects the strength and number of the ionic clusters will be presented. Comparison to the diffusion of polystyrene into polystyrene will resolve the effects of the ionic clusters from those of entanglements. The presence of the physical cross-links slows down the dynamics significantly with respect to that of polystyrene and an asymmetric process where the non-ionic blocks migrate into the ionic one is observed. Further rearrangements take place at a later stage.

  19. Neutron-induced reaction studies at FIGARO using a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.

    2004-05-01

    A description is given of the new flexible facility Fast Neutron-Induced Gamma-Ray Observer (FIGARO) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. FIGARO is designed to study fast-neutron-induced reactions that result in the emission of γ rays and neutrons, using the white neutron beam of the Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The emitted neutrons and γ rays are detected by several liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. As an example, the inelastic neutron scattering on Si from 4 to 20 MeV is presented and the results are compared with predictions of the nuclear model calculations performed with the codes GNASH and EMPIRE II.

  20. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  1. Experimental Studies of Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardet, A.; Granier, T.; Laurent, B.; Oberstedt, A.

    Prompt fission neutron spectra were measured in the reactions 238U(n,f), 235U(n,f) and 237Np(n,f) at different incident neutron energies. The neutrons were detected using a coaxial doped p-terphenyl scintillation detector in coincidence with fission fragments and their time-of-flight was recorded. The properties of the neutron detector were determined and the results are presented in this work. A preliminary neutron detection efficiency was applied to data from the neutron-induced fission of 238U at En = 5.2 MeV, leading to encouraging results.

  2. New signal processing technique for density profile reconstruction using reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Clairet, F; Ricaud, B; Briolle, F; Heuraux, S; Bottereau, C

    2011-08-01

    Reflectometry profile measurement requires an accurate determination of the plasma reflected signal. Along with a good resolution and a high signal to noise ratio of the phase measurement, adequate data analysis is required. A new data processing based on time-frequency tomographic representation is used. It provides a clearer separation between multiple components and improves isolation of the relevant signals. In this paper, this data processing technique is applied to two sets of signals coming from two different reflectometer devices used on the Tore Supra tokamak. For the standard density profile reflectometry, it improves the initialization process and its reliability, providing a more accurate profile determination in the far scrape-off layer with density measurements as low as 10(16) m(-1). For a second reflectometer, which provides measurements in front of a lower hybrid launcher, this method improves the separation of the relevant plasma signal from multi-reflection processes due to the proximity of the plasma. PMID:21895243

  3. New signal processing technique for density profile reconstruction using reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Ricaud, B.; Briolle, F.; Heuraux, S.

    2011-08-15

    Reflectometry profile measurement requires an accurate determination of the plasma reflected signal. Along with a good resolution and a high signal to noise ratio of the phase measurement, adequate data analysis is required. A new data processing based on time-frequency tomographic representation is used. It provides a clearer separation between multiple components and improves isolation of the relevant signals. In this paper, this data processing technique is applied to two sets of signals coming from two different reflectometer devices used on the Tore Supra tokamak. For the standard density profile reflectometry, it improves the initialization process and its reliability, providing a more accurate profile determination in the far scrape-off layer with density measurements as low as 10{sup 16} m{sup -1}. For a second reflectometer, which provides measurements in front of a lower hybrid launcher, this method improves the separation of the relevant plasma signal from multi-reflection processes due to the proximity of the plasma.

  4. Phase shift reflectometry for sub-surface defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asundi, Anand; Lei, Huang; Eden, Teoh Kang Min; Sreemathy, Parthasarathy; May, Watt Sook

    2012-11-01

    Phase Shift Reflectometry has recently been seen as a novel alternative to interferometry since it can provide warpage measurement over large areas with no need for large optical components. To confirm its capability and to explore the use of this method for sub-surface defect detection, a Chinese magic mirror is used. This bronze mirror which dates back to the Chinese Han Dynasty appears at first sight to be an ordinary convex mirror. However, unlike a normal mirror, when illuminated by a beam of light, an image is formed onto a screen. It has been hypothesized that there are indentations inside the mirror which alter the path of reflected light rays and hence the reflected image. This paper explores various methods to measure these indentations. Of the methods test Phase Shift Reflectometry (PSR) was found suitable to be the most suitable both in terms of the sensitivity and the field of view.

