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Sample records for neutron transport resolution

  1. Design studies for a high-resolution, transportable neutron radiography/radioscopy system

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, G.H.; Micklich, B.J.; McMichael, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    A preliminary design has been developed for a high-resolution, transportable neutron radiology system (TNRS) concept. The primary system requirement is taken to be a thermal neutron flux of 10[sup 6] n/(cm[sup 2]-sec) with a L/D ratio of 100. The approach is to use an accelerator-driven neutron source, with a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as the primary accelerator component. Initial concepts for all of the major components of the system have been developed,and selected key parts have been examined further. An overview of the system design is presented, together with brief summaries of the concepts for the ion source, low energy beam transport (LEBT), RFQ, high energy beam transport (HEBT), target, moderator, collimator, image collection, power, cooling, vacuum, structure, robotics, control system, data analysis, transport vehicle, and site support. The use of trade studies for optimizing the TNRS concept are also described.

  2. Coupled multi-group neutron photon transport for the simulation of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.

    2009-08-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples.

  3. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Walker, Steven A.; Badavi, Francis F.

    2010-01-01

    Long term human presence in space requires the inclusion of radiation constraints in mission planning and the design of shielding materials, structures, and vehicles. In this paper, the numerical error associated with energy discretization in HZETRN is addressed. An inadequate numerical integration scheme in the transport algorithm is shown to produce large errors in the low energy portion of the neutron and light ion fluence spectra. It is further shown that the errors result from the narrow energy domain of the neutron elastic cross section spectral distributions, and that an extremely fine energy grid is required to resolve the problem under the current formulation. Two numerical methods are developed to provide adequate resolution in the energy domain and more accurately resolve the neutron elastic interactions. Convergence testing is completed by running the code for various environments and shielding materials with various energy grids to ensure stability of the newly implemented method.

  4. Coupled Neutron Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircrafts exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETC-HEDS, FLUKA, and MCNPX, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light particle transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  5. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Hau, I D

    2006-05-25

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on {sup 6}LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, {alpha}) reactions with fast neutrons in {sup 6}Li and {sup 10}B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies k{sub B}T on the order of {mu}eV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution {Delta}E {approx} (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C){sup 1/2}, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB{sub 2} absorber using thermal neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in {sup 7}Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a {sup 6}Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}){sup 3}H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  6. Singular perturbation applications in neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Losey, D.C.; Lee, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    This is a paper on singular perturbation applications in neutron transport for submission at the next ANS conference. A singular perturbation technique was developed for neutron transport analysis by postulating expansion in terms of a small ordering parameter {eta}. Our perturbation analysis is carried, without approximation, through {Omicron}({eta}{sup 2}) to derive a material interface correction for diffusion theory. Here we present results from an analytical application of the perturbation technique to a fixed source problem and then describe and implementation of the technique in a computational scheme.

  7. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    Neutron radiography has the ability to differentiate between gas and liquid in two-phase flow due both to the density difference and the high neutron scattering probability of hydrogen. Previous studies have used dynamic neutron radiography -- in both real-time and high-speed -- for air-water, steam-water and gas-liquid metal two-phase flow measurements. Radiography with thermal neutrons is straightforward and efficient as thermal neutrons are easier to detect with relatively higher efficiency and can be easily extracted from nuclear reactor beam ports. The quality of images obtained using neutron radiography and the imaging speed depend on the neutron beam intensity at the imaging plane. A high quality neutron beam, with thermal neutron intensity greater than 3.0x 10 6 n/cm2-s and a collimation ratio greater than 100 at the imaging plane, is required for effective dynamic neutron radiography up to 2000 frames per second. The primary objectives of this work are: (1) to optimize a neutron radiography facility for dynamic neutron radiography applications and (2) to investigate a new technique for three-dimensional neutron radiography using information obtained from neutron scattering. In this work, neutron transport analysis and experimental validation of a dynamic neutron radiography facility is studied with consideration of real-time and high-speed neutron radiography requirements. A beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility, for a target thermal neutron flux of 1.0x107 n/cm2-s, has been analyzed, constructed and experimentally verified at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance is evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes using copper activation flux-mapping technique. The development of different facility components, such as beam tube liner, gamma ray filter, beam shutter and biological shield, is achieved analytically using neutron attenuation and divergence theories. Monte

  8. Higher Resolution Neutron Velocity Spectrometer Measurements of Enriched Uranium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Rainwater, L. J.; Havens, W. W. Jr.

    1950-08-09

    The slow neutron transmission of a sample of enriched U containing 3.193 gm/cm2 was investigated with a resolution width of 1 microsec/m. Results of transmission measurements are shown graphically. (B.J.H.)

  9. High spatial resolution fast-neutron imaging detectors for Pulsed Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Katz, D.; Sayag, E.; Shmueli, I.; Cohen, Y.; Tal, A.; Vagish, Z.; Bromberger, B.; Dangendorf, V.; Mugai, D.; Tittelmeier, K.; Weierganz, M.

    2009-05-01

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber scintillator screen and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). This detector is designed for energy-selective neutron radiography with nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1-10 MeV) neutron beams. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, such a detector is capable of simultaneously capturing several images, each at a different neutron energy (TOF). In addition, a gamma-ray image can also be simultaneously registered, allowing combined neutron/gamma inspection of objects. This permits combining the sensitivity of the fast-neutron resonance method to low-Z elements with that of gamma radiography to high-Z materials.

  10. Measurement of water content in polymer electrolyte membranes using high resolution neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John; Mukherjee, Partha P; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David

    2010-01-01

    Sufficient water content within a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) is necessary for adequate ionic conductivity. Membrane hydration is therefore a fundamental requirement for fuel cell operation. The hydration state of the membrane affects the water transport within, as both the diffusion coefficient and electro-osmotic drag depend on the water content. Membrane's water uptake is conventionally measured ex situ by weighing free-swelling samples equilibrated at controlled water activity. In the present study, water profiles in Nafion{reg_sign} membranes were measured using the high-resolution neutron imaging. The state-of-the-art, 10 {micro}m resolution neutron detector is capable of resolving water distributions across N1120, N1110 and N117 membranes. It provides a means to measure the water uptake and transport properties of fuel cell membranes in situ.

  11. High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P; Makundan, Rangachary; Spendelow, Jacob S; Borup, Rodney L; Hussey, D S; Jacobson, D L; Arif, M

    2009-01-01

    Water transport in the ionomeric membrane, typically Nafion{reg_sign}, has profound influence on the performance of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, in terms of internal resistance and overall water balance. In this work, high resolution neutron imaging of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane is presented in order to measure water content and through-plane gradients in situ under disparate temperature and humidification conditions.

  12. Stable Difference Schemes for the Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Taskin, Abdulgafur

    2011-09-22

    The initial boundary value problem for the neutron transport equation is considered. The first and second orders of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are presented. In applications, the stability estimates for solutions of difference schemes for the approximate solution of the neutron transport equation are obtained. Numerical techniques are developed and algorithms are tested on an example in MATLAB.

  13. Neutron Transport Characteristics of a Nuclear Reactor Based Dynamic Neutron Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Khaial, Anas M.; Harvel, Glenn D.; Chang, Jen-Shih

    2006-07-01

    An advanced dynamic neutron imaging system has been constructed in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) for nondestructive testing and multi-phase flow studies in energy and environmental applications. A high quality neutron beam is required with a thermal neutron flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}-s and a collimation ratio of 120 at image plane to promote high-speed neutron imaging up to 2000 frames per second. Neutron source strength and neutron transport have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance was evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and simple analytical neutron transport calculations were performed based upon these measured neutron fluxes to predict facility components in accordance with high-speed dynamic neutron imaging and operation safety requirements. Monte-Carlo simulations (using MCNP-4B code) with multiple neutron energy groups have also been used to validate neutron beam parameters and to ensure shielding capabilities of facility shutter and cave walls. Neutron flux distributions at the image plane and the neutron beam characteristics were experimentally measured by irradiating a two-dimensional array of Copper foils and using a real-time neutron radiography system. The neutron image characteristics -- such as neutron flux, image size, beam quality -- measured experimentally and predicted numerically for beam tube, beam shutter and radiography cave are compared and discussed in detail in this paper. The experimental results show that thermal neutron flux at image plane is nearly uniform over an imaging area of 20.0-cm diameter and its magnitude ranges from 8.0 x 10{sup 6} - 1.0 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}-sec while the neutron-to-gamma ratio is 6.0 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}-{mu}Sv. (authors)

  14. Neutron imaging of root water uptake, transport and hydraulic redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2012-12-01

    within the roots and soil. Even so, sub-millimeter scale image resolution could reveal the timing and relative magnitudes of root water uptake, internal rehydration and redistribution of water within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages - relationships not well characterized by other techniques.n situ root uptake and transport of deuterium oxide (D2O) in young maize seedlings based on neutron radiography.

  15. Efficiency and spatial resolution of the CASCADE thermal neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhli, M.; Allmendinger, F.; Häußler, W.; Schröder, T.; Klein, M.; Meven, M.; Schmidt, U.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the CASCADE project - a detection system, which has been designed for the purposes of neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy and which is continuously further developed and adapted to various applications. It features 2D spatially resolved detection of thermal neutrons at high rates. The CASCADE detector is composed of a stack of solid 10B coated Gas Electron Multiplier foils, which serve both as a neutron converter and as an amplifier for the primary ionization deposited in the standard counting gas environment. This multi-layer setup efficiently increases the detection efficiency and by extracting the signal of the charge traversing the stack the conversion layer can be identified allowing a precise determination of the time-of-flight. The spatial resolution is found by optical contrast determination to be σ =(1.39 ± 0.05) mm and by divergence corrected aperture measurements σ =(1.454 ± 0.007) mm , which is in agreement with the simulated detector model. Furthermore this enabled to investigate and describe the non-Gaussian resolution function. At the HEiDi diffractometer the absolute detection efficiency has been studied. At 0.6 Å for the 6 layer detector, which is currently part of the RESEDA spectrometer, an efficiency of 7.8% has been measured, which by means of Monte Carlo simulations translates to (21.0±1.5)% for thermal neutrons at 1.8 Å and (46.9±3.3)% at 5.4 Å.

  16. Multiphase Flow Characterization Using Simultaneous High Resolution Neutron and X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaManna, J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow in geologic materials is an important area of research for hydrology and oil recovery. A valuable tool for determining how liquid water and/or hydrocarbons transport through soils and rocks is neutron tomography due to its high sensitivity to hydrogen. This technique allows for the 3D reconstruction of the liquid phase in the sample. In order to resolve the solid phase structure of the sample it is necessary to perform x-ray tomography which often must be conducted at a separate facility from the neutron imaging. When imaging deformable samples or stochastic flow this delay in imaging modes ruins the analysis as the sample is no longer in an identical state. To address this issue and bring a unique capability to NIST, an instrument has been commissioned for the simultaneous imaging with neutrons and x-rays. The new system orients a micro-focus 90 kV x-ray beam 90° to the neutron beam which facilitates rapid dual-mode tomography of samples. Current highest spatial resolutions are 20 μm and 10 μm for the neutron and x-ray detectors, respectively, with upcoming improvements. This presentation will focus on introducing the new system and demonstrating its ability with several cases. Examples of high resolution water uptake and high speed imaging of uptake dynamics will be given.

  17. Ultra high resolution neutron scattering: Neutron Resonance Spin-Echo and Larmor Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Andrew; Keller, Thomas; Keimer, Bernhard

    2012-02-01

    The TRISP spectrometer at the FRM II neutron source near Munich, Germany, is a unique world-leading neutron scattering instrument which employs the Neutron Resonance Spin-Echo technique (NRSE). Linewidths of dispersive excitations with energy transfers up to 50 meV can be measured with an energy resolution in the μeV range without the restrictive flux limitations that normally apply to high resolution neutron triple-axis spectrometers. Pioneering studies on the electron-phonon interaction in elemental superconductorsootnotetextP. Aynajian et al., Science 319 1509 (2008) and the lifetimes of magnetic excitations in archetypal magnetic systems will be reviewed.ootnotetextS. Bayrakci et al., Science 312 1928 (2006) The instrument can also be used as a Larmor diffractometer, enabling d-spacings to be measured with a resolution of δdd ˜10-6, i.e. more than one order of magnitude more sensitive than conventional diffraction techniques.ootnotetextC. Pfleiderer et al., Science 316 1871 (2007) Ongoing and future NRSE and Larmor diffraction projects will be outlined, especially in regard to prospective studies which will take full advantage of the new low temperature and high pressure sample environment capabilities now available at TRISP.

  18. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, C.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Dazeley, S.; Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M. D.; Vetter, K.

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm2 rising to 5000 cm2. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm2 and 2500 cm2. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  19. Neutron transport in Eulerian coordinates with bulk material motion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R. S.; Dahl, J. A.; Fichtl, E. D.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    A consistent, numerically stable algorithm for the solution of the neutron transport equation in the presence of a moving material background is presented for one-dimensional spherical geometry. Manufactured solutions are used to demonstrate the correctness and stability of our numerical algorithm. The importance of including moving material corrections is shown for the r-process in proto-neutron stars. (authors)

  20. Improving the Spatial Resolution of Neutron Imaging at Paul Scherrer Institut - The Neutron Microscope Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trtik, Pavel; Hovind, Jan; Grünzweig, Christian; Bollhalder, Alex; Thominet, Vincent; David, Christian; Kaestner, Anders; Lehmann, Eberhard H.

    Here we present results stemming from the first prototype of the Neutron Microscope instrument at Paul ScherrerInstitut (PSI). The instrument is based on a very thin gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb+) scintillator screen and a magnifying optics. The Neutron Microscope prototype has been tested at the ICON and the BOA beamlines at PSI and sub-10 μm features can be clearly resolved on a focussed ion beam (FIB) enhance test object - a gadolinium-based Siemens star. The spatial resolution of the images of the gadolinium-based Siemensstar assessed by Fourier ring correlation was about 7.6 μm. The outlook for future improvement of the Neutron Microscope system is presented.

  1. Scattered Neutron Tomography Based on A Neutron Transport Inverse Problem

    SciTech Connect

    William Charlton

    2007-07-01

    Neutron radiography and computed tomography are commonly used techniques to non-destructively examine materials. Tomography refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object from either transmission or reflection data collected by illuminating the object from many different directions.

  2. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically

  3. Transport coefficients in superfluid neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Manuel, Cristina; Sarkar, Sreemoyee; Tarrus, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    We study the shear and bulk viscosity coefficients as well as the thermal conductivity as arising from the collisions among phonons in superfluid neutron stars. We use effective field theory techniques to extract the allowed phonon collisional processes, written as a function of the equation of state and the gap of the system. The shear viscosity due to phonon scattering is compared to calculations of that coming from electron collisions. We also comment on the possible consequences for r-mode damping in superfluid neutron stars. Moreover, we find that phonon collisions give the leading contribution to the bulk viscosities in the core of the neutron stars. We finally obtain a temperature-independent thermal conductivity from phonon collisions and compare it with the electron-muon thermal conductivity in superfluid neutron stars.

  4. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  5. Quantification of Water Content Across a Cement-clay Interface Using High Resolution Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafizadeh, A.; Gimmi, T.; Van Loon, L.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E.; Maeder, U. K.; Churakov, S. V.

    In many designs for radioactive waste repositories, cement and clay will come into direct contact. The geochemical contrast between cement and clay will lead to mass fluxes across the interface, which consequently results in alteration of structural and transport properties of both materials that may affect the performance of the multi-barrier system. We present an experimental approach to study cement-clay interactions with a cell to accommodate small samples of cement and clay. The cell design allows both in situ measurement of water content across the sample using neutron radiography and measurement of transport parameters using through-diffusion tracer experiments. The aim of the high-resolution neutron radiography experiments was to monitor changes in water content (porosity) and their spatial extent. Neutron radiographs of several evolving cement-clay interfaces delivered quantitative data which allow resolving local water contents within the sample domain. In the present work we explored the uncertainties of the derived water contents with regard to various input parameters and with regard to the applied image correction procedures. Temporal variation of measurement conditions created absolute uncertainty of the water content in the order of ±0.1 (m3/m3), which could not be fully accounted for by correction procedures. Smaller relative changes in water content between two images can be derived by specific calibrations to two sample regions with different, invariant water contents.

  6. The Lattice Boltzmann Method applied to neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Erasmus, B.; Van Heerden, F. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the applicability of the Lattice Boltzmann Method to neutron transport is investigated. One of the main features of the Lattice Boltzmann method is the simultaneous discretization of the phase space of the problem, whereby particles are restricted to move on a lattice. An iterative solution of the operator form of the neutron transport equation is presented here, with the first collision source as the starting point of the iteration scheme. A full description of the discretization scheme is given, along with the quadrature set used for the angular discretization. An angular refinement scheme is introduced to increase the angular coverage of the problem phase space and to mitigate lattice ray effects. The method is applied to a model problem to investigate its applicability to neutron transport and the results are compared to a reference solution calculated, using MCNP. (authors)

  7. Neutron radiography with sub-15 μm resolution through event centroiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; McPhate, Jason B.; Vallerga, John V.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Bruce Feller, W.; Lehmann, Eberhard; Kaestner, Anders; Boillat, Pierre; Panzner, Tobias; Filges, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    Conversion of thermal and cold neutrons into a strong ˜1 ns electron pulse with an absolute neutron detection efficiency as high as 50-70% makes detectors with 10B-doped Microchannel Plates (MCPs) very attractive for neutron radiography and microtomography applications. The subsequent signal amplification preserves the location of the event within the MCP pore (typically 6-10 μm in diameter), providing the possibility to perform neutron counting with high spatial resolution. Different event centroiding techniques of the charge landing on a patterned anode enable accurate reconstruction of the neutron position, provided the charge footprints do not overlap within the time required for event processing. The new fast 2×2 Timepix readout with >1.2 kHz frame rates provides the unique possibility to detect neutrons with sub-15 μm resolution at several MHz/cm2 counting rates. The results of high resolution neutron radiography experiments presented in this paper, demonstrate the sub-15 μm resolution capability of our detection system. The high degree of collimation and cold spectrum of ICON and BOA beamlines combined with the high spatial resolution and detection efficiency of MCP-Timepix detectors are crucial for high contrast neutron radiography and microtomography with high spatial resolution. The next generation of Timepix electronics with sparsified readout should enable counting rates in excess of 107 n/cm2/s taking full advantage of high beam intensity of present brightest neutron imaging facilities.

  8. Computing the moments of the neutron population using deterministic neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fichtl, E. D.; Baker, R. S.

    2013-07-01

    It is important to treat the inherent stochasticity of the fission process in systems where the behavior of the system is stochastic. This occurs when there are few neutrons in the system, or when the neutron source is weak. In order to characterize such systems, the capability to compute the first four moments of the neutron population distribution has been added to the deterministic neutral particle transport code, PARTISN. The moments are then fitted to probability density functions from the Pearson family. PARTISN is compared against MCNP6, with which it agrees well. (authors)

  9. High resolution neutron imaging capabilities at BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Morgano, M.; Panzner, T.; Lehmann, E.; Filgers, U.; Vallerga, J. V.; McPhate, J. B.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-06-01

    The cold neutron spectrum of the Beamline for neutron Optics and other Applications (BOA) at Paul Scherrer Institut enables high contrast neutron imaging because neutron cross sections for many materials increase with neutron wavelength. However, for many neutron imaging applications, spatial resolution can be as important as contrast. In this paper the neutron transmission imaging capabilities of an MCP/Timepix detector installed at the BOA beamline are presented, demonstrating the possibilities for studying sub-20 μm features in various samples. In addition to conventional neutron radiography and microtomography, the high degree of neutron polarization at the BOA beamline can be very attractive for imaging of magnetic fields, as demonstrated by our measurements. We also show that a collimated cold neutron beamline combined with a high resolution detector can produce image artifacts, (e.g. edge enhancements) due to neutron refraction and scattering. The results of our experiments indicate that the BOA beamline is a valuable addition to neutron imaging facilities, providing improved and sometimes unique capabilities for non-destructive studies with cold neutrons.

  10. High resolution neutron imaging of water in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John R; Spendelow, Jacob S

    2008-01-01

    Optimal water management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells is critical to improving the performance and durability of fuel cell systems especially during transient, start-up and shut-down operations. For example, while a high water content is desirable for improved membrane and catalyst ionomer conductivity, high water content can also block gas access to the triple-phase boundary resulting in lowered performance due to catalyst and gas diffusion layer (GDL) flooding. Visualizing liquid water by neutron imaging has been used over the past decade to study the water distribution inside operating fuel cells. In this paper, the results from our imaging at NIST using their recently installed higher resolution ({approx} 25 mm) Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector with a pixel pitch of 14.7 mm are presented. This detector is capable of quantitatively imaging the water inside the MEA (Membrane Electrode Assembly)/GDL (Gas Diffusion Layer) of working fuel cells and can provide the water profiles within these various components in addition to the channel water. Specially designed fuel cells (active area = 2.25 cm{sup 2}) have been used in order to take advantage of the full detector resolution. The cell design is illustrated in a figure where one of the current collector/end plates is shown. The serpentine pattern was machined into a block of aluminum and plated with nickel and then gold to form the flow field. The measurements were performed using beam no. 1 and aperture no. 2 with a fluence rate of 1.9 x 10{sup 6} neutrons cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. The cells were assembled with Gore{sup TM} Primea{sup R} MEAs and SGL Sigracet {sup R} 24 series GDLs (PRIMEA, GORE-SELECT and GORE are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc). All the cells were tested at 80 {sup o}C with 1.2 stoichiometry H{sub 2} and 2.0 stoichiometry air flows.

  11. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  12. 3D Multigroup Sn Neutron Transport Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-02-14

    ATTILA is a 3D multigroup transport code with arbitrary order ansotropic scatter. The transport equation is solved in first order form using a tri-linear discontinuous spatial differencing on an arbitrary tetrahedral mesh. The overall solution technique is source iteration with DSA acceleration of the scattering source. Anisotropic boundary and internal sources may be entered in the form of spherical harmonics moments. Alpha and k eigenvalue problems are allowed, as well as fixed source problems. Forwardmore » and adjoint solutions are available. Reflective, vacumn, and source boundary conditions are available. ATTILA can perform charged particle transport calculations using slowing down (CSD) terms. ATTILA can also be used to peform infra-red steady-state calculations for radiative transfer purposes.« less

  13. 3D Multigroup Sn Neutron Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, John; Wareing, Todd; Pautz, Shawn

    2001-02-14

    ATTILA is a 3D multigroup transport code with arbitrary order ansotropic scatter. The transport equation is solved in first order form using a tri-linear discontinuous spatial differencing on an arbitrary tetrahedral mesh. The overall solution technique is source iteration with DSA acceleration of the scattering source. Anisotropic boundary and internal sources may be entered in the form of spherical harmonics moments. Alpha and k eigenvalue problems are allowed, as well as fixed source problems. Forward and adjoint solutions are available. Reflective, vacumn, and source boundary conditions are available. ATTILA can perform charged particle transport calculations using slowing down (CSD) terms. ATTILA can also be used to peform infra-red steady-state calculations for radiative transfer purposes.

  14. Grid resolution study of ground water flow and transport.

    PubMed

    Bower, Kathleen M; Gable, Carl W; Zyvoloski, George A

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional grids representing a heterogeneous, ground water system are generated at 10 different resolutions in support of a site-scale flow and transport modeling effort. These grids represent hydrostratigraphy near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consisting of 18 stratigraphic units with contrasting fluid flow and transport properties. The grid generation method allows the stratigraphy to be modeled by numerical grids of different resolution so that comparison studies can be performed to test for grid quality and determine the resolution required to resolve geologic structure and physical processes such as fluid flow and solute transport. The process of generating numerical grids with appropriate property distributions from geologic conceptual models is automated, thus making the entire process easy to implement with fewer user-induced errors. The series of grids of various resolutions are used to assess the level at which increasing resolution no longer influences the flow and solute transport results. Grid resolution is found to be a critical issue for ground water flow and solute transport. The resolution required in a particular instance is a function of the feature size of the model, the intrinsic properties of materials, the specific physics of the problem, and boundary conditions. The asymptotic nature of results related to flow and transport indicate that for a hydrologic model of the heterogeneous hydrostratigraphy under Yucca Mountain, a horizontal grid spacing of 600 m and vertical grid spacing of 40 m resolve the hydrostratigraphic model with sufficient precision to accurately model the hypothetical flow and solute transport to within 5% of the value that would be obtained with much higher resolution. PMID:15726930

  15. In situ quantification and visualization of lithium transport with neutrons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Danny X; Wang, Jinghui; Pan, Ke; Qiu, Jie; Canova, Marcello; Cao, Lei R; Co, Anne C

    2014-09-01

    A real-time quantification of Li transport using a nondestructive neutron method to measure the Li distribution upon charge and discharge in a Li-ion cell is reported. By using in situ neutron depth profiling (NDP), we probed the onset of lithiation in a high-capacity Sn anode and visualized the enrichment of Li atoms on the surface followed by their propagation into the bulk. The delithiation process shows the removal of Li near the surface, which leads to a decreased coulombic efficiency, likely because of trapped Li within the intermetallic material. The developed in situ NDP provides exceptional sensitivity in the temporal and spatial measurement of Li transport within the battery material. This diagnostic tool opens up possibilities to understand rates of Li transport and their distribution to guide materials development for efficient storage mechanisms. Our observations provide important mechanistic insights for the design of advanced battery materials. PMID:25044527

  16. CMFD acceleration of spatial domain-decomposed neutron transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, B. W.; Larsen, E. W.

    2012-07-01

    A significant limitation to parallelizing the solution of neutron transport problems is the need for sweeps across the entirety of the problem domain. Angular domain decomposition is common practice, as the equations for each direction are independent aside from their shared scattering/fission source. Accordingly, spatial domain decomposition does not naturally arise in the transport equations and is therefore less frequent in practice. In this paper, we show that a neutron transport domain can be straightforwardly divided into independent, parallelizable sweep regions, globally linked with the standard CMFD method, with an additional update equation. We verify, theoretically (via Fourier analysis) and computationally, that the convergence properties of this method are stable and nominally as rapid as standard CMFD. (authors)

  17. Singular perturbation analysis of the neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Losey, D.C.; Lee, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    A singular perturbation technique is applied to the one-speed, one- dimensional neutron transport equation with isotropic scattering. Our technique extends previous singular perturbation applications to higher-order and reduces the transport problem to a series of diffusion theory problems in the interior medium and a series of analytically solvable transport problems in the boundary layers. Asymptotic matching links the two solutions, yielding boundary conditions and a composite expansion valid throughout the media. Our formulation generates an accurate correction for the material interface condition used in global diffusion theory calculations.

  18. Graphical User Interface for Simplified Neutron Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Randolph; Carter, Leland L

    2011-07-18

    A number of codes perform simple photon physics calculations. The nuclear industry is lacking in similar tools to perform simplified neutron physics shielding calculations. With the increased importance of performing neutron calculations for homeland security applications and defense nuclear nonproliferation tasks, having an efficient method for performing simple neutron transport calculations becomes increasingly important. Codes such as Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) can perform the transport calculations; however, the technical details in setting up, running, and interpreting the required simulations are quite complex and typically go beyond the abilities of most users who need a simple answer to a neutron transport calculation. The work documented in this report resulted in the development of the NucWiz program, which can create an MCNP input file for a set of simple geometries, source, and detector configurations. The user selects source, shield, and tally configurations from a set of pre-defined lists, and the software creates a complete MCNP input file that can be optionally run and the results viewed inside NucWiz.

  19. A deterministic method for transient, three-dimensional neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, S.; Bentley, C.; DeMeglio, R.; Dunn, M.; Norton, K.; Pevey, R.; Suslov, I.; Dodds, H.L.

    1998-05-01

    A deterministic method for solving the time-dependent, three-dimensional Boltzmann transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons has been developed and evaluated. The methodology used in this study for the time variable of the neutron flux is known as the improved quasi-static (IQS) method. The position, energy, and angle-dependent neutron flux is computed deterministically by using the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code TORT. This paper briefly describes the methodology and selected results. The code developed at the University of Tennessee based on this methodology is called TDTORT. TDTORT can be used to model transients involving voided and/or strongly absorbing regions that require transport theory for accuracy. This code can also be used to model either small high-leakage systems, such as space reactors, or asymmetric control rod movements. TDTORT can model step, ramp, step followed by another step, and step followed by ramp type perturbations. It can also model columnwise rod movement. A special case of columnwise rod movement in a three-dimensional model of a boiling water reactor (BWR) with simple adiabatic feedback is also included. TDTORT is verified through several transient one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and three-dimensional benchmark problems. The results show that the transport methodology and corresponding code developed in this work have sufficient accuracy and speed for computing the dynamic behavior of complex multi-dimensional neutronic systems.

  20. TRINIDY: Transport of ions and neutrons in dynamic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joshua B.

    The TRansport of Ions and Neutrons In DYnamic (TRINIDY) materials code is a new code designed to study the effects of high fluence ion and neutron radiation on solid surfaces. This is done in a quasi-deterministic way, in that the transport of pseudo-particles within target material is accomplished via a Monte Carlo approach while the changes within the target are calculated deterministically by use of a one-dimensional Lagrangian mesh into which each of the tracked pseudo-particles are either deposited or removed. After each cycle the mesh is allowed to relax to a solid state areal density adjusted for its new constituency. As a natural corollary to the change in material compositions in each mesh element comes the resultant change in thickness of the target. Within TRINIDY charged particles are transported by means of a Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) where the elastic nuclear and inelastic electronic stopping forces are decoupled in such a way that the projectile only interacts with one target atom at a time. TRINIDY builds on the legacy of the Transport of Ions in Matter (TRIM), TRIM-SP and TRIDYN codes, in that it uses Biersack's analytic approximation to the quantum scattering integral and a screened coulomb potential as the basic for the charged particle transport. The neutron transport within TRINIDY is based on 32-group elastic scattering and total absorption cross-section data which has been derived from the ENDF7 continuous neutron data sets for each of the naturally occurring elements Hydrogen through Uranium. This work is comprised of essentially three sections. First, there is a detailed technical description of the science behind TRINIDY. Secondly there will be a complete write-up of the validation and verification work done during the development of TRINIDY. Lastly, a series of practical demonstration of particular interest to the semi-conductor industry are presented to exemplify the use of TRINIDY within the realm of applied materials

  1. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H; Ochiai, Kentaro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Shikata, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the (12)C(n, α)(9)Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported. PMID:26931845

  2. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Ochiai, Kentaro; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Shikata, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported.

  3. The AN neutron transport by nodal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarino, A.; Tomatis, D.

    2013-07-01

    The two group diffusion model combined to a nodal approach in space is the preferred scheme for the industrial simulation of nuclear water reactors. The main selling point is the speed of computation, allowing a large number of parametric studies. Anyway, the drawbacks of the underlying diffusion equation may arise with highly heterogeneous interfaces, often encountered in modern UO{sub 2} and MO{sub x} fuel loading patterns, and boron less controlled systems. This paper aims at showing how the simplified AN transport model, equivalent to the well known SPN, can be implemented in standard diffusion codes with minor modifications. Some numerical results are illustrated. (authors)

  4. A multi-DSP system for the neutron high resolution Fourier diffractometer

    SciTech Connect

    Drozdov, V.A.; Butenko, V.A.; Prikhodko, V.I.

    1998-08-01

    The multi-DSP data acquisition system for neutron time-of-flight spectrum measurements requiring fast real-time data processing is designed and is operated at the neutron High Resolution Fourier Diffractometer (HRFD). The use of high performance DSPs and front-end electronics based on flexible PLDs allows increasing of the efficiency of neutron diffractometers with a Fourier chopper and a multi-element detector system by the method of electronic time-focusing.

  5. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, D.; Resnati, F.; Birch, J.; Etxegarai, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Höglund, C.; Hultman, L.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Oliveri, E.; Oksanen, E.; Robinson, L.; Ropelewski, L.; Schmidt, S.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.

    2016-05-01

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer (NMX) require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The μTPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of 10B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with a measured efficiency of 11.8% at a wavelength of 2 Åand a position resolution better than 250 μm.

  6. Tagged Neutron Source for API Inspection Systems with Greatly Enhanced Spatial Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-04

    We recently developed induced fission and transmission imaging methods with time- and directionally-tagged neutrons offer new capabilities for characterization of fissile material configurations and enhanced detection of special nuclear materials (SNM). An Advanced Associated Particle Imaging (API) generator with higher angular resolution and neutron yield than existing systems is needed to fully exploit these methods.

  7. Instrument resolution of the vertical-type cold-neutron reflectometer at HANARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of the instrument resolution of the vertical-type cold-neutron reflectometer installed at HANARO, a research reactor in Korea, are estimated. In order to ascertain differences in the instrument resolution according to two scan modes, i.e., the fixed-slit and the variable-slit scan modes, for the measurement of the neutron reflectivity profile, we estimated the beam status of the instrument. Moreover, because the footprint effect and the limitation of the neutron beam window arise during measurements of the neutron reflectivity profiles and affect the instrument resolution, the causes of their occurrence were determined and a correction method was devised. The neutron reflectivity profiles of a SiO2 standard thin-film sample were measured in a Q range up to 0.2 Å-1 by using the two scan modes, and the sample structure was analyzed with the weighted least-squares fitting program Parratt32. During the process of the least-squares fitting of the neutron reflectivity profiles for the structural analysis, the method used to correct for the footprint effect and the limitation of neutron beam window was found to be reasonable. Also, the modified instrument resolutions in the two scan modes for the vertical-type cold-neutron reflectometer were found to be suitable.

  8. Neutron imaging of ion transport in mesoporous carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ketki; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Walker, Lakeisha M H; Voisin, Sophie; Mayes, Richard T; Kiggans, Jim O; Yiacoumi, Sotira; DePaoli, David W; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2013-07-28

    Neutron imaging is presented as a tool for quantifying the diffusion of ions inside porous materials, such as carbon electrodes used in the desalination process via capacitive deionization and in electrochemical energy-storage devices. Monolithic mesoporous carbon electrodes of ∼10 nm pore size were synthesized based on a soft-template method. The electrodes were used with an aqueous solution of gadolinium nitrate in an electrochemical flow-through cell designed for neutron imaging studies. Sequences of neutron images were obtained under various conditions of applied potential between the electrodes. The images revealed information on the direction and magnitude of ion transport within the electrodes. From the time-dependent concentration profiles inside the electrodes, the average value of the effective diffusion coefficient for gadolinium ions was estimated to be 2.09 ± 0.17 × 10(-11) m(2) s(-1) at 0 V and 1.42 ± 0.06 × 10(-10) m(2) s(-1) at 1.2 V. The values of the effective diffusion coefficient obtained from neutron imaging experiments can be used to evaluate model predictions of the ion transport rate in capacitive deionization and electrochemical energy-storage devices. PMID:23756558

  9. Exact-to-precision generalized perturbation for neutron transport calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.

    2013-07-01

    This manuscript extends the exact-to-precision generalized perturbation theory (E{sub P}GPT), introduced previously, to neutron transport calculation whereby previous developments focused on neutron diffusion calculation only. The E{sub P}GPT collectively denotes new developments in generalized perturbation theory (GPT) that place premium on computational efficiency and defendable accuracy in order to render GPT a standard analysis tool in routine design and safety reactor calculations. EPGPT constructs a surrogate model with quantifiable accuracy which can replace the original neutron transport model for subsequent engineering analysis, e.g. functionalization of the homogenized few-group cross sections in terms of various core conditions, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. This is achieved by reducing the effective dimensionality of the state variable (i.e. neutron angular flux) by projection onto an active subspace. Confining the state variations to the active subspace allows one to construct a small number of what is referred to as the 'active' responses which are solely dependent on the physics model rather than on the responses of interest, the number of input parameters, or the number of points in the state phase space. (authors)

  10. Mathematical models for volume rendering and neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper reviews several different models for light interaction with volume densities of absorbing, glowing, reflecting, or scattering material. They include absorption only, glow only, glow and absorption combined, single scattering of external illumination, and multiple scattering. The models are derived from differential equations, and illustrated on a data set representing a cloud. They are related to corresponding models in neutron transport. The multiple scattering model uses an efficient method to propagate the radiation which does not suffer from the ray effect.

  11. High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-07-01

    Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations and

  12. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  13. Neutron transport in WIMS by the characteristics method

    SciTech Connect

    Halsall, M.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The common methods of solving the neutron transport equation in reactor assembly geometries involve some geometric approximation. The standard differential transport methods and diffusion methods rely on pin-cell smearing, and transmission probability methods make approximations to the boundary fluxes linking pin cells. Integral transport methods (collision probabilities) can cope with pin geometries by numerical integration but require excessive computing times that increase with the square of the number of regions. The characteristics method in WIMS, known as CACTUS, solves the differential transport equation by a numerical tracking technique whose accuracy is limited only by computing resources; in its WIMS implementation it can handle any pin-type geometry without the need for preliminary spatial smearing.

  14. The relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosi, R. M.; Watterson, J. I. W.

    1999-06-10

    Fast neutron radiography as a method for non destructive testing is a fast growing field of research. At the Schonland Research Center for Nuclear Sciences we have been engaged in the formulation of a model for the physics of image formation in fast neutron radiography (FNR). This involves examining all the various factors that affect image formation in FNR by experimental and Monte Carlo methods. One of the major problems in the development of a model for fast neutron radiography is the determination of the factors that affect image contrast and resolution. Monte Carlo methods offer an ideal tool for the determination of the origin of many of these factors. In previous work the focus of these methods has been the determination of the scattered neutron field in both a scintillator and a fast neutron radiography facility. As an extension of this work MCNP has been used to evaluate the role neutron scattering in a specimen plays in image detectability. Image processing of fast neutron radiographs is a necessary method of enhancing the detectability of features in an image. MCNP has been used to determine the part it can play in indirectly improving image resolution and aiding in image processing. The role noise plays in fast neutron radiography and its impact on image reconstruction has been evaluated. All these factors aid in the development of a model describing the relationship between contrast, resolution and detectability.

  15. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image. PMID:27271330

  16. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-06-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image.

  17. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image. PMID:27271330

  18. Parameters affecting temporal resolution of Time Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron Detector (TRION)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Weierganz, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Time-Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron (TRION) detector was developed for Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), a fast-neutron transmission imaging method that exploits characteristic energy-variations of the total scattering cross-section in the En = 1-10 MeV range to detect specific elements within a radiographed object. As opposed to classical event-counting time of flight (ECTOF), it integrates the detector signal during a well-defined neutron Time of Flight window corresponding to a pre-selected energy bin, e.g., the energy-interval spanning a cross-section resonance of an element such as C, O and N. The integrative characteristic of the detector permits loss-free operation at very intense, pulsed neutron fluxes, at a cost however, of recorded temporal resolution degradation This work presents a theoretical and experimental evaluation of detector related parameters which affect temporal resolution of the TRION system.

  19. Estimation of Orbital Neutron Detector Spatial Resolution by Systematic Shifting of Differential Topographic Masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Livengood, T.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Mazarico, E.; Smith, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method and preliminary results related to determining the spatial resolution of orbital neutron detectors using epithermal maps and differential topographic masks. Our technique is similar to coded aperture imaging methods for optimizing photonic signals in telescopes [I]. In that approach photon masks with known spatial patterns in a telescope aperature are used to systematically restrict incoming photons which minimizes interference and enhances photon signal to noise. Three orbital neutron detector systems with different stated spatial resolutions are evaluated. The differing spatial resolutions arise due different orbital altitudes and the use of neutron collimation techniques. 1) The uncollimated Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS) system has spatial resolution of 45km FWHM from approx. 30km altitude mission phase [2]. The Lunar Rennaissance Orbiter (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) with two detectors at 50km altitude evaluated here: 2) the collimated 10km FWHM spatial resolution detector CSETN and 3) LEND's collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons (SETN). Thus providing two orbital altitudes to study factors of: uncollimated vs collimated and two average altitudes for their effect on fields-of-view.

  20. An Improved Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.

    2000-01-01

    A low-energy neutron transport algorithm for use in space radiation protection is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multigroup analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. This analysis is accomplished by solving a realistic but simplified neutron transport test problem. The test problem is analyzed by using numerical and analytical procedures to obtain an accurate solution within specified error bounds. Results from the test problem are then used for determining mean values associated with rescattering terms that are associated with a multigroup solution of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through the evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for a water and an aluminum-water shield-target configuration is then compared with LAHET and MCNPX Monte Carlo code calculations for the same shield-target configuration. The algorithm developed showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a two-directional solution of the evaporation source showed even further improvement of the fluence near the front of the water target where diffusion from the front surface is important.

  1. Beam-transport optimization for cold-neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kenji; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Osakabe, Toyotaka

    2015-01-01

    We report the design of the beam-transport system (especially the vertical geometry) for a cold-neutron disk-chopper spectrometer AMATERAS at J-PARC. Based on the elliptical shape, which is one of the most effective geometries for a ballistic mirror, the design was optimized to obtain, at the sample position, a neutron beam with high flux without serious degrading in divergence and spacial homogeneity within the boundary conditions required from actual spectrometer construction. The optimum focal point was examined. An ideal elliptical shape was modified to reduce its height without serious loss of transmission. The final result was adapted to the construction requirements of AMATERAS. Although the ideas studied in this paper are considered for the AMATERAS case, they can be useful also to other spectrometers in similar situations.

  2. Novel Parallel Numerical Methods for Radiation& Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P N

    2001-03-06

    In many of the multiphysics simulations performed at LLNL, transport calculations can take up 30 to 50% of the total run time. If Monte Carlo methods are used, the percentage can be as high as 80%. Thus, a significant core competence in the formulation, software implementation, and solution of the numerical problems arising in transport modeling is essential to Laboratory and DOE research. In this project, we worked on developing scalable solution methods for the equations that model the transport of photons and neutrons through materials. Our goal was to reduce the transport solve time in these simulations by means of more advanced numerical methods and their parallel implementations. These methods must be scalable, that is, the time to solution must remain constant as the problem size grows and additional computer resources are used. For iterative methods, scalability requires that (1) the number of iterations to reach convergence is independent of problem size, and (2) that the computational cost grows linearly with problem size. We focused on deterministic approaches to transport, building on our earlier work in which we performed a new, detailed analysis of some existing transport methods and developed new approaches. The Boltzmann equation (the underlying equation to be solved) and various solution methods have been developed over many years. Consequently, many laboratory codes are based on these methods, which are in some cases decades old. For the transport of x-rays through partially ionized plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium, the transport equation is coupled to nonlinear diffusion equations for the electron and ion temperatures via the highly nonlinear Planck function. We investigated the suitability of traditional-solution approaches to transport on terascale architectures and also designed new scalable algorithms; in some cases, we investigated hybrid approaches that combined both.

  3. Current status of the PSG Monte Carlo neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Leppaenen, J.

    2006-07-01

    PSG is a new Monte Carlo neutron transport code, developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). The code is mainly intended for fuel assembly-level reactor physics calculations, such as group constant generation for deterministic reactor simulator codes. This paper presents the current status of the project and the essential capabilities of the code. Although the main application of PSG is in lattice calculations, the geometry is not restricted in two dimensions. This paper presents the validation of PSG against the experimental results of the three-dimensional MOX fuelled VENUS-2 reactor dosimetry benchmark. (authors)

  4. A concurrent, multigroup, discrete ordinates model of neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Still, C.H.

    1993-10-22

    The authors present an algorithm for the concurrent solution of the linear system arising from a multigroup, discrete ordinates model of neutron transport. The target architectures consist of distributed memory computers ranging from workstation clusters to massively parallel computers. Based on an analysis of the memory requirement and floating point complexity of matrix-vector multiplication in the iterative solution of the linear system, the authors propose a data layout and communication strategy designed to achieve scalability with respect to all phase space variables. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the algorithm on the nCUBE/2.

  5. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-01

    We describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Geometric Correction for Diffusive Expansion of Steady Neutron Transport Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lei; Guo, Yan

    2015-06-01

    We revisit the diffusive limit of a steady neutron transport equation in a two-dimensional unit disk with one-speed velocity. A classical theorem by Bensoussan et al. (Publ Res Inst Math Sci 15(1):53-157, 1979) states that its solution can be approximated in L ∞ by the leading order interior solution plus the Knudsen layer in the diffusive limit. In this paper, we construct a counterexample to this result via a different boundary layer expansion with geometric correction.

  7. Stochastic analog neutron transport with TRIPOLI-4 and FREYA: Bayesian uncertainty quantification for neutron multiplicity counting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verbeke, J. M.; Petit, O.

    2016-06-01

    From nuclear safeguards to homeland security applications, the need for the better modeling of nuclear interactions has grown over the past decades. Current Monte Carlo radiation transport codes compute average quantities with great accuracy and performance; however, performance and averaging come at the price of limited interaction-by-interaction modeling. These codes often lack the capability of modeling interactions exactly: for a given collision, energy is not conserved, energies of emitted particles are uncorrelated, and multiplicities of prompt fission neutrons and photons are uncorrelated. Many modern applications require more exclusive quantities than averages, such as the fluctuations in certain observables (e.g., themore » neutron multiplicity) and correlations between neutrons and photons. In an effort to meet this need, the radiation transport Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® was modified to provide a specific mode that models nuclear interactions in a full analog way, replicating as much as possible the underlying physical process. Furthermore, the computational model FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) was coupled with TRIPOLI-4 to model complete fission events. As a result, FREYA automatically includes fluctuations as well as correlations resulting from conservation of energy and momentum.« less

  8. Structures of the fractional spaces generated by the difference neutron transport operator

    SciTech Connect

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Taskin, Abdulgafur

    2015-09-18

    The initial boundary value problem for the neutron transport equation is considered. The first, second and third order of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are presented. Highly accurate difference schemes for neutron transport equation based on Padé approximation are constructed. In applications, stability estimates for solutions of difference schemes for the approximate solution of the neutron transport equation are obtained.The positivity of the neutron transport operator in Slobodeckij spaces is proved. Numerical techniques are developed and algorithms are tested on an example in MATLAB.

  9. Quantum transport in neutron-irradiated modulation-doped heterojunctions. I. Fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, W.; Zhou, J.; Huang, Y.; Cai, L.

    1988-12-15

    We have investigated the characteristics of low-temperature quantum transport in Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs modulation-doped heterojunctions irradiated by fast neutrons of about 14 MeV energy. The concentration and the mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2D EG) under low magnetic fields decrease with increase in the concentrations of scatterers, such as ionized impurities, lattice defects, and interface roughness. On the other hand, under strong magnetic fields, the Hall plateau broadening associated with the Landau localized states, and the Shubnikov--de Hass (SdH) oscillation enhancement associated with the Landau extended states, increase markedly after fast-neutron irradiation.

  10. Quantum transport in neutron-irradiated modulation-doped heterojunctions. II. Thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, W.; Zhou, J.; Huang, Y.; Cai, L.

    1988-12-15

    We have investigated the characteristics of the low-temperature quantum transport Al/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs modulation-doped heterojunctions irradiated by thermal neutrons of about 0.025 eV energy. Time-dependent effects related to nuclear radiation such as ..beta../sup -/ decay and ..gamma.. radiation are discussed in detail. The concentration and the mobility of the two-dimensional electron gas (2D EG) under low magnetic fields, the Hall plateau broadening, and the Shubnikov--de Haas (SdH) oscillation enhancement under strong magnetic fields all increase immediately after the irradiation, and then relax for long times. Above all, parallel conduction without illumination is first observed by us with a higher flux of thermal neutrons.

  11. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L

    2016-05-01

    Three high-resolution positioning methods based on the FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S. B. Andersson, Opt. Express 16, 18714 (2008)] are proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function, the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. After taking the super-Poissonian photon noise into account, the proposed algorithms give an average of 0.03-0.08 pixel position error much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. These improvements will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis. PMID:27250410

  12. A Segmented Neutron Detector with a High Position Resolution for the (p,pn) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Yuki; Sasano, Masaki; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Dozono, Masanori; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawase, Shoichiro; Kobayashi, Motoki; Lee, CheongSoo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Miki, Kenjiro; Miya, Hiroyuki; Ota, Shinsuke; Sekiguchi, Kimiko; Shima, Tatsushi; Taguchi, Takahiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Tang, Tsz Leung; Tokieda, Hiroshi; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Wakui, Takashi; Yasuda, Jumpei; Zenihiro, Juzo

    We are developing a neutron detector with a high position resolution to study the single particle properties of nuclei by the knockout (p,pn) reaction at intermediate energies. We constructed a prototype detector consisting of plastic scintillating fibers and multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Test experiments using 200- and 70-MeV proton and 199-, 188-, 68-, and 50-MeV neutron were performed for characterizing its performance. Preliminary results show that a position resolution of about 3 mm at full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) is realized as designed. The resulting separation-energy resolution to be obtained for (p,pn) measurement would be 1 MeV in FWHM, when the detector is used at a distance of 2 m from the target for measuring the neutron momentum.

  13. Techniques for obtaining high vertical resolution formation capture cross sections from pulsed neutron logs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Wyatt, D.F. Jr.; Smith, M.P.

    1991-02-05

    This patent describes a method for measuring high vertical resolution earth formation thermal neutron capture cross sections of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole. It comprises repetitively emitting in a well borehole relatively short duration bursts of fast neutrons; detecting, as a function of depth, in the borehole during time intervals between the repetitive bursts of fast neutrons; filtering count rate signals to reduce statistical fluctuations in subsequent computations; combining at least two filtered count rate signals; selecting at least one of the at least two filtered gate count rate signals.

  14. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  15. The vacuum geometry effect on neutron transmission and spatial resolution of neutron transmission.

    PubMed

    Khanouchi, A; Sabir, A; Boulkheir, M; Ichaoui, R; Ghassoun, J; Jehouani, A

    1997-01-01

    Frequently, shields used against radiation contain some vacuum channels. We have therefore considered an infinite slab with a fixed thickness (thickness 20 lambda with lambda the mean free path of the neutron in the slab) and an infinite plane source of neutrons which arrived on the left side of the slab; transmitted neutrons through the slab to its right side are detected by finite detectors having windows equal to 2 lambda. This slab contains a vacuum channel. This channel has many legs with several horizontal parts. We used the Monte Carlo method for sampling the neutron history in the slab with a spatial biasing technique in order to accelerate the calculation convergence (Levitt, L. B. (1968) Nuclear Science and Engineering 31, 500-504; Jehouani, A., Ghassoun, J. and Aboubker, A. (1994) In Proceedings of 6th International Symposium on Radiation Physics, Rabat, Morocco). We studied the effects of the angle position and the number of horizontal parts of the channel on the neutron transmission. We have studied the effect of the vacuum channel opening (Artigas, R. and Hungerford, H. E. (1969) Nuclear Science and Engineering 36, 295-303) on the neutron transmission; for several values of this opening we have calculated the neutron transmission probability for each detector position. This study allowed us to determine the optimal conditions of vacuum geometries to improve protection against neutrons. In the second part we considered a shield which consists of a slab and a two-legged vacuum channel with two horizontal parts. The spatial distribution of neutrons transmitted through the protection screen was determined. This distribution shows two peaks. The study was made for different distances between the two horizontal parts. We have determined the smallest distance between the two horizontal parts for which the two peaks can be resolved. PMID:9463882

  16. Quantitative observation of tracer transport with high-resolution PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulenkampff, Johannes; Gruendig, Marion; Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    Transport processes in natural porous media are typically heterogeneous over various scales. This heterogeneity is caused by the complexity of pore geometry and molecular processes. Heterogeneous processes, like diffusive transport, conservative advective transport, mixing and reactive transport, can be observed and quantified with quantitative tomography of tracer transport patterns. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is by far the most sensitive method and perfectly selective for positron-emitting radiotracers, therefore it is suited as reference method for spatiotemporal tracer transport observations. The number of such PET-applications is steadily increasing. However, many applications are afflicted by the low spatial resolution (3 - 5 mm) of the clinical scanners from cooperating nuclear medical departments. This resolution is low in relation to typical sample dimensions of 10 cm, which are restricted by the mass attenuation of the material. In contrast, our GeoPET-method applies a high-resolution scanner with a resolution of 1 mm, which is the physical limit of the method and which is more appropriate for samples of the size of soil columns or drill cores. This higher resolution is achieved at the cost of a more elaborate image reconstruction procedure, especially considering the effects of Compton scatter. The result of the quantitative image reconstruction procedure is a suite of frames of the quantitative tracer distribution with adjustable frame rates from minutes to months. The voxel size has to be considered as reference volume of the tracer concentration. This continuous variable includes contributions from structures far below the spatial resolution, as far as a detection threshold, in the pico-molar range, is exceeded. Examples from a period of almost 10 years (Kulenkampff et al. 2008a, Kulenkampff et al. 2008b) of development and application of quantitative GeoPET-process tomography are shown. These examples include different transport processes

  17. High-resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zöe; Hoffman, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-06-01

    High-resolution crystallographic studies of the hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin have provided hydrogen-bond parameters of unprecedented accuracy for a biomacromolecule. The hydration of the coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high-resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of 0.92 Å on the original D19 diffractometer with a prototype 4° × 64° detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue–Langevin. The resulting structure provides hydrogen-bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for the efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultrahigh resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data during commissioning of the TOPAZ diffractometer with a prototype array of 14 modular 2° × 21° detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten. PMID:26708515

  19. Improving the resolution of chopper spectrometers at pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M. ); Mildner, D.F.R. . Center for Analytical Chemistry)

    1990-01-01

    We examine the relationships between intensity and resolution in pulsed-source chopper spectrometers, including the effects of Soller collimation, narrower rotor slits and higher rotor speeds. The basis is a simplified description of a spectrometer, approximately optimizing the rotor pulse and lighthouse effects. the analysis includes a new treatment of the angular distribution transmitted through a system consisting of a coarse collimator and a Soller collimator. The results encourage the prospect for a reasonably easily accomplished, higher resolution, optional configuration of the pulsed source chopper spectrometers at IPNS. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Quantifying moisture transport in cementitious materials using neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Catherine L.

    A portion of the concrete pavements in the US have recently been observed to have premature joint deterioration. This damage is caused in part by the ingress of fluids, like water, salt water, or deicing salts. The ingress of these fluids can damage concrete when they freeze and expand or can react with the cementitious matrix causing damage. To determine the quality of concrete for assessing potential service life it is often necessary to measure the rate of fluid ingress, or sorptivity. Neutron imaging is a powerful method for quantifying fluid penetration since it can describe where water has penetrated, how quickly it has penetrated and the volume of water in the concrete or mortar. Neutrons are sensitive to light atoms such as hydrogen and thus clearly detect water at high spatial and temporal resolution. It can be used to detect small changes in moisture content and is ideal for monitoring wetting and drying in mortar exposed to various fluids. This study aimed at developing a method to accurately estimate moisture content in mortar. The common practice is to image the material dry as a reference before exposing to fluid and normalizing subsequent images to the reference. The volume of water can then be computed using the Beer-Lambert law. This method can be limiting because it requires exact image alignment between the reference image and all subsequent images. A model of neutron attenuation in a multi-phase cementitious composite was developed to be used in cases where a reference image is not available. The attenuation coefficients for water, un-hydrated cement, and sand were directly calculated from the neutron images. The attenuation coefficient for the hydration products was then back-calculated. The model can estimate the degree of saturation in a mortar with known mixture proportions without using a reference image for calculation. Absorption in mortars exposed to various fluids (i.e., deionized water and calcium chloride solutions) were investigated

  1. Prospects for High Resolution Neutron Spectroscopy on high power fusion devices in view of the recent diagnostic developments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Ericsson, Goeran; Sunden, E. Andersson; Conroy, S.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Giacomelli, L.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Ronchi, E.; Sjsoetrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Kaellne, J.; Gorini, G.; Ognissanto, F.; Tardocchi, M.; Angelone, M.; Popovichev, S.

    2008-03-12

    An evaluation of three different candidate techniques for a 14-MeV High Resolution Neutron Spectrometer for a high power fusion device is presented. The performance is estimated for a modelled neutron emission for ITER plasma scenario 4. As performance indicators we use the estimated time-resolution achieved in measurements of three plasma parameters, namely, the ion temperature, the intensity of neutron emission due to neutral beam--thermal plasma interactions and the intensity of the so-called alpha knock-on neutron tail. It is found that only the MPR technique can deliver results on all three parameters with reasonable time resolution.

  2. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methodswere proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. Moreover,more » these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.« less

  3. FREND neutron telescope for mapping the Martian water with fine spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Malakhov, Alexey; Mokrousov, Maxim; Golovin, Dmitry; Fedosov, Fedor; Kozyrev, Alexandr; Lisov, Denis; Litvak, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Sanin, Anton; Tret'yakov, Vlad; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    The concept of Fine Resolution Exploration Neutron Detector (FREND) is presented, as the Russian contributed instrument for the first element of ESA ExoMars mission, the TGO. FREND is the neutron collimated telescope, which is capable to measure the prompt neutron radiation of Mars from the 400 km orbit with the spatial resolution of about 40 km. The flux of epithermal neutrons is known to depend on the content of water in the shallow subsurface about 1 meter, so such measurements could allow to study the ground water distribution with fine spatial resolution over the entire martian surface from 70 degrees of the north latitude down to 70 degree of the south latitude. The resolution of tens of km is necessary to characterize the particular relief features on the surface by the content of water in the soil. Such mapping data should resolve the water distribution within the Gale crater, which is necessary to explain the paradoxic difefrence between the estimated contents of water in this crater, as about 5% by HEND on the Mars Odyssy and the ground data about 2 -3 % by DAN on the Curiosity. Also, the FREND mapping data of the ground water should be useful for the landing site selection of future Mars rovers, such as ExoMars or Mars 2020.

  4. High resolution neutron crystallographic studies of the hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin

    SciTech Connect

    Jogl, Gerwald; Wang, Xiaoping; Mason, Sax; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Mustyakimov, Marat; Fisher, Zoe; Hoffmann, Christina; Kratky, Christoph; Langan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The hydration of coenzyme cob(II)alamin has been studied using high resolution monochromatic neutron crystallographic data collected at room temperature to a resolution of surrounded by flexible side chains with terminal functional groups may be significant for 0.92 on the original diffractometer D19 with a prototype 4o x 64o detector at the high-flux reactor neutron source run by the Institute Laue Langevin. The resulting structure provides H bonding parameters for the hydration of biomacromolecules to unprecedented accuracy. These experimental parameters will be used to define more accurate force-fields for biomacromolecular structure refinement. The presence of a hydrophobic bowl motif efficient scavenging of ligands. The feasibility of extending the resolution of this structure to ultra high resolution was investigated by collecting time-of-flight neutron crystallographic data on diffractometer TOPAZ with a prototype array of 14 modular 21o x 21o detectors at the Spallation Neutron Source run by Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  5. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  6. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-15

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  7. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-17

    In high material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. Our paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 degrees C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. Our work covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  8. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Makowska, Małgorzata G.; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N.; Lauridsen, Erik M.; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J.; Tremsin, Anton S.; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; et al

    2015-12-17

    In high material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. Our paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 degrees C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition,more » examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. Our work covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.« less

  9. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Małgorzata G; Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N; Lauridsen, Erik M; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Molaison, Jamie J; Santodonato, Louis J; Tremsin, Anton S; Grosse, Mirco; Morgano, Manuel; Kabra, Saurabh; Strobl, Markus

    2015-12-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components. PMID:26724075

  10. High-resolution reactive transport: A coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisman, J. J.; Maxwell, R. M.; Steefel, C. I.; Sitchler, A.; Molins, S.

    2013-12-01

    Subsurface hydrogeochemical systems are an especially complex component of the terrestrial environment and play host to a multitude of interactions. Parameterizations of these interactions are perhaps the least understood component of terrestrial systems, presenting uncertainties in the predictive understanding of biogeochemical cycling and transport. Thorough knowledge of biogeochemical transport processes is critical to the quantification of carbon/nutrient fluxes in the subsurface, and to the development of effective contaminant remediation techniques. Here we present a coupled parallel hydrogeochemical model, ParCrunchFlow, as a tool to further our understanding of governing processes and interactions in natural hydrogeochemical systems. ParCrunchFlow is a coupling of the reactive transport simulator CrunchFlow with the hydrologic model ParFlow. CrunchFlow is a multicomponent reactive flow and transport code that can be used to simulate a range of important processes and environments, including reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, carbon sequestration, biogeochemical cycling, and water-rock interaction. ParFlow is a parallel, three-dimensional, variably-saturated, coupled surface-subsurface flow and transport code with the ability to simulate complex topography, geology, and heterogeneity. ParCrunchflow takes advantage of the efficient parallelism built into Parflow, allowing the numerical simulation of reactive transport processes in chemically and physically heterogeneous media at high spatial resolutions. This model provides an ability to further examine the interactions and feedbacks between biogeochemical systems and complex subsurface flow fields. In addition to the details of model construction, results will be presented that show floodplain nutrient cycling and the effects of heterogeneity on small-scale mixing reactions at the Department of Energy's Old Rifle Legacy site.

  11. A POD reduced order model for resolving angular direction in neutron/photon transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, A.G.; Calloo, A.A.; Goffin, M.G.; Dargaville, S.; Fang, F.; Pain, C.C.; Navon, I.M.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the first Reduced Order Model (ROM) that efficiently resolves the angular dimension of the time independent, mono-energetic Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). It is based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and uses the method of snapshots to form optimal basis functions for resolving the direction of particle travel in neutron/photon transport problems. A unique element of this work is that the snapshots are formed from the vector of angular coefficients relating to a high resolution expansion of the BTE's angular dimension. In addition, the individual snapshots are not recorded through time, as in standard POD, but instead they are recorded through space. In essence this work swaps the roles of the dimensions space and time in standard POD methods, with angle and space respectively. It is shown here how the POD model can be formed from the POD basis functions in a highly efficient manner. The model is then applied to two radiation problems; one involving the transport of radiation through a shield and the other through an infinite array of pins. Both problems are selected for their complex angular flux solutions in order to provide an appropriate demonstration of the model's capabilities. It is shown that the POD model can resolve these fluxes efficiently and accurately. In comparison to high resolution models this POD model can reduce the size of a problem by up to two orders of magnitude without compromising accuracy. Solving times are also reduced by similar factors.

  12. A killer micro attack on 3D neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, M.R.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1990-11-16

    In this paper, we describe the deterministic solution of the neutron transport equation and the computation of the effective criticality of three-dimensional assemblies using the BBN TC2000 killer micros. We observe that the performance of our research code PTRAN running on 48 processors of the TC2000 is competitive with the partially vectorizable version running on a single Cray Y/MP processor. This performance scales well with the number of processors on real problems, including those that are not load balanced a priori. To obtain this performance, we explicitly specify and exploit data locality and data dependence using domain decomposition and dynamic job scheduling. From the results obtained here, it appears that, at least for this application, a production machine based on the TC2000 architecture with more powerful processors and a commensurate increase in switch speed could yield a significant gain in our design capability. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. A novel approach to the microdosimetry of neutron capture therapy. Part I. High-resolution quantitative autoradiography applied to microdosimetry in neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Solares, G.R.; Zamenhof, R.G. |

    1995-10-01

    A novel approach to the microdosimetry of neutron capture therapy has been developed using high-resolution quantitative autoradiography (HRQAR) and two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation. This approach has been applied using actual cell morophology (nuclear and cytoplasmic cell structures) and the measured microdistribution of boron-10 in a transplanted murine brain tumor (GL261) containing p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron compound. The 2D Monte Carlo transport code for the {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles from the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reactions has been developed as a surrogate to a full 3D approach to calculate a variety of different microdosimetric parameters. The HRQAR method and the surrogate 2D Monte Carlo approach are described in detail and examples of their use are presented. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. NMDB: real-time database for high resolution neutron monitor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigies, Christian

    The worldwide network of standardized neutron monitors is, after 50 years, still the stateof-the-art instrumentation to measure variations of the primary cosmic rays in the energy range 500 MeV-60 GeV. These measurements are an ideal complement to space based cosmic ray measurements. Unlike data from satellite experiments, neutron monitor data has never been available in high time resolution from many neutron monitor stations in real-time. The data is often available only from the individual station's website, in varying formats, and not in real-time. To overcome this deficit, the European Commission is supporting the Neutron Monitor database (NMDB) since January 2008 as an e-Infrastructures project in the Seventh Framework Programme in the Capacities section. Neutron Monitor stations that do not yet have 1-minute resolution will be supported by software and the development of an affordable standard registration system to submit the measurements to the database via internet in realtime. This resolves the problem of different data formats and for the first time allows use of realtime cosmic ray measurements for space weather applications. Besides creating a database and developing applications that use this data, a part of the project is dedicated to create a public outreach website to inform about cosmic rays and possible effects on humans, technological systems, and the environment.

  15. Method for improving the angular resolution of a neutron scatter camera

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Gerling, Mark; Cooper, Robert Lee; Mrowka, Stanley; Brennan, James S.

    2012-12-25

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source wherein the neutron detection efficiency is increased has been described. Instead of the previous technique that uses a time-of-flight (TOF) between 2 widely spaced fixed planes of neutron detectors to measure scatter neutron kinetic energy, we now use the recoil proton energy deposited in the second of the 2 scatter planes which can now be repositioned either much closer together or further apart. However, by doubling the separation distance between the 2 planes from 20 cm to a distance of 40 cm we improved the angular resolution of the detector from about 12.degree. to about 10.degree.. A further doubling of the separation distance to 80 cm provided an addition improvement in angular resolution of the detector to about 6.degree. without adding additional detectors or ancillary electronics. The distance between planes also may be dynamically changed using a suitable common technique such as a gear- or motor-drive to toggle between the various positions. The angular resolution of this new configuration, therefore, is increased at the expanse of detection sensitivity. However, the diminished sensitivity may be acceptable for those applications where the detector is able to interrogate a particular site for an extended period.

  16. Fine Resolution Epithermal Neutron Detector (FREND) for ExoMarsTrace Gas Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, A.; Mitrofanov, I.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Kozyrev, A.; Tretiyakov, V.; Mokrousov, M.; Vostrukhin, A.; Golovin, D.; Fedosov, F.

    2012-04-01

    ExoMars is now under considerations, as a joint mission of the three agencies, ESA,Roscosmos and NASA to explore the red planet. Planned for launch in 2016, its first element, the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) is going to spend one Martian year (687 Earth days) orbiting around the planet. Fine Resolution Epithermal Neutron Detector (FREND), once aboard TGO, will be measuring thermal, epithermal and high energy neutrons with energy ranges up to 10 MeV, which variations are an excellent signature of H bearing elements presence in the regolith at up to 1 meter depth. Neutron mapping of Mars is being performed since 2002 by HEND instrument on board of Mars Odyssey, but the significant step up in FREND design compared to this previous mission will be its ability to collimate neutrons and thus have a very narrow Field of View of 40 km at a 400 km altitude. Its collimator consists of layers of polyethylene to moderate neutrons and 10B to absorb them. The collimator's design is equal to one used in LEND instrument on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and proved to be efficient. The instrument design and detectors will also be very similar to ones used in its both ancestors, LEND and HEND, benefitting from the best heritage there is. FREND will use a set of 3He proportional counters to cover the thermal and epithermal neutrons energy ranges, providing a set of several independent measurements for higher statistics, as well as a stilbene scintillation detector for high energy neutrons. FREND will be the first collimated neutron instrument to fly towards Mars and, like LEND on the Moon, FREND will be able to produce Martian neutron maps that could supersede previously created ones by about 10 times in the linear spatial resolution. This will potentially clarify the available global Mars neutron maps, but could also point out new, never before seen small water/hydrogen rich features and other places of interest on the surface of the planet. Without a doubt, this kind of

  17. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited).

    PubMed

    Forrest, C J; Radha, P B; Glebov, V Yu; Goncharov, V N; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Casey, D T; Gatu-Johnson, M; Gardner, S

    2012-10-01

    The areal density (ρR) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative ρR measurements and 1-D simulations. PMID:23126921

  18. High-resolution spectroscopy used to measure inertial confinement fusion neutron spectra on Omega (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C. J.; Radha, P. B.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Casey, D. T.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gardner, S.

    2012-10-15

    The areal density ({rho}R) of cryogenic DT implosions on Omega is inferred by measuring the spectrum of neutrons that elastically scatter off the dense deuterium (D) and tritium (T) fuel. Neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) techniques are used to measure the energy spectrum with high resolution. High signal-to-background data has been recorded on cryogenic DT implosions using a well-collimated 13.4-m line of sight and an nTOF detector with an advanced liquid scintillator compound. An innovative method to analyze the elastically scattered neutron spectra was developed using well-known cross sections of the DT nuclear reactions. The estimated areal densities are consistent with alternative {rho}R measurements and 1-D simulations.

  19. Design of a neutron penumbral-aperture microscope with 10-. mu. m resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.; Lerche, R.A.; Ellis, R.J.; Lane, S.M.

    1990-05-01

    We are currently designing a 10-{mu}m resolution neutron penumbral-aperture microscope to diagnose high-convergence targets at the Nova laser facility. To achieve such high resolution, the new microscope will require substantial improvements in three areas. First, we have designed thick penumbral apertures with extremely sharp cutoffs over a useful ({approx}100 {mu}m) field of view; fabrication of such apertures appears feasible using gold electroplating techniques. Second, the limited field of view and required close proximity of the aperture to the target (2 cm) necessitates a durable mounting and alignment system with {plus}25 {mu}m accuracy. Finally, a neutron detector containing 160,000 scintillator elements is required; readout and optimization of this large array are outstanding issues. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  1. Study of Transport Behavior and Conversion Efficiency in Pillar Structured Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R

    2007-04-26

    Room temperature, high efficiency and scalable radiation detectors can be realized by manipulating materials at the micro scale. With micro-semiconductor-pillars, we will advance the thermal neutron detection efficiency of semiconductor detectors to over 70% with 50 mm in detector thickness. New material science, new transport behavior, neutron to alpha conversion dynamics and their relationship with neutron detection will be discovered with the proposed structures.

  2. Cooperative learning of neutron diffusion and transport theories

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Michael A.

    1999-04-30

    A cooperative group instructional strategy is being used to teach a unit on neutron transport and diffusion theory in a first-year-graduate level, Reactor Theory course that was formerly presented in the traditional lecture/discussion style. Students are divided into groups of two or three for the duration of the unit. Class meetings are divided into traditional lecture/discussion segments punctuated by cooperative group exercises. The group exercises were designed to require the students to elaborate, summarize, or practice the material presented in the lecture/discussion segments. Both positive interdependence and individual accountability are fostered by adjusting individual grades on the unit exam by a factor dependent upon group achievement. Group collaboration was also encouraged on homework assignments by assigning each group a single grade on each assignment. The results of the unit exam have been above average in the two classes in which the cooperative group method was employed. In particular, the problem solving ability of the students has shown particular improvement. Further,the students felt that the cooperative group format was both more educationally effective and more enjoyable than the lecture/discussion format.

  3. Realization of a small-size high resolution linear neutron scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, R.; Reinartz, R.; Reinhart, P.; Schelten, J.; Jansen, E.; Schaefer, W.

    1998-06-01

    The spectrum of position sensitive neutron scintillation detectors, which have been developed and designed in the institute during the last decade, comprises several high resolution linear detectors. The design of the small size high resolution detector is based on a modified Anger technology using a linear array of 24 HAMAMATSU type R1770 rectangular photomultipliers and a 1 mm {sup 6}Li glass scintillator. The sensitive detector area is 200 x 20 mm{sup 2} and the spatial resolution is 1.2 mm. The neutron sensitivity at 1{angstrom} is about 65% and the residual gamma sensitivity is less than 10{sup {minus}4} and the maximum count rate is about 100 kHz. The detector is linked to a highly flexible PC-based data acquisition system with 12 bit position and 16 bit time resolution. The stand alone detector and data acquisition system is aimed preferably at pulsed sources performing high resolution angle-dispersive time-of-flight experiments.

  4. The measurement of the presampled MTF of a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Raymond Lei.; Biegalski, Steven R.

    2007-11-01

    A high spatial resolution neutron imaging device was developed at the Mark II TRIGA reactor at The University of Texas at Austin. As the modulation transfer function (MTF) is recognized as a well-established parameter for evaluation of imaging system resolution, the aliasing associated with digital sampling adds complexity to its measurement. Aliasing is especially problematic when using a high spatial resolution micro-channel plate (MCP) neutron detector that has a pixel grid size similar to that of a CCD array. To compensate for the aliasing an angulated edge method was used to evaluate the neutron imaging facility, overcoming aliasing by obtaining an oversampled edge spread function (ESF). Baseline correction was applied to the ESF to remove the noticeable trends and the LSF was multiplied by Hann window to obtain a smoothed version of presampled MTF. The computing procedure is confirmed by visual inspection of a testing phantom; in addition, it is confirmed by comparison to the MTF measurement of a scintillation screen with a known MTF curve.

  5. Multigroup Time-Independent Neutron Transport Code System for Plane or Spherical Geometry.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 PALLAS-PL/SP solves multigroup time-independent one-dimensional neutron transport problems in plane or spherical geometry. The problems solved are subject to a variety of boundary conditions or a distributed source. General anisotropic scattering problems are treated for solving deep-penetration problems in which angle-dependent neutron spectra are calculated in detail.

  6. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  7. Angular neutron transport investigation in the HZETRN free-space ion and nucleon transport and shielding computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, R. C., Jr.; Wilson, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Extension of the high charge and energy (HZE) transport computer program HZETRN for angular transport of neutrons is considered. For this paper, only light ion transport, He4 and lighter, will be analyzed using a pure solar proton source. The angular transport calculator is the ANISN/PC program which is being controlled by the HZETRN program. The neutron flux values are compared for straight-ahead transport and angular transport in one dimension. The shield material is aluminum and the target material is water. The thickness of these materials is varied; however, only the largest model calculated is reported which is 50 gm/sq cm of aluminum and 100 gm/sq cm of water. The flux from the ANISN/PC calculation is about two orders of magnitude lower than the flux from HZETRN for very low energy neutrons. It is only a magnitude lower for the neutrons in the 10 to 20 MeV range in the aluminum and two orders lower in the water. The major reason for this difference is in the transport modes: straight-ahead versus angular. The angular treatment allows a longer path length than the straight-ahead approximation. Another reason is the different cross section sets used by the ANISN/PC-BUGLE-80 mode and the HZETRN mode. The next step is to investigate further the differences between the two codes and isolate the differences to just the angular versus straight-ahead transport mode. Then, create a better coupling between the angular neutron transport and the charged particle transport.

  8. PHISICS multi-group transport neutronic capabilities for RELAP5

    SciTech Connect

    Epiney, A.; Rabiti, C.; Alfonsi, A.; Wang, Y.; Cogliati, J.; Strydom, G.

    2012-07-01

    PHISICS is a neutronic code system currently under development at INL. Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. This paper reports on the effort of coupling this package to the thermal hydraulic system code RELAP5. This will enable full prismatic core and system modeling and the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5 (NESTLE). The paper describes the capabilities of the coupling and illustrates them with a set of sample problems. (authors)

  9. High resolution imaging of vadose zone transport using crosswell radar and seismic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, Ernest L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Peterson, John E.; Daley, Thomas E.

    2001-10-10

    The summary and conclusions are that overall the radar and seismic results were excellent. At the time of design of the experiments we did not know how well these two methods could penetrate or resolve the moisture content and structure. It appears that the radar could easily go up to 5, even 10 meters between boreholes at 200 Mhz and even father (up to 20 to 40 m) at 50 Mhz. The seismic results indicate that at several hundred hertz propagation of 20 to 30 meters giving high resolution is possible. One of the most important results, however is that together the seismic and radar are complementary in their properties estimation. The radar being primarily sensitive to changes in moisture content, and the seismic being primarily sensitive to porosity. Taken in a time lapse sense the radar can show the moisture content changes to a high resolution, with the seismic showing high resolution lithology. The significant results for each method are: Radar: (1) Delineated geological layers 0.25 to 3.5 meters thick with 0.25 m resolution; (2) Delineated moisture movement and content with 0.25 m resolution; (3) Compared favorably with neutron probe measurements; and (4) Penetration up to 30 m. Radar results indicate that the transport of the riverwater is different from that of the heavier and more viscous sodium thiosulfate. It appears that the heavier fluids are not mixing readily with the in-situ fluids and the transport may be influenced by them. Seismic: (1) Delineated lithology at .25 m resolution; (2) Penetration over 20 meters, with a possibility of up to 30 or more meters; and (3) Maps porosity and density differences of the sediments. Overall the seismic is mapping the porosity and density distribution. The results are consistent with the flow field mapped by the radar, there is a change in flow properties at the 10 to 11 meter depth in the flow cell. There also appears to be break through by looking at the radar data with the denser sodium thiosulfate finally

  10. Development of a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lei

    The combination of a scintillation screen and a charged coupled device (CCD) camera is a digitized neutron imaging technology that has been widely employed for research and industry application. The maximum of spatial resolution of scintillation screens is in the range of 100 mum and creates a bottleneck for the further improvement of the overall system resolution. In this investigation, a neutron sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detector with pore pitch of 11.4 mum is combined with a cooled CCD camera with a pixel size of 6.8 mum to provide a high spatial resolution neutron imaging system. The optical path includes a high reflection front surface mirror for keeping the camera out of neutron beam and a macro lens for achieving the maximum magnification that could be achieved. All components are assembled into an aluminum light tight box with heavy radiation shielding to protect the camera as well as to provide a dark working condition. Particularly, a remote controlled stepper motor is also integrated into the system to provide on-line focusing ability. The best focus is guaranteed through use of an algorithm instead of perceptual observation. An evaluation routine not previously utilized in the field of neutron radiography is developed in this study. Routines like this were never previously required due to the lower resolution of other systems. Use of the augulation technique to obtain presampled MTF addresses the problem of aliasing associated with digital sampling. The determined MTF agrees well with the visual inspection of imaging a testing target. Other detector/camera combinations may be integrated into the system and their performances are also compared. The best resolution achieved by the system at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Texas at Austin is 16.2 lp/mm, which is equivalent to a minimum resolvable spacing of 30 mum. The noise performance of the device is evaluated in terms of the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum

  11. Multigroup Neutron/Gamma-Ray Direct Integration Transport Code System for Two-Dimensional Cylindrical Geometry.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-10-15

    Version 00 PALLAS-2DCY-FX is a code for direct integration of the transport equation in two-dimensional (r,z) geometry. It solves the energy and angular-dependent Boltzmann transport equation with general anisotropic scattering in cylindrical geometry. Its principal applications are to neutron or gamma-ray transport problems in the forward mode. The code is particularly designed for and suited to the solution of deep penetration radiation transport problems with an external (fixed) source.

  12. Cosmic ray heliospheric transport study with neutron monitor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Ygbuhay, R. C.; Modzelewska, R.; Dorman, L. I.; Alania, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    Determining transport coefficients for galactic cosmic ray (GCR) propagation in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) poses a fundamental challenge in modeling cosmic ray modulation processes. GCR scattering in the solar wind involves wave-particle interaction, the waves being Alfven waves which propagate along the ambient field (B). Empirical values at 1 AU are determined for the components of the diffusion tensor for GCR propagation in the heliosphere using neutron monitor (NM) data. At high rigidities, particle density gradients and mean free paths at 1 AU in B can only be computed from the solar diurnal anisotropy (SDA) represented by a vector A (components Ar, Aϕ, and Aθ) in a heliospherical polar coordinate system. Long-term changes in SDA components of NMs (with long track record and the median rigidity of response Rm ~ 20 GV) are used to compute yearly values of the transport coefficients for 1963-2013. We confirm the previously reported result that the product of the parallel (to B) mean free path (λ||) and radial density gradient (Gr) computed from NM data exhibits a weak Schwabe cycle (11y) but strong Hale magnetic cycle (22y) dependence. Its value is most depressed in solar activity minima for positive (p) polarity intervals (solar magnetic field in the Northern Hemisphere points outward from the Sun) when GCRs drift from the polar regions toward the helioequatorial plane and out along the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), setting up a symmetric gradient Gθs pointing away from HCS. Gr drives all SDA components and λ|| Gr contributes to the diffusive component (Ad) of the ecliptic plane anisotropy (A). GCR transport is commonly discussed in terms of an isotropic hard sphere scattering (also known as billiard-ball scattering) in the solar wind plasma. We use it with a flat HCS model and the Ahluwalia-Dorman master equations to compute the coefficients α (=λ⊥/λ∥) and ωτ (a measure of turbulence in the solar wind) and transport

  13. Hexagonal boron nitride thin film thermal neutron detectors with high energy resolution of the reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, T. C.; Majety, S.; Grenadier, S.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2015-05-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is highly promising for solid-state thermal neutron detector applications due to its many outstanding physical properties, especially its very large thermal neutron capture cross-section (~3840 barns for 10B), which is several orders of magnitude larger than those of most other isotopes. The focus of the present work is to carry out studies on h-BN thin film and detector properties to lay the foundation for the development of a direct-conversion solid-state thermal neutron detector with high sensitivity. The measured carrier mobility-lifetime (μτ) product of h-BN thin films grown on sapphire substrates is 2.83×10-7 cm2/V for electrons and holes, which is comparable to the value of about 10-7 cm2/V for GaN thin films grown on sapphire. Detectors based on h-BN thin films were fabricated and the nuclear reaction product pulse height spectra were measured. Under a bias of 20 V, very narrow individual peaks corresponding to the reaction product energies of α and Li particles as well as the sum peaks have been clearly resolved in the pulse height spectrum for the first time by a B-based direct-conversion semiconductor neutron detector. Our results indicate that h-BN thin film detectors possess unique advantages including small size, low weight, portability, low voltage operation and high energy resolution of specific reaction products.

  14. On-the-fly Neutron Tomography of Water Transport into Lupine Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea; Kaestner, Anders; Mannes, David; Morgano, Manuel; Peetermans, Steven; Lehmann, Eberhard; Trtik, Pavel

    Measurement and visualization of water flow in soil and roots is essential for understanding of how roots take up water from soils. Such information would allow for the optimization of irrigation practices and for the identification of the optimal traits for the capture of water, in particular when water is scarce. However, measuring water flow in roots growing in soil is challenging. The previous 2D experiments (Zarebanadkouki et al., 2012) have not been sufficient for understanding the water transport across the root and therefore we employed an on-the-fly tomography technique with temporal resolution of three minutes. In this paper, we show that the series of on-the-fly neutron tomographic experiments performed on the same sample allow for monitoring the three-dimensional spatial distribution of D2O across the root tissue. The obtained data will allow us to calculate the convective and diffusive transport properties across root tissue and to estimate the relative importance of different pathways of water across the root tissue.

  15. Neutron interaction and their transport with bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Esther Kalpana; Radhika, K.

    2015-05-01

    In the current paper an attempt was made to study and provide fundamental information about neutron interactions that are important to nuclear material measurements. The application of this study is explained about macroscopic interactions with bulk compound materials through a program in DEV C++ language which is done by enabling interaction of neutrons in nature. The output of the entire process depends upon the random number (i.e., incident neutron number), thickness of the material and mean free path as input parameters. Further the current study emphasizes on the usage of materials in shielding.

  16. Neutron interaction and their transport with bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Esther Kalpana; Radhika, K.

    2015-05-15

    In the current paper an attempt was made to study and provide fundamental information about neutron interactions that are important to nuclear material measurements. The application of this study is explained about macroscopic interactions with bulk compound materials through a program in DEV C++ language which is done by enabling interaction of neutrons in nature. The output of the entire process depends upon the random number (i.e., incident neutron number), thickness of the material and mean free path as input parameters. Further the current study emphasizes on the usage of materials in shielding.

  17. Development of a High-performance Optical System and Fluorescent Converters for High-resolution Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Matsubayashi, M.

    Two novel devices for use in neutron imaging technique are introduced. The first one is a high-performance optical lens for video camera systems. The lens system has a magnification of 1:1 and an F value of 3. The optical resolution is less than 5 μm. The second device is a high-resolution fluorescent plate that converts neutrons into visible light. The fluorescent converter material consists of a mixture of 6LiF and ZnS(Ag) fine powder, and the thickness of the converter is material is as little as 15 μm. The surface of the plate is coated with a 1 μm-thick gadolinium oxide layer. This layer is optically transparent and acts as an electron emitter for neutron detection. Our preliminary results show that the developed optical lens and fluorescent converter plates are very promising for high-resolution neutron imaging.

  18. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  19. In situ studies of mass transport in liquid alloys by means of neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Kargl, F; Engelhardt, M; Yang, F; Weis, H; Schmakat, P; Schillinger, B; Griesche, A; Meyer, A

    2011-06-29

    When in situ techniques became available in recent years this led to a breakthrough in accurately determining diffusion coefficients for liquid alloys. Here we discuss how neutron radiography can be used to measure chemical diffusion in a ternary AlCuAg alloy. Neutron radiography hereby gives complementary information to x-ray radiography used for measuring chemical diffusion and to quasielastic neutron scattering used mainly for determining self-diffusion. A novel Al(2)O(3) based furnace that enables one to study diffusion processes by means of neutron radiography is discussed. A chemical diffusion coefficient of Ag against Al around the eutectic composition Al(68.6)Cu(13.8)Ag(17.6) at.% was obtained. It is demonstrated that the in situ technique of neutron radiography is a powerful means to study mass transport properties in situ in binary and ternary alloys that show poor x-ray contrast. PMID:21654050

  20. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  1. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential.

    PubMed

    Blakeley, Matthew P; Hasnain, Samar S; Antonyuk, Svetlana V

    2015-07-01

    The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å) has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden) and Sirius (Brazil) under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å), for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59%) were released since 2010. Sub-mm(3) crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å) are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H(+)) remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place. Neutron

  2. Sub-atomic resolution X-ray crystallography and neutron crystallography: promise, challenges and potential

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Matthew P.; Hasnain, Samar S.; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.

    2015-01-01

    The International Year of Crystallography saw the number of macromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank cross the 100000 mark, with more than 90000 of these provided by X-ray crystallography. The number of X-ray structures determined to sub-atomic resolution (i.e. ≤1 Å) has passed 600 and this is likely to continue to grow rapidly with diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources such as MAX-IV (Sweden) and Sirius (Brazil) under construction. A dozen X-ray structures have been deposited to ultra-high resolution (i.e. ≤0.7 Å), for which precise electron density can be exploited to obtain charge density and provide information on the bonding character of catalytic or electron transfer sites. Although the development of neutron macromolecular crystallography over the years has been far less pronounced, and its application much less widespread, the availability of new and improved instrumentation, combined with dedicated deuteration facilities, are beginning to transform the field. Of the 83 macromolecular structures deposited with neutron diffraction data, more than half (49/83, 59%) were released since 2010. Sub-mm3 crystals are now regularly being used for data collection, structures have been determined to atomic resolution for a few small proteins, and much larger unit-cell systems (cell edges >100 Å) are being successfully studied. While some details relating to H-atom positions are tractable with X-ray crystallography at sub-atomic resolution, the mobility of certain H atoms precludes them from being located. In addition, highly polarized H atoms and protons (H+) remain invisible with X-rays. Moreover, the majority of X-ray structures are determined from cryo-cooled crystals at 100 K, and, although radiation damage can be strongly controlled, especially since the advent of shutterless fast detectors, and by using limited doses and crystal translation at micro-focus beams, radiation damage can still take place. Neutron

  3. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry

    1993-01-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The ENDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering cross sections for neutrons in

  4. Least-squares finite element discretizations of neutron transport equations in 3 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Manteuffel, T.A; Ressel, K.J.; Starkes, G.

    1996-12-31

    The least-squares finite element framework to the neutron transport equation introduced in is based on the minimization of a least-squares functional applied to the properly scaled neutron transport equation. Here we report on some practical aspects of this approach for neutron transport calculations in three space dimensions. The systems of partial differential equations resulting from a P{sub 1} and P{sub 2} approximation of the angular dependence are derived. In the diffusive limit, the system is essentially a Poisson equation for zeroth moment and has a divergence structure for the set of moments of order 1. One of the key features of the least-squares approach is that it produces a posteriori error bounds. We report on the numerical results obtained for the minimum of the least-squares functional augmented by an additional boundary term using trilinear finite elements on a uniform tesselation into cubes.

  5. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering and neutron powder diffraction study of the adsorption of dihydrogen by the Cu(II) metal-organic framework material HKUST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callear, Samantha K.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; David, William I. F.; Millange, Franck; Walton, Richard I.

    2013-12-01

    We present new high-resolution inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra (measured using the TOSCA and MARI instruments at ISIS) and powder neutron diffraction data (measured on the diffractometer WISH at ISIS) from the interaction of the prototypical metal-organic framework HKUST-1 with various dosages of dihydrogen gas. The INS spectra show direct evidence for the sequential occupation of various distinct sites for dihydrogen in the metal-organic framework, whose population is adjusted during increasing loading of the guest. The superior resolution of TOSCA reveals subtle features in the spectra, not previously reported, including evidence for split signals, while complementary spectra recorded on MARI present full information in energy and momentum transfer. The analysis of the powder neutron patterns using the Rietveld method shows a consistent picture, allowing the crystallographic indenisation of binding sites for dihydrogen, thus building a comprehensive picture of the interaction of the guest with the nanoporous host.

  6. Computational Transport Modeling of High-Energy Neutrons Found in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brad; Theriot, Corey A.; Rohde, Larry H.; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    The high charge and high energy (HZE) particle radiation environment in space interacts with spacecraft materials and the human body to create a population of neutrons encompassing a broad kinetic energy spectrum. As an HZE ion penetrates matter, there is an increasing chance of fragmentation as penetration depth increases. When an ion fragments, secondary neutrons are released with velocities up to that of the primary ion, giving some neutrons very long penetration ranges. These secondary neutrons have a high relative biological effectiveness, are difficult to effectively shield, and can cause more biological damage than the primary ions in some scenarios. Ground-based irradiation experiments that simulate the space radiation environment must account for this spectrum of neutrons. Using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS), it is possible to simulate a neutron environment that is characteristic of that found in spaceflight. Considering neutron dosimetry, the focus lies on the broad spectrum of recoil protons that are produced in biological targets. In a biological target, dose at a certain penetration depth is primarily dependent upon recoil proton tracks. The PHITS code can be used to simulate a broad-energy neutron spectrum traversing biological targets, and it account for the recoil particle population. This project focuses on modeling a neutron beamline irradiation scenario for determining dose at increasing depth in water targets. Energy-deposition events and particle fluence can be simulated by establishing cross-sectional scoring routines at different depths in a target. This type of model is useful for correlating theoretical data with actual beamline radiobiology experiments. Other work exposed human fibroblast cells to a high-energy neutron source to study micronuclei induction in cells at increasing depth behind water shielding. Those findings provide supporting data describing dose vs. depth across a water-equivalent medium. This

  7. Surface harmonics method equations for solving the time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Finite-difference time-dependent equations of Surface Harmonics method have been obtained for plane geometry. Verification of these equations has been carried out by calculations of tasks from 'Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416'. The capacity and efficiency of the Surface Harmonics method have been demonstrated by solution of the time-dependent neutron transport equation in diffusion approximation. The results of studies showed that implementation of Surface Harmonics method for full-scale calculations will lead to a significant progress in the efficient solution of the time-dependent neutron transport problems in nuclear reactors. (authors)

  8. Energy-selective neutron imaging with high spatial resolution and its impact on the study of crystalline-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Peetermans, S.; Josic, L.; Leber, H.; van Swygenhoven, H.

    2014-01-01

    Crystalline-structured materials with preferentially large grains were investigated by means of energy-selective neutron imaging methods (transmission radiography and tomography) under the conditions of the best possible spatial resolution at the ICON facility, SINQ, and PSI. Because of the cold spectrum at that beam line, access to the Bragg diffraction features was possible even when the energy resolution of the used selector device was only 15%. Grains with a size below the detector resolution (approximately 25 μm) are not visible, and a quasi-homogeneous contrast variation is found when the neutron energy is varied.In the cases of welded stainless steel samples and rolled Al plates, we obtained structural information from a very short exposure of approximately 60 s. Tomographic examinations of these samples at suitable neutron energies qualitatively verified the radiographic findings by showing the same features in the bulk. Comparison to common electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) investigations in selected regions of the samples provided a complete verification of the neutron-image data with respect to the grain size and the different grain orientations. The method of energy-selective neutron imaging provides an easy and straightforward approach for non-invasive material research that can be performed without any sample preparation if the most suitable neutron energy is chosen. Further studies will be necessary to extend the experimental data base to other materials with different crystal structures and grain sizes. A comparison to diffraction data will enhance the quantitative value of the investigations.

  9. Transport analysis of measured neutron energy spectra in a graphite stack with a collimated deuterium-tritium neutron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tsechanski, A.; Ofek, R.; Goldfeld, A.; Shani, G.

    1989-02-01

    The Ben-Gurion University measurements of neutron energy spectra in a graphite stack, resulting from the scattering of 14.7-MeV neutrons streaming through a 6-cm-diam collimator in a 121-cm-thick paraffin wall, have been used as a benchmark for the compatability and accuracy of discrete ordinates, P/sub n/, and transport calculations and as a tool for fusion reactor neutronics. The transport analysis has been carried out with the DOT 4.2 discrete ordinates code and with cross sections processed with the NJOY code. Most of the parameters affecting the accuracy of the flux and L system scattering cross sections in the P/sub n/ approximation, the quadrature set employed, and the energy multigroup structure. First, a spectrum calculated with DOT 4.2, with a detector located on the axis of the system, was compared with a spectrum calculated with the MCNP Monte Carlo code, which was a preliminary verification of the DOT 4.2 results. Both calculated spectra were in good agreement. Next, the DOT 4.2 calculations were compared with the measured spectra. The comparison showed that the discrepancies between the measurements and the calculations increase as the distance between the detector and the system axis increases. This trend indicates that when the flux is determined mainly by multiple scatterings, a more divided multigroup structure should be employed.

  10. Flexible polyvinyl chloride neutron guides for transporting ultracold and very cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Arzumanov, S. S. Bondarenko, L. N.; Geltenbort, P.; Morozov, V. I.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Panin, Yu. N.; Strepetov, A. N.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.

    2011-12-15

    The transmission of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) through flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes with lengths of up to 3 m and an internal diameter of 6-8 mm has been studied. High UCN transmission is found even for arbitrarily bent tubes (single bend, double bend, triple bend, figure eight, etc.). The transmission can be improved significantly by coating the inner surface of the tube with a thin layer of liquid fluorine polymer. The prospects of these neutron guides in fundamental and applied research are discussed.

  11. Neutron light output response and resolution functions in EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Andreas; Lawrence, Christopher C.; Wieger, Brian M.; Pozzi, Sara A.; Massey, Thomas N.

    2013-03-26

    Here, the neutron light output response functions and detector resolution functions were measured at Ohio University's tandem Van de Graaff generator for three cylindrical EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells, having dimensions 12.7(circle divide)-by-12.7, 7.6-by-7.6, and 7.6-by-5.1 cm. A 7.44 MeV deuteron beam was used on an Al-27 target generating a continuous spectrum over the energy range from a few hundred keV to over 10 MeV. The light output response functions are determined using an exponential fit. Detector resolution functions are obtained for the 12.7-by-12.7 and 7.6-by-7.6 cm detectors. It is demonstrated that the dependence on detector size is important for the light output response functions, but not to the same extent for the resolution function, even when photomultiplier tubes, detector material, and other detector characteristics are carefully matched.

  12. Neutron light output response and resolution functions in EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Enqvist, Andreas; Lawrence, Christopher C.; Wieger, Brian M.; Pozzi, Sara A.; Massey, Thomas N.

    2013-03-26

    Here, the neutron light output response functions and detector resolution functions were measured at Ohio University's tandem Van de Graaff generator for three cylindrical EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells, having dimensions 12.7(circle divide)-by-12.7, 7.6-by-7.6, and 7.6-by-5.1 cm. A 7.44 MeV deuteron beam was used on an Al-27 target generating a continuous spectrum over the energy range from a few hundred keV to over 10 MeV. The light output response functions are determined using an exponential fit. Detector resolution functions are obtained for the 12.7-by-12.7 and 7.6-by-7.6 cm detectors. It is demonstrated that the dependence on detector size is important for themore » light output response functions, but not to the same extent for the resolution function, even when photomultiplier tubes, detector material, and other detector characteristics are carefully matched.« less

  13. Nonlinear Acceleration Methods for Even-Parity Neutron Transport

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Martin; C. R. E. De Oliveira; H. Park

    2010-05-01

    Convergence acceleration methods for even-parity transport were developed that have the potential to speed up transport calculations and provide a natural avenue for an implicitly coupled multiphysics code. An investigation was performed into the acceleration properties of the introduction of a nonlinear quasi-diffusion-like tensor in linear and nonlinear solution schemes. Using the tensor reduced matrix as a preconditioner for the conjugate gradients method proves highly efficient and effective. The results for the linear and nonlinear case serve as the basis for further research into the application in a full three-dimensional spherical-harmonics even-parity transport code. Once moved into the nonlinear solution scheme, the implicit coupling of the convergence accelerated transport method into codes for other physics can be done seamlessly, providing an efficient, fully implicitly coupled multiphysics code with high order transport.

  14. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  15. L/sub 2/-error estimates for the discrete ordinates method for three-dimensional neutron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Asadzadeh, M.

    1988-02-01

    We prove L/sub 2/-error estimates for the discrete ordinates method for the angular discretization of the three-dimensional neutron transport equation. The analysis is for monoenergetic three-dimensional transport of neutrons in a homogeneous uniform media and isotropic scattering is assumed. A special quadrature rule with relatively uniformly distributed discrete directions is considered.

  16. Insights into Analogue Perovskite Solid Solutions from High-Resolution Neutron Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfern, S. A.; Chaddock, E. H.; Becerro, A. I.

    2002-12-01

    Neutron powder diffraction provides a powerful tool for the study of phase transitions as a function of pressure, temperature, or chemical composition. The structural information obtainable from powders using diffractometers such as HRPD (ISIS, UK) or D2B (ILL, France) rivals, and in some respects exceeds what may be possible using conventional crystallographic techniques reliant on single crystals. We have used both instruments to explore the subtle phase transitions observed in the (CaxSr1-x)TiO3 and (SrxBa1-x)SnO3 solid solutions. We have also used low resolution high flux instruments to explore the thermal dependence of the superlattice behavior below the cubic to tetragonal phase transition in (CaxSr1-x)TiO3. In each case a sequence of phase transitions from Pm-3m through I4/mcm to Pbnm is seen as a function of composition, and is driven by the change in average radius of the B-cation. This sequence of transitions is the same as expected for a magnesium silicate perovskite structure on increasing temperature. It is now recognised that lower mantle perovskite is likely aluminous, with solid solution towards either a stoichiometric or oxygen-defect end-member. The analogue systems we have characterised have been doped with trivalent cations on the B site to explore the effect of such substitution on the sequence of phase transitions. High-temperature neutron diffraction shows that oxygen defects stabilize the higher symmetry structures, lowering Tc for the transition to cubic. New developments in high-T high-P neutron diffraction techniques will allow the extension of these ambient pressure studies to the investigation of the influence of pressure as a variable, and hence the extension of such analogue studies to the whole range of variables experienced in the lower mantle. These will be briefly outlined.

  17. Radiation transport calculations for the ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) beam tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W., Jr.; Lillie, R.A.; Slater, C.O.

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source facility (ANS) will incorporate a large number of both radial and no-line-of-sight (NLS) beam tubes to provide very large thermal neutron fluxes to experimental facilities. The purpose of this work was to obtain comparisons for the ANS single- and split-core designs of the thermal and damage neutron and gamma-ray scalar fluxes in these beams tubes. For experimental locations far from the reactor cores, angular flux data are required; however, for close-in experimental locations, the scalar fluxes within each beam tube provide a credible estimate of the various signal to noise ratios. In this paper, the coupled two- and three-dimensional radiation transport calculations employed to estimate the scalar neutron and gamma-ray fluxes will be described and the results from these calculations will be discussed. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Low energy nuclear spin excitations in Ho metal investigated by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tapan; Jalarvo, Niina

    2013-04-17

    We have investigated the low energy excitations in metallic Ho by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. We found at T = 3 K clear inelastic peaks in the energy loss and energy gain sides, along with the central elastic peak. The energy of this low energy excitation, which is 26.59 ± 0.02 μeV at T = 3 K, decreased continuously and became zero at TN ≈ 130 K. By fitting the data in the temperature range 100-127.5 K with a power law we obtained the power-law exponent β = 0.37 ± 0.02, which agrees with the expected value β = 0.367 for a three-dimensional Heisenberg model. Thus the energy of the low energy excitations can be associated with the order parameter. PMID:23507905

  19. High-Resolution Neutron Total and Capture Cross-Section Measurements on 206Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Borella, A.; Brusegan, A.; Siegler, P.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Moxon, M.C.; Aerts, G.; Gunsing, F.

    2005-05-24

    High-resolution neutron total and capture cross-section measurements have been performed on a 99.82% enriched 206Pb metallic sample. The transmission and capture measurements were carried out at the 25- and 60-m stations, respectively, of the Time-Of-Flight facility GELINA of the IRMM in Geel (B). The small amount of material allowed us to detect 13 resonances below 80 keV in the transmission measurements and 70 were seen in the capture measurements below 150 keV. The resonance parameters for the resonances seen in transmission agree within the uncertainties of the parameters determined by Horen et al. at ORELA. The capture yield was measured up to 600 keV and the capture areas for resonances up to 150 keV were compared with published data. This comparison reveals systematic differences, which are due to the detection geometry, the different neutron sensitivity in the detection systems, the applied weighting function, and normalisation.

  20. High-resolution measurements of the DT neutron spectrum using new CD foils in the Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Casey, D. T.; Eckart, M. J.; Farrell, M. P.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoppe, M.; et al

    2016-08-09

    The Magnetic Recoil neutron Spectrometer (MRS) on the National Ignition Facility measures the DT neutron spectrum from cryogenically layered inertial confinement fusion implosions. Yield, areal density, apparent ion temperature, and directional fluid flow are inferred from the MRS data. Here, this paper describes recent advances in MRS measurements of the primary peak using new, thinner, reduced-area deuterated plastic (CD) conversion foils. The new foils allow operation of MRS at yields 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously possible, at a resolution down to ~200 keV FWHM.

  1. Asymptotic Analysis of Time-Dependent Neutron Transport Coupled with Isotopic Depletion and Radioactive Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, P S

    2006-09-27

    We describe an asymptotic analysis of the coupled nonlinear system of equations describing time-dependent three-dimensional monoenergetic neutron transport and isotopic depletion and radioactive decay. The classic asymptotic diffusion scaling of Larsen and Keller [1], along with a consistent small scaling of the terms describing the radioactive decay of isotopes, is applied to this coupled nonlinear system of equations in a medium of specified initial isotopic composition. The analysis demonstrates that to leading order the neutron transport equation limits to the standard time-dependent neutron diffusion equation with macroscopic cross sections whose number densities are determined by the standard system of ordinary differential equations, the so-called Bateman equations, describing the temporal evolution of the nuclide number densities.

  2. Numerical solution of the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    This study presents three numerical algorithms to solve the time dependent neutron transport equation by the method of the characteristics. The algorithms have been developed taking into account delayed neutrons and they have been implemented into the novel MCART code, which solves the neutron transport equation for two-dimensional geometry and an arbitrary number of energy groups. The MCART code uses regular mesh for the representation of the spatial domain, it models up-scattering, and takes advantage of OPENMP and OPENGL algorithms for parallel computing and plotting, respectively. The code has been benchmarked with the multiplication factor results of a Boiling Water Reactor, with the analytical results for a prompt jump transient in an infinite medium, and with PARTISN and TDTORT results for cross section and source transients. The numerical simulations have shown that only two numerical algorithms are stable for small time steps.

  3. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  4. Neutron beam characterization measurements at the Manuel Lujan Jr. neutron scattering center

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal; Muhrer, Guenter; Daemen, Luke L; Kelsey, Charles T; Duran, Michael A; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the neutron beam characteristics of neutron moderators at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE. The absolute thermal neutron flux, energy spectra and time emission spectra were measured for the high resolution and high intensity decoupled water, partially coupled liquid hydrogen and partially coupled water moderators. The results of our experimental study will provide an insight into aging of different target-moderator-reflector-shield components as well as new experimental data for benchmarking of neutron transport codes.

  5. A/sub n/ method in monokinetic neutron transport theory: Convergence and numerical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Coppa, G.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1981-10-01

    The convergence of the approximate method, referred to as A/sub n/, to study the solution of the monokinetic transport equation is fully investigated, when it is applied to the description of the neutron population in both infinite and finite media.

  6. The low resolution structure of ApoA1 in spherical high density lipoprotein revealed by small angle neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiping; Gogonea, Valentin; Lee, Xavier; May, Roland P; Pipich, Vitaliy; Wagner, Matthew A; Undurti, Arundhati; Tallant, Thomas C; Baleanu-Gogonea, Camelia; Charlton, Francesca; Ioffe, Alexander; DiDonato, Joseph A; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Hazen, Stanley L

    2011-04-01

    Spherical high density lipoprotein (sHDL), a key player in reverse cholesterol transport and the most abundant form of HDL, is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Small angle neutron scattering with contrast variation was used to determine the solution structure of protein and lipid components of reconstituted sHDL. Apolipoprotein A1, the major protein of sHDL, forms a hollow structure that cradles a central compact lipid core. Three apoA1 chains are arranged within the low resolution structure of the protein component as one of three possible global architectures: (i) a helical dimer with a hairpin (HdHp), (ii) three hairpins (3Hp), or (iii) an integrated trimer (iT) in which the three apoA1 monomers mutually associate over a portion of the sHDL surface. Cross-linking and mass spectrometry analyses help to discriminate among the three molecular models and are most consistent with the HdHp overall architecture of apoA1 within sHDL. PMID:21292766

  7. The coupling of the neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE to the nuclear fuels performance application BISON under the MOOSE framework

    SciTech Connect

    Gleicher, Frederick N.; Williamson, Richard L.; Ortensi, Javier; Wang, Yaqi; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Hales, Jason D.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2014-10-01

    The MOOSE neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the self-adjoint angular flux equations) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate on unstructured meshes. RATTLESNAKE solves self-adjoint angular flux transport equation and provides a sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux with resonance treatment during burnup or a fast transient. BISON solves the coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter scale. Both applications are able to solve their respective systems on aligned and unaligned unstructured finite element meshes. The power density and local burnup was transferred from RATTLESNAKE to BISON with the MOOSE Multiapp transfer system. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from RATTLESNAKE to BISON. The eigenvalues are shown to agree well with values obtained from the lattice physics code DRAGON. The one-way data transfer of power density is shown to agree with the power density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON.

  8. A neutron crystallographic analysis of a rubredoxin mutant at 1.6 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Tsyba, Irina; Bau, Robert; Jenney, Francis E; Adams, Michael W W; Niimura, Nobuo

    2004-08-01

    A neutron diffraction study has been carried out at 1.6 A resolution on a mutant rubredoxin from Pyrococcus furiosus using the BIX-3 single-crystal diffractometer at the JRR-3 reactor of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In order to study the unusual thermostability of rubredoxin from P. furiosus (an organism that grows optimally at 373 K), the hydrogen-bonding patterns were compared between the wild-type protein and a 'triple-mutant' variant. In this mutant protein, three residues were changed (Trp3-->Tyr3, Ile23-->Val23, Leu32-->Ile32) so that they are identical to those in a mesophilic rubredoxin from Clostridium pasteurianum. In the present study, some minor changes were found between the wild-type and mutant proteins in the hydrogen-bonding patterns of the Trp3/Tyr3 region. In this investigation, the H/D-exchange ratios in the protein were also studied. Because the target protein was soaked in D2O during the crystallization procedure, most of the N-H and O-H bonds have become deuterated, while essentially all of the C-H bonds have not. In particular, the H/D-exchange pattern of the N-H amide bonds of the protein backbone is of interest because it may contain some indirect information about the mechanism of unfolding of this small protein. The results are in broad agreement with those from solution NMR studies, which suggest that the backbone amide bonds near the four Cys residues of the FeS4 redox center are most resistant to H/D exchange. Finally, the detailed geometries of the water molecules of hydration around the rubredoxin molecule are also reported. The 1.6 A resolution of the present neutron structure determination has revealed a more detailed picture than previously available of some portions of the water structure, including ordered and disordered O-D bonds. Crystallographic details: space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (orthorhombic), unit-cell parameters a = 34.48, b = 35.70, c = 43.16 A; final agreement factors R = 0.196 and Rfree = 0.230 for 19

  9. Sensitive and transportable gadolinium-core plastic scintillator sphere for neutron detection and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Carrel, Frédérick; Corre, Gwenolé; Normand, Stéphane; Méchin, Laurence; Hamel, Matthieu

    2016-08-01

    Neutron detection forms a critical branch of nuclear-related issues, currently driven by the search for competitive alternative technologies to neutron counters based on the helium-3 isotope. The deployment of plastic scintillators shows a high potential for efficient detectors, safer and more reliable than liquids, more easily scalable and cost-effective than inorganic. In the meantime, natural gadolinium, through its 155 and mostly 157 isotopes, presents an exceptionally high interaction probability with thermal neutrons. This paper introduces a dual system including a metal gadolinium core inserted at the center of a high-scale plastic scintillator sphere. Incident fast neutrons are thermalized by the scintillator shell and then may be captured with a significant probability by gadolinium 155 and 157 nuclei in the core. The deposition of a sufficient fraction of the capture high-energy prompt gamma signature inside the scintillator shell will then allow discrimination from background radiations by energy threshold, and therefore neutron detection. The scaling of the system with the Monte Carlo MCNPX2.7 code was carried out according to a tradeoff between the moderation of incident fast neutrons and the probability of slow neutron capture by a moderate-cost metal gadolinium core. Based on the parameters extracted from simulation, a first laboratory prototype for the assessment of the detection method principle has been synthetized. The robustness and sensitivity of the neutron detection principle are then assessed by counting measurement experiments. Experimental results confirm the potential for a stable, highly sensitive, transportable and cost-efficient neutron detector and orientate future investigation toward promising axes.

  10. High-resolution neutron powder diffractometer SPODI at research reactor FRM II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelzel, M.; Senyshyn, A.; Juenke, N.; Boysen, H.; Schmahl, W.; Fuess, H.