  5. Remote Strain Sensing of CFRP Using Microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Moore, Jason P.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Composites Project is investigating technologies that increase automated remote inspection of aircraft composite structures. Therefore, microwave Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) is being investigated as a method of enabling rapid remote measurement of strain occurring at the first ply of a composite fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) structure using Radio Frequency (RF) Electro-Magnetic (EM) radiation. While microwave reflectometry has been used to detect disbonds in CFRP structures, its use in detecting strain has been limited. This work will present data demonstrating the measurement of the reactance changes due to loading conditions that are indicative of strain in a CFRP structure. In addition, the basic EM signature will be presented along with an analysis of temperature and humidity effects.

  6. Recent Developments in Synchrotron Mössbauer Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deák, L.; Bottyán, L.; Major, M.; Nagy, D. L.; Spiering, H.; Szilágyi, E.; Tanczikó, F.

    2002-12-01

    Synchrotron Mössbauer Reflectometry (SMR), the grazing incidence nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation, can be applied to perform depth-selective phase analysis and to determine the isotopic and magnetic structure of thin films and multilayers. Principles and methodological aspects of SMR are briefly reviewed. Off-specular SMR provides information from the lateral structure of multilayers. In anti-ferromagneticly coupled systems the size of magnetic domains can be measured.

  7. Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.G.; Durkee, J.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in the design and demonstrations of a small, long-lived nuclear heat and electric power source for potential applications at remote sites where alternate fossil energy systems would not be cost effective. This paper describes the neutronic design analysis that was performed to arrive at two conceptual designs, one using thermoelectric conversion, the other using an organic Rankine cycle. To meet the design objectives and constraints a number of scoping and optimization studies were carried out. The results of calculations of control worths, temperature coefficients of reactivity and fuel depletion effects are reported.

  8. The drying process of concrete: a neutron radiography study.

    PubMed

    de Beer, F C; Strydom, W J; Griesel, E J

    2004-10-01

    The natural drying process of concrete, which has a significant effect on its characteristics, for example durability, was studied at the neutron radiography facility at SAFARI-1 nuclear research reactor, operated by Necsa. Monitoring of the movement of the water in concrete samples, which were wet cured for one day and covered on all the sides but one, was done by means of a CCD camera system. In this paper the methodology in observing the drying process will be described together with results obtained from this investigation. The measured water content and porosity results were quantified and compared reasonably well with conventional gravimetrical measurements. PMID:15246408

  9. Solid phases of spatially nanoconfined oxygen: A neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Kojda, Danny; Wallacher, Dirk; Hofmann, Tommy; Baudoin, Simon; Hansen, Thomas; Huber, Patrick

    2014-01-14

    We present a comprehensive neutron scattering study on solid oxygen spatially confined in 12 nm wide alumina nanochannels. Elastic scattering experiments reveal a structural phase sequence known from bulk oxygen. With decreasing temperature cubic γ-, orthorhombic β- and monoclinic α-phases are unambiguously identified in confinement. Weak antiferromagnetic ordering is observed in the confined monoclinic α-phase. Rocking scans reveal that oxygen nanocrystals inside the tubular channels do not form an isotropic powder. Rather, they exhibit preferred orientations depending on thermal history and the very mechanisms, which guide the structural transitions.

  10. Solid phases of spatially nanoconfined oxygen: a neutron scattering study.

    PubMed

    Kojda, Danny; Wallacher, Dirk; Baudoin, Simon; Hansen, Thomas; Huber, Patrick; Hofmann, Tommy

    2014-01-14

    We present a comprehensive neutron scattering study on solid oxygen spatially confined in 12 nm wide alumina nanochannels. Elastic scattering experiments reveal a structural phase sequence known from bulk oxygen. With decreasing temperature cubic γ-, orthorhombic β- and monoclinic α-phases are unambiguously identified in confinement. Weak antiferromagnetic ordering is observed in the confined monoclinic α-phase. Rocking scans reveal that oxygen nanocrystals inside the tubular channels do not form an isotropic powder. Rather, they exhibit preferred orientations depending on thermal history and the very mechanisms, which guide the structural transitions. PMID:24437900