    2012-03-01

    SPODI is a high-resolution thermal neutron diffractometer at the research reactor Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) especially dedicated to structural studies of complex systems. Unique features like a very large monochromator take-off angle of 155° and a 5 m monochromator-sample distance in its standard configuration achieve both high-resolution and a good profile shape for a broad scattering angle range. Two dimensional data are collected by an array of 80 vertical position sensitive 3He detectors. SPODI is well suited for studies of complex structural and magnetic order and disorder phenomena at non-ambient conditions. In addition to standard sample environment facilities (cryostats, furnaces, magnet) specific devices (rotatable load frame, cell for electric fields, multichannel potentiostat) were developed. Thus the characterisation of functional materials at in-operando conditions can be achieved. In this contribution the details of the design and present performance of the instrument are reported along with its specifications. A new concept for data reduction using a 2 θ dependent variable height for the intensity integration along the Debye-Scherrer lines is introduced.

  11. Conflict Detection and Resolution for Future Air Transportation Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krozel, Jimmy; Peters, Mark E.; Hunter, George

    1997-01-01

    With a Free Flight policy, the emphasis for air traffic control is shifting from active control to passive air traffic management with a policy of intervention by exception. Aircraft will be allowed to fly user preferred routes, as long as safety Alert Zones are not violated. If there is a potential conflict, two (or more) aircraft must be able to arrive at a solution for conflict resolution without controller intervention. Thus, decision aid tools are needed in Free Flight to detect and resolve conflicts, and several problems must be solved to develop such tools. In this report, we analyze and solve problems of proximity management, conflict detection, and conflict resolution under a Free Flight policy. For proximity management, we establish a system based on Delaunay Triangulations of aircraft at constant flight levels. Such a system provides a means for analyzing the neighbor relationships between aircraft and the nearby free space around air traffic which can be utilized later in conflict resolution. For conflict detection, we perform both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional analyses based on the penetration of the Protected Airspace Zone. Both deterministic and non-deterministic analyses are performed. We investigate several types of conflict warnings including tactical warnings prior to penetrating the Protected Airspace Zone, methods based on the reachability overlap of both aircraft, and conflict probability maps to establish strategic Alert Zones around aircraft.

  12. Anisotropic Elastic Resonance Scattering model for the Neutron Transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed Ouisloumen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Shadi Z. Ghrayeb

    2014-11-24

    The resonance scattering transfer cross-section has been reformulated to account for anisotropic scattering in the center-of-mass of the neutron-nucleus system. The main innovation over previous implementations is the relaxation of the ubiquitous assumption of isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass and the actual effective use of scattering angle distributions from evaluated nuclear data files in the computation of the angular moments of the resonant scattering kernels. The formulas for the high order anisotropic moments in the laboratory system are also derived. A multi-group numerical formulation is derived and implemented into a module incorporated within the NJOY nuclear data processing code. An ultra-fine energy mesh cross section library was generated using these new theoretical models and then was used for fuel assembly calculations with the PARAGON lattice physics code. The results obtained indicate a strong effect of this new model on reactivity, multi-group fluxes and isotopic inventory during depletion.

  13. Marine transportation and burial of the Shippingport reactor pressure vessel/neutron shield tank package

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) project for dismantling the Shippingport atomic power station. One of the more significant and challenging technical aspects of the project, which is being managed for DOE by General Electric-Nuclear Energy, is the marine transport of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its associated neutron shield tank (NST) to the government-owned Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. Planning of the transport activity, barge transportation operations, and Hanford transportation operations, are discussed. This work will be the first use of barge transportation in the United States of a radioactive RPV package from a decommissioned land-based nuclear power plant. This extensive transportation operation has been accomplished in a timely, safe, and cost-effective manner.

  14. Radiative or neutron transport modeling using a lattice Boltzmann equation framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindra, H.; Patil, D. V.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE)-based framework is used to obtain the solution for the linear radiative or neutron transport equation. The LBE framework is devised for the integrodifferential forms of these equations which arise due to the inclusion of the scattering terms. The interparticle collisions are neglected, hence omitting the nonlinear collision term. Furthermore, typical representative examples for one-dimensional or two-dimensional geometries and inclusion or exclusion of the scattering term (isotropic and anisotropic) in the Boltzmann transport equation are illustrated to prove the validity of the method. It has been shown that the solution from the LBE methodology is equivalent to the well-known Pn and Sn methods. This suggests that the LBE can potentially provide a more convenient and easy approach to solve the physical problems of neutron and radiation transport.

  15. A discrete ordinates nodal method for one-dimensional neutron transport calculation in curvilinear geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Xie, Z.; Fischer, U.

    1999-11-01

    A discrete ordinates nodal transport method has been developed for numerical solution of the one-dimensional neutron transport equation in curvilinear geometries. The nodal transport equation is solved by the Green's function method, using the Legendre polynomial expansion for spatial dependence and the discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) approximation for angular dependence. The calculation for various test problems has been performed to verify the method. The numerical results demonstrate that it has very high precision on coarse spatial meshes relative to the standard fine-mesh S{sub N} method with the spatial diamond-differencing scheme.

  16. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid

    1995-09-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutron is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS) and pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ration is greater than about 0.01. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projections angles and modest (2 cm) reolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and the reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA technqiues are presented.

  17. A 109 neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 108 neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head.

  18. High resolution inelastic gamma-ray measurements with a white neutron source from 1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Laymon, C.M.; Wender, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of prompt gamma rays following neutron-induced reactions have recently been made at the spallation neutron source at the WNR target area of LAMPF using germanium detectors. These experiments provide extensive excitation function data for inelastic neutron scattering as well as for other reactions such as (n,{alpha}), (n,n{alpha}), (n,p), (n,np), (n,nnp) and (n,xn) for 1 {le} {times} {le} 11. The continuous energy coverage available from 1 MeV to over 200 MeV is ideal for excitation function measurements and greatly extends the energy range for such data. The results of these measurements will provide a database for interpretation of gamma-ray spectra from the planned Mars Observer mission, aid in radiation transport calculations, allow verification of nuclear reaction models, and improve the evaluated neutron reaction data base.

  19. Ageing of a neutron shielding used in transport/storage casks

    SciTech Connect

    Nizeyiman, Fidele; Alami, Aatif; Issard, Herve; Bellenger, Veronique

    2012-07-11

    In radioactive materials transport/storage casks, a mineral-filled vinylester composite is used for neutron shielding which relies on its hydrogen and boron atoms content. During cask service life, this composite is mainly subjected to three types of ageing: hydrothermal ageing, thermal oxidation and neutron irradiation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of hydrothermal ageing on the properties and chemical composition of this polymer composite. At high temperature (120 Degree-Sign C and 140 Degree-Sign C), the main consequence is the strong decrease of mechanical properties induced by the filler/matrix debonding.

  20. High Spatial Resolution Studies of Epithermal Neutron Emission from the Lunar Poles: Constraints on Hydrogen Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Droege, G. F.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; McClanahan, T. P.; Sanin, A. B.; Litvak, M. L.; Schaffner, M.; Chin, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J. B.; Harshman, K.; Malakhov, A.; Milikh, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Starr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The data from the collimated sensors of the LEND instrument are shown to be of exceptionally high quality. Counting uncertainties are about 0.3% relative and are shown to be the only significant source of random error, thus conclusions based on small differences in count rates are valid. By comparison with the topography of Shoemaker crater, the spatial resolution of the instrument is shown to be consistent with the design value of 5 km for the radius of the circle over which half the counts from the lunar surface would be determined. The observed epithermal-neutron suppression factor due to the hydrogen deposit in Shoemaker crater of 0.25 plus or minus 0.04 cps is consistent with the collimated field-of-view rate of 1.7 cps estimated by Mitrofanov et al. (2010a). The statistical significance of the neutron suppressed regions (NSRs) relative to the larger surrounding polar region is demonstrated, and it is shown that they are not closely related to the permanently shadowed regions. There is a significant increase in H content in the polar regions independent of the H content of the NSRs. The non-NSR H content increases directly with latitude, and the rate of increase is virtually identical at both poles. There is little or no increase with latitude outside the polar region. Various mechanisms to explain this steep increase in the non-NSR polar H with latitude are investigated, and it is suggested that thermal volatilization is responsible for the increase because it is minimized at the low surface temperatures close to the poles.

  1. Neutron and high-resolution room-temperature X-ray data collection from crystallized lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Bacik, John Paul; Mekasha, Sophanit; Forsberg, Zarah; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Nix, Jay C; Cuneo, Matthew J; Coates, Leighton; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Chen, Julian C H; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Unkefer, Clifford J

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria and fungi express lytic polysaccharide monooxgyenase (LPMO) enzymes that act in conjunction with canonical hydrolytic sugar-processing enzymes to rapidly convert polysaccharides such as chitin, cellulose and starch to single monosaccharide products. In order to gain a better understanding of the structure and oxidative mechanism of these enzymes, large crystals (1-3 mm(3)) of a chitin-processing LPMO from the Gram-positive soil bacterium Jonesia denitrificans were grown and screened for their ability to diffract neutrons. In addition to the collection of neutron diffraction data, which were processed to 2.1 Å resolution, a high-resolution room-temperature X-ray diffraction data set was collected and processed to 1.1 Å resolution in space group P212121. To our knowledge, this work marks the first successful neutron crystallographic experiment on an LPMO. Joint X-ray/neutron refinement of the resulting data will reveal new details of the structure and mechanism of this recently discovered class of enzymes. PMID:26527275

  2. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hazemann, I; Dauvergne, M T; Blakeley, M P; Meilleur, F; Haertlein, M; Van Dorsselaer, A; Mitschler, A; Myles, D A A; Podjarny, A

    2005-10-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Angstrom resolution from a small (0.15 mm(3)) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase [h-AR(D)], subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm(3) are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 Angstrom resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 Angstrom. This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples. PMID:16204895

  3. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: Application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazemann, I.; Dauvergne, M. T.; Blakeley, M. P.; Meilleur, Flora; Haertlein, M.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Mitschler, A.; Myles, Dean A A; Podjarny, A.

    2005-08-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution from a small (0.15 mm{sup 3}) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase [h-AR(D)], subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm{sup 3} are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 {angstrom} resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 {angstrom}. This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples.

  4. Secondary fusion coupled deuteron/triton transport simulation and thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. B.; Wang, K.; Liu, H. G.; Li, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) was developed to simulate deuteron/triton transportation and reaction coupled problem. The 'Forced particle production' variance reduction technique was used to improve the simulation speed, which made the secondary product play a major role. The mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source was employed as a validation. Then the thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor was studied with our tool. Moreover, an in-core conversion efficiency measurement experiment was performed with {sup 6}LiD and {sup 6}LiH converters. Threshold activation foils was used to indicate the fast and fusion neutron flux. Besides, two other pivotal parameters were calculated theoretically. Finally, the conversion efficiency of {sup 6}LiD is obtained as 1.97x10{sup -4}, which matches well with the theoretical result. (authors)

  5. Interfacing MCNPX and McStas for simulation of neutron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkby, Esben; Lauritzen, Bent; Nonbøl, Erik; Kjær Willendrup, Peter; Filges, Uwe; Wohlmuther, Michael; Gallmeier, Franz X.

    2013-02-01

    Simulations of target-moderator-reflector system at spallation sources are conventionally carried out using Monte Carlo codes such as MCNPX (Waters et al., 2007 [1]) or FLUKA (Battistoni et al., 2007; Ferrari et al., 2005 [2,3]) whereas simulations of neutron transport from the moderator and the instrument response are performed by neutron ray tracing codes such as McStas (Lefmann and Nielsen, 1999; Willendrup et al., 2004, 2011a,b [4-7]). The coupling between the two simulation suites typically consists of providing analytical fits of MCNPX neutron spectra to McStas. This method is generally successful but has limitations, as it e.g. does not allow for re-entry of neutrons into the MCNPX regime. Previous work to resolve such shortcomings includes the introduction of McStas inspired supermirrors in MCNPX. In the present paper different approaches to interface MCNPX and McStas are presented and applied to a simple test case. The direct coupling between MCNPX and McStas allows for more accurate simulations of e.g. complex moderator geometries, backgrounds, interference between beam-lines as well as shielding requirements along the neutron guides.

  6. An Algorithm for the Transport of Anisotropic Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.

    2005-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effect of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar particle events (SPE) were of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated GCR exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thicknesses of aluminum shielding, according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Therefore, a critical issue in the Human Exploration and Development of Space enterprise is cost effective mitigation of risk associated with ionizing radiation exposure. In order to estimate astronaut risk to GCR exposure and associated cancer risks and health hazards, it is necessary to do shield material studies. To determine an optimum radiation shield material it is necessary to understand nuclear interaction processes such as fragmentation and secondary particle production which is a function of energy dependent cross sections. This requires knowledge of material transmission characteristics either through laboratory testing or improved theoretical modeling. Here ion beam transport theory is of importance in that testing of materials in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are a major emphasis of the present work.

  7. Unambiguous determination of H-atom positions: comparing results from neutron and high-resolution X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Gardberg, Anna S.; Del Castillo, Alexis R.; Weiss, Kevin L.; Meilleur, Flora; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Myles, Dean A.A.

    2010-11-19

    The locations of H atoms in biological structures can be difficult to determine using X-ray diffraction methods. Neutron diffraction offers a relatively greater scattering magnitude from H and D atoms. Here, 1.65 {angstrom} resolution neutron diffraction studies of fully perdeuterated and selectively CH{sub 3}-protonated perdeuterated crystals of Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin (D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively) at room temperature (RT) are described, as well as 1.1 {angstrom} resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the same protein at both RT and 100 K. The two techniques are quantitatively compared in terms of their power to directly provide atomic positions for D atoms and analyze the role played by atomic thermal motion by computing the {sigma} level at the D-atom coordinate in simulated-annealing composite D-OMIT maps. It is shown that 1.65 {angstrom} resolution RT neutron data for perdeuterated rubredoxin are {approx}8 times more likely overall to provide high-confidence positions for D atoms than 1.1 {angstrom} resolution X-ray data at 100 K or RT. At or above the 1.0{sigma} level, the joint X-ray/neutron (XN) structures define 342/378 (90%) and 291/365 (80%) of the D-atom positions for D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively. The X-ray-only 1.1 {angstrom} resolution 100 K structures determine only 19/388 (5%) and 8/388 (2%) of the D-atom positions above the 1.0{sigma} level for D-rubredoxin and HD-rubredoxin, respectively. Furthermore, the improved model obtained from joint XN refinement yielded improved electron-density maps, permitting the location of more D atoms than electron-density maps from models refined against X-ray data only.

  8. Performance of European chemistry transport models as function of horizontal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, M.; Cuvelier, C.; Hendriks, C.; Bessagnet, B.; Baldasano, J. M.; Colette, A.; Thunis, P.; Karam, D.; Fagerli, H.; Graff, A.; Kranenburg, R.; Nyiri, A.; Pay, M. T.; Rouïl, L.; Schulz, M.; Simpson, D.; Stern, R.; Terrenoire, E.; Wind, P.

    2015-07-01

    Air pollution causes adverse effects on human health as well as ecosystems and crop yield and also has an impact on climate change trough short-lived climate forcers. To design mitigation strategies for air pollution, 3D Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) have been developed to support the decision process. Increases in model resolution may provide more accurate and detailed information, but will cubically increase computational costs and pose additional challenges concerning high resolution input data. The motivation for the present study was therefore to explore the impact of using finer horizontal grid resolution for policy support applications of the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) model within the Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP) convention. The goal was to determine the "optimum resolution" at which additional computational efforts do not provide increased model performance using presently available input data. Five regional CTMs performed four runs for 2009 over Europe at different horizontal resolutions. The models' responses to an increase in resolution are broadly consistent for all models. The largest response was found for NO2 followed by PM10 and O3. Model resolution does not impact model performance for rural background conditions. However, increasing model resolution improves the model performance at stations in and near large conglomerations. The statistical evaluation showed that the increased resolution better reproduces the spatial gradients in pollution regimes, but does not help to improve significantly the model performance for reproducing observed temporal variability. This study clearly shows that increasing model resolution is advantageous, and that leaving a resolution of 50 km in favour of a resolution between 10 and 20 km is practical and worthwhile. As about 70% of the model response to grid resolution is determined by the difference in the spatial emission distribution, improved emission allocation

  9. 5f-electron states in uranium dioxide investigated using high-resolution neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoretti, G.; Blaise, A.; Caciuffo, R.; Fournier, J. M.; Hutchings, M. T.; Osborn, R.; Taylor, A. D.

    1989-07-01

    High-resolution, high-energy-transfer, inelastic neutron scattering has been used to explore the crystal-field (CF) excitations in UO2. As all the dipole-allowed transitions within the free-ion ground manifold have been identified, the observations provide a complete determination of the crystal-field potential and 5f-electron eigenstates. The fourth- and sixth-degree CF parameters are V4=-123 meV and V6=26.5 meV. In spite of the strength of the CF, the ground state is accurately given by the intermediate-coupling approximation with little modification by J-mixing effects. In the antiferromagnetic phase below TN=30.8 K, a splitting of the cubic CF levels, due to the combined effects of the molecular field and the distortion of the oxygen-ligand cage surrounding the U4+ ions, has been observed. Detailed CF calculations are presented both for the case of a double-k magnetic structure with a monoclinic distortion of the oxygen sublattice, and for a combined triple-k distortion and magnetic order. The observed splittings are shown to be more consistent with the triple-k model.

  10. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction studies of Escherichia coli ABC transport receptor phosphate-binding protein at the Protein Crystallography Station

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, K. H.; Bacik, J.; Quiocho, F. A.; Fisher, S. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate is an essential molecule for all known life. Organisms have developed many mechanisms to ensure an adequate supply, even in low-phosphate conditions. In prokaryotes phosphate transport is instigated by the phosphate-binding protein (PBP), the initial receptor for the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) phosphate transporter. In the crystal structure of the PBP–phosphate complex, the phosphate is completely desolvated and sequestered in a deep cleft and is bound by 13 hydrogen bonds: 12 to protein NH and OH donor groups and one to a carboxylate acceptor group. The carboxylate plays a key recognition role by accepting a phosphate hydrogen. PBP phosphate affinity is relatively consistent across a broad pH range, indicating the capacity to bind monobasic (H2PO4 −) and dibasic (HPO4 2−) phosphate; however, the mechanism by which it might accommodate the second hydrogen of monobasic phosphate is unclear. To answer this question, neutron diffraction studies were initiated. Large single crystals with a volume of 8 mm3 were grown and subjected to hydrogen/deuterium exchange. A 2.5 Å resolution data set was collected on the Protein Crystallography Station at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Initial refinement of the neutron data shows significant nuclear density, and refinement is ongoing. This is the first report of a neutron study from this superfamily. PMID:24915101

  11. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method applied to the 1-D spherical neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, Eric . E-mail: machorro@amath.washington.edu

    2007-04-10

    Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods are used to estimate solutions to the non-scattering 1-D spherical neutron transport equation. Various trial and test spaces are compared in the context of a few sample problems whose exact solution is known. Certain trial spaces avoid unphysical behaviors that seem to plague other methods. Comparisons with diamond differencing and simple corner-balancing are presented to highlight these improvements.

  12. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulations on Neutron Transport and Absorbed Dose in Tissue-Equivalent Phantoms Exposed to High-Flux Epithermal Neutron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Carrara, M.; Burian, J.; Viererbl, L.

    2010-04-01

    Presently there are no standard protocols for dosimetry in neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments. Because of the high radiation intensity and of the presence at the same time of radiation components having different linear energy transfer and therefore different biological weighting factors, treatment planning in epithermal neutron fields for BNCT is usually performed by means of Monte Carlo calculations; experimental measurements are required in order to characterize the neutron source and to validate the treatment planning. In this work Monte Carlo simulations in two kinds of tissue-equivalent phantoms are described. The neutron transport has been studied, together with the distribution of the boron dose; simulation results are compared with data taken with Fricke gel dosimeters in form of layers, showing a good agreement.

  14. Hybrid method of deterministic and probabilistic approaches for multigroup neutron transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid method of deterministic and probabilistic methods is proposed to solve Boltzmann transport equation. The new method uses a deterministic method, Method of Characteristics (MOC), for the fast and thermal neutron energy ranges and a probabilistic method, Monte Carlo (MC), for the intermediate resonance energy range. The hybrid method, in case of continuous energy problem, will be able to take advantage of fast MOC calculation and accurate resonance self shielding treatment of MC method. As a proof of principle, this paper presents the hybrid methodology applied to a multigroup form of Boltzmann transport equation and confirms that the hybrid method can produce consistent results with MC and MOC methods. (authors)

  15. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operationa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the Spallation Neutron Source 1-MW beam operation with ~38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to ~1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: 1) inconsistent dependence of the post-RFQ beam current on the ion source tilt angle, and 2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  16. Synergism of the method of characteristics and CAD technology for neutron transport calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Wang, D.; He, T.; Wang, G.; Zheng, H.

    2013-07-01

    The method of characteristics (MOC) is a very popular methodology in neutron transport calculation and numerical simulation in recent decades for its unique advantages. One of the key problems determining whether the MOC can be applied in complicated and highly heterogeneous geometry is how to combine an effective geometry processing method with MOC. Most of the existing MOC codes describe the geometry by lines and arcs with extensive input data, such as circles, ellipses, regular polygons and combination of them. Thus they have difficulty in geometry modeling, background meshing and ray tracing for complicated geometry domains. In this study, a new idea making use of a CAD solid modeler MCAM which is a CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport developed by FDS Team in China was introduced for geometry modeling and ray tracing of particle transport to remove these geometrical limitations mentioned above. The diamond-difference scheme was applied to MOC to reduce the spatial discretization error of the flat flux approximation in theory. Based on MCAM and MOC, a new MOC code was developed and integrated into SuperMC system, which is a Super Multi-function Computational system for neutronics and radiation simulation. The numerical testing results demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the new idea for geometry treatment in SuperMC. (authors)

  17. Apparatus, Method and Program Storage Device for Determining High-Energy Neutron/Ion Transport to a Target of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W. (Inventor); Tripathi, Ram K. (Inventor); Badavi, Francis F. (Inventor); Cucinotta, Francis A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus, method and program storage device for determining high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest. Boundaries are defined for calculation of a high-energy neutron/ion transport to a target of interest; the high-energy neutron/ion transport to the target of interest is calculated using numerical procedures selected to reduce local truncation error by including higher order terms and to allow absolute control of propagated error by ensuring truncation error is third order in step size, and using scaling procedures for flux coupling terms modified to improve computed results by adding a scaling factor to terms describing production of j-particles from collisions of k-particles; and the calculated high-energy neutron/ion transport is provided to modeling modules to control an effective radiation dose at the target of interest.

  18. A Computer Program for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by Two-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP2 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for two-dimensional geometry.

  19. A Computer Code System for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by One-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP1 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for one-dimensional geometry.

  20. 66 Neutron, 22 Gamma-Ray Group Cross Sections for Radiation Transport for Neutron Energies Up to 400 MeV.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-12-12

    Version 00 For a variety of applications (accelerator shielding, the use of neutrons in radiotherapy, radiation damage studies, etc.) It is necessary to carry out transport calculations involving medium-energy neutrons. HILO86R multigroup cross sections are in the form needed for the CCC-254/ANISN-ORNL and CCC-543/TORT-DORT discrete ordinates codes and in the CCC-474/MORSE-CGA Monte Carlo code.

  1. A portable, parallel, object-oriented Monte Carlo neutron transport code in C++

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.R.; Cummings, J.C.; Nolen, S.D. |

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a multi-group Monte Carlo neutron transport code using C++ and the Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA) class library. This transport code, called MC++, currently computes k and {alpha}-eigenvalues and is portable to and runs parallel on a wide variety of platforms, including MPPs, clustered SMPs, and individual workstations. It contains appropriate classes and abstractions for particle transport and, through the use of POOMA, for portable parallelism. Current capabilities of MC++ are discussed, along with physics and performance results on a variety of hardware, including all Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) hardware. Current parallel performance indicates the ability to compute {alpha}-eigenvalues in seconds to minutes rather than hours to days. Future plans and the implementation of a general transport physics framework are also discussed.

  2. Digitized neutron imaging with high spatial resolution at a low power research reactor: I. Analysis of detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawisky, M.; Hameed, F.; Dyrnjaja, E.; Springer, J.

    2008-03-01

    Imaging techniques provide an indispensable tool for investigation of materials. Neutrons, due to their specific properties, offer a unique probe for many aspects of condensed matter. Neutron imaging techniques present a challenging experimental task, especially at a low power research reactor. The Atomic Institute with a 250 kW TRIGA MARK II reactor looks back at a long tradition in neutron imaging. Here we report on the advantages gained in a recent upgrade of the imaging instrument including the acquisition of a thin-plate scintillation detector, a single counting micro-channel plate detector, and an imaging plate detector in combination with a high resolution scanner. We analyze the strengths and limitations of each detector in the field of neutron radiography and tomography, and demonstrate that high resolution digitized imaging down to the 50 μm scale can be accomplished with weak beam intensities of 1.3×10 5 n/cm 2 s, if appropriate measures are taken for the inevitable extension of measurement times. In a separate paper we will present some promising first results from the fields of engineering and geology.

  3. Benchmark test of transport calculations of gold and nickel activation with implications for neutron kerma at Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, M; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Sawada, S; Munaka, M; Kuramoto, A; Oka, T; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hasai, H

    1992-11-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a 252Cf fission neutron source to validate the use of the code for the energy spectrum analyses of Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons. Nuclear data libraries used in the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code calculation were ENDF/B-III, ENDF/B-IV, LASL-SUB, and ENDL-73. The neutron moderators used were granite (the main component of which is SiO2, with a small fraction of hydrogen), Newlight [polyethylene with 3.7% boron (natural)], ammonium chloride (NH4Cl), and water (H2O). Each moderator was 65 cm thick. The neutron detectors were gold and nickel foils, which were used to detect thermal and epithermal neutrons (4.9 eV) and fast neutrons (> 0.5 MeV), respectively. Measured activity data from neutron-irradiated gold and nickel foils in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which correspond to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For both gold and nickel detectors, the measured activities and the calculated values agreed within 10%. The slopes of the depth-yield relations in each moderator, except granite, were similar for neutrons detected by the gold and nickel foils. From the results of these studies, the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code was verified to be accurate enough for use with the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, chlorine, and cadmium, and for the incident 252Cf fission spectrum neutrons. PMID:1399639

  4. A high-resolution disk chopper with two-stage rotors for neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Masayoshi

    1997-02-01

    Two-stage three-rotor disk chopper has been designed and constructed with the aim of bringing the resolution of crystal lattive strain ° d/ d = 10 -4-10 -5. The first two of them rotate at 150 rps in reverse directions from each other by a timing-belt system. This means that the actual rotation speed becomes 300 rps. The last rotor rotates as a tail-cutter for TOF measurements. The highest time resolution of the present Bragg scattering set-up is about 15 μs for 2 Å neutrons, realizing ° {d}/{d}<10 -4.

  5. High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L; Spendelow, Jacob S; Davey, John; Fairweather, Joseph; Mukherjee, Partha

    2010-01-01

    To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operation. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and neutron radiography were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells under various operating conditions. Variables examined include: sub-freezing conditions, inlet relative humidities, cell temperature, current density and response transients, different flow field orientations and different component materials (membranes, GDLs and MEAs). Quantification of the water within the membrane was made by neutron radiography after equilibration to different humidified gases, during fuel cell operation and in hydrogen pump mode. The water content was evaluated in bare Nafion{reg_sign} membranes as well as in MEAs operated in both fuel cell and H{sub 2} pump mode. These in situ imaging results allow measurement of the water content and gradients in the PEFC membrane and relate the membrane water transport characteristics to the fuel cell operation and performance under disparate materials and operational combinations. Flow geometry makes a large impact on MEA water content. Higher membrane water with counter flow was measured compared with co-flow for sub-saturated inlet RH's. This correlates to lower HFR and higher performance compared with co-flow. Higher anode stoichiometry helps remove water which accumulates in the anode channels and GDL material. Cell orientation was measured to affect both the water content and cell performance. While membrane water content was measured to be similar regardless of orientation, cells with the cathode on top show flooding and loss of performance compared with similarly operated cells with the anode on top. Transient fuel cell current measurements show a large degree of hysteresis in terms of membrane hydration as measured by HFR. Current step transients from 0.01 A cm

  6. Calculation of the Local Neutronic Parameters for CANDU Fuel Bundles Using Transport Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Balaceanu, Victoria; Rizoiu, Andrei; Hristea, Viorel

    2006-07-01

    For a realistic neutronic evaluation of the CANDU reactor core it is important to accurately perform the local neutronic parameters (i.e. multigroup macroscopic cross sections for the core materials) calculation. This means using codes that allow a good geometric representation of the CANDU fuel bundle and then solving the transport equation. The paper reported here intends to study in detail the local behavior for two types of CANDU fuel, NU{sub 3}7 (Natural Uranium, 37 elements) and SEU{sub 4}3 (Slightly Enriched Uranium, 43 elements, with 1.1 wt% enrichment). The considered fuel types represent fresh and used bundles. The two types of CANDU super-cells are reference NU{sub 3}7, perturbed NU{sub 3}7, reference SEU{sub 4}3 and perturbed SEU{sub 4}3. The perturbed super-cells contain a Mechanical Control Absorber (a very strong reactivity device). For reaching the proposed objective a methodology is used based on WIMS and PIJXYZ codes. WIMS is a standard lattice-cell code, based on transport theory and it is used for producing fuel cell multigroup macroscopic cross sections. For obtaining the fine local neutronic parameters in the CANDU super-cells (k-eff values, local MCA reactivity worth, flux distributions and reaction rates), the PIJXYZ code is used. PIJXYZ is a 3D integral transport code using the first collision probability method and it has been developed for CANDU cell geometry. It is consistent with WIMS lattice-cell calculations and allows a good geometrical representation of the CANDU bundle in three dimensions. The analysis of the neutronic parameters consists of comparing the obtained results with the similar results calculated with the DRAGON code. This comparison shows a good agreement between these results. (authors)

  7. High-temperature structural phase transitions in neighborite: a high-resolution neutron powder diffraction investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Kevin S.; Price, G. David; Stuart, John A.; Wood, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of the apparently continuous structural phase transition at 1,049 K in the perovskite-structured, MgSiO3 isomorph, neighborite (NaMgF3), from the orthorhombic ( Pbnm) hettotype phase to the cubic () aristotype structure, has been re-investigated using high-resolution, time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction. Using data collected at 1 K intervals close to the nominal phase transition temperature, the temperature dependence of the intensities of superlattice reflections at the M point and the R point of the pseudocubic Brillouin zone indicate the existence of a new intermediate tetragonal phase in space group P4/ mbm, with a narrow phase field extending from ~1,046.5 to ~1,048.5 K, at ambient pressure. Group theoretical analysis shows that the structural transitions identified in this study, Pbnm- P4/ mbm, and P4/ mbm-, are permitted to be second order. The observation of the tetragonal phase resolves the longstanding issue of why the high-temperature phase transition, previously identified as Pbnm-, and which would be expected to be first order under Landau theory, is in fact found to be continuous. Analysis of the pseudocubic shear strain shows it to vary with a critical exponent of 0.5 implying that the phase transition from Pbnm to P4/ mbm is tricritical in character. The large librational modes that exist in the MgF6 octahedron at high temperature, and the use of Gaussian probability density functions to describe atomic displacements, result in apparent bond shortening in the Mg-F distances, making mode amplitude determination an unreliable method for determination of the critical exponent from internal coordinates. Crystal structures are reported for the three phases of NaMgF3 at 1,033 K ( Pbnm), 1,047 K ( P4/ mbm) and 1,049 K ().

  8. High Resolution Spectroscopy And Timing Of The Isolated Neutron Star RBS 1774

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Drake, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The 2004 May 31 XMM-Newton observation was reprocessed using SASv6.0.0 and times of high background were filtered out. The net exposure time remaining was 23 ks. The source was clearly detected in MOS1, MOS2 and PN chips. We performed both timing and spectroscopic analysis on the data. We performed a spectral analysis by fitting data from the three EPIC detectors simultaneously, finding that the broadband spectrum can be represented by a single absorbed blackbody, with kT = 0.10 keV. The fitting revealed the presence of an absorption feature at 0:7 keV, but the data did have enough resolution to allow us to discriminate between an absorption line and an edge. We also tested magnetized models of Pavlov et a1 and Zavlin et al, but found that fits with these models were considerably worse than with a blackbody. For the timing analysis, we extracted the counts within a 3000 radius aperture in both PN and MOS 1 and MOS2 but with the aperture truncated by a chord where it approached the edge of the CCD window in each case: this maximized the counts while avoiding any edge effects. We analyzed PN, MOSl and MOS2 data both individually and combined using the Maximum Likelihood Periodogram technique of Zane et al. (2002) and Cropper et al. (2004). Periods from 10000 s to 30 ms were searched, ensuring that in each case the period grid was 2.5 times better sampled than the Nyquist frequency. The search revealed a significant period at 9.437s. Taken overall, we found the characteristics of RBS 1774 to be remarkably similar to those of another X-ray faint isolated neutron stars. These results were written up for the Astrophysical Journal, and the paper has recently been accepted for publication.

  9. An Improved Elastic and Nonelastic Neutron Transport Algorithm for Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowdsley, Martha S.; Wilson, John W.; Heinbockel, John H.; Tripathi, R. K.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Shinn, Judy L.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron transport algorithm including both elastic and nonelastic particle interaction processes for use in space radiation protection for arbitrary shield material is developed. The algorithm is based upon a multiple energy grouping and analysis of the straight-ahead Boltzmann equation by using a mean value theorem for integrals. The algorithm is then coupled to the Langley HZETRN code through a bidirectional neutron evaporation source term. Evaluation of the neutron fluence generated by the solar particle event of February 23, 1956, for an aluminum water shield-target configuration is then compared with MCNPX and LAHET Monte Carlo calculations for the same shield-target configuration. With the Monte Carlo calculation as a benchmark, the algorithm developed in this paper showed a great improvement in results over the unmodified HZETRN solution. In addition, a high-energy bidirectional neutron source based on a formula by Ranft showed even further improvement of the fluence results over previous results near the front of the water target where diffusion out the front surface is important. Effects of improved interaction cross sections are modest compared with the addition of the high-energy bidirectional source terms.

  10. Atmospheric transport of neutrons and gamma rays from near-horizon nuclear detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, R.C.; Heerema, B.D.

    1996-03-01

    This report continues a study of the transport of neutrons and rays from nuclear detonations at high altitudes to a set of detectors, with an emphasis on the limiting case of sources even beyond the horizon. To improve the calculational efficiency, the standard arrangement of a single source with multiple detectors is transformed to an equivalent one with a single detector and sources at multiple locations. Particular attention is paid to the critical problem of transport at near-horizon angles in an atmosphere whose density decreases exponentially with altitude. As a check, calculations for this region are made using both analytical and Monte Carlo approaches. For sources approaching the horizon, the fluence of gamma rays and neutrons reaching the detector drops gradually as the increasing column density attenuates the direct, unscattered fluence. Near the grazing angle, the direct fluence plummets, but the scattered component continues to decrease slowly and remains observable. Over this range, the timedependent flux of direct-plus-scattered gamma rays changes dramatically in both shape and magnitude, but it probably remains distinct from typical natural backgrounds. The neutron time-of-flight spectrum is dominated by scattering and reflects only the most important aspects of the original source spectrum; its most obvious features are a prominent low-energy tail and the resonance structure produced by nuclear interactions in the atmosphere. In some cases, the fluence of secondary gamma rays produced by these interactions may be larger than that from the source itself.

  11. A hybrid approach to the neutron transport K-eigenvalue problem using NDA-based algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, J. A.; Kelley, C. T.; Knoll, D. A.; Park, H.

    2013-07-01

    In order to provide more physically accurate solutions to the neutron transport equation it has become increasingly popular to use Monte Carlo simulation to model nuclear reactor dynamics. These Monte Carlo methods can be extremely expensive, so we turn to a class of methods known as hybrid methods, which combine known deterministic and stochastic techniques to solve the transport equation. In our work, we show that we can simulate the action of a transport sweep using a Monte Carlo simulation in order to solve the k-eigenvalue problem. We'll accelerate the solution using nonlinear diffusion acceleration (NDA) as in [1,2]. Our work extends the results in [1] to use Monte Carlo simulation as the high-order solver. (authors)

  12. THE COMMISSIONING PLAN FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING AND TRANSPORT LINES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA,D.BLASKIEWICZ,M.LEE,Y.Y.WEI,J.ET AL.

    2004-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator systems will provide a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. In order to satisfy the accelerator systems' portion of the Critical Decision 4 (CD-4) commissioning goal (which marks the completion of the construction phase of the project), a beam pulse with intensity greater than 1 x 10{sup 13} protons must be accumulated in the ring, extracted in a single turn and delivered to the target. A commissioning plan has been formulated for bringing into operation and establishing nominal operating conditions for the various ring and transport line subsystems as well as for establishing beam conditions and parameters which meet the commissioning goal.

  13. Application of three-dimensional transport code to the analysis of the neutron streaming experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatani, K.; Slater, C.O.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarized the calculational results of neutron streaming through a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Prototype coolant pipe chaseway. Particular emphasis is placed on results at bends in the chaseway. Calculations were performed with three three-dimensional codes: the discrete ordinates radiation transport code TORT and Monte Carlo radiation transport code MORSE, which were developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the discrete ordinates code ENSEMBLE, which was developed in Japan. The purpose of the calculations is not only to compare the calculational results with the experimental results, but also to compare the results of TORT and MORSE with those of ENSEMBLE. In the TORT calculations, two types of difference methods, weighted-difference method was applied in ENSEMBLE calculation. Both TORT and ENSEMBLE produced nearly the same calculational results, but differed in the number of iterations required for converging each neutron group. Also, the two types of difference methods in the TORT calculations showed no appreciable variance in the number of iterations required. However, a noticeable disparity in the computer times and some variation in the calculational results did occur. The comparisons of the calculational results with the experimental results, showed for the epithermal neutron flux generally good agreement in the first and second legs and at the first bend where the two-dimensional modeling might be difficult. Results were fair to poor along the centerline of the first leg near the opening to the second leg because of discrete ordinates ray effects. Additionally, the agreement was good throughout the first and second legs for the thermal neutron region. Calculations with MORSE were made. These calculational results and comparisons are described also. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. PMID:8083048

  15. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Radiation Transport Analysis in Chalcogenide-Based Devices and a Neutron Howitzer Using MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Herbert

    As photons, electrons, and neutrons traverse a medium, they impart their energy in ways that are analytically difficult to describe. Monte Carlo methods provide valuable insight into understanding this behavior, especially when the radiation source or environment is too complex to simplify. This research investigates simulating various radiation sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, characterizing their impact on various materials, and comparing the simulation results to general theory and measurements. A total of five sources were of interest: two photon sources of different incident particle energies (3.83 eV and 1.25 MeV), two electron sources also of different energies (30 keV and 100 keV), and a californium-252 (Cf-252) spontaneous fission neutron source. Lateral and vertical programmable metallization cells (PMCs) were developed by other researchers for exposure to these photon and electron sources, so simplified PMC models were implemented in MCNP to estimate the doses and fluences. Dose rates measured around the neutron source and the predicted maximum activity of activation foils exposed to the neutrons were determined using MCNP and compared to experimental results obtained from gamma-ray spectroscopy. The analytical fluence calculations for the photon and electron cases agreed with MCNP results, and differences are due to MCNP considering particle movements that hand calculations do not. Doses for the photon cases agreed between the analytical and simulated results, while the electron cases differed by a factor of up to 4.8. Physical dose rate measurements taken from the neutron source agreed with MCNP within the 10% tolerance of the measurement device. The activity results had a percent error of up to 50%, which suggests a need to further evaluate the spectroscopy setup.

  17. Resolution and linearity of Anger-type neutron-position detectors as simulated with different signal processing and optics

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, C.T.; Brenner, R.; Strauss, M.G.

    1985-02-01

    The apatial linearity and resolution of Anger-type neutron-position scintillation detectors are studied using a semi-empirical model. Detector optics with either an air gap or optical grease between the scintillator and the dispersive light guide are considered. An air gap focuses the scintillation light on the photomultiplier tubes nearest the scintillation point. Four signal processing methods which truncate signals from photomultipler tubes distant from the scintillation are compared with the linear resistive weighting method. Using linear processing, air-gap optics yield a 25% improvement in resolution distance and an 80% reduction in integral nonlinearity relative to grease-coupled optics. With either optics, using signal truncation instead of linear processing improves the resolution distance 5-15%.

  18. On the optimisation of the spectral resolution in spectrographs for cold neutrons based on refraction at grazing incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jark, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Recently the wavelength dispersion of cold neutrons in the refraction process at inclined interfaces was identified as an efficient tool for neutron spectrographs, in which a larger wavelength band can be registered simultaneously. This registration mode reduces the data acquisition time significantly as no need to monochromatise the incident neutron beam by use of inefficient choppers exists. In the related studies the spectrograph performance is treated with rather complex equations. This study instead provides a theoretical treatment of the dispersion properties with simpler analytical equations, which were previously used in connection with X-rays. It can be shown, that the spectral resolution in the original spectrographs is mostly limited by the finite size of the refracted beam, which is inconveniently increasing upon refraction at grazing internal incidence onto an inclined refracting interface. The blurring of the beam size of a monochromatic beam at the detector due to the angular spread of the incident beam is mostly negligible. It is thus proposed that a significant improvement in the spectral resolution of such a spectrograph can be achieved, when the beam size at the detector is reduced by introducing focusing in the refraction process. It is shown, that the spectral resolution can then ultimately be limited by the smaller size of the blurred image caused by the angular spread of the beam. Then the improvement in this beam divergence limit can be by an order of magnitude and it is achieved by refraction upon internal incidence onto a concave interface. It is found that such a configuration will focus appropriately in a larger wavelength interval. By this means for wavelengths between 5 Å and 12 Å spectral resolutions of below 1% are feasible, which are not yet reported for such prism spectrographs.

  19. Coupled Neutron-Photon, 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry, Time Dependent, Monte Carlo Transport Code System.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-06-24

    Version 07 TART2012 is a coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo transport code designed to use three-dimensional (3-D) combinatorial geometry. Neutron and/or photon sources as well as neutron induced photon production can be tracked. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART2012 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared tomore » other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART2012 extends the general utility of the code to even more areas of application than available in previous releases by concentrating on improving the physics, particularly with regard to improved treatment of neutron fission, resonance self-shielding, molecular binding, and extending input options used by the code. Several utilities are included for creating input files and displaying TART results and data. TART2012 uses the latest ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, data. New for TART2012 is the use of continuous energy neutron cross sections, in addition to its traditional multigroup cross sections. For neutron interaction, the data are derived using ENDF-ENDL2005 and include both continuous energy cross sections and 700 group neutron data derived using a combination of ENDF/B-VI, Release 8, and ENDL data. The 700 group structure extends from 10-5 eV up to 1 GeV. Presently nuclear data are only available up to 20 MeV, so that only 616 of the groups are currently used. For photon interaction, 701 point photon data were derived using the Livermore EPDL97 file. The new 701 point structure extends from 100 eV up to 1 GeV, and is currently used over this entire energy range. TART2012 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that one use only the most recent version of TART2012 and its data files. Check author’s homepage for related information: http

  20. Study of water distribution and transport in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell using neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekula, N.; Heller, K.; Chuang, P. A.; Turhan, A.; Mench, M. M.; Brenizer, J. S.; Ünlü, K.

    2005-04-01

    A procedure to utilize neutron imaging for the visualization of two-phase flow within an operating polymer electrolyte fuel cell has been developed at the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor. Neutron images allow us to visualize the liquid water inside the flow channel (˜0.5 mm deep) and gas diffusion media (˜200 μm thick) in real operating conditions. The current temporal and spatial resolution for radioscopy is approximately 30 frames/s and 129 μm/pixel in a 50 cm 2 image area. Continuous digital radioscopy can be recorded for 45 min. The determination of water volume within the cell has been enabled by referencing a calibration look-up table that correlates neutron attenuation to an equivalent liquid water thickness. It was found that liquid water tends to accumulate at specific locations within the fuel cell, depending on operating conditions. Anode flow channel blockage was observed to occur at low power, while higher power conditions resulted in more dispersed distribution of liquid droplets. Under high-power conditions, liquid water tended to accumulate along or under the channel walls at 180° turns, and radioscopy revealed that individual liquid droplet velocities were several orders of magnitude less than that of the reactant flow, indicating a slug-flow regime up to at least 1 A/cm 2.

  1. A Two-Dimensional Monte Carlo Code System for Linear Neutron Transport Calculations.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1980-04-24

    Version 00 KIM (k-infinite-Monte Carlo) solves the steady-state linear neutron transport equation for a fixed source problem or, by successive fixed-source runs, for the eigenvalue problem, in a two-dimensional infinite thermal reactor lattice using the Monte Carlo method. In addition to the combinatorial description of domains, the program allows complex configurations to be represented by a discrete set of points whereby the calculation speed is greatly improved. Configurations are described as the result of overlaysmore » of elementary figures over a basic domain.« less

  2. Petrov-galerkin finite element method for solving the neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, A.; Ferguson, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    A finite element using different trial and test spaces in introduced for solving the neutron transport equation in spherical geometry. It is shown that the widely used discrete ordinates method can also be thought of as such a finite element technique, in which integrals appearing in the difference equations are replaced by one-point Gauss quadrature formulas (midpoint rule). Comparison of accuracy between the new method and the discrete ordinates method is discussed, and numerical examples are given to illustrate the greater accuracy of the new technique.

  3. Variational Determination of the Neutron Integral Transport Equation Eigenvalues Using Space Asymptotic Trial Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, V.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1988-08-01

    An approximate determination of the critical eigenvalue of the neutron transport equation in integral form, within both the one speed and energy multigroup models, for a homogeneous medium, is achieved by means of a variational technique. The space asymptotic solutions for both the direct and adjoint problems are used as trial functions. A variational procedure is also developed and numerically exploited within the Fourier transformed domain, where noticeable theoretical features can be demonstrated. It is evidenced that excellent results can be obtained with little computational effort, and a set of critical calculations in plane geometry is presented and discussed.

  4. Variational determination of the neutron integral transport equation eigenvalues using space asymptotic trial functions

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, V.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1988-08-01

    An approximate determination of the critical eigenvalue of the neutron transport equation in integral form, within both the one speed and energy multigroup models, for a homogeneous medium, is achieved by means of a variational technique. The space asymptotic solutions for both the direct and adjoint problems are used as trial functions. A variational procedure is also developed and numerically exploited within the Fourier transformed domain, where noticeable theoretical features can be demonstrated. It is evidenced that excellent results can be obtained with little computational effort, and a set of critical calculations in plane geometry is presented and discussed. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  5. Hybrid Parallel Programming Models for AMR Neutron Monte-Carlo Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dureau, David; Poëtte, Gaël

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with High Performance Computing (HPC) applied to neutron transport theory on complex geometries, thanks to both an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) algorithm and a Monte-Carlo (MC) solver. Several Parallelism models are presented and analyzed in this context, among them shared memory and distributed memory ones such as Domain Replication and Domain Decomposition, together with Hybrid strategies. The study is illustrated by weak and strong scalability tests on complex benchmarks on several thousands of cores thanks to the petaflopic supercomputer Tera100.

  6. Hybrid method of deterministic and probabilistic approaches for continuous energy neutron transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Lee, D.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid method of continuous energy Monte Carlo (MC) and multi-group Method of Characteristics (MOC). For a continuous energy neutron transport analysis, the hybrid method employs a continuous energy MC for resonance energy range to treat the resonances accurately and a multi-group MOC for high and low energy ranges for efficiency. Numerical test with a model problem confirms that the hybrid method can produce consistent results with the reference continuous energy MC-only calculation as well as multi-group MOC-only calculation. (authors)

  7. Applying nonlinear diffusion acceleration to the neutron transport k-Eigenvalue problem with anisotropic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Taitano, William

    2015-10-12

    High-order/low-order (or moment-based acceleration) algorithms have been used to significantly accelerate the solution to the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem over the past several years. Recently, the nonlinear diffusion acceleration algorithm has been extended to solve fixed-source problems with anisotropic scattering sources. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can extend this algorithm to k-eigenvalue problems in which the scattering source is anisotropic and a significant acceleration can be achieved. Lastly, we demonstrate that the low-order, diffusion-like eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently using a technique known as nonlinear elimination.

  8. High temporal resolution tracing of xylem CO2 transport in oak trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Jasper; Ingrisch, Johannes; Bahn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation defines the flows of C between plant organs and their storage pools and metabolic processes and is therefore considered as an important determinant of forest C budgets and their responses to climate change. In trees, assimilates derived from leaf photosynthesis are transported via the phloem to above- and belowground sink tissues, where partitioning between growth, storage, and respiration occurs. At the same time, root- and aboveground respired CO2 can be dissolved in water and transported in the xylem tissue, thereby representing a C flux of large magnitude whose role in C allocation yet is unresolved. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the stem base of five year old potted oak (Quercus rubra) trees as a surrogate for respired CO2 to investigate the role of respired CO2 transport in trees in C allocation. We used high-resolution laser-based measurements of the isotopic composition of stem and soil CO2 efflux combined with stem gas probes to monitor the transport of 13C label. The high enrichment of the gas probes in the stem at the bottom of the canopy showed that the label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and lost to the atmosphere at stem level, as was observed using the stem CO2 efflux laser-based measurements. This study is the first to show results from tracing xylem CO2 transport in trees at high temporal resolution using a 13C labeling approach. Moreover, they extend results from previous studies on internal CO2 transport in species with high transpiration rates like poplar to species with lower transpiration rates like oak. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the current concepts of the tree C allocation need to be revisited, as they show that current gas exchange approach to estimating above- and belowground autotrophic respiration is inadequate.

  9. A Deterministic-Monte Carlo Hybrid Method for Time-Dependent Neutron Transport Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Justin Pounders; Farzad Rahnema

    2001-10-01

    A new deterministic-Monte Carlo hybrid solution technique is derived for the time-dependent transport equation. This new approach is based on dividing the time domain into a number of coarse intervals and expanding the transport solution in a series of polynomials within each interval. The solutions within each interval can be represented in terms of arbitrary source terms by using precomputed response functions. In the current work, the time-dependent response function computations are performed using the Monte Carlo method, while the global time-step march is performed deterministically. This work extends previous work by coupling the time-dependent expansions to space- and angle-dependent expansions to fully characterize the 1D transport response/solution. More generally, this approach represents and incremental extension of the steady-state coarse-mesh transport method that is based on global-local decompositions of large neutron transport problems. An example of a homogeneous slab is discussed as an example of the new developments.

  10. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N. Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  11. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, Robert F; Pennisi, Terry R

    2012-01-01

    The H{sup -} injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with {approx}38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to {approx}1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  12. Improved Convergence Rate of Multi-Group Scattering Moment Tallies for Monte Carlo Neutron Transport Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Adam

    Multi-group scattering moment matrices are critical to the solution of the multi-group form of the neutron transport equation, as they are responsible for describing the change in direction and energy of neutrons. These matrices, however, are difficult to correctly calculate from the measured nuclear data with both deterministic and stochastic methods. Calculating these parameters when using deterministic methods requires a set of assumptions which do not hold true in all conditions. These quantities can be calculated accurately with stochastic methods, however doing so is computationally expensive due to the poor efficiency of tallying scattering moment matrices. This work presents an improved method of obtaining multi-group scattering moment matrices from a Monte Carlo neutron transport code. This improved method of tallying the scattering moment matrices is based on recognizing that all of the outgoing particle information is known a priori and can be taken advantage of to increase the tallying efficiency (therefore reducing the uncertainty) of the stochastically integrated tallies. In this scheme, the complete outgoing probability distribution is tallied, supplying every one of the scattering moment matrices elements with its share of data. In addition to reducing the uncertainty, this method allows for the use of a track-length estimation process potentially offering even further improvement to the tallying efficiency. Unfortunately, to produce the needed distributions, the probability functions themselves must undergo an integration over the outgoing energy and scattering angle dimensions. This integration is too costly to perform during the Monte Carlo simulation itself and therefore must be performed in advance by way of a pre-processing code. The new method increases the information obtained from tally events and therefore has a significantly higher efficiency than the currently used techniques. The improved method has been implemented in a code system

  13. Micromachining of commodity plastics by proton beam writing and fabrication of spatial resolution test-chart for neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, T.; Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Matsubayashi, M.; Kada, W.; Kohka, M.; Satoh, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Ishii, Y.; Takano, K.

    2013-07-01

    Proton beam writing is a direct-write technique and a promising method for the micromachining of commodity plastics such as acrylic resins. Herein, we describe the fabrication of microscopic devices made from a relatively thick (∼75 μm) acrylic sheet using proton beam writing. In addition, a software package that converts image pixels into coordinates data was developed, and the successful fabrication of a very fine jigsaw puzzle was achieved. The size of the jigsaw puzzle pieces was 50 × 50 μm. For practical use, a prototype of a line and space test-chart was also successfully fabricated for the determination of spatial resolution in neutron radiography.

  14. Solution and Study of the Two-Dimensional Nodal Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Panta Pazos, Ruben; Biasotto Hauser, Eliete; Tullio de Vilhena, Marco

    2002-07-01

    In the last decade Vilhena and coworkers reported an analytical solution to the two-dimensional nodal discrete-ordinates approximations of the neutron transport equation in a convex domain. The key feature of these works was the application of the combined collocation method of the angular variable and nodal approach in the spatial variables. By nodal approach we mean the transverse integration of the SN equations. This procedure leads to a set of one-dimensional S{sub N} equations for the average angular fluxes in the variables x and y. These equations were solved by the old version of the LTS{sub N} method, which consists in the application of the Laplace transform to the set of nodal S{sub N} equations and solution of the resulting linear system by symbolic computation. It is important to recall that this procedure allow us to increase N the order of S{sub N} up to 16. To overcome this drawback we step forward performing a spectral painstaking analysis of the nodal S{sub N} equations for N up to 16 and we begin the convergence of the S{sub N} nodal equations defining an error for the angular flux and estimating the error in terms of the truncation error of the quadrature approximations of the integral term. Furthermore, we compare numerical results of this approach with those of other techniques used to solve the two-dimensional discrete approximations of the neutron transport equation. (authors)

  15. Reprint of The improvement of the energy resolution in epi-thermal neutron region of Bonner sphere using boric acid water solution moderator.

    PubMed

    Ueda, H; Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y

    2015-12-01

    Bonner sphere is useful to evaluate the neutron spectrum in detail. We are improving the energy resolution in epi-thermal neutron region of Bonner sphere, using boric acid water solution as a moderator. Its response function peak is narrower than that for polyethylene moderator and the improvement of the resolution is expected. The resolutions between polyethylene moderator and boric acid water solution moderator were compared by simulation calculation. Also the influence in the uncertainty of Bonner sphere configuration to spectrum estimation was simulated. PMID:26508275

  16. The improvement of the energy resolution in epi-thermal neutron region of Bonner sphere using boric acid water solution moderator.

    PubMed

    Ueda, H; Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y

    2015-10-01

    Bonner sphere is useful to evaluate the neutron spectrum in detail. We are improving the energy resolution in epi-thermal neutron region of Bonner sphere, using boric acid water solution as a moderator. Its response function peak is narrower than that for polyethylene moderator and the improvement of the resolution is expected. The resolutions between polyethylene moderator and boric acid water solution moderator were compared by simulation calculation. Also the influence in the uncertainty of Bonner sphere configuration to spectrum estimation was simulated. PMID:26133664

  17. High resolution inventory of GHG emissions of the road transport sector in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puliafito, Salvador Enrique; Allende, David; Pinto, Sebastián; Castesana, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Air quality models require the use of extensive background information, such as land use and topography maps, meteorological data and emission inventories of pollutant sources. This challenge increases when considering the vehicular sources. The available international databases have uneven resolution for all countries including some areas with low spatial resolution associated with large districts (several hundred km). A simple procedure is proposed in order to develop an inventory of emissions with high resolution (9 km) for the transport sector based on a geographic information system using readily available information applied to Argentina. The basic variable used is the vehicle activity (vehicle - km transported) estimated from fuel consumption and fuel efficiency. This information is distributed to a spatial grid according to a road hierarchy and segment length assigned to each street within the cell. Information on fuel is obtained from district consumption, but weighted using the DMSP-OLS satellite "Earth at night" image. The uncertainty of vehicle estimation and emission calculations was tested using sensitivity Montecarlo analysis. The resulting inventory is calibrated using annual average daily traffic counts in around 850 measuring points all over the country leading to an uncertainty of 20%. Uncertainties in the emissions calculation at pixel level can be estimated to be less than 12%. Comparison with international databases showed a better spatial distribution of greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions in the transport sector, but similar total national values.

  18. Tuning the instrument resolution using chopper and time of flight at the small-angle neutron scattering diffractometer KWS-2

    PubMed Central

    Radulescu, Aurel; Székely, Noémi Kinga; Polachowski, Stephan; Leyendecker, Marko; Amann, Matthias; Buitenhuis, Johan; Drochner, Matthias; Engels, Ralf; Hanslik, Romuald; Kemmerling, Günter; Lindner, Peter; Papagiannopoulos, Aristeidis; Pipich, Vitaliy; Willner, Lutz; Frielinghaus, Henrich; Richter, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Following demand from the user community regarding the possibility of improving the experimental resolution, the dedicated high-intensity/extended Q-range SANS diffractometer KWS-2 of the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science at the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Center in Garching was equipped with a double-disc chopper with a variable opening slit window and time-of-flight (TOF) data acquisition option. The chopper used in concert with a dedicated high-intensity velocity selector enables the tuning at will of the wavelength resolution Δλ/λ within a broad range, from 20% (standard) down to 2%, in a convenient and safe manner following pre-planned or spontaneous decisions during the experiment. The new working mode is described in detail, and its efficiency is demonstrated on several standard samples with known properties and on a completely new crystallizable copolymer system, which were investigated using both the conventional (static) and TOF modes. PMID:26664343

  19. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS, Final Report for the Period November 1, 1999 - February 28, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    FISHER,RK

    2003-02-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial 5 to 30 {micro}, are the most promising approach to imaging NIF target plasmas with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. Gel bubble detectors are being tested to record neutron images of ICF implosions in OMEGA experiments. By improving the noise reduction techniques used in analyzing the data taken in June 2000, we have been able to image the neutron emission from 6 {center_dot} 10{sup 13} yield DT target plasmas with a target plane spatial resolution of {approx} 140 {micro}. As expected, the spatial resolution was limited by counting statistics as a result of the low neutron detection efficiency of the easy-to-use gel bubble detectors. The results have been submitted for publication and will be the subject of an invited talk at the October 2001 Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society. To improve the counting statistics, data was taken in May 2001 using a stack of four gel detectors and integrated over a series of up to seven high-yield DT shots. Analysis of the 2001 data is still in its early stages. Gel detectors were chosen for these initial tests since the bubbles can be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. They consist of {approx} 5000 drops ({approx} 100 {micro} in diameter) of bubble detector liquid/cm{sup 3} suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector and a light scattering system to record the bubble locations a few microseconds after the neutron exposure when the bubbles are {approx} 10 {micro} in diameter, should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency and a target plane resolution on OMEGA of {approx} 10 to 50 {micro}.

  20. Effect of cross-flow on PEFC liquid-water distribution: An in-situ high-resolution neutron radiography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Anthony D.; Becton, Maxwell K.; Cooper, Nathanial J.; Weber, Adam Z.; Park, Jae Wan

    2015-10-01

    Liquid-water management in polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) remains an area of ongoing research. To enhance water removal, certain flow-fields induce cross-flow, or flow through the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) via channel-to-channel pressure differences. While beneficial to water removal, cross-flow comes at the cost of higher pumping pressures and may lead to membrane dehydration and other deleterious issues. This paper examines the impact of cross-flow on component saturation levels as determined through in-plane high-resolution neutron radiography. Various humidities and operating conditions are examined, and the results demonstrate that cell saturation levels correlate strongly with the level of cross-flow rate, and lower GDL saturation levels are found to correlate with an increase in permeability at higher flow rates. Effective water removal is found to occur at channel-to-channel pressure gradients greater than the measured breakthrough pressure of the GDL, evidence that similar liquid-water transport mechanisms exist for under-land area transport as in transverse GDL flow.

  1. Vectorization of a 2D-1D Iterative Algorithm for the 3D Neutron Transport Problem in Prismatic Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Salli; Févotte, François; Lathuilière, Bruno; Plagne, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    The past few years have been marked by a noticeable increase in the interest in 3D whole-core heterogeneous deterministic neutron transport solvers for reference calculations. Due to the extremely large problem sizes tackled by such solvers, they need to use adapted numerical methods and need to be efficiently implemented to take advantage of the full computing power of modern systems. As for numerical methods, one possible approach consists in iterating over resolutions of 2D and 1D MOC problems by taking advantage of prismatic geometries. The MICADO solver, developed at EDF R&D, is a parallel implementation of such a method in distributed and shared memory systems. However it is currently unable to use SIMD vectorization to leverage the full computing power of modern CPUs. In this paper, we describe our first effort to support vectorization in MICADO, typically targeting Intel© SSE CPUs. Both the 2D and 1D algorithms are vectorized, allowing for high expected speedups for the whole spatial solver. We present benchmark computations, which show nearly optimal speedups for our vectorized implementation on the TAKEDA case.

  2. Equations of the surface harmonics method for solving time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Time-dependent equations of the surface harmonics method (SHM) are obtained for planar one-dimensional geometry. The equations are verified by calculations of test problems from Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416, and the capabilities and efficiency of applying the SHM for solving the time-dependent neutron transport equation in the diffusion approximation are demonstrated. The results of the work show that the implementation of the SHG for full-scale computations will make possible substantial progress in the efficient solution of time-dependent problems of neutron transport in nuclear reactors.

  3. Monte Carlo Neutrino Transport through Remnant Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Kasen, Daniel; O'Connor, Evan; Fernández, Rodrigo; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-11-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 1046 erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 1048 erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet.

  4. In operando visualization of hydride-graphite composites during cyclic hydrogenation by high-resolution neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmann, Carsten; Herbrig, Kai; Gondek, Łukasz; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, André; Figiel, Henryk; Banhart, John; Kieback, Bernd; Manke, Ingo; Röntzsch, Lars

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen solid-state storage in metal hydrides has attracted remarkable attention within the past decades due to their high volumetric storage densities at low operating pressures. In particular, recently emerged hydride-graphite composites (HGC) can enable a safe, reliable and very compact hydrogen storage solution for various applications. In this regard, only little is known about the activation behavior of such HGC, their cycle stability and degradation effects. Because of the high sensitivity to hydrogen, neutron imaging offers a distinctive approach to examine in operando reaction fronts, swelling effects and microstructural changes of hydrogen absorbing materials with high spatial and temporal resolution. In this contribution, a comprehensive analysis of various phenomena during activation and cycling of HGC based on a Ti-Mn hydrogen absorbing alloy and expanded natural graphite is reported for the first time. A neutron radiography and tomography set-up with a spatial resolution down to 7 μm was utilized allowing highest detection precision. During initial hydrogenation, regions with enhanced reactivity are observed which contradicts a theoretically expected homogeneous reactivity inside the HGC. These active regions grow with the number of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycles until the whole HGC volume uniformly participates in the hydrogen sorption reaction. With regard to long-term hydrogenation-dehydrogenation cycling, inhomogeneous swelling effects were observed from which essential conclusions for technical HGC-based tank systems can be derived.

  5. Hydrogen and deuterium in myoglobin as seen by a neutron structure determination at 1.5 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Andreas; Tanaka, Ichiro; Engler, Niklas; Niimura, Nobuo; Parak, Fritz G

    2002-03-28

    From the first days of protein neutron structure determination sperm whale myoglobin was an object under investigation [Nature 224 (1969) 143, J. Mol. Biol. 220 (1991) 381]. Nevertheless myoglobin is still of interest [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97 (2000) 3872]. The feasibility of the monochromatic neutron diffractometer BIX-3 at the JRR-3M reactor at the JAERI [J. Phys. Chem. Solids 60 (1999) 1623], to collect high-resolution diffraction data in a relatively short time stimulated us to repeat the structural determination of myoglobin. The structure of metmyoglobin has been determined up to a resolution of 1.5 A. The hydrogen atoms were replaced in part, by deuterium soaking the crystals for more than 10 years in D(2)O. A refinement of all atoms has been performed including the refinement of individual mean square displacements and occupancies of the exchangeable protons in backbone hydrogen bonds. A method is described to show clear negative scattering densities of the H atoms. Water molecules within the protein and on the molecule surface are shown. The exchangeability of H atoms is correlated with structural distribution and flexibility. PMID:12062378

  6. Toward resolving the catalytic mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase using neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray crystallography [Neutron and ultrahigh resolution X-ray crystallography reveals water as the proton donor in the catalytic mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qun; Bennett, Brad C.; Wilson, Mark A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Langan, Paul; Howell, Elizabeth E.; Dealwis, Chris

    2014-12-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of dihydrofolate (DHF) to tetrahydrofolate (THF). An important step in the mechanism involves proton donation to the N5 atom of DHF. The inability to determine the protonation states of active site residues and substrate has led to the lack of consensus on a catalytic mechanism. To resolve this ambiguity, we conducted neutron and ultrahigh resolution X-ray crystallographic studies of the pseudo-Michaelis ternary complex of DHFR with folate and NADP+ from E. coli. The neutron data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using a 3.6 mm3 crystal with the quasi-Laue technique, and the structure reveals that the N3 atom of folate is protonated while Asp27 is negatively charged. Previous mechanisms have proposed a keto-to-enol tautomerization of the substrate to facilitate protonation of the N5 atom. The structure supports the existence of the keto tautomer due to protonation of the N3 atom, suggesting tautomerization is unnecessary for catalysis. In the 1.05 Å resolution X-ray structure of the ternary complex, conformational disorder of the Met20 side chain is coupled to electron density for a partially occupied water within hydrogen-bonding distance of the N5 atom of folate; this suggests direct protonation of substrate by solvent. We propose a catalytic mechanism for DHFR that involves stabilization of the keto tautomer of the substrate, elevation of the pKa of the N5 atom of DHF by Asp27, and protonation of N5 by water whose access to the active site is gated by fluctuation of the Met20 side chain even though the Met-20 loop is closed.

  7. Toward resolving the catalytic mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase using neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray crystallography [Neutron and ultrahigh resolution X-ray crystallography reveals water as the proton donor in the catalytic mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wan, Qun; Bennett, Brad C.; Wilson, Mark A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Langan, Paul; Howell, Elizabeth E.; Dealwis, Chris

    2014-12-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of dihydrofolate (DHF) to tetrahydrofolate (THF). An important step in the mechanism involves proton donation to the N5 atom of DHF. The inability to determine the protonation states of active site residues and substrate has led to the lack of consensus on a catalytic mechanism. To resolve this ambiguity, we conducted neutron and ultrahigh resolution X-ray crystallographic studies of the pseudo-Michaelis ternary complex of DHFR with folate and NADP+ from E. coli. The neutron data were collected to 2.0 Å resolution using a 3.6 mm3 crystal with the quasi-Laue technique, and the structuremore » reveals that the N3 atom of folate is protonated while Asp27 is negatively charged. Previous mechanisms have proposed a keto-to-enol tautomerization of the substrate to facilitate protonation of the N5 atom. The structure supports the existence of the keto tautomer due to protonation of the N3 atom, suggesting tautomerization is unnecessary for catalysis. In the 1.05 Å resolution X-ray structure of the ternary complex, conformational disorder of the Met20 side chain is coupled to electron density for a partially occupied water within hydrogen-bonding distance of the N5 atom of folate; this suggests direct protonation of substrate by solvent. We propose a catalytic mechanism for DHFR that involves stabilization of the keto tautomer of the substrate, elevation of the pKa of the N5 atom of DHF by Asp27, and protonation of N5 by water whose access to the active site is gated by fluctuation of the Met20 side chain even though the Met-20 loop is closed.« less

  8. A neutron crystallographic analysis of T{sub 6} porcine insulin at 2.1 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Wakari; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Ohnishi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Yoichiro; Tanaka, Ichiro; Takahashi, Haruyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Tamada, Taro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2009-10-01

    The charge balance and hydrogen-bonding network at the core of the insulin T{sub 6} hexamer have been investigated by neutron diffraction analysis at 2.1 Å resolution. Neutron diffraction data for T{sub 6} porcine insulin were collected to 2.1 Å resolution from a single crystal partly deuterated by exchange of mother liquor. A maximum-likelihood structure refinement was undertaken using the neutron data and the structure was refined to a residual of 0.179. The hydrogen-bonding network of the central core of the hexamer was observed and the charge balance between positively charged Zn ions and their surrounding structure was interpreted by considering the protonation and/or deprotonation states and interactions of HisB10, water and GluB13. The observed double conformation of GluB13 was essential to interpreting the charge balance and could be compared with the structure of a dried crystal of T{sub 6} human insulin at 100 K. Differences in the dynamic behaviour of the water molecules coordinating the upper and lower Zn ions were observed and interpreted. The hydrogen bonds in the insulin molecules, as well as those involving HisB10 and GluB13, are discussed. The hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange ratios of the amide H atoms of T{sub 6} porcine insulin in crystals were obtained and showed that regions highly protected from H/D exchange are concentrated in the centre of a helical region of the B chains. From the viewpoint of soaking time versus H/D-exchange ratios, the amide H atoms can be classified into three categories.

  9. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopman, D. B.; Bedau, D.; Kent, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude.

  10. A digitally configurable measurement platform using audio cards for high-resolution electronic transport studies.

    PubMed

    Gopman, D B; Bedau, D; Kent, A D

    2012-05-01

    We report on a software-defined digitally configurable measurement platform for determining electronic transport properties in nanostructures with small readout signals. By using a high-resolution audio analog-to-digital/digital-to-analog converter in a digitally compensated bridge configuration we significantly increase the measurement speed compared to established techniques and simultaneously acquire large and small signal characteristics. We characterize the performance (16 bit resolution, 100 dB dynamic range at 192 kS/s) and demonstrate the application of this measurement platform for studying the transport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a two-terminal device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance and whose resistance can be switched between two levels by applied magnetic fields and by currents applied by the audio card. The high resolution and fast sampling capability permits rapid acquisition of deep statistics on the switching of a spin-valve nanopillar and reduces the time to acquire the basic properties of the device - a state-diagram showing the magnetic configurations as function of applied current and magnetic field - by orders of magnitude. PMID:22667635

  11. Neutron transport with the method of characteristics for 3-D full core boiling water reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Justin W.

    2006-12-01

    The Numerical Nuclear Reactor (NNR) is a code suite that is being developed to provide high-fidelity multi-physics capability for the analysis of light water nuclear reactors. The focus of the work here is to extend the capability of the NNR by incorporation of the neutronics module, DeCART, for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) applications. The DeCART code has been coupled to the NNR fluid mechanics and heat transfer module STAR-CD for light water reactor applications. The coupling has been accomplished via an interface program, which is responsible for mapping the STAR-CD and DeCART meshes, managing communication, and monitoring convergence. DeCART obtains the solution of the 3-D Boltzmann transport equation by performing a series of 2-D modular ray tracing-based method of characteristics problems that are coupled within the framework of 3-D coarse-mesh finite difference. The relatively complex geometry and increased axial heterogeneity found in BWRs are beyond the modeling capability of the original version of DeCART. In this work, DeCART is extended in three primary areas. First, the geometric capability is generalized by extending the modular ray tracing scheme and permitting an unstructured mesh in the global finite difference kernel. Second, numerical instabilities, which arose as a result of the severe axial heterogeneity found in BWR cores, have been resolved. Third, an advanced nodal method has been implemented to improve the accuracy of the axial flux distribution. In this semi-analytic nodal method, the analytic solution to the transverse-integrated neutron diffusion equation is obtained, where the nonhomogeneous neutron source was first approximated by a quartic polynomial. The successful completion of these three tasks has allowed the application of the coupled DeCART/STAR-CD code to practical BWR problems.

  12. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D.A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  13. A comparison of acceleration methods for solving the neutron transport k-eigenvalue problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willert, Jeffrey; Park, H.; Knoll, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    Over the past several years a number of papers have been written describing modern techniques for numerically computing the dominant eigenvalue of the neutron transport criticality problem. These methods fall into two distinct categories. The first category of methods rewrite the multi-group k-eigenvalue problem as a nonlinear system of equations and solve the resulting system using either a Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method or Nonlinear Krylov Acceleration (NKA), a variant of Anderson Acceleration. These methods are generally successful in significantly reducing the number of transport sweeps required to compute the dominant eigenvalue. The second category of methods utilize Moment-Based Acceleration (or High-Order/Low-Order (HOLO) Acceleration). These methods solve a sequence of modified diffusion eigenvalue problems whose solutions converge to the solution of the original transport eigenvalue problem. This second class of methods is, in our experience, always superior to the first, as most of the computational work is eliminated by the acceleration from the LO diffusion system. In this paper, we review each of these methods. Our computational results support our claim that the choice of which nonlinear solver to use, JFNK or NKA, should be secondary. The primary computational savings result from the implementation of a HOLO algorithm. We display computational results for a series of challenging multi-dimensional test problems.

  14. High Resolution Neutron Radiography and Tomography of Hydrided Zircaloy-4 Cladding Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tyler S; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Ray, Holly B; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Yan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Neutron radiography for hydrogen analysis was performed with several Zircaloy-4 cladding samples with controlled hydrogen concentrations up to 1100 ppm. Hydrogen charging was performed in a process tube that was heated to facilitate hydrogen absorption by the metal. A correlation between the hydrogen concentration in the hydrided tubes and the neutron intensity was established, by which hydrogen content can be determined precisely in a small area (55 m x 55 m). Radiography analysis was also performed to evaluate the heating rate and its correlation with the hydrogen distribution through hydrided materials. In addition to radiography analysis, tomography experiments were performed on Zircaloy-4 tube samples to study the local hydrogen distribution. Through tomography analysis a 3D reconstruction of the tube was evaluated in which an uneven hydrogen distribution in the circumferential direction can be observed.

  15. Toward resolving the catalytic mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase using neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qun; Bennett, Brad C; Wilson, Mark A; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Langan, Paul; Howell, Elizabeth E; Dealwis, Chris

    2014-12-23

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of dihydrofolate (DHF) to tetrahydrofolate (THF). An important step in the mechanism involves proton donation to the N5 atom of DHF. The inability to determine the protonation states of active site residues and substrate has led to a lack of consensus regarding the catalytic mechanism involved. To resolve this ambiguity, we conducted neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray crystallographic studies of the pseudo-Michaelis ternary complex of Escherichia coli DHFR with folate and NADP(+). The neutron data were collected to 2.0-Å resolution using a 3.6-mm(3) crystal with the quasi-Laue technique. The structure reveals that the N3 atom of folate is protonated, whereas Asp27 is negatively charged. Previous mechanisms have proposed a keto-to-enol tautomerization of the substrate to facilitate protonation of the N5 atom. The structure supports the existence of the keto tautomer owing to protonation of the N3 atom, suggesting that tautomerization is unnecessary for catalysis. In the 1.05-Å resolution X-ray structure of the ternary complex, conformational disorder of the Met20 side chain is coupled to electron density for a partially occupied water within hydrogen-bonding distance of the N5 atom of folate; this suggests direct protonation of substrate by solvent. We propose a catalytic mechanism for DHFR that involves stabilization of the keto tautomer of the substrate, elevation of the pKa value of the N5 atom of DHF by Asp27, and protonation of N5 by water that gains access to the active site through fluctuation of the Met20 side chain even though the Met20 loop is closed. PMID:25453083

  16. Toward resolving the catalytic mechanism of dihydrofolate reductase using neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qun; Bennett, Brad C.; Wilson, Mark A.; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Langan, Paul; Howell, Elizabeth E.; Dealwis, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of dihydrofolate (DHF) to tetrahydrofolate (THF). An important step in the mechanism involves proton donation to the N5 atom of DHF. The inability to determine the protonation states of active site residues and substrate has led to a lack of consensus regarding the catalytic mechanism involved. To resolve this ambiguity, we conducted neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray crystallographic studies of the pseudo-Michaelis ternary complex of Escherichia coli DHFR with folate and NADP+. The neutron data were collected to 2.0-Å resolution using a 3.6-mm3 crystal with the quasi-Laue technique. The structure reveals that the N3 atom of folate is protonated, whereas Asp27 is negatively charged. Previous mechanisms have proposed a keto-to-enol tautomerization of the substrate to facilitate protonation of the N5 atom. The structure supports the existence of the keto tautomer owing to protonation of the N3 atom, suggesting that tautomerization is unnecessary for catalysis. In the 1.05-Å resolution X-ray structure of the ternary complex, conformational disorder of the Met20 side chain is coupled to electron density for a partially occupied water within hydrogen-bonding distance of the N5 atom of folate; this suggests direct protonation of substrate by solvent. We propose a catalytic mechanism for DHFR that involves stabilization of the keto tautomer of the substrate, elevation of the pKa value of the N5 atom of DHF by Asp27, and protonation of N5 by water that gains access to the active site through fluctuation of the Met20 side chain even though the Met20 loop is closed. PMID:25453083

  17. Atomic resolution structure of the E. coli YajR transporter YAM domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Daohua; Zhao, Yan; Fan, Junping; Liu, Xuehui; Wu, Yan; Feng, Wei; Zhang, Xuejun C.

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • We report the crystal structure of the YAM domain of YajR transporter at 1.07 Å. • The YAM dimerization is related to the halogen-dependent high thermal stability. • A belt of poly-pentagonal water molecules was observed in the dimer interface. - Abstract: YajR is an Escherichia coli transporter that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily. Unlike most MFS transporters, YajR contains a carboxyl terminal, cytosolic domain of 67 amino acid residues termed YAM domain. Although it is speculated that the function of this small soluble domain is to regulate the conformational change of the 12-helix transmembrane domain, its precise regulatory role remains unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the YAM domain at 1.07-Å resolution, along with its structure determined using nuclear magnetic resonance. Detailed analysis of the high resolution structure revealed a symmetrical dimer in which a belt of well-ordered poly-pentagonal water molecules is embedded. A mutagenesis experiment and a thermal stability assay were used to analyze the putative role of this dimerization in response to changes in halogen concentration.

  18. Imaging ion and molecular transport at subcellular resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Morrison, George H.

    1995-05-01

    The transport of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ were imaged in individual cells with a Cameca IMS-3f ion microscope. Strict cryogenic frozen freeze-dry sample preparations were employed. Ion redistribution artifacts in conventional chemical preparations are discussed. Cryogenically prepared freeze-fractured freeze-dried cultured cells allowed the three-dimensional ion microscopic imaging of elements. As smaller structures in calcium images can be resolved with the 0.5 [mu]m spatial resolution, correlative techniques are needed to confirm their identity. The potentials of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy are discussed for microfeature recognition in freeze-fractured freeze-dried cells. The feasibility of using frozen freeze-dried cells for imaging molecular transport at subcellular resolution was tested. Ion microscopy successfully imaged the transport of the isotopically tagged (13C, 15N) amino acid, -arginine. The labeled amino acid was imaged at mass 28 with a Cs+ primary ion beam as the 28(13C15N)- species. After a 4 h exposure of LLC-PK1 kidney cells to 4 mM labeled arginine, the amino acid was localized throughout the cell with a preferential incorporation into the nucleus and nucleolus. An example is also shown of the ion microscopic imaging of sodium borocaptate, an experimental therapeutic drug for brain tumors, in cryogenically prepared frozen freeze-dried Swiss 3T3 cells.

  19. New Potentiometric Wireless Chloride Sensors Provide High Resolution Information on Chemical Transport Processes in Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smettem, Keith; Harris, Nick; Cranny, Andy; Klaus, Julian; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the travel times, pathways and dispersion of solutes moving through stream environments is critical for understanding the biogeochemical cycling processes that control ecosystem functioning. Validation of stream solute transport and exchange process models requires data obtained from in-stream measurement of chemical concentration changes through time. This can be expensive and time consuming, leading to a need for cheap distributed sensor arrays that respond instantly and record chemical transport at points of interest on timescales of seconds. To meet this need we apply new, low-cost (in the order of a euro per sensor) potentiometric chloride sensors used in a distributed array to obtain data with high spatial and temporal resolution. The application here is to monitoring in-stream hydrodynamic transport and dispersive mixing of an injected chemical, in this case NaCl. We present data obtained from the distributed sensor array under baseflow conditions for three stream reaches in Luxembourg. Sensor results are comparable to data obtained from more expensive electrical conductivity meters and allow spatial resolution of hydrodynamic mixing processes and identification of chemical 'dead zones' in the study reaches.

  20. Low Resolution Structure and Dynamics of a Colicin-Receptor Complex Determined by Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, Luke A; Johnson, Christopher L; Solovyova, Alexandra; Callow, Phil; Weiss, Kevin L; Ridley, Helen; Le Brun, Anton P; Kinane, Christian; Webster, John; Holt, Stephen A; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that translocate across cell membranes need to overcome a significant hydrophobic barrier. This is usually accomplished via specialized protein complexes, which provide a polar transmembrane pore. Exceptions to this include bacterial toxins, which insert into and cross the lipid bilayer itself. We are studying the mechanism by which large antibacterial proteins enter Escherichia coli via specific outer membrane proteins. Here we describe the use of neutron scattering to investigate the interaction of colicin N with its outer membrane receptor protein OmpF. The positions of lipids, colicin N, and OmpF were separately resolved within complex structures by the use of selective deuteration. Neutron reflectivity showed, in real time, that OmpF mediates the insertion of colicin N into lipid monolayers. This data were complemented by Brewster Angle Microscopy images, which showed a lateral association of OmpF in the presence of colicin N. Small angle neutron scattering experiments then defined the three-dimensional structure of the colicin N-OmpF complex. This revealed that colicin N unfolds and binds to the OmpF-lipid interface. The implications of this unfolding step for colicin translocation across membranes are discussed.

  1. Using the transportable, computer-operated, liquid-scintillator fast-neutron spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1988-11-01

    When a detailed energy spectrum is needed for radiation-protection measurements from approximately 1 MeV up to several tens of MeV, organic-liquid scintillators make good neutron spectrometers. However, such a spectrometer requires a sophisticated electronics system and a computer to reduce the spectrum from the recorded data. Recently, we added a Nuclear Instrument Module (NIM) multichannel analyzer and a lap-top computer to the NIM electronics we have used for several years. The result is a transportable fast-neutron spectrometer system. The computer was programmed to guide the user through setting up the system, calibrating the spectrometer, measuring the spectrum, and reducing the data. Measurements can be made over three energy ranges, 0.6--2 MeV, 1.1--8 MeV, or 1.6--16 MeV, with the spectrum presented in 0.1-MeV increments. Results can be stored on a disk, presented in a table, and shown in graphical form. 5 refs., 51 figs.

  2. Membrane Transport Processes Analyzed by a Highly Parallel Nanopore Chip System at Single Protein Resolution.

    PubMed

    Urban, Michael; Vor der Brüggen, Marc; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Membrane protein transport on the single protein level still evades detailed analysis, if the substrate translocated is non-electrogenic. Considerable efforts have been made in this field, but techniques enabling automated high-throughput transport analysis in combination with solvent-free lipid bilayer techniques required for the analysis of membrane transporters are rare. This class of transporters however is crucial in cell homeostasis and therefore a key target in drug development and methodologies to gain new insights desperately needed. The here presented manuscript describes the establishment and handling of a novel biochip for the analysis of membrane protein mediated transport processes at single transporter resolution. The biochip is composed of microcavities enclosed by nanopores that is highly parallel in its design and can be produced in industrial grade and quantity. Protein-harboring liposomes can directly be applied to the chip surface forming self-assembled pore-spanning lipid bilayers using SSM-techniques (solid supported lipid membranes). Pore-spanning parts of the membrane are freestanding, providing the interface for substrate translocation into or out of the cavity space, which can be followed by multi-spectral fluorescent readout in real-time. The establishment of standard operating procedures (SOPs) allows the straightforward establishment of protein-harboring lipid bilayers on the chip surface of virtually every membrane protein that can be reconstituted functionally. The sole prerequisite is the establishment of a fluorescent read-out system for non-electrogenic transport substrates. High-content screening applications are accomplishable by the use of automated inverted fluorescent microscopes recording multiple chips in parallel. Large data sets can be analyzed using the freely available custom-designed analysis software. Three-color multi spectral fluorescent read-out furthermore allows for unbiased data discrimination into different

  3. A demonstration of a whole core neutron transport method in a gas cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper illustrates a capability of the whole core transport method COMET. Building on previous works which demonstrated the accuracy of the method, this work serves to emphasize the robust capability of the method while also accentuating its efficiency. A set of core configurations is presented based on an operating gas-cooled thermal reactor, Japan's HTTR, and COMET determines the eigenvalue and fission density profile throughout each core configuration. Results for core multiplication factors are compared to MCNP for accuracy and also to compare runtimes. In all cases, the values given by COMET differ by those given by MCNP by less than the uncertainty inherent in the stochastic solution procedure, however, COMET requires runtimes shorter on the order of a few hundred. Figures are provided illustrating the whole core fission density profile, with segments of pins explicitly modeled individually, so that pin-level neutron flux behavior can be seen without any approximation due to simplification strategies such as homogenization. (authors)

  4. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  5. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.; Yan, J.

    2012-07-01

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  6. Radiation transport codes for potential applications related to radiobiology and radiotherapy using protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo radiation transport computer codes are used to predict quantities of interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiobiology. The calculational methods are described and comparisions of calculated and experimental results are presented for dose distributions produced by protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions. Comparisons of calculated and experimental cell survival probabilities are also presented.

  7. Transport realization of high resolution fossil fuel CO2 emissions in an urban domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Gurney, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion are the largest net annual flux of carbon in the earth atmosphere system and energy consumption in urban environments is a major contributor to total fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Understanding how the emissions are transported in space and time, especially in urban environments and resolving contributions from individual sources of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions are an essential component of a complete reliable monitoring, reporting, and verification (MRV) system that are emerging at local, national, and international levels. As grid models are not designed to resolve concentrations on local scales, we tested the transport realization of fossil fuel CO2 emissions using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) model, a commonly used transport algorithm for small domain air quality studies, in the greater Indianapolis region, USA. A typical 24-hour point, mobile, and area sources fossil fuel CO2 emissions in four seasons (spring, summer, autumn and winter) were processed from hourly emissions data and prepared at 500-meter spatial resolution for the model inputs together with other parameters. The simulation result provides a complete 4-dimensional concentration matrix transported from all sources for the urban domain which can be analyzed in order to isolate individual sources or test sampling strategies for verification at selected time periods. In addition, the urban 4-dimensional concentration matrix can be visualized in a virtual environment, which provides a powerful education and outreach platform for researchers, students, and public.

  8. High resolution model studies of transport of sedimentary material in the south-western Baltic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Torsten; Fennel, Wolfgang; Kuhrts, Christiane

    2009-02-01

    The paper presents high resolution model simulations of transport, deposition and resuspension of sedimentary material in the south-western Baltic, based on an upgrade of the sediment transport model described in the work of Kuhrts et al. [Kuhrts, C., Fennel, W., Seifert, T., 2004. Model studies of transport of sedimentary material in the Western Baltic. Journal of Marine Systems 52, 167.]. In the western Baltic, a grid spacing of at least 1 nautical mile is required to resolve the shallow and narrow bathymetry and the associated current patterns. A series of experimental model simulations is carried out with forcing data for the year 1993, which include a sequence of storms in January. Compared to earlier model versions, a more detailed description of potential deposition areas can be provided. The study quantifies the influence of enhanced bottom roughness caused by biological structures, like mussels and worm holes, provides estimates of the regional erosion risks for fine grained sediments, and analyses scenarios of the settling and spreading of material at dumping sites. Although the effects of changed bottom roughness, as derived from more detailed, re-classified sea floor data, are relatively small, the sediment transport and deposition patterns are clearly affected by the variation of the sea bed properties.

  9. Improved Edge Directed Super-Resolution (EDSR) with hardware realization for surveillance, transportation, and multimedia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; de Lima, Osborn; Saber, Eli; Bengtson, Kurt R.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present an improved Edge Directed Super Resolution (EDSR) technique to produce enhanced edge definition and improved image quality in the resulting high resolution image. The basic premise behind this algorithm remains, like its predecessor, to utilize gradient and spatial information and interpolate along the edge direction in a multiple pass iterative fashion. The edge direction map generated from horizontal and vertical gradients and resized to the target resolution is quantized into eight directions over a 5 × 5 block compared to four directions over a 3 × 3 block in the previous algorithm. This helps reduce the noise caused in part due to the quantization error and the super resolved results are significantly improved. In addition, an appropriate weighting encompassing the degree of similarity between the quantized edge direction and the actual edge direction is also introduced. In an attempt to determine the optimal super resolution parameters for the case of still image capture, a hardware setup was utilized to investigate and evaluate those factors. In particular, the number of images captured as well as the amount of sub pixel displacement that yield a high quality result was studied. This is done by utilizing a XY stage capable of sub-pixel movement. Finally, an edge preserving smoothing algorithm contributes to improved results by reducing the high frequency noise introduced by the super resolution process. The algorithm showed favorable results on a wide variety of datasets obtained from transportation to multimedia based print/scan application in addition to images captured with the aforementioned hardware setup.

  10. The TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates neutron/photon transport code (TORT version 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Simpson, D.B.

    1997-10-01

    TORT calculates the flux or fluence of neutrons and/or photons throughout three-dimensional systems due to particles incident upon the system`s external boundaries, due to fixed internal sources, or due to sources generated by interaction with the system materials. The transport process is represented by the Boltzman transport equation. The method of discrete ordinates is used to treat the directional variable, and a multigroup formulation treats the energy dependence. Anisotropic scattering is treated using a Legendre expansion. Various methods are used to treat spatial dependence, including nodal and characteristic procedures that have been especially adapted to resist numerical distortion. A method of body overlay assists in material zone specification, or the specification can be generated by an external code supplied by the user. Several special features are designed to concentrate machine resources where they are most needed. The directional quadrature and Legendre expansion can vary with energy group. A discontinuous mesh capability has been shown to reduce the size of large problems by a factor of roughly three in some cases. The emphasis in this code is a robust, adaptable application of time-tested methods, together with a few well-tested extensions.

  11. MCNP: a general Monte Carlo code for neutron and photon transport

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, R.A.; Godfrey, T.N.K.

    1985-01-01

    MCNP is a very general Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code system with approximately 250 person years of Group X-6 code development invested. It is extremely portable, user-oriented, and a true production code as it is used about 60 Cray hours per month by about 150 Los Alamos users. It has as its data base the best cross-section evaluations available. MCNP contains state-of-the-art traditional and adaptive Monte Carlo techniques to be applied to the solution of an ever-increasing number of problems. Excellent user-oriented documentation is available for all facets of the MCNP code system. Many useful and important variants of MCNP exist for special applications. The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is the contact point for worldwide MCNP code and documentation distribution. A much improved MCNP Version 3A will be available in the fall of 1985, along with new and improved documentation. Future directions in MCNP development will change the meaning of MCNP to Monte Carlo N Particle where N particle varieties will be transported.

  12. DOXCY - A discrete ordinates approximation of neutron transport in heterogeneous rod lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, H.D.; Stegemann, D.

    1987-08-01

    For calculating the fine flux distribution in heterogeneous fuel rod lattices, an exact treatment of the geometry and the use of a high-order approximation of the transport theory is needed. For this purpose, a discrete ordinates solution of the neutron transport equation for mixed geometry has been developed. The discretization of the space is performed in separate one-dimensional cylindrical coordinate systems, imbedded in a two-dimensional rectangular mesh grid. The geometrical link between the cylindrical and the rectangular systems is achieved by approximating the outer circle of each cylindrical system by a polygon with side numbers greater than or equal to8. Thus, each cylindrical geometry is enclosed in a two-dimensional mesh grid consisting of rectangles, trapeziums, and triangles. Because of the different orientation of the angular segmentation in XY and R coordinates, transfer coefficients are derived to calculate the directional flux distribution on the boundary between both systems. A special set of equal-weighted quadrature coefficients (EQ/sub n/) is used to get transfer coefficients, providing a fast and accurate solution. The method is realized in a program called DOXCY, which runs within the nuclear program system RSYST. The program is verified on selected benchmark problems. The numerical results are given, showing the advantage and limits of the method.

  13. On the adequacy of message-passing parallel supercomputers for solving neutron transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1990-01-01

    A coarse-grained, static-scheduling parallelization of the standard iterative scheme used for solving the discrete-ordinates approximation of the neutron transport equation is described. The parallel algorithm is based on a decomposition of the angular domain along the discrete ordinates, thus naturally producing a set of completely uncoupled systems of equations in each iteration. Implementation of the parallel code on Intcl's iPSC/2 hypercube, and solutions to test problems are presented as evidence of the high speedup and efficiency of the parallel code. The performance of the parallel code on the iPSC/2 is analyzed, and a model for the CPU time as a function of the problem size (order of angular quadrature) and the number of participating processors is developed and validated against measured CPU times. The performance model is used to speculate on the potential of massively parallel computers for significantly speeding up real-life transport calculations at acceptable efficiencies. We conclude that parallel computers with a few hundred processors are capable of producing large speedups at very high efficiencies in very large three-dimensional problems. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  14. A new paradigm for local-global coupling in whole-core neutron transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.; Smith, M.; Palmiotti, G,; Nuclear Engineering Division; Northwestern Univ.; INL

    2009-01-01

    A new paradigm that increases the efficiency of whole-core neutron transport calculations without lattice homogenization is introduced. Quasi-reflected interface conditions are formulated to partially decouple periodic lattice effects from global flux gradients. The starting point is the finite subelement form of the variational nodal code VARIANT that eliminates fuel-coolant homogenization through the use of heterogeneous nodes. The interface spherical harmonics expansions that couple pin-cell-sized nodes are divided into low-order and high-order terms, and reflected interface conditions are applied to the high-order terms. Combined with an integral transport method within the node, the new approach dramatically reduces both the formation time and the dimensions of the nodal response matrices and leads to sharply reduced memory requirements and computational time. The method is applied to the two-dimensional C5G7 problem, an Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency pressurized water reactor benchmark containing mixed oxide (MOX) and UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies, as well as to a three-dimensional MOX fuel assembly. Results indicate the new approach results in very little loss of accuracy relative to the corresponding full spherical harmonics expansions while reducing computational times by well over an order of magnitude.

  15. Analysis of subgrid-scale vertical transport in convective boundary layers at gray-zone resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeyum Hailey; Hong, Song-You

    2013-04-01

    The gray zone of a physics process in numerical models is defined as the range of model resolution in which the process is partly resolved by model dynamics and partly parameterized. In this study, we examine the effects of grid size on resolved and parameterized vertical transport for horizontal grid scales including the gray zone. To assess how stability alters the dependency on grid size, four convective boundary layer (CBL)s with different surface heating and geostrophic winds are considered. For this purpose, reference data for grid-scale (GS) and subgrid-scale (SGS) fields are constructed for 50-4000 mesh sizes by filtering 25-m large-eddy simulations (LES) data. As wind shear becomes stronger, turbulent kinetic energy and the vertical transport of potential temperature and momentum are more resolved for a given grid spacing. A passive scalar with bottom-up diffusion behaves in a similar fashion. For a top-down diffusion scalar, the cospectral peak scale of the scalar flux is larger than the horizontal size of the thermals and increases in time. For the scalar, the entrainment ratio, in conjunction with the shear, influences the mesh-size dependency of GS and SGS transport. The total vertical transport of heat and the bottom-up scalar is decomposed into a non-local mixing owing to the coherent structures and remaining local mixing. The contribution of the resolved parts is larger when roll-like structures are present than when only thermals exist, for both non-local and local fluxes. The grid-size dependency of the non-local flux and its sensitivity to stability predominantly determines the dependency of total (non-local plus local) transport.

  16. Surface harmonics method for two-dimensional time-dependent neutron transport problems of square-lattice nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-07-01

    Time-dependent equations of the Surface Harmonics Method (SHM) have been derived from the time-dependent neutron transport equation with explicit representation of delayed neutrons for solving the two-dimensional time-dependent problems. These equations have been realized in the SUHAM-TD code. The TWIGL benchmark problem has been used for verification of the SUHAM-TD code. The results of the study showed that computational costs required to achieve necessary accuracy of the solution can be an order of magnitude less than with the use of the conventional finite difference method (FDM). (authors)

  17. U{sub N} Method For The Critical Slab Problem In One-Speed Neutron Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Oeztuerk, Hakan; Guengoer, Sueleyman

    2008-11-11

    The Chebyshev polynomial approximation (U{sub N} method) is used to solve the critical slab problem in one-speed neutron transport theory using Marshak boundary condition. The isotropic scattering kernel with the combination of forward and backward scattering is chosen for the neutrons in a uniform finite slab. Numerical results obtained by the U{sub N} method are presented in the tables together with the results obtained by the well-known P{sub N} method for comparison. It is shown that the method converges rapidly with its easily executable equations.

  18. A Novel Algorithm for Solving the Multidimensional Neutron Transport Equation on Massively Parallel Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Yousry

    2014-06-10

    We employ the Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) as the kernel of new parallel solution methods for the discrete ordinates approximation of the within-group neutron transport equation. The ITMM abandons the repetitive mesh sweeps of the traditional source iterations (SI) scheme in favor of constructing stored operators that account for the direct coupling factors among all the cells' fluxes and between the cells' and boundary surfaces' fluxes. The main goals of this work are to develop the algorithms that construct these operators and employ them in the solution process, determine the most suitable way to parallelize the entire procedure, and evaluate the behavior and parallel performance of the developed methods with increasing number of processes, P. The fastest observed parallel solution method, Parallel Gauss-Seidel (PGS), was used in a weak scaling comparison with the PARTISN transport code, which uses the source iteration (SI) scheme parallelized with the Koch-baker-Alcouffe (KBA) method. Compared to the state-of-the-art SI-KBA with diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA), this new method- even without acceleration/preconditioning-is completitive for optically thick problems as P is increased to the tens of thousands range. For the most optically thick cells tested, PGS reduced execution time by an approximate factor of three for problems with more than 130 million computational cells on P = 32,768. Moreover, the SI-DSA execution times's trend rises generally more steeply with increasing P than the PGS trend. Furthermore, the PGS method outperforms SI for the periodic heterogeneous layers (PHL) configuration problems. The PGS method outperforms SI and SI-DSA on as few as P = 16 for PHL problems and reduces execution time by a factor of ten or more for all problems considered with more than 2 million computational cells on P = 4.096.

  19. Mechanistic picture for conformational transition of a membrane transporter at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2013-11-19

    During their transport cycle, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters undergo large-scale conformational changes between inward- and outward-facing states. Using an approach based on designing system-specific reaction coordinates and using nonequilibrium work relations, we have performed extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of explicit membrane/solvent to sample a large number of mechanistically distinct pathways for the conformational transition of MsbA, a bacterial ABC exporter whose structure has been solved in multiple functional states. The computational approach developed here is based on (i) extensive exploration of system-specific biasing protocols (e.g., using collective variables designed based on available low-resolution crystal structures) and (ii) using nonequilibrium work relations for comparing the relevance of the transition pathways. The most relevant transition pathway identified using this approach involves several distinct stages reflecting the complex nature of the structural changes associated with the function of the protein. The opening of the cytoplasmic gate during the outward- to inward-facing transition of apo MsbA is found to be disfavored when the periplasmic gate is open and facilitated by a twisting motion of the nucleotide-binding domains that involves a dramatic change in their relative orientation. These results highlight the cooperativity between the transmembrane and the nucleotide-binding domains in the conformational transition of ABC exporters. The approach introduced here provides a framework to study large-scale conformational changes of other membrane transporters whose computational investigation at an atomic resolution may not be currently feasible using conventional methods. PMID:24191018

  20. Detection system for high-resolution gamma radiation spectroscopy with neutron time-of-flight filtering

    DOEpatents

    Dioszegi, Istvan; Salwen, Cynthia; Vanier, Peter

    2014-12-30

    A .gamma.-radiation detection system that includes at least one semiconductor detector such as HPGe-Detector, a position-sensitive .alpha.-Detector, a TOF Controller, and a Digitizer/Integrator. The Digitizer/Integrator starts to process the energy signals of a .gamma.-radiation sent from the HPGe-Detector instantly when the HPGe-Detector detects the .gamma.-radiation. Subsequently, it is determined whether a coincidence exists between the .alpha.-particles and .gamma.-radiation signal, based on a determination of the time-of-flight of neutrons obtained from the .alpha.-Detector and the HPGe-Detector. If it is determined that the time-of-flight falls within a predetermined coincidence window, the Digitizer/Integrator is allowed to continue and complete the energy signal processing. If, however, there is no coincidence, the Digitizer/Integrator is instructed to be clear and reset its operation instantly.

  1. High-resolution Structures of Protein-Membrane Complexes by Neutron Reflection and MD Simulation: Membrane Association of the PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösche, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    The lipid matrix of biomembranes is an in-plane fluid, thermally and compositionally disordered leaflet of 5 nm thickness and notoriously difficult to characterize in structural terms. Yet, biomembranes are ubiquitous in the cell, and membrane-bound proteins are implicated in a variety of signaling pathways and intra-cellular transport. We developed methodology to study proteins associated with model membranes using neutron reflection measurements and showed recently that this approach can resolve the penetration depth and orientation of membrane proteins with ångstrom resolution if their crystal or NMR structure is known. Here we apply this technology to determine the membrane bindung and unravel functional details of the PTEN phosphatase, a key player in the PI3K apoptosis pathway. PTEN is an important regulatory protein and tumor suppressor that performs its phosphatase activity as an interfacial enzyme at the plasma membrane-cytoplasm boundary. Acting as an antagonist to phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cell signaling, it is deleted in many human cancers. Despite its importance in regulating the levels of the phosphoinositoltriphosphate PI(3,4,5)P3, there is little understanding of how PTEN binds to membranes, is activated and then acts as a phosphatase. We investigated the structure and function of PTEN by studying its membrane affinity and localization on in-plane fluid, thermally disordered synthetic membrane models. The membrane association of the protein depends strongly on membrane composition, where phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidylinositol diphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) act synergetically in attracting the enzyme to the membrane surface. Membrane affinities depend strongly on membrane fluidity, which suggests multiple binding sites on the protein for PI(4,5)P2. Neutron reflection measurements show that the PTEN phosphatase ``scoots'' along the membrane surface (penetration < 5 å) but binds the membrane tightly with its two major domains, the C2 and

  2. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  3. Neutron radiography and modelling of water flow and D2O transport in soil and plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea; Kröner, Eva

    2014-05-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is currently limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure the water fluxes in soil and plants. Our study aimed to develop a new non-destructive method to measure the local fluxes of water into roots of plants growing in soil. We injected deuterated water (D2O) near the roots of lupines growing in sandy soils, and we used neutron radiography to image the transport of D2O through the root system. The experiments were performed during day, when plants were transpiring, and at night, when transpiration was reduced. The radiographs showed that: 1) the radial transport of D2O from soil and roots depended similarly from diffusion and convection; and 2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To determine the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we simulated the D2O transport in soils and roots. A dual porosity model was used to describe the apoplastic and symplastic pathways of water across the root tissue. Other features as the endodermis and the xylem were also included in the model. The D2O transport was modelled solving a convection-diffusion numerical model in soil and plants. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that at night the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modelling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots, as well as the ration between the apoplastic and symplastic flow. For 24 day-old lupine grown in a sandy soil with uniform water content, our modelling results showed that root water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the roots near soil surface and it decreased toward the distal parts. The results indicated the water crossed the root cortex mainly through the apoplastic pathway. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along root systems growing in

  4. Phase coexistence in NaTaO3 at room temperature; a high resolution neutron powder diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Kevin S.; Kennedy, Brendan J.

    2015-05-01

    Room temperature high resolution neutron powder diffraction data, measured in time-of-flight, from two independent samples of NaTaO3 shows the presence of phase coexistence of two orthorhombic structures with space groups Pbnm, and Cmcm. The failure of earlier work to recognise the extent of the hysteresis associated with the high temperature (∼763 K on heating) Cmcm - Pbnm phase transition, that extends down to room temperature, and probably to 0 K, is due to data having been collected at too low a real-space resolution to characterise the diagnostic pseudocubic fundamental and superlattice reflection multiplicities. The phase fraction of the Cmcm phase increases with increasing temperature from 45 weight % at 298 K, to 74 weight % at 758 K. Throughout the whole temperature interval 298 K-758 K, the volume per formula unit of the Cmcm phase exceeds that of the Pbnm phase by an almost constant ∼0.01 Å3 suggesting the addition of pressure would supress the volume fraction of the higher temperature phase. The crystal structure of both phases, determined from data collected at 298 K, are reported, with the atomic displacement parameters of the Cmcm phase being significantly larger than those associated with the Pbnm phase, probably reflecting a high degree of thermal and static disorder.

  5. On the emissions and transport of bromoform: sensitivity to model resolution and emission location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, M. R.; Ashfold, M. J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Bromoform (CHBr3) is a short-lived species with an important but poorly quantified ocean source. It can be transported to the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL), in part by rapid, deep convective lifting, from where it can influence the global stratospheric ozone budget. In a modelling study, we investigate the importance of the regional distribution of the emissions and of model resolution for the transport of bromoform to the TTL. We use two idealized CHBr3 emission fields (one coastal, one uniformly distributed across the oceans) implemented in high- and coarse-resolution (HR and CR) versions of the same global model and focus on February as the period of peak convection in the West Pacific. Using outgoing long-wave radiation and precipitation as metrics, the HR version of the model is found to represent convection better. In the more realistic HR model version, the coastal emission scenario leads to 15-20 % more CHBr3 in the global TTL, and up to three times more CHBr3 in the TTL over the Maritime Continent, than when uniform emissions of the same tropical magnitude are employed. Using the uniform emission scenario in both model versions, the distribution of CHBr3 at 15.7 km (approximately the level of zero net radiative heating) is qualitatively consistent with the differing geographic distributions of convection. However, averaged over the whole tropics, the amount of CHBr3 in the TTL in the two model versions is similar. Using the coastal scenario, in which emissions are particularly high in the Maritime Continent because of its long coastlines, the mixing ratio of CHBr3 in the TTL is enhanced over the Maritime Continent in both model versions. The enhancement is larger, and the peak in CHBr3 mixing ratio occurs at a higher altitude, in the HR model version. Our regional-scale results indicate that using aircraft measurements and coarse global models to infer CHBr3 emissions will be very difficult, particularly if (as is possible) emissions are distributed

  6. On the emissions and transport of bromoform: sensitivity to model resolution and emission location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, M. R.; Ashfold, M. J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Bromoform (CHBr3) is a short-lived species with an important but poorly quantified ocean source. It can be transported to the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL), in part by rapid, deep convective lifting, from where it can influence the global stratospheric ozone budget. In a modelling study, we investigate the importance of the regional distribution of the emissions and of model resolution for the transport of bromoform to the TTL. We use two idealised CHBr3 emission fields (one coastal, one uniformly distributed across the oceans) implemented in high and coarse resolution (HR and CR) versions of the same global model and focus on February as the period of peak convection in the West Pacific. Using outgoing long-wave radiation and precipitation as metrics, the HR version of the model is found to represent convection better. In the more realistic HR model version, the coastal emission scenario leads to 15-20 % more CHBr3 in the global TTL, and up to three times more CHBr3 in the TTL over the Maritime Continent, than when uniform emissions of the same tropical magnitude are employed. Using the uniform emission scenario in both model versions, the distribution of CHBr3 at 15.7 km (approximately the level of zero net radiative heating) is qualitatively consistent with the differing geographic distributions of convection. However, averaged over the whole tropics, the amount of CHBr3 in the TTL in the two model versions is similar. Using the coastal scenario, in which emissions are particularly high in the Maritime Continent because of its long coastlines, the mixing ratio of CHBr3 in the TTL is enhanced over the Maritime Continent in both model versions. The enhancement is larger, and the peak in CHBr3 mixing ratio occurs at a higher altitude, in the HR model version. Our regional-scale results indicate that using aircraft measurements and coarse global models to infer CHBr3 emissions will be very difficult, particularly if (as is possible) emissions are distributed

  7. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E.

    2014-12-15

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  8. Neutron emission spectroscopy results for internal transport barrier and mode conversion ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Sunden, E. Andersson; Ericsson, G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sjoestrand, H.; Weiszflog, M.; Kaellne, J.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2008-10-15

    The effect of ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on ({sup 3}He)D plasmas at JET was studied with the time of flight optimized rate (TOFOR) spectrometer dedicated to 2.5 MeV dd neutron measurements. In internal transport barrier (ITB) plasma experiments with large {sup 3}He concentrations (X({sup 3}He)>15%) an increase in neutron yield was observed after the ITB disappeared but with the auxiliary neutral beam injection and ICRH power still applied. The analysis of the TOFOR data revealed the formation of a high energy (fast) D population in this regime. The results were compared to other mode conversion experiments with similar X({sup 3}He) but slightly different heating conditions. In this study we report on the high energy neutron tails originating from the fast D ions and their correlation with X({sup 3}He) and discuss the light it can shed on ICRH-plasma power coupling mechanisms.

  9. Study of the response of a lithium yttrium borate scintillator based neutron rem counter by Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil, C.; Tyagi, Mohit; Biju, K.; Shanbhag, A. A.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity and the high cost of 3He has spurred the use of various detectors for neutron monitoring. A new lithium yttrium borate scintillator developed in BARC has been studied for its use in a neutron rem counter. The scintillator is made of natural lithium and boron, and the yield of reaction products that will generate a signal in a real time detector has been studied by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. A 2 cm lead introduced to enhance the gamma rejection shows no appreciable change in the shape of the fluence response or in the yield of reaction products. The fluence response when normalized at the average energy of an Am-Be neutron source shows promise of being used as rem counter.