  11. Neutron diffraction study of the deuterides of Ti Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Yuan, Xuezhong; Wu, Erdong; Chen, Dongfeng; Gou, Cheng

    2006-11-01

    The structures of the deuterides of seven Ti-Mo alloys with different Mo contents ranging from 5 to 40 at% are studied by neutron diffraction. After deuterization at ∼150 kPa, the saturated deuterides containing ∼1.8-1.9 deuterium per alloy atom with a δ-phase titanium hydride type of structure have formed. The lattice constants of the deuterides decrease consistently with the increase of Mo content. The analysis of the line broadening of the diffraction patterns has revealed the relationship between lattice deformation and the contents of the alloying Mo in the deuterides.

  12. Infrared absorption study of neutron-transmutation-doped germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, I. S.; Haller, E. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using high-resolution far-infrared Fourier transform absorption spectroscopy and Hall effect measurements, the evolution of the shallow acceptor and donor impurity levels in germanium during and after the neutron transmutation doping process was studied. The results show unambiguously that the gallium acceptor level concentration equals the concentration of transmutated Ge-70 atoms during the whole process indicating that neither recoil during transmutation nor gallium-defect complex formation play significant roles. The arsenic donor levels appear at full concentration only after annealing for 1 h at 450 C. It is shown that this is due to donor-radiation-defect complex formation. Again, recoil does not play a significant role.

  13. Precision Neutron Decay Studies with the Nab and UCNB Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprow, Aaron; Nab Collaboration; UCNB Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Precision neutron decay correlation experiments are a sensitive means to study the standard model and probe for beyond the standard model physics. Nab and UCNB are two such experiments that will measure the neutrino-electron correlation term, a, and the neutrino asymmetry, B, respectively. Thick, highly-segmented silicon detectors will be used to directly measure the proton and electron from each decay event in coincidence, leading to the extraction of these angular correlations. Preliminary work to understand the systematic uncertainties associated with these experiments, as well as the early analysis of data taken from the 2015-2016 beam time at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be presented.

  14. STUDY OF A 10-MW CONTINUOUS SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.LUDEWIG,H.SHAPIRO,S.

    2003-05-12

    This paper reports on the feasibility study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac as the driver for an Accelerator-based Continuous Neutron Source (ACNS) [1] to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Linac is to be operated in the Continuous Wave (CW) mode to produce an average 10 MW of beam power. The Linac beam energy is taken to be 1.25 GeV. The required average proton beam intensity in exit is then 8 mA.

  15. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; et al

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  16. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  17. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  18. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg). PMID:26827330

  19. Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

  20. Analysis of bacterial growth by UV/Vis spectroscopy and laser reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Gomar, Mary Carmen; Viramontes-Gamboa, Gonzalo; Peña-Gomar, Grethel; Ortiz Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Hernández Ramírez, Mariano

    2012-10-01

    This work presents a preliminary study on an experimental analysis of the lactobacillus bacterial growth in liquid medium with and without the presence of silver nanoparticles. The study aims to quantify the bactericidal effect of nanoparticles. Quantification of bacterial growth at different times was analyzed by spectroscopy UV/visible and laser reflectometry near the critical angle. From these two techniques the best results were obtained by spectroscopy, showing that as the concentration of silver nanoparticles increases, it inhibits the growth of bacteria, it only grows 63% of the population. Regarding Laser Reflectometry, the variation of reflectance near the critical angle is measured in real time. The observed results at short times are reasonable, since they indicate a gradual growth of the bacteria and the stabilization stage of the population. But at long time, the observed results show abrupt changes caused by temperature effects. The bacteria were isolated from samples taken from commercial yougurth, and cultured in MRS broth at pH 6.5, and controlled with citric acid and constant temperature of 32 °C. Separately, silver nanoparticles were synthesized at 3 °C from aqueous solutions of 1.0 mM silver nitrate and chemically reduced with sodium borohydride to 2.0 mM, with magnetic stirring.