  10. Quantum transport equation for systems with rough surfaces and its application to ultracold neutrons in a quantizing gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, M.; Meyerovich, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss transport of particles along random rough surfaces in quantum size effect conditions. As an intriguing application, we analyze gravitationally quantized ultracold neutrons in rough waveguides in conjunction with GRANIT experiments (ILL, Grenoble). We present a theoretical description of these experiments in the biased diffusion approximation for neutron mirrors with both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) roughness. All system parameters collapse into a single constant which determines the depletion times for the gravitational quantum states and the exit neutron count. This constant is determined by a complicated integral of the correlation function (CF) of surface roughness. The reliable identification of this CF is always hindered by the presence of long fluctuation-driven correlation tails in finite-size samples. We report numerical experiments relevant for the identification of roughness of a new GRANIT waveguide and make predictions for ongoing experiments. We also propose a radically new design for the rough waveguide.

  11. Development of a transportable neutron activation analysis system to quantify manganese in bone in vivo: feasibility and methodology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingzi; Koltick, David; Byrne, Patrick; Wang, Haoyu; Zheng, Wei; Nie, Linda H

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the methodology and feasibility of developing a transportable neutron activation analysis (NAA) system to quantify manganese (Mn) in bone using a portable deuterium–deuterium (DD) neutron generator as the neutron source. Since a DD neutron generator was not available in our laboratory, a deuterium–tritium (DT) neutron generator was used to obtain experimental data and validate the results from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. After validation, MC simulations using a DD generator as the neutron source were then conducted. Different types of moderators and reflectors were simulated, and the optimal thicknesses for the moderator and reflector were determined. To estimate the detection limit (DL) of the system, and to observe the interference of the magnesium (Mg) γ line at 844 keV to the Mn γ line at 847 keV, three hand phantoms with Mn concentrations of 30 parts per million (ppm), 150 ppm, and 500 ppm were made and irradiated by the DT generator system. The Mn signals in these phantoms were then measured using a 50% high-efficiency high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The DL was calculated to be about 4.4 ppm for the chosen irradiation, decay, and measurement time. This was calculated to be equivalent to a DL of about 3.3 ppm for the DD generator system. To achieve this DL with one 50% high-efficiency HPGe detector, the dose to the hand was simulated to be about 37 mSv, with the total body equivalent dose being about 23μSv. In conclusion, it is feasible to develop a transportable NAA system to quantify Mn in bone in vivo with an acceptable radiation exposure to the subject. PMID:24165395

  12. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δmore » > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.« less

  13. A fully coupled Monte Carlo/discrete ordinates solution to the neutron transport equation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, W.L.; Baker, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    The neutron transport equation is solved by a hybrid method that iteratively couples regions where deterministic (S{sub N}) and stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods are applied. Unlike previous hybrid methods, the Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are fully coupled in the sense that no assumption is made about geometrical separation or decoupling. The hybrid method provides a new means of solving problems involving both optically thick and optically thin regions that neither Monte Carlo nor S{sub N} is well suited for by themselves. The fully coupled Monte Carlo/S{sub N} technique consists of defining spatial and/or energy regions of a problem in which either a Monte Carlo calculation or an S{sub N} calculation is to be performed. The Monte Carlo region may comprise the entire spatial region for selected energy groups, or may consist of a rectangular area that is either completely or partially embedded in an arbitrary S{sub N} region. The Monte Carlo and S{sub N} regions are then connected through the common angular boundary fluxes, which are determined iteratively using the response matrix technique, and volumetric sources. The hybrid method has been implemented in the S{sub N} code TWODANT by adding special-purpose Monte Carlo subroutines to calculate the response matrices and volumetric sources, and linkage subrountines to carry out the interface flux iterations. The common angular boundary fluxes are included in the S{sub N} code as interior boundary sources, leaving the logic for the solution of the transport flux unchanged, while, with minor modifications, the diffusion synthetic accelerator remains effective in accelerating S{sub N} calculations. The special-purpose Monte Carlo routines used are essentially analog, with few variance reduction techniques employed. However, the routines have been successfully vectorized, with approximately a factor of five increase in speed over the non-vectorized version.

  14. 3D Neutron Transport PWR Full-core Calculation with RMC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yishu; She, Ding; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Kan; Li, Zeguang; Liang, Jingang; Leroyer, Hadrien

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, there are more and more interests in the use of Monte Carlo codes to calculate the detailed power density distributions in full-core reactors. With the Inspur TS1000 HPC Server of Tsinghua University, several calculations have been done based on the EDF 3D Neutron Transport PWR Full-core benchmark through large-scale parallelism. To investigate and compare the results of the deterministic method and Monte Carlo method, EDF R&D and Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University are having a collaboration to make code to code verification. So in this paper, two codes are used. One is the code COCAGNE developed by the EDF R&D, a deterministic core code, and the other is the Monte Carlo code RMC developed by Department of Engineering Physics in Tsinghua University. First, the full-core model is described and a 26-group calculation was performed by these two codes using the same 26-group cross-section library provided by EDF R&D. Then the parallel and tally performance of RMC is discussed. RMC employs a novel algorithm which can cut down most of the communications. It can be seen clearly that the speedup ratio almost linearly increases with the nodes. Furthermore the cell-mapping method applied by RMC consumes little time to tally even millions of cells. The results of the codes COCAGNE and RMC are compared in three ways. The results of these two codes agree well with each other. It can be concluded that both COCAGNE and RMC are able to provide 3D-transport solutions associated with detailed power density distributions calculation in PWR full-core reactors. Finally, to investigate how many histories are needed to obtain a given standard deviation for a full 3D solution, the non-symmetrized condensed 2-group fluxes of RMC are discussed.

  15. A discrete ordinates approximation to the neutron transport equation applied to generalized geometries

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1992-12-01

    A method for applying the discrete ordinates method for solution of the neutron transport equation in arbitary two-dimensional meshes has been developed. The finite difference approach normally used to approximate spatial derivatives in extrapolating angular fluxes across a cell is replaced by direct solution of the characteristic form of the transport equation for each discrete direction. Thus, computational cells are not restricted to the traditional shape of a mesh element within a given coordinate system. However, in terms of the treatment of energy and angular dependencies, this method resembles traditional discrete ordinates techniques. Using the method developed here, a general two-dimensional space can be approximated by an irregular mesh comprised of arbitrary polygons. The present work makes no assumptions about the orientations or the number of sides in a given cell, and computes all geometric relationships between each set of sides in each cell for each discrete direction. A set of non-reentrant polygons can therefore be used to represent any given two dimensional space. Results for a number of test problems have been compared to solutions obtained from traditional methods, with good agreement. Comparisons include benchmarks against analytical results for problems with simple geometry, as well numerical results obtained from traditional discrete ordinates methods by applying the ANISN and TWOTRAN computer programs. Numerical results were obtained for problems ranging from simple one-dimensional geometry to complicated multidimensional configurations. These results have demonstrated the ability of the developed method to closely approximate complex geometrical configurations and to obtain accurate results for problems that are extremely difficult to model using traditional methods.

  16. Variations on thermal transport modelling of subsurface temperatures using high resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanafield, Margaret; McCallum, James L.; Cook, Peter G.; Noorduijn, Saskia

    2016-03-01

    Although streambed dynamics are known to be complex and three-dimensional, flux within the subsurface is often estimated with simplified models for convenience, despite the errors this incurs. While three-dimensional (3D) models have the advantage of being able to capture complex flow paths within the subsurface, they are also more data intensive, requiring a detailed knowledge of both thermal and hydraulic streambed properties. Temperature data are relatively easy to acquire at a high resolution within a natural stream environment; however, it is typically more difficult to capture hydraulic head measurements at this same resolution, making it difficult to apply appropriate boundary conditions to 3D models in order to estimate streambed fluxes from heat tracer techniques alone. In this study, we examine the consequences of the lack of detailed head data for parameterizing boundary conditions. We tested the abilities of three 3D heat and water transport models with increasingly complex boundary conditions to match observed thermal patterns and predict streambed fluxes. All three models showed similar spatial patterns of high and low fluxes. The amplitude of predicted daily temperature variation at a depth of 0.25 m and 0.5 m below the streambed was generally within 0.1 °C (i.e. within sensor error) of observed, while all three models typically underestimated daily temperature variation in advective areas at a depth of 0.1 m. The results of this study suggest that 3D heat transport models of streambeds may be more limited by the low sensitivity of hydraulic conductivity to small temperature variations than by the lack of detailed hydraulic head data for parameterizing boundary conditions.

  17. Multi-instrument, high-resolution imaging of polar cap patch transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E. G.; Hosokawa, K.; Sakai, J.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Taguchi, S.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Coster, A. J.; St.-Maurice, J.-P.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2015-09-01

    Transionospheric radio signals in the high-latitude polar cap are susceptible to degradation when encountering sharp electron density gradients associated with discrete plasma structures, or patches. Multi-instrument measurements of polar cap patches are examined during a geomagnetic storm interval on 22 January 2012. For the first time, we monitor the transportation of patches with high spatial and temporal resolution across the polar cap for 1-2 h using a combination of GPS total electron content (TEC), all-sky airglow imagers (ASIs), and Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF radar backscatter. Simultaneous measurements from these data sets allow for continuous tracking of patch location, horizontal extent, and velocity despite adverse observational conditions for the primary technique (e.g., sunlit regions in the ASI data). Spatial collocation between patch-like features in relatively coarse but global GPS TEC measurements and those mapped by high-resolution ASI data was very good, indicating that GPS TEC can be applied to track patches continuously as they are transported across the polar cap. In contrast to previous observations of cigar-shaped patches formed under weakly disturbed conditions, the relatively narrow dawn-dusk extent of patches in the present interval (500-800 km) suggests association with a longitudinally confined plasma source region, such as storm-enhanced density (SED) plume. SuperDARN observations show that the backscatter power enhancements corresponded to the optical patches, and for the first time we demonstrate that the motion of the optical patches was consistent with background plasma convection velocities.

  18. A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinatorial Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-06-12

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly fast: if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system canmore » save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and ist data files.« less

  19. A time-dependent neutron transport method of characteristics formulation with time derivative propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Adam J.; Lee, John C.

    2016-02-01

    A new time-dependent Method of Characteristics (MOC) formulation for nuclear reactor kinetics was developed utilizing angular flux time-derivative propagation. This method avoids the requirement of storing the angular flux at previous points in time to represent a discretized time derivative; instead, an equation for the angular flux time derivative along 1D spatial characteristics is derived and solved concurrently with the 1D transport characteristic equation. This approach allows the angular flux time derivative to be recast principally in terms of the neutron source time derivatives, which are approximated to high-order accuracy using the backward differentiation formula (BDF). This approach, called Source Derivative Propagation (SDP), drastically reduces the memory requirements of time-dependent MOC relative to methods that require storing the angular flux. An SDP method was developed for 2D and 3D applications and implemented in the computer code DeCART in 2D. DeCART was used to model two reactor transient benchmarks: a modified TWIGL problem and a C5G7 transient. The SDP method accurately and efficiently replicated the solution of the conventional time-dependent MOC method using two orders of magnitude less memory.

  20. Inversion of Source and Transport Parameters of Relativistic SEPs from Neutron Monitor Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueda, Neus; Bütikofer, Rolf; Vainio, Rami; Heber, Bernd; Afanasiev, Alexander; Malandraki, Olga E.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new methodology to study the release processes of relativistic solar energetic particles (SEPs) based on the direct inversion of Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) observed by the worldwide network of neutron monitors (NMs). The new approach makes use of several models, including: the propagation of relativistic SEPs from the Sun to the Earth, their transport in the Earth's magnetosphere and atmosphere, as well as the detection of the nucleon component of the secondary cosmic rays by ground based NMs. The combination of these models allows us to compute the expected ground-level NM counting rates for a series of instantaneous releases from the Sun. The amplitudes of the source components are then inferred by fitting the NM observations with the modeled NM counting rate increases. Within the HESPERIA project, we will develop the first software package for the direct inversion of GLEs and we will make it freely available for the solar and heliospheric communities. Acknowledgement: This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324.

  1. Measured performances on vectorization and multitasking with a Monte Carlo code for neutron transport problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, Yves

    1985-07-01

    This paper summarized two improvements of a real production code by using vectorization and multitasking techniques. After a short description of Monte Carlo algorithms employed in our neutron transport problems, we briefly describe the work we have done in order to get a vector code. Vectorization principles will be presented and measured performances on the CRAY 1S, CYBER 205 and CRAY X-MP compared in terms of vector lengths. The second part of this work is an adaptation to multitasking on the CRAY X-MP using exclusively standard multitasking tools available with FORTRAN under the COS 1.13 system. Two examples will be presented. The goal of the first one is to measure the overhead inherent to multitasking when tasks become too small and to define a granularity threshold that is to say a minimum size for a task. With the second example we propose a method that is very X-MP oriented in order to get the best speedup factor on such a computer. In conclusion we prove that Monte Carlo algorithms are very well suited to future vector and parallel computers.

  2. Irradiation effects in 6H-SiC induced by neutron and heavy ions: Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Xiankun; Tang, Bin; Li, Jiangbo; Xue, Jianming; Peng, Shuming

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation effects of neutron and 3 MeV C+, Si+ in 6H-SiC were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD. The total disorder values of neutron irradiated SiC agree well with that of samples irradiated by ions at the same doses respectively. On the other hand, high-resolution XRD results shows that the lattice strain rate caused by neutron irradiation is 6.8%/dpa, while it is only 2.6%/dpa and 4.2%/dpa for Si+ and C+ irradiations respectively. Our results illustrate that the total disorder in neutron irradiated SiC can be accurately simulated by MeV Si+ or C+ irradiations at the same dose, but for the lattice strain and strain-related properties like surface hardness, the depth profile of irradiation damages induced by energetic ions must be considered. This research will contribute to a better understanding of the difference in irradiation effects between neutron and heavy ions.

  3. A Microscopic View of Mass Transport in Silicate Melts by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Andreas; Kargl, Florian; Horbach, Jürgen

    The application of quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation to the study of mass transport in silicate melts is outlined. It is shown how the knowledge of atomic dynamics and structure reveals the mechanisms of mass transport. Peculiar properties of atomic diffusion and viscous flow behaviour as a function of melt composition are discussed in terms of the formation of alkali diffusion channels in the static structure. This non-homogeneous distribution of alkali ions in a disrupted tetrahedral Si-O network is investigated in binary lithium, sodium and potassium silicate melts and in ternary sodium aluminosilicates and sodium ironsilicates representing the main compositions of natural volcanic rocks.

  4. Metastable states of a flux-line lattice studied by transport and small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pautrat, A.; Scola, J.; Simon, Ch.; Brulet, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2005-02-01

    Flux-line lattice (FLL) states have been studied using transport measurements and small-angle neutron scattering in low-T{sub c} materials. In Pb-In, the bulk dislocations in the FLL do not influence the transport properties. In Fe-doped NbSe{sub 2}, transport properties can differ after a field cooling (FC) or a zero field cooling (ZFC) procedure, as previously reported. The ZFC FLL is found ordered with narrow Bragg peaks and is linked to a linear V(I) curve and to a superficial critical current. The FC FLL pattern exhibits two Bragg peaks and the corresponding V(I) curve shows an S-shape. This can be explained by the coexistence of two ordered FLLs slightly tilted from the applied field direction by different superficial currents. These currents are wiped out when the transport current is increased.

  5. Metastable states of a flux-line lattice studied by transport and small-angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pautrat, A.; Scola, J.; Simon, Ch.; Mathieu, P.; Brûlet, A.; Goupil, C.; Higgins, M. J.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2005-02-01

    Flux-line lattice (FLL) states have been studied using transport measurements and small-angle neutron scattering in low- Tc materials. In Pb-In , the bulk dislocations in the FLL do not influence the transport properties. In Fe -doped NbSe2 , transport properties can differ after a field cooling (FC) or a zero field cooling (ZFC) procedure, as previously reported. The ZFC FLL is found ordered with narrow Bragg peaks and is linked to a linear V(I) curve and to a superficial critical current. The FC FLL pattern exhibits two Bragg peaks and the corresponding V(I) curve shows an S -shape. This can be explained by the coexistence of two ordered FLLs slightly tilted from the applied field direction by different superficial currents. These currents are wiped out when the transport current is increased.

  6. A 10(9) neutrons/pulse transportable pulsed D-D neutron source based on flexible head plasma focus unit.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R K; Srivastava, R; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2016-03-01

    A 17 kJ transportable plasma focus (PF) device with flexible transmission lines is developed and is characterized. Six custom made capacitors are used for the capacitor bank (CB). The common high voltage plate of the CB is fixed to a centrally triggered spark gap switch. The output of the switch is coupled to the PF head through forty-eight 5 m long RG213 cables. The CB has a quarter time-period of 4 μs and an estimated current of 506 kA is delivered to the PF device at 17 kJ (60 μF, 24 kV) energy. The average neutron yield measured using silver activation detector in the radial direction is (7.1 ± 1.4) × 10(8) neutrons/shot over 4π sr at 5 mbar optimum D2 pressure. The average neutron yield is more in the axial direction with an anisotropy factor of 1.33 ± 0.18. The average neutron energies estimated in the axial as well as in the radial directions are (2.90 ± 0.20) MeV and (2.58 ± 0.20) MeV, respectively. The flexibility of the PF head makes it useful for many applications where the source orientation and the location are important factors. The influence of electromagnetic interferences from the CB as well as from the spark gap on applications area can be avoided by putting a suitable barrier between the bank and the PF head. PMID:27036774

  7. Predicting vehicular emissions in high spatial resolution using pervasively measured transportation data and microscopic emissions model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Kang, Chaogui; Robinson, Prudence; Corti, Andrea; Szell, Michael; Streets, David; Lu, Zifeng; Britter, Rex; Barrett, Steven R. H.; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution related to traffic emissions pose an especially significant problem in cities; this is due to its adverse impact on human health and well-being. Previous studies which have aimed to quantify emissions from the transportation sector have been limited by either simulated or coarsely resolved traffic volume data. Emissions inventories form the basis of urban pollution models, therefore in this study, Global Positioning System (GPS) trajectory data from a taxi fleet of over 15,000 vehicles were analyzed with the aim of predicting air pollution emissions for Singapore. This novel approach enabled the quantification of instantaneous drive cycle parameters in high spatio-temporal resolution, which provided the basis for a microscopic emissions model. Carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) emissions were thus estimated. Highly localized areas of elevated emissions levels were identified, with a spatio-temporal precision not possible with previously used methods for estimating emissions. Relatively higher emissions areas were mainly concentrated in a few districts that were the Singapore Downtown Core area, to the north of the central urban region and to the east of it. Daily emissions quantified for the total motor vehicle population of Singapore were found to be comparable to another emissions dataset. Results demonstrated that high-resolution spatio-temporal vehicle traces detected using GPS in large taxi fleets could be used to infer highly localized areas of elevated acceleration and air pollution emissions in cities, and may become a complement to traditional emission estimates, especially in emerging cities and countries where reliable fine-grained urban air quality data is not easily available. This is the first study of its kind to investigate measured microscopic vehicle movement in tandem with microscopic emissions modeling for a substantial study domain.

  8. Oxygen transport pathways in Ruddlesden–Popper structured oxides revealed via in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkiewicz, Alex C.; Tamimi, Mazin; Huq, Ashfia; McIntosh, Steven

    2015-09-21

    Ruddlesden-Popper structured oxides, general form An+1BnO3n+1, consist of n-layers of the perovskite structure stacked in between rock-salt layers, and have potential application in solid oxide electrochemical cells and ion transport membrane reactors. Three materials with constant Co/Fe ratio, LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ (n = 1), La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ (n = 2), and LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ (n = 3) were synthesized and studied via in situ neutron powder diffraction between 765 K and 1070 K at a pO2 of 10-1 atm. Then, the structures were fit to a tetragonal I4/mmm space group, and were found to have increased total oxygen vacancy concentration in the order La0.3Sr2.7CoFeO7-δ > LaSr3Co1.5Fe1.5O10-δ > LaSrCo0.5Fe0.5O4-δ, following the trend predicted for charge compensation upon increasing Sr2+/La3+ ratio. The oxygen vacancies within the material were almost exclusively located within the perovskite layers for all of the crystal structures with only minimal vacancy formation in the rock-salt layer. Finally, analysis of the concentration of these vacancies at each distinct crystallographic site and the anisotropic atomic displacement parameters for the oxygen sites reveals potential preferred oxygen transport pathways through the perovskite layers.

  9. High Resolution Simulations of Pollution Vertical Stratification over Santiago and its Transport to the Chilean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfanoz-Cheuquelaf, A. P.; Gallardo, L.; Huneeus, N.; Lambert, F.

    2015-12-01

    Santiago, Chile (33.5 S, 70.5 W, 500 m.a.s.l., population 7 millions) is a large city situated in a basin surrounded by the Andes in the East and smaller mountain ranges to the North, West, and South. It is plagued by abnormally high pollution levels for its size due to climatological and topological features. To date, it is unclear how far the urban pollution plume reaches up the mountain. Here we explore the region's complex atmospheric circulation and particularly the transport of black carbon (BC) using a state of the art numerical model (WRF-Chem, Weather Research and Forecasting model).Observations indicate the presence of multiple layers within the boundary layer, as well as the occurrence of uncoupled layers above the boundary layer. Here we explore mechanisms within our simulation that may explain these features. Our results suggest that they may correspond to residual layers that are produced by recirculation along mountain slopes due to the complex terrain around the city.In late August 2013, a short multi-platform measuring campaign (DIVERSOL) took place in the Santiago basin, providing the first vertical profiles of BC, accompanied by meteorological soundings. We analyze the dispersion of a quasi-passive tracer (carbon monoxide) of black carbon in our simulation to improve our understanding of the governing mixing and transport processes. We also perform sensitivity studies with respect to vertical resolution and turbulence schemes, contrasting our results against DIVERSOL data. Our simulations suggest that pollutants emitted in Santiago could reach the high regions of Andes mountains during the afternoon circulation, thus affecting local glaciers. With an entire year of simulation we find that the stratification of pollutants within the basin displays a seasonal signal, as well as a capacity to reach the Chilean Andes and affect the Andean cryosphere.

  10. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  11. Visualization of root water uptake: quantification of deuterated water transport in roots using neutron radiography and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kroener, Eva; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure water fluxes in soil and plants. Here, we describe a new method to noninvasively quantify water fluxes in roots. To this end, neutron radiography was used to trace the transport of deuterated water (D2O) into roots. The results showed that (1) the radial transport of D2O from soil to the roots depended similarly on diffusive and convective transport and (2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To quantify the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we introduced a convection-diffusion model to simulate the D2O transport in roots. The model takes into account different pathways of water across the root tissue, the endodermis as a layer with distinct transport properties, and the axial transport of D2O in the xylem. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modeling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For a 24-d-old lupine (Lupinus albus) grown in a soil with uniform water content, root water uptake was higher in the proximal parts of lateral roots and decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along the root systems. PMID:25189533

  12. A 2D/1D coupling neutron transport method based on the matrix MOC and NEM methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Zheng, Y.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2013-07-01

    A new 2D/1D coupling method based on the matrix MOC method (MMOC) and nodal expansion method (NEM) is proposed for solving the three-dimensional heterogeneous neutron transport problem. The MMOC method, used for radial two-dimensional calculation, constructs a response matrix between source and flux with only one sweep and then solves the linear system by using the restarted GMRES algorithm instead of the traditional trajectory sweeping process during within-group iteration for angular flux update. Long characteristics are generated by using the customization of commercial software AutoCAD. A one-dimensional diffusion calculation is carried out in the axial direction by employing the NEM method. The 2D and ID solutions are coupled through the transverse leakage items. The 3D CMFD method is used to ensure the global neutron balance and adjust the different convergence properties of the radial and axial solvers. A computational code is developed based on these theories. Two benchmarks are calculated to verify the coupling method and the code. It is observed that the corresponding numerical results agree well with references, which indicates that the new method is capable of solving the 3D heterogeneous neutron transport problem directly. (authors)

  13. Development of a Position Sensitive Neutron Detector with High Efficiency and Energy Resolution for Use at High-Flux Beam Sources.

    PubMed

    Markoff, Diane M; Cianciolo, Vince; Britton, Chuck L; Cooper, Ronald G; Greene, Geoff L

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a high-efficiency neutron detector with 1 cm position resolution and coarse energy resolution for use at high-flux neutron source facilities currently proposed or under construction. The detector concept integrates a segmented (3)He ionization chamber with the position sensitive, charged particle collection methods of a MicroMegas detector. Neutron absorption on the helium produces protons and tritons that ionize the fill gas. The charge is amplified in the field region around a wire mesh and subsequently detected in current mode by wire strips mounted on a substrate. One module consisting of a high-voltage plate, a field-shaping high-voltage plate, a grid and wire strips defines a detection region. For 100 % efficiency, detector modules are consecutively placed along the beam axis. Analysis over several regions with alternating wire strip orientation provides a two-dimensional beam profile. By using (3)He, a 1/v absorption gas, each axial region captures neutrons of a different energy range, providing an energy-sensitive detection scheme especially useful at continuous beam sources. PMID:27308166

  14. Development of a Position Sensitive Neutron Detector with High Efficiency and Energy Resolution for Use at High-Flux Beam Sources

    PubMed Central

    Markoff, Diane M.; Cianciolo, Vince; Britton, Chuck L.; Cooper, Ronald G.; Greene, Geoff L.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a high-efficiency neutron detector with 1 cm position resolution and coarse energy resolution for use at high-flux neutron source facilities currently proposed or under construction. The detector concept integrates a segmented 3He ionization chamber with the position sensitive, charged particle collection methods of a MicroMegas detector. Neutron absorption on the helium produces protons and tritons that ionize the fill gas. The charge is amplified in the field region around a wire mesh and subsequently detected in current mode by wire strips mounted on a substrate. One module consisting of a high-voltage plate, a field-shaping high-voltage plate, a grid and wire strips defines a detection region. For 100 % efficiency, detector modules are consecutively placed along the beam axis. Analysis over several regions with alternating wire strip orientation provides a two-dimensional beam profile. By using 3He, a 1/v absorption gas, each axial region captures neutrons of a different energy range, providing an energy-sensitive detection scheme especially useful at continuous beam sources. PMID:27308166

  15. Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Transport Calculations Involving Incident Neutrons and Protons of Energy Up to 100 MeV.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-08-09

    Version 00 This data base was developed for use in Monte Carlo or discrete ordinate transport codes, for example, the general Monte Carlo code MCNP. Various modules of the NJOY processing code system have been enhanced to permit processing of the ENDF/B-VI formatted evaluations into both continuous-energy and multi-group format. The transport data files for all 18 projectile-plus-target systems have been processed through NJOY, and coupled multi-particle, multi-group transport libraries for MCNP now exist. Inmore » addition, pointwise MCNP libraries to 100 MeV for incident neutrons have been prepared for the nine targets. The production version of the MCNP code is being modified to handle the new pointwise libraries. The production version of MCNP already supports the use of coupled multi-group libraries.« less

  16. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on the incommensurate magnetic phase transition in holmium at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Uhoya, Walter; Tsoi, Georgiy; Wenger, Lowell E; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2012-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been made on the heavy rare earth metal holmium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a paramagnetic (PM) to a helical antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in the resistance slope as the temperature is lowered through the antiferromagnetic Neel temperature. The temperature of this antiferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 122 K at ambient pressure at a rate of -4.9 K GPa(-1) up to a pressure of 9 GPa, whereupon the PM-to-AFM transition vanishes for higher pressures. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at 89 and 110 K confirm the incommensurate nature of the phase transition associated with the antiferromagnetic ordering of the magnetic moments in a helical arrangement and that the ordering occurs at similar pressures as determined from the resistance results for these temperatures.

  17. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  18. Development and Implementation of Photonuclear Cross-Section Data for Mutually Coupled Neutron-Photon Transport Calculations in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Radiation Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan C. White

    2000-07-01

    The fundamental motivation for the research presented in this dissertation was the need to development a more accurate prediction method for characterization of mixed radiation fields around medical electron accelerators (MEAs). Specifically, a model is developed for simulation of neutron and other particle production from photonuclear reactions and incorporated in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. This extension of the capability within the MCNP code provides for the more accurate assessment of the mixed radiation fields. The Nuclear Theory and Applications group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory has recently provided first-of-a-kind evaluated photonuclear data for a select group of isotopes. These data provide the reaction probabilities as functions of incident photon energy with angular and energy distribution information for all reaction products. The availability of these data is the cornerstone of the new methodology for state-of-the-art mutually coupled photon-neutron transport simulations. The dissertation includes details of the model development and implementation necessary to use the new photonuclear data within MCNP simulations. A new data format has been developed to include tabular photonuclear data. Data are processed from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Format (ENDF) to the new class ''u'' A Compact ENDF (ACE) format using a standalone processing code. MCNP modifications have been completed to enable Monte Carlo sampling of photonuclear reactions. Note that both neutron and gamma production are included in the present model. The new capability has been subjected to extensive verification and validation (V&V) testing. Verification testing has established the expected basic functionality. Two validation projects were undertaken. First, comparisons were made to benchmark data from literature. These calculations demonstrate the accuracy of the new data and transport routines to better than 25 percent. Second, the ability to

  19. An analytical discrete ordinates solution for a nodal model of a two-dimensional neutron transport problem

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, J. F. P.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, an analytical discrete ordinates method is used to solve a nodal formulation of a neutron transport problem in x, y-geometry. The proposed approach leads to an important reduction in the order of the associated eigenvalue systems, when combined with the classical level symmetric quadrature scheme. Auxiliary equations are proposed, as usually required for nodal methods, to express the unknown fluxes at the boundary introduced as additional unknowns in the integrated equations. Numerical results, for the problem defined by a two-dimensional region with a spatially constant and isotropically emitting source, are presented and compared with those available in the literature. (authors)

  20. Asymptotic solutions of neutron transport equation and the limits of correct use of diffusion approximation for rocks.

    PubMed

    Dworak, D; Loskiewicz, J; Janik, M

    2001-05-01

    The diffusion approximation solution for neutron transport has been used in well-logging geophysics for calculating tool responses in boreholes, sometimes with success. The problem of the dimension of different materials to which it can be applied with success is important for the borehole environment. The results obtained show that the diffusion approximation can be used for distances greater than a few millimetre in some rock types. For iron, barium, and other highly absorbing media the use of the diffusion approximation is inappropriate even for large distances. PMID:11258535

  1. A New High Energy Resolution Neutron Transmission Detector at the Gaerttner LINAC Center and Isotopic Molybdenum Total Cross Section Measurements in the keV-Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahran, Rian M.

    The Gaerttner LINAC Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is home to a 60 MeV electron linear accelerator (LINAC) that is used as a pulsed neutron source for TOF nuclear data experiments. High energy resolution total cross section measurements for the stable molybdenum isotopes of Mo-95, Mo-96, Mo-98, and Mo-100 were performed with a newly developed modular neutron transmission detector positioned at a 100 m experimental flight station. This work is part of an effort to both improve existing neutron total cross section libraries and measurement capabilities at the Gaerttner LINAC Center in and above the resolved resonance energy region (from 5-620 keV). The overall design optimization process and qualification of the new high resolution detector is presented. Additionally, a new method to quantify the energy-dependent neutron and gamma-ray experimental background of the detector was developed. High resolution isotopic molybdenum total cross section data are of particular importance because stable Mo isotopes can be found in significant concentrations in a nuclear fuel cycle either as a high yield fission product or in alloyed form with applications in reactor piping, fuel cladding, and as an advanced nuclear fuel in the form of U-Mo. The measured total cross section energy range encompasses the resolved resonance region and extends into the unresolved resonance region for each molybdenum isotope. New high accuracy resonance parameters for Mo-95 were generated from fitting experimental data using the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY in the resolved resonance region. In the unresolved resonance region, average resonance parameters and fits to the total cross section were obtained using the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model code FITACS which is embedded in SAMMY.

  2. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2.

    PubMed

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB(0,+) became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20-25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB(0,+), LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB(0,+), respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB(0,+), as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose. PMID:25580517

  3. Transport analysis of measured neutron leakage spectra from spheres as tests of evaluated high energy cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, D. D.; Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.

    1973-01-01

    Integral tests of evaluated ENDF/B high-energy cross sections have been made by comparing measured and calculated neutron leakage flux spectra from spheres of various materials. An Am-Be (alpha,n) source was used to provide fast neutrons at the center of the test spheres of Be, CH2, Pb, Nb, Mo, Ta, and W. The absolute leakage flux spectra were measured in the energy range 0.5 to 12 MeV using a calibrated NE213 liquid scintillator neutron spectrometer. Absolute calculations of the spectra were made using version 3 ENDF/B cross sections and an S sub n discrete ordinates multigroup transport code. Generally excellent agreement was obtained for Be, CH2, Pb, and Mo, and good agreement was observed for Nb although discrepancies were observed for some energy ranges. Poor comparative results, obtained for Ta and W, are attributed to unsatisfactory nonelastic cross sections. The experimental sphere leakage flux spectra are tabulated and serve as possible benchmarks for these elements against which reevaluated cross sections may be tested.

  4. General Purpose Monte Carlo Multigroup Neutron and Gamma-Ray Transport Code System. We recommend C00474/ALLCP/02 MORSE-CGA.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-08-01

    Version: 00 The original MORSE code was a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It was designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems could be obtained in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry could be used with an albedo option available atmore » any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution was allowed. MORSE-CG incorporated the Mathematical Applications, Inc. (MAGI) combinatorial geometry routines. MORSE-B modifies the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport computer code MORSE-CG by adding routines which allow various flexible options.« less

  5. Inter-pulse high-resolution gamma-ray spectra using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, L.G.; Trombka, J.I.; Jensen, D.H.; Stephenson, W.A.; Hoover, R.A.; Mikesell, J.L.; Tanner, A.B.; Senftle, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron generator pulsed at 100 s-1 was suspended in an artificial borehole containing a 7.7 metric ton mixture of sand, aragonite, magnetite, sulfur, and salt. Two Ge(HP) gamma-ray detectors were used: one in a borehole sonde, and one at the outside wall of the sample tank opposite the neutron generator target. Gamma-ray spectra were collected by the outside detector during each of 10 discrete time windows during the 10 ms period following the onset of gamma-ray build-up after each neutron burst. The sample was measured first when dry and then when saturated with water. In the dry sample, gamma rays due to inelastic neutron scattering, neutron capture, and decay were counted during the first (150 ??s) time window. Subsequently only capture and decay gamma rays were observed. In the wet sample, only neutron capture and decay gamma rays were observed. Neutron capture gamma rays dominated the spectrum during the period from 150 to 400 ??s after the neutron burst in both samples, but decreased with time much more rapidly in the wet sample. A signal-to-noise-ratio (S/N) analysis indicates that optimum conditions for neutron capture analysis occurred in the 350-800 ??s window. A poor S/N in the first 100-150 ??s is due to a large background continuum during the first time interval. Time gating can be used to enhance gamma-ray spectra, depending on the nuclides in the target material and the reactions needed to produce them, and should improve the sensitivity of in situ well logging. ?? 1984.

  6. The effect of biological shielding on fast neutron and photon transport in the VVER-1000 mock-up model placed in the LR-0 reactor.

    PubMed

    Košťál, Michal; Cvachovec, František; Milčák, Ján; Mravec, Filip

    2013-05-01

    The paper is intended to show the effect of a biological shielding simulator on fast neutron and photon transport in its vicinity. The fast neutron and photon fluxes were measured by means of scintillation spectroscopy using a 45×45 mm(2) and a 10×10 mm(2) cylindrical stilbene detector. The neutron spectrum was measured in the range of 0.6-10 MeV and the photon spectrum in 0.2-9 MeV. The results of the experiment are compared with calculations. The calculations were performed with various nuclear data libraries. PMID:23434890

  7. 3-D Deep Penetration Neutron Imaging of Thick Absorgin and Diffusive Objects Using Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ragusa, Jean; Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    here explores the inverse problem of optical tomography applied to heterogeneous domains. The neutral particle transport equation was used as the forward model for how neutral particles stream through and interact within these heterogeneous domains. A constrained optimization technique that uses Newtons method served as the basis of the inverse problem. Optical tomography aims at reconstructing the material properties using (a) illuminating sources and (b) detector readings. However, accurate simulations for radiation transport require that the particle (gamma and/or neutron) energy be appropriate discretize in the multigroup approximation. This, in turns, yields optical tomography problems where the number of unknowns grows (1) about quadratically with respect to the number of energy groups, G, (notably to reconstruct the scattering matrix) and (2) linearly with respect to the number of unknown material regions. As pointed out, a promising approach could rely on algorithms to appropriately select a material type per material zone rather than G2 values. This approach, though promising, still requires further investigation: (a) when switching from cross-section values unknowns to material type indices (discrete integer unknowns), integer programming techniques are needed since derivative information is no longer available; and (b) the issue of selecting the initial material zoning remains. The work reported here proposes an approach to solve the latter item, whereby a material zoning is proposed using one-group or few-groups transport approximations. The capabilities and limitations of the presented method were explored; they are briefly summarized next and later described in fuller details in the Appendices. The major factors that influenced the ability of the optimization method to reconstruct the cross sections of these domains included the locations of the sources used to illuminate the domains, the number of separate experiments used in the reconstruction, the

  8. Evaluation of Subgrid-Scale Transport of Hydrometeors in a PDF-based Scheme using High-Resolution CRM Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M.; Ovchinnikov, M.; Wang, M.; Larson, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    In current climate models, the model resolution is too coarse to explicitly resolve deep convective systems. Parameterization schemes are therefore needed to represent the physical processes at the sub-grid scale. Recently, an approach based on assumed probability density functions (PDFs) has been developed to help unify the various parameterization schemes used in current global models. In particular, a unified parameterization scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB) scheme has been developed and tested successfully for shallow boundary-layer clouds. CLUBB's implementation in the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5) is also being extended to treat deep convection cases, but parameterizing subgrid-scale vertical transport of hydrometeors remains a challenge. To investigate the roots of the problem and possible solutions, we generate a high-resolution benchmark simulation of a deep convection case using a cloud-resolving model (CRM) called System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM). We use the high-resolution 3D CRM results to assess the prognostic and diagnostic higher-order moments in CLUBB that are in relation to the subgrid-scale transport of hydrometeors. We also analyze the heat and moisture budgets in terms of CLUBB variables from the SAM benchmark simulation. The results from this study will be used to devise a better representation of vertical subgrid-scale transport of hydrometeors by utilizing the sub-grid variability information from CLUBB.

  9. The Development of WARP - A Framework for Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Neutron Transport in General 3D Geometries on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ryan

    Graphics processing units, or GPUs, have gradually increased in computational power from the small, job-specific boards of the early 1990s to the programmable powerhouses of today. Compared to more common central processing units, or CPUs, GPUs have a higher aggregate memory bandwidth, much higher floating-point operations per second (FLOPS), and lower energy consumption per FLOP. Because one of the main obstacles in exascale computing is power consumption, many new supercomputing platforms are gaining much of their computational capacity by incorporating GPUs into their compute nodes. Since CPU-optimized parallel algorithms are not directly portable to GPU architectures (or at least not without losing substantial performance), transport codes need to be rewritten to execute efficiently on GPUs. Unless this is done, reactor simulations cannot take full advantage of these new supercomputers. WARP, which can stand for ``Weaving All the Random Particles,'' is a three-dimensional (3D) continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport code developed in this work as to efficiently implement a continuous energy Monte Carlo neutron transport algorithm on a GPU. WARP accelerates Monte Carlo simulations while preserving the benefits of using the Monte Carlo Method, namely, very few physical and geometrical simplifications. WARP is able to calculate multiplication factors, flux tallies, and fission source distributions for time-independent problems, and can run in both criticality or fixed source modes. WARP can transport neutrons in unrestricted arrangements of parallelepipeds, hexagonal prisms, cylinders, and spheres. WARP uses an event-based algorithm, but with some important differences. Moving data is expensive, so WARP uses a remapping vector of pointer/index pairs to direct GPU threads to the data they need to access. The remapping vector is sorted by reaction type after every transport iteration using a high-efficiency parallel radix sort, which serves to keep the

  10. High-resolution Monte Carlo simulation of flow and conservative transport in heterogeneous porous media 2. Transport results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Haley, D.F.; Sudicky, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this, the second of two papers concerned with the use of numerical simulation to examine flow and transport parameters in heterogeneous porous media via Monte Carlo methods, results from the transport aspect of these simulations are reported on. Transport simulations contained herein assume a finite pulse input of conservative tracer, and the numerical technique endeavors to realistically simulate tracer spreading as the cloud moves through a heterogeneous medium. Medium heterogeneity is limited to the hydraulic conductivity field, and generation of this field assumes that the hydraulic- conductivity process is second-order stationary. Methods of estimating cloud moments, and the interpretation of these moments, are discussed. Techniques for estimation of large-time macrodispersivities from cloud second-moment data, and for the approximation of the standard errors associated with these macrodispersivities, are also presented. These moment and macrodispersivity estimation techniques were applied to tracer clouds resulting from transport scenarios generated by specific Monte Carlo simulations. Where feasible, moments and macrodispersivities resulting from the Monte Carlo simulations are compared with first- and second-order perturbation analyses. Some limited results concerning the possible ergodic nature of these simulations, and the presence of non- Gaussian behavior of the mean cloud, are reported on as well.

  11. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Hagos, Samson M.; Wu, Chien-Ming; Wan, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the behavior of quasi-equilibrium-based convection parameterizations at higher resolution, we use a diagnostic framework to examine the resolution-dependence of subgrid-scale vertical transport of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM). Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations onto subdomains ranging in size from 8 × 8 to 256 × 256 km2. Then the ZM-based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the subdomain size (w'h'>¯ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w'h'>¯CRM) for different subdomain sizes. The ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases by more than half as the subdomain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w'h'>¯ZM decreases with subdomain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM is determined by the positive-definite grid-scale tendency of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the actual grid-scale tendency of CAPE (before taking the positive definite value) and w'h'>¯CRM behave very similarly as the subdomain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We can improve the resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM significantly by averaging the grid-scale tendency of CAPE over an appropriately large area surrounding each subdomain before taking its positive definite value. Even though the ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases with increasing resolution, its variability increases dramatically. w'h'>¯ZM cannot capture such increase in the variability, suggesting the need for stochastic treatment of convection at relatively high spatial resolution (8 or 16 km).

  12. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Gustafson, W. I., Jr.; Hagos, S.; Wu, C. M.; Wan, H.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the resolution-dependence of subgrid-scale vertical transport of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM) under a diagnostic framework. Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations onto sub-domains ranging in size from 8x8 to 256x256 km^2. Then the ZM based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the sub-domain size (w'h'ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w'h'CRM) for different sub-domain sizes. We find that the overall strength of w'h'CRM decreases by more than half as the sub-domain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w'h'ZM decreases with sub-domain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w'h'ZM is determined by the positive-definite change rate of grid-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE) used in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the change rate of actual grid-scale CAPE itself (before taking the positive definite value) and w'h'CRM behave very similarly as the sub-domain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We suggest a simple algorithm to improve the resolution awareness of ZM based on our analysis. The overall strength of w'h'CRM decreases with increasing resolution while its variability increases dramatically. We find that ZM can capture neither the magnitude nor the pattern of this variability at relatively high resolutions (8 or 16 km grid spacing), suggesting the urgent need for stochastic treatment of convection at high resolutions.

  13. MICADO: Parallel implementation of a 2D-1D iterative algorithm for the 3D neutron transport problem in prismatic geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Fevotte, F.; Lathuiliere, B.

    2013-07-01

    The large increase in computing power over the past few years now makes it possible to consider developing 3D full-core heterogeneous deterministic neutron transport solvers for reference calculations. Among all approaches presented in the literature, the method first introduced in [1] seems very promising. It consists in iterating over resolutions of 2D and ID MOC problems by taking advantage of prismatic geometries without introducing approximations of a low order operator such as diffusion. However, before developing a solver with all industrial options at EDF, several points needed to be clarified. In this work, we first prove the convergence of this iterative process, under some assumptions. We then present our high-performance, parallel implementation of this algorithm in the MICADO solver. Benchmarking the solver against the Takeda case shows that the 2D-1D coupling algorithm does not seem to affect the spatial convergence order of the MOC solver. As for performance issues, our study shows that even though the data distribution is suited to the 2D solver part, the efficiency of the ID part is sufficient to ensure a good parallel efficiency of the global algorithm. After this study, the main remaining difficulty implementation-wise is about the memory requirement of a vector used for initialization. An efficient acceleration operator will also need to be developed. (authors)

  14. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    The theory used in FASTER-III, a Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries, is outlined. The program includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quadric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. It can also calculate minimum weight shield configuration meeting a specified dose rate constraint. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron, and primary and secondary photon, transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration.

  15. Innovative and Advanced Coupled Neutron Transport and Thermal Hydraulic Method (Tool) for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of VHTR/NGNP Prismatic Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rahnema, Farzad; Garimeela, Srinivas; Ougouag, Abderrafi; Zhang, Dingkang

    2013-11-29

    This project will develop a 3D, advanced coarse mesh transport method (COMET-Hex) for steady- state and transient analyses in advanced very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). The project will lead to a coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulic (T/H) core simulation tool with fuel depletion capability. The computational tool will be developed in hexagonal geometry, based solely on transport theory without (spatial) homogenization in complicated 3D geometries. In addition to the hexagonal geometry extension, collaborators will concurrently develop three additional capabilities to increase the code’s versatility as an advanced and robust core simulator for VHTRs. First, the project team will develop and implement a depletion method within the core simulator. Second, the team will develop an elementary (proof-of-concept) 1D time-dependent transport method for efficient transient analyses. The third capability will be a thermal hydraulic method coupled to the neutronics transport module for VHTRs. Current advancements in reactor core design are pushing VHTRs toward greater core and fuel heterogeneity to pursue higher burn-ups, efficiently transmute used fuel, maximize energy production, and improve plant economics and safety. As a result, an accurate and efficient neutron transport, with capabilities to treat heterogeneous burnable poison effects, is highly desirable for predicting VHTR neutronics performance. This research project’s primary objective is to advance the state of the art for reactor analysis.

  16. Evaluation of Subgrid-scale Hydrometeor Transport Schemes using a High-resolution Cloud-resolving Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, May Wai San; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Wang, Minghuai

    2015-09-14

    Potential ways of parameterizing vertical turbulent fluxes of hydrometeors are examined using a high-resolution cloud-resolving model. The cloud-resolving model uses the Morrison microphysics scheme, which contains prognostic variables for rain, graupel, ice, and snow. A benchmark simulation with a horizontal grid spacing of 250 m of a deep convection case carried out to evaluate three different ways of parameterizing the turbulent vertical fluxes of hydrometeors: an eddy-diffusion approximation, a quadrant-based decomposition, and a scaling method that accounts for within-quadrant (subplume) correlations. Results show that the down-gradient nature of the eddy-diffusion approximation tends to transport mass away from concentrated regions, whereas the benchmark simulation indicates that the vertical transport tends to transport mass from below the level of maximum to aloft. Unlike the eddy-diffusion approach, the quadri-modal decomposition is able to capture the signs of the flux gradient but underestimates the magnitudes. The scaling approach is shown to perform the best by accounting for within-quadrant correlations, and improves the results for all hydrometeors except for snow. A sensitivity study is performed to examine how vertical transport may affect the microphysics of the hydrometeors. The vertical transport of each hydrometeor type is artificially suppressed in each test. Results from the sensitivity tests show that cloud-droplet-related processes are most sensitive to suppressed rain or graupel transport. In particular, suppressing rain or graupel transport has a strong impact on the production of snow and ice aloft. Lastly, a viable subgrid-scale hydrometeor transport scheme in an assumed probability density function parameterization is discussed.

  17. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  18. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1985-06-19

    A neutron detector of very high temporal resolution is described. It may be used to measure distributions of neutrons produced by fusion reactions that persist for times as short as about 50 picoseconds.

  19. Using 2H labeling with neutron radiography for the study of solid polymer electrolyte water transport properties.

    PubMed

    Boillat, P; Oberholzer, P; Seyfang, B C; Kästner, A; Perego, R; Scherer, G G; Lehmann, E H; Wokaun, A

    2011-06-15

    A method combining (2)H labeling of different sources of H atoms (hydrogen, water vapor) with neutron imaging for the analysis of transport parameters in the bulk and at the interfaces of Nafion polymer electrolyte membranes is proposed. The use of different isotope compositions in the steady state allows evaluation of the relation between bulk and interface transport parameters, but relies on literature data for evaluating absolute values. By using transients of isotope composition, absolute values of these parameters including the self-diffusion coefficient of H can be extracted, making this method an attractive alternative to self-diffusion measurements using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), allowing measurements in precisely controlled conditions in real fuel cell structures. First measurements were realized on samples with and without electrodes and we report values of the self-diffusion coefficient of the same order of magnitude as values measured using NMR, although with slightly higher numbers. In our particular case, lower interfacial exchange rates for water transport were observed for samples with an electrode. PMID:21613688

  20. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  1. Bedload transport rates in a gravel bedded-river derived from high-resolution monitoring using seismic impact plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Peter; Soar, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Accurate characterisation of bedload transport rates is critical for a better understanding of geomorphological process dynamics, aquatic habitats, sediment budgets and strategies for catchment-scale initiatives in sediment management under conditions of climate change. However, rate estimation is challenging in practice: direct measurements are costly and logistically difficult to achieve with acceptable accuracy over geomorphologically-relevant time periods, and the uncertainty in transport rates predicted from empirical formulae and numerical simulation is rarely below 50 per cent. Partly reflecting these issues, passive technologies for continuous bedload monitoring are becoming increasingly popular. Sensors such as seismic impact plates offer the opportunity to characterise bedload activity at exceptionally high resolution - monitoring from the River Avon, (Devon, UK) indicated that despite significant intra-event and between-plate differences in apparent bedload transport aggregated over 5-minute periods, the magnitude-frequency product of discharge and impact frequency result in a highly plausible effective discharge, supporting the potential value of impact plates as indicators of relative sediment transport loads over annual timescales. Whereas the focus in bedload rate estimation to date has been on developing satisfactory sediment rating curves from detection signals, we instead develop a method for directly estimating bedload transport rates from impact plate data as a function of intensity of transport (count, n, per second), bed material mass (kg) and cross-stream transport variability. Bulk sediment samples are converted to a mass in transit for each instantaneous discharge according to the intensity of transport and a Monte Carlo simulation of the load in transit determined at random from the bed material particle size distribution. The lower detection threshold is determined using experimental calibration and the upper size limit is determined from

  2. Global ocean circulation and equator-pole heat transport as a function of ocean GCM resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C.

    1994-06-01

    To determine whether resolution of smaller scales is necessary to simulate large-scale ocean climate correctly, I examine results from a global ocean GCM run with horizontal grid spacings spanning a range from coarse resolutions traditionally used in climate modeling to nearly the highest resolution attained with today`s computers. The experiments include four cases employing 4{degrees}, 2{degrees}, 1{degrees} and 1/2{degrees} spacing in latitude and longitude, which were run with minimal differences among them, i.e., in a controlled experiment. Two additional cases-1/2{degrees} spacing with a more scale-selective sub-gridscale mixing of heat and momentum, and approximate 1/4{degrees} spacing-are also included. The 1/4{degrees} run resolves most of the observed mesoscale eddy energy in the ocean. Several artificial constraints on the model tend to minimize differences among the different resolution cases. Nevertheless, for quantities of interest to global climate studies,the simulations show significant changes as resolution increases.

  3. Determination of neutron flux distribution by using ANISN, a one-dimensional discrete S sub n ordinates transport code with anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghorai, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a one-dimensional discrete coordinates transport code called ANISN in order to determine the energy-angle-spatial distribution of neutrons in a 6-feet cube rock box which houses a D-T neutron generator at its center. The project was two-fold. The first phase of the project involved adaptation of the ANISN code written for an IBM 360/75/91 computer to the UNIVAC system at JSC. The second phase of the project was to use the code with proper geometry, source function and rock material composition in order to determine the neutron flux distribution around the rock box when a 14.1 MeV neutron generator placed at its center is activated.

  4. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košťál, Michal; Milčák, Ján; Cvachovec, František; Jánský, Bohumil; Rypar, Vojtěch; Juříček, Vlastimil; Novák, Evžen; Egorov, Alexander; Zaritskiy, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1-10 MeV) and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1). Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  5. Determination of neutron flux distribution by using ANISN, a one-dimensional discrete S sub n ordinates transport code with anisotropic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorai, S. K.

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a one-dimensional discrete coordinates transport code called ANISN in order to determine the energy-angle-spatial distribution of neutrons in a 6-feet cube rock box which houses a D-T neutron generator at its center. The project was two-fold. The first phase of the project involved adaptation of the ANISN code written for an IBM 360/75/91 computer to the UNIVAC system at JSC. The second phase of the project was to use the code with proper geometry, source function and rock material composition in order to determine the neutron flux distribution around the rock box when a 14.1 MeV neutron generator placed at its center is activated.

  6. General Purpose Monte Carlo Codes for Neutron and Photon Transport Calculations based on Continuous Energy and Multigroup Methods.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-02-29

    Version 00 (1) Problems to be solved: MVP/GMVP II can solve eigenvalue and fixed-source problems. The multigroup code GMVP can solve forward and adjoint problems for neutron, photon and neutron-photon coupled transport. The continuous-energy code MVP can solve only the forward problems. Both codes can also perform time-dependent calculations. (2) Geometry description: MVP/GMVP employs combinatorial geometry to describe the calculation geometry. It describes spatial regions by the combination of the 3-dimensional objects (BODIes). Currently, themore » following objects (BODIes) can be used. - BODIes with linear surfaces : half space, parallelepiped, right parallelepiped, wedge, right hexagonal prism - BODIes with quadratic surface and linear surfaces : cylinder, sphere, truncated right cone, truncated elliptic cone, ellipsoid by rotation, general ellipsoid - Arbitrary quadratic surface and torus The rectangular and hexagonal lattice geometry can be used to describe the repeated geometry. Furthermore, the statistical geometry model is available to treat coated fuel particles or pebbles for high temperature reactors. (3) Particle sources: The various forms of energy-, angle-, space- and time-dependent distribution functions can be specified. See Abstract for more detail.« less

  7. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Chesnut, Gary Neal; Weir, S. T.; Tulk, Christopher A; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2013-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare-earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic (FM) order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the FM Curie temperature. The temperature of this FM transition decreases at a rate of-16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of FM order is suppressed. The neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the FM ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. A disappearance of FM ordering was observed as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa and is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed structure to an -Sm-type structure at high pressures.

  8. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function of pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.

  9. Application of 3-dimensional radiation transport codes to the analysis of the CRBR prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chatani, K. )

    1992-08-01

    This report summarizes the calculational results from analyses of a Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) prototypic coolant pipe chaseway neutron streaming experiment Comparisons of calculated and measured results are presented, major emphasis being placed on results at bends in the chaseway. Calculations were performed with three three-dimensional radiation transport codes: the discrete ordinates code TORT and the Monte Carlo code MORSE, both developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the discrete ordinates code ENSEMBLE, developed by Japan. The calculated results from the three codes are compared (1) with previously-calculated DOT3.5 two-dimensional results, (2) among themselves, and (3) with measured results. Calculations with TORT used both the weighted-difference and nodal methods. Only the weighted-difference method was used in ENSEMBLE. When the calculated results were compared to measured results, it was found that calculation-to-experiment (C/E) ratios were good in the regions of the chaseway where two-dimensional modeling might be difficult and where there were no significant discrete ordinates ray effects. Excellent agreement was observed for responses dominated by thermal neutron contributions. MORSE-calculated results and comparisons are described also, and detailed results are presented in an appendix.

  10. Neutron diffraction and electrical transport studies on magnetic ordering in terbium at high pressures and low temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Thomas, Sarah A.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Chesnut, Gary N.; Weir, Samuel T.; Tulk, Christopher A.; dos Santos, Antonio M.

    2013-06-11

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate the onset of ferromagnetic order as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of this ferromagnetic transition decreases from approximately 240 K at ambient pressure at a rate of –16.7 K/GPa up to a pressure of 3.6 GPa, at which point the onset of ferromagnetic order is suppressed. Neutron diffraction measurements as a function ofmore » pressure at temperatures ranging from 90 K to 290 K confirm that the change of slope in the resistance is associated with the ferromagnetic ordering, since this occurs at pressures similar to those determined from the resistance results at these temperatures. Furthermore, a change in ferromagnetic ordering as the pressure is increased above 3.6 GPa is correlated with the phase transition from the ambient hexagonal close packed (hcp) structure to an α-Sm type structure at high pressures.« less

  11. Diurnally modulating neutron flux in the Moon's high-latitudes: Evidence for transported hydrogen volatiles and/ or complex regolith compositions in topographic slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, Timothy; Mirofanov, Igor; Boynton, William; Chin, Gordon; Livengood, Timothy; Su, Jiao Jang; Sagdeev, Raold; Parsons, Ann; Evans, Larry; Starr, Richard; Hamara, Dave; Bodnarik, Julia; Williams, Jeane-Pierre; Mazarico, Erwan; Litvak, Maxim; Sanin, Anton; Murray, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    We report evidence that the Moon's diurnally modulating neutron flux is being forced by a latitude dependent mix of 1) transient hydrogen-bearing volatiles near the surface in the upper latitudes and 2) regolith temperature variation in lower latitudes. In this study we investigate diurnally varying neutron flux measurements from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector's Collimated Sensor for Epithermal Neutrons (LEND CSETN) and surface temperature observations from the Diviner radiometer poleward of >±45°. Our presentation shows that the modulating neutron flux is not consistent with a regolith temperature control for latitudes >70°. The anticorrelation may be evidence for transported lunar hydrogen volatiles or highly non-uniform regolith compositional dynamics. Observational evidence is consistent with regolith temperature being the source of the neutron flux modulation in the northern mare (45° to 60°) and may be related to its mafic composition and fast neutron contributions. Predictions for hypothesized regolith temperature effects are evaluated using insolation inferred from the Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography.

  12. TART98 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry time dependent Monte Carlo Transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D E

    1998-11-22

    TART98 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART98 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART98 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART98 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART98 and its data files.

  13. Direct high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance studies of cation transport in vivo. Na/sup +/ transport in yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Balschi, J.A.; Cirillo, V.P.; Springer, C.S. Jr.

    1982-06-01

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for monitoring transmembrane metal cation transport is reported. It is illustrated with a study of Na/sup +/ efflux from Na/sup +/-rich yeast cells. The technique involves the use of an anionic paramagnetic shift reagent, present only outside the cells, to induce a splitting of the sodium-23 NMR peak, in this case, into components representing intra- and extracellular Na/sup +/. The time course of the efflux is in good agreement with the literature and can be well fitted with a double exponential decay expression. Splitting of the lithium-7 NMR signal from a suspension of Li/sup +/-rich respiratory-deficient, petite yeasts is also reported.

  14. Multidimensional supernova simulations with approximative neutrino transport. I. Neutron star kicks and the anisotropy of neutrino-driven explosions in two spatial dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheck, L.; Kifonidis, K.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2006-10-01

    We study hydrodynamic instabilities during the first seconds of core-collapse supernovae by means of 2D simulations with approximative neutrino transport and boundary conditions that parameterize the effects of the contracting neutron star and allow us to obtain sufficiently strong neutrino heating and, hence, neutrino-driven explosions. Confirming more idealised studies, as well as supernova simulations with spectral transport, we find that random seed perturbations can grow by hydrodynamic instabilities to a globally asymmetric mass distribution in the region between the nascent neutron star and the accretion shock, leading to a dominance of dipole (l=1) and quadrupole (l=2) modes in the explosion ejecta, provided the onset of the supernova explosion is sufficiently slower than the growth time scale of the low-mode instability. By gravitational and hydrodynamic forces, the anisotropic mass distribution causes an acceleration of the nascent neutron star, which lasts for several seconds and can propel the neutron star to velocities of more than 1000 km s-1. Because the explosion anisotropies develop chaotically and change by small differences in the fluid flow, the magnitude of the kick varies stochastically. No systematic dependence of the average neutron star velocity on the explosion energy or the properties of the considered progenitors is found. Instead, the anisotropy of the mass ejection, and hence of the kick, seems to increase when the nascent neutron star contracts more quickly, and thus low-mode instabilities can grow more rapidly. Our more than 70 models separate into two groups, one with high and the other with low neutron star velocities and accelerations after one second of post-bounce evolution, depending on whether the l=1 mode is dominant in the ejecta or not. This leads to a bimodality of the distribution when the neutron star velocities are extrapolated to their terminal values. Establishing a link to the measured distribution of pulsar

  15. Analytical Tests for Ray Effect Errors in Discrete Ordinate Methods for Solving the Neutron Transport Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B

    2004-03-22

    This paper contains three analytical solutions of transport problems which can be used to test ray-effect errors in the numerical solutions of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE). We derived the first two solutions and the third was shown to us by M. Prasad. Since this paper is intended to be an internal LLNL report, no attempt was made to find the original derivations of the solutions in the literature in order to cite the authors for their work.

  16. High-resolution monitoring of bedload transport rates: a benchmark of two approaches (accelerometers and image processing)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhont, Blaise; Rousseau, Gauthier; Ancey, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Experimental and field studies have shown how intermittent bedload transport can be at low flow rates. The development and validation of bedload-transport equations require high-resolution records over long periods of time. Two technologies are considered in the present investigation: image processing and accelerometers mounted on impact plates. The former has been successfully applied to monitor bedload transport in many flume experiments, and the latter has shown encouraging results at different field sites. Calibration is a major issue in both cases, and it is often difficult to assess the precision of the data collected. In our talk, we show how to calibrate and compare the performances of accelerometer and image-processing based techniques in laboratory conditions. The accelerometer is fixed on a perforated steel plate, which is placed vertically at the lower end of the flume. The vibrations due to the particles impacting the plate are recorded with a sampling frequency of 10 kHz. The proxy for bedload transport rate is chosen as the number of peaks above a fixed threshold of the recorded signal. Note that impact plates are usually set in flush with the bed, and to our knowledge, the vertical configuration presented here has not yet been documented. The experimental setup for image processing involves a video-camera that takes top-view images of the particles moving over a white board mounted at the outlet of the flume. Data storage poses an issue, which can be got round by pre-processing the images in real time. The bedload transport rate is estimated based on the number of particles that are identified on the images. The two technologies have the advantages of being cost-effective and demanding limited effort for implementation. They provide high-resolution bedload transport rates over several hours. Estimates of bedload discharge were found to be robust and accurate for low sediment transport rates. At higher rates, the sensors may saturate due the arrival

  17. Subdiffraction-Resolution Optical Measurements of Molecular Transport in Thin Polymer Films.

    PubMed

    Pahal, Suman; Raichur, Ashok M; Varma, Manoj M

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of molecular transport within polymer films yields information about the internal structural organization of the films and is useful in applications such as the design of polymeric capsules for drug delivery. Layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayer films has been widely used in such applications where the multilayer structure often exhibits anisotropic transport resulting in different diffusivities in the lateral (parallel to the film) and transverse (normal to the film) directions. Although lateral transport can be probed using techniques such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), it cannot be applied to probing transverse diffusivity in polymer films smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Here we present a technique to probe the transport of molecules tagged with fluorphores in polymer films thinner than the optical diffraction limit using the modulation of fluorescence emission depending on the distance of the tagged molecules from a metal surface. We have used this technique to probe the diffusion of proteins biotin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in polyelectrolyte multilayer films. We also studied the interdiffusion of chains in multilayer films using this technique. We observed a 3 order of magnitude increase in interdiffusion as a function of the ionic strength of the medium. This technique, along with FRAP, will be useful in studying anisotropic transport in polymer films, even those thinner than the diffraction limit, because the signal in this technique arises only from transverse and not lateral transport. Finally, this technique is also applicable to studying the diffusion of chromophore-labeled species within a polymer film. We demonstrate this aspect by measuring the transverse diffusion of methylene blue in the PAH-PAA multilayer system. PMID:27175850

  18. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Hagos, Samson M.; Wu, Chien-Ming; Wan, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the behavior of quasi-equilibrium based convective parameterizations at higher resolution, we use a diagnostic frame- work to examine the resolution-dependence of sub grid-scale vertical trans-port of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM). Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations onto sub-domains ranging in size from 8 _ 8 to 256 _ 256 km2. Then the ZM based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the sub-domain size (w0h0 ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w0h0CRM) for different sub-domain sizes. The overall strength of w0h0CRM decreases by more than half as the sub-domain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w0h0 ZM decreases with sub-domain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w0h0 ZM is determined by the positive-denite change rate of grid-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the change rate of actual grid-scale CAPE (before taking the positive definite value) and w0h0CRM behave very similarly as the sub-domain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We can improve the resolution dependence of w0h0ZM significantly by averaging the grid-scale change rate of CAPE over an appropriately large area surrounding each sub-domain before taking its positive definite value. Even though the overall strength of w0h0CRM decreases with increasing resolution, its variability increases dramatically. w0h0ZM can capture neither the magnitude nor the pattern of this variability at relatively high resolutions (8 or 16 km grid spacing), suggesting the need for stochastic treatment of convection at these scales.

  19. Experiment LEND of the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter for high-resolution mapping of neutron emission of the Moon.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, I G; Sanin, A B; Golovin, D V; Litvak, M L; Konovalov, A A; Kozyrev, A S; Malakhov, A V; Mokrousov, M I; Tretyakov, V I; Troshin, V S; Uvarov, V N; Varenikov, A B; Vostrukhin, A A; Shevchenko, V V; Shvetsov, V N; Krylov, A R; Timoshenko, G N; Bobrovnitsky, Y I; Tomilina, T M; Grebennikov, A S; Kazakov, L L; Sagdeev, R Z; Milikh, G N; Bartels, A; Chin, G; Floyd, S; Garvin, J; Keller, J; McClanahan, T; Trombka, J; Boynton, W; Harshman, K; Starr, R; Evans, L

    2008-08-01

    The scientific objectives of neutron mapping of the Moon are presented as 3 investigation tasks of NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. Two tasks focus on mapping hydrogen content over the entire Moon and on testing the presence of water-ice deposits at the bottom of permanently shadowed craters at the lunar poles. The third task corresponds to the determination of neutron contribution to the total radiation dose at an altitude of 50 km above the Moon. We show that the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) will be capable of carrying out all 3 investigations. The design concept of LEND is presented together with results of numerical simulations of the instrument's sensitivity for hydrogen detection. The sensitivity of LEND is shown to be characterized by a hydrogen detection limit of about 100 ppm for a polar reference area with a radius of 5 km. If the presence of ice deposits in polar "cold traps" is confirmed, a unique record of many millions of years of lunar history would be obtained, by which the history of lunar impacts could be discerned from the layers of water ice and dust. Future applications of a LEND-type instrument for Mars orbital observations are also discussed. PMID:18844457

  20. Structure of ribonuclease A: results of joint neutron and X-ray refinement at 2.0-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Wlodawer, A; Sjölin, L

    1983-05-24

    The structure of ribonuclease A has been refined jointly with the neutron and X-ray data extending to 2.0 A. The results of an earlier X-ray refinement provided the starting model [Wlodawer, A., Bott, R., & Sjölin, L. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 1325-1332]. The final R factors were 0.159 (X-ray) and 0.183 (neutron) for a model containing all of the atoms expected in the protein, 128 waters, and a phosphate molecule in the active site. The joint refinement necessitated modifications in the orientation of a number of side chains, including the catalytically active lysine-41, which is now thought to form a salt link to the phosphate. Major modifications of the previous model of the bound solvent were necessary. The refinement of all atom occupancies with the neutron data only provided the information about the amide hydrogen exchange. A fourth of all amide hydrogens were found to be at least partially protected from exchange after a year of exchange with D2O. PMID:6871157

  1. Quantitative imaging of water transport in soil and roots using neutron radiography, D2O and a new numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, M.; Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of soil and plant water relations is currently limited by the lack of experimental methods to measure the water fluxes in soil and plants. Our study aimed to develop a new non-destructive method to measure the local fluxes of water into roots of plants growing in soils. We injected deuterated water (D2O) near the roots of lupines growing in sandy soils, and we used neutron radiography to image the transport of D2O through the root system. The experiments were performed during day, when plants were transpiring, and at night, when transpiration was reduced. The radiographs showed that: 1) the radial transport of D2O from soil and roots depended similarly to diffusion and convection; and 2) the axial transport of D2O along the root xylem was largely dominated by convection. To determine the convective fluxes from the radiographs, we simulated the D2O transport in soils and roots. A dual porosity model was used to describe the apoplastic and symplastic pathways of water across the root tissue. Other features such as the endodermis and the xylem were also included in the model. The D2O transport was modelled solving a convection-diffusion numerical model in soil and plants. The diffusion coefficients of the root tissues were inversely estimated by simulating the experiments at night under the assumption that at night the convective fluxes were negligible. Inverse modelling of the experiment at day gave the profile of water fluxes into the roots. For 24 day-old lupine grown in a sandy soil with uniform water content, our modelling results showed that root water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the roots near soil surface and it decreased toward the distal parts. The method allows the quantification of the root properties and the regions of root water uptake along root systems growing in soils. Future applications of this method include the characterization of varying root systems, the radial and axial hydraulic conductivity of different root

  2. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  3. Design of a high-current low-energy beam transport line for an intense D-T/D-D neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaolong; Wang, Junrun; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jianyi; Xia, Li; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yanyan; Jiang, Bing; Huang, Zhiwu; Ma, Zhanwen; Wei, Zheng; Qian, Xiangping; Xu, Dapeng; Lan, Changlin; Yao, Zeen

    2016-03-01

    An intense D-T/D-D neutron generator is currently being developed at the Lanzhou University. The Cockcroft-Walton accelerator, as a part of the neutron generator, will be used to accelerate and transport the high-current low-energy beam from the duoplasmatron ion source to the rotating target. The design of a high-current low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line and the dynamics simulations of the mixed beam were carried out using the TRACK code. The results illustrate that the designed beam line facilitates smooth transportation of a deuteron beam of 40 mA, and the number of undesired ions can be reduced effectively using two apertures.

  4. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, J.I.

    1997-09-01

    This investigation used sysmbolic manipulation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and mixed-mode energy transport. Contained in this report are seven papers which present the technical results as individual modules.

  5. Scalar Transport and Dispersion in Complex Terrain within a High Resolution Mass-Consistent Wind Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Edburg, S. L.; Lamb, B.; Forthofer, J.

    2012-12-01

    In areas of complex terrain, fine-scale changes in topography or vegetation substantially alter the flow field, and in turn, the transport and dispersion of air pollutants, pheromones, or other scalars. Thus, accurate modeling of scalar transport in complex topography requires accurate prediction of the flow field at a high spatial resolution. Mesoscale weather models typically operate on horizontal grids of 4 km or larger and are not capable of handling the effects of sub-grid complex terrain, such as wind speed-up over ridges, flow channeling in valleys, flow separation around terrain obstacles, and enhanced surface roughness from vegetation. In this paper we describe a scalar transport algorithm (advection and turbulent diffusion) used with WindNinja, a high-resolution mass-consistent wind model. WindNinja operates on a terrain-following coordinate system with a hexahedral cell mesh that grows in vertical size with height above the ground. A variational calculus approach is used in WindNinja that results in fast run times on the order of one minute for a 50 km x 50 km domain and 100 m horizontal resolution. The advection-diffusion algorithm uses a first order closure scheme for turbulent diffusion, where diffusivities are parameterized based on mixing length theory and modified as a function of atmospheric stability. We initialize WindNinja simulations with output from mesoscale weather forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to capture the large-scale atmospheric flows and stability conditions. Model performance is evaluated against field data collected under a range of conditions at different locations including a multi-day continuous tracer gas dispersion experiment in an orchard located on rolling terrain in eastern Washington and a post-wildfire PM10 monitoring campaign in SE Idaho. The combination of fast run times, low computational demands, and explicit treatment of terrain and vegetation at a high spatial resolution are expected

  6. A critical source area phosphorus index with topographic transport factors using high resolution LiDAR digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Murphy, Paul; Fenton, Owen; Shine, Oliver; Mellander, Per-Erik; Dunlop, Paul; Jordan, Phil

    2015-04-01

    A new phosphorus index (PI) tool is presented which aims to improve the identification of critical source areas (CSAs) of phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface waters. In a novel approach, the PI incorporates topographic indices rather than watercourse proximity as proxies for runoff risk, to account for the dominant control of topography on runoff-generating areas and P transport pathways. Runoff propensity and hydrological connectivity are modelled using the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI) and Network Index (NI) respectively, utilising high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to capture the influence of micro-topographic features on runoff pathways. Additionally, the PI attempts to improve risk estimates of particulate P losses by incorporating an erosion factor that accounts for fine-scale topographic variability within fields. Erosion risk is modelled using the Unit Stream Power Erosion Deposition (USPED) model, which integrates DEM-derived upslope contributing area and Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) factors. The PI was developed using field, sub-field and sub-catchment scale datasets of P source, mobilisation and transport factors, for four intensive agricultural catchments in Ireland representing different agri-environmental conditions. Datasets included soil test P concentrations, degree of P saturation, soil attributes, land use, artificial subsurface drainage locations, and 2 m resolution LiDAR DEMs resampled from 0.25 m resolution data. All factor datasets were integrated within a Geographical Information System (GIS) and rasterised to 2 m resolution. For each factor, values were categorised and assigned relative risk scores which ranked P loss potential. Total risk scores were calculated for each grid cell using a component formulation, which summed the products of weighted factor risk scores for runoff and erosion pathways. Results showed that the new PI was able to predict

  7. Heat Transport upon River-Water Infiltration investigated by Fiber-Optic High-Resolution Temperature Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, T.; Schirmer, M.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2010-12-01

    Infiltrating river water is of high relevance for drinking water supply by river bank filtration as well as for riparian groundwater ecology. Quantifying flow patterns and velocities, however, is hampered by temporal and spatial variations of exchange fluxes. In recent years, heat has become a popular natural tracer to estimate exchange rates between rivers and groundwater. Nevertheless, field investigations are often limited by insufficient sensors spacing or simplifying assumptions such as one-dimensional flow. Our interest lies in a detailed local survey of river water infiltration at a restored river section at the losing river Thur in northeast Switzerland. Here, we measured three high-resolution temperature profiles along an assumed flow path by means of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) using fiber optic cables wrapped around poles. Moreover, piezometers were equipped with standard temperature sensors for a comparison to the DTS data. Diurnal temperature oscillations were tracked in the river bed and the riparian groundwater and analyzed by means of dynamic harmonic regression and subsequent modeling of heat transport with sinusoidal boundary conditions to quantify seepage velocities and thermal diffusivities. Compared to the standard temperature sensors, the DTS data give a higher vertical resolution, facilitating the detection of process- and structure-dependent patterns of the spatiotemporal temperature field. This advantage overcompensates the scatter in the data due to instrument noise. In particular, we could demonstrate the impact of heat conduction through the unsaturated zone on the riparian groundwater by the high resolution temperature profiles.

  8. Dust transport and deposition observed from the Terra-Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spacecraft over the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Koren, I.; Remer, L. A.; Tanré, D.; Ginoux, P.; Fan, S.

    2005-05-01

    Meteorological observations, in situ data, and satellite images of dust episodes were used already in the 1970s to estimate that 100 Tg of dust are transported from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean every year between June and August and are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean and the Americas. Desert dust is a main source of nutrients to oceanic biota and the Amazon forest, but it deteriorates air quality, as shown for Florida. Dust affects the Earth radiation budget, thus participating in climate change and feedback mechanisms. There is an urgent need for new tools for quantitative evaluation of the dust distribution, transport, and deposition. The Terra spacecraft, launched at the dawn of the last millennium, provides the first systematic well-calibrated multispectral measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument for daily global analysis of aerosol. MODIS data are used here to distinguish dust from smoke and maritime aerosols and to evaluate the African dust column concentration, transport, and deposition. We found that 240 ± 80 Tg of dust are transported annually from Africa to the Atlantic Ocean, 140 ± 40 Tg are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, 50 Tg fertilize the Amazon Basin (four times as previous estimates, thus explaining a paradox regarding the source of nutrition to the Amazon forest), 50 Tg reach the Caribbean, and 20 Tg return to Africa and Europe. The results are compared favorably with dust transport models for maximum particle diameter between 6 and 12 μm. This study is a first example of quantitative use of MODIS aerosol for a geophysical research.

  9. Resolution of parameters in the equivalent electrical circuit of the sodium transport mechanism across toad skin.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, L C

    1977-01-28

    In amphibian epithelia, amiloride reduces net sodium transport by hindering the entry of sodium to the active transport mechanism, that is, by increasing the series resistance (Rser). Theoretically, therefore, analysis of amiloride-induced changes in potential differences and short-circuit current should yield numerical estimates of all the parameters in the equivalent electrical circuit of the sodium transport mechanism. The concept has been explored by analysis of such changes in toad skins (Xenopus laevis) bathed in hypotonic sulphate Ringer's, after exposure to varying doses of amiloride, or to amphotericin, dinitrophenol or Pitressin. The estimated values of Rser, of the electromotive force of the sodium pump (ENa), and of the shunt resistance (Rsh) were independent of the dose of amiloride employed. Skins bathed in hypotonic sulphate Ringer's exhibited a progressive rise in ENa. Amphotericin produced a fall in Rser, while dinitrophenol caused a fall in ENa; washout of the drugs reversed these effects. Pitressin produced a fall in both Rser and Rsh, with a rise in ENa. These results are in accord with earlier suggestions regarding the site(s) of action of these agents. PMID:839526

  10. Neutron structural characterization, inversion degree and transport properties of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel prepared by the hydroxide route

    SciTech Connect

    Sagua, A.; Lescano, Gabriela M.; Alonso, J.A.; Martínez-Coronado, R.; Fernández-Díaz, M.T.; Morán, E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A pure specimen has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. This spinel, studied by NPD, shows an important inversion degree, λ = 0.80. A bond-valence study shows that the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected 3+ and 2+ values, respectively. The mixed valence Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} accounts for a hopping mechanism between adjacent octahedral sites, leading to a significant conductivity. Highlights: ► A low-temperature hydroxide route allowed preparing almost pure specimens of NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. ► NPD essential to determine inversion degree; contrasting Ni and Mn for neutrons. ► Bond valence establishes valence state of octahedral and tetrahedral Ni and Mn ions. ► Thermal analysis, transport measurements complement characterization of this oxide. ► A structure–properties relationship is established. -- Abstract: The title compound has been synthesized by the hydroxide route. The crystal structure has been investigated at room temperature from high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD) data. It crystallizes in a cubic spinel structure, space group Fd3{sup ¯}m, Z = 8, with a = 8.3940(2) Å at 295 K. The crystallographic formula is (Ni{sub 0.202(1)}Mn{sub 0.798(1)}){sub 8a}(Ni{sub 0.790(1)}Mn{sub 1.210(1)}){sub 16d}O{sub 4} where 8a and 16d stand for the tetrahedral and octahedral sites of the spinel structure, respectively. There is a significant inversion degree of the spinel structure, λ = 0.80. In fact, the variable parameter for the oxygen position, u = 0.2636(4), is far from that expected (u = 0.25) for normal spinels. From a bond-valence study, it seems that the valence distribution in NiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is not as trivial as expected (Ni{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+}), but clearly the tetrahedral Mn ions are divalent whereas the octahedral Mn and Ni are slightly oxidized from the expected +3 and +2 values, respectively. The mixed valence observed at

  11. High Resolution Modelling of Anomalous Transport of Carbon Dioxide in Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.; Main, I. G.; Geiger, S.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, large-scale modelling for Geological Carbon Storage (GCS) focuses mainly on carbon dioxide plume migration in porous media and do not account for sub-grid heterogeneities. A prevailing assumption therefore is that component transport and chemical reaction happens under well-mixed conditions. However, it has been shown that spreading of a dispersed plume and mixing of its components with the moving fluid is being affected by spatial changes in hydraulic and chemical properties. This leads to incomplete mixing as relevant processes at scales considered are not in local equilibrium resulting in anomalous transport. Anomalous transport is characterized by early or late component arrival and non-linear growth of the second moment of phase distributions and displacing saturation front. Incomplete mixing affects the amount of carbon dioxide in storage repositories. Using classical means to compute effective transport properties by averaging permeabilities and porosities, and assuming well-mixed carbon dioxide concentrations, may lead to significantly different patterns for large-scale flow and transport. Subsequent trapping processes such as capillary, solubility and mineral trapping therefore overpredicts the amount of supercritical carbon dioxide in storage repositories as as only a fraction of the rock volume will be exposed to it. We study the impact of variable length correlated apertures of fracture networks on breakthrough curves and on upscaled effective properties for carbon dioxide transport. We use an advection-dispersion equation which accounts for capillarity and gravity effects. Chemical reactions are not considered. Simulations are carried out using a general purpose reservoir simulator, the 'Complex System Modelling Platform (CSMP)'. It has been purposefully designed to solve compositional and compressible multi-phase flow and transport problems for fractured porous media in complex geological settings. It uses a Godunov operator

  12. 2D/1D approximations to the 3D neutron transport equation. II: Numerical comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, B. W.; Collins, B.; Larsen, E. W.

    2013-07-01

    In a companion paper [1], (i) several new '2D/1D equations' are introduced as accurate approximations to the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, (ii) the simplest of these approximate equations is systematically discretized, and (iii) a theoretically stable iteration scheme is developed to solve the discrete equations. In this paper, numerical results are presented that confirm the theoretical predictions made in [1]. (authors)

  13. Updated version of the DOT 4 one- and two-dimensional neutron/photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W.A.; Childs, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    DOT 4 is designed to allow very large transport problems to be solved on a wide range of computers and memory arrangements. Unusual flexibilty in both space-mesh and directional-quadrature specification is allowed. For example, the radial mesh in an R-Z problem can vary with axial position. The directional quadrature can vary with both space and energy group. Several features improve performance on both deep penetration and criticality problems. The program has been checked and used extensively.

  14. A high-resolution coherent transition radiation diagnostic for laser-produced electron transport studies (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, M.; Begishev, I. A.; Brown, R. J.; Mileham, C.; Myatt, J. F.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Zuegel, J. D.; Guo, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2008-10-15

    High-resolution images of the rear-surface optical emission from high-intensity (I{approx}10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser illuminated metal foils have been recorded using coherent transition radiation (CTR). CTR is generated as relativistic electrons, generated in high-intensity laser-plasma interactions, exit the target's rear surface and move into vacuum. A transition radiation diagnostic (TRD) records time-integrated images in a 24 nm bandwidth window around {lambda}=529 nm. The optical transmission at {lambda}=1053 nm, the laser wavelength, is 15 orders of magnitude lower than the transmission at the wavelength of interest, {lambda}=527 nm. The detector is a scientific grade charge-coupled device (CCD) camera that operates with a signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sup 3} and has a dynamic range of 10{sup 4}. The TRD has demonstrated a spatial resolution of 1.4 {mu}m over a 1 mm field of view, limited only by the CCD pixel size.

  15. Real Space Mapping of Li-Ion Transport in Amorphous Si Anodes with Nanometer Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Kim, Yoongu; Adamczyk, Leslie A; Tselev, Alexander; Ivanov, Ilia N; Dudney, Nancy J; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2010-01-01

    The electrical bias driven Li-ion motion in silicon anode materials in thin film battery heterostructures is investigated using electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), which is a newly developed scanning probe microscopy based characterization method. ESM utilizes the intrinsic link between bias-controlled Li-ion concentration and molar volume of electrode materials, providing the capability for studies on the sub-20 nm scale, and allows the relationship between Li-ion flow and microstructure to be established. The evolution of Li-ion transport during the battery charging is directly observed.

  16. High-Resolution Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements, and the Astrophysical 95Mo(n,gamma) Reaction Rate at s-process Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul Edward; Guber, Klaus H; Harvey, John A; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2008-01-01

    Abundances of Mo isotopes predicted by stellar models of the s process are, except for {sup 95}Mo, in good agreement with data from single grains of mainstream presolar SiC. Because the meteorite data seemed sound and no reasonable modification to stellar theory resulted in good agreement for {sup 95}Mo, it has been suggested that the recommended neutron capture reaction rate for this nuclide is 30% too low. Therefore, we have made a new determination of the {sup 95}Mo(n,{gamma}) reaction rate via high-resolution measurements of the neutron-capture and total cross sections of {sup 95}Mo at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. These data were analyzed with the R-matrix code SAMMY to obtain parameters for resonances up to E{sub n} = 10 keV. Also, a small change to our capture apparatus allowed us to employ a new technique to vastly improve resonance spin and parity assignments. These new resonance parameters, together with our data in the unresolved range, were used to calculate the {sup 95}Mo(n,{gamma}) reaction rate at s-process temperatures. We compare the currently recommended rate to our new results and discuss their astrophysical impact.

  17. Crystal structure of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3} from high-resolution neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Saxin, Stefan; Knee, Christopher S.

    2011-06-15

    Samples of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3}, with x=0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25, have been synthesised by solid state reaction. The crystal structures of the perovskite phases, characterised via Rietveld analysis of high resolution powder neutron diffraction data, reveal a structural transition from the R3c symmetry of the parent phase BiFeO{sub 3} to orthorhombic Pnma symmetry, which is complete for x=0.20. The x=0.10 and 0.15 samples are bi-phasic. The transition from a rhombohedral to orthorhombic unit cell is suggested to be driven by the dilution of the stereochemistry of the Bi{sup 3+} lone pair at the A-site. The G-type antiferromagnetic spin structure, the size of the ordered magnetic moment ({approx}3.8 {mu}{sub B}) and the T{sub N} ({approx}375 deg. C) are relatively insensitive to increasing Tb concentrations at the A-site. - Graphical abstract: High resolution neutron powder diffraction has been used to study the evolution of the RT crystal structure of Bi{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (0.05{<=}x{<=}0.25) with terbium content. A transition from polar R3c to centrosymmetric Pnma symmetry is observed. The antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and size of the ordered magnetic moment are relatively insensitive to the change of crystal structure. Highlights: > Structural transition from polar R3c symmetry to non-polar Pnma symmetry occurs. > Behaviour is rationalised via dilution of the stereochemical nature of the Bi lone pair. > Magnetic properties are largely unaffected.

  18. Simulation of intrathrombus fluid and solute transport using in vivo clot structures with single platelet resolution.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Roman S; Stalker, Timothy J; Brass, Lawrence F; Diamond, Scott L

    2013-06-01

    The mouse laser injury thrombosis model provides up to 0.22 μm-resolved voxel information about the pore architecture of the dense inner core and loose outer shell regions of an in vivo arterial thrombus. Computational studies were conducted on this 3D structure to quantify transport within and around the clot: Lattice Boltzmann method defined vessel hemodynamics, while passive Lagrangian Scalar Tracking with Brownian motion contribution simulated diffusive-convective transport of various inert solutes (released from lumen or the injured wall). For an input average lumen blood velocity of 0.478 cm/s (measured by Doppler velocimetry), a 0.2 mm/s mean flow rate was obtained within the thrombus structure, most of which occurred in the 100-fold more permeable outer shell region (calculated permeability of the inner core was 10(-11) cm(2)). Average wall shear stresses were 80-100 dyne/cm(2) (peak values >200 dyne/cm(2)) on the outer rough surface of the thrombus. Within the thrombus, small molecule tracers (0.1 kDa) experienced ~70,000 collisions/s and penetrated/exited it in about 1 s, whereas proteins (~50 kDa) had ~9000 collisions/s and required about 10 s (tortuosity ~2-2.5). These simulations help define physical processes during thrombosis and constraints for drug delivery to the thrombus. PMID:23423707

  19. General Purpose Monte Carlo Multigroup Neutron and Gamma-Ray Transport Code System with Array Geometry Capability. We recommend C00474/ALLCP/02 MORSE-CGA.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-05-01

    Version 00 MORSE-CGA was developed to add the capability of modelling rectangular lattices for nuclear reactor cores or for multipartitioned structures. It thus enhances the capability of the MORSE code system. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. It has been designed as a tool for solving most shielding problems. Through the use of multigroup cross sections, the solution of neutron, gamma-ray, or coupled neutron-gamma-ray problems may be obtainedmore » in either the forward or adjoint mode. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. Isotropic or anisotropic scattering up to a P16 expansion of the angular distribution is allowed.« less

  20. A Posteriori Error Estimation for a Nodal Method in Neutron Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.; Buscaglia, G.C.; Zamonsky, O.M.

    1999-11-03

    An a posteriori error analysis of the spatial approximation is developed for the one-dimensional Arbitrarily High Order Transport-Nodal method. The error estimator preserves the order of convergence of the method when the mesh size tends to zero with respect to the L{sup 2} norm. It is based on the difference between two discrete solutions that are available from the analysis. The proposed estimator is decomposed into error indicators to allow the quantification of local errors. Some test problems with isotropic scattering are solved to compare the behavior of the true error to that of the estimated error.

  1. 2D/1D approximations to the 3D neutron transport equation. I: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, B. W.; Larsen, E. W.

    2013-07-01

    A new class of '2D/1D' approximations is proposed for the 3D linear Boltzmann equation. These approximate equations preserve the exact transport physics in the radial directions x and y and diffusion physics in the axial direction z. Thus, the 2D/1D equations are more accurate approximations of the 3D Boltzmann equation than the conventional 3D diffusion equation. The 2D/1D equations can be systematically discretized, to yield accurate simulation methods for 3D reactor core problems. The resulting solutions will be more accurate than 3D diffusion solutions, and less expensive to generate than standard 3D transport solutions. In this paper, we (i) show that the simplest 2D/1D equation has certain desirable properties, (ii) systematically discretize this equation, and (iii) derive a stable iteration scheme for solving the discrete system of equations. In a companion paper [1], we give numerical results that confirm the theoretical predictions of accuracy and iterative stability. (authors)

  2. Cryogenic Neutron Spectrometer Development

    SciTech Connect

    Niedermayr, T; Hau, I D; Friedrich, S; Burger, A; Roy, U N; Bell, Z W

    2006-03-08

    and the instrument is transportable. We are currently developing a fast neutron spectrometer with 0.1% energy resolution at 1 MeV neutron energy with an efficiency of > 1%. Our fast-neutron spectrometers use boron-based and {sup 6}LiF absorber crystals with Mo/Cu thermistors readout. They have achieved an energy resolution of 5.5 keV FWHM for 2.79 MeV deposited in {sup 10}B by thermal neutron capture (fig. 1), and 46 keV FWHM for fast (MeV) neutrons absorbed in {sup 6}LiF (fig. 2). Since the energy resolution does not depend on the neutron energy, we expect a similar energy resolution for MeV neutron energies. The response function is given simply by the cross section of the capture reaction, offset from zero by the Q-value of the capture reaction. This allows straightforward discrimination against gamma-events, most of which deposit less that Q{sub 6Li} = 4.79 MeV in the {sup 6}LiF absorber, and easy deconvolution of the neutron spectrum, since there is only a single capture reaction in {sup 6}Li and the spectrum is not affected by edge effects or geometric broadening. The current challenge for microcalorimeters is their necessarily small effective pixel area, {approx}1cm{sup 3} for neutron spectrometer pixels, and their slow decay time, {approx}10ms for neutron spectrometers. The pixel size is limited by the requirement for low Cabs for high energy resolution; the decay time is set by the intrinsically weak thermal coupling between materials at low temperatures. Both issues can be addressed by fabricating large detector arrays. This will enable high-precision neutron spectrometry with high statistics, such as simulated for Pu analysis in fig 3.

  3. Whole-core neutron transport calculations without fuel-coolant homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. A.; Tsoulfanidis, N.; Lewis, E. E.; Palmiotti, G.; Taiwo, T. A.

    2000-02-10

    The variational nodal method implemented in the VARIANT code is generalized to perform full core transport calculations without spatial homogenization of cross sections at either the fuel-pin cell or fuel assembly level. The node size is chosen to correspond to one fuel-pin cell in the radial plane. Each node is divided into triangular finite subelements, with the interior spatial flux distribution represented by piecewise linear trial functions. The step change in the cross sections at the fuel-coolant interface can thus be represented explicitly in global calculations while retaining the fill spherical harmonics capability of VARIANT. The resulting method is applied to a two-dimensional seven-group representation of a LWR containing MOX fuel assemblies. Comparisons are made of the accuracy of various space-angle approximations and of the corresponding CPU times.

  4. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an {approximately}0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses.

  5. In Meso Structure of the Cobalamin Transporter, BtuB, at 1.95 Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Cherezov, V.; Yamashita, E.; Liu, W.; Zhalnina, M.; Cramer, WA; Caffrey, M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Crystals of the apo-form of the vitamin B12 and colicin transporter, BtuB, that diffract to 1.95 Å have been grown by the membrane-based in meso technique. The structure of the protein differs in several details from that of its counterpart grown by the more traditional, detergent-based (in surfo) method. Some of these differences include i) the five N-terminal residues are resolved in meso, ii) residues 57–62 in the hatch domain and residues 574–581 in loop 21–22 are disordered in meso and are ordered in surfo, iii) residues 278–287 in loop 7–8 are resolved in meso, iv) residues 324–331 in loop 9–10, 396–411 in loop 13–14, 442–458 in loop 15–16 and 526–541 in loop 19–20 have large differences in position between the two crystal forms, as have residues 86–96 in the hatch domain, and v) the conformation of residues 6 and 7 in the Ton box (considered critical to signal transduction and substrate transport) are entirely different in the two structures. Importantly, the in meso orientation of residues 6 and 7 is similar to that of the vitamin B12-charged state. These data suggest that the 'substrate-induced' 180-degree rotation of residues 6 and 7 reported in the literature may not be a unique signaling event. The extent to which these findings agree with structural, dynamic and functional insights gleaned from site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements is evaluated. Packing in in meso-grown crystals is dense and layered, consistent with the current model for crystallogenesis of membrane proteins in lipidic mesophases. Layered packing has been used to locate the transmembrane hydrophobic surface of the protein. Generally, this is consistent with tryptophan, tyrosine, lipid and Cα-B-factor distributions in the protein, and with predictions based on transfer free energy calculations. PMID:17028020

  6. Comparison of the 3-D Deterministic Neutron Transport Code Attila® To Measure Data, MCNP And MCNPX For The Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    D. Scott Lucas; D. S. Lucas

    2005-09-01

    An LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project is underway at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to apply the three-dimensional multi-group deterministic neutron transport code (Attila®) to criticality, flux and depletion calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper discusses the development of Attila models for ATR, capabilities of Attila, the generation and use of different cross-section libraries, and comparisons to ATR data, MCNP, MCNPX and future applications.

  7. Small-scale sediment transport patterns and bedform morphodynamics: new insights from high resolution multibeam bathymetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Rubin, David M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.

    2011-01-01

    New multibeam echosounder and processing technologies yield sub-meter-scale bathymetric resolution, revealing striking details of bedform morphology that are shaped by complex boundary-layer flow dynamics at a range of spatial and temporal scales. An inertially aided post processed kinematic (IAPPK) technique generates a smoothed best estimate trajectory (SBET) solution to tie the vessel motion-related effects of each sounding directly to the ellipsoid, significantly reducing artifacts commonly found in multibeam data, increasing point density, and sharpening seafloor features. The new technique was applied to a large bedform field in 20–30 m water depths in central San Francisco Bay, California (USA), revealing bedforms that suggest boundary-layer flow deflection by the crests where 12-m-wavelength, 0.2-m-amplitude bedforms are superimposed on 60-m-wavelength, 1-m-amplitude bedforms, with crests that often were strongly oblique (approaching 90°) to the larger features on the lee side, and near-parallel on the stoss side. During one survey in April 2008, superimposed bedform crests were continuous between the crests of the larger features, indicating that flow detachment in the lee of the larger bedforms is not always a dominant process. Assessment of bedform crest peakedness, asymmetry, and small-scale bedform evolution between surveys indicates the impact of different flow regimes on the entire bedform field. This paper presents unique fine-scale imagery of compound and superimposed bedforms, which is used to (1) assess the physical forcing and evolution of a bedform field in San Francisco Bay, and (2) in conjunction with numerical modeling, gain a better fundamental understanding of boundary-layer flow dynamics that result in the observed superimposed bedform orientation.

  8. Atmospheric Chemical Transport Based on High Resolution Model- Derived Winds: A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, John R.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Bieberbach, George, Jr.; Knabb, Richard D.; Kondo, Yutaka; Anderson, Bruce E.; Browell, Edward V.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Sachse, Glen; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1999-01-01

    Flight 10 of NASA's Subsonic Assessment (SASS) Ozone and Nitrogen Oxide Experiment (SONEX) extended southwest of Lajes, Azores. A variety of chemical signatures were encountered. These signatures are examined in detail, relating them to meteorological data from a high resolution numerical model having horizontal grid spacing of 30 and 90 km and 26 vertical levels. The meteorological output at hourly intervals is used to create backward trajectories from the locations of the chemical signatures. Four major categories of chemical signatures are discussed-stratospheric, lightning, continental pollution, and a transition layer. The strong stratospheric signal is encountered just south of the Azores in a region of depressed tropopause height. Three chemical signatures at different altitudes in the upper troposphere are attributed to lightning. Backward trajectories arriving at locations of these signatures are related to locations of cloud-to-ground lightning. Results show that the trajectories pass through regions of lightning 1-2 days earlier over the eastern Gulf of Mexico and off the southeast coast of the United States. The lowest leg of the flight exhibits a chemical signature consistent with continental pollution. Trajectories arriving at this signature are found to pass over the highly populated Northeast Corridor of the United States. Surface based pollution apparently is lofted to the altitudes of the trajectories by convective clouds along the East Coast that did not contain lightning. Finally, a chemical transition layer is described. Its chemical signature is intermediate to those of lightning and continental pollution. Trajectories arriving in this layer pass between the trajectories of the lightning and pollution signatures. Thus, they probably are impacted by both sources.

  9. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1981-05-14

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  10. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, C.L.

    1983-09-13

    Disclosed is an apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon. 4 figs.

  11. Neutron streak camera

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-09-13

    Apparatus for improved sensitivity and time resolution of a neutron measurement. The detector is provided with an electrode assembly having a neutron sensitive cathode which emits relatively low energy secondary electrons. The neutron sensitive cathode has a large surface area which provides increased sensitivity by intercepting a greater number of neutrons. The cathode is also curved to compensate for differences in transit time of the neutrons emanating from the point source. The slower speeds of the secondary electrons emitted from a certain portion of the cathode are matched to the transit times of the neutrons impinging thereupon.

  12. Uranium Neutron Capture Gamma Cascade Generation and Transport Simulation for Capture Tank Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosener, Thomas Jay

    1992-01-01

    A computer analysis has been performed to evaluate the energy dependent response of a capture tank to the gamma-ray cascades emitted from excited ^ {239}U. The GAMINT code was developed to simulate the decay of the ^{239 }U nucleus, formed in the ^{238}U(n,gamma)^{239 }U reaction, in order to provide the source spectrum for the complete analysis of the capture tank efficiency. This model determines the energies of the gamma-ray cascades, the order of emission of the gamma rays in a cascade, and the gamma-ray multiplicities by Monte Carlo techniques. A gamma-ray emission spectrum for the excited ^{239}U nucleus is generated. In the GAMINT code, known level data for ^{239}U is used below 1 MeV. A statistical approach based on the back-shifted Fermi gas model is used for the continuum level density. A single -particle model description for transition rates, with hindrance factors applied, is used to determine the gamma ray transition probabilities. Internal conversion probabilities are determined and the inclusion of this competing process suppresses the low energy portion of the gamma spectrum. A capture tank responds to the combined effect of the gamma rays of various energies from a cascade, after being transported through the material between the sample and the capture tank. Examined is the energy deposition, in a capture tank, by the cascades generated from resonant and off-resonant capture in a ^{238 }U sample. Internal conversion has a negligible effect on the average cascade energy deposited in the tank. Off -resonant (volumetric) capture deposits, on the average, less energy than resonant (surface) capture in the capture tank as a result of self-shielding of the gamma rays in the capture sample.

  13. Spatial homogenization methods for pin-by-pin neutron transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, Tomasz

    For practical reactor core applications low-order transport approximations such as SP3 have been shown to provide sufficient accuracy for both static and transient calculations with considerably less computational expense than the discrete ordinate or the full spherical harmonics methods. These methods have been applied in several core simulators where homogenization was performed at the level of the pin cell. One of the principal problems has been to recover the error introduced by pin-cell homogenization. Two basic approaches to treat pin-cell homogenization error have been proposed: Superhomogenization (SPH) factors and Pin-Cell Discontinuity Factors (PDF). These methods are based on well established Equivalence Theory and Generalized Equivalence Theory to generate appropriate group constants. These methods are able to treat all sources of error together, allowing even few-group diffusion with one mesh per cell to reproduce the reference solution. A detailed investigation and consistent comparison of both homogenization techniques showed potential of PDF approach to improve accuracy of core calculation, but also reveal its limitation. In principle, the method is applicable only for the boundary conditions at which it was created, i.e. for boundary conditions considered during the homogenization process---normally zero current. Therefore, there exists a need to improve this method, making it more general and environment independent. The goal of proposed general homogenization technique is to create a function that is able to correctly predict the appropriate correction factor with only homogeneous information available, i.e. a function based on heterogeneous solution that could approximate PDFs using homogeneous solution. It has been shown that the PDF can be well approximated by least-square polynomial fit of non-dimensional heterogeneous solution and later used for PDF prediction using homogeneous solution. This shows a promise for PDF prediction for off

  14. The lower timing resolution bound for scintillators with non-negligible optical photon transport time in time-of-flight PET

    PubMed Central

    Vinke, Ruud; Olcott, Peter D.; Cates, Joshua W.; Levin, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a method is presented that can calculate the lower bound of the timing resolution for large scintillation crystals with non-negligible photon transport. Hereby, the timing resolution bound can directly be calculated from Monte Carlo generated arrival times of the scintillation photons. This method extends timing resolution bound calculations based on analytical equations, as crystal geometries can be evaluated that do not have closed form solutions of arrival time distributions. The timing resolution bounds are calculated for an exemplary 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 LYSO crystal geometry, with scintillation centers exponentially spread along the crystal length as well as with scintillation centers at fixed distances from the photosensor. Pulse shape simulations further show that analog photosensors intrinsically operate near the timing resolution bound, which can be attributed to the finite single photoelectron pulse rise time. PMID:25255807

  15. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  16. Review of current neutron detection systems for emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-09-05

    Neutron detectors are utilized in a myriad of applications—from safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutron detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Finally, modern microfabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.

  17. Combining High Resolution Measurements and Simulations of Near-Bed Sediment Transport Processes Under Large-Scale Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, J. R.; Hurther, D.; van der Zanden, J.; van der A, D. A.; Ribberink, J.; O'Donoghue, T.; Li, M.

    2015-12-01

    Physical processes involved in near-bed sediment transport under regular, breaking waves are investigated using a combined framework of high resolution measurement and numerical simulation. Experiments are carried out at full scale (0.85 m wave height, 4 s period) in the CIEM wave flume above a mobile sand bed (d10, d50, d90 = 0.15 mm, 0.25 mm, 0.37 mm). Vertical profiles of co-located, two component (u, w) velocity and particle concentration are measured in the bottom boundary layer (BBL) using a multi-frequency acoustic concentration velocity profiler (ACVP) at several locations along the beach. The intra-wave free stream velocity measurements are provided as input to three dimensional Euler-Lagrange point-particle simulations of the BBL. Using a series of feedback controllers, the simulation forcing is adjusted to match the measured orbital velocity and turbulent intensities at an elevation of z~8 cm above the bed. The simulations treat sand grains both in the bed and in suspension as Lagrangian particles that respond to hydrodynamic and inter-particle forces. Particles are coupled to the near-bed hydrodynamics through the volume filtered Navier Stokes equations, which are solved in a finite volume LES framework at near particle scale. Several wave cycles are simulated in order to make direct comparisons of the mean and turbulent statistics with the measurements and to explore the near-bed particle response to wave breaking. Statistics of the space-time dependent grain-size distribution, a natural output of the particle-based simulations, are fed back into the acoustic calibration of the ACVP, improving the instrument's response to grain size sorting induced by the near bed flow. This cross validation and calibration of measurement and simulation allows for detailed interrogation of near-bed transport processes with minimal empirical assumptions relating to bed shear, particle pickup, or surface wave breaking.

  18. High-resolution regional modeling of summertime transport and impact of African dust over the Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenderski, Stoitchko; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2016-06-01

    Severe dust outbreaks and high dust loading over Eastern Africa and the Red Sea are frequently detected in the summer season. Observations suggest that small-scale dynamic and orographic effects, from both the Arabian and African sides, strongly contribute to dust plume formation. To better understand these processes, we present here the first high-resolution modeling study of a dust outbreak in June 2012 developed over East Africa, the Red Sea, and the Arabian Peninsula. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) component, we identified several dust generating dynamical processes that range from convective to synoptic scales, including synoptic cyclones, nocturnal low-level jets, and cold pools of mesoscale convective systems. The simulations reveal an eastward transport of African dust across the Red Sea. Over the northern part of the Red Sea, most of the dust transport occurs above 2 km height, whereas across the central and southern parts of the sea; dust is mostly transported below 2 km height. Dust is the dominant contributor (87%) to the aerosol optical depth, producing a domain average cooling effect of -12.1 W m-2 at the surface, a warming of 7.1 W m-2 in the atmosphere, and a residual cooling of -4.9 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere. Both dry and wet deposition processes contribute significantly to dust removal from the atmosphere. Model results compare well with available ground-based and satellite observations but generally underestimate the observed maximum values of aerosol optical depth. The satellite-retrieved mean optical depth at some locations is underestimated by a factor of 2. A sensitive experiment suggests that these large local differences may result from poor characterization of dust emissions in some areas of the modeled domain. In this case study we successfully simulate the major fine-scale dust generating dynamical processes, explicitly resolving convection and haboob formation. The future

  19. Equation of state and phase transition of deuterated ammonia monohydrate (ND3.D2O) measured by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction up to 500 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, A. Dominic; Suard, Emmanuelle; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Pickard, Christopher J.; Needs, Richard J.

    2009-10-01

    We describe the results of a neutron powder diffraction study of perdeuterated ammonia monohydrate (AMH, ND3ṡD2O) carried out in the range 102resolution diffractometer at the Institut Laue-Langevin. This paper reports observations of the phase transformation from the low-pressure P212121 phase (AMH I) to the high-pressure Pbca phase (AMH II) at 351 MPa, and measurements which have allowed us to determine the volumetric and axial incompressibilities of both polymorphs. At 180 K, the fitted third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state of AMH I has parameters, V0=248.00(2) Å3, K0=7.33(3) GPa with the first pressure derivative of K0 fixed at the value obtained in ab initio calculations, (∂K0/∂P)T=K0'=5.3; the implied value of the second derivative is therefore (∂2K0/∂P2)T=K0″=-0.94(1) GPa-1. At 351 MPa, we observed that the transition from AMH I to AMH II occurred over a period of 90 min, with an associated reduction in molar volume of 4.6% and an increase in the incompressibility of 19.6%.

  20. Magnetic ordering in double perovskites R2CoMnO6 (R = Y, Tb) investigated by high resolution neutron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tapan; Frick, Bernhard; Nair, Harikrishnan S

    2012-07-01

    We have investigated low energy nuclear spin excitations in double perovskite compounds R(2)CoMnO(6) (R=Y, Tb) by inelastic neutron scattering with a high resolution back-scattering spectrometer. We observed inelastic signals at about 2.1 μeV for Y(2)CoMnO(6) and also for Tb(2)CoMnO(6) at T = 2 K in both energy-loss and energy-gain sides. We interpret these inelastic peaks to be due to the transitions between the hyperfine split nuclear levels of the (59)Co nucleus. The inelastic peaks move towards the central elastic peak and finally merge with it at the magnetic ordering temperature T(C). The energy of the low energy excitations decreases continuously and becomes zero at T(C) ≈ 75 K for Y(2)CoMnO(6) and T(C) ≈ 100 K for Tb(2)CoMnO(6). For Tb(2)CoMnO(6), which contains magnetic rare earth ions, additional quasielastic scattering due presumably to the fluctuations of large Tb magnetic moments was observed. The present study reveals the magnetic ordering of the Co sublattice. The results of this investigation along with that obtained by us for other compounds indicate the presence of unquenched orbital moments in some of the Co compounds. PMID:22691537

  1. Neutron scatter camera

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Nicholas; Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Krenz, Kevin D.

    2010-06-22

    An instrument that will directly image the fast fission neutrons from a special nuclear material source has been described. This instrument can improve the signal to background compared to non imaging neutron detection techniques by a factor given by ratio of the angular resolution window to 4.pi.. In addition to being a neutron imager, this instrument will also be an excellent neutron spectrometer, and will be able to differentiate between different types of neutron sources (e.g. fission, alpha-n, cosmic ray, and D-D or D-T fusion). Moreover, the instrument is able to pinpoint the source location.

  2. Review of current neutron detection systems for emergency response

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Guss, Paul; Kruschwitz, Craig

    2014-09-05

    Neutron detectors are utilized in a myriad of applications—from safeguarding special nuclear materials (SNM) to determining lattice spacing in soft materials. The transformational changes taking place in neutron detection and imaging techniques in the last few years are largely being driven by the global shortage of helium-3 (3He). This article reviews the status of neutron sensors used specifically for SNM detection in radiological emergency response. These neutron detectors must be highly efficient, be rugged, have fast electronics to measure neutron multiplicity, and be capable of measuring direction of the neutron sources and possibly image them with high spatial resolution. Neutronmore » detection is an indirect physical process: neutrons react with nuclei in materials to initiate the release of one or more charged particles that produce electric signals that can be processed by the detection system. Therefore, neutron detection requires conversion materials as active elements of the detection system; these materials may include boron-10 (10B), lithium-6 (6Li), and gadollinium-157 (157Gd), to name a few, but the number of materials available for neutron detection is limited. However, in recent years, pulse-shape-discriminating plastic scintillators, scintillators made of helium-4 (4He) under high pressure, pillar and trench semiconductor diodes, and exotic semiconductor neutron detectors made from uranium oxide and other materials have widely expanded the parameter space in neutron detection methodology. In this article we will pay special attention to semiconductor-based neutron sensors. Finally, modern microfabricated nanotubes covered inside with neutron converter materials and with very high aspect ratios for better charge transport will be discussed.« less

  3. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process. PMID:27096293

  4. FASTER 3: A generalized-geometry Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays. Volume 2: Users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.

    1970-01-01

    A description of the FASTER-III program for Monte Carlo Carlo calculation of photon and neutron transport in complex geometries is presented. Major revisions include the capability of calculating minimum weight shield configurations for primary and secondary radiation and optimal importance sampling parameters. The program description includes a users manual describing the preparation of input data cards, the printout from a sample problem including the data card images, definitions of Fortran variables, the program logic, and the control cards required to run on the IBM 7094, IBM 360, UNIVAC 1108 and CDC 6600 computers.