  1. Studies of Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dana; TKE Team

    2014-09-01

    A Frisch-gridded ionization chamber and the double energy (2E) analysis method were used to study mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release from neutron-induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. Despite decades of fission research, little or no TKE data exist for high incident neutron energies. Additional average TKE information at incident neutron energies relevant to defense- and energy-related applications will provide a valuable observable for benchmarking simulations. The data can also be used as inputs in theoretical fission models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on 238U, 235U, and 239Pu will be presented. LA-UR-14-24921.

  2. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  3. Improved time-frequency analysis of ASDEX Upgrade reflectometry data using the reassigned spectrogram technique.

    PubMed

    Varela, P; Silva, A; da Silva, F; da Graça, S; Manso, M E; Conway, G D

    2010-10-01

    The spectrogram is one of the best-known time-frequency distributions suitable to analyze signals whose energy varies both in time and frequency. In reflectometry, it has been used to obtain the frequency content of FM-CW signals for density profile inversion and also to study plasma density fluctuations from swept and fixed frequency data. Being implemented via the short-time Fourier transform, the spectrogram is limited in resolution, and for that reason several methods have been developed to overcome this problem. Among those, we focus on the reassigned spectrogram technique that is both easily automated and computationally efficient requiring only the calculation of two additional spectrograms. In each time-frequency window, the technique reallocates the spectrogram coordinates to the region that most contributes to the signal energy. The application to ASDEX Upgrade reflectometry data results in better energy concentration and improved localization of the spectral content of the reflected signals. When combined with the automatic (data driven) window length spectrogram, this technique provides improved profile accuracy, in particular, in regions where frequency content varies most rapidly such as the edge pedestal shoulder. PMID:21061480

  4. QCM-D and reflectometry instrument: applications to supported lipid structures and their biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Malin; Svedhem, Sofia; Wang, Guoliang; Richter, Ralf; Rodahl, Michael; Kasemo, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    A novel setup was recently developed, combining quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and optical reflectometry for measurements on one and the same surface of, for example, biomolecular adlayers and interactions ( Rev. Sci. Instr. 2008 , 79 075107 ). This combination was chosen on the basis of prior experience of using QCM-D and optical techniques in separate instruments, which showed both the advantage of employing multiple techniques and the disadvantage of not working with the same surface and (flow) cell. The new instrument provides, for example, information about associated water and structural changes of the adlayers that would often pass unnoticed or be hard to interpret or quantify, using either technique alone. The triple response instrument (QCM-D frequency and dissipation and reflectometry) is here applied to four model systems: (A) formation of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), (B) lipid exchange between a SLB and transiently adsorbed vesicles, (C) binding of a hydrated peptide on a functionalized SLB, and (D) streptavidin coupling to a biotinylated SLB, followed by attachment of biotinylated vesicles. The results demonstrate three major advantages of the combination instrument: (i) much faster data collection because the experiments are done on one surface for all signals, (ii) a common time axis and the same relative importance of surface kinetics and mass transport because the same liquid sample and the same transport conditions apply, and (iii) new features are discovered about the studied system that would be difficult to unravel in separate instruments. PMID:19035651

  5. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed a study on the structure of trypsin trimmed histone octamers using small angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies and nuclear magnetic resonance. We have also completed studies on the structure of TFIIIA induced DNA bending by a circular permutation gel electrophoresis assay. Individual acetylated species of core histones from butyrate treated HeLa cells were isolated and reconstituted into nucleosomes using a 5S rDNA nucleosome positioning DNA sequence from sea urchin. These nucleosomes were characterized by sulfhydryl group probing, nucleoprotein particle gel electrophoresis and DNase I footprinting. Fully acetylated species of histones H3 and H4 were also reconstituted in closed circular minichromosomes and the effect of DNA topology changes caused by acetylation was studied. Finally, protamines isolated from human sperm were characterized and a full set of core histones were isolated and characterized. 7 refs.