  5. Boronophenylalanine, a boron delivery agent for boron neutron capture therapy, is transported by ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2

    PubMed Central

    Wongthai, Printip; Hagiwara, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Wei, Ling; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kato, Itsuro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy relies on the selective delivery of boron carriers to malignant cells. p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA), a boron delivery agent, has been proposed to be localized to cells through transporter-mediated mechanisms. In this study, we screened aromatic amino acid transporters to identify BPA transporters. Human aromatic amino acid transporters were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and examined for BPA uptake and kinetic parameters. The roles of the transporters in BPA uptake were characterized in cancer cell lines. For the quantitative assessment of BPA uptake, HPLC was used throughout the study. Among aromatic amino acid transporters, ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2 were found to transport BPA with Km values of 137.4 ± 11.7, 20.3 ± 0.8 and 88.3 ± 5.6 μM, respectively. Uptake experiments in cancer cell lines revealed that the LAT1 protein amount was the major determinant of BPA uptake at 100 μM, whereas the contribution of ATB0,+ became significant at 1000 μM, accounting for 20–25% of the total BPA uptake in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. ATB0,+, LAT1 and LAT2 transport BPA at affinities comparable with their endogenous substrates, suggesting that they could mediate effective BPA uptake in vivo. The high and low affinities of LAT1 and ATB0,+, respectively, differentiate their roles in BPA uptake. ATB0,+, as well as LAT1, could contribute significantly to the tumor accumulation of BPA at clinical dose. PMID:25580517

  6. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  7. An experimental setup for measurement of neutron energy spectra in lithium with collimated 14.7 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofek, R.; Tsechanski, A.; Profio, A. E.; Shani, G.

    1989-06-01

    Neutron energy spectra in an 88 cm diameter, 88 cm long lithium tank were measured with the Ben Gurion University experimental setup. In this setup, the lithium tank is separated from the DT neutron generator by a 120 cm thick paraffin wall with a 6 cm diameter collimator through it, along the axis of the neutron generator and the lithium tank. This enables unidirectionality and monoenergeticity of the neutrons penetrating the lithium tank. A neutron energy spectrum is obtained by unfolding with the code FORIST of proton-recoil spectra measured by an NE213 liquid scintillator. The important features of the spectrometry system, comprised of the NE213 scintillator and the attached electronic system, are the high pulse shape discrimination capability of the NE213 scintillator, which enables the separation of neutron and gamma events, relatively high energy resolution, and the system linearity. Also the simultaneous measurement of the low gain and high gain proton-recoil spectra prevents a distortion of the unfolded neutron spectrum. The neutron energy spectra are absolutely normalized and internormalized to each other by an absolutely calibrated, second NE213 scintillator, placed close to the neutron generator. The measured neutron energy spectra inside the lithium tank were compared to some preliminary calculations of the spectra, carried out with the discrete-ordinates transport code DOT4.2. Both spectra are in poor agreement. These discrepancies are assigned mainly to the inadequancy of the transport calculations. Finally, the distribution of the tritium production in the lithium tank, with the same experimental configurations, was calculated with the code DOT4.2 as well. The results indicate that the collimated neutron beam configuration is inappropriate for the purpose of tritium breeding ratio measurements.

  8. Detailed design of ex-vessel neutron yield monitor for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, K.; Iguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Nishitani, T.; Walker, C. I.

    2004-10-01

    Taking into consideration the latest design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) main units, we have made the detailed design consideration for an ex-vessel neutron yield monitor to meet the ITER requirements. The monitoring system is constructed of four detector modules consisting of several 235U fission chambers with different sensitivities and graphite (or beryllium) neutron moderator. We also selected possible spaces in the diagnostic ports to install them at appropriate distances and neutron shielding effects from the plasma. Through Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations, it has been confirmed that the present system can cover all the neutron yields encountered in the ITER experiments including the in situ calibrations with a time resolution around 200 μs without detector replacement over the whole ITER experiments. This system can also be calibrated with 10% of required accuracies in a realistic 50 h of accumulation time using a DT neutron generator.

  9. Sodium Ion Transport Mechanisms in Antiperovskite Electrolytes Na3OBr and Na4OI2: An in Situ Neutron Diffraction Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Shuai; Howard, John W; Neuefeind, Jörg; Ren, Yang; Wang, Hui; Liang, Chengdu; Yang, Wenge; Zou, Ruqiang; Jin, Changqing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-06-20

    Na-rich antiperovskites are recently developed solid electrolytes with enhanced sodium ionic conductivity and show promising functionality as a novel solid electrolyte in an all solid-state battery. In this work, the sodium ionic transport pathways of the parent compound Na3OBr, as well as the modified layered antiperovskite Na4OI2, were studied and compared through temperature-dependent neutron diffraction combined with the maximum entropy method. In the cubic Na3OBr antiperovskite, the nuclear density distribution maps at 500 K indicate that sodium ions hop within and among oxygen octahedra, and Br(-) ions are not involved. In the tetragonal Na4OI2 antiperovskite, Na ions, which connect octahedra in the ab plane, have the lowest activation energy barrier. The transport of sodium ions along the c axis is assisted by I(-) ions. PMID:27251879

  10. Sensitivity to grid resolution in the ability of a chemical transport model to simulate observed oxidant chemistry under high-isoprene conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Karen; Jacob, Daniel J.; Fisher, Jenny A.; Kim, Patrick S.; Marais, Eloise A.; Miller, Christopher C.; Travis, Katherine R.; Zhu, Lei; Yantosca, Robert M.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Cohen, Ron C.; Dibb, Jack E.; Fried, Alan; Mikoviny, Tomas; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2016-04-01

    Formation of ozone and organic aerosol in continental atmospheres depends on whether isoprene emitted by vegetation is oxidized by the high-NOx pathway (where peroxy radicals react with NO) or by low-NOx pathways (where peroxy radicals react by alternate channels, mostly with HO2). We used mixed layer observations from the SEAC4RS aircraft campaign over the Southeast US to test the ability of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model at different grid resolutions (0.25° × 0.3125°, 2° × 2.5°, 4° × 5°) to simulate this chemistry under high-isoprene, variable-NOx conditions. Observations of isoprene and NOx over the Southeast US show a negative correlation, reflecting the spatial segregation of emissions; this negative correlation is captured in the model at 0.25° × 0.3125° resolution but not at coarser resolutions. As a result, less isoprene oxidation takes place by the high-NOx pathway in the model at 0.25° × 0.3125° resolution (54 %) than at coarser resolution (59 %). The cumulative probability distribution functions (CDFs) of NOx, isoprene, and ozone concentrations show little difference across model resolutions and good agreement with observations, while formaldehyde is overestimated at coarse resolution because excessive isoprene oxidation takes place by the high-NOx pathway with high formaldehyde yield. The good agreement of simulated and observed concentration variances implies that smaller-scale non-linearities (urban and power plant plumes) are not important on the regional scale. Correlations of simulated vs. observed concentrations do not improve with grid resolution because finer modes of variability are intrinsically more difficult to capture. Higher model resolution leads to decreased conversion of NOx to organic nitrates and increased conversion to nitric acid, with total reactive nitrogen oxides (NOy) changing little across model resolutions. Model concentrations in the lower free troposphere are also insensitive to grid resolution. The

  11. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    industry, from the initial fuel enrichment and fabrication processes right through to storage or reprocessing, and neutron metrology is clearly important in this area. Neutron fields do, however, occur in other areas, for example where neutron sources are used in oil well logging and moisture measurements. They also occur around high energy accelerators, including photon linear accelerators used for cancer therapy, and are expected to be a more serious problem around the new hadron radiation therapy facilities. Roughly 50% of the cosmic ray doses experienced by fliers at the flight altitudes of commercial aircraft are due to neutrons. Current research on fusion presents neutron metrology with a whole new range of challenges because of the very high fluences expected. One of the most significant features of neutron fields is the very wide range of possible neutron energies. In the nuclear industry, for example, neutrons occur with energies from those of thermal neutrons at a few meV to the upper end of the fission spectrum at perhaps 10 MeV. For cosmic ray dosimetry the energy range extends into the GeV region. This enormous range sets a challenge for designing measuring devices and a parallel challenge of developing measurement standards for characterizing these devices. One of the major considerations when deciding on topics for this special issue was agreeing on what not to include. Modelling, i.e. the use of radiation transport codes, is now a very important aspect of neutron measurements. These calculations are vital for shielding and for instrument design; nevertheless, the topic has only been included here where it has a direct bearing on metrology and the development of standards. Neutron spectrometry is an increasingly important technique for unravelling some of the problems of dose equivalent measurements and for plasma diagnostics in fusion research. However, this topic is at least one step removed from primary metrology and so it was felt that it should not be

  12. The 2 A resolution structure of the sulfate-binding protein involved in active transport in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Pflugrath, J W; Quiocho, F A

    1988-03-01

    The crystal structure of the liganded form of the sulfate-binding protein, an initial receptor for active transport of sulfate in Salmonella typhimurium, has been solved and refined at 2.0 A resolution (1 A = 0.1 nm). The final model, which consists of 2422 non-hydrogen atoms, one sulfate substrate and 143 water molecules, yields a crystallographic R-factor of 14.0% for 16,959 reflections between 8 and 2 A. The structure deviates from ideal bond lengths and angle distances by 0.015 A and 0.037 A, respectively. The protein is ellipsoid with overall dimensions of 35 A x 35 A x 65 A and consists of two similar globular domains. The two domains are linked by three distinct peptide segments, which though widely separated in the amino acid sequence, are in close proximity in the tertiary structure. As these connecting segments are located near the periphery of the molecule, they further serve as the base or a "boundary" of the deep cleft formed between the two domains. Despite the unusual interdomain connectivity, both domains have similar supersecondary structure consisting of a central five-stranded beta-pleated sheet sandwiched by alpha-helices on either side. The arrangement of the two domains gives rise to the ellipsoidal shape and to the cleft between the two domains wherein the sulfate substrate is found and completely engulfed. A discovery of considerable importance is that the sulfate substrate is tightly held in place primarily by seven hydrogen bonds, five of which are donated by main-chain peptide NH groups, another by a serine hydroxyl and the last by the indole NH moiety of a tryptophan side-chain; there are no positively charged residues, nor cations, nor water molecules within van der Waals' distance to the sulfate dianion. All the main-chain peptide units associated with the sulfate are in turn linked (via the peptide CO group) to arrays of hydrogen bonds. Three of these arrays are composed of alternating peptide units and hydrogen bonds within the

  13. New electronically black neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, D.M.; Feldman, W.C.; Hurlbut, C.

    1986-03-01

    Two neutron detectors are described that can function in a continuous radiation background. Both detectors identify neutrons by recording a proton recoil pulse followed by a characteristic capture pulse. This peculiar signature indicates that the neutron has lost all its energy in the scintillator. Resolutions and efficiencies have been measured for both detectors.

  14. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  15. Frascati neutron generator (FNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, M.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, Mario

    1995-03-01

    The 14 MeV neutron generator (FNG), in operation at the ENEA Energy Center of Frascati, Italy, is described. It produces up to 1 X 1011 neutrons per second and consists essentially of a deuterium-ion accelerator, a beam transport system, and a target of titanium tritide, where neutrons are produced by the T(d,n)4He fusion reactions. An application of FNG in the context of research activity on controlled thermonuclear fusion research is also briefly described.

  16. Pore characteristics and their emergent effect on water adsorption and transport in clays using small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hartl, M.; Wang, Y.; Hjelm, R.

    2013-12-01

    In nuclear waste management, clays are canonical materials in the construction of engineered barriers. They are also naturally occurring reactive minerals which play an important role in retention and colloidal facilitated reactive transport in subsurface systems. Knowledge of total and accessible porosity in clays is crucial in determining fluids transport behavior in clays. It will provide fundamental insight on the performance efficiency of specific clays as a barrier material and their role in regulating radionuclide transport in subsurface environments. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the change in pore characteristics of clays as function of moisture content, and to determine their pore character in relation to their water retention capacity. Recent developments in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques allow quantitative measurement of pore morphology and size distribution of various materials in their pristine state under various sample environments (exposure to solution, high temperature, and so on). Furthermore, due to dramatic different neutron scattering properties of hydrogen and deuterium, one can readily use contrast variation, which is the isotopic labeling with various ratios of H and D (e.g. mixture of H2O/D2O) to highlight or suppress features of the sample. This is particularly useful in the study of complex pore system such as clays. In this study, we have characterized the pore structures for a number of clays including clay minerals and field samples which are relevant to high-level waste systems under various sample environments (e.g., humidity, temperature and pressure) using SANS. Our results suggest that different clays show unique pore features under various sample environments. To distinguish between accessible/non-accessible pores and the nature of pore filling (e.g. the quantity of H2O adsorbed by clays, and the distribution of H2O in relation to pore character) to water, clays were exposed for

  17. Using Neutron Radiography to Quantify Water Transport and the Degree of Saturation in Entrained Air Cement Based Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, Catherine L.; Bentz, Dale P.; Hussey, Daniel S.; Jacobson, David L.; Weiss, W. Jason

    Air entrainment is commonly added to concrete to help in reducing the potential for freeze thaw damage. It is hypothesized that the entrained air voids remain unsaturated or partially saturated long after the smaller pores fill with water. Small gel and capillary pores in the cement matrix fill quickly on exposure to water, but larger pores (entrapped and entrained air voids) require longer times or other methods to achieve saturation. As such, it is important to quantitatively determine the water content and degree of saturation in air entrained cementitious materials. In order to further investigate properties of cement-based mortar, a model based on Beer's Law has been developed to interpret neutron radiographs. This model is a powerful tool for analyzing images acquired from neutron radiography. A mortar with a known volume of aggregate, water to cement ratio and degree of hydration can be imaged and the degree of saturation can be estimated.

  18. Accelerator-based neutron radioscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Harold; Dance, William E.

    1999-06-01

    There is interest in non-reactor source, thermal neutron inspection systems for applications in aircraft maintenance, explosive devices, investment-cast turbine blades, etc. Accelerator sources, (d-T), RFQ accelerators and cyclotrons as examples, are available for either transportable or fixed neutron inspection systems. Sources are reviewed for neutron output, portability, ease of use and cost, and for use with an electronic neutron imaging camera (image intensifier or scintillator-camera system) to provide a prompt response, neutron inspection system. Particular emphasis is given to the current aircraft inspection problem to detect and characterize corrosion. Systems are analyzed to determine usefulness in providing an on-line inspection technique to detect corrosion in aluminum honeycomb aircraft components, either on-aircraft or in a shop environment. The neutron imaging sensitivity to hydrogenous aluminum corrosion product offers early detection advantages for aircraft corrosion, to levels of aluminum metal loss as small as 25 μm. The practical capability for a continuous scan thermal neutron radioscopic system to inspect up to 500 square feet of component surface per day is used as an evaluation criterion, with the system showing contrast sensitivity of at least 5% and image detail in the order of 4 mm for parts 10 cm thick. Under these practical conditions and 3-shift operation, the source must provide an incident thermal neutron flux of 5.6×104n cm-2 s-1 at an L/D of 30. A stop and go inspection approach, offering improved resolution, would require a source with similar characteristics.

  19. Effect of different transport observations on inverse modeling results: case study of a long-term groundwater tracer test monitored at high resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rasa, Ehsan; Foglia, Laura; Mackay, Douglas M.; Scow, Kate M.

    2014-01-01

    Conservative tracer experiments can provide information useful for characterizing various subsurface transport properties. This study examines the effectiveness of three different types of transport observations for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of a three-dimensional site-specific groundwater flow and transport model: conservative tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs), first temporal moments of BTCs (m1), and tracer cumulative mass discharge (Md) through control planes combined with hydraulic head observations (h). High-resolution data obtained from a 410-day controlled field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California (USA), have been used. In this experiment, bromide was injected to create two adjacent plumes monitored at six different transects (perpendicular to groundwater flow) with a total of 162 monitoring wells. A total of 133 different observations of transient hydraulic head, 1,158 of BTC concentration, 23 of first moment, and 36 of mass discharge were used for sensitivity analysis and parameter estimation of nine flow and transport parameters. The importance of each group of transport observations in estimating these parameters was evaluated using sensitivity analysis, and five out of nine parameters were calibrated against these data. Results showed the advantages of using temporal moment of conservative tracer BTCs and mass discharge as observations for inverse modeling. PMID:24672283

  20. Thermal evolution of the crystal structure of proton conducting BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-δ from high-resolution neutron diffraction in dry and humid atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Eriksson Andersson, Annika K; Selbach, Sverre M; Grande, Tor; Knee, Christopher S

    2015-06-21

    The crystal structure of the proton conducting perovskite BaCe(0.8)Y(0.2)O(3-δ) (BCY20) has been studied via high-resolution in situ neutron diffraction performed in controlled dry and humid (heavy water) oxygen flow. Two phase transitions, cubic Pm3[combining macron]m→R3[combining macron]c (775 °C)→Imma (250 °C) were observed on cooling from 1000 °C in dry O(2). A significant shift of the phase stability fields was observed on cooling in wet oxygen (pD(2)O ≈ 0.2 atm) with the R3[combining macron]c structure stabilised at 900 °C, and the R3[combining macron]c→Imma transition occurring at 675 °C. On cooling below 400 °C a monoclinic, I2/m, phase started to appear. The structural dependence on hydration level is primarily due to the de-stabilisation of the correlated, octahedra tilts as a consequence of structural relaxation around the oxygen vacancies present in the non-hydrated phase. The tendency of hydrated BaCe(0.8)Y(0.2)O(3-δ) to show octahedral tilting is also found to be enhanced, indicating that the deuteronic (protonic) defects influence the crystal structure, possibly via hydrogen bonding. Stabilisation of the monoclinic I2/m phase is attributed to the structural effect of deuterons that is inferred to increase on cooling as deuterons localise to a greater extent. Changing from wet oxidising (O(2) + D2O(g)) to wet reducing (5% H2 in Ar + D2O(g)) atmosphere did not influence the structure or the phase stability, indicating that Ce(4+) was not reduced under the present conditions. Based on the observed cell volume expansion protonic defects are present in the material at 900 °C at a D(2)O partial pressure of ∼0.2 atm. The origin of the chemical expansion is explained by the effective size of the oxygen vacancy being significantly smaller than the [OD] defect. Rietveld analysis has been used to locate possible sites for the deuterons in the high temperature, R3[combining macron]c and Imma, phases that are most relevant for proton transport

  1. Simulations of the transport and deposition of 137Cs over Europe after the Chernobyl NPP accident: influence of varying emission-altitude and model horizontal and vertical resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangeliou, N.; Balkanski, Y.; Cozic, A.; Møller, A. P.

    2013-03-01

    The coupled model LMDzORINCA has been used to simulate the transport, wet and dry deposition of the radioactive tracer 137Cs after accidental releases. For that reason, two horizontal resolutions were deployed and used in the model, a regular grid of 2.5°×1.25°, and the same grid stretched over Europe to reach a resolution of 0.45°×0.51°. The vertical dimension is represented with two different resolutions, 19 and 39 levels, respectively, extending up to mesopause. Four different simulations are presented in this work; the first uses the regular grid over 19 vertical levels assuming that the emissions took place at the surface (RG19L(S)), the second also uses the regular grid over 19 vertical levels but realistic source injection heights (RG19L); in the third resolution the grid is regular and the vertical resolution 39 vertical levels (RG39L) and finally, it is extended to the stretched grid with 19 vertical levels (Z19L). The best choice for the model validation was the Chernobyl accident which occurred in Ukraine (ex-USSR) on 26 May 1986. This accident has been widely studied since 1986, and a large database has been created containing measurements of atmospheric activity concentration and total cumulative deposition for 137Cs from most of the European countries. According to the results, the performance of the model to predict the transport and deposition of the radioactive tracer was efficient and accurate presenting low biases in activity concentrations and deposition inventories, despite the large uncertainties on the intensity of the source released. However, the best agreement with observations was obtained using the highest horizontal resolution of the model (Z19L run). The model managed to predict the radioactive contamination in most of the European regions (similar to Atlas), and also the arrival times of the radioactive fallout. As regards to the vertical resolution, the largest biases were obtained for the 39 layers run due to the increase of

  2. A variable-order time-dependent neutron transport method for nuclear reactor kinetics using analytically-integrated space-time characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, A. J.; Lee, J. C.

    2013-07-01

    A new time-dependent neutron transport method based on the method of characteristics (MOC) has been developed. Whereas most spatial kinetics methods treat time dependence through temporal discretization, this new method treats time dependence by defining the characteristics to span space and time. In this implementation regions are defined in space-time where the thickness of the region in time fulfills an analogous role to the time step in discretized methods. The time dependence of the local source is approximated using a truncated Taylor series expansion with high order derivatives approximated using backward differences, permitting the solution of the resulting space-time characteristic equation. To avoid a drastic increase in computational expense and memory requirements due to solving many discrete characteristics in the space-time planes, the temporal variation of the boundary source is similarly approximated. This allows the characteristics in the space-time plane to be represented analytically rather than discretely, resulting in an algorithm comparable in implementation and expense to one that arises from conventional time integration techniques. Furthermore, by defining the boundary flux time derivative in terms of the preceding local source time derivative and boundary flux time derivative, the need to store angularly-dependent data is avoided without approximating the angular dependence of the angular flux time derivative. The accuracy of this method is assessed through implementation in the neutron transport code DeCART. The method is employed with variable-order local source representation to model a TWIGL transient. The results demonstrate that this method is accurate and more efficient than the discretized method. (authors)

  3. Overview of neutron and confined escaping alpha diagnostics planned for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasao, M.; Krasilnikov, A. V.; Nishitani, T.; Batistoni, P.; Zaveryaev, V.; Kaschuck, Yu A.; Popovichev, S.; Iguchi, T.; Jarvis, O. N.; Kallne, J.; Fiore, C. L.; Roquemore, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Donne, A. J. H.; Costley, A. E.; Walker, C.

    2004-07-01

    Fusion product measurements planned for ITER are reviewed from the viewpoint of alpha particle-related physics studies. Recent advances in fusion plasma physics have extended the desirable measurement requirements to the megahertz region for neutron emission rate, better resolution of neutron profiles for the study of internal transport barriers (ITBs), etc. Employing threshold counters and/or scintillation detectors confers megahertz capability on neutron emission rate measurement. The changes in the neutron/alpha particle birth profile due to the formation of ITB and its deviation from uniformity on the magnetic flux surface can be measured by addition of eight viewing chords in an equatorial port plug and seven viewing chords from the divertor to the original radial neutron camera. On the other hand, it is still difficult to measure the distributions of confined and escaping alpha particles. Several proposals to resolve these difficulties are currently under investigation.

  4. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP-oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution.

    PubMed

    Howard, E I; Guillot, B; Blakeley, M P; Haertlein, M; Moulin, M; Mitschler, A; Cousido-Siah, A; Fadel, F; Valsecchi, W M; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T; Claudot, J; Podjarny, A

    2016-03-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  5. A multitask neutron beam line for spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Festa, G.; Grazzi, F.; Barzagli, E.; Scherillo, A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Civita, F.

    2011-08-01

    Here we present a new concept for a time-of-flight neutron scattering instrument allowing for simultaneous application of three different techniques: time-of-flight neutron diffraction, neutron resonance capture analysis and Bragg edge transmission analysis. The instrument can provide average resolution neutron radiography too. The potential of the proposed concept was explored by implementing the necessary equipment on INES (Italian Neutron Experimental Station) at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). The results obtained show the effectiveness of the proposed instrument to acquire relevant quantitative information in a non-invasive way on a historical metallurgical sample, namely a Japanese hand guard (tsuba). The aforementioned neutron techniques simultaneously exploited the extended neutron energy range available from 10 meV to 1 keV. This allowed a fully satisfactory characterization of the sample in terms of metal components and their combination in different phases, and forging and assembling methods.

  6. High-resolution modeling of overland flow and sediment transport following wildfire: Insights into initiation mechanisms and sediment sources for runoff-generated debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, L.; Kean, J. W.; Staley, D. M.; Rengers, F. K.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment transport in steep landscapes may be facilitated by both water-dominated flows and debris-flow processes. Given the differences in erosion potential and mobility possessed by runoff and debris flows, knowledge of the conditions that determine the runoff-to-debris-flow transition has important implications for hazard assessment as well as our understanding of the long-term evolution of steep bedrock channels. Debris flows in alpine areas and burned steeplands are frequently triggered by runoff following high-intensity rainfall, but the mechanics by which runoff generates a debris flow are not well understood. To examine the connections between runoff and debris flow initiation, we developed a numerical model that couples overland flow with sediment transport and debris-flow processes. We applied the model to study erosion and debris-flow initiation that occurred during a rainfall event that produced numerous debris flows within a burned drainage basin in the San Gabriel Mountains, CA, USA. Input data for the numerical model was constrained by rain gauges, stage measurements at the basin outlet, soil-moisture sensors, and high-resolution topographic data obtained using a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). Numerical model predictions, which compare well with TLS-derived measurements of topographic change, indicate that hillslope erosion at our study site was primarily the result of raindrop-induced sediment transport. Further, results indicate that the majority of sediment eroded from the hillslopes was deposited within the channel system during the storm with only minor amounts being transported out of the basin in suspension. Based on model results, we hypothesize that numerous debris flows were generated from the mass failure of sediment dams that built up within the channel system throughout the storm. This study adds to our understanding of sediment transport in steep landscapes and provides insight into the topographic and hydrologic factors that

  7. A report on high-level nuclear waste transportation: Prepared pursuant to assembly concurrent resolution No. 8 of the 1987 Nevada Legislature

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    This report has been prepared by the staff of the State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) in response to Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 8 (ACR 8), passed by the Nevada State Legislature in 1987. ACR 8 directed the NWPO, in cooperation with affected local governments and the Legislative committee on High-Level Radioactive Waste, to prepare this report which scrutinizes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plans for transportation of high-level radioactive waste to the proposed yucca Mountain repository, which reviews the regulatory structure under which shipments to a repository would be made and which presents NWPO`s plans for addressing high-level radioactive waste transportation issues. The report is divided into three major sections. Section 1.0 provides a review of DOE`s statutory requirements, its repository transportation program and plans, the major policy, programmatic, technical and institutional issues and specific areas of concern for the State of Nevada. Section 2.0 contains a description of the current federal, state and tribal transportation regulatory environment within which nuclear waste is shipped and a discussion of regulatory issues which must be resolved in order for the State to minimize risks and adverse impacts to its citizens. Section 3.0 contains the NWPO plan for the study and management of repository-related transportation. The plan addresses four areas, including policy and program management, regulatory studies, technical reviews and studies and institutional relationships. A fourth section provides recommendations for consideration by State and local officials which would assist the State in meeting the objectives of the plan.

  8. Neutron phase spin echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Hautle, Patrick; Schanzer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A novel neutron spin resonance technique is presented based on the well-known neutron spin echo method. In a first proof-of-principle measurement using a monochromatic neutron beam, it is demonstrated that relative velocity changes of down to a precision of 4 ×10-7 can be resolved, corresponding to an energy resolution of better than 3 neV. Currently, the sensitivity is only limited by counting statistics and not by systematic effects. An improvement by another two orders of magnitude can be achieved with a dedicated setup, allowing energy resolutions in the 10 peV regime. The new technique is ideally suited for investigations in the field of precision fundamental neutron physics, but will also be beneficial in scattering applications.

  9. Simulation of the transport of Rn222 using on-line and off-line global models at different horizontal resolutions: a detailed comparison with measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentener, Frank; Feichter, Johann; Jeuken, Ad

    1999-07-01

    The short-lived radionuclide Rn222 is emitted at a fairly constant rate from the continents and is a good surrogate for studying the transport of "air pollution" from polluted continental areas to clean, remote regions. The large concentration gradients of 2 3 orders of magnitude which exist between the continents and the remote atmosphere present a major challenge to the modelling of horizontal and vertical atmospheric transport. We use the global off-line tracer transport model TM3 at 3 different resolutions. Input to the model consists of meteorological data for the year 1993 obtained from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The same meteorological data is used to constrain the climate model ECHAM4-T42-L19. Using these meteorological data, Rn222 simulations are used to evaluate and document model performance and associated uncertainties. High time-resolution measurements made at 2 continental stations, 2 stations under continental influence and 4 remote sites, and aircraft measurements obtained during the NARE aircraft campaign are used for a detailed comparison.Although in specific regions there are inter-model differences of up to a factor of 2 in the calculated boundary layer concentrations, these differences are not translated into a better performance of either model for the stations used for comparison. We generally obtain high correlations of model results and measurements; these range from r= 0.6 0.8 for the continental and coastal stations and 0.5 0.6 for the remote sites. Calculated mean concentrations and corresponding standard deviations generally agree favourably with observations, lending credibility to the usefulness of our models for evaluating transport of air pollutants from continental sources to remote regions. The main cause of model deviations is probably related to uncertainties in the meteorological input data set provided by the ECMWF model and to a lesser extent by our knowledge of the spatial distribution of

  10. A fast neutron spectrometer for D-D fusion neutron measurements at the Alcator C tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. A.; Chen, S. H.; Gwinn, D.; Parker, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer using a high pressure 3He ionization chamber has been designed and used to measure the neutron spectrum from an ohmically heated deuterium plasma. The resolution of the spectrometer at 2.45 MeV is determine to be 46 keV full width at half-maximum (fwhm). Particular attention has been paid to optimizing the detector shielding and collimation to reject thermal and epithermal neutrons scattered from the tokamak structure. As a result, measurements indicate that the ratio of the number of counts in the 2.45 MeV peak to the total number of detected neutron events is {1}/{67}. For the 8 μs amplifier time constant used, a count rate as high as 44 counts per second has been achieved in the thermonuclear peak. The observed spectra have been compared with calculated spectra using the MCNP Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Transport code and they show good agreement. There is little evidence of neutrons produced from photoneutron reactions or electrodisintegration. It has been possible to confirm that the shape of the thermonuclear peak is consistent with the Gaussian shape predicted and that the ion temperature as determined from the line width is consistent with other Alcator C ion temperature diagnostics, and follows the trends predicted by the theory of Doppler line broadening.

  11. Investigating the influence of subsurface heterogeneity on chemical weathering in the critical zone using high resolution reactive transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Rajaram, H.

    2014-12-01

    The critical zone (CZ) represents a major life-sustaining realm of the terrestrial surface. The processes controlling the development and transformation of the CZ are important to continued health of the planet as human influence continues to grow. The CZ encompasses the shallow subsurface, a region of reaction, unsaturated flow, and transport. Chemical weathering in the subsurface is one of the important processes involved in the formation and functioning of the CZ. We present two case studies of reactive transport modeling to investigate the influence of subsurface heterogeneity and unsaturated flow on chemical weathering processes in the CZ. The model is implemented using the reactive transport code PFLOTRAN. Heterogeneity in subsurface flow is represented using multiple realizations of conductive fracture networks in a hillslope cross-section. The first case study is motivated by observations at the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (BCCZO) including extensive hydrologic and geochemical datasets. The simulations show that fractures greatly enhance weathering as compared to a homogeneous porous medium. Simulations of north-facing slope hydrology with prolonged snowmelt pulses also increases weathering rates, showing the importance of slope aspect on weathering intensity. Recent work elucidates deteriorating water quality caused by climate change in the CZ of watersheds where acid rock drainage (ARD) occurs. The more complex reactions of ARD require a customized kinetic reaction module with PFLOTRAN. The second case study explores the mechanisms by which changes in hydrologic forcing, air and ground temperatures, and water table elevations influence ARD. For instance, unreacted pyrite exposed by a water table drop was shown to produce a 125% increase in annual pyrite oxidization rate, which provides one explanation for increased ARD.

  12. Transport Equations Resolution By N-BEE Anti-Dissipative Scheme In 2D Model Of Low Pressure Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kraloua, B.; Hennad, A.

    2008-09-23

    The aim of this paper is to determine electric and physical properties by 2D modelling of glow discharge low pressure in continuous regime maintained by term constant source. This electric discharge is confined in reactor plan-parallel geometry. This reactor is filled by Argon monatomic gas. Our continuum model the order two is composed the first three moments the Boltzmann's equations coupled with Poisson's equation by self consistent method. These transport equations are discretized by the finite volumes method. The equations system is resolved by a new technique, it is about the N-BEE explicit scheme using the time splitting method.

  13. Coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  14. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  15. High-resolution monte carlo simulation of flow and conservative transport in heterogeneous porous media 1. Methodology and flow results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Haley, D.F.; Sudicky, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this, the first of two papers concerned with the use of numerical simulation to examine flow and transport parameters in heterogeneous porous media via Monte Carlo methods, Various aspects of the modelling effort are examined. In particular, the need to save on core memory causes one to use only specific realizations that have certain initial characteristics; in effect, these transport simulations are conditioned by these characteristics. Also, the need to independently estimate length Scales for the generated fields is discussed. The statistical uniformity of the flow field is investigated by plotting the variance of the seepage velocity for vector components in the x, y, and z directions. Finally, specific features of the velocity field itself are illuminated in this first paper. In particular, these data give one the opportunity to investigate the effective hydraulic conductivity in a flow field which is approximately statistically uniform; comparisons are made with first- and second-order perturbation analyses. The mean cloud velocity is examined to ascertain whether it is identical to the mean seepage velocity of the model. Finally, the variance in the cloud centroid velocity is examined for the effect of source size and differing strengths of local transverse dispersion.

  16. Neutron Laue macromolecular crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Meilleur, Flora; Myles, Dean A A; Blakeley, M. P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent progress in neutron protein crystallography such as the use of the Laue technique and improved neutron optics and detector technologies have dramatically improved the speed and precision with which neutron protein structures can now be determined. These studies are providing unique and complementary insights on hydrogen and hydration in protein crystal structures that are not available from X-ray structures alone. Parallel improvements in modern molecular biology now allow fully (per)deuterated protein samples to be produced for neutron scattering that essentially eradicate the large--and ultimately limiting--hydrogen incoherent scattering background that has hampered such studies in the past. High quality neutron data can now be collected to near atomic resolution ({approx}2.0 Angstroms) for proteins of up to {approx}50 kDa molecular weight using crystals of volume {approx}0.1 mm3 on the Laue diffractometer at ILL. The ability to flash-cool and collect high resolution neutron data from protein crystals at cryogenic temperature (15 K) has opened the way for kinetic crystallography on freeze trapped systems. Current instrument developments now promise to reduce crystal volume requirements by a further order of magnitude, making neutron protein crystallography a more accessible and routine technique.

  17. Beam measurements on the H- source and Low Energy Beam Transport system for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Thomae, R.; Gough, R.; Keller, R.; Leung, K.N.; Schenkel, T.; Aleksandrov, A.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2001-09-01

    The ion source and Low Energy Beam Transport section of the front-end systems presently being built by Berkeley Lab are required to provide 50 mA of H - beam current at 6% duty factor (1 ms pulses at 60 Hz) with a normalized rms emittance of less than 0.20 p-mm-mrad. Experimental results, including emittance, chopping, and steering measurements, on the performance of the ion source and LEBT system operated at the demanded beam parameters will be discussed.

  18. `Consistent bosonization-debosonization': A resolution of the non-equilibrium transport puzzle blazes a new path forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Nayana

    In this talk, we will critically reexamine the bosonization-debosonization procedure for systems including certain types of localized features (although more general scenarios are possible). By focusing on the case of a tunneling junction out of equilibrium, I will show that the conventional approach gives results that are not consistent with the exact solution of the problem even at the qualitative level and highlight the inconsistencies that can adversely affect the results of all types of calculations. I will subsequently report on a `Consistent bosonization-debosonization' procedure that we have developed to resolve the aforementioned non-equilibrium transport puzzle and argue that this framework should be widely applicable. I will touch upon its application for the two-lead Kondo problem that besides being a key theoretical prototype of a strongly correlated system is also of immediate experimental relevance in many ways (see also related talk by Bolech).

  19. Roughness of the Mantle Transition Zone Discontinuities Revealed by High Resolution Wavefield Imaging with the Earthscope Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pavlis, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    We post-processed 141,080 pairs of high quality radial and transverse receiver functions from the Earthscope Automated Receiver Survey using a variant of what we have called generalized iterative deconvolution method and reshaped the spiking output into different scales of Ricker wavelets. We then used these data as input to our 3D plane wave migration method to produce an image volume of P to S scattering surfaces under all of the lower 48 states. The result is arguably the highest resolution image ever produce of the mantle transition zone. Due to the effect of migration impulse response, different scales of Ricker wavelets provide another important means of controlling the resolution of the image produced by 3D plane wave migration method. Model simulation shows that comparing to the widely used CCP stacking method with receiver functions shaped by Gaussian wavelet, the application of our methods is capable of resolving not only dipping discontinuities but also more subtle details of the discontinuities. Application to the latest USArray data reveals several previously unobserved features of the 410 and 660 discontinuities. Both discontinuities are resolved to a precision approaching 1 km under the stable interior, but degrading to the order of 10 km in the western US due to a probably combination of higher attenuation and velocity heterogeneity not resolved by current generation tomography models. Topography with many 10s of km is resolved at a range of scales. In addition, we observe large variation of relative amplitude on the radial component and large variations in the radial to transverse amplitude ratio that correlate with inferred variations in discontinuity topography. We argue this combination of observations can be explained by roughness at a range of scales. Roughness is consistent with the phase-change model for these discontinuities given there is little reason to think the mantle is homogeneous at these distance scales. Continental scale isopach

  20. The DEAD SEA VALLEY as a trap for Saharan dust transported by west winds, based on COSMO-ART high-resolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Vogel, Bernhard; Bangert, Max; Schaettler, Ulrich; Starobinets, Boris; Alpert, Pinhas

    2015-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique place on the Earth which is located at approximately 400 m below sea level. It is surrounded by the Judean Mountains to the west and by the Moab Mountains to the east. The Dead Sea Valley is quite often affected by Saharan dust intrusions. It is also characterized by changeable meteorology, particularly by unsteady winds blowing along the valley. High-resolution modeling was used for studying Saharan dust transport over this region with complex topography and unsteady winds. It was the purpose of the current study to determine space - time variations of Saharan dust over the Dead Sea Valley using the COSMO-ART model with 3-km resolution. This was carried out for the extreme dust event observed on March 22, 2013, when PM10 measurements in the Dead Sea Valley showed surface dust concentration exceeding 6,000 µg m-3. An intensive low-pressure system, centered over the Eastern Mediterranean, created favorable conditions for dust transport by south-west winds from the Eastern Sahara into the Eastern Mediterranean and particularly into Israel and Jordan. In the middle of the dust event, when the low-pressure system shifted eastward, dust was transported by strong west winds towards the Dead Sea Valley, across the Judean Mountains. It is reasonable to suggest that the greater the height of the Judean Mountains - the lower the dust concentration on the downwind slope of the mountains, in the Dead Sea Valley. The high-resolution COSMO-ART model shows the opposite result: the greater the height of the Judean Mountains - the higher the dust concentration in the Dead Sea Valley. COSMO-ART shows that the height of the Judean Mountains leads to high dust concentration of over 15,000 µg m-3 in the Dead Sea Valley. We analyzed east-west cross-sections of dust concentration and topography at different latitudes across the Dead Sea Valley. Our analysis showed that, over the North of the Dead Sea Valley, where the height of the Judean Mountains is greater

  1. Simulation of the full-core pin-model by JMCT Monte Carlo neutron-photon transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, G.; Zhang, B.; Shu, L.; Shangguan, D.; Ma, Y.; Hu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Since the large numbers of cells over a million, the tallies over a hundred million and the particle histories over ten billion, the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model has become a real challenge for the computers and the computational methods. On the other hand, the basic memory of the model has exceeded the limit of a single CPU, so the spatial domain and data decomposition must be considered. JMCT (J Monte Carlo Transport code) has successful fulfilled the simulation of the full-core pin-by-pin model by the domain decomposition and the nested parallel computation. The k{sub eff} and flux of each cell are obtained. (authors)

  2. Antibiotic Transport in Resistant Bacteria: Synchrotron UV Fluorescence Microscopy to Determine Antibiotic Accumulation with Single Cell Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Maigre, Laure; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    A molecular definition of the mechanism conferring bacterial multidrug resistance is clinically crucial and today methods for quantitative determination of the uptake of antimicrobial agents with single cell resolution are missing. Using the naturally occurring fluorescence of antibacterial agents after deep ultraviolet (DUV) excitation, we developed a method to non-invasively monitor the quinolones uptake in single bacteria. Our approach is based on a DUV fluorescence microscope coupled to a synchrotron beamline providing tuneable excitation from 200 to 600 nm. A full spectrum was acquired at each pixel of the image, to study the DUV excited fluorescence emitted from quinolones within single bacteria. Measuring spectra allowed us to separate the antibiotic fluorescence from the autofluorescence contribution. By performing spectroscopic analysis, the quantification of the antibiotic signal was possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the intracellular accumulation of a clinical antibitiotic could be determined and discussed in relation with the level of drug susceptibility for a multiresistant strain. This method is especially important to follow the behavior of quinolone molecules at individual cell level, to quantify the intracellular concentration of the antibiotic and develop new strategies to combat the dissemination of MDR-bacteria. In addition, this original approach also indicates the heterogeneity of bacterial population when the same strain is under environmental stress like antibiotic attack. PMID:22719907

  3. Self and transport diffusivity of CO2 in the metal-organic framework MIL-47(V) explored by quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Salles, Fabrice; Jobic, Hervé; Devic, Thomas; Llewellyn, Philip L; Serre, Christian; Férey, Gérard; Maurin, Guillaume

    2010-01-26

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements are combined with molecular dynamics simulations to determine the self-diffusivity, corrected diffusivity, and transport diffusivity of CO(2) in the metal-organic framework MIL-47(V) (MIL = Materials Institut Lavoisier) over a wide range of loading. The force field used for describing the host/guest interactions is first validated on the thermodynamics of the MIL-47(V)/CO(2) system, prior to being transferred to the investigations of the dynamics. A decreasing profile is then deduced for D(s) and D(o) whereas D(t) presents a non monotonous evolution with a slight decrease at low loading followed by a sharp increase at higher loading. Such decrease of D(t) which has never been evidenced in any microporous systems comes from the atypical evolution of the thermodynamic correction factor that reaches values below 1 at low loading. This implies that, due to intermolecular interactions, the CO(2) molecules in MIL-47(V) do not behave like an ideal gas. Further, molecular simulations enabled us to elucidate unambiguously a 3D diffusion mechanism within the pores of MIL-47(V). PMID:19957953

  4. Discontinuous isogeometric analysis methods for the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A. R.; Welch, J. A.; Kópházi, J.; Eaton, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two discontinuous Galerkin isogeometric analysis methods are developed and applied to the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with a discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation. The discontinuous Galerkin projection approach was taken on both an element level and the patch level for a given Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) patch. This paper describes the detailed dispersion analysis that has been used to analyse the numerical stability of both of these schemes. The convergence of the schemes for both smooth and non-smooth solutions was also investigated using the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) for multidimensional problems and a 1D semi-analytical benchmark whose solution contains a strongly discontinuous first derivative. This paper also investigates the challenges posed by strongly curved boundaries at both the NURBS element and patch level with several algorithms developed to deal with such cases. Finally numerical results are presented both for a simple pincell test problem as well as the C5G7 quarter core MOX/UOX small Light Water Reactor (LWR) benchmark problem. These numerical results produced by the isogeometric analysis (IGA) methods are compared and contrasted against linear and quadratic discontinuous Galerkin finite element (DGFEM) SN based methods.

  5. Neutron reflectometry: Filling Δq with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleshanov, N. K.

    2016-06-01

    Luminosity of the reflectometer is defined as the neutron flux incident onto the sample surface for measurements made with a given momentum transfer resolution Δq. The filling of Δq with neutrons near a certain q depends not only on the source luminance and the source-sample tract transmittance, but also on the neutron beam tailoring. The correct choice of the working wavelength and measurements with optimum neutron beam parameters increase luminosity in several times. New optimization criteria for neutron reflectometers are suggested. Standard schemes of the reflectivity measurement with monochromatic and white beams are re-examined. Optimization of reflectivity measurements generally requires numerical calculations. Analytically, its potential is demonstrated by considering thermalized neutron beams. Such innovations as velocity selector on the basis of aperiodic multilayers, small angle Soller collimator with traps for neutrons reflected from the channel walls and fan beam time-of-flight technique are proposed to further increase the luminosity of reflectometers.

  6. Polyethylene-reflected plutonium metal sphere : subcritical neutron and gamma measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.

    2009-11-01

    Numerous benchmark measurements have been performed to enable developers of neutron transport models and codes to evaluate the accuracy of their calculations. In particular, for criticality safety applications, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Program (ICSBEP) annually publishes a handbook of critical and subcritical benchmarks. Relatively fewer benchmark measurements have been performed to validate photon transport models and codes, and unlike the ICSBEP, there is no program dedicated to the evaluation and publication of photon benchmarks. Even fewer coupled neutron-photon benchmarks have been performed. This report documents a coupled neutron-photon benchmark for plutonium metal reflected by polyethylene. A 4.5-kg sphere of ?-phase, weapons-grade plutonium metal was measured in six reflected configurations: (1) Bare; (2) Reflected by 0.5 inch of high density polyethylene (HDPE); (3) Reflected by 1.0 inch of HDPE; (4) Reflected by 1.5 inches of HDPE; (5) Reflected by 3.0 inches of HDPE; and (6) Reflected by 6.0 inches of HDPE. Neutron and photon emissions from the plutonium sphere were measured using three instruments: (1) A gross neutron counter; (2) A neutron multiplicity counter; and (3) A high-resolution gamma spectrometer. This report documents the experimental conditions and results in detail sufficient to permit developers of radiation transport models and codes to construct models of the experiments and to compare their calculations to the measurements. All of the data acquired during this series of experiments are available upon request.

  7. Variable-density groundwater flow and solute transport in heterogeneous porous media: approaches, resolutions and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Simmons, C T; Fenstemaker, T R; Sharp, J M

    2001-11-01

    In certain hydrogeological situations, fluid density variations occur because of changes in the solute or colloidal concentration, temperature, and pressure of the groundwater. These include seawater intrusion, high-level radioactive waste disposal, groundwater contamination, and geothermal energy production. When the density of the invading fluid is greater than that of the ambient one, density-driven free convection can lead to transport of heat and solutes over larger spatial scales and significantly shorter time scales than compared with diffusion alone. Beginning with the work of Lord Rayleigh in 1916, thermal and solute instabilities in homogeneous media have been studied in detail for almost a century. Recently, these theoretical and experimental studies have been applied in the study of groundwater phenomena, where the assumptions of homogeneity and isotropy rarely, if ever, apply. The critical role that heterogeneity plays in the onset as well as the growth and/or decay of convective motion is discussed by way of a review of pertinent literature and numerical simulations performed using a variable-density flow and solute transport numerical code. Different styles of heterogeneity are considered and range from continuously "trending" heterogeneity (sinusoidal and stochastic permeability distributions) to discretely fractured geologic media. Results indicate that both the onset of instabilities and their subsequent growth and decay are intimately related to the structure and variance of the permeability field. While disordered heterogeneity tends to dissipate convection through dispersive mixing, an ordered heterogeneity (e.g., sets of vertical fractures) allows instabilities to propagate at modest combinations of fracture aperture and separation distances. Despite a clearer understanding of the processes that control the onset and propagation of instabilities, resultant plume patterns and their migration rates and pathways do not appear amenable to

  8. Development of High Resolution Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Neutron Dosimetry Technique with93Nb(n,n')93mNb Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Hideki; Takatsuka, Takaaki; Takamatsu, Takahide; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Furuta, Yujin; Noto, Takuma; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Sonnenschein, Volker; Wendt, Klaus; Ito, Chikara; Maeda, Shigetaka

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed an advanced technique to measure the 93mNb yield precisely by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry, instead of conventional characteristic X-ray spectroscopy. 93mNb-selective resonance ionization is achievable by distinguishing the hyperfine splitting of the atomic energy levels between 93Nb and 93mNb at high resolution. In advance of 93mNb detection, we could successfully demonstrate high resolution resonant ionization spectroscopy of stable 93Nb using an all solid-state, narrow-band and tunable Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at 1 kHz repetition rate.

  9. Small-scale sediment transport patterns and bedform morphodynamics: New insights from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, P.L.; Erikson, L.H.; Kvitek, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    New multibeam echosounder and processing technologies yield sub-meter-scale bathymetric resolution, revealing striking details of bedform morphology that are shaped by complex boundary-layer flow dynamics at a range of spatial and temporal scales. An inertially aided post processed kinematic (IAPPK) technique generates a smoothed best estimate trajectory (SBET) solution to tie the vessel motion-related effects of each sounding directly to the ellipsoid, significantly reducing artifacts commonly found in multibeam data, increasing point density, and sharpening seafloor features. The new technique was applied to a large bedform field in 20-30 m water depths in central San Francisco Bay, California (USA), revealing bedforms that suggest boundary-layer flow deflection by the crests where 12-m-wavelength, 0.2-m-amplitude bedforms are superimposed on 60-m-wavelength, 1-m-amplitude bedforms, with crests that often were strongly oblique (approaching 90??) to the larger features on the lee side, and near-parallel on the stoss side. During one survey in April 2008, superimposed bedform crests were continuous between the crests of the larger features, indicating that flow detachment in the lee of the larger bedforms is not always a dominant process. Assessment of bedform crest peakedness, asymmetry, and small-scale bedform evolution between surveys indicates the impact of different flow regimes on the entire bedform field. This paper presents unique fine-scale imagery of compound and superimposed bedforms, which is used to (1) assess the physical forcing and evolution of a bedform field in San Francisco Bay, and (2) in conjunction with numerical modeling, gain a better fundamental understanding of boundary-layer flow dynamics that result in the observed superimposed bedform orientation. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag (outside the USA).

  10. Small-scale sediment transport patterns and bedform morphodynamics: new insights from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Kvitek, Rikk G.

    2011-08-01

    New multibeam echosounder and processing technologies yield sub-meter-scale bathymetric resolution, revealing striking details of bedform morphology that are shaped by complex boundary-layer flow dynamics at a range of spatial and temporal scales. An inertially aided post processed kinematic (IAPPK) technique generates a smoothed best estimate trajectory (SBET) solution to tie the vessel motion-related effects of each sounding directly to the ellipsoid, significantly reducing artifacts commonly found in multibeam data, increasing point density, and sharpening seafloor features. The new technique was applied to a large bedform field in 20-30 m water depths in central San Francisco Bay, California (USA), revealing bedforms that suggest boundary-layer flow deflection by the crests where 12-m-wavelength, 0.2-m-amplitude bedforms are superimposed on 60-m-wavelength, 1-m-amplitude bedforms, with crests that often were strongly oblique (approaching 90°) to the larger features on the lee side, and near-parallel on the stoss side. During one survey in April 2008, superimposed bedform crests were continuous between the crests of the larger features, indicating that flow detachment in the lee of the larger bedforms is not always a dominant process. Assessment of bedform crest peakedness, asymmetry, and small-scale bedform evolution between surveys indicates the impact of different flow regimes on the entire bedform field. This paper presents unique fine-scale imagery of compound and superimposed bedforms, which is used to (1) assess the physical forcing and evolution of a bedform field in San Francisco Bay, and (2) in conjunction with numerical modeling, gain a better fundamental understanding of boundary-layer flow dynamics that result in the observed superimposed bedform orientation.

  11. High-resolution neutron and X-ray diffraction room-temperature studies of an H-FABP–oleic acid complex: study of the internal water cluster and ligand binding by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution

    PubMed Central

    Howard, E. I.; Guillot, B.; Blakeley, M. P.; Haertlein, M.; Moulin, M.; Mitschler, A.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Fadel, F.; Valsecchi, W. M.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Petrova, T.; Claudot, J.; Podjarny, A.

    2016-01-01

    Crystal diffraction data of heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in complex with oleic acid were measured at room temperature with high-resolution X-ray and neutron protein crystallography (0.98 and 1.90 Å resolution, respectively). These data provided very detailed information about the cluster of water molecules and the bound oleic acid in the H-FABP large internal cavity. The jointly refined X-ray/neutron structure of H-FABP was complemented by a transferred multipolar electron-density distribution using the parameters of the ELMAMII library. The resulting electron density allowed a precise determination of the electrostatic potential in the fatty acid (FA) binding pocket. Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules was then used to study interactions involving the internal water molecules, the FA and the protein. This approach showed H⋯H contacts of the FA with highly conserved hydrophobic residues known to play a role in the stabilization of long-chain FAs in the binding cavity. The determination of water hydrogen (deuterium) positions allowed the analysis of the orientation and electrostatic properties of the water molecules in the very ordered cluster. As a result, a significant alignment of the permanent dipoles of the water molecules with the protein electrostatic field was observed. This can be related to the dielectric properties of hydration layers around proteins, where the shielding of electrostatic interactions depends directly on the rotational degrees of freedom of the water molecules in the interface. PMID:27006775

  12. Applications of the COG multiparticle Monte Carlo transport code to simulated imaging of complex objects

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R M; Hall, J M

    1999-06-01

    COG is a major multiparticle simulation code in the LLNL Monte Carlo radiation transport toolkit. It was designed to solve deep-penetration radiation shielding problems in arbitrarily complex 3D geometries, involving coupled transport of photons, neutrons, and electrons. COG was written to provide as much accuracy as the underlying cross-sections will allow, and has a number of variance-reduction features to speed computations. Recently COG has been applied to the simulation of high- resolution radiographs of complex objects and the evaluation of contraband detection schemes. In this paper we will give a brief description of the capabilities of the COG transport code and show several examples of neutron and gamma-ray imaging simulations. Keywords: Monte Carlo, radiation transport, simulated radiography, nonintrusive inspection, neutron imaging.

  13. Reactive transport of uranium in a groundwater bioreduction study: Insights from high-temporal resolution 238U/235U data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiel, A. E.; Johnson, T. M.; Lundstrom, C. C.; Laubach, P. G.; Long, P. E.; Williams, K. H.

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a detailed investigation of U isotopes in conjunction with a broad geochemical investigation during field-scale biostimulation and desorption experiments. This investigation was carried out in the uranium-contaminated alluvial aquifer of the Rifle field research site. In this well-characterized setting, a more comprehensive understanding of U isotope geochemistry is possible. Our results indicate that U isotope fractionation is consistently observed across multiple experiments at the Rifle site. Microbially-mediated reduction is suggested to account for most or all of the observed fractionation as abiotic reduction has been demonstrated to impart much smaller, often near-zero, isotopic fractionation or isotopic fractionation in the opposite direction. Data from some time intervals are consistent with a simple model for transport and U(VI) reduction, where the fractionation factor (ε = +0.65‰ to +0.85‰) is consistent with experimental studies. However, during other time intervals the observed patterns in our data indicate the importance of other processes in governing U concentrations and 238U/235U ratios. For instance, we demonstrate that departures from Rayleigh behavior in groundwater systems arise from the presence of adsorbed species. We also show that isotope data are sensitive to the onset of oxidation after biostimulation ends, even in the case where reduction continues to remove contaminant uranium downstream. Our study and the described conceptual model support the use of 238U/235U ratios as a tool for evaluating the efficacy of biostimulation and potentially other remedial strategies employed at Rifle and other uranium-contaminated sites.

  14. Mapping the distribution of serotonin transporter in the human brainstem with high-resolution PET: Validation using postmortem autoradiography data.

    PubMed

    Fazio, P; Schain, M; Varnäs, K; Halldin, C; Farde, L; Varrone, A

    2016-06-01

    The human brainstem is a complex structure with several small nuclei and neural pathways of interest in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In common with other monoaminergic systems, serotoninergic neurons originate from a group of nuclei located in the brainstem. The present study was designed to validate a user-independent approach for a detailed in vivo quantification of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) availability in the human brainstem using a template-based approach that consisted of three steps. First, 3T-MR images and parametric binding potential (BPND) [(11)C]MADAM images of ten healthy subjects were used to generate a PET template of 5-HTT availability. In the second step, volumes of interest (VOIs) for different brainstem nuclei were obtained using a method in which VOIs are initially delineated on MRI images using anatomical landmarks and then are finally tailored on the distribution of 5-HTT binding using a thresholding approach applied to the 5-HTT template. In the final step, the VOIs were transformed and applied individually to BPND images of 16 healthy subjects (14M/2F, 20-64years). The in vivo distribution of BPND values obtained with the template-based method were in good agreement with an individual-based approach taken as gold standard. Results were also in agreement with 5-HTT quantification using in vitro binding data obtained with autoradiography (ARG) studies using [(3)H]MADAM. The proposed template-based method can be applied to PET data acquired in several CNS disorders in which serotonin neurons in the brainstem might be affected. PMID:26994829

  15. A High-resolution Simulation of the Transport of Gazeous Pollutants from a Severe Effusive Volcanic Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, J.; Tulet, P.; Filippi, J. B.; Leriche, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Reunion Island experienced its biggest eruption of Piton de la Fournaise volcano during April 2007. Known as "the eruption of the century", this event degassed more than 230 KT of SO2. Theses emissions led to important health issues, accompanied by environmental and infrastructure degradations. We want to show a modeling study uses the mesoscale chemical model MesoNH to simulate the transport of gazeous SO2 between April 2nd and 7th, with a focus on the influence of heat fluxes from lava. Three domains are nested from 2km to 100m horizontal spacing grid, allow us to better represent the phenomenology of its eruption. This modelling study have coupled on-line (i) the MesoNH mesoscale dynamics, (ii) a gas and aqueous chemical scheme, and (iii) a surface scheme that integrates a new sheme for the lava heat flux and its surface propagation. Thus, all flows (heat sensible and latent, vapor, SO2, CO2, CO) are triggered depending on its dynamic. Our simulations reproduce quite faithfully the surface field observation of SO2. Various sensitivity analyzes exhibit that volcano sulfur distribution was mainly controlled by the lava heat flow.Without heat flow parameterization, the surface concentrations are multiplied by a factor 30 compared to the reference simulation.Numerical modeling allows us to distinguish acid rain produced by the emission of water vapor and chloride when the lava flows into the seawater of those formed by the mixing of the volcanic SO2 into the raindrops of convective clouds.

  16. Airway surface liquid volume expansion induces rapid changes in amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport across upper airway epithelium-Implications concerning the resolution of pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Fouad; Arredouani, Abdelilah; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2015-01-01

    During airway inflammation, airway surface liquid volume (ASLV) expansion may result from the movement of plasma proteins and excess liquid into the airway lumen due to extravasation and elevation of subepithelial hydrostatic pressure. We previously demonstrated that elevation of submucosal hydrostatic pressure increases airway epithelium permeability resulting in ASLV expansion by 500 μL cm−2 h−1. Liquid reabsorption by healthy airway epithelium is regulated by active Na+ transport at a rate of 5 μL cm−2 h−1. Thus, during inflammation the airway epithelium may be submerged by a large volume of luminal liquid. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which ASLV expansion alters active epithelial Na+ transport, and we have characterized the time course of the change. We used primary cultures of tracheal airway epithelium maintained under air interface (basal ASLV, depth is 7 ± 0.5 μm). To mimic airway flooding, ASLV was expanded to a depth of 5 mm. On switching from basal to expanded ASLV conditions, short-circuit current (Isc, a measure of total transepithelial active ion transport) declined by 90% with a half-time (t1/2) of 1 h. 24 h after the switch, there was no significant change in ATP concentration nor in the number of functional sodium pumps as revealed by [3H]-ouabain binding. However, amiloride-sensitive uptake of 22Na+ was reduced by 70% upon ASLV expansion. This process is reversible since after returning cells back to air interface, Isc recovered with a t1/2 of 5–10 h. These results may have important clinical implications concerning the development of Na+ channels activators and resolution of pulmonary edema. PMID:26333829

  17. A Lagrangian trajectory view on transport and mixing processes between the eye, eyewall, and environment using a high resolution simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cram, Thomas A.; Persing, John; Montgomery, Michael T.; Braun, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    The transport and mixing characteristics of a large sample of air parcels within a mature and vertically sheared hurricane vortex is examined. Data from a high-resolution (2 km grid spacing) numerical simulation of "real-case" Hurricane Bonnie (1998) is used to calculate Lagrangian trajectories of air parcels in various subdomains of the hurricane (namely, the eye, eyewall, and near-environment) to study the degree of interaction (transport and mixing) between these subdomains. It is found that 1) there is transport and mixing from the low-level eye to the eyewall that carries high- Be air which can enhance the efficiency of the hurricane heat engine; 2) a portion of the low-level inflow of the hurricane bypasses the eyewall to enter the eye, that both replaces the mass of the low-level eye and lingers for a sufficient time (order 1 hour) to acquire enhanced entropy characteristics through interaction with the ocean beneath the eye; 3) air in the mid- to upper-level eye is exchanged with the eyewall such that more than half the air of the eye is exchanged in five hours in this case of a sheared hurricane; and 4) that one-fifth of the mass in the eyewall at a height of 5 km has an origin in the mid- to upper-level environment where thet(sub e) is much less than in the eyewall, which ventilates the ensemble average eyewall theta(sub e) by about 1 K. Implications of these findings to the problem of hurricane intensity forecasting are discussed.

  18. A Monte Carlo neutron transport code for eigenvalue calculations on a dual-GPU system and CUDA environment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.; Ding, A.; Ji, W.; Xu, X. G.; Carothers, C. D.; Brown, F. B.

    2012-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is able to accurately calculate eigenvalues in reactor analysis. Its lengthy computation time can be reduced by general-purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units (GPU), one of the latest parallel computing techniques under development. The method of porting a regular transport code to GPU is usually very straightforward due to the 'embarrassingly parallel' nature of MC code. However, the situation becomes different for eigenvalue calculation in that it will be performed on a generation-by-generation basis and the thread coordination should be explicitly taken care of. This paper presents our effort to develop such a GPU-based MC code in Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) environment. The code is able to perform eigenvalue calculation under simple geometries on a multi-GPU system. The specifics of algorithm design, including thread organization and memory management were described in detail. The original CPU version of the code was tested on an Intel Xeon X5660 2.8 GHz CPU, and the adapted GPU version was tested on NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. Double-precision floating point format was used throughout the calculation. The result showed that a speedup of 7.0 and 33.3 were obtained for a bare spherical core and a binary slab system respectively. The speedup factor was further increased by a factor of {approx}2 on a dual GPU system. The upper limit of device-level parallelism was analyzed, and a possible method to enhance the thread-level parallelism was proposed. (authors)

  19. A high resolution neutron scattering study of Tb2Mo2O7: A geometrically frustrated and disorder-free spin glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Gardner, Jason; Qiu, Y.; Rule, K; Greedan, John E; Stewart, John Ross; Fouquet, Peter; Cornelius, A. L.; Adriano, Cris; Pagliuso, P G

    2010-01-01

    Neutron scattering, muon spin relaxation, and de susceptibility studies have been carried out on polycrystalline Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, a pyrochlore antiferromagnet in which the Tb{sup 3+} moments reside on a network of corner-sharing tetrahedra. Unlike other geometrically frustrated systems, Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} remains paramagnetic down to {approx}0.07 K, rather than ordering into a conventional Neel or spin-glass-like state, despite the fact that short-range antiferromagnetic correlations (AFC) develop at {approx}50 K. At the first AFC wave vector, its low-lying, relatively flat magnetic excitation spectrum softens partially below 30 K.

  20. Investigation of Contaminant Transport and Dispersion in New York Harbor by a High Resolution SF6 Tracer Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplow, T.; Schlosser, P.; Ho, D. T.

    2002-12-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) has been used successfully as a deliberate tracer for rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas, due to its inert nature, non-toxicity, and extremely low detection limit. An automated, high-resolution SF6 measurement system mounted on a boat was recently developed for several projects on the Hudson River. The system has a sampling interval of two minutes and a detection limit of 1 x 10-14 mol L-1. Real-time data visualization enables revisions of sampling strategy during the experiment. A single injection has allowed observation of advection rates, dispersion processes, and air-water gas exchange for up to two weeks, and longer experiments are possible. This equipment, with minor modifications, was applied to New York Harbor in July 2002. New York Harbor is one of the busiest seaports in the United States, processing nearly \\100 billion in cargo each year. Most of the shipping facilities are located in Newark Bay (approximately 15 km^{2}) or in two adjacent channels: the Kill van Kull (6 km long) and the Arthur Kill (20 km long). Newark Bay, which is mostly saline, is fed by the Hackensack and Passaic Rivers, both of which flow through heavily industrialized areas. Ultimately, these waters drain through the Kills to Raritan Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Due to a combination of point sources, runoff, wastewater treatment plants, and emissions from the shipping industry, Newark Bay and the Kills receive a large volume and variety of contaminants, including petroleum, heavy metals, PCBs, and dioxins. In addition, much of the area is subject to ongoing and extensive navigational dredging, causing widespread re-suspension of previously deposited contaminants. A small quantity (ca. 2 mols) of SF_{6}$ was injected into northern Newark Bay to investigate the spreading of water throughout the Bay, the Kills, and the tidal portions of the Passaic and Hackensack Rivers. The tracer was successfully monitored across most of this area for 12 consecutive days

  1. Structure of Ce2RhIn8: an example of complementary use of high-resolution neutron powder diffraction and reciprocal-space mapping to study complex materials.

    PubMed

    Moshopoulou, E G; Ibberson, R M; Sarrao, J L; Thompson, J D; Fisk, Z

    2006-04-01

    The room-temperature crystal structure of the heavy fermion antiferromagnet Ce2RhIn8, dicerium rhodium octaindide, has been studied by a combination of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray reciprocal-space mapping of single crystals and high-resolution time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction. The structure is disordered, exhibiting a complex interplay of non-periodic, partially correlated planar defects, coexistence and segregation of polytypic phases (induced by periodic planar ;defects'), mosaicity (i.e. domain misalignment) and non-uniform strain. These effects evolve as a function of temperature in a complicated way, but they remain down to low temperatures. The room-temperature diffraction data are best represented by a complex mixture of two polytypic phases, which are affected by non-periodic, partially correlated planar defects, differ slightly in their tetragonal structures, and exhibit different mosaicities and strain values. Therefore, Ce2RhIn8 approaches the paracrystalline state, rather than the classic crystalline state and thus several of the concepts of conventional single-crystal crystallography are inapplicable. The structural results are discussed in the context of the role of disorder in the heavy-fermion state and in the interplay between superconductivity and magnetism. PMID:16552150

  2. NEUTRON IMAGING, RADIOGRAPHY AND TOMOGRAPHY.

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,G.C.

    2002-03-01

    Neutrons are an invaluable probe in a wide range of scientific, medical and commercial endeavors. Many of these applications require the recording of an image of the neutron signal, either in one-dimension or in two-dimensions. We summarize the reactions of neutrons with the most important elements that are used for their detection. A description is then given of the major techniques used in neutron imaging, with emphasis on the detection media and position readout principle. Important characteristics such as position resolution, linearity, counting rate capability and sensitivity to gamma-background are discussed. Finally, the application of a subset of these instruments in radiology and tomography is described.

  3. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-30

    Studies were initiated at the Hanford Site to evaluate the process controlling the transport of fluids in the vadose zone and to develop a reliable database upon which vadose-zone transport models can be calibrated. These models are needed to evaluate contaminant migration through the vadose zone to underlying groundwaters at Hanford. A study site that had previously been extensively characterized using geophysical monitoring techniques was selected in the 200 E Area. Techniques used previously included neutron probe for water content, spectral gamma logging for radionuclide tracers, and gamma scattering for wet bulk density. Building on the characterization efforts of the past 20 years, the site was instrumented to facilitate the comparison of nine vadose-zone characterization methods: advanced tensiometers, neutron probe, electrical resistance tomography (ERT), high-resolution resistivity (HRR), electromagnetic induction imaging (EMI), cross-borehole radar (XBR), and cross-borehole seismic (XBS). Soil coring was used to obtain soil samples for analyzing ionic and isotopic tracers.

  4. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Zhuang, Q.; Henze, D. K.; Frankenberg, C.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Turner, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004-June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr-1, with wetland methane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr-1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004-June 2005 were in the range of 14.6-30.4 Tg yr-1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr-1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr-1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.

  5. Directionally positionable neutron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Bumgardner, H.M.; Dance, W.E.

    1981-11-10

    Disclosed is apparatus for forming and directionally positioning a neutron beam. The apparatus includes an enclosed housing rotatable about a first axis with a neutron source axially positionable on the axis of rotation of the enclosed housing but rotationally fixed with respect to the housing. The rotatable housing is carried by a vertically positionable arm carried on a mobile transport. A collimator is supported by the rotatable housing and projects into the housing to orientationally position its inlet window at an adjustably fixed axial and radial spacing from the neutron source so that rotation of the enclosed housing causes the inlet window to rotate about a circle which is a fixed axial distance from the neutron source and has the axis of rotation of the housing as its center.

  6. Neutron imaging of alkali metal heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kihm, Ken; Kirchoff, Eric; Golden, Matt; Rosenfeld, J.; Rawal, S.; Pratt, D.; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Walker, Lakeisha MH; Voisin, Sophie; Hussey, Dan

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had

  7. Neutron Imaging of Alkali Metal Heat Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, K.; Kirchoff, E.; Golden, M.; Rosenfeld, J.; Rawal, S.; Pratt, D.; Swanson, A.; Bilheux, H.; Walker, L.; Voisin, S.; Hussey, D. S.; Jacobson, D. L.

    High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 °C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had

  8. Hypotonic activation of the myo-inositol transporter SLC5A3 in HEK293 cells probed by cell volumetry, confocal and super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Andronic, Joseph; Shirakashi, Ryo; Pickel, Simone U; Westerling, Katherine M; Klein, Teresa; Holm, Thorge; Sauer, Markus; Sukhorukov, Vladimir L

    2015-01-01

    Swelling-activated pathways for myo-inositol, one of the most abundant organic osmolytes in mammalian cells, have not yet been identified. The present study explores the SLC5A3 protein as a possible transporter of myo-inositol in hyponically swollen HEK293 cells. To address this issue, we examined the relationship between the hypotonicity-induced changes in plasma membrane permeability to myo-inositol P ino [m/s] and expression/localization of SLC5A3. P ino values were determined by cell volumetry over a wide tonicity range (100-275 mOsm) in myo-inositol-substituted solutions. While being negligible under mild hypotonicity (200-275 mOsm), P ino grew rapidly at osmolalities below 200 mOsm to reach a maximum of ∼ 3 nm/s at 100-125 mOsm, as indicated by fast cell swelling due to myo-inositol influx. The increase in P ino resulted most likely from the hypotonicity-mediated incorporation of cytosolic SLC5A3 into the plasma membrane, as revealed by confocal fluorescence microscopy of cells expressing EGFP-tagged SLC5A3 and super-resolution imaging of immunostained SLC5A3 by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). dSTORM in hypotonic cells revealed a surface density of membrane-associated SLC5A3 proteins of 200-2000 localizations/μm2. Assuming SLC5A3 to be the major path for myo-inositol, a turnover rate of 80-800 myo-inositol molecules per second for a single transporter protein was estimated from combined volumetric and dSTORM data. Hypotonic stress also caused a significant upregulation of SLC5A3 gene expression as detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In summary, our data provide first evidence for swelling-mediated activation of SLC5A3 thus suggesting a functional role of this transporter in hypotonic volume regulation of mammalian cells. PMID:25756525

  9. Climatology of the aerosol optical depth by components from the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and a high-resolution chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Suzuki, K.; Braverman, A.; Garay, M. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Joint Aerosol (JOINT_AS) Level 3 product provides a global, descriptive summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol type information for each month between March 2000 and the present. Using Version 1 of JOINT_AS, which is based on the operational (Version 22) MISR Level 2 aerosol product, this study analyzes, for the first time, characteristics of observed and simulated distributions of AOD for three broad classes of aerosols: non-absorbing, absorbing, and non-spherical - near or downwind of their major source regions. The statistical moments (means, standard deviations, and skewnesses) and distributions of AOD by components derived from the JOINT_AS are compared with results from the SPectral RadIatioN-TrAnSport (SPRINTARS) model, a chemistry transport model (CTM) with very high spatial and temporal resolution. Overall, the AOD distributions of combined MISR aerosol types show good agreement with those from SPRINTARS. Marginal distributions of AOD for each aerosol type in both MISR and SPRINTARS show considerable high positive skewness, which indicates the importance of including extreme AOD events when comparing satellite retrievals with models. The MISR JOINT_AS product will greatly facilitate comparisons between satellite observations and model simulations of aerosols by type.

  10. The 1.3-Å resolution structure of Nitrosomonas europaea Rh50 and mechanistic implications for NH3 transport by Rhesus family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lupo, Domenico; Li, Xiao-Dan; Durand, Anne; Tomizaki, Takashi; Cherif-Zahar, Baya; Matassi, Giorgio; Merrick, Mike; Winkler, Fritz K.

    2007-01-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) proteins are a family of integral membrane proteins found throughout the animal kingdom that also occur in a number of lower eukaryotes. The significance of Rh proteins derives from their presence in the human red blood cell membrane, where they constitute the second most important group of antigens used in transfusion medicine after the ABO group. Rh proteins are related to the ammonium transport (Amt) protein family and there is considerable evidence that, like Amt proteins, they function as ammonia channels. We have now solved the structure of a rare bacterial homologue (from Nitrosomonas europaea) of human Rh50 proteins at a resolution of 1.3 Å. The protein is a trimer, and analysis of its subunit interface strongly argues that all Rh proteins are likely to be homotrimers and that the human erythrocyte proteins RhAG and RhCE/D are unlikely to form heterooligomers as previously proposed. When compared with structures of bacterial Amt proteins, NeRh50 shows several distinctive features of the substrate conduction pathway that support the concept that Rh proteins have much lower ammonium affinities than Amt proteins and might potentially function bidirectionally. PMID:18032606

  11. Quantifying uncertainty in morphologically-derived bedload transport rates for large braided rivers: insights from high-resolution, high-frequency digital elevation model differencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, J.; Hicks, M.; Wheaton, J. M.; Williams, R. D.; Vericat, D.

    2013-12-01

    Repeat surveys of channel morphology provide a means to quantify fluvial sediment storage and enable inferences about changes in long-term sediment supply, watershed delivery and bed level adjustment; information vital to support effective river and land management. Over shorter time-scales, direct differencing of fluvial terrain models may also offer a route to predict reach-averaged sediment transport rates and quantify the patterns of channel morphodynamics and the processes that force them. Recent and rapid advances in geomatics have facilitated these goals by enabling the acquisition of topographic data at spatial resolutions and precisions suitable for characterising river morphology at the scale of individual grains over multi-kilometre reaches. Despite improvements in topographic surveying, inverting the terms of the sediment budget to derive estimates of sediment transport and link these to morphodynamic processes is, nonetheless, often confounded by limited knowledge of either the sediment supply or efflux across a boundary of the control volume, or unobserved cut-and-fill taking place between surveys. This latter problem is particularly poorly constrained, as field logistics frequently preclude surveys at a temporal frequency sufficient to capture changes in sediment storage associated with each competent event, let alone changes during individual floods. In this paper, we attempt to quantify the principal sources of uncertainty in morphologically-derived bedload transport rates for the large, labile, gravel-bed braided Rees River which drains the Southern Alps of NZ. During the austral summer of 2009-10, a unique timeseries of 10 high quality DEMs was derived for a 3 x 0.7 km reach of the Rees, using a combination of mobile terrestrial laser scanning, aDcp soundings and aerial image analysis. Complementary measurements of the forcing flood discharges and estimates of event-based particle step lengths were also acquired during the field campaign

  12. Digital fast neutron radiography of steel reinforcing bar in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitton, K.; Jones, A.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutron imaging has previously been used in order to test for cracks, degradation and water content in concrete. However, these techniques often fall short of alternative non-destructive testing methods, such as γ-ray and X-ray imaging, particularly in terms of resolution. Further, thermal neutron techniques can be compromised by the significant expense associated with thermal neutron sources of sufficient intensity to yield satisfactory results that can often precipitate the need for a reactor. Such embodiments are clearly not portable in the context of the needs of field applications. This paper summarises the results of a study to investigate the potential for transmission radiography based on fast neutrons. The objective of this study was to determine whether the presence of heterogeneities in concrete, such as reinforcement structures, could be identified on the basis of variation in transmitted fast-neutron flux. Monte-Carlo simulations have been performed and the results from these are compared to those arising from practical tests using a 252Cf source. The experimental data have been acquired using a digital pulse-shape discrimination system that enables fast neutron transmission to be studied across an array of liquid scintillators placed in close proximity to samples under test, and read out in real time. Whilst this study does not yield sufficient spatial resolution, a comparison of overall flux ratios does provide a basis for the discrimination between samples with contrasting rebar content. This approach offers the potential for non-destructive testing that gives less dose, better transportability and better accessibility than competing approaches. It is also suitable for thick samples where γ-ray and X-ray methods can be limited.

  13. Portable Neutron Sensors for Emergency Response Operations

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-06-24

    This article presents the experimental work performed in the area of neutron detector development at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews Operations (RSL-AO) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the last four years. During the 1950s neutron detectors were developed mostly to characterize nuclear reactors where the neutron flux is high. Due to the indirect nature of neutron detection via interaction with other particles, neutron counting and neutron energy measurements have never been as precise as gamma-ray counting measurements and gamma-ray spectroscopy. This indirect nature is intrinsic to all neutron measurement endeavors (except perhaps for neutron spin-related experiments, viz. neutron spin-echo measurements where one obtains μeV energy resolution). In emergency response situations generally the count rates are low, and neutrons may be scattered around in inhomogeneous intervening materials. It is also true that neutron sensors are most efficient for the lowest energy neutrons, so it is not as easy to detect and count energetic neutrons. Most of the emergency response neutron detectors are offshoots of nuclear device diagnostics tools and special nuclear materials characterization equipment, because that is what is available commercially. These instruments mostly are laboratory equipment, and not field-deployable gear suited for mobile teams. Our goal is to design and prototype field-deployable, ruggedized, lightweight, efficient neutron detectors.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) drugs for boron delivery and retention at subcellular scale resolution in human glioblastoma cells with imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, S.; Ahmad, T.; Barth, R. F.; Kabalka, G. W.

    2014-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of cancer depends on the selective delivery of a sufficient number of boron-10 (10B) atoms to individual tumor cells. Cell killing results from the 10B (n, α)7Li neutron capture and fission reactions that occur if a sufficient number of 10B atoms are localized in the tumor cells. Intranuclear 10B localization enhances the efficiency of cell killing via damage to the DNA. The net cellular content of 10B atoms reflects both bound and free pools of boron in individual tumor cells. The assessment of these pools, delivered by a boron delivery agent, currently cannot be made at subcellular scale resolution by clinically applicable techniques such as PET and MRI. In this study, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging instrument, a CAMECA IMS 3f ion microscope, capable of 500 nm spatial resolution was employed. Cryogenically prepared cultured human T98G glioblastoma cells were evaluated for boron uptake and retention of two delivery agents. The first, L-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used clinically for BNCT of high grade gliomas, recurrent tumors of the head and neck region and melanomas. The second, a boron analogue of an unnatural amino acid, 1-amino-3-borono-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid (cis-ABCPC), has been studied in rodent glioma and melanoma models by quantification of boron in the nucleus and cytoplasm of individual tumor cells. The bound and free pools of boron were assessed by exposure of cells to boron-free nutrient medium. Both BPA and cis-ABCPC delivered almost 70% of the pool of boron in the free or loosely bound form to the nucleus and cytoplasm of human glioblastoma cells. This free pool of boron could be easily mobilized out of the cell and was in some sort of equilibrium with extracellular boron. In the case of BPA, the intracellular free pool of boron also was affected by the presence of phenylalanine in the nutrient medium. This suggests that it might be advantageous if patients were placed on a

  15. RCPO1 - A Monte Carlo program for solving neutron and photon transport problems in three dimensional geometry with detailed energy description and depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Ondis, L.A., II; Tyburski, L.J.; Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-03-01

    The RCP01 Monte Carlo program is used to analyze many geometries of interest in nuclear design and analysis of light water moderated reactors such as the core in its pressure vessel with complex piping arrangement, fuel storage arrays, shipping and container arrangements, and neutron detector configurations. Written in FORTRAN and in use on a variety of computers, it is capable of estimating steady state neutron or photon reaction rates and neutron multiplication factors. The energy range covered in neutron calculations is that relevant to the fission process and subsequent slowing-down and thermalization, i.e., 20 MeV to 0 eV. The same energy range is covered for photon calculations.

  16. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  17. Neutron transport in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Makai, M.

    1996-08-01

    The survey reviews the methods available in the literature which allow a discussion of corium recriticality after a severe accident and a characterization of the corium. It appears that to date no one has considered the eigenvalue problem, though for the source problem several approaches have been proposed. The mathematical formulation of a random medium may be approached in different ways. Based on the review of the literature, we can draw three basic conclusions. The problem of static, random perturbations has been solved. The static case is tractable by the Monte Carlo method. There is a specific time dependent case for which the average flux is given as a series expansion.

  18. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley; deNolfo, G. A.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-01-01

    The Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, En > 0.5 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from (sup 3)He(n,p) (sup 3)H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The performance of the NIC from laboratory and accelerator tests is presented.

  19. High-resolution radiography by means of a hodoscope

    DOEpatents

    De Volpi, Alexander

    1978-01-01

    The fast neutron hodoscope, a device that produces neutron radiographs with coarse space resolution in a short time, is modified to produce neutron or gamma radiographs of relatively thick samples and with high space resolution. The modification comprises motorizing a neutron and gamma collimator to permit a controlled scanning pattern, simultaneous collection of data in a number of hodoscope channels over a period of time, and computerized image reconstruction of the data thus gathered.

  20. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  1. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukosi, Eric; Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Lee, Kyung-Min; Wiggins, Brenden; Trtik, Pavel; Penumadu, Dayakar; Young, Stephen; Santodonato, Louis; Bilheux, Hassina; Burger, Arnold; Matei, Liviu; Stowe, Ashley C.

    2016-09-01

    Lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. This paper reports on the performance of scintillating LISe crystals for its potential use as a converter screen for cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% threshold of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 μm or larger resulted in an average spatial resolution of 67 μm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 μm thick LISe (27 μm) outperforms a commercial 50 μm thick ZnS(Cu):6LiF scintillation screen by more than a factor of three. For the LISe dimensions considered in this study, it was found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness. However, absorption measurements indicate that the 6Li concentration is uniform and the neutron absorption efficiency of LISe as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory. This suggests that the differences in apparent brightness observed for the LISe samples investigated may be due to a combination of secondary charged particle escape, scintillation light transport in the bulk and across the LISe-air interface, and variations in the activation of the scintillation mechanism. Finally, it was found that the presence of 115In and its long-lived 116In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential of LISe for imaging transient systems.

  2. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  3. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  4. Inverting for volcanic SO2 flux at high temporal resolution using spaceborne plume imagery and chemistry-transport modelling: the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boichu, M.; Menut, L.; Khvorostyanov, D.; Clarisse, L.; Clerbaux, C.; Turquety, S.; Coheur, P.-F.

    2013-09-01

    Depending on the magnitude of their eruptions, volcanoes impact the atmosphere at various temporal and spatial scales. The volcanic source remains a major unknown to rigorously assess these impacts. At the scale of an eruption, the limited knowledge of source parameters, including time variations of erupted mass flux and emission profile, currently represents the greatest issue that limits the reliability of volcanic cloud forecasts. Today, a growing number of satellite and remote sensing observations of distant plumes are becoming available, bringing indirect information on these source terms. Here, we develop an inverse modelling approach combining satellite observations of the volcanic plume with an Eulerian regional chemistry-transport model (CHIMERE) to characterise the volcanic SO2 emissions during an eruptive crisis. The May 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull is a perfect case study to apply this method as the volcano emitted substantial amounts of SO2 during more than a month. We take advantage of the SO2 column amounts provided by a vast set of IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) satellite images to reconstruct retrospectively the time series of the mid-tropospheric SO2 flux emitted by the volcano with a temporal resolution of ~2 h, spanning the period from 1 to 12 May 2010. We show that no a priori knowledge on the SO2 flux is required for this reconstruction. The initialisation of chemistry-transport modelling with this reconstructed source allows for reliable simulation of the evolution of the long-lived tropospheric SO2 cloud over thousands of kilometres. Heterogeneities within the plume, which mainly result from the temporal variability of the emissions, are correctly tracked over a timescale of a week. The robustness of our approach is also demonstrated by the broad similarities between the SO2 flux history determined by this study and the ash discharge behaviour estimated by other means during the phases of high explosive activity at

  5. Neutron Powder Diffraction Measurements of the Spinel MgGa2O4:Cr3+ - A Comparative Study between the High Flux Diffractometer D2B at the ILL and the High Resolution Powder Diffractometer Aurora at IPEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. A. F. M.; Sosman, L. P.; Yokaichiya, F.; Mazzocchi, V. L.; Parente, C. B. R.; Mestnik-Filho, J.; Henry, P. F.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2012-02-01

    Optical materials that emit from the visible to the near-infrared spectral region are of great interest due to their possible application as tunable radiation sources, as signal transmission, display, optoelectronics signal storage, cellulose industry as well as in dosimetry. One important family of such systems are the spinel compounds doped with Cr3+, in which the physical the properties are related to the insertion of punctual defects in the crystalline structure. The purpose of our work is two fold. First, we compare the luminescence of the MgGa2O4-Ga2O3 system with the single phase Ga2O3 and MgGa2O4 and relate structural changes observed in MgGa2O4-Ga2O3 system to the optical properties, and secondly, to compare the neutron powder diffraction results obtained using two diffractometers: D2B located at the ILL (Grenoble, France) and Aurora located at IPEN (São Paulo, Brazil). In the configuration chosen, Aurora shows an improved resolution, which is related to the design of its silicon focusing monochromator.

  6. Detailed Study of the Phase Diagram of Fe-based Superconductor Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 by Super High-Resolution Neutron Diffraction Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeuchi, K.; Sato, M.; Li, S.; Toyoda, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Itoh, M.; Miao, P.; Torii, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kamiyama, T.

    2015-03-01

    Temperature (T) dependence of Bragg reflections of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 (x = 0, 0.02) have been measured in detail on assembled mm-size crystallites to avoid effects of surface and/or externally induced strains with the high-resolution neutron powder diffractometer, where we have found that the profile width of the (400)O/(040)O reflections with the orthorhombic indexing begin to increase, as T decreases, at ~270 K, much higher than the tetragonal (Tet)-orthorhombic (Ort) second order transition temperature TS (-147.5 K) without showing any indication of an phase change above TS. The coexistence of two Ort phases with different orthorhombicity exists in the region of ~140 K < T < 143 K). The profile widths of (hhl)O reflections are nearly T-independent in the entire temperature region studied here (130 K <= T <= 350 K). An additional broadening due to the Co-doping is clearly found. We discuss these results in relation to the breakdown of the 4-fold symmetry of static physical quantities found in the electrical resistivity and band splitting of the 3dyz and 3dzx and orbitals and conclude that the disappearance of the 4-fold symmetry even in the macroscopically tetragonal phase can be understood by the existence of orthorhombic domains induced by crystal defects and/or impurities.

  7. New detector for use in fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, V.; Degtiarenko, P.; Musatov, I.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed and tested a new type detector for use in the fast neutron (FN) imaging radiography applications. FN radiography is generally used for nondestructive material testing, medical and biology applications, border patrol, transportation and cargo screening tasks. It is complementary to other types of radiography, providing additional information on light element content of the material samples. Distinct from other FN imagers presently known, our device implements a neutron-sensitive scintillator attached to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT), and operates in an event-by-event readout mode, acquiring energy, timing, and pulse shape information for all detected radiation events. The information is used to help separate events of FN interactions in the scintillator from the background events caused by the electronics noise and by the other types of background radiation. Selection of pure fast neutron events in the final image allows us to achieve ultimate image contrast and resolution, as compared with other types of FN imaging devices operating most commonly in an integration mode, in which the detector's dark noise and radiation background dilute the images. The detector performance for FN imaging application was tested using D-D neutron generator, designed and manufactured by Adelphi Technology, Inc. This essentially point-like neutron source operates in continuous mode producing up to 109 of 2.5 MeV neutrons per second. Samples made of metals plastic and other material were used to measure the detector resolution, efficiency and uniformity. Results of these tests are presented and discussed. Fig. 1 shows one of the test FN radiographic images obtained using the sample made of 11 styrene plastic strips. All strips are squares 4.8 x 4.8 mm2 with six different lengths 10 to 60 mm with 10 mm increment. [A] [B] [C] Fig. 1. [A]-layout of the test sample; [B]-raw FN shadow image of the sample; [C]-map of the plastic strips as they appear on

  8. Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.G.; Carpenter, J.M.; Prael, R.E.

    1980-02-01

    An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

  9. Prompt Fission Neutron Energy Spectra Induced by Fast Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Parrish Alan

    Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for ^{235}U and ^{239 }Pu have been measured for fission neutron energies greater than the energy of the incident neutrons inducing fission. The measurements were undertaken to investigate the shape dependence of the fission neutron spectra upon both the incident neutron energy and the mass of the nucleus undergoing fission. Measurements were made for both nuclides at the following incident neutron energies; 0.50 MeV, 1.50 MeV, 2.50 MeV and 3.50 MeV. The data are presented either as relative yields or as ratios of a measured spectrum to the ^{235}U spectrum at 0.50 MeV. Incident neutrons were produced by the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction using a pulsed, bunched proton beam from the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Pinanski Energy Center. The neutrons were detected by a thin liquid scintillator with good time resolution capabilities; time-of-flight techniques were used for neutron energy determination; in addition pulse-shape-discrimination was used to reduce gamma-ray background levels. The measurements are compared to calculations based on the Los Alamos Model of Madland and Nix to test its predictive capabilities. The data are fit by the Watt equation to determine the mean energy of the spectra, and to facilitate comparison of the results to previous measurements. The data are also compared directly to previous measurements.

  10. Ultrafast neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Ching L.

    1987-01-01

    The invention comprises a neutron detector (50) of very high temporal resolution that is particularly well suited for measuring the fusion reaction neutrons produced by laser-driven inertial confinement fusion targets. The detector comprises a biased two-conductor traveling-wave transmission line (54, 56, 58, 68) having a uranium cathode (60) and a phosphor anode (62) as respective parts of the two conductors. A charge line and Auston switch assembly (70, 72, 74) launch an electric field pulse along the transmission line. Neutrons striking the uranium cathode at a location where the field pulse is passing, are enabled to strike the phosphor anode and produce light that is recorded on photographic film (64). The transmission line may be variously configured to achieve specific experimental goals.

  11. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. F.; Sale, K.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J. H.; Preston, C. C.

    1991-06-01

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry.

  12. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  13. Neutron beam imaging at neutron spectrometers at Dhruva

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Shraddha S.; Rao, Mala N.

    2012-06-05

    A low efficiency, 2-Dimensional Position Sensitive Neutron Detector based on delay line position encoding is developed. It is designed to handle beam flux of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/s and for monitoring intensity profiles of neutron beams. The present detector can be mounted in transmission mode, as the hardware allows maximum neutron transmission in sensitive region. Position resolution of 1.2 mm in X and Y directions, is obtained. Online monitoring of beam images and intensity profile of various neutron scattering spectrometers at Dhruva are presented. It shows better dynamic range of intensity over commercial neutron camera and is also time effective over the traditionally used photographic method.

  14. Shaping micron-sized cold neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Frédéric; Kozhevnikov, Sergey; Thiaville, André; Torrejón, Jacob; Vázquez, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    In the field of neutron scattering, the need for micro-sized (1-50 μm) thermal or cold neutron beams has recently appeared, typically in the field of neutron imaging to probe samples with a high spatial resolution. We discuss various possibilities of producing such micro-sized neutron beams. The advantages and drawbacks of the different techniques are discussed. We show that reflective optics offers the most flexible way of producing tiny neutron beams together with an enhanced signal to background ratio. The use of such micro beams is illustrated by the study of micrometric diameter magnetic wires.

  15. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, G. M., Jr.; Jenkins, T. L.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  16. Neutron Imaging Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; DeNolfo, Georgia; Floyd, Sam; Krizmanic, John; Link, Jason; Son, Seunghee; Guardala, Noel; Skopec, Marlene; Stark, Robert

    2008-01-01

    We describe the Neutron Imaging Camera (NIC) being developed for DTRA applications by NASA/GSFC and NSWC/Carderock. The NIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics applications. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approximately 0.4 mm resolution. 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of fast neutrons, E(sub N) > 0.5 MeV. arc reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the proton and triton fragments resulting from 3He(n,p)3H interactions in the 3-DTI volume. We present angular and energy resolution performance of the NIC derived from accelerator tests.

  17. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, Samuel D.

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  18. Heat transport system

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  19. Simulation of Collimator for Neutron Imaging Facility of TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zin, Muhammad Rawi Mohamed; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Yazid, Khairiah; Hussain, Hishamuddin; Yazid, Hafizal; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Azman, Azraf; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Hamzah, Nai'im Syaugi; Abu, Mohamad Puad

    Neutron Radiography facility in TRIGA MARK II PUSPATI reactor is being upgraded to obtain better image resolution as well as reducing exposure time. Collimator and exposure room are the main components have been designed for fabrication. This article focuses on the simulation part that was carried out to obtain the profile of collimated neutron beam by utilizing the neutron transport protocol code in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) software. Particular interest is in the selection of materials for inlet section of the collimator. Results from the simulation indicates that a combination of Bismuth and Sapphire, each of which has 5.0 cm length that can significantly filter both the gamma radiation and the fast neutrons. An aperture made of Cadmium with 1.0 cm opening diameter provides thermal neutron flux about 1.8 x108 ncm-2s-1 at the inlet, but reduces to 2.7 x106 ncm-2s-1 at the sample plane. Still the flux obtained is expected to reduces exposure time as well as gaining better image resolution.

  20. Preliminary time-of-flight neutron diffraction study of human deoxyhemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, A. Y.; Chatake, T.; Shibayama, N.; Park, S.-Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Mustyakimov, M.; Fisher, S. Z.; Langan, P.; Morimoto, Y.

    2008-04-01

    In order to investigate the role of the protonation states of protein residues in O{sub 2} binding, large crystals of deoxy HbA (∼20 mm{sup 3}) were grown in D{sub 2}O under anaerobic conditions for neutron diffraction studies. Human hemoglobin (HbA) is an intricate system that has evolved to efficiently transport oxygen molecules (O{sub 2}) from lung to tissue. Its quaternary structure can fluctuate between two conformations, T (tense or deoxy) and R (relaxed or oxy), which have low and high affinity for O{sub 2}, respectively. The binding of O{sub 2} to the heme sites of HbA is regulated by protons and by inorganic anions. In order to investigate the role of the protonation states of protein residues in O{sub 2} binding, large crystals of deoxy HbA (∼20 mm{sup 3}) were grown in D{sub 2}O under anaerobic conditions for neutron diffraction studies. A time-of-flight neutron data set was collected to 1.8 Å resolution on the Protein Crystallography Station (PCS) at the spallation source run by Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The HbA tetramer (64.6 kDa; 574 residues excluding the four heme groups) occupies the largest asymmetric unit (space group P2{sub 1}) from which a high-resolution neutron data set has been collected to date.

  1. SUSANS With Polarized Neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Apoorva G.; Rakhecha, Veer Chand; Strobl, Makus; Treimer, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Super Ultra-Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SUSANS) studies over wave vector transfers of 10–4 nm–1 to 10–3 nm–1 afford information on micrometer-size agglomerates in samples. Using a right-angled magnetic air prism, we have achieved a separation of ≈10 arcsec between ≈2 arcsec wide up- and down-spin peaks of 0.54 nm neutrons. The SUSANS instrument has thus been equipped with the polarized neutron option. The samples are placed in a uniform vertical field of 8.8 × 104 A/m (1.1 kOe). Several magnetic alloy ribbon samples broaden the up-spin neutron peak significantly over the ±1.3 × 10–3 nm–1 range, while leaving the down-spin peak essentially unaltered. Fourier transforms of these SUSANS spectra corrected for the instrument resolution, yield micrometer-range pair distribution functions for up- and down-spin neutrons as well as the nuclear and magnetic scattering length density distributions in the samples. PMID:27308127

  2. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  3. Integrating high-resolution mapping of the seafloor with sediment-transport measurements to understand coastal erosion in northern South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhardt, W.; Baldwin, W.; Denny, J.; Schwab, W.; Paul, G.; Driscoll, N.; Warner, J.; Voulgaris, G.

    2006-12-01

    Shoreline behavior along the coast of Long Bay, South Carolina is dictated by waves, tidal currents, and sediment supply that act within the overall constraints of the regional geologic setting. This study examined the influence of the geologic framework on coastal evolution through the interpretation of high-resolution geophysical data (swath bathymetry, sidescan-sonar imagery, seismic-reflection profiles), bottom samples and cores. Interpreted geophysical data were used to form conceptual models of sediment flux in the nearshore area, which are being tested by conducting site-specific sediment transport and oceanographic measurements and modeling. The inner shelf of Long Bay extends from the shoreface to about 10 km offshore (5-15 m water depth). It is underlain by coastal-plain strata of Cretaceous/Tertiary age that are incised by large fluvial channels formed during the Pliocene and Pleistocene. The indurated coastal-plain and channel-fill deposits are exposed as hardgrounds over large expanses of the inner shelf, and locally overlain by a discontinuous veneer of sandy Holocene sediment generally less than 1-m thick. A regional unconformity, thought to represent erosion during the most recent marine transgression, coincides with the seafloor in these areas of sparse sediment. Minor bathymetric highs occur where relatively thicker accumulations of Holocene sediment lie above the low- relief, transgressive unconformity. One of the thickest accumulations of Holocene sediment is contained within an anomalous, shore-oblique sand body that lies 3 km offshore of Myrtle Beach and is not associated with a modern tidal inlet. The lobate deposit is approximately 11-km long, 3-km wide, and up to 3-m thick. Cores show that the shoal is a marine deposit less than 5000 years old with a gravelly lag at the base representing the transgressive surface. It contains an estimated volume of 26 million m3 of sediment, largely consisting of fine to medium, well sorted quartz sand and

  4. Characteristics of Lunar Lava Ponds as Indicators of Magma Transport Mechanisms and Local-Scale Geology of Ganymede Bright Terrain as Shown by Galileo Very High Resolution Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, Robin Aileen

    1998-10-01

    The characteristics of 305 small lunar mare deposits (ponds) considered best estimates for individual eruptive phases were analyzed in a global survey. Typical lunar eruptive episodes are relatively smooth and lack features such as large domes and calderas normally associated with shallow magma reservoirs. This suggests deep reservoirs may be prevalent. Mean deposit volume is 370 km3, indicating high volumes per eruption by terrestrial standards. Ponds often are associated with relatively thin crust, suggesting a link between crustal thickness and magma transport. Based upon this estimate of an average lunar flow, potentially ~27,000 separate flows comprise the majority of the contiguous maria, while individual maria may each represent 100s to 1000s of flows. The size of an ideal spherical reservoir associated with an average flow of 370 km3 is estimated to be ~100 km in diameter. These observations and estimates are consistent with a model in which plumes rising diapirically from depth stall at the base of the crust and overpressurize, driving dikes to the surface. Comparison of source region sizes predicted by the model to those using the independently-derived size estimates stated above show that reservoirs of 75-150 km yield overpressure values producing observed volumes. These results are also consistent with the above model. Using very-high resolution images of Xibalba Sulci bright terrain, Ganymede, we have classified three major geological units-craters, massifs and plains-and analyzed their various degradation states in terms of local-scale geological and regolith processes. The lack of many small craters, the distribution of rubble blocks, mantling of hills bases, and the texture of smooth plains all suggest the presence of a fragmental layer, (regolith). Candidates for regolith formation processes include tectonic fragmentation of massifs, downslope movement and impact generation. Evidence for tectonism is observed in N-S trending massifs and lineaments

  5. A neutron camera system for MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Cecconello, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Ronchi, E.; Sangaroon, S.; Weiszflog, M.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Akers, R.; Fitzgerald, I.; Cullen, A.

    2010-10-15

    A prototype neutron camera has been developed and installed at MAST as part of a feasibility study for a multichord neutron camera system with the aim to measure the spatial and time resolved 2.45 MeV neutron emissivity profile. Liquid scintillators coupled to a fast digitizer are used for neutron/gamma ray digital pulse shape discrimination. The preliminary results obtained clearly show the capability of this diagnostic to measure neutron emissivity profiles with sufficient time resolution to study the effect of fast ion loss and redistribution due to magnetohydrodynamic activity. A minimum time resolution of 2 ms has been achieved with a modest 1.5 MW of neutral beam injection heating with a measured neutron count rate of a few 100 kHz.

  6. Gamma-ray, neutron, and hard X-ray studies and requirements for a high-energy solar physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Dennis, B. R.; Emslie, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    The requirements for future high-resolution spatial, spectral, and temporal observation of hard X-rays, gamma rays and neutrons from solar flares are discussed in the context of current high-energy flare observations. There is much promise from these observations for achieving a deep understanding of processes of energy release, particle acceleration and particle transport in a complicated environment such as the turbulent and highly magnetized atmosphere of the active sun.

  7. Absolute determination of the neutron source yield using melamine as a neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciechanowski, M.; Bolewski, A., Jr.; Kreft, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to absolute determination of the neutron source yield is presented. It bases on the application of melamine (C3H6N6) to neutron detection combined with Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport. Melamine has the ability to detect neutrons via 14N(n, p)14C reaction and subsequent determination of 14C content. A cross section for this reaction is relatively high for thermal neutrons (1.827 b) and much lower for fast neutrons. A concentration of 14C nuclei created in the irradiated sample of melamine can be reliably measured with the aid of the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The mass of melamine sufficient for this analysis is only 10 mg. Neutron detection is supported by Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport carried out with the use of MCNP-4C code. These simulations are aimed at computing the probability of 14C creation in the melamine sample per the source neutron. The result of AMS measurements together with results of MCNP calculations enable us to determine the number of neutrons emitted from the source during the irradiation of melamine. The proposed method was applied for determining the neutron emission from a commercial 252Cf neutron source which was independently calibrated. The measured neutron emission agreed with the certified one within uncertainty limits. The relative expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the absolute neutron source yield determination was estimated at 2.6%. Apart from calibration of radionuclide neutron sources the proposed procedure could facilitate absolute yield measurements for more complex sources. Potential applications of this methodology as it is further developed include diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion and plasma-focus experiments, calibration of neutron measurement systems at tokamaks and accelerator-based neutron sources as well as characterization of neutron fields generated in large particle detectors during collisions of hadron beams.

  8. Imaging with cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-09-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 Å). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects—choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  9. Film adhesive enhances neutron radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    Resolution of neutron radiographic images of thermally conductive film is increased by replacing approximately 5 percent of aluminum powder, which provides thermal conductivity, with gadolinium oxide. Oxide is also chemically stable.

  10. Micromegas neutron beam monitor neutronics.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Andrew C; Miller, Laurence F

    2005-01-01

    The Micromegas is a type of ionising radiation detector that consists of a gas chamber sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes, with the gas chamber divided by a Frisch grid into drift and amplification gaps. Investigators have applied it to a number of different applications, such as charged particle, X-ray and neutron detection. A Micromegas device has been tested as a neutron beam monitor at CERN and is expected to be used for that purpose at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction in Oak Ridge, TN. For the Micromegas to function effectively as neutron beam monitor, it should cause minimal disruption to the neutron beam in question. Specifically, it should scatter as few neutrons as possible and avoid neutron absorption when it does not contribute to generating useful information concerning the neutron beam. Here, we present the results of Monte Carlo calculations of the effect of different types of wall materials and detector gases on neutron beams and suggest methods for minimising disruption to the beam. PMID:16381746

  11. UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-08-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during extended storage. The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage system SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Hanson et al. 2011). Other sources of information surveyed to develop the list of SSCs and their degradation mechanisms included references such as Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel (NWTRB 2010), Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification, Revision 1 (OCRWM 2008), Data Needs for Long-Term Storage of LWR Fuel (EPRI 1998), Technical Bases for Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EPRI 2002), Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program (EPRI 2010a), Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (EPRI 2010b), and Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, Issues Resolution (EPRI 2010c). SSCs include items such as the fuel, cladding, fuel baskets, neutron poisons, metal canisters, etc. Potential degradation mechanisms (FEPs) included mechanical, thermal, radiation and chemical stressors, such as fuel fragmentation, embrittlement of cladding by hydrogen, oxidation of cladding, metal fatigue, corrosion, etc. These degradation mechanisms are discussed in Section 2 of this report. The degradation mechanisms have been evaluated to determine if they would be influenced by extended storage or high burnup, the need for additional data, and their importance to transportation. These categories were used to identify the most significant transportation degradation mechanisms. As expected, for the most part, the

  12. Neutron and X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Carini, Gabriella; Denes, Peter; Gruener, Sol; Lessner, Elianne

    2012-08-01

    : Improvements in the readout speed and energy resolution of X-ray detectors are essential to enable chemically sensitive microscopies. Advances would make it possible to take images with simultaneous spatial and chemical information. Very high-energy-resolution X-ray detectors: The energy resolution of semiconductor detectors, while suitable for a wide range of applications, is far less than what can be achieved with X-ray optics. A direct detector that could rival the energy resolution of optics could dramatically improve the efficiency of a multitude of experiments, as experiments are often repeated at a number of different energies. Very high-energy-resolution detectors could make these experiments parallel, rather than serial. Low-background, high-spatial-resolution neutron detectors: Low-background detectors would significantly improve experiments that probe excitations (phonons, spin excitations, rotation, and diffusion in polymers and molecular substances, etc.) in condensed matter. Improved spatial resolution would greatly benefit radiography, tomography, phase-contrast imaging, and holography. Improved acquisition and visualization tools: In the past, with the limited variety of slow detectors, it was straightforward to visualize data as it was being acquired (and adjust experimental conditions accordingly) to create a compact data set that the user could easily transport. As detector complexity and data rates explode, this becomes much more challenging. Three goals were identified as important for coping with the growing data volume from high-speed detectors: Facilitate better algorithm development. In particular, algorithms that can minimize the quantity of data stored. Improve community-driven mechanisms to reduce data protocols and enhance quantitative, interactive visualization tools. Develop and distribute community-developed, detector-specific simulation tools. Aim for parallelization to take advantage of high-performance analysis platforms. Improved analysis

  13. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  15. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  16. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  17. Development of neutron spectrometer toward deuterium plasma diagnostics in LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, H.; Iwai, H.; Iguchi, T.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Isobe, M.; Konno, C.

    2010-10-15

    Neutron spectrometer based on coincident counting of associated particles has been developed for deuterium plasma diagnostics on Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. Efficient detection of 2.5 MeV neutron with high energy resolution would be achievable by coincident detection of a scattered neutron and a recoiled proton associated with an elastic scattering of incident neutron in a plastic scintillator as a radiator. The calculated neutron spectra from deuterium plasma heated by neutral beam injection indicate that the energy resolution of better than 7% is required for the spectrometer to evaluate energetic deuterium confinement. By using a prototype of the proposed spectrometer, the energy resolution of 6.3% and the detection efficiency of 3.3x10{sup -7} count/neutron were experimentally demonstrated for 2.5 MeV monoenergetic neutron, respectively.

  18. Development of neutron spectrometer toward deuterium plasma diagnostics in LHD.

    PubMed

    Tomita, H; Iwai, H; Iguchi, T; Isobe, M; Kawarabayashi, J; Konno, C

    2010-10-01

    Neutron spectrometer based on coincident counting of associated particles has been developed for deuterium plasma diagnostics on Large Helical Device (LHD) at the National Institute for Fusion Science. Efficient detection of 2.5 MeV neutron with high energy resolution would be achievable by coincident detection of a scattered neutron and a recoiled proton associated with an elastic scattering of incident neutron in a plastic scintillator as a radiator. The calculated neutron spectra from deuterium plasma heated by neutral beam injection indicate that the energy resolution of better than 7% is required for the spectrometer to evaluate energetic deuterium confinement. By using a prototype of the proposed spectrometer, the energy resolution of 6.3% and the detection efficiency of 3.3×10(-7) count/neutron were experimentally demonstrated for 2.5 MeV monoenergetic neutron, respectively. PMID:21033835

  19. Search for Neutron Anti-Neutron Oscillation using Cold Neutron Beams with Focusing Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hirohiko; NNBar Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The electric charge of neutrons is experimentally known as less than 10-21 e and considered as exactly zero and the transition between neutron and anti-neutron is allowed in terms of the conservation of the electric charge but is considered forbidden according to the empirical conservation law of the baryon number. On the other hand, the existence of physical processes which violates the conservation of the baryon number is required in the Sakharov's conditions to explain the baryon assymmetry in the big-bang cosmology. The search for the neutron antineutron (n n) oscillation offers information the baryon number violation with the Δ (B - L) = 2 complementary to the attempts with Δ (B - L) = 0 . The sensitivity to the n n oscillation has been improved by searching for the instability of nuclei via n n oscillation in large-scale deep-underground experiments, which are now limited by the background. On the other hand, the improvement of accelerator-driven neutron sources and transport optics of slow neutron beams have introduced new possibility to improve the sensitivity to n n by orders of magnitude. In this paper, we discuss the experimental sensitivity to n n oscillation with accelerator-based neutron sources and neutron focusing optics.

  20. Thermal neutron analysis (TNA) explosive detection based on electronic neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.; Mahood, D. B.; Ryge, P.; Shea, P.; Gozani, T.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal neutron analysis explosive detection systems have been developed and demonstrated for inspection of checked airline baggage and for detection of buried land mines. Thermal neutrons from a moderated neutron source impinge on the inspected object, and the resulting capture gamma ray signatures provide detection information. Isotopic neutron sources, e.g. 252Cf, are compact, economical and reliable, but they are subject to the licensing requirements, safety concerns and public perception problems associated with radioactive material. These are mitigated by use of an electronic neutron generator — an ion accelerator with a target producing neutrons by a nuclear reaction such as D(d, n) 3He or 9Be(d, n) 10B. With suitable moderator designs based on neutron transport codes, operational explosive detection systems can be built and would provide effective alternatives to radioactive neutron sources. Calculations as well as laboratory and field experience with three generator types will be presented.