  6. Neutron beam studies for a medical therapy reactor.

    PubMed

    Neuman, W A

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Medical Therapy Reactor (MTR) for neutron capture therapy (NCT) has been performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The initial emphasis of the conceptual design was toward the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and other presently incurable cancers. The design goal of the facility is to provide routine patient treatments both in brief time intervals (approximately 10 minutes) and inexpensively. The conceptual study has shown this goal to be achievable by locating an MTR at a major medical facility. This paper addresses the next step in the conceptual design process: a guide to the optimization of the epithermal-neutron filter and collimator assembly for the treatment of brain tumors. The current scope includes the sensitivity of the treatment beam to variations in filter length, gamma shield length, and collimator lengths as well as exit beam aperture size. The study shows the areas which can provide the greatest latitude in improving beam intensity and quality. Suggestions are given for future areas of optimization of beam filtering and collimation. PMID:2268234

  7. Study of SMM flares in gamma-rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the research supported by NASA grant NAGW-2755 and lists the papers and publications produced through the grant. The objective of the work was to study solar flares that produced observable signals from high-energy (greater than 10 MeV) gamma-rays and neutrons in the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS). In 3 of 4 flares that had been studied previously, most of the neutrons and neutral pions appear to have been produced after the 'main' impulsive phase as determined from hard x-rays and gamma-rays. We, therefore, proposed to analyze the timing of the high-energy radiation, and its implications for the acceleration, trapping, and transport of flare particles. It was equally important to characterize the spectral shapes of the interacting energetic electrons and protons - another key factor in constraining possible particle acceleration mechanisms. In section 2.0, we discuss the goals of the research. In section 3.0, we summarize the results of the research. In section 4.0, we list the papers and publications produced under the grant. Preprints or reprints of the publications are attached as appendices.

  8. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of novel quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp W.

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to study the magnetic excitation spectrum of three quantum magnets: (i) the double perovskite Ba2FeReO 6; (ii) the two-dimensional square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet Sr2CuO2Cl2; and (iii) the quasi-two-dimensional frustrated two-leg ladder BiCu2PO6. We have conducted inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of the double perovskite compound Ba2FeReO6. The measurements revealed two well defined dispersing spin wave modes. No excitation gap was observable and the spectrum can be explained with a local moment model incorporating the interactions of Fe spins with spin-orbital locked degrees of freedom on the Re site. The results reveal that both significant electronic correlations and spin-orbit coupling on the Re site play a significant role in the spin dynamics of Ba2FeReO6. High resolution neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations in the parent cuprate Sr2CuO2Cl2 reveal a significant dispersion and momentum dependent damping of the zone boundary magnons. We directly compare our measurements with previous resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements and find a ~25 meV discrepancy between the two techniques for the measured zone boundary energy at (1/2, 0). The deviations are greatest precisely in the region of phase space where the magnon damping is strongest. This comparison shows that the inelastic x-ray spectrum must contain significant contributions from higher energy excitations not previously considered. Our measurements demonstrate that the high energy continuum of magnetic fluctuations is a ubiquitous feature of the magnetic spectrum among insulating monolayer cuprates, and that these excitations couple to both inelastic neutron and light scattering. A comprehensive series of inelastic neutron scattering measurements was used to investigate spin excitations in the frustrated two-leg ladder compound BiCu2PO6. The measurements revealed six branches of steeply dispersing triplon

  9. Neutron scattering studies of 54,56Fe with monoenergetic neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Combs, B. M.; Henderson, S. L.; Sidwell, L. C.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Garza, E.; Steves, J.; Chakraborty, A.; Crider, B. P.; Prados-Estevez, F. M.; Kumar, A.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Ross, T. J.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-10-01

    Neutron scattering data for Fe are important for the development of next generation fission reactors, since Fe is an important structural material in all proposed reactor designs, as well as in existing reactors. How neutrons interact with Fe has an important impact on fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of fission reactors. While differential scattering cross sections have been previously measured at several incident neutron energies in the fast neutron region, questions remain regarding the uncertainties for existing cross sections and for neutron inelastic scattering. Elastic and inelastic differential scattering cross sections have been measured on 54,56Fe at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory in the fast neutron energy region between 1.7 and 4 MeV. Results from our measurements and comparisons to model calculations will be presented. This material is based on work supported by the Department of Energy under grant NEUP: NU-12-KY-UK-0201-05 and by the Cowan Physics Fund at the Univ. of Dallas.

  10. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin.